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Sample records for sandy sediments analyzing

  1. Analyzing Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertino, Angelyn; Meyer, Stephan; Edwards, Becca

    2015-03-01

    Post-tropical Storm Sandy underwent extratropical transition shortly before making landfall in southern New Jersey October 29 2012. Data from this system was compared with data from Hurricane Ike (2008) which represents a classic hurricane with a clear eye wall and symmetry after landfall. Storm Sandy collided with a low pressure system coming in from the north as the hurricane made landfall on the US East coast. This contributed to Storm Sandy acting as a non-typical hurricane when it made landfall. Time histories of wind speed and wind direction were generated from data provided by Texas Tech's StickNet probes for both storms. The NOAA Weather and Climate program were used to generate radar loops of reflectivity during the landfall for both storms; these loops were compared with time histories for both Ike and Sandy to identify a relationship between time series data and storm-scale features identified on radar.

  2. Colonization dynamics of ciliate morphotypes modified by shifting sandy sediments.

    PubMed

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Felsmann, Katja; Mutz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Sandy stream-bed sediments colonized by a diverse ciliate community are subject to various disturbance regimes. In microcosms, we investigated the effect of sediment shifting on the colonization dynamics of 3 ciliate morphotypes differing in morphology, behavior and feeding strategy. The dynamics of the ciliate morphotypes inhabiting sediment pore water and overlying water were observed at 3 sediment shifting frequencies: (1) stable sediments, (2) periodically shifting sediments such as migrating ripples, and (3) continuously shifting sediments as occurring during scour events of the uppermost sediment. Sediment shifting significantly affected the abundance and growth rate of the ciliate morphotypes. The free-swimming filter feeder Dexiostoma campylum was vulnerable to washout by sediment shifting since significantly higher numbers occurred in the overlying water than in pore water. Abundance of D. campylum only increased in pore water of stable sediments. On the contrary, the vagile grasper feeder Chilodonella uncinata and the sessile filter feeder Vorticella convallaria had positive growth rates and successfully colonized sediments that shifted periodically and continuously. Thus, the spatio-temporal pattern of sediment dynamics acts as an essential factor of impact on the structure, distribution and function of ciliate communities in sand-bed streams.

  3. Sediment yield and connectivity in a gullied sandy catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía, Ana; Francisco Martín-Duque, José; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Ángel Sanz-Santos, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Badland areas are considered to have high connectivity of sediment at the catchment scale; however, little is known about processes occurring in gullies and badlands developed in sands. This type of gullies is quite common in the Central-Eastern Iberian Peninsula and is associated with historic mining. The sandy badlands also appear in both abandoned and traditionally reclaimed mines, generating on- and offsite environmental effects. Our aim is to quantify the rates of the different processes occurring in the sandy gullied catchments, as well as their coupling and connectivity at a catchment scale. This may allow application to improve reclamation practice in mines and quarries located in sandy materials. The study site is a small (1.32 ha) gullied catchment, the Barranca de los Pinos, which is located in the Northern Piedmont of the Guadarrama Mountains (Central Spain). The catchment area has been divided into Homogeneous Response Units (HRUs) attending to the dominant active process . The sediment produced in the different HRUs has been monitored by a variety of methods: repeat Terrestrial Laser Scanning of high gradient slopes, closed microplots in low gradient slopes and automatic (Reid type) slot bedload samplers and siphon samplers to monitor suspended sediment transport in the channel. During the 2010-11 monitoring period the sediment yield due to gravitational movements in high gradient slopes varied from 20 to 200 kg m-2y-1. In the low gradient slopes the splash and non-concentrated runoff generated 0.1 - 6 kg m-2y-1,while the channel yielded 7.44 ± 1.08 kg m-2y-1 with a very high proportion (>70%) of bedload. Despite the difficulties of extrapolating and comparing the results obtained at different spatial and temporal resolutions, annual patterns of erosion and transport of sediments within the sandy gullied catchments have been identified. These confirm that the transport of sediment in this catchment is limited by the capacity of flow events to

  4. Glider observations and modeling of sediment transport in Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Travis; Seroka, Greg; Kohut, Josh; Schofield, Oscar; Glenn, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Regional sediment resuspension and transport are examined as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) in October 2012. A Teledyne-Webb Slocum glider, equipped with a Nortek Aquadopp current profiler, was deployed on the continental shelf ahead of the storm, and is used to validate sediment transport routines coupled to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The glider was deployed on 25 October, 5 days before Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey (NJ) and flew along the 40 m isobath south of the Hudson Shelf Valley. We used optical and acoustic backscatter to compare with two modeled size classes along the glider track, 0.1 and 0.4 mm sand, respectively. Observations and modeling revealed full water column resuspension for both size classes for over 24 h during peak waves and currents, with transport oriented along-shelf toward the southwest. Regional model predictions showed over 3 cm of sediment eroded on the northern portion of the NJ shelf where waves and currents were the highest. As the storm passed and winds reversed from onshore to offshore on the southern portion of the domain waves and subsequently orbital velocities necessary for resuspension were reduced leading to over 3 cm of deposition across the entire shelf, just north of Delaware Bay. This study highlights the utility of gliders as a new asset in support of the development and verification of regional sediment resuspension and transport models, particularly during large tropical and extratropical cyclones when in situ data sets are not readily available.

  5. Comparison of wastewater-associated contaminants in the bed sediment of Hempstead Bay, New York, before and after Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Shawn C.; Phillips, Patrick; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Browne, James

    2016-01-01

    Changes in bed sediment chemistry of Hempstead Bay (HB) have been evaluated in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which resulted in the release of billions of liters of poorly-treated sewage into tributaries and channels throughout the bay. Surficial grab samples (top 5 cm) collected before and (or) after Hurricane Sandy from sixteen sites in HB were analyzed for 74 wastewater tracers and steroid hormones, and total organic carbon. Data from pre- and post-storm comparisons of the most frequently detected wastewater tracers and ratios of steroid hormone and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations indicate an increased sewage signal near outfalls and downstream of where raw sewage was discharged. Median concentration of wastewater tracers decreased after the storm at sites further from outfalls. Overall, changes in sediment quality probably resulted from a combination of additional sewage inputs, sediment redistribution, and stormwater runoff in the days to weeks following Hurricane Sandy.

  6. Comparison of wastewater-associated contaminants in the bed sediment of Hempstead Bay, New York, before and after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Shawn C; Phillips, Patrick J; Brownawell, Bruce J; Browne, James P

    2016-06-30

    Changes in bed sediment chemistry of Hempstead Bay (HB) have been evaluated in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which resulted in the release of billions of liters of poorly-treated sewage into tributaries and channels throughout the bay. Surficial grab samples (top 5cm) collected before and (or) after Hurricane Sandy from sixteen sites in HB were analyzed for 74 wastewater tracers and steroid hormones, and total organic carbon. Data from pre- and post-storm comparisons of the most frequently detected wastewater tracers and ratios of steroid hormone and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations indicate an increased sewage signal near outfalls and downstream of where raw sewage was discharged. Median concentration of wastewater tracers decreased after the storm at sites further from outfalls. Overall, changes in sediment quality probably resulted from a combination of additional sewage inputs, sediment redistribution, and stormwater runoff in the days to weeks following Hurricane Sandy. PMID:27045048

  7. Surface Sediments in the Marsh-Sandy Land Transitional Area: Sandification in the Western Songnen Plain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofei; Grace, Michael; Zou, Yuanchun; Yu, Xuefeng; Lu, Xianguo; Wang, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The development of sandification process was studied, by monitoring the changes of sediment characteristics, at marsh-sandy land intersections in China's Songnen region. A series of sediment collection plates were deployed in the region; after one year, sediments in these plates were analyzed for changes of mass and chemical characteristics. The sediment flux and the sand content of the sediments decreased with the increasing longitudinal distance between the sampling site and the centre line of a sand dune. The mean sediment flux was 29±14 kg m−2 yr−1 and 0.6±0.3 kg m−2 yr−1 in the sandy land and marsh, respectively. Strong, positive correlations were found between the concentrations of organic matter, total nitrogen, P, Fe, Ti, V and Zr, all of which were also negatively correlated with the sand content. The concentrations of organic matter, total nitrogen, P, Fe, Ti, V and Zr in the marsh sediment samples were all significantly greater than the corresponding concentrations of the sandy land (p<0.001). Sand content and Ti, V and Zr concentrations all proved to be valid indicators of sandification intensity, and they showed that the marsh could be divided into three distinct zones. Sand expansion extended about 88 m into the marsh. The mean sand content in the sediments of the sandy land was 91% and then 64% in the marsh, which in turn was higher than that of marshes outside the influence of sandification, suggesting that the marsh in the marsh-sandy land transitional area has already undergone extensive sandification in the past. The study results provide information on the wetland's function of indicating and buffering the sandification process. PMID:24932717

  8. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  9. Sediment Chemistry and Toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and Post- Hurricane Sandy, 2012-2013.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romanok, Kristin; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J.; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality.

  10. Sediment chemistry and toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012-13.

    PubMed

    Romanok, Kristin M; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K

    2016-06-30

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality. PMID:27158047

  11. Sediment chemistry and toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012-13.

    PubMed

    Romanok, Kristin M; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K

    2016-06-30

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality.

  12. Microplastics elutriation from sandy sediments: A granulometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2016-06-15

    Although relatively easy to extract in the marine environment, microplastics are very difficult to recover when they are trapped in sediments. The elutriation column is one of the best tools currently available for extracting plastics from sediment, but with a high sand recovery yield. This study aims to address the following questions: (i) is it possible to use a sedimentological approach to limit the sand recovery? (ii) does the extraction velocity of the sand and plastic particles vary according to density and granulometry? (iii) what is the relative recovery efficiency obtained for dense polymer particles mixed with marine sand? Based on a new granulometric classification, different plastic particle-size fractions are defined. Their extraction velocities are experimentally determined on particles of sediment and different plastics (PA, PVC). The particle recovery experiments indicate that it is possible to extract >90% of dense plastic particles in cases of negligible sand recovery. PMID:27053014

  13. Microplastics elutriation from sandy sediments: A granulometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2016-06-15

    Although relatively easy to extract in the marine environment, microplastics are very difficult to recover when they are trapped in sediments. The elutriation column is one of the best tools currently available for extracting plastics from sediment, but with a high sand recovery yield. This study aims to address the following questions: (i) is it possible to use a sedimentological approach to limit the sand recovery? (ii) does the extraction velocity of the sand and plastic particles vary according to density and granulometry? (iii) what is the relative recovery efficiency obtained for dense polymer particles mixed with marine sand? Based on a new granulometric classification, different plastic particle-size fractions are defined. Their extraction velocities are experimentally determined on particles of sediment and different plastics (PA, PVC). The particle recovery experiments indicate that it is possible to extract >90% of dense plastic particles in cases of negligible sand recovery.

  14. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction - Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Benzel, William M; Hoefen, Todd M; Hageman, Philip L; Morman, Suzette A; Reilly, Timothy J; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J; Fischer, Jeffrey M; Fisher, Irene

    2016-06-30

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity). PMID:27210565

  15. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick J; Gibson, Catherine A; Fisher, Shawn C; Fisher, Irene J; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Romanok, Kristin M; Foreman, William T; ReVello, Rhiannon C; Focazio, Michael J; Jones, Daniel K

    2016-06-30

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region. PMID:27177500

  16. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick; Gibson, Cathy A; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly; Romanok, Kristin; Foreman, William; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Focazio, Michael J.; Jones, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  17. Provenance and Paleoenvironment of Sandy Sediments Possibly Hosting Gas Hydrate in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Takashima, I.; Ito, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    2010-12-01

    the Japan Sea as well as the Nankai Trough areas. Although the chimney type accumulation may be dominated and is characterized by massive concentration of nodular and fracture filling hydrates, the sandy sediments hosting gas hydrate concentration filling the intergranular pore system may likely occur. Time of deposition and sedimentary environment of coarse-grained sediments, thermoluminescence (TL) dating of constituent quartz grains and grain-size distributions are analyzed. TL dating works on the principle that materials containing naturally occurring radioactive isotopes such as uranium, thorium or potassium are subject to low levels of radiation. In mineral crystals, this leads to ionization of the atoms in the host material and freed electrons may become trapped in structural defects or ‘holes’ in the mineral crystal lattice. These electrons can be released in the laboratory by heating under controlled conditions, and an emission of light occurs which is the basis of TL dating. They may provide information about the provenance of sands and the paleoenvironment when the sediments deposited. This study was performed as a part of the MH21 Research Consortium on methane hydrate in Japan.

  18. Mobility and toxicity of metals in sandy sediments deposited on land.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Z; Vangheluwe, M L; Van Sprang, P A; Janssen, C R; Holoubek, I

    2003-01-01

    A times series of laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of land deposition of contaminated sediments on the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Four sandy sediments were sampled at sites expected to have elevated levels of cadmium and zinc. The physical and chemical characteristics and ecotoxicity of sediments, pore waters, and leachates were evaluated after periods ranging from 1 to 45 days of land deposition. Cd and Zn retardation and leaching potential were calculated and this simulation gave good predictions of subsequently observed Cd and Zn mobility. The mobility and leaching of Cd and Zn in the sediments increased with decreasing pH and with decreasing content of organic matter. During the deposition an increase in sediment toxicity to plants and an increase in eluate toxicity to invertebrates were observed. A high rate of water flow through the sediment resulted in a lower toxicity enhancement of the sediments and a higher toxicity enhancement of the eluates. This result suggests that water flow through the sediment reduces the actual toxicity of the upper layer of deposited sediment but at the same time intensifies the risk of groundwater contamination.

  19. Groundwater recharge measurements in gravel sandy sediments with monolith lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracic Zeleznik, Branka; Souvent, Petra; Cencur Curk, Barbara; Zupanc, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Ljubljana field aquifer is recharging through precipitation and the river Sava, which has the snow-rain flow regime. The sediments of the aquifer have high permeability and create fast flow as well as high regeneration of the dynamic reserves of the Ljubljana field groundwater resource. Groundwater recharge is vulnerable to climate change and it is very important for drinking water supply management. Water stored in the soil and less permeable layers is important for water availability under extreme weather conditions. Measurements of water percolation through the vadose zone provide important input for groundwater recharge assessment and estimation of contaminant migration from land surface to the groundwater. Knowledge of the processes governing groundwater recharge in the vadose zone is critical to understanding the overall hydrological cycle and quantifying the links between land uses and groundwater quantity and quality. To improve the knowledge on water balance for Ljubljana field aquifer we establish a lysimeter for measurements of processes in unsaturated zone in well field Kleče. The type of lysimeter is a scientific lysimeter designed to solve the water balance equation by measuring the mass of the lysimeter monolith as well as that of outflow tank with high accuracy and high temporal resolution. We evaluated short period data, however the chosen month demonstrates weather extremes of the local climate - relatively dry periods, followed by high precipitation amount. In time of high water usage of vegetation only subsequent substantial precipitation events directly results in water flow towards lower layers. At the same time, gravely layers of the deeper parts of the unsaturated zone have little or no capacity for water retention, and in the event that water line leaves top soil, water flow moves downwards fairly quickly. On one hand this confirms high recharge capacity of Ljubljana field aquifer from precipitation on green areas; on the other hand it

  20. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik; Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi

    2013-06-18

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  1. First-Year Downstream Sediment Budget Following the Marmot Dam Removal from the Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C. J.; Wilcock, P. R.; Pittman, A.

    2008-12-01

    The October 2007 removal of the Marmot Dam, from the Sandy River, OR, provides an opportunity to assess the impact of increased sediment flux on a river channel. The Sandy River drains the west flank of Mt Hood and typically carries a large load of sand and gravel. The 14-meter-tall dam impounded over 750,000 m3 of sediment, only a small amount of which was removed during the decommissioning. Using a one- dimensional modeling approach, it was assessed that the river could transport the accumulated sediment without large adverse impacts downstream of the dam (Cui et al, 2008 - abstract submitted). In order to observe the actual changes to the river due to the dam removal and to test the modeled predictions, a significant monitoring effort has be in place on the Sandy River including bedload and suspended load measurements, discharge measurements, high-fidelity topographic surveys, repeat photography, multiple airborne LIDAR flights, long profile surveys, as well as mapping and characterizing the grain sizes throughout several reaches downstream of the dam. A key step in the quest to describe and predict the spatial distribution of the sediment throughout the downstream reach is to first account for all the sediment (both stored in the reservoir and supplied from upstream). Here, we examine the transport and deposition downstream of the dam through a 2-fraction sediment budget approach using the former dam as the upstream limit of the reach and choosing a the mouth of a bedrock gorge 7 km below the dam site as the downstream limit. Suspended sediment and bedload measurements taken by the USGS just below the dam site (Major et al, 2008 - abstract submitted) are combined with suspended sediment and bedload measurements collected just below the mouth of the gorge and the annual hydrograph to define the sediment fluxes into and out of the reach. Repeat surveys in the reach below the dam (Wallick et al, 2008 - abstract submitted) provide the measure of change in storage

  2. Analyzing Tropical Waves Using the Parallel Ensemble Empirical Model Decomposition Method: Preliminary Results from Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Cheung, Samson; Li, Jui-Lin F.; Wu, Yu-ling

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we discuss the performance of the parallel ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EMD) in the analysis of tropical waves that are associated with tropical cyclone (TC) formation. To efficiently analyze high-resolution, global, multiple-dimensional data sets, we first implement multilevel parallelism into the ensemble EMD (EEMD) and obtain a parallel speedup of 720 using 200 eight-core processors. We then apply the parallel EEMD (PEEMD) to extract the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) from preselected data sets that represent (1) idealized tropical waves and (2) large-scale environmental flows associated with Hurricane Sandy (2012). Results indicate that the PEEMD is efficient and effective in revealing the major wave characteristics of the data, such as wavelengths and periods, by sifting out the dominant (wave) components. This approach has a potential for hurricane climate study by examining the statistical relationship between tropical waves and TC formation.

  3. Petrophysical Properties Of Sandy Sediments Possibly Hosting Gas Hydrate In The Eastern Margin Of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Takashima, I.; Sunaga, H.; Sasaki, S.; Matsumoto, R.

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 the MD179 project was undertaken by the Marion Dufresne aiming at recovery of deep seated gas and gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate, and deep sediments older than 300 ka in order to develop geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate the possible environmental impact of gas hydrate for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Sediment samples below the seafloor were obtained in the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Japan Basin, Nishi Tsugaru and Okushiri Ridge areas by the MD179 cruise. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Pleistocene and Holocene silty layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Those sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sand grains, and are sometimes tuffaceous. Pore-size distribution measurements and thin-section observations of these arenite sands were undertaken, which indicatesd that porosities of muddy sediments are around 50 % but those of arenites range from 42 to 52 %, of which mean pore sizes and permeabilities are larger than those of siltstones and mudstones. These coarser sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka, where supplying sediments may not be abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. While the presence of gas hydrate in intergranular pores of arenite sands has not been confirmed, the soupy occurrence in recovered sediments may strongly indicate the presence of gas hydrate filling the intergranular pore system of arenite sands that is called pore-space hydrates. They have been recognized till now in the Mallik as well as in the Nankai Trough areas, which are considered to be very common even in the subsurface sandy sediments at the eastern margin of Japan Sea. Concentration of gas hydrate may need primary intergranular pores large enough to occur within a host sediment that may be arenite sand without matrix grains deposited in the sedimentary

  4. Estuarine bed-sediment-quality data collected in New Jersey and New York after Hurricane Sandy, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.; Loftin, Keith A.; Benzel, William M.; Jones, Daniel K.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Jenkins, Darkus E.; Bowers, Luke; Boehlke, Adam; Foreman, William T.; Deetz, Anna C.; Carper, Lisa G.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-sediment samples were collected from June to October 2013 from 167 estuarine sites extending from Cape May, New Jersey, to the New York Harbor and the eastern end of Long Island. Each sampling location and study region was characterized by using geographic information to identify potential contaminant sources. Characterizations included land cover, locations and types of businesses (industrial, financial, and others), spills (sewage, chemical, and others), bulk storage facilities, effluent discharges within 2 kilometers of the sampling point, and discharges within inundated and non-inundated regions near the sampling location. Samples were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon, metals and trace elements, semivolatile organic compounds, wastewater compounds, hormones, and sediment toxicity. Samples were also screened using x-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In addition, bioassays for endocrine disruptors and protein phosphatase 2A inhibition were conducted. The study was designed to provide the data needed to understand the extent and sources of contamination resulting from Hurricane Sandy, to compare the chemistry and toxicity of estuarine bed sediments before and after the storm, and to evaluate the usefulness of rapid screening and bioassay approaches in disaster settings.

  5. Influences of microbial activity and sediment disturbance on hyporheic exchange in sandy sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Lera, C.; Mutz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Besides the vertical hydraulic gradient, sediment permeability is the main controlling factor of water exchange across the stream bed. Reduction of permeability by microbial activity is reported from unidirectional percolated sediment columns. We investigated effects of algal and bacterial activity on hyporheic exchange (vertical water flux, VWF) under semi-natural stream conditions in 16 outdoor sand-bed flumes during 30 day. Variability of bedform was considered by 8 flumes having plane-bed and 8 flumes ripple-bed. To gain information on the relative significance of algae and heterotrophic microorganisms, half of the flumes were operated under constant dark conditions (no-light flumes), while the others were exposed to daylight. After 21 days, the upper 2 cm of the sediments was manually disturbed simulating moderate sediment dynamics which frequently occurs in natural sand-bed streams. VWF was measured by tracing loss of uranine from the water column while flumes were operating in re-circulating mode. Algae and bacterial abundance, organic matter, and CaCO3 content in sediments were determined. Sediment potential respiration (SPR) was measured in flow through respiration chambers and oxygen bubbles from primary production were sampled. As expected, initial VWF was higher in ripple-bed. After 13 days, VWF was completely inhibited in both plane and ripple-bed flumes under daylight conditions. In no-light flumes reduction of VWF was moderate. Microbial precipitation of calcium carbonate and production of oxygen bubbles in the uppermost sediments blocked the pore space. After 3 weeks, abundance and biomass of algae and SPR in the upper 2 cm of sediment were higher in daylight flumes than in no-light flumes, while bacterial abundance was higher in no-light flumes. The sediment disturbance at day 21 released the oxygen bubbles increased bed permeability and therefore restored VWF to initial rates in day-light flumes. SPR was unaffected by the sediment disturbance. In

  6. Is nematode colonisation in the presence of Scolelepis in tropical sandy-beach sediment similar to the colonisation process in temperate sandy beaches?

    PubMed

    Maria, T F; Esteves, A M; Vanaverbeke, J; Vanreusel, A

    2013-02-01

    The role of a dominant macrobenthic polychaete, Scolelepis squamata, in the colonisation of defaunated tropical sediments by sandy-beach nematodes was investigated and compared with a previous colonisation experiment carried out on a temperate sandy beach. Experimental cylinders, equipped with lateral windows allowing infaunal colonisation, were filled with defaunated sediment containing two treatments, with and without S. squamata. These cylinders were inserted into microcosms containing sediment with indigenous meiofauna collected from the field. The treatments were incubated in the laboratory at ambient temperature and salinity for 7, 14 and 21 days. The nematode assemblages in both treatments did not differ in composition between treatments and from the natural assemblages, suggesting that all the species were equally able to colonise the experimental cores. The presence of the polychaete did not affect the development of the nematode community composition, in contrast to the results from a previous temperate-beach experiment. However, our results did not indicate whether the difference in results was caused by the different behaviour of the polychaete specimens, or by the different composition and response of the present nematode community. PMID:23644785

  7. Transport Behavior of Groundwater Protozoa and Protozoan-Sized Microspheres in Sandy Aquifer Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Kinner, N. E.; Bunn, A.; MacDonald, D.; Metge, D.

    1995-01-01

    Transport behaviors of unidentified flagellated protozoa (flagellates) and flagellate-sized carboxylated microspheres in sandy, organically contaminated aquifer sediments were investigated in a small-scale (1 to 4-m travel distance) natural-gradient tracer test on Cape Cod and in flow-through columns packed with sieved (0.5-to 1.0-mm grain size) aquifer sediments. The minute (average in situ cell size, 2 to 3 (mu)m) flagellates, which are relatively abundant in the Cape Cod aquifer, were isolated from core samples, grown in a grass extract medium, labeled with hydroethidine (a vital eukaryotic stain), and coinjected into aquifer sediments along with bromide, a conservative tracer. The 2-(mu)m flagellates appeared to be near the optimal size for transport, judging from flowthrough column experiments involving a polydispersed (0.7 to 6.2 (mu)m in diameter) suspension of carboxylated microspheres. However, immobilization within the aquifer sediments accounted for a log unit reduction over the first meter of travel compared with a log unit reduction over the first 10 m of travel for indigenous, free-living groundwater bacteria in earlier tests. High rates of flagellate immobilization in the presence of aquifer sediments also was observed in the laboratory. However, immobilization rates for the laboratory-grown flagellates (initially 4 to 5 (mu)m) injected into the aquifer were not constant and decreased noticeably with increasing time and distance of travel. The decrease in propensity for grain surfaces was accompanied by a decrease in cell size, as the flagellates presumably readapted to aquifer conditions. Retardation and apparent dispersion were generally at least twofold greater than those observed earlier for indigenous groundwater bacteria but were much closer to those observed for highly surface active carboxylated latex microspheres. Field and laboratory results suggest that 2-(mu)m carboxylated microspheres may be useful as analogs in investigating several

  8. Transport behavior of groundwater protozoa and protozoan-sized microspheres in sandy aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Kinner, N.E.; Bunn, A.; MacDonald, D.; Metge, D.

    1995-01-01

    Transport behaviors of unidentified flagellated protozoa (flagellates) and flagellate-sized carboxylated microspheres in sandy, organically contaminated aquifer sediments were investigated in a small-scale (1 to 4-m travel distance) natural-gradient tracer test on Cape Cod and in flow-through columns packed with sieved (0.5-to 1.0-mm grain size) aquifer sediments. The minute (average in situ cell size, 2 to 3 ??m) flagellates, which are relatively abundant in the Cape Cod aquifer, were isolated from core samples, grown in a grass extract medium, labeled with hydroethidine (a vital eukaryotic stain), and coinjected into aquifer sediments along with bromide, a conservative tracer. The 2-??m flagellates appeared to be near the optimal size for transport, judging from flowthrough column experiments involving a polydispersed (0.7 to 6.2 ??m in diameter) suspension of carboxylated microspheres. However, immobilization within the aquifer sediments accounted for a log unit reduction over the first meter of travel compared with a log unit reduction over the first 10 m of travel for indigenous, free-living groundwater bacteria in earlier tests. High rates of flagellate immobilization in the presence of aquifer sediments also was observed in the laboratory. However, immobilization rates for the laboratory-grown flagellates (initially 4 to 5 ??m) injected into the aquifer were not constant and decreased noticeably with increasing time and distance of travel. The decrease in propensity for grain surfaces was accompanied by a decrease in cell size, as the flagellates presumably readapted to aquifer conditions. Retardation and apparent dispersion were generally at least twofold greater than those observed earlier for indigenous groundwater bacteria but were much closer to those observed for highly surface active carboxylated latex microspheres. Field and laboratory results suggest that 2- ??m carboxylated microspheres may be useful as analogs in investigating several abiotic

  9. Analyze of waves dynamic over an intertidal mudflat of a sandy-gravely estuarine beach - Field survey and preliminary modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morio, Olivier; Sedrati, Mouncef; Goubert, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    As well as marine submersion or erosive phenomena, clay-silted sediment in-filling on estuarial and bay beaches are a main issue in these human-attractive areas. Coupled sandy/gravely and clay/silty intertidal areas can be observed in these particular coastal areas, depending of rivers characteristic (discharge of particle, water flow), ocean dynamics (wave exposure, current) and sediments sources. All around the world, sandy/gravely beaches are exposed to punctual or continuous input clay sediments. Vilaine estuary, Bay of Arcachon and Bay of Seine in France, Plymouth Bay in UK and also Wadden Sea in Deutschland are few examples of muddy/sandy coupled or mixed system. The beach of Bétahon (Ambon town, Brittany - France) is located on the external Vilaine estuary and is an example of this issue. This meso-macrotidal intermediate (low tide terrace) beach presents heterogeneous sediments. The upper intertidal zone is composed by sand and gravel and characterized by a steep slope. A very gentle slope characterized the lower part of the beach and is constituted by silt and clay. Clay/sand limit is characterized by a decimetric erosion cliff of mudflat along the beach. In order to understand bed variations and sediment transport of this complex heterogeneous beach, a well understanding of wave dynamic across the beach is necessary. This study focus on wave dynamics over the beach, using field observations and MIKE 21 3D wave numerical model. This paper is a preliminary approach of an upcoming global understanding of this estuarial beach behavior. Swell from deep-sea to near-shore area is modeled over a 100 km² area and real wind, deep sea wave characteristic, river water flow and tidal level are defined as open boundary conditions for the regional model. This last one is based on multiple bathymetric surveys over the last 50 years. Local model, triangular mesh gridded to 5 meters, covering Bétahon beach , is based on topographic and photographic survey of the mudflat

  10. Transport of bisphenol-A in sandy aquifer sediment: Column experiment.

    PubMed

    Zakari, Sissou; Liu, Hui; Tong, Lei; Wang, Yan; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-02-01

    The present paper aims to study the transport behavior of bisphenol-A (BPA) in sandy aquifer so as to provide important parameters for the prediction and control of contaminant plume in aquifer. Miscible displacement experiments were conducted and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) were simulated using HYDRUS-1D software. The effects of pore-water velocity (10-52 cm h(-1)) and initial concentration (2.5-40 mg L(-1)) on the sorption were also investigated. The BTCs of BPA fit the linear first-order non-equilibrium two-site model. The parameters such as partition coefficient (K(d)), the fraction of instantaneous adsorption on "Type-1" sites (F), the first order sorption rate coefficient for the kinetic non-equilibrium (type-2) sites (α), the retardation coefficient (R), and sorption capacity (q(column)) were computed. Results showed that BPA transported 0.11-0.83 m with various pore water velocity in sandy sediment column when water flowed 1 m. The sorption of BPA was mainly caused by the instantaneous surface adsorption as F varied from 0.596 to 0.908. The transport velocity of BPA was affected by pore water velocity (v) and followed the linear equation 1/R = 0.0600 + 0.0110v (r(2) = 0.9724). The parameter K(d) were also closely related to v and followed the equation LnK(d) = 1.0023-0.0482v (r(2) = 0.9690). The sorption capacity was more related to the initial BPA concentration (C0) and followed the linear equation q(column) = 0.265 + 0.253C0 (r(2) = 0.9727). The parameter α was affected by both v and C0 whereas F was not dramatically affected by both. PMID:26539704

  11. Erosion and Redeposition of Reservoir Sediment in Response to Removal of Marmot Dam, Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallick, R.; Major, J. J.; Spicer, K. R.; Rhode, A.; Keith, M.; O'Connor, J. E.; Burkholder, B.; Grant, G.; Tanner, D. Q.; Saunders, D.

    2008-12-01

    The 19 October 2007 removal of the 14-m-high temporary coffer dam standing in stead of Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, triggered a rapid sequence of fluvial responses as the ~730,000 m3 of sand and gravel filling the former reservoir was suddenly exposed to an energetic river. Here we report on the rapid erosion and redeposition of this sediment in the minutes, days, and months following breaching of the coffer dam. Our analyses stem from: 1) repeat topographic surveys of the reservoir and downstream channel reach made before and after breaching and after major storm events; 2) repeat and time-lapse photography from locations around the reservoir; and 3) frequent site visits during and immediately after smaller flow events to document modest channel changes. Following mechanical notching of the earthen coffer dam at 17:00 PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), small knickpoints formed on the downstream dam face and migrated up face until they intercepted the dam crest at 17:45 PDT. This interception resulted in rapid vertical erosion of the reservoir sediment, an instantaneous peak discharge of 136 m3/s (compared to an incoming flow of 50 m3/s) as pooled reservoir water drained, and tall (e.g., 1-2 m high) knickpoints migrated upstream at rates exceeding 200 m/hr. Rapid knickpoint migration slowed 200 m upstream from the breach when the channel became superposed on a bedrock outcrop. After the river slid off the bedrock during slightly higher flow, the knickpoint declined in height and moved upstream another 300 m over the next several days at a mean rate of about 1 m/hr. Knickpoint migration over the next 1.5 km of the reservoir progressed episodically, sweeping rapidly through long (~ 400 m) pools but slowing where it intercepted bouldery riffles that had emerged. At the end of high flows in May 2008, the remnant knickpoint had migrated 2 km upstream from the former dam site, resembled a riffle crest approximately 1 m high, but remained 1.5 km downstream from the

  12. Time-lapse imagery of the breaching of Marmot Dam, Oregon, and subsequent erosion of sediment by the Sandy River, October 2007 to May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Collins, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, was removed and a temporary cofferdam standing in its place was breached, allowing the river to flow freely along its entire length. Time-lapse imagery obtained from a network of digital single-lens reflex cameras placed around the lower reach of the sediment-filled reservoir behind the dam details rapid erosion of sediment by the Sandy River after breaching of the cofferdam. Within hours of the breaching, the Sandy River eroded much of the nearly 15-m-thick frontal part of the sediment wedge impounded behind the former concrete dam; within 24-60 hours it eroded approximately 125,000 m3 of sediment impounded in the lower 300-meter-reach of the reservoir. The imagery shows that the sediment eroded initially through vertical incision, but that lateral erosion rapidly became an important process.

  13. Hurricane Sandy deposits on Fire Island, NY: Using washover deposit stratigraphy to understand sediment transport during large storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Selle, S.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Jaffe, B. E.; Costa, P. J. M.; Lunghino, B.; Bellanova, P.

    2015-12-01

    By examining coastal deposits from modern inundation events, a number of criteria have been developed to help distinguish between onshore storm and tsunami deposits. The presence of sedimentary structures such as planar lamination and foreset beds in storm deposits suggest a dominance of bedload transport, although some tsunami deposits also contain these structures. The presence of normally graded beds in many tsunami deposits is indicative of the dominance of suspended load transport. Understanding how the stratigraphy in modern event deposits develops during inundation and post-deposition modification improves our ability to differentiate between tsunami and storm deposits in the geologic record. We investigated Hurricane Sandy washover deposits on Fire Island, NY a year after the storm in order to describe deposit stratigraphy on sandy barrier islands. Stratigraphic descriptions from trenches, bulk sediment samples, and push cores were collected. So far, grain size and microtextural analyses have been performed on bulk sediment samples. Deposits ranged from 1-100 cm thick and consist of very well-sorted, fine to coarse sand. Elevation profiles of washover features were measured using Differential GPS. Comparisons of GPS elevations to Lidar data from pre- and post-Sandy surveys show that at some locations, the upper 10-40 cm of the deposit had been reworked in the year following Hurricane Sandy. However, there were still areas where the deposit was almost entirely intact, consisting of massive sand layers near the base, overlain by laminated layers. We hypothesize that the lower sand layers represent deposition from overwash carrying sand in suspension that may have occurred during dune breaching. The upper laminated layers are indicative of deposition from bedload transport by successive storm waves. Detailed analyses of vertical grainsize trends will help determine if the lower unstratified sand layers were deposited by one or multiple flows.

  14. Temporal dynamics of gastropod fauna on subtidal sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, J.; Aldea, C.; Troncoso, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The temporal variation of the gastropod fauna inhabiting sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (Galicia, Spain) was studied at three subtidal sites from February 1996 to February 1997 by means of quantitative sampling. A total of 5,463 individuals representing 51 gastropod species and 22 families were found. The family Pyramidellidae was the most diverse in number of species (11 species), followed by Rissoidae and Trochidae (4 species each). The dogwhelk, Nassarius reticulatus, and the rissoid snail, Rissoa parva, were the numerically dominant species at the three studied sites; those and other abundant species showed their greatest densities by the end of summer and the beginning of autumn. In general, univariate measures of the assemblage (number of species, abundance, diversity and evenness) showed variations through time; greater values were recorded between summer and autumn depending on the site. Multivariate analyses done on abundance data showed certain seasonality in the evolution of the assemblage as expected for shallow subtidal sandy sediments at temperate latitudes; those seasonal changes were mostly related to variations in abundance of numerically dominant species. Although the measured sedimentary variables did not show significant correlations with faunal univariate parameters, sediment heterogeneity due to the presence of mats of Zostera marina L. and shells of dead bivalves might explain the differences in composition of the gastropod assemblage among sampling sites.

  15. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.; McGann, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy minerals have been used to trace the sources and transportation of sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay and nearby coastal areas since the 1960s. We have the opportunity to sample similar environments and revisit the heavy mineral populations under the current San Francisco Coastal System study of the provenance of beach sand. Most of the sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay can be traced to distant sources including the Sierra Nevada batholith and associated terranes with local contributions from the Franciscan Complex. Heavy minerals from Sierran sources include ordinary hornblende, metamorphic amphiboles, and hypersthene while those from the Franciscan Complex include other types of pyroxene, epidote, basaltic hornblende, and glaucophane... Tertiary strata and volcanics in the surrounding hills and displaced Sierran rocks found on the continental shelf west of the San Andreas Fault Zone introduce similar minerals, but perhaps in a lesser volume to be identified as major contributors... The primary result of cluster analysis of heavy minerals separated from sand-sized sediment taken within San Francisco Bay, the adjacent continental shelf, local beaches, cliffs outside the Golden Gate, and upstream drainages indicate a widespread occurrence of sediment traceable to the Sierra Nevada. A second cluster of samples identifies samples of mixed Sierran and Franciscan lineage within the strait of the Golden Gate, on the San Francisco bar, and on coastal beaches. Sediment samples with predominantly Franciscan mineral content appear on beaches around Point Reyes, possibly transported from the Russian River. The heavy mineral composition supports transport from the east, through San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate to the San Francisco bar and southward.

  16. Analysis of temperature variability and determination of apparent thermal diffusivity in sandy intertidal sediments at the German North Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklefs, Klaus; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich

    2012-08-01

    Temperature was measured at depths of 1, 10, 30, 75, and 170 cm in fine sandy intertidal sediments by means of specially-designed "temperature lances". The measurements cover a period from February to October 2007 and have a temporal resolution of 5 min. Stochastic as well as recurrent processes due to the solar cycle and due to tide induces flooding and drying of the sediment surface lead to a complex composition of the time series curves. Spectral analyses based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) reveal that temperature variability at the sediment water/air interface is widely controlled by recurrent processes with period lengths of 4.93, 6.1, 8.19, ˜12, ˜24 h, and 354 h (14.7 days). The importance of the higher frequencies decreases with increasing sediment depth. At a depth of 30 cm the 24 h and the 14.7 days cycles mainly determine the temperature development over time, while at 75 cm sediment depth contour temperature varies only along the 14.7 days cycle, as well as within the seasonal cycle. Using cross-correlation-analysis the time necessary for a temperature signal at the surface to trigger a response at a sediment depth of 10, 30, and 75 cm was calculated as 1.4, 7.0, and 73.1 h respectively. Utilizing an alternate approach, FFT derived temperature peak-to-peak amplitude values and phase angles of up to 9 different cycles were used to calculate apparent thermal diffusivity in different sediment depths. The thermal diffusivity decreases from approximately 6-9 × 10-7 m2 s-1 from the surface down to a sediment depth of 75 cm. The specially-designed instrumentation has proven to be robust and precise enough to record high resolution time series of sediment temperature in different depths. The time series analysis of the data clearly shows that the temperature variability in the intertidal sediments to a high degree can be explained by recurrent solar and/or tidal effects. So the methods and results presented in this paper can help to answer questions

  17. Modeling explosion generated Scholte waves in sandy sediments with power law dependent shear wave speed.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Alexander G; Dahl, Peter H; Odom, Robert I

    2015-10-01

    Experimental measurements of Scholte waves from underwater explosions collected off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA in shallow water are presented. It is shown here that the dispersion of these explosion-generated Scholte waves traveling in the sandy seabed can be modeled using a power-law dependent shear wave speed profile and an empirical source model that determines the pressure time-series at 1 m from the source as a function of TNT-equivalent charge weight.

  18. Hurricane Sandy's Impact on Coastal Sedimentation on Long Island's South Shore: Results from a 2013 Rapid Response Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, B. A.; Goff, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Austin, J. A., Jr.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the NY coast, we conducted subsurface and multi-beam analyses, ground-truthed by grab samples, in 3 areas: the western end of Fire Island (FIW), eastern Fire Island (FIE) where a new inlet formed during the storm, and Long Beach (LB). Grab samples yielded sands and muds, a surprise given the shallow (10-25m) water depths. Muds rested on top of sands and were removed for additional analyses. Since percent mud could not be determined absolutely, sediments were washed through a 63 mm sieve, RoTapped for 10 minutes at ¼ Φ, and weight percent calculated for the coarse fraction. At FIW and FIE, fine sands dominate the shallowest depths studied, consistent with previous studies. At FIE, the sedimentary wedge extends to ~15m, with finest sands (peak 3-3.5 Φ) in shallowest waters surveyed (~10m). Slightly coarser (2.5Φ) sediments plus relict gravels are present in swales where the wedge shoals. This supports mapping results indicating sand ridges migrated to the SW. Medium to fine sand is present at the deepest extent of the wedge; the grain size distribution matches a sample taken in the swash zone on the eastern flank of the new breach. Sediments may have been transported shoreward and then reworked post-Sandy. Samples seaward of the new breach were capped by a mud layer, which in turn had a layer of fine sand resting on it, evidence of a nascent ebb tidal deposit. At FIW, sediments in the shallow NE swale are finer (3.5Φ) and better sorted. As the region is underlain by relict sediments, these fine sands may be relicts exposed by storm-driven bedform migration. Deeper water (~22m w.d.) samples at FIW are coarser and contain shell hash. Sand on the lee side of the sand ridge, which CHIRP profiles show did not migrate significantly and accumulated sands, are medium (1.5 Φ), and match the grain sizes found on Fire Island beach. Muds contain heavy metals in concentrations consistent with transport from adjacent estuaries.

  19. Occurrence of authigenic beidellite in the Eocene transitional sandy sediments of the Chu-Saryssu basin (South-Central Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Valentin; Hebert, Benoit; Beaufort, Daniel; Sardini, Paul; Tertre, Emmanuel; Regnault, Olivier; Descostes, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the petrographic properties and the clay mineralogy of Eocene sandy sediments of the Chu-Saryssu basin (South-Central Kazakhstan), in which dioctahedral smectite formed during shallow burial diagenesis (eogenesis). Evidence from petrography and clay mineralogy supports the successive occurrence of kaolinite and dioctahedral smectite during the eogenetic processes, which may have resulted from a change from wet and humid to semi-arid or arid climatic conditions. An original result of this study is the predominantly beidellitic nature of the authigenic smectite, which was determined via X-ray diffraction (XRD, using the Hofmann-Klemen test) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) investigations and chemical microanalysis. The crystal-chemical investigations indicate a rather homogeneous chemical composition of the smectite at the regional scale, and the following unit formula is proposed: (Si4 +3.65Al3 +0.35)(Al3 +1.65Fe3 +0.21Mg2 +0.14)O10(OH)2Na+0.10Mg2 +0.11Ca2 +0.04K+0.07. This type of smectite has been interpreted as representative of mixed layers of montmorillonite and beidellite. The fact that the smectite that formed primarily in the unconsolidated sandy sediments is close to beidellite, rather than montmorillonite, may have a major impact on the rate of further illitization in the Chu-Saryssu basin. Indeed, the crystal chemistry of beidellite is more favorable to illitization, and the presence of this mineral provides new insights concerning the different rates of illitization between sandstones and shale formations observed worldwide.

  20. SANDY: A Matlab tool to estimate the sediment size distribution from a sieve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Gabriel; Rivillas-Ospina, Germán Daniel; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Posada-Vanegas, Gregorio

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new computational tool called SANDY© which calculates the sediment size distribution and its textural parameters from a sieved sediment sample using Matlab®. The tool has been developed for professionals involved in the study of sediment transport along coastal margins, estuaries, rivers and desert dunes. The algorithm uses several types of statistical analyses to obtain the main textural characteristics of the sediment sample (D50, mean, sorting, skewness and kurtosis). SANDY© includes the method of moments (geometric, arithmetic and logarithmic approaches) and graphical methods (geometric, arithmetic and mixed approaches). In addition, it provides graphs of the sediment size distribution and its classification. The computational tool automatically exports all the graphs as enhanced metafile images and the final report is also exported as a plain text file. Parameters related to bed roughness such as Nikuradse and roughness length are also computed. Theoretical depositional environments are established by a discriminant function analysis. Using the uniformity coefficient the hydraulic conductivity of the sand as well as the porosity and void ratio of the sediment sample are obtained. The maximum relative density related to sand compaction is also computed. The Matlab® routine can compute one or several samples. SANDY© is a useful tool for estimating the sediment textural parameters which are the basis for studies of sediment transport.

  1. Airflow and sediment movement within an inland blowout in Hulun Buir sandy grassland, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hasi, Eerdun; Liu, Meiping; Du, Huishi; Guan, Chao; Tao, Binbin

    2016-09-01

    We measured wind flows and sediment transport rates through a blowout in Hulun Buir grassland, Inner Mongolia. Topography and the angle of incidence between the approaching wind and the blowout long-axis significantly affected the air flow. Flow separated and decelerated at the western wall and accelerated towards the east, until maximum wind speed occurred at the top of the depositional lobe, and then decelerated on the lee side. When airflow emerged on the eastern wall, resultant directions were always NW. When winds approached from directions within 17.5° of the blowout axis, both the northwestern and southwestern walls developed turbulent flow, and significant topographic steering occurred. The deceleration zone expanded eastwards from 10.3 to 12.8 m from the western rim. When the wind direction was more oblique than 17.5°, turbulent flow at the southwestern wall disappeared. 'S-shaped' flow intensified, causing more pronounced steering at the bottom, but topographic steering elsewhere was reduced, and the boundary of the deceleration moved to 10 m from the western rim. Minor sediment deposition occurred on the western wall, while other parts were eroded; maximum sediment transport occurred at the top of the depositional lobe. The approaching wind speed affected the sediment transport rate more than the direction; and spatial variability in sediment transport reflected differences in compaction, vegetation coverage, slope, aspect, and upwind sediment availability, resulting in asymmetrical development. Overall, flow-form interactions governed the flow structures and controlled the evolution of the blowout via sediment transport.

  2. Stable isotope biogeochemistry of the sulfur cycle in modern marine sediments: I. Seasonal dynamics in a temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Michael; Hespenheide, Britta; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Bosselmann, Katja

    2004-12-01

    A biogeochemical and stable isotope geochemical study was carried out in surface sediments of an organic-matter poor temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment (German Wadden Sea of the North Sea) to investigate the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria and the dynamics of the vertical partitioning of sedimentary sulfur, iron, and manganese species in relation to the availability of total organic carbon (TOC) and mud contents. The contents and stable isotopic compositions ((34)S/(32)S) of total reduced inorganic sulfur species (TRIS) and dissolved sulfate were measured. Maximum oxygen penetration depths were estimated from the onset of a blackening of the sediments due to FeS accumulation and ranged from 5 to 10 mm below surface (mmbsf). A zone of relatively moderate relative organic-matter enrichment was found between 5 and 20 mmbsf leading to enhanced activities of sulfate-reducing bacteria with sulfate-reduction rates (SRR) up to 350 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Below this zone, microbial SRR dropped significantly. Depth integrated SRR seem to depend not only on temperature but also on the availability of reactive organic matter. The sulfur-isotopic composition of TRIS was depleted in (34)S by 33-40 per thousand with respect to coexisting dissolved sulfate (constant at about +21 per thousand vs. Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT)). Since sulfate reduction is not limited by dissolved sulfate (open system), depth variations of the isotopic composition of TRIS reflect changes in overall isotope effect due to superimposed microbial and abiotic reactions. Most of the solid-phase iron and manganese was bonded to (non-reactive) heavy minerals. However, a layer of reactive Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxi(hydroxi)des was found in the uppermost sediment section due to re-oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) and Mn(II) species at the sediment-water interface. Metal cycling below the surface is at least partially coupled to intense sulfur cycling.

  3. Behavior and Fate of PFOA and PFOS in Sandy Aquifer Sediment (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosms were constructed with sediment from beneath a landfill that received waste containing PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) and PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate). The microcosms were amended with PFOA and PFOS, and sampled after 91, 210, 343, 463, 574, and 740 days of incubat...

  4. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  5. Effects of sandy vs muddy sediments on the vertical distribution of microphytobenthos in intertidal flats of the Fraser River Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kedong; Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Harrison, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Benthic algae or microphytobenthos (MPB) in intertidal flats play an important role in the sediment and overlying water ecosystems. We hypothesize that there are effects of sediment texture on the vertical distribution of MPB using chlorophyll a (chl a) as a proxy for MPB biomass and present results over a 2.5-year period. Four sites were sampled monthly: two sandy sites (A10 and A12) and two muddy sites (A0 and A14) on the intertidal flats of the Fraser River Estuary. At the two sandy sites, pigments were distributed down to 10 cm. High ratios of depth-integrated chl a to phaeopigments suggest that the chl a had been recently buried. In contrast, at the muddy sites, pigments were limited to the top 4 cm, with MBP in the top 1 cm contributing up to 60 % of the whole sediment core pigments. As a result, the depth-integrated chl a values were on average 2,044 mg m(-2) (160-4,200) at A10 and 882 mg m(-2) (183-2,569) at A12, the two sandy sites, and much higher than at the two muddy sites where averages of 84 mg m(-2) (41-174) and 235 mg m(-2) (77-854) were measured at A0 and A14, respectively. Despite these lower concentrations at the muddy sites than at the sandy sites, particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) concentrations showed a homogenous vertical distribution at the two sandy sites. Such a homogeneous vertical distribution of chl a, POC, and PON suggests that vertical transport mechanisms were actively transporting organic material into and out of the sediment. These results suggest that MBP on sandy sediments play a very active role in providing food for herbivores and are interacting with the overlying water column in the sediment-water exchange processes during tidal cycles. PMID:27053045

  6. Influence of Trypaea australiensis population density on benthic metabolism and nitrogen dynamics in sandy estuarine sediment: A mesocosm simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Mark A.; Welsh, David T.; Dunn, Ryan J. K.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    surprisingly T. australiensis population density had no effect on rates of denitrification and DNRA despite the higher rates of nitrification and higher equilibrium water column nitrate concentration. Indeed, nitrate reduction processes became an increasingly unimportant element with increasing yabby density with for example, N 2 generated by coupled nitrification-denitrification representing 11.5, 5.2 and 2.8% of the total inorganic-N recycled to the water column in the control, low density and high density yabby treatments, respectively. Overall, the major influence of T. australiensis in the studied low organic matter content, sandy sediments was to enhance coupling between the benthic and pelagic systems through increased rates of inorganic nitrogen regeneration in the sediment and enhanced export of this nitrogen to the water column. Our results also suggest that the influences of organisms such as T. australiensis which form deep, extensive and complex burrow systems where irrigation rates differ greatly between different burrow sections, may be more complex than those recorded for infauna which form simple U-shaped burrows. Additionally, there may be a strong interaction between faunal effects and the sediment physical and biological environment and thus the same species may have contrasting influences in different sediment types.

  7. Balance Between Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Components and Processes in Microbenthic Communities of Sandy Sediments: A Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundbäck, Kristina; Nilsson, Per; Nilsson, Claes; Jönsson, Benno

    1996-12-01

    The microscopic community of a microtidal sandy sediment on the Swedish west coast was studied in situat two depths (0·5 and 4 m) on four occasions (January, April, August and October). Biomass of microalgae, bacteria, ciliates and meiofauna, as well as primary and bacterial productivity, were quantified. Meiofaunal grazing on algae and bacteria was measured simultaneously by radiolabelling intact sediment cores. Autotrophic biomass dominated the microbial community at both depths and on all sampling occasions, accounting for 47-87% of the microbial biomass. Meiofauna contributed 10-47%, while bacteria and ciliates together made up less than 6%. The microflora was dominated by attached (epipsammic) diatoms, but occasional ' blooms ' of motile species occurred. Vital cells of planktonic diatoms contributed to benthic algal biomass in spring. Primary productivity exceeded bacterial productivity in April and August at both depths, while the balance was reversed in October and January. Meiofauna grazed between 2 and 12% of the algal biomass per day, and between 0·3 and 37% of the bacterial biomass. Almost an order of magnitude more algal (17-138 mg C m -2) than bacterial (0·1-33 mg C m -2) carbon was grazed daily. At the shallow site, primary productivity always exceeded grazing rates on algae, whereas at the deeper site, grazing exceeded primary productivity in October and January. Bacterial productivity exceeded grazing at both depths on all four occasions. Thus, meiofaunal grazing seasonally controlled microalgal, but not bacterial, biomass. These results suggest that, during summer, only a minor fraction (<10%) of the daily microbenthic primary production appears to enter the ' small food web ' through meiofauna. During spring and autumn, however, a much larger fraction (≈30-60%) of primary production may pass through meiofauna. During winter, meiofaunal grazing is a less important link in the shallow zone, but at sublittoral depths, algal productivity may be

  8. Enrichment of Geobacter Species in Response to Stimulation of Fe(III) Reduction in Sandy Aquifer Sediments.

    PubMed

    Snoeyenbos-West; Nevin; Anderson; Lovley

    2000-02-01

    Engineered stimulation of Fe(III) has been proposed as a strategy to enhance the immobilization of radioactive and toxic metals in metal-contaminated subsurface environments. Therefore, laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine which microbial populations would respond to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in the sediments of sandy aquifers. In laboratory studies, the addition of either various organic electron donors or electron shuttle compounds stimulated Fe(III) reduction and resulted in Geobacter sequences becoming important constituents of the Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences that could be detected with PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Quantification of Geobacteraceae sequences with a PCR most-probable-number technique indicated that the extent to which numbers of Geobacter increased was related to the degree of stimulation of Fe(III) reduction. Geothrix species were also enriched in some instances, but were orders of magnitude less numerous than Geobacter species. Shewanella species were not detected, even when organic compounds known to be electron donors for Shewanella species were used to stimulate Fe(III) reduction in the sediments. Geobacter species were also enriched in two field experiments in which Fe(III) reduction was stimulated with the addition of benzoate or aromatic hydrocarbons. The apparent growth of Geobacter species concurrent with increased Fe(III) reduction suggests that Geobacter species were responsible for much of the Fe(III) reduction in all of the stimulation approaches evaluated in three geographically distinct aquifers. Therefore, strategies for subsurface remediation that involve enhancing the activity of indigenous Fe(III)-reducing populations in aquifers should consider the physiological properties of Geobacter species in their treatment design.

  9. Influence of intermittent estuary outflow on coastal sediments of adjacent sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Jessica L.; Quinn, Gerry P.; Matthews, Ty G.; Barton, Jan; Bellgrove, Alecia

    2011-03-01

    Outflows from estuaries potentially contribute to the productivity of adjacent coastal waters, although most previous work has been on estuaries with considerable river discharge. We investigated the influence of estuary outflow on aspects of coastal sediments adjacent to two seasonally intermittent estuaries, the Curdies and Anglesea Rivers, in southwest Victoria, Australia. For each estuary, we measured sediment organic matter, microphytobenthic chlorophyll a and microbial utilization of carbon sources at three locations associated with each estuary: (1) inside estuary mouth, (2) estuary swash and (3) control swash (an open beach distant from any estuarine influences). Sampling occurred one week before and at one and nine weeks after both an artificial mouth opening and a separate natural flood at both estuaries. Significant temporal changes were detected for all three variables at the estuary mouth and estuary swash but the direction of change was inconsistent across the two estuaries and between the artificial mouth opening and natural flood. Organic matter in both estuaries showed no difference after the artificial mouth openings. Only Anglesea showed an increase in organic matter in the estuary mouth and estuary swash after the floods. Microphytobenthic chlorophyll a concentrations were highest when the estuary mouths were closed. Concentrations decreased at all locations at Curdies after the mouth was artificially opened. The estuary mouth at Anglesea sustained high chlorophyll concentrations and the estuary swash increased one week post artificial opening. The flood event resulted in an increase in chlorophyll a at the estuary mouth and swash at both estuaries, one week post flood. At Curdies, the microbial utilization of different carbon sources changed after both mouth events; estuary mouth and estuary swash showed similar patterns at one and nine weeks post opening. At Anglesea, the bacteria utilized different carbon sources between locations and the

  10. Sandy inland braidplain deposition with local aeolian sedimentation in the lower and middle parts of the buntsandstein and sandy coastal braidplain deposition in the topmost zechstein in the sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroczkowski, Jerzy; Mader, Detlef

    The lower and middle parts of the Buntsandstein between Röt and Zechstein in the Sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland) crop out in the marginal seams of the North Sudetic Trough and the Intra Sudetic Trough. The continental red beds originate in predominantly sandy braided river systems of an extensive inland alluvial plain in almost arid climate. The sediments are laid down in channels and floodplains of a moderately- to highly-braided, sandy to pebbly stream complex consisting of narrowly- to moderately-spaced low-sinuosity watercourses and narrow to wide overbank plains between the channels. Rapid aggradation and abandonment, quick lateral migration or high avulsion rates of the considerably mobile streams result in effective combing of the interchannel areas. Persistent high-energy overspilling of watercourse banks and invasion of bed-load-saturated flood surges into the overbank areas often lead to primary restriction or even suppression of formation of topstratum suspension fines. Secondarily, the silty-clayey and fine sandy overbank sediments which could occasionally originate in remote or sheltered lakes and ponds are frequently completely reworked by considerable lateral and vertical erosion during sidewards displacement of the rivers. As a result of both primary-depositional restriction and secondary-erosional removal of floodplain fines, the channel sediments are commonly stacked upon each other to multistorey stream sand complexes. Emergence and desiccation of parts of the alluvial plain sometimes give rise to aeolian deflation and accumulation of the winnowed sand to small dunelets and wind ripple trains. The aeolian depositional environment representing a more peripheral erg facies with sheet sand interdune milieu could not be fully ascertained due to poor outcrop conditions, but is likely to occur locally in view of comparative interpretation with other mixed dune and river sand sequences in the Mid-European Buntsandstein. Variations of fluvial style are

  11. Sediment and discharge yields within a minimally disturbed, headwater watershed in North Central Pennsylvania, USA, with an emphasis on Superstorm Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloney, Kelly O.; Shull, Dustin R.

    2015-01-01

    We estimated discharge and suspended sediment (SS) yield in a minimally disturbed watershed in North Central Pennsylvania, USA, and compared a typical storm (September storm, 4.80 cm) to a large storm (Superstorm Sandy, 7.47 cm rainfall). Depending on branch, Sandy contributed 9.7–19.9 times more discharge and 11.5–37.4 times more SS than the September storm. During the September storm, the upper two branches accounted for 60.6% of discharge and 88.8% of SS at Lower Branch; during Sandy these percentages dropped to 36.1% for discharge and 30.1% for SS. The branch with close proximity roads had over two-three times per area SS yield than the branch without such roads. Hysteresis loops showed typical clockwise patterns for the September storm and more complicated patterns for Sandy, reflecting the multipeak event. Estimates of SS and hysteresis in minimally disturbed watersheds provide useful information that can be compared spatially and temporally to facilitate management.

  12. Early Diagenesis of Subseafloor Sandy Sediments Closely Related to Gas Hydrate Occurrences and Their Provenances in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Sakai, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of effort have been put into recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate, and associated sediments in order to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate its possible environmental impact for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Having investigated gas hydrate occurrences in the eastern margin of Japan Sea revealed wide distributions of chimney-shape gas hydrate concentrations beneath the seafloor, confirmed off Shimane and off Akita/Yamagata as well as off Joetsu (Niigata), which are quite different from the occurrences of pore space hydrate filling intergranular pore systems of sands recognized in Nankai Trough, Mallik and other sites. Many sediment samples have been obtained below from the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Mogami Trough and Okushiri Ridge areas. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Holocene and Pleistocene silty/muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sand grains, and are sometimes tuffaceous. Pore-size distribution measurements and thin-section observations of these sands were carried out, which indicate that porosities of silty sediments are around 50 % but those of arenites range from 42 to 52 %, of which mean pore sizes and permeabilities are larger than those of silty sediments. These coarser sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka due to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might be abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. Sandy sediments contain not only detrital quartz and feldspar but mafic minerals (pyroxene, amphibole and mica), contents of which may indicate their provenances. Silty/muddy sediments usually contain diatom tests, foraminifers and framboidal pyrites, and, in particular, the shapes of diatom are usually various, dominantly fragmental and infrequently preserved. It is

  13. The chemistry of fluvial sediments analyzed by the Curiosity rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Nicolas; Thompson, Lucy; Le Deit, Laetitia; Forni, Olivier; Gellert, Ralf; Grotzinger, John; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover has encountered a diversity of sedimentary rocks, which overall have displayed significant variations in both texture and composition. Early observations by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater revealed isolated outcrops of cemented pebbles and sand grains with textures typical of fluvial sedimentary conglomerates (Williams et al., Science, 2013). Sandstones and mudstones, interpreted as having been deposited in a fluvio-lacustrine environment, were observed at Yellowknife Bay, a location identified from orbital images as of significant interest (Grotzinger et al., 2014). More stratified sandstones have been observed in the second and third terrestrial years of investigation in the outcrops named Cooperstown, Kylie and Kimberley, and Pahrump. The different groups of sediments have been interpreted to represent fluvial transport across Gale crater (Grotzinger et al., AGU, 2014), but they show a high variation in their composition, especially at Kimberley where rocks display enhanced K proportion. Among sedimentary rocks, conglomerates provide the most direct knowledge of the source of sediments. Conglomerates observed by Curiosity contain clasts with a strong diversity in albedo and textures indicating multiple sources on the Gale crater rims, with local identification of minerals such as plagioclases and alkali feldspars. Assuming the conglomerates are a mechanically altered product of crustal rocks with relatively little aqueous alteration, the average composition of conglomerates can be considered as a proxy for the source rock composition. This average composition displays a more felsic composition than the Martian average crust as defined by meteorites and orbital data implying that the Gale crater rim is enriched in felsic rocks. The difference in sedimentary composition suggests a variability in source rocks and/or diagenetic evolution compared to the conglomerates that needs to be considered in the broad context of Gale crater's evolution.

  14. Caesium-137 in sandy sediments of the River Loire (France): Assessment of an alluvial island evolving over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Détriché, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Stéphane; Macaire, Jean-Jacques; Bonté, Philippe; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Bakyono, Jean-Paul; Jugé, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    Recent sedimentological and morphological evolution of an island in the River Loire (France) was investigated using the 137Cs method. This study describes the morphological adjustment of the island in the last 50 years, which corresponds to the increased bed incision of this sandy, multiple-channel environment because of, among other things, the increase in sediment extraction up to 1995. The results show that some 137Cs can be retained by sandy particles, potentially in clay minerals forming weathering features included in detrital sand grains. From a morphological perspective, significant lateral erosion can be observed in the upstream part of the island, while a weak lateral accretion occurs in its downstream section. Data about 137Cs and aerial photographs show that the morphology of the island margins has undergone significant changes leading to a lateral migration, while the centre of the island has remained relatively stable or is slowly eroding. The migration of the island depends on: (1) the withdrawal of inherited preincision morphological units, such as levees, or the development of new units, such as a channel shelf; (2) water and sediment supply from surrounding channels during flood events; (3) preferential sediment trapping (20 mm year - 1 ) from the presence of riparian vegetation on the bank of the secondary channel that is subject to narrowing. The sedimentological and morphological response of the island in the context of incision of the Loire river bed is expressed mainly by lateral migration and secondarily by a low vertical adjustment.

  15. Role of macrofauna on benthic oxygen consumption in sandy sediments of a high-energy tidal beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, Céline; Lavesque, Nicolas; Anschutz, Pierre; Bachelet, Guy; Lecroart, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Sandy beaches exposed to tide and waves are characterized by low abundance and diversity of benthic macrofauna, because of high-energy conditions. This is the reason why there are few studies on benthic communities living in such highly dynamic environments. It has been shown recently that tidal sandy beaches may act as biogeochemical reactors. Marine organic matter that is supplied in the sand during each flood tide is efficiently mineralized through aerobic respiration. In order to quantify the role of macrofauna in the whole beach benthic respiration, we studied the macrofauna and the pore water oxygen content of an exposed sandy beach (Truc Vert, SW of France) during four seasons in 2011. The results showed that macrofauna was characterised by a low number of species of specialized organisms such as the crustaceans Eurydice naylori and Gastrosaccus spp. and the polychaetes Ophelia bicornis and Scolelepis squamata. The distribution and abundance of macrofauna were clearly affected by exposure degree and emersion time. The combined monitoring of benthic macrofauna and pore waters chemistry allowed us to estimate (1) the macrofauna oxygen uptake, calculated with a standard allometric relationship using biomass data, and (2) the total benthic oxygen uptake, calculated from the oxygen deficit measured in pore waters. This revealed that benthic macrofauna respiration represented a variable but low (<10%) contribution to the total benthic oxygen consumption. This suggests that oxygen was mainly consumed by microbial respiration.

  16. Combined Effects of Dam Removal and Past Sediment Mining on a Relatively Large Lowland Sandy Gravelly Bed River (Vienne River, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S.; Ursache, O.; Bouchard, J. P.; Juge, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dam removal is of growing interest for the management of sediment fluxes, morphological evolution and ecological restoration of rivers. If dam removal experiments are well documented for small streams, examples of lowland and large rivers are scarce. We present the morphological response of a relatively large lowland river (Vienne River, France) to a dam removal. The objective is to understand and quantify the morphological adaptation on a reach of 50 km and over 15 years associated with the dam removal and the presence of ancient sand pits located along the riverbed. This study is based on field data collected during 7 surveys performed between 1998 and 2013. This dataset focuses on bed geometry, sediment grain size, and bedload fluxes. It was combined with a 1D numerical model to assess flow dynamics and sediment transport before and after dam removal. Results show that dam removal triggered both regressive and progressive erosions and that discharges higher than 100 m3.s-1 were sufficient to erode the sandy sediments trapped by the dam whereas gravels were mobilised for discharges higher than 300 m3.s-1. Since 1999, large bedload sediment waves coming from upstream migrated downstream at an average celerity of 2.2 km.year-1 and were trapped by three ancient sand pits located downstream. Some of these pits constitute efficient sediment traps even 15 years after dam removal. As a result, between 2002 and 2013, the slope of the river bed adjusted gently and observed morphological processes were minors compared with the time period between 1998 and 2002.

  17. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Heavy or high-specific gravity minerals make up a small but diagnostic component of sediment that is well suited for determining the provenance and distribution of sediment transported through estuarine and coastal systems worldwide. By this means, we see that surficial sand-sized sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System comes primarily from the Sierra Nevada and associated terranes by way of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and is transported with little dilution through the San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate. Heavy minerals document a slight change from the strictly Sierran-Sacramento mineralogy at the confluence of the two rivers to a composition that includes minor amounts of chert and other Franciscan Complex components west of Carquinez Strait. Between Carquinez Strait and the San Francisco Bar, Sierran sediment is intermingled with Franciscan-modified Sierran sediment. The latter continues out the Gate and turns southward towards beaches of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Sierran sediment also fans out from the San Francisco Bar to merge with a Sierran province on the shelf in the Gulf of the Farallones. Beach-sand sized sediment from the Russian River is transported southward to Point Reyes where it spreads out to define a Franciscan sediment province on the shelf, but does not continue southward to contribute to the sediment in the Golden Gate area.

  18. Assessing the impact of Hurricanes Irene and Sandy on the morphology and modern sediment thickness on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Denny, Jane F.

    2016-01-15

    This report documents the changes in seabed morphology and modern sediment thickness detected on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, before and after Hurricanes Irene and Sandy made landfall. Comparison of acoustic backscatter imagery, seismic-reflection profiles, and bathymetry collected in 2011 and in 2014 show that sedimentary structures and depositional patterns moved alongshore to the southwest in water depths up to 30 meters during the 3-year period. The measured lateral offset distances range between about 1 and 450 meters with a mean of 20 meters. The mean distances computed indicate that change tended to decrease with increasing water depth. Comparison of isopach maps of modern sediment thickness show that a series of shoreface-attached sand ridges, which are the dominant sedimentary structures offshore of Fire Island, migrated toward the southwest because of erosion of the ridge crests and northeast-facing flanks as well as deposition on the southwest-facing flanks and in troughs between individual ridges. Statistics computed suggest that the modern sediment volume across the about 81 square kilometers of common sea floor mapped in both surveys decreased by 2.8 million cubic meters, which is a mean change of –0.03 meters, which is smaller than the resolution limit of the mapping systems used.

  19. Assessing the impact of Hurricanes Irene and Sandy on the morphology and modern sediment thickness on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Denny, Jane F.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the changes in seabed morphology and modern sediment thickness detected on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, before and after Hurricanes Irene and Sandy made landfall. Comparison of acoustic backscatter imagery, seismic-reflection profiles, and bathymetry collected in 2011 and in 2014 show that sedimentary structures and depositional patterns moved alongshore to the southwest in water depths up to 30 meters during the 3-year period. The measured lateral offset distances range between about 1 and 450 meters with a mean of 20 meters. The mean distances computed indicate that change tended to decrease with increasing water depth. Comparison of isopach maps of modern sediment thickness show that a series of shoreface-attached sand ridges, which are the dominant sedimentary structures offshore of Fire Island, migrated toward the southwest because of erosion of the ridge crests and northeast-facing flanks as well as deposition on the southwest-facing flanks and in troughs between individual ridges. Statistics computed suggest that the modern sediment volume across the about 81 square kilometers of common sea floor mapped in both surveys decreased by 2.8 million cubic meters, which is a mean change of –0.03 meters, which is smaller than the resolution limit of the mapping systems used.

  20. A three-year time series of elemental and biochemical composition of organic matter in subtidal sandy sediments of the Ligurian Sea (northwestern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiano, M.; Danovaro, R.; Fraschetti, S.

    Variations in organic matter composition and microphytobenthic biomass were examined in the surface sandy sediments at a water depth of 10 m in the Gulf of Marconi (NW Mediterranean Sea) over a three year period. Seasonal changes in elemental (organic C and total N) and biochemical (lipids, proteins, carbohydrates) composition of sediment organic matter as well as Chla were assessed in order to provide information about the origin and fate of sedimentary organic matter, the contribution of microphytobenthic biomass, seasonal and interannual variations of food quantity and quality, and factors related to food availability. Data obtained in this three-year study revealed that organic matter determined with a muffle furnace is clearly an overestimate of the organic content of the sediment and is thus of little significance for benthic ecologists studying community dynamics in relation to food availability. Labile organic matter, utilized to estimate the food potentially available for benthic consumers, accounted for only a small percentage (on average less than 10%) of total organic C. The highest labile fraction was observed in spring, whereas minima were recorded in winter. Analysis of elemental and biochemical composition of organic matter showed an inverse relationship between amount of organic matter and its potential availability to consumers; small quantities of high-quality organic matter were replaced by large quantities of refractory material. The labile portion was mostly microphytobenthic (65% of the labile carbon). Protein: carbohydrate ratios were low and confirmed the role of proteins as a potentially limiting factor for consumers. Significant differences in nutritional quality of the sediment organic matter were observed from year to year, changes due to the increase in specific labile compound content.

  1. Laboratory investigations on the role of sediment surface and ground water chemistry in transport of bacteria through a contaminated Sandy Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of pH and sediment surface characteristics on sorption of indigenous groundwater bacteria were determined using contaminated and uncontaminated aquifer material from Cape Cod, MA. Over the pH range of the aquifer (5-7), the extent of bacterial sorption onto sediment in uncontaminated groundwater was strongly pH-dependent, but relatively pH-insensitive in contaminated groundwater from the site. Bacterial sorption was also affected by the presence of oxyhydroxide coatings (iron, aluminum, and manganese). Surface coating effects were most pronounced in uncontaminated groundwater (pH 6.4 at 10??C). Desorption of attached bacteria (up to 14% of the total number of labeled cells added) occurred in both field and laboratory experiments upon adjustment of groundwater to pH 8. The dependence of bacterial sorption upon environmental conditions suggests that bacterial immobilization could change substantially over relatively short distances in contaminated, sandy aquifers and that effects caused by changes in groundwater geochemistry can be significant.

  2. Microseisms from Superstorm Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufri, Oner; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; de Foy, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed and visualized the microseisms generated by Superstorm Sandy as recorded by the Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) during late October through early November of 2012. We applied continuous, frequency-dependent polarization analysis to the data and were able to track the course of Sandy as it approached the Florida coastline and, later, the northeastern coast of the U.S. The energy level of Sandy was roughly comparable to the background microseism level generated by wave-wave interactions in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans. The maximum microseismic power and degree of polarization were observed across the TA when Sandy sharply changed its direction to the west-northwest (specifically, towards Long Island, New York) on October 29. The westward turn also briefly changed the dominant microseism period from 5 s to 8 s. We identified three other microseismic source regions during the 18 day observation period. In particular, peak-splitting in the double frequency band and the orientation of the 5 s and 8 s polarization vectors revealed two contemporaneous microseism sources, one in the North Atlantic and one in the Northeast Pacific, for the dates of November 3-4. Predictions of microseismic excitation based on ocean wave models showed consistency with the observed microseismic energy generated by Sandy and other storms.

  3. Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA to Follow Dark Incorporation of 14C-bicarbonate by Bacteria and Archaea in Sandy Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, B. J.; Musat, N.; Kuypers, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) and the genes encoding it have become the basis of modern microbial phylogeny, and of numerous methods for characterizing the composition of bacterial, archaeal, and even eukaryotic communities as they occur in nature. A limitation of this approach has been that phylogeny alone is not a reliable guide to physiology, particularly for groups with no close relatives in culture. We have been developing ways of using the SSU rRNA molecule itself to identify and (eventually) quantify the carbon sources incorporated by particular phylogenetic groups. This can be done by taking advantage of natural variations in carbon isotopic composition among growth substrates, or by following incorporation of 13C- or 14C-labeled compounds. 14C has the advantage that natural background levels are negligible. In the present study, our goal is to identify species responsible for non-photosynthetic CO2 incorporation in sandy sediments of the German Wadden Sea. Sediment cores collected from the Janssand sand flats were percolated with 14C-bicarbonate at in situ temperature for 36-38h in the dark, total RNA isolated, and domain-specific oligonucleotide probes used to capture bacterial and archaeal SSU rRNA. Total and/or captured RNA was separated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and 14C detected by phosphor imager, autoradiography, or beta imager. Detection was fastest and most sensitive with the beta imager. Both Bacteria and Archaea had incorporated label, suggesting both groups may harbor non-photosynthetic autotrophs. The next step will be to use more specific capture probes. We are currently working to separate the captured domain-specific SSU rRNA on non-denaturing gels, with detection by the high-resolution mode of the beta imager, so that individual species incorporating label can be identified by RT-PCR and sequencing of labeled bands.

  4. Degradation of dissolved organic monomers and short-chain fatty acids in sandy marine sediment by fermentation and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The decay of a wide range of organic monomers (short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA's), amino acids, glucose and a pyrimidine) was studied in marine sediments using experimental plug flow-through reactors. The reactions were followed in the presence and absence of 10 mM SO 42-. Degradation stoichiometry of individual monomers (inflow concentration of 6 mM organic C) was traced by measuring organic (VFA's, amino acids) and inorganic (CO 2, NH 4+, SO 42-) compounds in the outflow. Fermentation of amino acids was efficient and complete during passage through anoxic sediment reactors. Aliphatic amino acids (alanine, serine and glutamate) were primarily recovered as CO 2 (24-34%), formate (3-22%) and acetate (41-83%), whereas only ˜1/3 of the aromatic amino acid (tyrosine) was recovered as CO 2 (13%) and acetate (20%). Fermentation of glucose and cytosine was also efficient (78-86%) with CO 2 (30-35%), formate (3%) and acetate (28-33%) as the primary products. Fermentation of VFA's (acetate, propionate and butyrate), on the other hand, appeared to be product inhibited. The presence of SO 42- markedly stimulated VFA degradation (29-45% efficiency), and these compounds were recovered as CO 2 (17% for butyrate to 100% for acetate) and acetate (51% and 82% for propionate and butyrate, respectively). When reaction stoichiometry during fermentation is compared with compound depletion during sulfate reduction, the higher proportion CO 2 recovery is consistent with lower acetate and formate accumulation. Our results therefore suggest that fermentation reactions mediate the initial degradation of added organic compounds, even during active sulfate reduction. Fermentative degradation stoichiometry also suggested significant H 2 production, and >50% of sulfate reduction appeared to be fuelled by H 2. Furthermore, our results suggest that fermentation was the primary deamination step during degradation of the amino acids and cytosine.

  5. Functional structure of laminated microbial sediments from a supratidal sandy beach of the German Wadden Sea (St. Peter-Ording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühring, Solveig I.; Kamp, Anja; Wörmer, Lars; Ho, Stephanie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Hidden for the untrained eye through a thin layer of sand, laminated microbial sediments occur in supratidal beaches along the North Sea coast. The inhabiting microbial communities organize themselves in response to vertical gradients of light, oxygen or sulfur compounds. We performed a fine-scale investigation on the vertical zonation of the microbial communities using a lipid biomarker approach, and assessed the biogeochemical processes using a combination of microsensor measurements and a 13C-labeling experiment. Lipid biomarker fingerprinting showed the overarching importance of cyanobacteria and diatoms in these systems, and heterocyst glycolipids revealed the presence of diazotrophic cyanobacteria even in 9 to 20 mm depth. High abundance of ornithine lipids (OL) throughout the system may derive from sulfate reducing bacteria, while a characteristic OL profile between 5 and 8 mm may indicate presence of purple non-sulfur bacteria. The fate of 13C-labeled bicarbonate was followed by experimentally investigating the uptake into microbial lipids, revealing an overarching importance of cyanobacteria for carbon fixation. However, in deeper layers, uptake into purple sulfur bacteria was evident, and a close microbial coupling could be shown by uptake of label into lipids of sulfate reducing bacteria in the deepest layer. Microsensor measurements in sediment cores collected at a later time point revealed the same general pattern as the biomarker analysis and the labeling experiments. Oxygen and pH-microsensor profiles showed active photosynthesis in the top layer. The sulfide that diffuses from deeper down and decreases just below the layer of active oxygenic photosynthesis indicates the presence of sulfur bacteria, like anoxygenic phototrophs that use sulfide instead of water for photosynthesis.

  6. Composition of conglomerates analyzed by the Curiosity rover: Implications for Gale Crater crust and sediment sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Thompson, L. M.; Forni, O.; Williams, A. J.; Fabre, C.; Le Deit, L.; Wiens, R. C.; Williams, R.; Anderson, R. B.; Blaney, D. L.; Calef, F.; Cousin, A.; Clegg, S. M.; Dromart, G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Fisk, M. R.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kah, L.; Le Mouélic, S.; McLennan, S. M.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H. E.; Palucis, M. C.; Rapin, W.; Sautter, V.; Siebach, K. L.; Stack, K.; Sumner, D.; Yingst, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Curiosity rover has analyzed various detrital sedimentary rocks at Gale Crater, among which fluvial and lacustrine rocks are predominant. Conglomerates correspond both to the coarsest sediments analyzed and the least modified by chemical alteration, enabling us to link their chemistry to that of source rocks on the Gale Crater rims. In this study, we report the results of six conglomerate targets analyzed by Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer and 40 analyzed by ChemCam. The bulk chemistry derived by both instruments suggests two distinct end-members for the conglomerate compositions. The first group (Darwin type) is typical of conglomerates analyzed before sol 540; it has a felsic alkali-rich composition, with a Na2O/K2O > 5. The second group (Kimberley type) is typical of conglomerates analyzed between sols 540 and 670 in the vicinity of the Kimberley waypoint; it has an alkali-rich potassic composition with Na2O/K2O < 2. The variety of chemistry and igneous textures (when identifiable) of individual clasts suggest that each conglomerate type is a mixture of multiple source rocks. Conglomerate compositions are in agreement with most of the felsic alkali-rich float rock compositions analyzed in the hummocky plains. The average composition of conglomerates can be taken as a proxy of the average igneous crust composition at Gale Crater. Differences between the composition of conglomerates and that of finer-grained detrital sediments analyzed by the rover suggest modifications by diagenetic processes (especially for Mg enrichments in fine-grained rocks), physical sorting, and mixing with finer-grained material of different composition.

  7. An experimental challenge: Unraveling the dependencies of ultrasonic and electrical properties of sandy sediments with pore-filling gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Seyberth, Karl; Priegnitz, Mike; Schicks, Judith M.

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of gas hydrate quantification using seismic or electric measurements fundamentally depends on the knowledge of any factor describing the dependencies of physical properties on gas hydrate saturation. Commonly, these correlations are the result of laboratory measurements on artificially produced gas hydrates of exact saturation. Thus, the production of gas hydrates and accurate determination of gas hydrate concentrations or those of a substitute are a major concern. Here we present data of both, seismic and electric measurements on accurately quantified pore-filling ice as a substitute for natural gas hydrates. The method was validated using selected gas hydrate saturations in the same experimental set-up as well as literature data from glass bead samples [Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2006]. The environmental parameters were chosen to fit those of a possible gas hydrate reservoir in the Danube Delta, which is in the focus of models for joint inversions of seismic and electromagnetic data in the SUGAR III project. The small effective pressures present at this site proved to be yet another challenge for the experiments. Using a more powerful pulse generator and a 4 electrode electric measurement, respectively, models for a wide range of gas hydrate saturations between 20 - 90 % vol. could be established. Spangenberg, E. and Kulenkampff, J., Influence of methane hydrate content on electrical sediment properties. Geophysical Research Letters 2006, 33, (24).

  8. Analyzing sediment impacts for the Glen Canyon Long-term Experimental and Management Plan EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Huang, V.; Varyu, D.; Greimann, B. P.; O'Connor, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Department of the Interior is currently evaluating alternatives in the Glen Canyon Dam Long-term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The purpose of the EIS to evaluate dam operations and identify management actions and experimental options that will provide a framework for adaptively managing operations of Glen Canyon Dam over the next 15 to 20 years. Sediment and sandbars along the Colorado River are important downstream resources in Grand Canyon National Park. Sediment is one of the resources being analyzed for impacts in Marble and Grand Canyon. Since 1963, Glen Canyon Dam has regulated the flow in the Colorado River by decreasing the magnitude of annual flood flows and increasing the magnitude of base flows, and has nearly eliminated main-channel sand supply from the upper Colorado River Basin. These changes disrupted the natural ability of the river to build and maintain sandbars. Grand Canyon sandbars provide camping beaches for river runners and hikers, generate habitat for native fish and vegetation, and supply sediment to protect archaeological resources. In order to measure the impacts of the different alternatives on the sediment resource, several different models are being utilized. A sand budget numerical model that tracks the storage and transport of sand in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam developed by the USGS is utilized. The model uses empirically based rating curves for specific particle sizes. The decision criteria for the high flow experiment environmental assessment is applied to the sand budget model as well as other flow changes incorporated in the alternatives. An empirically based sandbar volume model was also developed for the LTEMP EIS process to address the sandbar resource impacts. Based on the model results, performance criteria have been established to allow for comparisons between the alternatives. The criteria include the changes in the sand mass balance of the system, the

  9. Development of a Numerical Simulator for Analyzing the Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and application of a numerical simulator that analyzes the geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments, which may become an important future energy supply. The simulator is developed by coupling a robust numerical simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrate thermodynamics, and phase behavior in geologic media (TOUGH+HYDRATE) with an established geomechanical code (FLAC3D). We demonstrate the current simulator capabilities and applicability for two examples of geomechanical responses of hydrate bearing sediments during production-induced hydrate dissociation. In these applications, the coupled geomechanical behavior within hydrate-bearing seducements are considered through a Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, corrected for changes in pore-filling hydrate and ice content, based on laboratory data. The results demonstrate how depressurization-based gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits may lead to severe geomechanical problems unless care is taken in designing the production scheme. We conclude that the coupled simulator can be used to design production strategies for optimizing production, while avoiding damaging geomechanical problems.

  10. Analyzing the contribution of climate change to long-term variations in sediment nitrogen sources for reservoirs/lakes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Baotong; Zhao, Pujun; Zhang, Shangwei; Yang, Lingyan

    2015-08-01

    We applied a mixing model based on stable isotopic δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and C:N ratios to estimate the contributions of multiple sources to sediment nitrogen. We also developed a conceptual model describing and analyzing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment. These two models were conducted in Miyun Reservoir to analyze the contribution of climate change to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources based on two (210)Pb and (137)Cs dated sediment cores. The results showed that during the past 50years, average contributions of soil and fertilizer, submerged macrophytes, N2-fixing phytoplankton, and non-N2-fixing phytoplankton were 40.7%, 40.3%, 11.8%, and 7.2%, respectively. In addition, total nitrogen (TN) contents in sediment showed significant increasing trends from 1960 to 2010, and sediment nitrogen of both submerged macrophytes and phytoplankton sources exhibited significant increasing trends during the past 50years. In contrast, soil and fertilizer sources showed a significant decreasing trend from 1990 to 2010. According to the changing trend of N2-fixing phytoplankton, changes of temperature and sunshine duration accounted for at least 43% of the trend in the sediment nitrogen enrichment over the past 50years. Regression analysis of the climatic factors on nitrogen sources showed that the contributions of precipitation, temperature, and sunshine duration to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources ranged from 18.5% to 60.3%. The study demonstrates that the mixing model provides a robust method for calculating the contribution of multiple nitrogen sources in sediment, and this study also suggests that N2-fixing phytoplankton could be regarded as an important response factor for assessing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment.

  11. Analyzing microbial and sediment geochemistry to identify safe aquifer zones in an Arsenic prone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibria, G.; Hossain, M.; Kirk, M. F.; Bhattacharya, P.; Ahmed, K.; Datta, S.

    2013-12-01

    The assessment of the incidence of arsenic (As) and other oxyanions was examined in Bengal delta floodplain groundwaters from Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Our field campaign in 2013 covered an area of ~400km2 between North and South Matlab. Shallow tubewells except those installed within off-white sediments are mostly contaminated with high As. In our field studies we found the wells installed within light grey medium sand, the As concentration was found below 50μg/L. Groundwater abstracted from oxidized reddish sediments in contrast to reduced greyish sediments, contain significantly lower amount of dissolved As and can be a source of safe water. Sediment geochemistry and adsorption extent of oxidized red brown and reduced grey sediments to attenuate As are studied here. Sediment cores were collected at regular intervals from within depth of ~125m in Matlab. This study describes the color, lithofacies and mineralogy of the sediments The stable isotopes of groundwaters from various depths within a piezometer nest are studied also to determine the extent of hydraulic conductivity between depths of aquifers along with mechanism of recharge of the groundwater at those depths. DNA recovered from Matlab core samples averaged 450ng/g from course-grained samples and 800ng/g from fine-grained samples. After sequencing the DNA, it was found that microbial community in red or light gray sediments are different than gray-dark gray sediments (e.g. Burkholderiaceae and Pseudomonadacee are common in grey/ dark gray sediment but Streptomycetaceae is common in red/ light grey color). Rhodocyclaceae, Aeromonadaceae, Shewanellaceae are the common genera present in these sediments that are capable of reducing Fe in this aquifer environment. Synchrotron aided μXANES and μXRD studies conducted for solid state As and S speciation in the core samples at different depths indicate the occurrences of hotspots of As differently distributed in red-brown and grey sediments. Samples collected

  12. Dynamic changes of sandy land in northwest of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; He, Ting; Guo, Xudong; Liu, Aixia; Zhou, Qing

    2006-10-01

    The area northwest of Beijing is one of the most important regions where many organizations invest and pay most attention. The environmental problems in this region affect not only Beijing but also the surrounding area. Based on observation of the characteristics of the change in sandy land, this study classified four types of dynamic change of sandy land, including extended sandy land, the reversely changed sandy land, the potential sandy land and no change in sandy land. Then the process and the trend of changes in sandy land and their environmental impact on the area northwest of Beijing were analyzed. The results show that the area of sandy land has increased in this region in the period of 1991 to 2002. Change between sandy land and grassland was the dominant change. It is found that the monitoring zones of Hunshandake sandy land and north of Yin Shan are regions with high ratio of extended sandy land, and are connected with widespread potential change of sandy land. This implies that these two regions have a high probability of increase in sandy land in the future. On the other hand, in the monitoring zone of Horqin sandy land and Ba Shang Plateau and its surrounding area, desertification had been controlled and the area of sandy land is expected to decrease. This indicates that the direction of the sandstorm to Beijing is expected to gradually move to the northwest. Furthermore, the decreases in sandy land and the reversing change from arable land to grassland and forests in the study region will affect the land quality and atmosphere. And the logistic multiple regression (LMR) model was employed to better understand the complexity and processes of increases in sandy land. This model predicts that there is a high probability of increases in sandy land in north of Siziwang Banner, Zhengxiangbai Banner and Zhenglan Banner. Finally, suggestions to the ecological construction of the study area have been proposed. PMID:16758285

  13. Numerical model for analyzing the effects of sediment supply on river morphology and streambed characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonina, D.; McKean, J. A.; Buffington, J. M.; Luce, C.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    We are investigating the effects of different sediment supply regimes on the morphology and aquatic habitat of gravel-bed rivers in mountain basins. Sediment inputs to the river network in these environments range from periodic pulsed events of large magnitude (e.g., landslides and debris flows) to low-level chronic inputs (e.g., road drainage). The pulsed events tend to be natural, while the chronic inputs are commonly anthropogenic. Our goal is to inform managers of the range of sediment supply impacts and to evaluate the common perception that pulsed events are more detrimental to the aquatic ecosystem. Four cases of sediment supply are considered: 1) periodic pulses of fine material (e.g., debris flows in decomposed granite), 2) periodic pulses of coarse material (e.g., landslides in harder bedrock), 3) chronic supplies of fine material (e.g., roads or distributed soil creep and dry raveling) and 4) chronic supplies of coarse material (e.g., mining activity). Currently we are focusing on fine sediment moving primarily as bedload at flows below bank-full over an immobile coarse-grained bed. As part of this work, we evaluated the performance of available surface-based transport models. Predicted transport rates were compared to field measurements from gravel-bed rivers in Idaho. Results show that the Wilcock and Kenworthy (2002) equation performs best. We also have developed a sand conservation model based on filling the voids between coarse particles in a gravel bed. Numerical simulations were conducted coupling the conservation model with the Wilcock and Kenworthy equation using an extension of the MD-SWMS hydraulic model (McDonald et al. 2005). Performance of the transport and conservation models has been tested with data from laboratory experiments. Future modeling will initially compare the effects of cases 1) and 2) (chronic versus pulsed loads of fine sediment), as smaller particles are often implicated in degradation of aquatic habitats.

  14. Structure analysis of shallow water ecosystems: Interaction of microbiological, chemical and physical characteristics measured in the overlying waters of sandy beach sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bölter, Manfred; Meyer-Reil, Lutz-Arend; Rodger, Dawson; Gerd, Liebezeit; Karin, Wolter; Heidrun, Szwerinki

    1981-11-01

    An ecological study of the shallow, brackish water ecosystem near sandy beaches in the Kiel Fjord and Kiel Bight (Western Baltic Sea) was carried out in July 1977. A total of 33 parameters describing physical, chemical and biological characteristics were processed with particular reference to microbiological activity. The data were compared by a rank correlation analysis which revealed a large variety of relationships, the interpretation of which permitted a comprehensive description of the ecosystem. It could be shown that certain parameters occupy a central position in the correlation pattern. Such parameters are salinity, nitrite, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, free dissolved glucose and ribose, bacterial biomass, filamentous cells and biological oxygen demand. The use of such a correlation pattern in providing a general description of the shallow water ecosystem is discussed, taking into account the results of earlier investigations in this region.

  15. Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively. Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria. To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 307, 309, 310, 313. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are four activity units: (1) Measuring Dissolved Oxygen Quantitatively; (2) Collecting and Cultivating Marine Bacteria; (3) To Recognize, Record, and Analyze Characteristics of a Sandy Beach Environment; and (4) Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Phosphate in Water. All the activities are designed to be used by secondary school…

  16. Sandy desertification cycles in the southwestern Mu Us Desert in China over the past 80 years recorded based on nebkha sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinchang; Zhao, Yanfang; Liu, Haixia; Su, Zhizhu

    2016-03-01

    Sandy desertification (SDN) cycles in the southwestern Mu Us Desert since the late 1920s were recorded based on the evolution of Nitraria tangutorum nebkhas. Particle size changes of the nebkha excavated during the study, together with AMS 14C and 137Cs dating controls, indicated that the SDN of the study area was reverse on the whole over the past 80 years, but multiple SDN cycles also occurred. SDN mainly occurred during the late 1920s to the early 1940s, late 1940s to early 1950s, late 1950s to early 1960s, mid- and late 1980s, and early 2000s. The formation of nebkhas in the study area was triggered by severe SDN caused by extreme drought events that occurred in the 1920s to the 1930s. Over the past 80 years, the general SDN trend in the southwestern Mu Us Desert was mainly controlled by the westerly circulation strength, and severe SDN resulted mainly from extreme drought events in a large spatial scale, whereas slight SDN cycles were mainly due to local climate fluctuations and human activities.

  17. Influence of waves and horseshoe crab spawning on beach morphology and sediment grain-size characteristics on a sandy estuarine beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, N.L.; Nordstrom, K.F.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of wave action and horseshoe crab spawning on the topography and grain-size characteristics on the foreshore of an estuarine sand beach in Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA were evaluated using data collected over six consecutive high tides. Data were gathered inside and outside a 25 m long exclosure constructed to create a control area free of disturbance by crabs. The density of crabs in the swash zone outside the exclosure was 8??1 organisms m-2. The maximum depth of sediment activation on the upper foreshore where spawning occurred was 0??103 m during periods characterized by low significant wave heights: < 0??08 m. This depth is greater than the depth of activation by waves alone during moderate significant wave heights of 0??16 - 0??18 m but less than the maximum depth (0??127 m) recorded when spawning occurred during periods of moderate wave heights. Spawning, combined with moderate wave heights, creates a concave upper foreshore that is similar to the type of profile change that occurs during storms, thus lowering the wave-energy threshold for morphological response. Spawning during low wave heights increases the mean grain size and sorting of surface sediments caused by the addition of gravel to the swash. Sedimentological differences are most pronounced on the upper foreshore, and data from this location may be most useful when using grain-size characteristics to interpret the effect of spawning in the sedimentary record. Depths of sediment reworking by horseshoe crabs can be greater than those by subsequent storm waves, so evidence of spawning can be preserved on non-eroding beaches. Greater depth of activation by horseshoe crab spawning than by waves alone, even during moderate-energy conditions, reveals the importance of crab burrowing in releasing eggs to the water column and making them available for shore birds. ?? 2005 International Association of Sedimentologists.

  18. Maps showing bathymetry and modern sediment thickness on the inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, pre-Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey mapped approximately 336 square kilometers of the lower shoreface and inner continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York, in 2011 by using interferometric sonar and high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection systems. This report presents maps of bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, the coastal plain unconformity, the Holocene marine transgressive surface, and modern sediment thickness. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of the Fire Island coastal system and provide baseline information for research on coastal processes along southern Long Island.

  19. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP from the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Van Trump, G. Jr.; Motooka, J.M.; Erlich, O.; Tompkins, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological report is presented detailing analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP from the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles, Alaska.

  20. Paleosols can promote root growth of the recent vegetation - a case study from the sandy soil-sediment sequence Rakt, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocke, M. I.; Kessler, F.; van Mourik, J. M.; Jansen, B.; Wiesenberg, G. L. B.

    2015-12-01

    Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing e.g. soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of e.g. nutrient contents, thus supporting their utilization and exploitation by deep roots. We aimed to decipher the different phases of soil formation in Dutch drift- and coversands. The study site is located at Bedafse Bergen (SE Netherlands) in a 200 year old oak stand. A recent Podzol developed on driftsand covering a Plaggic Anthrosol that established in a relict Podzol on Late Glacial eolian coversand. Root-free soil and sediment samples, collected in 10-15 cm depth increments, were subjected to a multi-proxy physical and geochemical approach. The Plaggic Anthrosol revealed low bulk density and high phosphorous and organic carbon contents, whereas the relict Podzol was characterized by high iron and aluminum contents. Frequencies of fine (≤ 2 mm) and medium roots (2-5 mm) were determined on horizontal levels and the profile wall for a detailed pseudo-three-dimensional insight. On horizontal levels, living roots maximized in the uppermost part of the relict Podzol with ca. 4450 and 220 m-2, significantly exceeding topsoil root abundances. Roots of oak trees thus benefited from the favorable growth conditions in the nutrient-rich Plaggic Anthrosol, whereas increased compactness and high aluminum contents of the relict Podzol caused a strong decrease of roots. The approach demonstrated the benefit of comprehensive root investigation to support and explain pedogenic investigations of soil profiles, as fine roots can be significantly underestimated when quantified at the profile wall. The possible rooting of soil parent material and paleosols long after their burial confirmed recent studies on the potential influence of rooting to overprint sediment

  1. Diversity of bacterial community and detection of nirS- and nirK-encoding denitrifying bacteria in sandy intertidal sediments along Laizhou Bay of Bohai Sea, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Zheng, Binghui; Nan, Bingxu; Hu, Peilong

    2014-11-15

    The microbial community and the nirS- and nirK-encoding denitrifiers in the intertidal sediments along Laizhou Bay in China were studied using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), respectively. There were three primary intertidal zones: Laizhou (La), Weifang Harbor (We), and Dongying (Do). Significant differences in composition and abundances at the different taxonomic levels were observed among the three bacterial communities. The qPCR results indicated that the nirS gene abundance varied from 8.67 × 10(5) to 5.68 × 10(6)copies/gwet weight (ww), whereas the nirK gene abundance varied from 1.26 × 10(5) to 1.89 × 10(6)copies/gww. The canonical correlation analysis (CCA) indicated that the sand percentage was the most important factor in shaping the bacterial community followed by silt percentage, NO2(-), TOC, DO, pH, and clay percentage, whereas the clay percentage, pH, NO3(-), DO, NO2(-), TOC, silt percentage, and sand percentage were the most important factors associated with regulating the abundance of nirS- and nirK-encoding denitrifiers.

  2. Hurricane Sandy Washover Deposits on Southern Long Beach Island, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. M.; Richmond, B. M.; Kane, H. H.; Lunghino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were investigated at Forsyth National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) on Southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey in order to map deposit thickness and characterize the sedimentary deposits. FNWR was chosen as a field area because there has been relatively little anthropogenic shoreline modification since washover deposition from Hurricane Sandy. Sediment, elevation, and geophysical data were collected during the April 2015 field campaign, approximately two and a half years after the storm. Sediment deposit data included trenches, stratigraphic descriptions, bulk sediment samples, push cores, Russian cores, and photos. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was conducted on push cores in order to acquire high resolution imaging of density, grain size, and sedimentary structure. Profiles of washover elevation were measured using Differential GPS with Real Time Kinematic processing. Ground Penetrating Radar data was collected to image the depth of the deposit and identify sedimentary structures. These data sets are compared to pre- and post -Sandy lidar surveys in order to determine post-Sandy modification in the two and a half years following the hurricane. We compare sediment thickness and sedimentary characteristics to hurricane Sandy deposits elsewhere along the U.S. eastern seaboard and to tsunami deposits.

  3. Reflections on Sandy Hook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his thoughts for district administrators regarding the Sandy Hook Elementary school tragedy. Administrators heard a lot of potential solutions or attempts at solutions. However, these proposals raise lengthy lists of implementation questions and issues that illustrate a lack of understanding of school operations,…

  4. Trophic niche shifts driven by phytoplankton in sandy beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamino, Leandro; Martínez, Ana; Han, Eunah; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) together with chlorophyll a and densities of surf diatoms were used to analyze changes in trophic niches of species in two sandy beaches of Uruguay with contrasting morphodynamics (i.e. dissipative vs. reflective). Consumers and food sources were collected over four seasons, including sediment organic matter (SOM), suspended particulate organic matter (POM) and the surf zone diatom Asterionellopsis guyunusae. Circular statistics and a Bayesian isotope mixing model were used to quantify food web differences between beaches. Consumers changed their trophic niche between beaches in the same direction of the food web space towards higher reliance on surf diatoms in the dissipative beach. Mixing models indicated that A. guyunusae was the primary nutrition source for suspension feeders in the dissipative beach, explaining their change in dietary niche compared to the reflective beach where the proportional contribution of surf diatoms was low. The high C/N ratios in A. guyunusae indicated its high nutritional value and N content, and may help to explain the high assimilation by suspension feeders at the dissipative beach. Furthermore, density of A. guyunusae was higher in the dissipative than in the reflective beach, and cell density was positively correlated with chlorophyll a only in the dissipative beach. Therefore, surf diatoms are important drivers in the dynamics of sandy beach food webs, determining the trophic niche space and productivity. Our study provides valuable insights on shifting foraging behavior by beach fauna in response to changes in resource availability.

  5. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon using a direct mercury analyzer: Mercury profiles in sediment cores from oxbow lakes in the Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed for total-mercury (Hg) using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA). In the process we evaluated the feasibility of simultaneously determining organic matter content by...

  6. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition-atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Chakravarty, Pragya; Davidson, Gregg R; Wren, Daniel G; Locke, Martin A; Zhou, Ying; Brown, Garry; Cizdziel, James V

    2015-04-29

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p<0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm(-2) yr(-1) for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s. PMID:25847156

  7. Validation of the Diesse Mini-Ves erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) analyzer using the Westergren ESR method in patients with systemic inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Happe, Marc R; Battafarano, Daniel F; Dooley, David P; Rennie, Thomas A; Murphy, Frederick T; Casey, Thomas J; Ward, John A

    2002-07-01

    The Diesse Mini-Ves (DMV) erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) analyzer was designed to improve efficiency in determining the ESR. We compared the Westergren ESR method with the 4-sample DMV ESR analyzer for performance and clinical correlation. This prospective observational study, conducted at a 450-bed tertiary medical center, evaluated 291 paired samples from subjects with various systemic inflammatory conditions. Linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant correlation between the 2 methods. Satisfactory precision of the DMV analyzer was obtained for high and mid-range ESR values. The 4-sample DMV ESR analyzer was precise and comparable in results to the Westergren ESR method. This DMV ESR analyzer is now used at our medical center based on quality control improvements that include a faster, safer, and more standardized ESR method. Hospital or office-based clinical laboratories should consider using the 4-sample DMV ESR analyzer in place of the Westergren method.

  8. Continuum Statistics of the Bed Topography in a Sandy River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B.; Jerolmack, D.; Mohrig, D.

    2005-12-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities in the bed geometry of sandy rivers contain information about processes of sediment transport that has not been fully appreciated. This is primarily due to a disparity between the dynamic nature of the sediment-fluid interface and the relatively static methods of surveying bed elevation, e.g. single profiles or point measurements. High resolution topographic data is paramount to understanding the dynamic behavior of sandy beds. We present and analyze a data set collected on a 2cm x 2cm grid at 1 minute intervals and with a vertical precision of ~1mm. This was accomplished by using Lambert-Beer's Law for attenuation of light to transform low-altitude aerial photographs into digital elevation models. Forty successive models were generated for a 20 m by 30 m section of channel bottom of the N. Loup River, Nebraska. To calculate the average, whole bed translation rate, or celerity, cross-correlations between a reference bed topography and its proceeding configurations were determined. Time differences between models were related to the shift lengths that produced correlation maxima for each model pair. The result is a celerity of ~3.8cm/s with a correlation coefficient of 0.992. Bed topography also deforms while it translates, and this can be seen as a secular decrease of correlation maxima. The form of this decrease in correlation is exponential, and from it an interface half-life is defined. In this case, the bed had become extensively reorganized within ~40 minutes, the time necessary to translate the bed one wavelength of the dominant roughness element. Although the bed is continuously deforming, its roughness is statistically stationary. Essentially, a mean roughness is maintained as the bed creates new realizations of itself. The dynamic nature of the whole bed and similarly transient behavior of individual elements suggests the utility of a holistic approach to studying the feedback between bed topography, fluid flow, and

  9. In situ estimation of sediment sound speed and critical angle

    PubMed

    Maguer; Bovio; Fox; Schmidt

    2000-09-01

    Understanding the basic physics of sound penetration into ocean sediments is essential for the design of sonar systems that can detect, localize, classify, and identify buried objects. In this regard the sound speed of the sediment is a crucial parameter as the ratio of sound speed at the water-sediment interface determines the critical angle. Sediment sound speed is typically measured from core samples using high frequency (100's of kHz) pulsed travel time measurements. Earlier experimental work on subcritical penetration into sandy sediments has suggested that the effective sound speed in the 2-20 kHz range is significantly lower than the core measurement results. Simulations using Biot theory for propagation in porous media confirmed that sandy sediments may be highly dispersive in the range 1-100 kHz for the type of sand in which the experiments were performed. Here it is shown that a direct and robust estimate of the critical angle, and therefore the sediment sound speed, at the lower frequencies can be achieved by analyzing the grazing angle dependence of the phase delays observed on a buried array. A parametric source with secondary frequencies in the 2-16 kHz range was directed toward a sandy bottom similar to the one investigated in the earlier study. An array of 14 hydrophones was used to measure penetrated field. The critical angle was estimated by analyzing the variations of signal arrival times versus frequency, burial depth, and grazing angle. Matching the results with classical transmission theory yielded a sound speed estimate in the sand of 1626 m/s in the frequency range 2-5 kHz, again significantly lower the 1720 m/s estimated from the cores at 200 kHz. However, as described here, this dispersion is consistent with the predictions of the Biot theory for this type of sand.

  10. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT RIGAKU ZSX MINI 11 XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Rigaku ZSX Mini II (ZSX Mini II) XRF Services x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demon-strated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2...

  11. FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT NITON'S XLI/XLT 700 SERIES X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    NITON's XL-700 Series X-ray fluorescence analyzers were demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in May 2003 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the Demonstration...

  12. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT NITON XLT700 SERIES XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Niton XLt 700 Series (XLt) XRF Services x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at ...

  13. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OXFORD ED2000 XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oxford ED2000 x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at the Kennedy Athletic, Recr...

  14. FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OHIO LUMEX'S RA-915+/RP-91C MERCURY ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ohio Lumex's RA915+/91 C mercury analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in May 2003, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the Demonstration was to c...

  15. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT RONTEC PICOTAX XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Rontec PicoTAX x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at the Kennedy Athletic, Rec...

  16. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT XCALIBUR ELVAX XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innov-X XT400 Series (XT400) x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at the Kenned...

  17. Tsunami characteristics and formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit in Sanriku Coast: implications from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, D.; Haraguchi, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological investigation of paleotsunami deposit is crucial for knowing the history and magnitude of tsunami events in the past. Among various kinds of grain sizes, sandy tsunami deposit has been best investigated by previous studies, because of its potential for identification in the sedimentary column. Many sandy tsunami deposits have been found from coastal plains, which have sandy beach and low-lying wetlands. However, sandy tsunami deposits in narrow valleys at rocky ria coast have rarely been found. It may be presumed that formation potential of sandy tsunami layer in the rocky coasts is generally lower than coastal plains, because of the absence of sandy beach, tsunami run-up on steeper slope and stronger return flow. In this presentation, characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake tsunami in Sanriku Coast, a continuous rocky ria coast located in the northeast Japan, is investigated based on numerical modeling. In addition, the formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit is also investigated based on numerical modeling of sediment transport. Preliminary result of tsunami hydrodynamics showed that the waveform and amplification of the tsunami are clearly affected by the local bathymetry, which is associated with submerged topography formed during the last glacial stage. Although the tsunami height in the offshore of each bay is around 8.0 m, the tsunami height at the bay head was increased in different way. The amplification factor at the bay head was typically 2.0 among most of V-shaped narrow embayments; meanwhile the amplification factor is much lower than 1.0 at some cases. The preliminary result of the modeling of sediment transport predicted huge amount of sediments may be suspended into the water column, given that sandy deposit is available there. Massive erosion and deposition of sea bottom sediments may commonly take place in the bays. However, formation of onshore tsunami deposit differs from each other. Whether the suspended sediments

  18. Effects of Super Strom Sandy on Depositional Environments Offshore Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C. M.; Christensen, B. A.; Dutton, J.; Brownawell, B.; Gurung, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy's landfall affected the coastlines over a broad swath of mid-Atlantic including New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The effects included breaching, overwash and erosion of barrier islands, some of which are heavily populated and sustained extensive damage. The peak storm-tide elevation produced by Hurricane Sandy measured by USGS stations in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m more than the historical peak-water level elevations in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation RAPID response we sampled the sediment in West Bay, Middle Bay, East Bay, Jones Inlet and Reynolds Channel of Long Island, New York from the R/V Pritchard. The sediment sampling took place 4 months after the storm and prior to any similar large storms. The sampling strategy was designed to characterize the post-storm sedimentation in distinct depositional environments. In this survey 156 grab samples were recovered from areas, many of which had been sampled prior to the storm. The samples were analyzed for grain size variability, short-lived radioisotopes and x-ray fluorescence elemental analyses. Google Earth images from before and after the storm reveal moderate to severe erosion and overwash of the dunes in Jones inlet, and Middle and East Bays. The Long Beach barrier island tidal marshes were submerged for several days post Sandy and underwent severe erosion. The storm surge brought from offshore a layer of coarse sand that was deposited over mussel beds. Most of the mussels were dead indicative of the strength of the waves. Be-7 concentrations allowed tracking the path of the storm from the bays and inlets, to the offshore. Some of the highest Be-7 concentrations ever detected in the local estuaries: 5,329, 4,955 and 4,553 pCi/kg were measured in West Bay and Middle Bay Channels. Additionally, unusually high Be-7 concentrations of 2,130 pCi/kg were recorded ~5.24 km offshore from Long Beach barrier island four months after the

  19. Reciprocal influences of microbial community and hydrogeomorphology in sandy streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Lera, C.; Federlein, L. L.; Frossard, A.; Gessner, M. O.; Knie, M.; Mutz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stream hydrogeomorphology is a strong determinant of streambed microbial community activity, which in turn influences stream biogeochemistry. Whether this influence is unidirectional or whether microbial communities can also modulate biogeochemical processes by affecting hydrogeomorphology is an emerging question in research on sediment-water interfaces. Using experimental flumes simulating sandy streams, we tested whether such influences can occur through altered water exchange across the sediment-water interface. Results show that microbial communities in sandy streambeds can indeed affect hydrogeomorphology by producing gas bubbles. Specifically, gas bubbles accumulating in microbial biofilms can alter the water exchange by (i) reducing sediment pore space or (ii) provoking the detachment of the microbial biofilm detachment and thus altering streambed topography. Additionally, results indicate that water exchange is the major for the structure and activity of the microbial community. Our data also indicate that the potential of microbial communities to influence water exchange can be modulated by factors such as light intensity and discharge fluctuations. These biological-physical interactions and their effects on the influence of microbial communities on hydrogeomorphology is a source of spatiotemporal variability in water exchange across the sediment-water interface. Heterogeneity in water exchange is known to increase biogeochemical pathways and, thus, ecosystem functions. These results suggest that a holistic understanding of vertical connectivity in running waters requires consideration of biological-physical interactions at the water-sediment interface.

  20. 78 FR 46999 - Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... impacted and distressed areas declared a major disaster due to Hurricane Sandy (see 78 FR 14329, published... notice published March 5, 2013 (78 FR 14329), the Department allocated $5.4 billion after analyzing the impacts of Hurricane Sandy and identifying unmet needs. A subsequent notice, providing additional...

  1. Hurricane Sandy Prowls the Eastern Seaboard

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from Oct. 26-29, 2012, shows Hurricane Sandy move along the U.S. East coast and into the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern U.S. Sandy had still not made landfall ...

  2. Hurricane Sandy -- Pass 1, Oct. 29, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Sandy was viewed Monday morning from the International Space Station as it orbited 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had sustained winds of 90 miles an hour as the station passed ...

  3. Hurricane Sandy -- Pass 2, Oct. 29, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Sandy was viewed Monday morning from the International Space Station as it orbited 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had sustained winds of 90 miles an hour as the station passed ...

  4. Real time and in situ determination of lead in road sediments using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Cuñat, J; Fortes, F J; Laserna, J J

    2009-02-01

    In situ, real time levels of lead in road sediments have been measured using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer. The instrument consists of a backpack and a probe housing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser head delivering 50 mJ per pulse at 1064 nm. Plasma emission was collected and transmitted via fiber optic to a compact cross Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a linear CCD array allocated in the backpack together with a personal computer. The limit of detection (LOD) for lead and the precision measured in the laboratory were 190 microg g(-1) (calculated by the 3 sigma method) and 9% R.S.D. (relative standard deviation), respectively. During the field campaign, averaged Pb concentration in the sediments were ranging from 480 microg g(-1) to 660 microg g(-1) depending on the inspected area, i.e. the entrance, the central part and the exit of the tunnel. These results were compared with those obtained with flame-atomic absorption spectrometry (flame-AAS). The relative error, expressed as [100(LIBS result-flame AAS result)/(LIBS result)], was approximately 14%.

  5. On Sandy Shores. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Craig; And Others

    The activities in this guide (for grades 2-4) transport students to the sandy shore, one of the most fascinating ecosystems on the planet. At this ecological juncture a multiplicity of life forms find ways to survive, thrive, and interact with each other. Using a wide variety of learning formats, students explore and deepen their understanding of…

  6. Experimental Study of Clay Deposition and Storage in Sandy River Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, N.; Hajek, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ancient fluvial deposits are important records of historical surface conditions on Earth and also serve as important reservoir units for groundwater and hydrocarbons. Grain-size heterogeneity within fluvial deposits may record paleo-flow variability and/or paleo-sediment supply, but without improved understanding of the conditions under which clay can accumulate in sandy river beds, it is difficult to uniquely interpret these deposits. In order to better understand the processes controlling when and where fine sediment accumulates in sandy river beds, we conducted a series of physical experiments to test if there is a relationship between supplied clay concentration and the amount of clay preserved in the river bed under constant and variable discharge conditions. In a 15.5 m feed-style flume, water discharge of 0.21 m3/s and sand supply of 15 g/s were used to aggrade a sandy bed 6.5 cm over the course of 4 hours. In three constant-discharge experiments, clay was added in concentrations of 1000 mg/l, 4000 mg/l and 8500 mg/l. An additional experiment with 1000 mg/l clay concentration was conducted with variable water-discharge, where discharge was slowed to a stop every hour of run time and clay allowed to settle for one hour and once overnight. After each experiment, clay deposits observable in the bed were mapped and samples were collected from the dry bed and analyzed for clay content. Results demonstrate that under constant discharge conditions, clay can accumulate in the bed and that the amount of clay retained in the bed is related to the amount of clay supplied to the flume. In sediment deposited with a low clay concentration, little to no clay accumulated in the bed while under high clay concentration, as much five percent of the bed had a high clay fraction. Clay accumulations that formed under constant flow conditions had different distribution and character from those formed under variable discharge conditions. In all experiments, clay retention was

  7. The relationship between sandy beach nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy beaches (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).

    PubMed

    Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M

    2013-03-01

    We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy beaches were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both beaches were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between beaches, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both beaches were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between beaches, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered beaches was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy beaches. The density and structure of the nematode community at both beaches clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation.

  8. Science and Sandy: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established a Task Force to '...ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future.' The author was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was not always at the forefront of this process. This talk describes the author's experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on organizing scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. This includes a description of federal activity supporting Sandy recovery efforts, the role of the Task Force, and lessons learned from developing a science support function within the Task Force.

  9. SANDY CREEK ROADLESS AREA, MISSISSIPPI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Bitar, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    The Sandy Creek Roadless Area includes about 3. 7 sq mi in the southeastern part of Adams County, Mississippi. On the basis of a mineral survey, the area offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources but has a probable resource potential for oil and natural gas. It is possible that wells drilled deep enough to penetrate the older reservoirs will encounter significant quantities of oil and natural gas in the roadless area. The deposits of gravel, sand, and clay present in the area could be utilized in the construction industry, but similar deposits elsewhere are much closer to available markets.

  10. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  11. Deaths associated with Hurricane Sandy - October-November 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-05-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the northeastern U.S. coastline. Sandy's tropical storm winds stretched over 900 miles (1,440 km), causing storm surges and destruction over a larger area than that affected by hurricanes with more intensity but narrower paths. Based on storm surge predictions, mandatory evacuations were ordered on October 28, including for New York City's Evacuation Zone A, the coastal zone at risk for flooding from any hurricane. By October 31, the region had 6-12 inches (15-30 cm) of precipitation, 7-8 million customers without power, approximately 20,000 persons in shelters, and news reports of numerous fatalities (Robert Neurath, CDC, personal communication, 2013). To characterize deaths related to Sandy, CDC analyzed data on 117 hurricane-related deaths captured by American Red Cross (Red Cross) mortality tracking during October 28-November 30, 2012. This report describes the results of that analysis, which found drowning was the most common cause of death related to Sandy, and 45% of drowning deaths occurred in flooded homes in Evacuation Zone A. Drowning is a leading cause of hurricane death but is preventable with advance warning systems and evacuation plans. Emergency plans should ensure that persons receive and comprehend evacuation messages and have the necessary resources to comply with them.

  12. 1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 DEGREES NORTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-1. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING 6 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  14. 3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 DEGREES SOUTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-2. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  15. 4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 DEGREES SOUTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  16. 7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  17. 6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 DEGREES NORTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  18. 2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  19. Geoacoustic inversion in shallow tropical waters for a silty and sandy seabed.

    PubMed

    M C, Sanjana; G, Latha; Potty, G R

    2016-02-01

    Seabed parameters are inverted from ambient noise measurements at two shallow tropical environments with dissimilar seabed characteristics, a silty and a sandy seabed, using an approach that matches the measured and modeled complex vertical coherence. Coherence is modeled using the Green's function output from the model oases, along with theoretical formulation, for a range independent environment. Genetic algorithm is used to search the model parameter space consisting of sound speed, density, and attenuation in the sediment layers and half-space. Reasonable estimates have been obtained for the silty site, whereas the sandy site gave relatively poor parameter estimates due to reflective seabed and shipping interference. PMID:26936582

  20. Managing Environmental Stress: An Evaluation of Environmental Management of the Long Point Sandy Barrier, Lake Erie, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kreutzwiser; Gabriel

    2000-01-01

    / This paper assesses the extent to which key geomorphic components, processes, and stresses have been reflected in the management of a coastal sandy barrier environment. The management policies and practices of selected agencies responsible for Long Point, a World Biosphere Reserve along Lake Erie, Canada, were evaluated for consistency with these principles of environmental management for sandy barriers: maintaining natural stresses essential to sandy barrier development and maintenance;protecting sediment sources, transfers, and storage; recognizing spatial variability and cyclicity of natural stresses, such as barrier overwash events; and accepting and planning for long-term evolutionary changes in the sandy barrier environment. Generally, management policies and practices have not respected the dynamic and sensitive environment of Long Point because of limited mandates of the agencies involved, inconsistent policies, and failure to apply or enforce existing policies. This is particularly evident with local municipalities and less so for the Canadian Wildlife Service, the federal agency responsible for managing National Wildlife Areas at the point. In the developed areas of Long Point, landward sediment transfers and sediment storage in dunes have been impacted by cottage development, shore protection, and maintenance of roads and parking lots. Additionally, agencies responsible for managing Long Point have no jurisdiction over sediment sources as far as 95 km away. Evolutionary change of sandy barriers poses the greatest challenge to environmental managers.

  1. Physical factors influencing immature-fish communities in the surf zones of sandy beaches in northwestern Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Ryutei; Nishida, Takashi; Onikura, Norio; Eguchi, Katsuhisa; Kawagishi, Motoyoshi; Nakatani, Masaya; Oikawa, Shin

    2010-02-01

    We aim to understand the relationships between physical conditions and characteristics of the immature-fish community in surf zones of sandy beaches. Therefore, we obtained fish samples between March 2007 and February 2008 and analyzed certain physical conditions in the surf zones of 21 sandy beaches on the coastline of the northwestern Kyushu Island, Japan. We collected a total of 83 species and 6458 immature individuals. In a BIO-ENV analysis, the highest correlation was observed between fish assemblage and S20 (i.e., the slope from the shoreline to the sites where the depth was 20 m) and current velocity (CV) values. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the number of species and individuals decrease with an increase in the S20 and CV values. These results show that species richness and the abundance of immature-fish increase under shelving and calm conditions. Thus, immature-fish assemblages are strongly influenced by the prevailing physical conditions. Moreover, in six of the 10 dominant species, a negative correlation was observed between CV and abundance. On the other hand, S20 was found to be the explanatory variable only in the case of the most dominant species, i.e., Gymnogobius breunigii. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between S1 (i.e., the slope from the shoreline to the sites where the depth was 1.0 m at the mean tidal level) and median particle size (i.e., MPS of the sediments) and the abundances of Sillago japonica and Favonigobius gymnauchen, respectively, and a negative correlation with salinity, in the case of Acanthogobius lactipes. We conclude that the characteristics of the fish community in surf zones on sandy beaches are determined by not only the shelving and calm conditions, which influence fish assemblages and abundances, but also the habitat diversity, which influences the diversity of fish species.

  2. Analyzing turbidity, suspended-sediment concentration, and particle-size distribution resulting from a debris flow on Mount Jefferson, Oregon, November 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A debris flow and sediment torrent occurred on the flanks of Mt Jefferson in Oregon on November 6, 2006, inundating 150 acres of forest. The massive debris flow was triggered by a rock and snow avalanche from the Milk Creek glaciers and snowfields during the early onset of an intense storm originating near the Hawaiian Islands. The debris flow consisted of a heavy conglomerate of large boulders, cobbles, and coarse-grained sediment that was deposited at depths of up to 15 ft and within 3 mi of the glaciers, and a viscous slurry that deposited finer-grained sediments at depths of 0.5 to 3 ft. The muddy slurry coated standing trees within the lower reaches of Milk Creek as it moved downslope.

  3. Seasonal dynamics of anammox bacteria in estuarial sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yi-Guo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The community and population dynamics of anammox bacteria in summer (wet) and winter (dry) seasons in estuarial mudflat sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve were investigated by 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes. 16S rRNA phylogenetic diversity showed that sequences related to 'Kuenenia' anammox bacteria were presented in summer but not winter while 'Scalindua' anammox bacteria occurred in both seasons and could be divided into six different clusters. Compared to the 16S rRNA genes, the hzo genes revealed a relatively uniform seasonal diversity, with sequences relating to 'Scalindua', 'Anammoxoglobus', and planctomycete KSU-1 found in both seasons. The seasonal specific bacterial groups and diversity based on the 16S rRNA and hzo genes indicated strong seasonal community structures in estuary sediment of this site. Furthermore, the higher abundance of hzo genes in summer than winter indicates clear seasonal population dynamics. Combining the physicochemical characteristics of estuary sediment in the two seasons and their correlations with anammox bacteria community structure, we proposed the strong seasonal dynamics in estuary sediment of Mai Po to be due to the anthropogenic and terrestrial inputs, especially in summer, which brings in freshwater anammox bacteria, such as 'Kuenenia', interacting with the coastal marine anammox bacteria 'Scalindua'. PMID:21487198

  4. Seasonal dynamics of anammox bacteria in estuarial sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yi-Guo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The community and population dynamics of anammox bacteria in summer (wet) and winter (dry) seasons in estuarial mudflat sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve were investigated by 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes. 16S rRNA phylogenetic diversity showed that sequences related to 'Kuenenia' anammox bacteria were presented in summer but not winter while 'Scalindua' anammox bacteria occurred in both seasons and could be divided into six different clusters. Compared to the 16S rRNA genes, the hzo genes revealed a relatively uniform seasonal diversity, with sequences relating to 'Scalindua', 'Anammoxoglobus', and planctomycete KSU-1 found in both seasons. The seasonal specific bacterial groups and diversity based on the 16S rRNA and hzo genes indicated strong seasonal community structures in estuary sediment of this site. Furthermore, the higher abundance of hzo genes in summer than winter indicates clear seasonal population dynamics. Combining the physicochemical characteristics of estuary sediment in the two seasons and their correlations with anammox bacteria community structure, we proposed the strong seasonal dynamics in estuary sediment of Mai Po to be due to the anthropogenic and terrestrial inputs, especially in summer, which brings in freshwater anammox bacteria, such as 'Kuenenia', interacting with the coastal marine anammox bacteria 'Scalindua'.

  5. Quantifying the digital traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr.

    PubMed

    Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah; Bishop, Steven R; Treleaven, Philip; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Society's increasing interactions with technology are creating extensive "digital traces" of our collective human behavior. These new data sources are fuelling the rapid development of the new field of computational social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data from Flickr, a popular website for sharing personal photographs. In this case study, we find that the number of photos taken and subsequently uploaded to Flickr with titles, descriptions or tags related to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during this period. Appropriate leverage of such information could be useful to policy makers and others charged with emergency crisis management. PMID:24189490

  6. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah; Bishop, Steven R.; Treleaven, Philip; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-11-01

    Society's increasing interactions with technology are creating extensive ``digital traces'' of our collective human behavior. These new data sources are fuelling the rapid development of the new field of computational social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data from Flickr, a popular website for sharing personal photographs. In this case study, we find that the number of photos taken and subsequently uploaded to Flickr with titles, descriptions or tags related to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during this period. Appropriate leverage of such information could be useful to policy makers and others charged with emergency crisis management.

  7. Quantifying the digital traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr.

    PubMed

    Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah; Bishop, Steven R; Treleaven, Philip; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Society's increasing interactions with technology are creating extensive "digital traces" of our collective human behavior. These new data sources are fuelling the rapid development of the new field of computational social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data from Flickr, a popular website for sharing personal photographs. In this case study, we find that the number of photos taken and subsequently uploaded to Flickr with titles, descriptions or tags related to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during this period. Appropriate leverage of such information could be useful to policy makers and others charged with emergency crisis management.

  8. Heat transport dynamics at a sandy intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2013-06-01

    Intertidal zones are spatially complex and temporally dynamic environments. Coastal groundwater discharge, including submarine groundwater discharge, may provide stabilizing conditions for intertidal zone permeable sediments. In this study, we integrated detailed time series temperature observations, porewater pressure measurements, and two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography profiles to understand the coupled hydraulic-thermal regime of a tropical sandy intertidal zone in a fringing coral reef lagoon (Rarotonga, Cook Islands). We found three heating patterns across the 15 m study transect over tidal and diel periods: (1) a highly variable thermal regime dominated by swash infiltration and changes in saturation state in the upper foreshore with net heat import into the sediment, (2) a groundwater-supported underground stable, cool region just seaward of the intertidal slope break also importing heat into the subsurface, and (3) a zone of seawater recirculation that sustained consistently warm subsurface temperatures that exported heat across the sediment-water interface. Simple calculations suggested thermal conduction as the main heat transport mechanism for the shallow intertidal sediment, but deeper and/or multidimensional groundwater flow was required to explain temperature patterns beyond 20 cm depth. Temperature differences between the distinct hydrodynamic zones of the foreshore site resulted in significant thermal gradients that persisted beyond tidal and diel periods. The thermal buffering of intertidal zones by coastal groundwater systems, both at surface seeps and in the shallow subsurface, can be responsible for thermal refugia for some coastal organisms and hotspots for biogeochemical reactions.

  9. Hurricane Sandy From the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The International Space Station flew high above Hurricane Sandy just before 12 p.m. CDT Thursday. The storm was located about 85 miles south-southeast of Great Exuma Island. The storm’s maximum s...

  10. Constraining Depositional Slope From Sedimentary Structures in Sandy Braided Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, R. M.; Mohrig, D.; Heller, P. L.

    2003-12-01

    Determination of paleoslopes in ancient fluvial systems has potentially broad application to quantitatively constraining the history of tectonics and paleoclimate in continental sequences. Our method for calculating paleoslopes for sandy braided streams is based upon a simple physical model that establishes depositional skin-frictional shear stresses from assemblages of sedimentary structures and their associated grain size distributions. The addition of a skin-frictional shear stress, with a geometrically determined form-drag shear stress results in a total boundary shear stress which is directly related to water-surface slope averaged over an appropriate spatial scale. In order to apply this model to ancient fluvial systems, it is necessary to measure the following: coarsest suspended sediment size, finest grain size carried in bed load, flow depth, dune height, and dune length. In the rock record, suspended load and bed load can be accurately assessed by well-preserved suspended load deposits ("low-energy" ripples) and bed load deposits (dune foresets). This model predicts an average slope for the North Loup River near Taylor, Nebraska (modern case study) of 2.7 x 10-3. The measured reach-averaged water surface slope for the same reach of the river is 1.37 x 10-3. We suggest that it is possible to calculate the depositional slope of a sandy fluvial system by a factor of approximately two. Additionally, preliminary application of this model to the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation throughout the Colorado Plateau provides a promising and consistent evaluation of paleoslope in an ancient and well-preserved, sandy braided stream deposit.

  11. Simulation and control of morphological changes due to dam removal in the Sandy River, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Altinakar, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    A one-dimensional channel evolution simulation model (CCHE1D) is applied to assess morphological changes in a reach of the Sandy River, Oregon, USA, due to the Marmot Dam removal in 2007. Sediment transport model parameters (e.g. sediment transport capacity, bed roughness coefficient) were calibrated using observed bed changes after the dam removal. The validated model is then applied to assess long-term morphological changes in response to a 10-year hydrograph selected from historical storm water records. The long-term assessment of sedimentation gives a reasonable prediction of morphological changes, expanding erosion in reservoir and growing deposition immediately downstream of the dam site. This prediction result can be used for managing and planning river sedimentation after dam removal. A simulation-based optimization model is also applied to determine the optimal sediment release rates during dam-removal that will minimize the morphological changes in the downstream reaches.

  12. GC estimation of organic hydrocarbons that threaten shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zawrah, M F; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; El-Sayed, E; Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Tantawy, M A

    2014-11-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination is one of the important environmental problems at petroleum-related sites, which causes critical environmental and health defects. Severe petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from coastal refinery plant was detected in a shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer is bordered by Gulf in the Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The overall objective of this investigation is to estimate the organic hydrocarbons in shallow sandy aquifers, released from continuous major point-source of pollution over a long period of time (91 years ago). This oil refinery contamination resulted mainly in the improper disposal of hydrocarbons and produced water releases caused by equipment failures, vandalism, and accidents that caused direct groundwater pollution or discharge into the gulf. In order to determine the fate of hydrocarbons, detailed field investigations were made to provide intensive deep profile information. Eight composite randomly sediment samples from a test plot were selected for demonstration. The tested plot was 50 m long × 50 m wide × 70 cm deep. Sediment samples were collected using an American auger around the point 29° 57' 33″ N and 32° 30' 40″ E in 2012 and covered an area of 2,500 m(2) which represents nearly 1/15 of total plant area (the total area of the plant is approximately 3.250 km(2)). The detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were 2.44, 2.62, 4.54, 4.78, 2.83, 3.22, 2.56, and 3.13 wt%, respectively. TPH was calculated by differences in weight and subjected to gas chromatography (GC). Hydrocarbons were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard (HP-7890 plus) gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The percentage of paraffine of the investigated TPH samples was 7.33, 7.24, 7.58, 8.25, 10.25, 9.89, 14.77, and 17.53 wt%, respectively.

  13. Superstorm Sandy and the Verdant Power RITE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corren, D.; Colby, J.; Adonizio, M.

    2013-12-01

    River water speed and level data acquired during Sandy is revelatory, not only indicating the extent and timing of the extraordinarily high levels, but also significant changes to the very sense of the tidal flows. This unique observational data provides an invaluable insight for Verdant Power, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, and researchers studying the potential effects of extreme storms on New York City and potential countermeasures. In this paper, Verdant first presents the East River data collected during Superstorm Sandy, indicating what actually happened during the storm. Verdant provides further analyses and estimates of the potential for yet more extreme water levels due to different storm timing relative to the astronomical tides. These results should also provide additional insights for measures to prepare for extreme storms in the New York City area. Specific to Verdant Power, as a renewable energy developer, we also analyze the data to estimate how a different storm timing could affect the water velocity through the river. We relate these findings to the design criteria for our turbines and associated equipment, and draw conclusions about the potential impact of an extreme storm such as Sandy on a commercial array of kinetic hydropower turbines.

  14. The Topic Is Sandy Hook: A Program for Gifted and Talented Students at Sandy Hook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, David

    "The Topic Is Sandy Hook" is an experiential 10-week program designed to provide special opportunities and educational experiences for 6th to 10th grade gifted and talented students. Sandy Hook, a natural resource in Monmouth County, New Jersey, is unique in its physical and historical features and provides an exceptionally rich environment in…

  15. Hurricane Sandy washover deposits on southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, James M.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Zaremba, Nicholas J.; Lunghino, Brent D.; Kane, Haunani H.

    2016-07-22

    Sedimentologic and topographic data from Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were collected from southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey, in order to document changes to the barrier-island beaches, dunes, and coastal wetlands caused by Hurricane Sandy and subsequent storm events. These data will provide a baseline dataset for use in future coastal change descriptive and predictive studies and assessments. The data presented here were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/sandy-wetland-assessment/), which aims to assess ecological and societal vulnerability that results from long- and short-term physical changes to barrier islands and coastal wetlands. This report describes data that were collected in April 2015, approximately 2½ years after Hurricane Sandy’s landfall on October 29, 2012. During the field campaign, washover deposits were photographed and described, and sediment cores, sediment samples, and surface-elevation data were collected. Data collected during this study, including sample locations and elevations, core photographs, computed tomography scans, descriptive core logs, sediment grain-size data, and accompanying Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata, are available in the associated U.S. Geological Survey data release (Bishop and others, 2016; http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7PK0D7S).

  16. Hurricane Sandy washover deposits on southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, James M.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Zaremba, Nicholas J.; Lunghino, Brent D.; Kane, Haunani H.

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentologic and topographic data from Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were collected from southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey, in order to document changes to the barrier-island beaches, dunes, and coastal wetlands caused by Hurricane Sandy and subsequent storm events. These data will provide a baseline dataset for use in future coastal change descriptive and predictive studies and assessments. The data presented here were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/sandy-wetland-assessment/), which aims to assess ecological and societal vulnerability that results from long- and short-term physical changes to barrier islands and coastal wetlands. This report describes data that were collected in April 2015, approximately 2½ years after Hurricane Sandy’s landfall on October 29, 2012. During the field campaign, washover deposits were photographed and described, and sediment cores, sediment samples, and surface-elevation data were collected. Data collected during this study, including sample locations and elevations, core photographs, computed tomography scans, descriptive core logs, sediment grain-size data, and accompanying Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata, are available in the associated U.S. Geological Survey data release (Bishop and others, 2016; http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7PK0D7S).

  17. Variations in macrobenthic community structure in relation to changing environmental conditions in sandy beaches of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcedo, M. Cecilia; Fiori, Sandra M.; Piccolo, M. Cintia; López Abbate, M. Celeste; Bremec, Claudia S.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes for the first time the intertidal macrobenthic community of exposed sandy beaches located near the Bahía Blanca Estuary (38°S) and reports the physical characterization of this coastal fringe. The main objective of the study was to link environmental variables to biotic information, analyzing the results in the context of the Swash Exclusion Hypothesis (SEH) and possible estuarine influence. Four beaches were sampled seasonally at different distances from the mouth of the Bahía Blanca Estuary. To characterize the morphodynamic state of the beaches, the Dean parameter (Ω) was calculated. Multivariate analyses were used to assess benthic community structures and their relationships with physical variables. The two beaches located closest to the Bahía Blanca Estuary were classified as intermediate and those located further from the estuary as dissipative. Richness, diversity and biomass of intertidal macrobenthic communities varied with the SEH, increasing towards the dissipative beaches. However, total density was higher on intermediate beaches, possibly because of nutrient-rich silt-clay sediment input from the estuary, enabling them to maintain a higher density of organisms than dissipative beaches. The estuary acts as a moderator of habitat hardness, which together with the morphodynamic state of the beaches is an important factor in the structuring of the macrobenthic community along this coastal fringe.

  18. Low-frequency geoacoustic model for the effective properties of sandy seabottoms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen; Knobles, D P

    2009-05-01

    The debate on the sound speed dispersion and the frequency dependence of sound attenuation in seabottoms has persisted for decades, mainly due to the lack of sufficient experimental data in the low-frequency (LF) to high-frequency speed/attenuation transition band. This paper analyzes and summarizes a set of LF measurements in shallow water that have resulted in the identification of nonlinear frequency dependence of sound attenuation in the effective media of sandy seabottoms. The long-range acoustic measurements were conducted at 20 locations in different coastal zones around the world. The seabed attenuations, inverted from different acoustic field measurements and characteristics, exhibit similar magnitude and nonlinear frequency dependence below 1000 Hz. The resulting effective sound attenuation can be expressed by alpha(dB/m)=(0.37+/-0.01)(f/1000)((1.80+/-0.02)) for 50-1000 Hz. The corresponding average sound speed ratio at the bottom-water interface in the 50-600 Hz range is 1.061+/-0.009. Both the LF-field-derived sound speed and attenuation can be well described by the Biot-Stoll model with parameters that are consistent with either theoretical considerations or experimental measurements. A combination of the LF-field-inverted data with the SAX99, SAX04, and other high-frequency measurements offers a reference broadband data set in the 50-400 000 Hz range for sonar prediction and sediment acoustics modeling.

  19. Emergency evacuation orders: considerations and lessons from Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the problems surrounding the execution of emergency evacuation orders by evaluating Hurricane Sandy and the emergency actions taken by the State of New Jersey and the City of Atlantic City New Jersey. The analysis provides an overview of the legal authority granting emergency powers to governors and mayors to issue evacuation proclamations in addition to an evaluation of the New Jersey's emergency evacuation mandate and subsequent compliance. The article concludes with provision of planning and preparedness recommendations for public managers facing similar hazards, including a recommendation for provision of emergency shelter contingencies within the threat zone in anticipation of citizen noncompliance evacuation orders.

  20. Emergency evacuation orders: considerations and lessons from Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the problems surrounding the execution of emergency evacuation orders by evaluating Hurricane Sandy and the emergency actions taken by the State of New Jersey and the City of Atlantic City New Jersey. The analysis provides an overview of the legal authority granting emergency powers to governors and mayors to issue evacuation proclamations in addition to an evaluation of the New Jersey's emergency evacuation mandate and subsequent compliance. The article concludes with provision of planning and preparedness recommendations for public managers facing similar hazards, including a recommendation for provision of emergency shelter contingencies within the threat zone in anticipation of citizen noncompliance evacuation orders. PMID:25062822

  1. Iron reduction in the sediments of a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuccillo, M.E.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Sediments sampled at a hydrocarbon-contaminated, glacial-outwash, sandy aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, were analyzed for sediment-associated Fe with several techniques. Extraction with 0.5 M HCl dissolved poorly crystalline Fe oxides and small amounts of Fe in crystalline Fe oxides, and extracted Fe from phyllosilicates. Use of Ti-citrate-EDTA-bicarbonate results in more complete removal of crystalline Fe oxides. The average HCl-extractable Fe(III) concentration in the sediments closest to the crude-oil contamination (16.2 ??mol/g) has been reduced by up to 30% from background values (23.8 ??mol/g) as a result of Fe(III) reduction in contaminated anoxic groundwater. Iron(II) concentrations are elevated in sediments within an anoxic plume in the aquifer. Iron(II) values under the oil body (19.2 ??mol/g) are as much as 4 times those in the background sediments (4.6 ??mol/g), indicating incorporation of reduced Fe in the contaminated sediments. A 70% increase in total extractable Fe at the anoxic/oxic transition zone indicates reoxidation and precipitation of Fe mobilized from sediment in the anoxic plume. Scanning electron microscopy detected authigenic ferroan calcite in the anoxic sediments and confirmed abundant Fe(III) oxyhydroxides at the anoxic/oxic boundary. The redox biogeochemistry of Fe in this system is coupled to contaminant degradation and is important in predicting processes of hydrocarbon degradation.

  2. Sediment trap efficiency of paddy fields at the watershed scale in a mountainous catchment in northwest Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, Johanna I. F.; Schmitter, Petra; Hilger, Thomas; Vien, Tran Duc; Cadisch, Georg

    2016-06-01

    Composite agricultural systems with permanent maize cultivation in the uplands and irrigated rice in the valleys are very common in mountainous southeast Asia. The soil loss and fertility decline of the upland fields is well documented, but little is known about reallocation of these sediments within the landscape. In this study, a turbidity-based linear mixed model was used to quantify sediment inputs, from surface reservoir irrigation water and from direct overland flow, into a paddy area of 13 ha. Simultaneously, the sediment load exported from the rice fields was determined. Mid-infrared spectroscopy was applied to analyze sediment particle size. Our results showed that per year, 64 Mg ha-1 of sediments were imported into paddy fields, of which around 75 % were delivered by irrigation water and the remainder by direct overland flow during rainfall events. Overland flow contributed one-third of the received sandy fraction, while irrigated sediments were predominantly silty. Overall, rice fields were a net sink for sediments, trapping 28 Mg ha-1 a-1 or almost half of total sediment inputs. As paddy outflow consisted almost exclusively of silt- and clay-sized material, 24 Mg ha-1 a-1 of the trapped amount of sediment was estimated to be sandy. Under continued intensive upland maize cultivation, such a sustained input of coarse material could jeopardize paddy soil fertility, puddling capacity and ultimately food security of the inhabitants of these mountainous areas. Preventing direct overland flow from entering the paddy fields, however, could reduce sand inputs by up to 34 %.

  3. Sediment trap efficiency of paddy fields at the watershed scale in a mountainous catchment in Northwest Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, J. I. F.; Schmitter, P.; Hilger, T.; Vien, T. D.; Cadisch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Composite agricultural systems with permanent maize cultivation in the uplands and irrigated rice in the valleys are very common in mountainous Southeast Asia. The soil loss and fertility decline of the upland fields is well documented, but little is known about reallocation of these sediments within the landscape. In this study, a turbidity-based linear mixed model was used to quantify sediment inputs, from surface reservoir irrigation water and from direct overland flow, into a paddy area of 13 hectares. Simultaneously, the sediment load exported from the rice fields was determined. Mid-infrared spectroscopy was applied to analyze sediment particle size. Our results showed that per year, 64 Mg ha-1 of sediments were imported into paddy fields, of which around 75 % were delivered by irrigation water and the remainder by direct overland flow during rainfall events. Overland flow contributed one third of the received sandy fraction, while irrigated sediments were predominantly silty. Overall, rice fields were a net sink for sediments, trapping 28 Mg ha-1 a-1 or almost half of total sediment inputs. As paddy outflow consisted almost exclusively of silt- and clay-sized material, 24 Mg ha-1 a-1 of the trapped amount of sediment was estimated to be sandy. Under continued intensive upland maize cultivation, such a sustained input of coarse material could jeopardize paddy soil fertility, puddling capacity and ultimately also food security of the inhabitants of these mountainous areas. Preventing direct overland flow from entering the paddy fields, however, could reduce sand inputs by up to 34 %.

  4. Quantitative centrifugation to extract benthic protozoa from freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Starink, M; Bär-Gilissen, M J; Bak, R P; Cappenberg, T E

    1994-01-01

    TWO METHODS FOR EXTRACTING PROTISTS FROM FRESHWATER SEDIMENT ARE DESCRIBED: (i) an adapted isopycnic centrifugation technique for sandy and gyttja-like sediments and (ii) a rate zonal centrifugation technique for sediments rich in particulate organic material (litter-like sediments). The recoveries of protists during isopycnic centrifugation in media of several densities were compared. No significant losses in sodium diatrizoate and Percoll were recorded. After known amounts of nanoflagellates were added to azoic sediments, the protists were extracted and counted. For sandy sediments, we found 100% recovery, and for the gyttja-like sediments we found a maximum recovery of 94%. The recovery of protozoa extracted from litter-like sediments, characteristic of littoral systems, depends on a given centrifugal force, on time, and on the dimensions of the flagellates. A recovery model which takes into account cell dimensions and centrifugation characteristics gives the minimum expected recovery.

  5. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT INNOV-X XT400 SERIES XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innov-X Systems (Innov-X) XT400 series (XT400) x-ray flurescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The demonstration was designed to collect reliable performance and...

  6. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OXFORD X-MTE 3000TX XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Elvatech, Ltd. ElvaX (ElvaX) x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer distributed in the United States by Xcalibur XRF Services (Xcalibur), was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field por...

  7. The North Patagonian orogenic front and related foreland evolution during the Miocene, analyzed from synorogenic sedimentation and U/Pb dating (˜42°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel E.; Tobal, Jonathan E.; Sagripanti, Lucía; Folguera, Andrés; Orts, Darío L.; Giménez, Mario; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    Miocene sedimentary successions of the Ñirihuau and Collón Cura formations east of the El Maitén Belt constitute a partial record of the Andean exhumation, defining a synorogenic infill of the Ñirihuau Basin in the foothills of the North Patagonian fold and thrust belt. Gravimetric and seismic data allow recognizing the internal arrangement and geometry of these depocenters that host both units, separating a synextensional section previous to the Andean development at these latitudes, from a series of syncontractional units above. A series of progressive unconformities in the upper terms shows the synorogenic character of these units corresponding to the different pulses of deformation that occurred during the middle Miocene. New U-Pb ages constrain these pulses to the ˜13.5-12.9 Ma interval and allow reconstructing the tectonic history of this region based on the detrital zircon source populations. The U-Pb maximum ages of sedimentation give to the Ñirihuau Formation in particular a younger age than previously assumed. Additionally, synsedimentary deformation in strata of the upper exposures of the Collón Cura Formation associated with contractional structures and U-Pb ages allow identifying a younger paleoseismogenic pulse in ˜11.3 Ma. Thus, based on these data and a compilation of previous datasets, a tectonic evolution is proposed characterized by a contractional episode that migrated eastwardly since ˜19 to 15 Ma producing the Gastre broken foreland and then retracted to the eastern North Patagonian Precordillera, where out-of-sequence thrusts cannibalized the wedge top zone in the El Maitén belt at ˜13.5-11.3 Ma.

  8. Toxicological and chemical assessment of ordnance compounds in marine sediments and porewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nipper, M.; Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.; Miller, K.

    2002-01-01

    Toxicological and chemical studies were performed with a silty and a sandy marine sediment spiked with 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl), or 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid). Whole sediment toxicity was analyzed by the 10-day survival test with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita, and porewater toxicity tests assessed macro-algae (Ulva fasciata) zoospore germination and germling growth, sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) embryological development, and polychaete (Dinophilus gyrociliatus) survival and reproduction. Whole sediments spiked with 2,6-DNT were not toxic to amphipods. The fine-grained sediment spiked with tetryl was also not acutely toxic. The tetryl and picric acid LC50 values in the sandy sediment were 3.24 and 144 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. The fine-grained sediment spiked with picric acid generated a U-shaped concentration-response curve in the amphipod test, with increased survival both in the lowest and highest concentration. Grain-size distribution and organic carbon content strongly influenced the behavior of ordnance compounds in spiked sediments. Very low concentrations were measured in some of the treatments and irreversible binding and biodegradation are suggested as the processes responsible for the low measurements. Porewater toxicity varied with its sedimentary origin and with ordnance compound. The sea urchin embryological development test tended to be the least sensitive. Tetryl was the most toxic chemical in all porewater tests, and picric acid the least toxic. Samples spiked with 2,6-DNT contained a degradation product identified as 2-methyl-3-nitroaniline (also known as 2-amino-6-nitrotoluene), and unidentified peaks, possibly degradation products, were also seen in some of the picric acid- and tetryl-spiked samples. Degradation products may have played a role in observed toxicity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Operational Group Sandy technical progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    This report documents results from the March 2013 deployment of the OGS. It includes background information on Hurricane Sandy and the federal response; the OGS methodology; scenarios for Hurricane Sandy’s impact on coastal communities and urban ecosystems; potential interventions to improve regional resilience to future major storms; a discussion of scenario results; and lessons learned about the OGS process.

  10. A Bad Day for Sandy Dayton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duch, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Presents a rear-end car accident scenario to teach about forces and kinetic energy in a problem-based learning format. Includes four parts: (1) "A Bad Day for Sandy Dayton"; (2) "The Emergency Room"; (3) "The Facts of the Case"; and (4) "Judgement Day". Discusses the major issues of the questions, introduces scientific concepts, and initiates…

  11. Post-Sandy, Schools Claw Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2012-01-01

    David Weiss, the superintendent in Long Beach, N.Y., wrestled with a slew of considerations last week as he weighed when to restart school, nine days after Hurricane Sandy wrecked his community. Just one of seven buildings had most of the essentials: electricity, heat, working fire alarms, sewage, and food. And, with many students and staff…

  12. A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Steve K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach…

  13. Comparison of instream methods for measuring hydraulic conductivity in sandy streambeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, M.K.; Rus, D.L.; Edwin, Harvey F.

    2001-01-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) values were determined at seven stream transects in the Platte River Basin in Nebraska using different instream measurement techniques. Values were compared to determine the most appropriate technique(s) for use in sandy streambeds. Values of K determined from field falling- and constant-head permeameter tests analyzed using the Darcy equation decreased as permeameter diameter increased. Seepage meters coupled with hydraulic gradient measurements failed to yield K values in 40% of the trials. Consequently, Darcy permeameter and seepage meter tests were not preferred approaches. In the upper 0.25 m of the streambed, field falling- and constant-head permeameter tests analyzed with the Hvorslev solution generally had similar K values that were significantly greater than those determined using the Hazen grain-size, Bouwer and Rice slug test for anisotropic and isotropic conditions, and Alyamani and Sen grain-size methods; median differences between these tests and the Hvorslev falling-head 60 cm diameter permeameter were about 8, 9, 17, and 35 m/day, respectively. The Hvorslev falling-head permeameter test is considered the most robust method for measuring K of the upper 0.25 m of the streambed because of the inherent limitations of the empirical grain-size methods and less sediment disturbance for permeameter than slug tests. However, lateral variability in K along transects on the Platte, North Platte, and Wood Rivers was greater than variability in K between valid permeameter, grain-size, or slug tests, indicating that the method used may matter less than making enough measurements to characterize spatial variability adequately. At the Platte River tributary sites, the upper 0.3 m of the streambed typically had greater K than sediment located 0.3 to 2.5 m below the streambed surface, indicating that deposits below the streambed may limit ground water/surface water fluxes. The Hvorslev permeameter tests are not a practical

  14. Disentangling diversity patterns in sandy beaches along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Francisco R; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Species richness in sandy beaches is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy beaches with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative beaches. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and beach slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative

  15. Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy Beaches along Environmental Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Francisco R.; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Species richness in sandy beaches is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy beaches with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative beaches. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and beach slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative

  16. Disentangling diversity patterns in sandy beaches along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Francisco R; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Species richness in sandy beaches is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy beaches with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative beaches. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and beach slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative

  17. High-Resolution Sedimentation Rates at IODP Sites U1424 and U1427 since the late Pliocene from spectral-analyzing GRA Bulk Density and RGB Color Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas; Irino, Tomohisa; Tada, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Sedimentation Rates (SRs) for IODP Sites U1424 (lat/lon coordinates: 40o11.40'N, 138o13.90'E; water depth: 2808 mbsl) and U1427 (lat/lon coordinates: 35o57.92'N, 134o26.06'E; water depth: 330 mbsl) were calculated by performing spectral analysis in the depth domain on both RGB color and Gamma-Ray-Attenuation (GRA) bulk density data. Inversion and integration of SRs versus depth from spectral analysis yielded detailed SR profiles in both time and depth domains. Our results show a greater variability in calculated SRs and differed from those established through coarse-scaled biostratigraphy and paleo-magnetic data. Our data analyses produces pulses of distinct high SRs for certain depth/age intervals at both sites, with time lags for such features possibly due to variable oceanographic conditions near-shore for Site U1427 versus those at Site U1424 further offshore. Both GRA and RGB profiles reveal a distinct periodicity in the waveband of Milankovitch cycles and other prominent periodicities in the 10-to-1ky period range. This observation suggests climate variabilities and trends in SRs responding to insolation patterns during the past 1 Myr at both sites and extending to 4.5 Myr for Site U1424. With only few identified eccentricity (100ky) cycle segments throughout the entire normalized spectral amplitude profile, our high-resolution Age-Depth model was tuned to obliquity (41ky) and precessional (19-23ky) cycles to achieving a strong fit with corresponding low-resolution models based on biostratigraphy, paleo-magnetic and, at least for Site U1424, augmenting volcanostratigraphy data. According to our Age-Depth models, relatively low SRs occur when evolutive amplitude spectra are dominated by periods in the range of obliquity and eccentricity. In contrast, significant SR peaks at both sites often occur when strong precessional amplitudes coexist with all other cycles. Lower SRs at Site U1424 have been interpreted to reflect a decrease in diatom flux and relative

  18. Low faunal diversity on Maltese sandy beaches: fact or artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deidun, Alan; Azzopardi, Marthese; Saliba, Stephen; Schembri, Patrick J.

    2003-10-01

    Eight sandy beaches on Malta and two on Gozo were sampled for macrofauna to test the hypothesis that Maltese beaches have an intrinsically low diversity. Stations distributed in the supralittoral (dry zone), mediolittoral (wet zone) and upper infralittoral (submerged zone to 1 m water depth) were sampled by sieving core samples and standardised searching during daytime, and pitfall trapping and standardised sweeping of the water column using a hand-net at night, as appropriate. Physical parameters of the sediment were measured and human occupancy of the beaches was estimated. From the supralittoral and mediolittoral, 39 species represented by 1584 individuals were collected by the combined techniques of pitfall trapping, sieving and standard searching. For Ramla beach, which had the highest diversity, 267 individuals representing 25 infaunal species were collected by sieving from a combined volume of 1.175 m 3 of sand, and 149 individuals representing 28 epifaunal species were collected by standardised searching from a combined area of 700 m 2 of sand during two winter and two summer sampling sessions between 1992 and 1993. For nine other beaches sampled during the summer of 2000, only six macrofaunal species were collected from core samples, with overall population densities ranging from 4.13 to 45.45 individuals m -2. Only 92 individuals belonging to 12 species were collected by hand-net from the uppermost infralittoral of five beaches sampled using this method during the summer of 2000. Taxa of gastropods, bivalves, decapods, mysids and staphylinid beetles generally abundant on Mediterranean sandy beaches, were entirely absent from the beaches sampled. Few correlations that could explain the impoverishment of Maltese sandy beaches were found between physical parameters and faunal abundances, and other factors such as inadequate sampling effort, human disturbance and marine pollution were also excluded; however, seasonally biased sampling may partly explain the

  19. Tropical to extratropical: Marine environmental changes associated with Superstorm Sandy prior to its landfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-12-01

    Superstorm Sandy was a massive storm that impacted the U.S. East Coast on 22-31 October 2012, generating large waves, record storm surges, and major damage. The Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport modeling system was applied to hindcast this storm. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity of air-sea-wave coupling were used to depict characteristics of this immense storm as it underwent tropical to extratropical transition. Regardless of coupling complexity, model-simulated tracks were all similar to the observations, suggesting the storm track was largely determined by large-scale synoptic atmospheric circulation, rather than by local processes resolved through model coupling. Analyses of the sea surface temperature, ocean heat content, and upper atmospheric shear parameters showed that as a result of the extratropical transition and despite the storm encountering much cooler shelf water, its intensity and strength were not significantly impacted. Ocean coupling was not as important as originally thought for Sandy.

  20. Responses of soil fungal community to the sandy grassland restoration in Horqin Sandy Land, northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Kun; Zuo, Xiao-An; Zhao, Xue-Yong; Li, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Lv, Peng; Luo, Yong-Qing; Yun, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Sandy grassland restoration is a vital process including re-structure of soils, restoration of vegetation, and soil functioning in arid and semi-arid regions. Soil fungal community is a complex and critical component of soil functioning and ecological balance due to its roles in organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling following sandy grassland restoration. In this study, soil fungal community and its relationship with environmental factors were examined along a habitat gradient of sandy grassland restoration: mobile dunes (MD), semi-fixed dunes (SFD), fixed dunes (FD), and grassland (G). It was found that species abundance, richness, and diversity of fungal community increased along with the sandy grassland restoration. The sequences analysis suggested that most of the fungal species (68.4 %) belonged to the phylum of Ascomycota. The three predominant fungal species were Pleospora herbarum, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Deconica Montana, accounting for more than one fourth of all the 38 species. Geranomyces variabilis was the subdominant species in MD, Pseudogymnoascus destructans and Mortierella alpine were the subdominant species in SFD, and P. destructans and Fungi incertae sedis were the dominant species in FD and G. The result from redundancy analysis (RDA) and stepwise regression analysis indicated that the vegetation characteristics and soil properties explain a significant proportion of the variation in the fungal community, and aboveground biomass and C:N ratio are the key factors to determine soil fungal community composition during sandy grassland restoration. It was suggested that the restoration of sandy grassland combined with vegetation and soil properties improved the soil fungal diversity. Also, the dominant species was found to be alternative following the restoration of sandy grassland ecosystems.

  1. Soil vapor extraction in sandy soils: influence of airflow rate.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, José Tomás; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria da Conceição M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2008-11-01

    Airflow rate is one of the most important parameters for the soil vapor extraction of contaminated sites, due to its direct influence on the mass transfer occurring during the remediation process. This work reports the study of airflow rate influence on soil vapor extractions, performed in sandy soils contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene. The objectives were: (i) to analyze the influence of airflow rate on the process; (ii) to develop a methodology to predict the remediation time and the remediation efficiency; and (iii) to select the most efficient airflow rate. For dry sandy soils with negligible contents of clay and natural organic matter, containing the contaminants previously cited, it was concluded that: (i) if equilibrium between the pollutants and the different phases present in the soil matrix was reached and if slow diffusion effects did not occur, higher airflow rates exhibited the fastest remediations, (ii) it was possible to predict the remediation time and the efficiency of remediation with errors below 14%; and (iii) the most efficient remediation were reached with airflow rates below 1.2 cm(3)s(-1) standard temperature and pressure conditions.

  2. Rebuilding Emergency Care After Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Smith, Silas W; McStay, Christopher M; Portelli, Ian; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Husk, Gregg; Shah, Nirav R

    2014-04-01

    A freestanding, 911-receiving emergency department was implemented at Bellevue Hospital Center during the recovery efforts after Hurricane Sandy to compensate for the increased volume experienced at nearby hospitals. Because inpatient services at several hospitals remained closed for months, emergency volume increased significantly. Thus, in collaboration with the New York State Department of Health and other partners, the Health and Hospitals Corporation and Bellevue Hospital Center opened a freestanding emergency department without on-site inpatient care. The successful operation of this facility hinged on key partnerships with emergency medical services and nearby hospitals. Also essential was the establishment of an emergency critical care ward and a system to monitor emergency department utilization at affected hospitals. The results of this experience, we believe, can provide a model for future efforts to rebuild emergency care capacity after a natural disaster such as Hurricane Sandy. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-4). PMID:24713152

  3. Spatial Patterns and Natural Recruitment of Native Shrubs in a Semi-arid Sandy Land

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Yang, Hongxiao

    2013-01-01

    Passive restoration depending on native shrubs is an attractive approach for restoring desertified landscapes in semi-arid sandy regions. We sought to understand the relationships between spatial patterns of native shrubs and their survival ability in sandy environments. Furthermore, we applied our results to better understand whether passive restoration is feasible for desertified landscapes in semi-arid sandy regions. The study was conducted in the semi-arid Mu Us sandy land of northern China with the native shrub Artemisia ordosica. We analyzed population structures and patterns of A. ordosica at the edges and centers of land patches where sand was stabilized by A. ordosica-dominated vegetation. Saplings were more aggregated than adults, and both were more aggregated at the patch edges than at the patch centers. At the patch edges, spatial association of the saplings with the adults was mostly positive at distances 0.3–6.6 m, and turned from positive to neutral, and even negative, at other distances. At the patch centers, the saplings were spaced almost randomly around the adults, and their distances from the adults did not seem to affect their locations. A greater number of A. ordosica individuals emerged at the patch edges than at the patch centers. Such patterns may have resulted from their integrative adjustment to specific conditions of soil water supply and sand drift intensity. These findings suggest that in semi-arid sandy regions, native shrubs that are well-adapted to local environments may serve as low-cost and competent ecological engineers that can promote the passive restoration of surrounding patches of mobile sandy land. PMID:23505489

  4. Phosphorus adsorption and desorption potential of stream sediments and field soils in agricultural watersheds.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Sandra C; Nelson, Nathan O; Barnes, Philip L; Keane, Timothy D; Pierzynski, Gary M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus release from stream sediments into water could increase P loads leaving agricultural watersheds and contribute to lag-time between implementation of best management practices and improvement in water quality. Improved understanding of P release from stream sediments can assist in setting water quality goals and designing stream monitoring programs. The objective of this study was to estimate the relative potential of sediments and soils to release P to stream water in two agricultural watersheds. Stream sediments were collected from banks, pools, riffles, and depositional features. Soils were sampled from wheat, row crop, pasture, and manure-amended fields. Sediments and soils were analyzed for equilibrium P concentration at zero net P sorption (EPC0), maximum P adsorption capacity (P(max)), anion exchange extractable P (P(lab)), and degree of P saturation. Dissolved reactive P (DRP) of stream water was monitored. Stream sediment EPC0 was similar to or less than EPC0 from field soils; however, P(lab) of stream sediments was three times less than field soils. Sediments were sandy and had low P(max) due to low oxalate-extractable Fe and Al, which could be explained by stream geomorphology. Manure-amended fields had the highest EPC0 and P(lab) due to continued inputs of manure-based P; however, conventionally fertilized fields also represented an important P source due to their vast extent. Stream water DRP was similar to EPC0 of sediments during base flow and similar to EPC0 of field soils during storm flow. These results indicate that sediments in these streams are a relatively minor P source. PMID:21488503

  5. Atmospheric significance of aeolian salts in the sandy deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.-Q.

    2016-02-01

    Large sandy deserts in the middle latitudes of northwestern China were investigated for soluble salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore the environmental significance of "aeolian salts". Results revealed that aeolian salt variations have a clear relationship with the changing meridional and zonal gradients of the desert locations and the aeolian differentiation effect, but are weakly linked to local geological conditions. Atmospheric depositions of water-soluble chemical species are an important process/source contributing to aeolian salt. Sequential variations of soluble salts in sedimentary profiles interbedded with aeolian and non-aeolian deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications in the hinterland areas of these deserts were further evaluated, based on the constraints of OSL dating and radiocarbon dating data. The results indicate that inorganic salts may be a latent geoproxy in revealing regional palaeoclimatic changes in desert areas for sediments deposited under a single depositional environment, but the interpretation should be more cautious for sediments deposited under diverse depositional conditions. This study presents evidence of the atmospheric origin of aeolian salt in sandy deserts, with limited climatic significance in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

  6. The occurrence of endocrine disrupting compounds in off-shore sediments from the southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Ruczyńska, Wiesława; Szlinder-Richert, Joanna; Drgas, Aleksander

    2016-09-14

    This paper presents the study on the occurrence and spatial distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), butyltin compounds (BTCs), bisphenol A (BPA), and alkylphenols (APs) in sediments. The study focused mainly on off-shore surface sediments collected from the southern Baltic Sea. The pollutant concentrations were as follows: analyzed compounds was highly related to the organic matter content in the sediments. Only BDE-209 concentrations were the highest in sandy sediments collected near the point source of pollution. This suggests the fresh anthropogenic input of BDE-209 into the marine environment. The principal component analysis (PCA) confirms these observations-the distribution of ∑BTCs, NPs, and ∑9PBDEs was mainly determined by the physicochemical properties of the sediments, while the distribution of BDE-209 was also related to other factors, such as proximity to the pollution source. According to the environmental standards applied in this work, NPs, and to a lesser extent TBT, might pose a risk to aquatic life in the present study area as they occur in some sediments in concentrations higher than those that might cause adverse effects on biota. PMID:27461960

  7. The occurrence of endocrine disrupting compounds in off-shore sediments from the southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Ruczyńska, Wiesława; Szlinder-Richert, Joanna; Drgas, Aleksander

    2016-09-14

    This paper presents the study on the occurrence and spatial distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), butyltin compounds (BTCs), bisphenol A (BPA), and alkylphenols (APs) in sediments. The study focused mainly on off-shore surface sediments collected from the southern Baltic Sea. The pollutant concentrations were as follows: analyzed compounds was highly related to the organic matter content in the sediments. Only BDE-209 concentrations were the highest in sandy sediments collected near the point source of pollution. This suggests the fresh anthropogenic input of BDE-209 into the marine environment. The principal component analysis (PCA) confirms these observations-the distribution of ∑BTCs, NPs, and ∑9PBDEs was mainly determined by the physicochemical properties of the sediments, while the distribution of BDE-209 was also related to other factors, such as proximity to the pollution source. According to the environmental standards applied in this work, NPs, and to a lesser extent TBT, might pose a risk to aquatic life in the present study area as they occur in some sediments in concentrations higher than those that might cause adverse effects on biota.

  8. Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

    2009-01-01

    We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not

  9. CMs work overtime in Sandy's wake.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    When Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of Manhattan, Lutheran Medical Center in Brooklyn prepared in advance to handle an influx of patients evacuated from nursing homes and hospitals. Case management staff worked overtime in advance to discharge appropriate patients and free up beds. When evacuated patients came into the emergency department, the staff transferred stable patients to the hospital's own nursing homes and others with available beds, and admitted patients who met inpatient criteria. After the storm passed, case managers worked to discharge more patients to free up beds for injured patients and find placement for patients who presented to the emergency department but didn't meet admission criteria.

  10. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    PubMed

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will

  11. Regime Shift in Sandy Beach Microbial Communities following Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Remediation Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A.

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will

  12. Mediterranean undercurrent sandy contourites, Gulf of Cadiz, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hans, Nelson C.; Baraza, J.; Maldonado, A.

    1993-01-01

    and contourite deposits exhibit reverse graded bedding and sharp upper bed contacts in coarse-grained layers, low deposition rates, and a regional pattern of bedform zones, textural variation, and compositional gradation. The surface sandy contourite layer of 0.2-1.2 m thickness that covers the Gulf of Cadiz slope has formed during the present Holocene high sea level because high sea level results in maximum water depth over the Gibraltar sill and full development of the Mediterranean undercurrent. The late Pleistocene age of the mud underlying the surface sand sheet correlates with the age of the last sea-level lowstand and apparent weak Mediterranean undercurrent development. Thus, the cyclic deposition of sand or mud layers and contourite or drape sequences appear to be related to late Pliocene and Quaternary sea-level changes and Mediterranean water circulation patterns. Since its Pliocene origin, the contourite sequence has had low deposition rates of < 5 cm/1000y on the upper slope and < 13 cm/1000y in the middle slope sediment drift. ?? 1993.

  13. Characteristics of a sandy depositional lobe on the outer Mississippi fan from SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Schwab, William C.; Nelson, C. Hans; Kenyon, Neil H.; Lee, Homa J.

    1992-01-01

    SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images of the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized rather than unconfined transport was the dominant transport mechanism for coarse-grained sediment during the formation of this part of the deep-sea fan. Overbank sheet flow of sands was not an important process in the transport and deposition of the sandy and silty sediment found on this fan. The dendritic distributary pattern and the high order of splaying of the channels, only one of which appears to have been active at a time, suggest that coarse-grained deposits on this fan are laterally discontinuous.

  14. Characteristics of a sandy depositional lobe on the outer Mississippi fan from SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images

    SciTech Connect

    Twichell, D.C.; Schwab, W.C. ); Nelson, C.H.; Lee, H.J. ); Kenyon, N.H. )

    1992-08-01

    SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images of the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized rather than unconfined transport was the dominant transport mechanism for coarse-grained sediment during the formation of this part of the deep-sea fan. Overbank sheet flow of sands was not an important process in the transport and deposition of the sandy and silty sediment found on this fan. The dendritic distributary pattern and the high order of splaying of the channels, only one which appears to have been active at a time, suggest that coarse-grained deposits on this fan are laterally discontinuous.

  15. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  16. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal impact assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: coastal topography and bathymetry, impacts to coastal beaches and barriers, impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology, impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures, impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife. This fact sheet focuses assessing impacts to coastal beaches and barriers.

  17. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  18. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ChemScan UV-6100 is a spectrometry system originally developed by Biotronics Technologies, Inc. under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. It is marketed to the water and wastewater treatment industries, replacing "grab sampling" with on-line data collection. It analyzes the light absorbance characteristics of a water sample, simultaneously detects hundreds of individual wavelengths absorbed by chemical substances in a process solution, and quantifies the information. Spectral data is then processed by ChemScan analyzer and compared with calibration files in the system's memory in order to calculate concentrations of chemical substances that cause UV light absorbance in specific patterns. Monitored substances can be analyzed for quality and quantity. Applications include detection of a variety of substances, and the information provided enables an operator to control a process more efficiently.

  19. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  20. Composition, structure and properties of sediment thermal springs of Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, Violetta; Smolyakov, Pavel; Parfenov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the physical and mechanical properties sediment thermal fields Mutnovsky, Lower Koshelevo and Bannyh (Kamchatka). This multi-component soils, mineral and chemical composition of which depends on the formation factors (pH, temperature, salinity of water, composition and structure of the host volcanic rocks). Samples Lower Koshelevo sediment thermal sources differ in the following composition: smectite, kaolinite, kaolinite-smectite mixed-mineral. Samples of sediment thermal springs Mutnovsky volcano in accordance with the X-ray analysis has the following composition: volcanic glass, crystalline sulfur, plagioclase, smectite, illite-smectite mixed, illite, chlorite, quartz, cristobalite, pyrite, melanterite, kaolinite. Natural moisture content samples of sediment thermal springs from 45 to 121%, hygroscopic moisture content of 1.3 to 3.7%. A large amount of native sulfur (up to 92%) and the presence of amorphous material gives low values of density of solid particles (up to 2.1 g/cm3) samples Mutnovskii thermal field. The values of the density of solids sediment Koshelevo and Bannyh hot springs close to those of the main components of mineral densities (up to 2.6-3.0 g/cm3). The results of the particle size distribution and microaggregate analysis of sediment thermal springs Lower Koshelevo field shows that the predominance observed of particles with a diameter from 0.05 mm to 0.25 mm, the coefficient of soil heterogeneity heterogeneous. In the bottom sediments of the thermal springs of the volcano Mutnovsky poorly traced predominance of one faction. Most prevalent fraction with particle size 0.01 - 0.05 mm. When analyzing the content in the soil microaggregates their content is shifted towards particles with a diameter of 0.25 mm. The contents of a large number of large (1-10 mm), porous rock fragments, due to the deposition of pyroclastic material from the eruptions of the last century. Present in large amounts rounded crystals of native sulfur

  1. BACTERIOPHAGE TRANSPORT IN SANDY SOIL AND FRACTURED TUFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage transport was investigated in laboratory column experiments using sandy soil, a controlled field study in a sandy wash, and laboratory experiments using fractured rock. In the soil columns, the phage MS-2 exhibited significant dispersion and was excluded from 35 to ...

  2. 77 FR 74341 - Establishing the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... person. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, December 7, 2012. [FR Doc. 2012-30310 Filed 12... the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force By the authority vested in me as President by the.... Hurricane Sandy made landfall on October 29, 2012, resulting in major flooding, extensive structural...

  3. Correlation between landscape fragmentation and sandy desertification: a case study in Horqin Sandy Land, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaodong; Dong, Kaikai; Luloff, A E; Wang, Luyao; Xiao, Jun; Wang, Shiying; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The exact roles of landscape fragmentation on sandy desertification are still not fully understood, especially with the impact of different land use types in spatial dimension. Taking patch size and shape into consideration, this paper selected the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index to establish a model that reveals the association between the area of bare sand land and the fragmentation of different land use types adjacent to bare sand land. Results indicated that (1) grass land and arable land contributed the most to landscape fragmentation processes in the regions adjacent to bare sand land during the period 1980 to 2010. Grass land occupied 54 % of the region adjacent to bare sand land in 1980. The Ratio of Patch Size of grass land decreased from 1980 to 2000 and increased after 2000. The Fractal Dimension Index of grass increased during the period 1980 to 1990 and decreased after 1990. Arable land expanded significantly during this period. The Ratio of Patch Size of arable land increased from 1980 to 1990 and decreased since 1990. The Fractal Dimension Index of arable land increased from 1990 to 2000 and decreased after 2000. (2) The Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were significantly related to the area of bare sand land. The role of landscape fragmentation was not linear to sandy desertification. There were both positive and negative effects of landscape fragmentation on sandy desertification. In 1980, the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were negatively related to the area of bare sand land, showing that the landscape fragmentation and regularity of patches contributed to the expansion of sandy desertification. In 1990, 2000, and 2010, the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were mostly positively related to the area of bare sand land, showing the landscape fragmentation and regularity of patches contributed to the reversion of sandy desertification in this phase. The absolute values of

  4. Correlation between landscape fragmentation and sandy desertification: a case study in Horqin Sandy Land, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaodong; Dong, Kaikai; Luloff, A E; Wang, Luyao; Xiao, Jun; Wang, Shiying; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The exact roles of landscape fragmentation on sandy desertification are still not fully understood, especially with the impact of different land use types in spatial dimension. Taking patch size and shape into consideration, this paper selected the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index to establish a model that reveals the association between the area of bare sand land and the fragmentation of different land use types adjacent to bare sand land. Results indicated that (1) grass land and arable land contributed the most to landscape fragmentation processes in the regions adjacent to bare sand land during the period 1980 to 2010. Grass land occupied 54 % of the region adjacent to bare sand land in 1980. The Ratio of Patch Size of grass land decreased from 1980 to 2000 and increased after 2000. The Fractal Dimension Index of grass increased during the period 1980 to 1990 and decreased after 1990. Arable land expanded significantly during this period. The Ratio of Patch Size of arable land increased from 1980 to 1990 and decreased since 1990. The Fractal Dimension Index of arable land increased from 1990 to 2000 and decreased after 2000. (2) The Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were significantly related to the area of bare sand land. The role of landscape fragmentation was not linear to sandy desertification. There were both positive and negative effects of landscape fragmentation on sandy desertification. In 1980, the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were negatively related to the area of bare sand land, showing that the landscape fragmentation and regularity of patches contributed to the expansion of sandy desertification. In 1990, 2000, and 2010, the Ratio of Patch Size and the Fractal Dimension Index were mostly positively related to the area of bare sand land, showing the landscape fragmentation and regularity of patches contributed to the reversion of sandy desertification in this phase. The absolute values of

  5. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

    2014-01-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0 m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols. PMID:24670631

  6. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

    2014-03-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0 m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols.

  7. Defibrillator analyzers.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Defibrillator analyzers automate the inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) testing of defibrillators. They need to be able to test at least four basic defibrillator performance characteristics: discharge energy, synchronized-mode operation, automated external defibrillation, and ECG monitoring. We prefer that they also be able to test a defibrillator's external noninvasive pacing function--but this is not essential if a facility already has a pacemaker analyzer that can perform this testing. In this Evaluation, we tested seven defibrillator analyzers from six suppliers. All seven units accurately measure the energies of a variety of discharge wave-forms over a wide range of energy levels--from 1 J for use in a neonatal intensive care unit to 360 J for use on adult patients requiring maximum discharge energy. Most of the analyzers are easy to use. However, only three of the evaluated units could perform the full range of defibrillator tests that we prefer. We rated these units Acceptable--Preferred. Three more units could perform four of the five tests, they could not test the pacing feature of a defibrillator. These units were rated Acceptable. The seventh unit could perform only discharge energy testing and synchronized-mode testing and was difficult to use. We rate that unit Acceptable--Not Recommended. PMID:10604089

  8. Setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Linda; Nel, Ronel; Holness, Stephen; Sink, Kerry; Schoeman, David

    2014-10-01

    Representative and adequate reserve networks are key to conserving biodiversity. This begs the question, how much of which features need to be placed in protected areas? Setting specifically-derived conservation targets for most ecosystems is common practice; however, this has never been done for sandy beaches. The aims of this paper, therefore, are to propose a methodology for setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems; and to pilot the proposed method using data describing biodiversity patterns and processes from microtidal beaches in South Africa. First, a classification scheme of valued features of beaches is constructed, including: biodiversity features; unique features; and important processes. Second, methodologies for setting targets for each feature under different data-availability scenarios are described. From this framework, targets are set for features characteristic of microtidal beaches in South Africa, as follows. 1) Targets for dune vegetation types were adopted from a previous assessment, and ranged 19-100%. 2) Targets for beach morphodynamic types (habitats) were set using species-area relationships (SARs). These SARs were derived from species richness data from 142 sampling events around the South African coast (extrapolated to total theoretical species richness estimates using previously-established species-accumulation curve relationships), plotted against the area of the beach (calculated from Google Earth imagery). The species-accumulation factor (z) was 0.22, suggesting a baseline habitat target of 27% is required to protect 75% of the species. This baseline target was modified by heuristic principles, based on habitat rarity and threat status, with final values ranging 27-40%. 3) Species targets were fixed at 20%, modified using heuristic principles based on endemism, threat status, and whether or not beaches play an important role in the species' life history, with targets ranging 20-100%. 4) Targets for processes and 5

  9. Mechanisms for subcritical penetration into a sandy bottom: experimental and modeling results

    PubMed

    Maguer; Fox; Schmidt; Pouliquen; Bovio

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a recent study whose overall objectives are to determine the mechanisms contributing significantly to subcritical acoustic penetration into ocean sediments, and to quantify the results for use in sonar performance prediction for the detection of buried objects. In situ acoustic measurements were performed on a sandy bottom whose geoacoustical and geomorphological properties were also measured. A parametric array mounted on a tower moving on a rail was used to insonify hydrophones located above and below the sediment interface. Data covering grazing angles both above and below the nominal critical angle and in the frequency range 2-15 kHz were acquired and processed. The results are compared to two models that account for scattering of sound at the rough water-sediment interface into the sediment. Although all possible mechanisms for subcritical penetration are not modeled, the levels predicted by both models are consistent with the levels observed in the experimental data. For the specific seafloor and experimental conditions examined, the analysis suggests that for frequencies below 5-7 kHz sound penetration into the sediment at subcritical insonification is dominated by the evanescent field, while scattering due to surface roughness is the dominant mechanism at higher frequencies.

  10. Physical criteria for distinguishing sandy tsunami and storm deposits using modern examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Modern subaerial sand beds deposited by major tsunamis and hurricanes were compared at trench, transect, and sub-regional spatial scales to evaluate which attributes are most useful for distinguishing the two types of deposits. Physical criteria that may be diagnostic include: sediment composition, textures and grading, types and organization of stratification, thickness, geometry, and landscape conformity. Published reports of Pacific Ocean tsunami impacts and our field observations suggest that sandy tsunami deposits are generally 30 cm thick, generally extend The distinctions between tsunami and storm deposits are related to differences in the hydrodynamics and sediment-sorting processes during transport. Tsunami deposition results from a few high-velocity, long-period waves that entrain sediment from the shoreface, beach, and landward erosion zone. Tsunamis can have flow depths greater than 10 m, transport sediment primarily in suspension, and distribute the load over a broad region where sediment falls out of suspension when flow decelerates. In contrast, storm inundation generally is gradual and prolonged, consisting of many waves that erode beaches and dunes with no significant overland return flow until after the main flooding. Storm flow depths are commonly

  11. Uranium Redistribution Due to Water Table Fluctuations in Sandy Wetland Mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Emily R; Huang, Shan; Koster van Groos, Paul G; Scheckel, Kirk G; Qafoku, Odeta; Peacock, Aaron D; Kaplan, Daniel I; Jaffé, Peter R

    2015-10-20

    To understand better the fate and stability of immobilized uranium (U) in wetland sediments, and how intermittent dry periods affect U stability, we dosed saturated sandy wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl acetate for 4 months before imposing a short drying and rewetting period. Concentrations of U in mesocosm effluent increased after drying and rewetting, but the cumulative amount of U released following the dry period constituted less than 1% of the total U immobilized in the soil during the 4 months prior. This low level of remobilization suggests, and XANES analyses confirm, that microbial reduction was not the primary means of U immobilization, as the U immobilized in mesocosms was primarily U(VI) rather than U(IV). Drying followed by rewetting caused a redistribution of U downward in the soil profile and to root surfaces. Although the U on roots before drying was primarily associated with minerals, the U that relocated to the roots during drying and rewetting was bound diffusely. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a sandy wetland, which expose reduced sediments to air, may impact U distribution without causing large releases of soil-bound U to surface waters. PMID:26404564

  12. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Axiomatics Corporation developed a shunting Dielectric Sensor to determine the nutrient level and analyze plant nutrient solutions in the CELSS, NASA's space life support program. (CELSS is an experimental facility investigating closed-cycle plant growth and food processing for long duration manned missions.) The DiComp system incorporates a shunt electrode and is especially sensitive to changes in dielectric property changes in materials at measurements much lower than conventional sensors. The analyzer has exceptional capabilities for predicting composition of liquid streams or reactions. It measures concentrations and solids content up to 100 percent in applications like agricultural products, petrochemicals, food and beverages. The sensor is easily installed; maintenance is low, and it can be calibrated on line. The software automates data collection and analysis.

  13. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  14. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  15. Contribution of phytoplankton and benthic microalgae to inner shelf sediments of the north-central Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grippo, M. A.; Fleeger, J. W.; Rabalais, N. N.; Condrey, R.; Carman, K. R.

    2010-03-01

    Marine sediment may contain both settled phytoplankton and benthic microalgae (BMA). In river-dominated, shallow continental shelf systems, spatial, and temporal heterogeneity in sediment type and water-column characteristics (e.g., turbidity and primary productivity) may promote spatial variation in the relative contribution of these two sources to the sediment organic matter pool available to benthic consumers. Here we use photosynthetic pigment analysis and microscopic examination of sediment microalgae to investigate how the biomass, composition, and degradation state of sediment-associated microalgae vary along the Louisiana (USA) inner shelf, a region strongly influenced by the Mississippi River. Three sandy shoals and surrounding muddy sediments with depths ranging from 4 to 20 m were sampled in April, August, and October 2007. Pigment composition suggested that sediment microalgae were primarily diatoms at all locations. We found no significant differences in sediment chlorophyll a concentrations (8-77 mg m -2) at the shoal and off-shoal stations. Epipelic pennate diatoms (considered indicative of BMA) made up a significantly greater proportion of sediment diatoms at sandy (50-98%) compared to more silty off-shoal stations (16-56%). The percentage of centric diatoms (indicators of settled phytoplankton) in the sediment was highest in August. Sediment total pheopigment concentrations on sandy stations (<20 mg m -2) were significantly lower than concentrations at nearby muddy stations (>40 mg m -2), suggesting differences in sediment microalgal degradation state. These observations suggest that BMA predominate in shallow sandy sediments and that phytodetritus predominates at muddy stations. Our results also suggest that the relative proportion of phytodetritus in the benthos was highest where phytoplankton biomass in the overlying water was greatest, independent of sediment type. The high biomass of BMA found on shoals suggests that benthic primary production

  16. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  17. Rediscovering community--reflections after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    See, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hoboken, New Jersey, is a town of 50,000 residents located across the Hudson River from New York City. Most of Hoboken's infrastructure was compromised during Hurricane Sandy as a result of flooding and power outages that rendered many businesses inoperable, including all of the pharmacies in town. Despite a focus on emergency preparedness since Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, there were no contingencies in place to facilitate and assess the medication needs of the community in the event of a natural disaster. This essay describes how the author rediscovered the meaning of community, and through working with colleagues in other health care disciplines and non-health care volunteers, provided care to patients in suboptimal circumstances.

  18. Hurricane Sandy science plan: New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Clarice N.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is one of the largest providers of geologic and hydrologic information in the world. Federal, State, and local partners depend on the USGS science to know how to prepare for hurricane hazards and reduce losses from future hurricanes. The USGS works closely with other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many State and local agencies to identify their information needs before, during, and after hurricanes.

  19. Rediscovering community--reflections after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    See, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hoboken, New Jersey, is a town of 50,000 residents located across the Hudson River from New York City. Most of Hoboken's infrastructure was compromised during Hurricane Sandy as a result of flooding and power outages that rendered many businesses inoperable, including all of the pharmacies in town. Despite a focus on emergency preparedness since Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, there were no contingencies in place to facilitate and assess the medication needs of the community in the event of a natural disaster. This essay describes how the author rediscovered the meaning of community, and through working with colleagues in other health care disciplines and non-health care volunteers, provided care to patients in suboptimal circumstances. PMID:24218382

  20. Sources, Transport, and Storage of Sediment at Selected Sites in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, Allen C.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Pavich, Milan J.; Landwehr, Jurate M.; Banks, William S.L.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Langland, Michael J.; Ritchie, Jerry C.; Reuter, Joanna M.

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Watershed covers 165,800 square kilometers and is supplied with water and sediment from five major physiographic provinces: Appalachian Plateau, Blue Ridge, Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and the Valley and Ridge. Suspended-sediment loads measured in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed showed that the Piedmont Physiographic Province has the highest rates of modern (20th Century) sediment yields, measured at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations, and the lowest rates of background or geologic rates of erosion (~10,000 years) measured with in situ beryllium-10. In the agricultural and urbanizing Little Conestoga Creek Watershed, a Piedmont watershed, sources of sediment using the 'sediment-fingerprinting' approach showed that streambanks were the most important source (63 percent), followed by cropland (37 percent). Cesium-137 inventories, which quantify erosion rates over a 40-year period, showed average cropland erosion of 19.39 megagrams per hectare per year in the Little Conestoga Creek Watershed. If this erosion rate is extrapolated to the 13 percent of the watershed that is in cropland, then cropland could contribute almost four times the measured suspended-sediment load transported out of the watershed (27,600 megagrams per hectare per year), indicating that much of the eroded sediment is being deposited in channel and upland storage. The Piedmont has had centuries of land-use change, from forest to agriculture, to suburban and urban areas, and in some areas, back to forest. These land-use changes mobilized a large percentage of sediment that was deposited in upland and channel storage, and behind thousands of mill dams. The effects of these land-use changes on erosion and sediment transport are still being observed today as stored sediment in streambanks is a source of sediment. Cropland is also an important source of sediment. The Coastal Plain Physiographic Province has had the lowest sediment yields in the 20th Century and with sandy

  1. Paleoenvironment interpretation of a 1760 years B.P. old sediment in a mangrove area of the Bay of Guanabara, using pollen analysis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ortrud M; São-Thiago, Luiz E U; Barros, Marcia A

    2006-06-01

    A sediment sample was obtained at 122 cm from the top of a drilling core in the Guapimirim mangrove, Bay of Guanabara, and analyzed using pollen analysis. This muddy core reached a sandy ground at 133 cm. 14C datation got the age of 1760 +/- 50 years B.P. The most frequent pollen grains were mangrove species of Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia schaueriana. "Restinga" and tropical rain forest vegetation was recognized behind the mangrove. After the last sea transgression at 2500 years B.P., the water level lowered to its actual size, allowing the installation of this mangrove. PMID:16710562

  2. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  3. Tsunami inundation and sediment transport in a sediment-limited embayment on American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, A.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Jaffe, B.; Watt, Sebastian; Peck, B.; Buckley, M.; Stevens, A.

    2011-01-01

    Field observations and numerical simulations are used to explore tsunami inundation and sediment transport in an embayment (Fagafue Bay) on the north side of Tutuila, American Samoa during the 29 September 2009 South Pacific tsunami. Field observations of the nearshore bathymetry and topography, tsunami flow depth and sediment deposition, and extent of movable sandy sediment remaining on the beach were collected during two field surveys approximately two and five weeks after the tsunami. Onshore measurements of flow depth at forty-eight locations indicate the wave inundated almost 250. m onshore with a depth exceeding 7. m locally. The tsunami deposited patchy areas of sediment up to 0.2. m thick interspersed with a thin dusting (< 0.01 m) of sandy sediment throughout most of the inundated area. A numerical simulation based on the best available topography and bathymetry and a simplified offshore wave forcing is calibrated with the onshore flow observations. The calibrated model is used to simulate tsunami-induced sediment transport within and onshore of both the actual embayment and several idealized embayments. The simulations show that the onshore deposition of sediment can be affected by more than 50% by both the amount of sediment available for transport and the steepness of the onshore topography, suggesting these effects may need to be considered when interpreting tsunami deposits.

  4. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches.

    PubMed

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development.

  5. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C.; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A.

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development.

  6. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches.

    PubMed

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development. PMID:27376939

  7. Stress Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    SPATE 900 Dynamic Stress Analyzer is an acronym for Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission. It detects stress-induced temperature changes in a structure and indicates the degree of stress. Ometron, Inc.'s SPATE 9000 consists of a scan unit and a data display. The scan unit contains an infrared channel focused on the test structure to collect thermal radiation, and a visual channel used to set up the scan area and interrogate the stress display. Stress data is produced by detecting minute temperature changes, down to one-thousandth of a degree Centigrade, resulting from the application to the structure of dynamic loading. The electronic data processing system correlates the temperature changes with a reference signal to determine stress level.

  8. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  9. Geomorphic response of the Sandy River, Oregon, to removal of Marmot Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Podolak, Charles J.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Grant, Gordon E.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Pittman, Smokey; Bragg, Heather M.; Wallick, J. Rose; Tanner, Dwight Q.; Rhode, Abagail; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    The October 2007 breaching of a temporary cofferdam constructed during removal of the 15-meter (m)-tall Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, triggered a rapid sequence of fluvial responses as ~730,000 cubic meters (m3) of sand and gravel filling the former reservoir became available to a high-gradient river. Using direct measurements of sediment transport, photogrammetry, airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys, and, between transport events, repeat ground surveys of the reservoir reach and channel downstream, we monitored the erosion, transport, and deposition of this sediment in the hours, days, and months following breaching of the cofferdam. Rapid erosion of reservoir sediment led to exceptional suspended-sediment and bedload-sediment transport rates near the dam site, as well as to elevated transport rates at downstream measurement sites in the weeks and months after breaching. Measurements of sediment transport 0.4 kilometers (km) downstream of the dam site during and following breaching show a spike in the transport of fine suspended sediment within minutes after breaching, followed by high rates of suspended-load and bedload transport of sand. Significant transport of gravel bedload past the measurement site did not begin until 18 to 20 hours after breaching. For at least 7 months after breaching, bedload transport rates just below the dam site during high flows remained as much as 10 times above rates measured upstream of the dam site and farther downstream. The elevated sediment load was derived from eroded reservoir sediment, which began eroding when a meters-tall knickpoint migrated about 200 m upstream in the first hour after breaching. Rapid knickpoint migration triggered vertical incision and bank collapse in unconsolidated sand and gravel, leading to rapid channel widening. Over the following days and months, the knickpoint migrated upstream more slowly, simultaneously decreasing in height and becoming less distinct. Within 7 months

  10. The impact of onsite wastewater disposal systems on groundwater in areas inundated by Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Irene; Phillips, Patrick; Colella, Kaitlyn; Fisher, Shawn C.; Tagliaferri, Tristen N.; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal onsite wastewater disposal systems (OWDS) were inundated by Hurricane Sandy's storm tide. This study compares the shallow groundwater quality (nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) downgradient of OWDS before and after Hurricane Sandy, where available, and establishes a baseline for wastewater influence on groundwater in coastal communities inundated by Hurricane Sandy. Nutrients and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were detected in shallow groundwater downgradient of OWDS in two settings along the New Jersey and New York coastlines: 1) a single, centralized OWDS in a park; and 2) multiple OWDS (cesspools) in low-density residential and mixed-use/medium density residential areas. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were lidocaine (40%), carbamazepine (36%), and fexofenadine, bupropion, desvenlafaxine, meprobamate, and tramadol (24–32%). Increases in the number and total concentration of pharmaceuticals after Hurricane Sandy may reflect other factors (seasonality, usage) besides inundation, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing for a wide variety of CECs in regional studies.

  11. The impact of onsite wastewater disposal systems on groundwater in areas inundated by Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Irene J; Phillips, Patrick J; Colella, Kaitlyn M; Fisher, Shawn C; Tagliaferri, Tristen; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T

    2016-06-30

    Coastal onsite wastewater disposal systems (OWDS) were inundated by Hurricane Sandy's storm tide. This study compares the shallow groundwater quality (nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) downgradient of OWDS before and after Hurricane Sandy, where available, and establishes a baseline for wastewater influence on groundwater in coastal communities inundated by Hurricane Sandy. Nutrients and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were detected in shallow groundwater downgradient of OWDS in two settings along the New Jersey and New York coastlines: 1) a single, centralized OWDS in a park; and 2) multiple OWDS (cesspools) in low-density residential and mixed-use/medium density residential areas. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were lidocaine (40%), carbamazepine (36%), and fexofenadine, bupropion, desvenlafaxine, meprobamate, and tramadol (24-32%). Increases in the number and total concentration of pharmaceuticals after Hurricane Sandy may reflect other factors (seasonality, usage) besides inundation, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing for a wide variety of CECs in regional studies.

  12. The impact of onsite wastewater disposal systems on groundwater in areas inundated by Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Irene J; Phillips, Patrick J; Colella, Kaitlyn M; Fisher, Shawn C; Tagliaferri, Tristen; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T

    2016-06-30

    Coastal onsite wastewater disposal systems (OWDS) were inundated by Hurricane Sandy's storm tide. This study compares the shallow groundwater quality (nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) downgradient of OWDS before and after Hurricane Sandy, where available, and establishes a baseline for wastewater influence on groundwater in coastal communities inundated by Hurricane Sandy. Nutrients and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were detected in shallow groundwater downgradient of OWDS in two settings along the New Jersey and New York coastlines: 1) a single, centralized OWDS in a park; and 2) multiple OWDS (cesspools) in low-density residential and mixed-use/medium density residential areas. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were lidocaine (40%), carbamazepine (36%), and fexofenadine, bupropion, desvenlafaxine, meprobamate, and tramadol (24-32%). Increases in the number and total concentration of pharmaceuticals after Hurricane Sandy may reflect other factors (seasonality, usage) besides inundation, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing for a wide variety of CECs in regional studies. PMID:27261279

  13. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  14. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  15. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  16. [Distribution and seasonal dynamics of meiofauna in intertidal zone of Qingdao sandy beaches, Shandong Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Li, Ha; Hua, Er; Zhang, Zhi-Nan

    2012-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the abundance, group composition, and distribution of meiofauna at the Second Beach of Taiping Bay and the Shilaoren Beach in Qingdao in January, April, July, and October 2008, aimed to analyze the distribution and seasonal dynamics of meiofauna in the intertidal zone of Qingdao sandy beaches. The measurements of environmental factors, including sediment grain size, interstitial water salinity, interstitial water temperature, organic matter content (TOC), and chlorophyll a (Chl a) content, were made simultaneously. There existed obvious seasonal differences in the environment factors, which could be clustered into two groups, i. e. , spring-winter group (January and April) and summer-autumn group (July and October). At the Second Beach of Taiping Bay, the mean annual abundance of meiofauna was (1167.3 +/- 768.3) ind x 10 cm(-2), and the most dominant group was Nematoda, accounting for 91% of the total. The meiofaunal group composition and abundance at the Second Beach differed horizontally, with the abundance ranked as high tide zone < middle tide zone < low tide zone. The meiofaunal group composition and abundance also varied seasonally, with high values in spring/winter and low values in summer/autumn (spring > winter > autumn > summer). The vertical distribution of the meiofauna in the high and middle tide zones of the Second Beach varied seasonally too. The meiofauna migrated downward with increasing temperature, concentrated in surface layer in winter and migrated downward in summer. At the Shilaoren Beach, the mean annual abundance of meiofauna was (1130.2 +/- 1419.1) ind x 10 cm(-2), and Nematoda accounted for 85% of the total. There was a great similarity of the environmental factors in the middle tide zone of the Second Beach and Shilaoren Beach, which led to no differences in the meiofaunal group composition and abundance. However, the vertical distribution of the meiofauna differed between the two beaches. When the

  17. Vertical variation of potential mobility of heavy metal in sediment to groundwater of the Kanto plain, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S.; Hachinohe, S.; Ishiyama, T.; Hamamoto, H.; Oguchi, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals release from sediment may occur due to sediment water interaction under different changing environmental conditions. This has substantial influence on groundwater quality. However, identification of potentially mobile fractions of metals like Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Mn and Ti requires for the sustainable land and groundwater development and pollution management. 44 sediment and pore water samples at 1 m interval were analyzed from a vertical profile beneath the Naka river at the bottom of Central Kanto plain, Japan. Sequential extraction method was applied to determine potentially mobile forms of metals such as water soluble, ion exchangeable, acid soluble and Fe-Mn oxide bound. Metals were determined using X-Ray Fluorescence, Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometer. Analyses show that potential mobility is high in river bed, volcanic ash mix, marine and transitional clayey silt. Metal mobility was higher in lower gravelly aquifer than upper sandy aquifer. Potential mobility and bioavailability of Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb and Mn are very high in river bed sediment which may pose threat to river bottom aquatic system. Zn, Cu and Ni concentration in pore water is high in river bed and peat bearing sediment. In pore water of marine and transitional sediment ion concentration such as Ca2+ and SO42- is very high indicating high mobility of Calcium and Sulfur from sediment as no significant variation observed in total content. In vertical profile, potential mobility tendency of metal in sediment trends to be Zn > Cu > Ni > Cr > Pb > Mn > Fe > Ti. Current study indicates low potential mobility and pollution risk to groundwater due to overall low metal concentration in pore water and high portion of metals attached with sediment as Fe-Mn oxide bound. More over under strong reducing condition considerable amount of metals will release and pollute groundwater.

  18. GOES-13 Sees Life and Death of Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of satellite imagery shows the life of Hurricane Sandy from its development in the Caribbean Sea on Oct. 21, through its track up the U.S. East coast and landfall. The animation cont...

  19. On the Impact Angle of Hurricane Sandy's New Jersey Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy's track crossed the New Jersey coastline at an angle closer to perpendicular than any previous hurricane in the historic record, one of the factors contributing to recordsetting peak-water levels in parts of New Jersey and New York. To estimate the occurrence rate of Sandy-like tracks, we use a stochastic model built on historical hurricane data from the entire North Atlantic to generate a large sample of synthetic hurricanes. From this synthetic set we calculate that under long-term average climate conditions, a hurricane of Sandy's intensity or greater (category 1+) makes NJ landfall at an angle at least as close to perpendicular as Sandy's at an average annual rate of 0.0014 yr-1 (95% confidence range 0.0007 to 0.0023); i.e., a return period of 714 years (95% confidence range 435 to 1429).

  20. Model projections of atmospheric steering of Sandy-like superstorms.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Polvani, Lorenzo M; Sobel, Adam H

    2013-09-17

    Superstorm Sandy ravaged the eastern seaboard of the United States, costing a great number of lives and billions of dollars in damage. Whether events like Sandy will become more frequent as anthropogenic greenhouse gases continue to increase remains an open and complex question. Here we consider whether the persistent large-scale atmospheric patterns that steered Sandy onto the coast will become more frequent in the coming decades. Using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 multimodel ensemble, we demonstrate that climate models consistently project a decrease in the frequency and persistence of the westward flow that led to Sandy's unprecedented track, implying that future atmospheric conditions are less likely than at present to propel storms westward into the coast.

  1. Using Repeat LiDAR Surveys to Determine the Geomorphic Changes Related the Removal of the Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzek, C. D.; Ely, L. L.; O'Connor, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The removal of the Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon in October 2007 released an estimated 430,000 m3 of sand and gravel downstream. Field surveys by Major and others (Major and others, USGS Professional Paper 1792) following the dam removal documented deposition of nearly half of the eroded sediment (215,000 m3) in the first 2 km downstream of the dam within a year of breaching. However, the fate of more than 200,000 m3 of chiefly sand transported farther downstream is uncertain. In the current study, five sequential LiDAR data sets from 2006 to 2011 were used to quantify sediment storage and erosion in the 40 km from the former dam site to the confluence with the Columbia River to track the downstream movement of the sediment released from the reservoir. We hypothesized that a pulse of sediment from the dam removal would be distinguished by a successive downstream growth of sediment bars through time. The LiDAR imagery includes two data sets acquired before the dam removal and three afterward. Geomorphic Change Detection software (GCD) (gcd.joewheaton.org) was used to quantify the locations and volume of sediment erosion and deposition through the successive years of LiDAR imagery. GCD allows for error assessment of each LiDAR-derived digital elevation map (DEM) and propagates the combined errors when differencing two repeat surveys. This process allows creation of DEM of Difference (DoD) maps with associated uncertainty estimates. Preliminary results of the LiDAR analysis agree with the previous field estimates of deposition within the first 2 km from the former dam. Following the initial phase of deposition immediately downstream of the dam breach, the subsequent surveys (2008-2011) show an erosional front beginning to migrate downstream through the newly deposited sediment. Many of the sediment bars still remained in 2011, but were reduced in size. After calibrating the model in the 2-km reach below the dam, we analyzed the additional 38 km of channel

  2. Timing of turbidite sedimentation on the Mississippi Fan

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, V. ); Perlmutter, M.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Sandy turbidite sedimentation on the Mississippi Fan, initiated during the falling and maximum relative lowstand stages of sea level during the last glacio-eustatic cycle, was significant well into the mid to late sea level during the last glacio-eustatic cycle, was significant well into the mid to late sea level rise until the Holocene, 12,000-11,000 yr B.P. or slightly thereafter. Several factors suggest this late continuation of sandy turbidite sedimentation: (1) landward extension of the Mississippi Canyon into the mid-shelf water depths as sea level rose, (2) a major increase in glacial meltwater discharge and sediment loads (pebble to clay size) delivered directly to the head of the canyon by the Mississippi River during the rising sea level, (3) probable persistent interception of longshore drift by the canyon as it eroded landward, (4) steep gradients at the head of the canyon that favored slumping of depocenters and formation of turbidity currents, and (5) absence of expected coarse-grained lithologies and deltaic stratal patterns within the canyon, indicating sediment bypass through the canyon into deep water. The late sand-prone turbidite sedimentation inferred for the Mississippi Fan is compatible with the occurrence of sandy turbidites in the middle Amazon Fan subsequent to 13,285 [+-] 650 yr B.P. and significant deposition of turbidites and clastics until the Holocene elsewhere in the deep ocean. Sand-prone turbidite sedimentation into the middle/late rise of sea level is in contrast to the common perception of sequence-stratigraphic models. This perception assumes that turbidite and fan sedimentation occurs mainly during falling. Maximum lowstand, and early rise of sea level. Late continuation of significant sandy turbidite sedimentation will impact concepts of subsurface stratigraphic calibration, interferences of depositional systems, and reservoir predictions. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Extension of 239+240Pu sediment geochronology to coarse-grained marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuehl, Steven A.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment geochronology of coastal sedimentary environments dominated by sand has been extremely limited because concentrations of natural and bomb-fallout radionuclides are often below the limit of measurement using standard techniques. ICP-MS analyses of 239+240Pu from two sites representative of traditionally challenging (i.e., low concentration) environments provide a "proof of concept" and demonstrate a new application for bomb-fallout radiotracers in the study of sandy shelf-seabed dynamics. A kasten core from the New Zealand shelf in the Southern Hemisphere (low fallout), and a vibracore from the sandy nearshore of North Carolina (low particle surface area) both reveal measurable 239+240Pu activities at depth. In the case of the New Zealand site, independently verified steady-state sedimentation results in a 239+240Pu profile that mimics the expected atmospheric fallout. The depth profile of 239+240Pu in the North Carolina core is more uniform, indicating significant sediment resuspension, which would be expected in this energetic nearshore environment. This study, for the first time, demonstrates the utility of 239+240Pu in the study of sandy environments, significantly extending the application of bomb-fallout isotopes to coarse-grained sediments, which compose the majority of nearshore regions.

  4. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Mathilde I; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2008-12-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a time-course experiment was performed under laboratory conditions. Earthworms were incubated in perspex columns filled with sandy soil (2% organic matter, 2.9% clay) or loamy clay soil (15% organic matter, 20% clay), and surface casts were collected after up to 80 days. On the sandy soil, A. caliginosa and L. rubellus brought approximately 7.1-16 g dry wt. casts/g fresh wt. earthworm to the surface, which is significantly more than A. chlorotica and L. terrestris (2.5-5.0 g dry wt./g fresh wt.). A. caliginosa was the only species that produced significantly more surface casts in the sandy soil than in the loamy clay soil. In the loamy clay soil, no differences in biomass-corrected casting rates were found among the species. Surface casting rates tended to decrease after 20 days. Considering the densities of the different species in a Dutch floodplain area Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden, surface cast production is estimated to amount to 2.0 kg dry soil/m2 after 80 days, which could be extrapolated to 2.7-9.1 kg/m2 per year. These amounts correspond to a surface deposition of a layer of approximately 1.9-6.5 mm/year, which is of the same order or even slightly higher than the sedimentation rate and much higher than the amount of soil brought to the soil surface by bioturbating small mammals. PMID:18771792

  5. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities. PMID:26173013

  6. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, G C; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Yang, X E; Yu, S; Calvert, D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1,183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils.

  7. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities.

  8. Shoreline change patterns in sandy coasts. A case study in SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, Laura; Gracia, F. Javier; Benavente, Javier

    2013-08-01

    Coastal changes on sandy shorelines are continuous and occur at diverse spatial and temporal scales. Gaining knowledge on beach change processes increases our capability to manage risks, especially shoreline erosion, affecting the increasing population living in coastal areas. Processes and factors involved in medium- and short-term beach changes depend on the morphological and dynamic characteristics of the coast. In this work, the decadal behaviour of 58 sandy beaches along the 150 km long South-Atlantic coast of Spain, between the Guadalquivir river mouth and the Strait of Gibraltar, is analysed in order to investigate the relationships between shoreline change patterns and the diverse morphological and dynamic factors controlling beach evolution in the area. For this purpose, georectified aerial photographs spanning the period 1956-2008 were compared in a GIS environment to calculate rates of shoreline change. Short-term evolution of beach profiles was also analysed in selected areas of interest. Results show that the study area exhibits a great variety of shoreline evolution trends, with erosion prevailing in the northern and central sectors and stability or even accretion in the southern sector. In general, sediment availability is the main factor determining coastal erodibility in the area, largely conditioned by the reduction in fluvial sediment supply caused by river basin regulation. Nearshore bathymetry also has a great significance, as it controls wave refraction-diffraction patterns and wave energy concentration on certain zones. Human interventions on the coast also represent a major influence on beach erodibility in the study area. Severe detrimental effects are caused at certain points by shore-normal engineering structures blocking longshore drift. Additionally extensive urban development in backbeach environments has a significant influence on the sediment budget at certain areas. On the basis of these results, a morphological and evolutionary

  9. Statistical Analysis of Small-Scale Bedforms Formed by Hurricane Sandy Offshore Fire Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, K.; Goff, J. A.; Wood, L. J.; Flood, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry surveys acquired two months after hurricane Sandy offshore of Fire Island, NY, revealed broad areas of small-scale (<15 m) bedforms on top of large-scale (200-3000 m) sand ridges and sorted bedforms. The small-scale bedforms were absent prior to the hurricane, as evidenced by previous surveys in 2003 and 2011. Here we statistically analyze these bedforms in conjunction with seabed sedimentary properties and storm history to understand the correlation of sedimentary deposition with the storm history. The Fire Island shoreface/inner shelf has been the site of ongoing studies by the USGS. The western half is dominated by 1-3 km-wide sand ridges, with abundant fine-medium sand. The eastern half, on the other hand, is largely starved of modern sand, and the bedform morphology is dominated by 0.2-1.0 km-wide sorted bedforms. We utilize two post-storm surveys, one along the western half of the island and the other to the east, providing an opportunity to compare these different nearshore settings. A Gaussian covariance model is used, with four parameters: rms height, orientation and characteristics length and width. An iterative, least-squares inversion is used to estimate these parameters and their uncertainties from selected sample areas. Bedforms with aspect ratio (length/width) > 1.5 are categorized as two-dimensional, and have rms heights ~3-7 cm and widths 4-6 m. Bedforms with aspect ratio < 1.5 are categorized as three-dimensional, and have smaller rms heights (~1.5-4 cm) and larger widths (~6-13 m). Parameters are correlatable with grain size and large-scale bedform topography. Three-dimensional bedforms tend to form in finer sands and have been interpreted as hummocky bedforms formed by long-period surface gravity waves generated during the storm. The two-dimensional bedforms are interpreted as large ripples that show consistent lineation oblique to the orientation of larger sand ridges. For this study we will compare bedform lineations to

  10. Global patterns in sandy beach macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton

    2013-10-01

    Global patterns in species richness in sandy beach ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy beaches around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the beach: in gentle slope beaches, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope beaches it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of beach slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective beaches. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in beach macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective beaches, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat beach slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy beach macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative beaches harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy beaches (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary

  11. Evolving fluvial response of the Sandy River, Oregon, following removal of Marmot Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; O'Connor, Jim; Podolak, Charles J.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Wallick, J. Rose; Bragg, Heather M.; Pittman, Smokey; Wilcock, Peter R.; Rhode, Abagail; Grant, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    The October 2007 removal of Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, triggered a rapid sequence of fluvial responses as ~730,000 m3 of sand and gravel that filled the former reservoir were suddenly exposed to an energetic river. Using direct measurements of sediment transport, photogrammetry, and repeat surveys between transport events, we monitored the erosion, transport, and redeposition of this sediment in the hours, days, and months following breaching. Measurements of suspended load and bedload documented an initial spike in the flux of fine suspended sediment in the minutes after breaching followed by high rates of suspendedand bedload transport of sand. Significant gravel transport did not begin at a measurement site 0.4 km downstream of the dam until 18–20 hours after breaching, when bedload transport achieved rates of about 60 kg/s—rates that greatly exceeded concurrent measurements of less than 10 kg/s at sites upstream and farther downstream of the dam. Bedload transport rates just below the dam site remained 10–100 times above upstream and downstream rates through subsequent high flow events during the winter and spring of 2007 and 2008. Much of the elevated sediment load was derived from eroded reservoir sediment, which initially began eroding when a multi-meter-tall knickpoint migrated upstream 200 meters in the first hour. Rapid knickpoint migration triggered bank collapse in the unconsolidated fill, which swiftly widened the channel. Over the following days and months, the knickpoint migrated slowly upchannel, simultaneously lowering and becoming less distinct. By May 2008, a riffle-like feature approximately 1 m high, a few tens of meters long, and 2 km upstream from the breached dam persisted. Knickpoint and lateral erosion evacuated ~100,000 cubic meters of sediment from the reservoir in the first 60 hours, and by the end of high flows in May 2008 about 350,000 cubic meters (45 percent of the initial reservoir volume) had been evacuated

  12. Environmental analysis of the sediments in the beaches of the Gulf of Palermo (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Vincenzo; Manno, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    The gulf of Palermo is long about 30 km and the coast is closed between two headlands, Monte Gallo Cape (western side) and Zafferano Cape (east side). The continental shelf is linked with the abyssal plan by an high slope and the depth is included between 50 m and 1500 m. The shape of the Palermo gulf is the answer of both the natural forces and human activity. Nevertheless the coastal morphologies reproduce the geological setting of this area. The coast is divided in two morphotypes, low and rocky coast and beaches. Respectively composed by compact limestone and calcareous incoherent sediment with common sandy granulometry. The beaches, compressively long 11,46 km, are different in lengths, amplitude and lithological types (30% sandy and 70 % sandy-pebbly). In order to study the coastal evolution it is important to define all the coastal dynamics. The coastal evolution is actually the result of complex and intertwined action of both natural and/or anthropic processes. Nowday in the gulf of Palermo these processes exist and in some case they already triggered erosive phenomena. The westernmost beaches is the famous Mondello beach, it is made of pale sand and with sloping very low. This section of coast as other similar beaches (Arenella, Romagnolo and Acqua dei Corsari) has gone through remarkable dynamic phenomena. More precisely between 1976 and 1992 the beach (known as Arenella beach), beyond the Palermo harbor, advanced its shoreline position. Going further west along the coast one can find a landfill, partially collapsed and eroded by the impact of sea storms, that contributes to the coastal advancement from West towards East. At Romagnolo coast zone the beach has advanced because of the debris coming from local landfills, instead the Acqua dei Corsari beach (pebbles and sand) has been going through various fluctuations with a general trend towards advancement due to the longitudinal sediment transport. The study analyze the nature of sediments that made the

  13. RESEARCH: Conceptualizing Environmental Stress: A Stress-Response Model of Coastal Sandy Barriers.

    PubMed

    Gabriel; Kreutzwiser

    2000-01-01

    / The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a conceptual framework of environmental stress-response for a geomorphic system. Constructs and methods generated from the literature were applied in the development of an integrative stress-response framework using existing environmental assessment techniques: interaction matrices and a systems diagram. Emphasis is on the interaction between environmental stress and the geomorphic environment of a sandy barrier system. The model illustrates a number of stress concepts pertinent to modeling environmental stress-response, including those related to stress-dependency, frequency-recovery relationships, environmental heterogeneity, spatial hierarchies and linkages, and temporal change. Sandy barrier stress-response and recovery are greatly impacted by fluctuating water levels, stress intensity and frequency, as well as environmental gradients such as differences in sediment storage and supply. Aspects of these stress-response variables are articulated in terms of three main challenges to management: dynamic stability, spatial integrity, and temporal variability. These in turn form the framework for evaluative principles that may be applied to assess how policies and management practices reflect key biophysical processes and human stresses identified by the model.

  14. A detailed seabed signature from Hurricane Sandy revealed in bedforms and scour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembanis, Arthur; DuVal, Carter; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Schmidt, Val; Miller, Doug; Mayer, Larry

    2013-10-01

    On 30 October 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall near Brigantine New Jersey bringing widespread erosion and damage to the coastline. We have obtained a unique set of high-resolution before and after storm measurements of seabed morphology and in situ hydrodynamic conditions (waves and currents) capturing the impact of the storm at an inner continental shelf field site known as the "Redbird reef". Understanding the signature of this storm event is important for identifying the impacts of such events and for understanding the role that such events have in the transport of sediment and marine debris on the inner continental shelf. As part of an ONR-sponsored program designed to understand and characterize the ripple dynamics and scour processes in an energetic, heterogeneous inner-shelf setting, a series of high-resolution geoacoustic surveys were conducted before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our overall goal is to improve our understanding of bedform dynamics and spatio-temporal length scales and defect densities through the application of a recently developed fingerprint algorithm technique. Utilizing high-resolution swath sonar collected by an AUV and from surface vessel sonars, our study focuses both on bedforms in the vicinity of manmade seabed objects and dynamic natural ripples on the inner shelf in energetic coastal settings with application to critical military operations such as mine countermeasures.

  15. Meiofauna distribution along a gradient of sandy beaches in northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J. Germán; Lastra, Mariano; López, Jesús

    2003-10-01

    Ten sandy beaches located in northern Spain were studied during the summer of 1999 to analyse the patterns in number of major taxa, abundance and biomass of meiofauna along a gradient of morphodynamic beach types and exposure rate. Sediment samples were collected with metallic cylinders (23 cm 2 cross-sectional area, 120 cm long) at 10 equally spaced shore levels along six replicated transects extended from the drift line down to the low tide level. Wave exposure rate and Dean's parameter were estimated at each sampled beach. The meiofauna was primarily represented by Nematoda and Harpacticoidea. Meiofaunal abundances ranged between 64×10 6 and 296×10 6 ind. m-1, whereas biomass (ash free dry weight) per linear meter of beach ranged between 30 and 166 g m -1. The results showed two significant trends: (1) the meiofaunal biomass increases exponentially with exposure rate from exposed to very exposed beaches; and (2) the number of major taxa increases exponentially with exposure rate and linearly with average grain size. These trends are opposite to the general patterns of the sandy beach macroinfauna, which is generally negatively affected by increases in wave exposure and grain size. This suggests that macro- and meiofauna are affected in different ways by the physical processes associated with wave action.

  16. Removal of Fast Flowing Nitrogen from Marshes Restored in Sandy Soils

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Eric L.; Cebrian, Just; Smith, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater flow rates and nitrate removal capacity from an introduced solution were examined for five marsh restoration designs and unvegetated plots shortly after planting and 1 year post-planting. The restoration site was a sandy beach with a wave-dampening fence 10 m offshore. Simulated groundwater flow into the marsh was introduced at a rate to mimic intense rainfall events. Restoration designs varied in initial planting density and corresponded to 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the plot area planted. In general, groundwater flow was slower with increasing planting density and decreased from year 0 to year 1 across all treatments. Nevertheless, removal of nitrate from the introduced solution was similar and low for all restoration designs (3–7%) and similar to the unvegetated plots. We suggest that the low NO3− removal was due to sandy sediments allowing rapid flow of groundwater through the marsh rhizosphere, thereby decreasing the contact time of the NO3− with the marsh biota. Our findings demonstrate that knowledge of the groundwater flow regime for restoration projects is essential when nutrient filtration is a target goal of the project. PMID:25353607

  17. Removal of fast flowing nitrogen from marshes restored in sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Eric L; Cebrian, Just; Smith, Sara M

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater flow rates and nitrate removal capacity from an introduced solution were examined for five marsh restoration designs and unvegetated plots shortly after planting and 1 year post-planting. The restoration site was a sandy beach with a wave-dampening fence 10 m offshore. Simulated groundwater flow into the marsh was introduced at a rate to mimic intense rainfall events. Restoration designs varied in initial planting density and corresponded to 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the plot area planted. In general, groundwater flow was slower with increasing planting density and decreased from year 0 to year 1 across all treatments. Nevertheless, removal of nitrate from the introduced solution was similar and low for all restoration designs (3-7%) and similar to the unvegetated plots. We suggest that the low NO3(-) removal was due to sandy sediments allowing rapid flow of groundwater through the marsh rhizosphere, thereby decreasing the contact time of the NO3(-) with the marsh biota. Our findings demonstrate that knowledge of the groundwater flow regime for restoration projects is essential when nutrient filtration is a target goal of the project.

  18. Wrack patches and their influence on upper-shore macrofaunal abundance in an Atlantic Canada sandy beach system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, Mitchell R.; Quijón, Pedro A.

    2012-08-01

    Patches of stranded macrophytes (wrack) are a distinctive feature of sandy beaches worldwide and a potential food subsidy for their resident communities. Despite their relevance, the spatial variation of wrack and its potential influence on upper shore beach organisms remain poorly understood. Wrack and macrofauna were surveyed on seven sandy beaches associated with dunes, till bluffs and sandstone cliffs along the north shore of Prince Edward Island, Atlantic Canada. Wrack patch density, cover, and water content were measured, and their associated macrofauna was compared to the communities inhabiting nearby bare sediments. The survey found among-site spatial differences in wrack characteristics and identified rockweeds (Fucus serratus) and eelgrass (Zostera marina) as the main macrophyte species in the area. Macrofaunal abundances were higher in wrack than in bare sediments but this varied among locations. A field manipulation was then conducted at two sandy beaches to measure macrofauna colonization on patches of fresh and aged rockweed and eelgrass. Regardless of macrophyte's age, macrofaunal organisms preferentially colonized sediments associated with rockweeds. In addition, calculations across treatments detected positive relationships between macrofaunal abundance and wet mass, dry mass and water content of the wrack patches, regardless of macrophyte species or state. Macrophyte preferences were further explored by comparing the nutritional value of the plant tissues and assessing macrofauna feeding rates under laboratory conditions. Rockweed tissues had consistently higher protein, lipid and carbohydrate contents than eelgrass and were affected by higher invertebrate consumption rates. Overall, these results suggest that spatial variation and wrack features and species composition play key roles on the structure of the supralittoral macrofauna.

  19. Effects of sediment physical properties on the phosphorus release in aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, HongWei; Wang, DaoZeng; Cheng, PengDa; Fan, JingYu; Zhong, BaoChang

    2015-02-01

    Particle size, porosity, and the initial phosphorus concentration in sediments are the main factors affecting phosphorus release flux through the sediment-water interface. Sediments can be physically divided to muddy and sandy matters, and the adsorption-desorption capacity of sediment with phosphorus depends on particle size. According to phosphorus adsorption-desorption experiments, phosphorus sorption capacity of the sediment decreases with the increase of particle dimension. But among the size-similar particles, sediment with a bigger particle size has the larger initial phosphorus release rate. In terms of muddy and sandy sediments, there are inversely proportional relationships between the release rate and the flux. Due to the contact of surface sediment and the overlying water, the release flux from the sediment is either from direct desorption of surface sediment layer or from the diffusion of pore water in the sediment layer, which is mainly determined by sediment particle size and porosity. Generally, static phosphorus release process may include two stages: the first is the initial release. As for coarse particles, phosphorus is desorbed from surface sediment. And for fine particles, phosphorus concentration in water often decreases, mainly from pore water by the molecular diffusion. During the second stage, pore water flows faster in coarse sediment, and phosphorus is easy to desorb from the surface of the particles as diffusion dominates. For the smaller liquid-solid ratio of fine particles and the larger amount of phosphorus adsorption, the release flux from pore water due to diffusion is very small with longer sorption duration.

  20. Autonomous bed-sediment imaging-systems for revealing temporal variability of grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel; Rubin, David M.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hatcher, Gerald; Chezar, Henry; Wyland, Robert; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a remotely operated video microscope system, designed to provide high-resolution images of seabed sediments. Two versions were developed, which differ in how they raise the camera from the seabed. The first used hydraulics and the second used the energy associated with wave orbital motion. Images were analyzed using automated frequency-domain methods, which following a rigorous partially supervised quality control procedure, yielded estimates to within 20% of the true size as determined by on-screen manual measurements of grains. Long-term grain-size variability at a sandy inner shelf site offshore of Santa Cruz, California, USA, was investigated using the hydraulic system. Eighteen months of high frequency (min to h), high-resolution (μm) images were collected, and grain size distributions compiled. The data constitutes the longest known high-frequency record of seabed-grain size at this sample frequency, at any location. Short-term grain-size variability of sand in an energetic surf zone at Praa Sands, Cornwall, UK was investigated using the ‘wave-powered’ system. The data are the first high-frequency record of grain size at a single location of a highly mobile and evolving bed in a natural surf zone. Using this technology, it is now possible to measure bed-sediment-grain size at a time-scale comparable with flow conditions. Results suggest models of sediment transport at sandy, wave-dominated, nearshore locations should allow for substantial changes in grain-size distribution over time-scales as short as a few hours.

  1. Sediment Sources in the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoutian, Mehrab

    2014-05-01

    Sediment Constituent Analysis is an effective tool for identifying sediment sources. Based on several sediment samples taken from different sites all over the Iranian coastlines, we have been able to show that an important portion of sediment on the beaches in the Persian Gulf is bio-clastic; that is, biologically created from the coral environment as well as other marine habitats. Unlike mineral (clastic) sediments, carbonate sediments are born not made. Furthermore, carbonate sand constituents are generally less durable than their quartz and mineral counterparts, and break down relatively quickly. Therefore, destruction of reefs and degradation of marine habitat are certain to reduce the sand supply to the shoreline in the Persian Gulf that is necessary to maintain beaches. Carbonate sands are also found on the coastline of the Oman Sea. One of the striking things about the sediments along the coastline of Iran is the high percentage of carbonate material. Molluscan debris is common, even ubiquitous. This reflects the populations living in the offshore waters. Some molluscs thrive in high-energy sandy environments, others like finer sediments. Some live at the surface, while some burrow down as much as a half-metre. A great deal of information can be gained from the study of the species of mollusk and their distribution in the sediments. This paper introduces a few case studies done in different parts of the Persian Gulf by using this method as a general assessment toolbox.

  2. Nematode community structure and diversity pattern in sandy beaches of Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Er; Mu, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhinan; Yang, Shichao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jia

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the diversity and structure of free-living marine nematode communities at three sandy beaches representing typical intertidal environments of a temperate zone in Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Average nematode abundance ranged from 1006 to 2170 ind. 10 cm-2, and a total of 34 nematode genera were recorded, of which only 8 were common in all the studied beaches. Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were the lowest at the second beach where nematode abundance was the highest. The highest species diversity index coincided with the lowest nematode abundance at Shilaoren beach. Sediment median grain size, sorting coefficient, and chlorophyll-a content were essential for differentiation in nematode abundance and species diversity, whereas taxonomic diversity of nematode was homogeneous across the three beaches. In 0-20 cm sediment profile, nematode abundance declined abruptly with depth, whereas nematode diversity changed gently with obvious difference in 16-20 cm layer. Sediment granulometry and chlorophyll- a content were the two foremost factors which influenced the vertical distribution pattern of nematode generic diversity. Non-selective deposit feeders constituted the most dominant trophic group, followed by epistratum feeders. Bathylaimus (family: Tripyloididae) dominated at the second and Yangkou beach, while Theristus (family: Xyalidae) prevailed at Shilaoren beach. Omnivores and predators became important at Shilaoren beach because of the high proportion of Enoplolaimus. Even though, nematode community of the studied beaches did not differ significantly from each other.

  3. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

    2002-11-01

    The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS

  4. Quaternary Turbidite Sedimentation in the Moresby Trough, Preliminary Observations from the Papua New Guinea S2S Study Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, S. J.; Muhammad, Z.; Dickens, J.; Droxler, A.; Peterson, L.; Opdyke, B.

    2004-12-01

    Multicores and jumbo piston cores were collected from the Moresby Trough from the R/V Melville in March-April 204 to study patterns of off-shelf sediment flux from the Gulf of Papua to the deep sea over Pleistocene-Holocene timescales. The Moresby Trough represents the primary deep-sea sediment conduit linking the Source to Sink Gulf of Papua study area to the north with the Coral Sea Basin to the south. Core locations were navigated from the surface using dynamic positioning and multibeam bathymetric mosaics collected during the cruise. Selected cores have been analyzed using a multi-sensor core logger, X-radiography, granulometry, and Pb-210 geochronology. Most piston cores collected from the Moresby Trough contain abundant mafic sandy turbidites overlain by fine-grained hemipelagic deposits 1-2 m thick. X-radiographs of multicores reveal mostly bioturbated hemipelagics. However, one core, MV25-0403-24MC, was collected from the axis of a primary channel, and contains at least two fine-grained turbidites within the upper 0.5 m of sediment. The uppermost turbidite contains low but uniform activities of excess Pb-210, and may have been 15-20 cm thick at the time of deposition (i.e., before subsequent disruption by bioturbation), based on fabric and radiochemical evidence. Application of a simple box-model for physical mixing (i.e., during the flow) and subsequent decay suggests that the uppermost turbidite was deposited 70-120 years before present. Bioturbation has since reworked about 60% of the bed, suggesting that such beds will only escape destruction by bioturbation if they are > 10 cm thick, and are deposited more frequently than once per century. Based on these observations, we suggest that gravity flows are presently active in the Moresby trough, and may account for a significant fraction of the hemipelagic drape present in channel systems. However, fabric evidence for these thin, fine-grained beds may be obscured by subsequent bioturbation. Also, at some

  5. The importance of biological interactions for the vertical distribution of nematodes in a temperate ultra-dissipative sandy beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maria, Tatiana F.; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Esteves, André M.; De Troch, Marleen; Vanreusel, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This study of the vertical distribution of nematode communities in an ultra-dissipative sandy beach on the North Sea coast at De Panne, Belgium showed species-specific vertical migrations occurred over a tidal cycle. During the period of submersion, smaller deposit feeders were dominant at the subsurface, whereas large nematodes (originally classified as predators) were concentrated at the surface. The interstitial water content showed a weak correlation to the observed patterns and biological interactions among nematodes, such as predation and competition, which were measured through stable isotopes, also explained the observed segregation. The predator Enoplolaimus litoralis and its potential prey species did not co-exist in the same part of the sediment, suggesting avoidance of predation by prey species. In addition, the different prey species inhabited different subsurface layers, which can be explained by avoidance of competition for food. Stable isotope signatures further showed that the two major biological components of sandy beaches (macrofauna and meiofauna, including some species assumed to be predators) partly depend on microphytobenthos, demonstrating the importance of in situ primary producers in the diet of the fauna from ultra-dissipative sandy beaches. However, meiofauna and macrofauna do not seem to compete for these food sources. The combined examination of environmental and biological factors revealed the additional importance of the latter in controlling the vertical distribution of nematodes in environments that were previously assumed to be mainly physically controlled.

  6. Dynamic groundwater flows and geochemistry in a sandy nearshore aquifer over a wave event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malott, Spencer; O'Carroll, Denis M.; Robinson, Clare E.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic coastal forcing influences the transport of pollutants in nearshore aquifers and their ultimate flux to coastal waters. In this study, field data are presented that show, for the first time, the influence of a period of intensified wave conditions (wave event) on nearshore groundwater flows and geochemistry in a sandy beach. Field measurements at a freshwater beach allow wave effects to be quantified without other complex forcing that are present along marine shorelines (e.g., tides). Pressure transducer data obtained over an isolated wave event reveal the development of transient groundwater flow recirculations. The groundwater flows were simulated in FEFLOW using a phase-averaged wave setup approach to represent waves acting on the sediment-water interface. Comparison of measured and simulated data indicates that consideration of wave setup alone is able to adequately capture wave-induced perturbations in groundwater flows. While prior studies have shown sharp pH and redox spatial zonations in nearshore aquifers, this study reveals rapid temporal variations in conductivity, pH, and redox (ORP) in shallow sediments (up to 0.5 m depth) in response to varying wave conditions. Comparison of head gradients with calculated conductivity and pH mixing ratios indicates the controlling effect of the wave-induced water exchange and flows in driving the observed geochemical dynamics. While we are not able to conclusively determine the extent to which temporal variations are caused by conservative mixing versus reactive processes, the pH and ORP variations observed will have significant implications for the fate of reactive pollutants discharging through sandy nearshore aquifers.

  7. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  8. Nutrient leaching from sediments according to different oxygen supplying conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Park, J. I.; Choi, S. H.; Kim, K.

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the role of sediments controlling the water quality, many studies have adopted nutrient leaching experiments. However, the experiments were mostly performed under air-open condition, which is different from the actual condition at the bottom of fairly stagnant water body. Therefore, the results may not properly reflect the capability of the sediments supplying the nutrients to the water column. In this study, nutrient leaching experiments were conducted using various sediment samples under two different oxygen supplying conditions: one open and the other closed to the air. For this study, 5 sediment samples were collected from lakes and rivers around Kunsan, Korea. Air-closed leaching experiments were carried out using conventional BOD glass bottles (355 mL) without any head spaces. All the experiments were performed at a solid:solution ratio of 1:7.3. Each reactor was incubated at 25 ℃ for 72 hours or 120 hours. The solution was analyzed for pH, DO, Eh, NO3-N, NH4-N, and PO4-P after the incubation. Silt+clay fraction, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and COD of the sediments showed close correlations with each other. Air-closed condition showed much higher leached concentrations for NH4-N and PO4-P (up to 60 times) than the air-open condition and the concentrations increased with the incubation time. However, the differences were very small in the experiments using sandy sediments (<0.13 mg/L and < 50 ug/L for NH4 and PO4 concentrations, respectively). In general, the leached NH4 and PO4 concentrations from the air-open experiments were not correlated well with the fine fractions due to nitrification and suppression of Fe-oxide reduction in aerobic condition, respectively. Because of this reason, some air-open results showed NO3-N concentrations higher than the concentrations obtained from the air-closed experiments. The experiments closed to air showed NO3-N concentrations substantially decreasing with the incubation time due to

  9. Interactive 4D Visualization of Sediment Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.; Englert, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal sediment transport models simulate the effects that waves, currents, and tides have on near-shore bathymetry and features such as beaches and barrier islands. Understanding these dynamic processes is integral to the study of coastline stability, beach erosion, and environmental contamination. Furthermore, analyzing the results of these simulations is a critical task in the design, placement, and engineering of coastal structures such as seawalls, jetties, support pilings for wind turbines, etc. Despite the importance of these models, there is a lack of available visualization software that allows users to explore and perform analysis on these datasets in an intuitive and effective manner. Existing visualization interfaces for these datasets often present only one variable at a time, using two dimensional plan or cross-sectional views. These visual restrictions limit the ability to observe the contents in the proper overall context, both in spatial and multi-dimensional terms. To improve upon these limitations, we use 3D rendering and particle system based illustration techniques to show water column/flow data across all depths simultaneously. We can also encode multiple variables across different perceptual channels (color, texture, motion, etc.) to enrich surfaces with multi-dimensional information. Interactive tools are provided, which can be used to explore the dataset and find regions-of-interest for further investigation. Our visualization package provides an intuitive 4D (3D, time-varying) visualization of sediment transport model output. In addition, we are also integrating real world observations with the simulated data to support analysis of the impact from major sediment transport events. In particular, we have been focusing on the effects of Superstorm Sandy on the Redbird Artificial Reef Site, offshore of Delaware Bay. Based on our pre- and post-storm high-resolution sonar surveys, there has significant scour and bedform migration around the

  10. Acidic sandy soil improvement with biochar - A microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Farkas, Éva; Ujaczki, Éva; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Tolner, Mária; Klebercz, Orsolya; Kirchkeszner, Csaba; Gruiz, Katalin; Uzinger, Nikolett; Feigl, Viktória

    2016-09-01

    Biochar produced from a wide range of organic materials by pyrolysis has been reported as a means to improve soil physical properties, fertility and crop productivity. However, there is a lack of studies on the complex effects of biochar both on the degraded sandy soil physico-chemical properties and the soil biota as well as on toxicity, particularly in combined application with fertilizer and compost. A 7-week microcosm experiment was conducted to improve the quality of an acidic sandy soil combining variations in biochar types and amounts, compost and fertilizer application rates. The applied biochars were produced from different feedstocks such as grain husks, paper fibre sludge and wood screenings. The main purpose of the microcosm experiment was to assess the efficiency and applicability of different biochars as soil amendment prior to field trials and to choose the most efficient biochar to improve the fertility, biological activity and physical properties of acidic sandy soils. We complemented the methodology with ecotoxicity assessment to evaluate the possible risks to the soil as habitat for microbes, plants and animals. There was clear evidence of biochar-soil interactions positively affecting both the physico-chemical properties of the tested acidic sandy soil and the soil biota. Our results suggest that the grain husk and the paper fibre sludge biochars applied to the tested soil at 1% and 0.5 w/w% rate mixed with compost, respectively can supply a more liveable habitat for plants and soil living animals than the acidic sandy soil without treatment.

  11. Morphodynamics and Sedimentology of a Falling Stage Sandy Fjord Delta, Goose River, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slingerland, R.; Edmonds, D. A.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Royce, J.; Burpee, A.; Cederberg, J.; Caldwell, R.; Nijhuis, A.; McGuffin, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment size and degree of cohesion are thought to exert a strong control on the morphodynamic processes, planform shape and clinoform stratigraphy of deltas. To test model predictions concerning these two parameters, we present a morphometric and stratigraphic analysis of a sandy delta formed where the Goose River flows into Goose Bay at the western end of Lake Melville, Labrador. Goose River delta sediments consist of arkosic, heavy-mineral-rich sand (D50 = 225 to 600 microns) with very little silt and clay, placing this delta at the coarser-grained, non-cohesive end of the spectrum. The delta started to form approx. 7000 years ago as the Laurentide ice sheet retreated and post-glacial rebound created a relative base level fall of approximately 4 mm/yr. The current tidal range in Goose Bay averages 0.5 m, and the average wave height is negligible. Results from our 2012 field season show that the delta planform consists of two moribund lobes at elevations of ~ 5 m and ~ 2 m and a presently active delta at sea level. Aerial photography from 1951 to 2012 show there has been surprisingly little progradation despite active channel change at the six-month timescale and an assumed base level fall of 244 mm during that period. A topographic section along a dipline consists of three treads and two clinoform risers. The bottomset tread is a virtually featureless fjord bottom at ~35 m from which a first clinoform rises to a second tread at ~-15 m. The second tread is a sandy platform onto which an upper clinoform downlaps. This upper sandy clinoform ranges in dip from 9 to 17 dg. and passes into the topset at an elevation of ~ -1 m. The topset consists of braid-like trapezoidal unit bars that in GPR show little evidence of wave, alongshore current, or ice reworking, even though they are submerged at higher high tides. The planform, bar geometries and facies, and clinoform dips and dip-directions are remarkably consistent with model predictions from Delft3d.

  12. Chemical Signals of Critical Zone Processing: Quantification of Water and Sediment Sources During Individual Storm Events in the Christina River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Aalto, R. E.; Lazareva, O.; Marquard, J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Sawyer, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical signals of water and materials in catchment exports have long been studied as proxies for within-watershed processing. In the Christina River Critical Zone Observatory, we use the chemistry of water, in particular the oxygen-18 and chloride concentrations, and hydrograph separation to evaluate the contributions of different water sources to the stream discharge during a series of five storm events in 2011 and 2012. These events varied in magnitude, from 44 to 168 mm total precipitation, and precipitation chemistry, with δ18O values ranging from -5.38 to -11.06 ‰. The contribution of old water during the storm peak, determined by isotope hydrograph separation, varied from 0% in a spring storm of annual magnitude to 76% during Hurricane Sandy. Soil moisture data, available for all but one of our storms, indicates higher old water contribution at peak flow when the catchment has higher antecedent soil moisture. Understanding differences in water sourcing to the stream during different events provides a basis on which we analyze the movement of critical zone processing with regard to erosion and the source of exported sediment. For example, sediment fingerprinting with fallout radioisotopes indicated variation in sediment source between events. For example, suspended sediment samples taken during Hurricane Irene (28 August 2011) contained between 0 and 11.4 Bq/kg cesium-137 (137Cs) and 175 - 698 Bq/kg of beryllium-7 (7Be), indicating some level of recent surface erosion. Suspended sediment samples taken during Hurricane Sandy (29 October 2012) did not contain measureable activities of either 137Cs or 7Be.

  13. Legal Considerations for Health Care Practitioners After Superstorm Sandy.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Tina Batra; Van Nostrand, Elizabeth; Sood, Rishi K; Potter, Margaret

    2016-06-01

    During disaster response and recovery, legal issues often arise related to the provision of health care services to affected residents. Superstorm Sandy led to the evacuation of many hospitals and other health care facilities and compromised the ability of health care practitioners to provide necessary primary care. This article highlights the challenges and legal concerns faced by health care practitioners in the aftermath of Sandy, which included limitations in scope of practice, difficulties with credentialing, lack of portability of practitioner licenses, and concerns regarding volunteer immunity and liability. Governmental and nongovernmental entities employed various strategies to address these concerns; however, legal barriers remained that posed challenges throughout the Superstorm Sandy response and recovery period. We suggest future approaches to address these legal considerations, including policies and legislation, additional waivers of law, and planning and coordination among multiple levels of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:518-524).

  14. Did Hurricane Sandy influence the 2012 US presidential election?

    PubMed

    Hart, Joshua

    2014-07-01

    Despite drawing on a common pool of data, observers of the 2012 presidential campaign came to different conclusions about whether, how, and to what extent "October surprise" Hurricane Sandy influenced the election. The present study used a mixed correlational and experimental design to assess the relation between, and effect of, the salience of Hurricane Sandy on attitudes and voting intentions regarding President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in a large sample of voting-aged adults. Results suggest that immediately following positive news coverage of Obama's handling of the storm's aftermath, Sandy's salience positively influenced attitudes toward Obama, but that by election day, reminders of the hurricane became a drag instead of a boon for the President. In addition to theoretical implications, this study provides an example of how to combine methodological approaches to help answer questions about the impact of unpredictable, large-scale events as they unfold. PMID:24767585

  15. Did Hurricane Sandy influence the 2012 US presidential election?

    PubMed

    Hart, Joshua

    2014-07-01

    Despite drawing on a common pool of data, observers of the 2012 presidential campaign came to different conclusions about whether, how, and to what extent "October surprise" Hurricane Sandy influenced the election. The present study used a mixed correlational and experimental design to assess the relation between, and effect of, the salience of Hurricane Sandy on attitudes and voting intentions regarding President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in a large sample of voting-aged adults. Results suggest that immediately following positive news coverage of Obama's handling of the storm's aftermath, Sandy's salience positively influenced attitudes toward Obama, but that by election day, reminders of the hurricane became a drag instead of a boon for the President. In addition to theoretical implications, this study provides an example of how to combine methodological approaches to help answer questions about the impact of unpredictable, large-scale events as they unfold.

  16. Event-Based Monitoring of Sediment Flux Following Removal of Oregon's Marmot Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J. E.; Spicer, K. R.; Bragg, H. M.; Wallick, J. R.; Kittleson, R. L.; Lee, K. K.; Cushman, D.; Piatt, D.; Tanner, D. Q.; Hale, T.; Uhrich, M. A.; Rhode, A.

    2008-12-01

    Breaching of Oregon's Marmot Dam in October 2007 allowed the 80-km-long Sandy River to flow freely from Mount Hood to the Columbia River for the first time in nearly 100 years. When breached, the dam was brimful with sediment. As part of an analysis examining the redistribution of ~730,000 m3 of stored sediment following the dam removal, we measured suspended-sediment load and bedload at sites 10 km upstream and 0.5 to 18 km downstream of the dam before, during and after breaching, and during five subsequent high-water events. Prior to breaching of the dam, suspended-sediment and bedload mass fluxes along the Sandy River both upstream and downstream of the dam were of the order of a few to a few tens of kg/s. Suspended sediment upstream was composed chiefly of sand in contrast to mostly silt and clay passing measurement sites 0.5 and 18 km below the dam. In all reaches bedload consisted chiefly (>90%) of sand. Breaching of the dam released a pulse of turbid water having an instantaneous suspended-sediment flux of 5200 kg/s. The initial sediment pulse consisted predominantly of silt and clay, presumably eroded from thin, fine-grained topset beds at the downstream end of the reservoir. However, the suspended load coarsened rapidly as the Sandy River incised into the stored sand and gravel that filled the former reservoir. Following the initial peak value, median fluxes of sandy suspended sediment 0.5 km below the dam site hovered around several tens to hundreds of kg/s for at least 24 hours, whereas the median suspended- sediment flux remained about 30 kg/s both 10 km upstream and 18 km downstream. Bedload transport also increased following breaching, but its response was slower than for suspended sediment. Bedload flux 0.5 km below the dam site increased from ~1 kg/s before breaching to 60 kg/s by 6 hours and to about 70 kg/s by 18 hours after breaching, in contrast to the steady, low (<10 kg/s) flux of sandy bedload passing upstream and farther downstream before

  17. Weathering the Storm: Nurses' Stories about Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2014-06-19

    Proposed is a hermeneutic humanbecoming study on the reflections of 16 nurses' stories about Hurricane Sandy. The phenomenon of interest is weathering the storm. The research question is "what are the emerging meanings of the living experience of weathering the storm?" The perspective to be used is the humanbecoming school of thought. The participants were nurses who were living and working in New York City (NYC) during and after Hurricane Sandy. The emergent meanings are to enhance knowledge and understanding of the experience of weathering the storm for global health nursing.

  18. Aquatic Sediments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. The Department of the Interior Strategic Sciences Group and its Response to Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Machlis, G. E.; Applegate, D.

    2013-12-01

    the affected region and published an online peer-reviewed report on their results. Subsequently, the DOI used SSG findings to ensure supplemental investments for mitigation projects were prioritized to enhance regional resilience. The SSG is an innovative and flexible tool to support decision making that continues to evolve and show that it has applications across multiple phases of emergency management. The SSG methodology was developed during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when its predecessor, the Strategic Sciences Working Group (SSWG), convened to develop scenarios analyzing the cascading consequences of the spill on the Gulf of Mexico. The SSWG was deployed during the height of the emergency, when oil was still flowing from the broken pipe. By comparison, the recent deployment of the SSG was in Sandy's aftermath, when local, state, and federal institutions were focused on rebuilding efforts. Together, these deployments have enabled the SSG to assess its approach to scenario building during both emergency and recovery situations. The SSG continues to identify lessons learned from this experience to use in preparation for future deployments.

  20. The Scientific and Institutional Context for the Removal of Marmot Dam, Sandy River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G. E.; Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J.; Wallick, J. R.; Marr, J.; Wilcock, P.; Podolack, C.

    2008-12-01

    Dam removal has been widely viewed as an important river restoration strategy and an interesting scientific opportunity, the latter because it represents a real-time, full-scale field experiment on fluvial adjustment. Removals therefore offer an excellent setting for testing analytical models of sediment transport, morphologic change, and our capacity to predict short- and medium-term channel evolution in response to changing water and sediment transport regimes. Most dam removals to date have involved relatively small structures and modest releases of sediment stored in pre-removal reservoirs. The largest instantaneous and uncontrolled release of sediment accompanying a dam removal occurred with the breaching of the Marmot coffer dam on the Sandy River in Oregon in October 2007. Marmot Dam was a 14-m-high by 50-m-wide diversion dam built in 1913 as part of a larger hydroelectric project. It was located on the Sandy River, an energetic gravel to cobble-bed river that naturally carries copious quantities of sand and gravel, ~45 km upstream from its confluence with the Columbia River near Portland, Oregon. At the time of removal, the reservoir upstream of the dam was completely filled with ~750,000 m3 of sand (40%) and gravel (60%). The river below the dam includes bedrock gorges, mixed bedrock/alluvial reaches, and alluvial reaches with well-developed gravel and sand bars. The decision to remove the dam was motivated by a combination of increasing maintenance costs and an unfavorable future economic return due to the necessity of installing expensive fish passage facilities to meet relicensing requirements. Portland General Electric, the dam's owner, surrendered the dam's license in 1999, and removal commenced in summer 2007. To remove the concrete structure, a temporary coffer dam was constructed 70 m upstream. In October 2007 the coffer dam was breached and the river allowed to erode the remaining impounded sediment (~730,000 m3). Physical modeling conducted at

  1. Biotransformation of tributyltin to tin in freshwater river-bed sediments contaminated by an organotin release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Tanner, T.L.; Watt, B.E.

    2004-01-01

    The largest documented release of organotin compounds to a freshwater river system in the United States occurred in early 2000 in central South Carolina. The release consisted of an unknown volume of various organotin compounds such tetrabutyltin (TTBT), tributyltin (TBT), tetraoctyltin (TTOT), and trioctyl tin (TOT) and resulted in a massive fish kill and the permanent closures of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a local city's only drinking-water intake. Initial sampling events in 2000 and 2001 indicated that concentrations of the ecologically toxic TTBT and TBT were each greater than 10 000 ??g/kg in surface-water bed sediments in depositional areas, such as lakes and beaver ponds downstream of the release. Bed-sediment samples collected between 2001 and 2003, however, revealed a substantial decrease in bed-sediment organotin concentrations and an increase in concentrations of degradation intermediate compounds. For example, in bed sediments of a representative beaver pond located about 1.6 km downstream of the release, total organotin concentrations [the sum of TTBT, TBT, and the TBT degradation intermediates dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT)] decreased from 38 670 to 298 ??g/kg. In Crystal Lake, a large lake about 0.4 km downstream from the beaver pond, total organotin concentrations decreased from 28 300 to less than 5 ??g/kg during the same time period. Moreover, bed-sediment inorganic tin concentrations increased from pre-release levels of less than 800 to 32 700 ??g/kg during this time. These field data suggest that the released organotin compounds, such as TBT, are being transformed into inorganic tin by bed-sediment microbial processes. Microcosms were created in the laboratory that contained bed sediment from the two sites and were amended with tributyltin (as tributyltin chloride) under an ambient air headspace and sacrificially analyzed periodically for TBT, the biodegradation intermediates DBT and MBT, and tin. TBT concentrations

  2. Biological soil crust formation under artificial vegetation effect and its properties in the Mugetan sandy land, northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. W.; Jia, Y. H.; Zhang, K.

    2016-08-01

    Mugetan sandy land is an inland desertification area of about 2,065 km2 in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. In the ecological restoration region of the Mugetan sandy land, different crusts have formed under the action of vegetation in three types of sandy soil (i.e. semi-fixed sand dune, fixed sand dune and ancient fixed aeolian sandy soil). The surface sand particle distribution, mineral component and vegetation composition of moving sand dunes and three types of sandy soil were studied in 2010-2014 to analyze the biological crust formation properties in the Mugetan sandy land and the effects of artificial vegetation. Results from this study revealed that artificial vegetation increases the clay content and encourages the development of biological curst. The fine particles (i.e. clay and humus) of the surface layer of the sand dunes increased more than 15% ten years after the artificial vegetation planting, and further increased up to 20% after one hundred years. The interaction of clay, humus, and other fine particles formed the soil aggregate structure. Meanwhile, under the vegetation effect from the microbes, algae, and moss, the sand particles stuck together and a biological crust formed. The interconnection of the partial crusts caused the sand dunes to gradually be fixed as a whole. Maintaining the integrity of the biological crust plays a vital role in fixing the sand under the crust. The precipitation and temperature conditions in the Mugetan sandy land could satisfy the demand of biological crust formation and development. If rational vegetation measures are adopted in the region with moving sand dunes, the lichen-moss-algae biological curst will form after ten years, but it still takes more time for the sand dunes to reach the nutrient enrichment state. If the biological curst is partly broken due to human activities, reasonable closure and restoration measures can shorten the restoration time of the biological crust.

  3. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  4. School Safety in a Post-Sandy Hook World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    In this report the author, who is a school safety expert, provides information about school safety in a post-Sandy Hook world. He presents the following: (1) Continuum of Threats and Responses; (2) The role social media plays; (3) Reliable Best Practices; (4) Policy and Funding--Climate and Context; (5) Policy and Funding--Things to Avoid; and (6)…

  5. Microfungi diversity isolation from sandy soil of Acapulco touristic beaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopic fungi diversity in marine sandy soil habitats is associated with key functions of beach ecosystems. There are few reports on their presence in Mexican beaches. Although standard methods to obtain the fungi from soil samples are established, the aim of this pilot study was to test the pla...

  6. Global diversity patterns in sandy beach macrofauna: a biogeographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rafael Barboza, Francisco; Defeo, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the advances generated on land, the knowledge of global diversity patterns in marine ecosystems is limited to a small number of studies. For sandy beaches, which dominate the world’s ocean shores, previous meta-analyses highlighted the role of beach morphodynamics in explaining species richness patterns. Oceanographic variables and historical processes have not been considered, even though they could be main predictors of community structure. Our work, based on 256 sandy beaches around the world, analysed species richness considering for the first time temperature, salinity and primary productivity. Biogeographic units (realms, provinces and ecoregions) were used to incorporate historical factors in modelling processes. Ecoregions, which implicitly include isolation and coastal complexity among other historical geographic factors, best represented trends in species richness worldwide. Temperature was a main predictor of species richness, which increased from temperate to tropical sandy beaches. Species richness increased with tide range and towards wide beaches with gentle slopes and fine grains, which is consistent with the hypothesis that habitat availability has an important role in structuring sandy beach communities. The role of temperature and habitat availability suggests that ocean warming and sea level rise could affect the distribution of obligate species living in these narrow ecosystems. PMID:26411697

  7. Hurricane Sandy: An Educational Bibliography of Key Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There, undoubtedly, will be a flurry of research activity in the "Superstorm" Sandy impact area on a myriad of disaster-related topics, across academic disciplines. The purpose of this study was to review the disaster research related specifically to hurricanes in the educational and social sciences that would best serve as a compendium…

  8. Global diversity patterns in sandy beach macrofauna: a biogeographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Francisco Rafael; Defeo, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the advances generated on land, the knowledge of global diversity patterns in marine ecosystems is limited to a small number of studies. For sandy beaches, which dominate the world's ocean shores, previous meta-analyses highlighted the role of beach morphodynamics in explaining species richness patterns. Oceanographic variables and historical processes have not been considered, even though they could be main predictors of community structure. Our work, based on 256 sandy beaches around the world, analysed species richness considering for the first time temperature, salinity and primary productivity. Biogeographic units (realms, provinces and ecoregions) were used to incorporate historical factors in modelling processes. Ecoregions, which implicitly include isolation and coastal complexity among other historical geographic factors, best represented trends in species richness worldwide. Temperature was a main predictor of species richness, which increased from temperate to tropical sandy beaches. Species richness increased with tide range and towards wide beaches with gentle slopes and fine grains, which is consistent with the hypothesis that habitat availability has an important role in structuring sandy beach communities. The role of temperature and habitat availability suggests that ocean warming and sea level rise could affect the distribution of obligate species living in these narrow ecosystems. PMID:26411697

  9. FIELD SAMPLING OF RESIDUAL AVIATION GASOLINE IN SANDY SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two complimentary field sampling methods for the determination of residual aviation gasoline content in the contaminated capillary fringe of a fine, uniform, sandy soil were investigated. The first method featured filed extrusion of core barrels into pint size Mason jars, while ...

  10. Global diversity patterns in sandy beach macrofauna: a biogeographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Francisco Rafael; Defeo, Omar

    2015-09-28

    Unlike the advances generated on land, the knowledge of global diversity patterns in marine ecosystems is limited to a small number of studies. For sandy beaches, which dominate the world's ocean shores, previous meta-analyses highlighted the role of beach morphodynamics in explaining species richness patterns. Oceanographic variables and historical processes have not been considered, even though they could be main predictors of community structure. Our work, based on 256 sandy beaches around the world, analysed species richness considering for the first time temperature, salinity and primary productivity. Biogeographic units (realms, provinces and ecoregions) were used to incorporate historical factors in modelling processes. Ecoregions, which implicitly include isolation and coastal complexity among other historical geographic factors, best represented trends in species richness worldwide. Temperature was a main predictor of species richness, which increased from temperate to tropical sandy beaches. Species richness increased with tide range and towards wide beaches with gentle slopes and fine grains, which is consistent with the hypothesis that habitat availability has an important role in structuring sandy beach communities. The role of temperature and habitat availability suggests that ocean warming and sea level rise could affect the distribution of obligate species living in these narrow ecosystems.

  11. Switchgrass and pecan biochar amendments to a sandy coastal soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sandy soils of the wet, warm SE Coastal Plain have poor physical characteristics and low carbon contents. To improve soil properties, we added switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and non-activated pecan (Carya illinoinensis) biochar. Switchgrass was ground to a fine powder and added to soil at rates of 0...

  12. Leaching of metribuzin metabolites and the associated contamination of a sandy Danish aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Jeanne; Olsen, Preben; Henriksen, Trine; Ullum, Marlene

    2005-11-01

    As degradation products of metribuzin have received little attention as potential groundwater contaminants, we evaluated leaching of metribuzin and its primary metabolites desaminometribuzin (DA), desaminodiketometribuzin (DADK), and diketometribuzin (DK) at a sandy test site in Denmark. Soil water and groundwater were sampled monthly over a four-year period. Leaching of metribuzin and DA was negligible. DK and DADK leached from the root zone (1 meter below ground surface (mbgs)) in average concentrations considerably exceeding the EU limit value for drinking water (0.1 microg/L). Both metabolites appear to be relatively stable and persisted in soil water and groundwater several years after application. Past application of metribuzin at the site had contaminated the groundwater with both DK and DADK, which were detected in 99% and 48%, respectively, of the groundwater samples analyzed. Except for three of the groundwater samples, the DADK concentration never exceeded the EU limit value. In contrast, the annual concentration of DK exceeded 0.1 microg/L at 90% of the screens analyzed. The present findings suggest that as the degradation products of metribuzin can leach through sandy soil in high concentrations, they could potentially contaminate the groundwater. In view of this risk DK and DADK should both be included in monitoring programs and their ecotoxicological effects should be further investigated.

  13. Acidic sandy soil improvement with biochar - A microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Farkas, Éva; Ujaczki, Éva; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Tolner, Mária; Klebercz, Orsolya; Kirchkeszner, Csaba; Gruiz, Katalin; Uzinger, Nikolett; Feigl, Viktória

    2016-09-01

    Biochar produced from a wide range of organic materials by pyrolysis has been reported as a means to improve soil physical properties, fertility and crop productivity. However, there is a lack of studies on the complex effects of biochar both on the degraded sandy soil physico-chemical properties and the soil biota as well as on toxicity, particularly in combined application with fertilizer and compost. A 7-week microcosm experiment was conducted to improve the quality of an acidic sandy soil combining variations in biochar types and amounts, compost and fertilizer application rates. The applied biochars were produced from different feedstocks such as grain husks, paper fibre sludge and wood screenings. The main purpose of the microcosm experiment was to assess the efficiency and applicability of different biochars as soil amendment prior to field trials and to choose the most efficient biochar to improve the fertility, biological activity and physical properties of acidic sandy soils. We complemented the methodology with ecotoxicity assessment to evaluate the possible risks to the soil as habitat for microbes, plants and animals. There was clear evidence of biochar-soil interactions positively affecting both the physico-chemical properties of the tested acidic sandy soil and the soil biota. Our results suggest that the grain husk and the paper fibre sludge biochars applied to the tested soil at 1% and 0.5 w/w% rate mixed with compost, respectively can supply a more liveable habitat for plants and soil living animals than the acidic sandy soil without treatment. PMID:26850860

  14. Observations of erosion and damage along barrier islands following Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, J. L.; Weiss, R.; Lynett, P. J.; MacInnes, B. T.; Cheng, W.; Smallegan, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ on 29 October 2012. This unusually large, hybrid storm generated significant storm surge and large waves over multiple high tides. Widespread damage and erosion occurred along coastal New Jersey and New York. In November and December 2012, field surveys were carried out to quantify barrier-island overwash, breaching, sediment deposition, and structural damage. Flood levels in the bays behind the barrier islands, in the vicinity of breaching and significant overwash, were also quantified. Here, we report on observations and findings from these surveys. The team visited devastated barrier-island communities including Mantoloking and Bay Head, NJ and Westhampton Dunes and Tiana Beach, NY. Observations were also made on Fire Island, NY--a natural barrier system. In natural areas, barrier-island breaching and significant overwash were primarily observed in locations of known vulnerability, where the pre-storm barrier island elevation and/or width were small relative to neighboring areas. In contrast, sediment overwash and breaching in areas with significant infrastructure were found to be highly variable, even though pre-storm topography did not vary significantly in the alongshore direction. For example, quasi-steady flood elevations in the adjacent communities of Mantoloking and Bay Head were found to be very similar, between 4.2 and 4.6 m, MSL (from water lines on the interior of oceanfront homes). Likewise, September 2012 topography in both communities was very similar, characterized by dune heights between 5.8 to 6.0 m, MSL throughout (The Richard Stockdon Coastal Research Center, Beach-dune assessment of New Jersey Beach Profile Network, 2012). However, high-water marks on the exterior of oceanfront homes, inclusive of instantaneous ocean wave effects, in Bay Head were 0.5 to 1 m lower than in Mantoloking. Field observations revealed that Hurricane Sandy uncovered a buried rock seawall in Bay Head that dates

  15. Bioremediation potential of microorganisms from a sandy beach affected by a major oil spill.

    PubMed

    Reis, Izabela; Almeida, C Marisa R; Magalhães, Catarina M; Cochofel, Jaqueline; Guedes, Paula; Basto, M Clara P; Bordalo, Adriano A; Mucha, Ana P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioremediation potential of microorganisms from intertidal sediments of a sandy beach affected by a major oil spill 7 years before and subject to chronic petroleum contamination since then. For that, the response of microorganisms to a new oil contamination was assessed in terms of community structure, abundance, and capacity to degrade hydrocarbons. Experiments were carried out under laboratory-controlled conditions by mixing sediment with crude oil with three different nitrogen supplementations in 50 ml serum bottles under constant shake for 15 days. Autochthonous microorganisms were able to respond to the new oil contamination by increasing their abundance (quantified by DAPI) and changing the community structure (evaluated by DGGE). This response was particularly clear for some specific bacterial groups such as Pseudomonas, Actinomycetales, and Betaproteobacteria. These communities presented an important potential for hydrocarbon degradation (up to 85 % for TPHs and 70 % for total PAHs), being the biodegradation stimulated by addition of an appropriate amount of nitrogen.

  16. Denitrification coupled to pyrite oxidation and changes in groundwater quality in a shallow sandy aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Chun; Slomp, Caroline P.; Broers, Hans Peter; Passier, Hilde F.; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2009-11-01

    This study focuses on denitrification in a sandy aquifer using geochemical analyses of both sediment and groundwater, combined with groundwater age dating ( 3H/ 3He). The study sites are located underneath cultivated fields and an adjacent forested area at Oostrum, The Netherlands. Shallow groundwater in the region has high nitrate concentrations (up to 8 mM) due to intense fertilizer application. Nitrate removal from the groundwater below cultivated fields correlates with sulfate production, and the release of dissolved Fe 2+ and pyrite-associated trace metals (e.g. As, Ni, Co and Zn). These results, and the presence of pyrite in the sediment matrix within the nitrate removal zone, indicate that denitrification coupled to pyrite oxidation is a major process in the aquifer. Significant nitrate loss coupled to sulfate production is further confirmed by comparing historical estimates of regional sulfate and nitrate loadings to age-dated groundwater sulfate and nitrate concentrations, for the period 1950-2000. However, the observed increases in sulfate concentration are about 50% lower than would be expected from complete oxidation of pyrite to sulfate, possibly due to the accumulation of intermediate oxidation state sulfur compounds, such as elemental sulfur. Pollutant concentrations (NO 3, Cl, As, Co and Ni) measured in the groundwater beneath the agricultural areas in 1996 and 2006 show systematic decreases most likely due to declining fertilizer use.

  17. Impact of Hurricane Sandy on the Shoreface and Inner Shelf, Offshore Long Island: Evidence for Ravinement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Schwab, W. C.; Denny, J. F.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    In January 2013, approximately two months after Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the Mid-Atlantic Bight, a scientific team from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, partnering with colleagues at Adelphi and Stony Brook universities and the USGS, conducted marine geophysical and surficial sampling surveys both offshore and in the inshore bays of Long Island, NY. The primary scientific goal was to assess the impact of the storm on the shoreface and inner shelf. Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone near Brigantine, NJ, with 70-kt maximum sustained winds. However, its unusual trajectory and massive size created record storm surges along the heavily-populated NJ and NY coastlines. As a result, infrastructure in the NY metropolitan area was damaged, and the Long Island barrier island system was both breached in places and elsewhere seriously eroded. The surveys included ten days of operations aboard Stony Brook's R/V Seawolf, offshore of Long Beach and Fire Island, barrier islands south of Long Island, complementing ongoing land-based studies of Sandy's impact on the NY-NJ barrier island system. Data collection involved multibeam bathymetric swath mapping, CHIRP very high resolution acoustic subbottom profiling, and surface sediment (grab) sampling to provide ground truth for the geophysical data. We surveyed regions that had been previously surveyed, both by Stony Brook in 2001 and 2005 to support reef management, and by the USGS for coastal sedimentary research, most recently in 2011 offshore Fire Island. These areas include shoreface-attached sand ridges that may be exchanging sand with the barrier island shoreface. We focus on before-and-after data comparisons on the shoreface and inner shelf, searching in particular for evidence that the storm contributed significantly to ravinement, either by wave- or current-forced erosion along the shoreface or via migration of shoreface-attached or detached sand ridges on the inner shelf. The interpreted

  18. Mixing Model Analysis of Suspended Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Sources in White Clay Creek, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Aalto, R. E.; Marquard, J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Newbold, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Material exports from watersheds have consequences to upstream catchment elemental budgets, downstream ecosystem processes and water resources management. Despite this importance, quantifying exports of all major and trace elements associated with suspended sediments is challenging due to the highly episodic nature of that export. Constraining sediment sources using various mixing model approaches is further complicated by the diversity of potential sources. In this study, we leveraged the infrastructure of the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory (CRB-CZO) to collect large volume (200 L) samples from 17 storms, including some of the biggest storms of the decade (i.e. Hurricane Irene and Sandy), and 95 potential source soils and sediments within the White Clay Creek watershed, a third-order watershed in southeastern Pennsylvania. On all samples we analyzed major and minor elements, rare earth elements, and radioisotopes in order to determine the erosional source category of stream suspended material, such that differences in the chemical composition of source materials can be used in a multivariate statistical model to predict the chemical composition of suspended sediment. For example, 137Cs is higher in surface and near-surface terrestrial soils and low in streambanks, deeper soils, road cuts, and road dust. Elemental chromium is much higher in road dust than any other source. We integrate sediment fingerprinting analyses common in geomorphological studies of mineral suspended material with biological and ecological characterizations of particulate organic carbon. Through this combination, we determine particle source, a necessary first step to calculating the amount of excess carbon that has complexed with particles during erosion and transit through the watershed. This interdisciplinary project is conducted as one of many studies in the CRB-CZO and directly contributes to the overall research focus of this CZO: to quantify the net carbon sink or

  19. Distributional patterns in an insect community inhabiting a sandy beach of Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourglia, Virginia; González-Vainer, Patricia; Defeo, Omar

    2015-12-01

    Most studies of sandy beach macrofauna have been restricted to semiterrestrial species and do not include insects when providing species richness and abundance estimates. Particularly, spatio-temporal patterns of community structure of the entomofauna inhabiting these ecosystems have been scarcely documented. This study assessed spatio-temporal distributional patterns of the night active entomofauna on a beach-dune system of Uruguay, including variations in species richness, abundance and diversity, and their relationship with environmental factors. A deconstructive taxonomic analysis was also performed, considering richness and abundance patterns separately for the most abundant insect Orders (Hymenoptera and Coleoptera) to better understand the factors which drive their patterns. We found clear temporal and across-shore patterns in the insect community inhabiting a land-ocean interface, which matched spatiotemporal variations in the environment. Abundance and species richness were highest in spring and summer, concurrently with high temperatures and low values of sediment moisture and compaction. Multivariate ordinations showed two well-defined species groups, which separated summer, autumn and spring samples from winter ones. Generalized Linear Models allowed us to describe a clear segregation in space of the most important orders of the insect community, with specific preferences for the terrestrial (Hymenoptera) and beach (Coleoptera) fringes. Hymenoptera preferred the dune zone, characterized by high elevation and low sand moisture and compaction levels, whereas Coleoptera preferred gentle slopes and fine and humid sands of the beach. Our results suggest that beach and dune ecosystems operate as two separate components in regard to their physical and biological features. The high values of species richness and abundance of insects reveal that this group has a more significant ecological role than that originally considered so far in sandy beach ecology.

  20. Characteristics of groundwater and lead geochemistry along the Sandy Creek, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jian Ping; Chyi, L.L. . Dept. of Geology); Khourey, C.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The Sandy Creek is about 65 km in length. It is a tributary of the Tuscarawas River, which flows into the Ohio River. The valley of Sandy Creek is filled with sediments as deep as 70 m and as wide as 2 km. The bedrock valley walls consist of the Allegheny Formation of the Pennsylvanian System. Groundwater samples were collected from active wells in the valley. Recharge to the buried valley aquifer comes from groundwater in the valley wall stream infiltration and precipitation. The total dissolved solids are generally less than 500 ppm but could be as high as 2,000 ppm. The Ca/Mg ratio stays between 2.6 and 7.5, which is similar to those of the limestones in the bedrock valley walls. Bicarbonate is the major anionic species which ranges from 98 to 580 ppm. Sulfate varies between 2.5 and 334 ppm and chloride from 1.9 to 753 ppm. Major cations are Ca and Na with significant amounts of Mg and K. The concentration of Pb varies within a small range from 1.2 to 5.1 ppb. The Pb concentration is related to bicarbonate anion concentrations when sulfate is low. Acid mine drainage appears to be the major sulfate carrier. It reduces the bicarbonate concentration and adds additional Pb and Fe as it joins the groundwater in the valley. High chloride concentrations can be traced to areas with salt storage or petroleum brine disposal. High chloride concentrations are always marked by high Na concentrations and high Na/K ratios, but not other anions and cations. High nitrate concentrations can be traced to areas with intensive agricultural activities. It is not marked by sympathetic changes in other ion concentrations.

  1. Winter-time circulation and sediment transport in the Hudson Shelf Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, C.K.; Butman, B.; Traykovski, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Hudson Shelf Valley is a bathymetric low that extends across the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. From December 1999 to April 2000 a field experiment was carried out to investigate the transport of sediment in the shelf and valley system. Near-bed tripods and water-column moorings were deployed at water depths from 38 to 75 m in the axis of the shelf valley and at about 26 m on the adjacent shelves offshore of New Jersey and Long Island, New York. These measured suspended sediment concentrations, current velocities, waves, and water column properties. This paper analyzes observations made during December 1999 and January 2000, and presents the first direct near-bed measurements of suspended sediment concentration and sediment flux from the region. Sediment transport within the Hudson Shelf Valley was coherent over tens of kilometers, and usually aligned with the axis of the shelf valley. Down-valley (off-shore) transport was associated with energetic waves, winds from the east, moderate current velocities (5-10 cm/s), and sea level setup at Sandy Hook, NJ. Up-valley (shoreward) transport occurred frequently, and was associated with winds from the west, low wave energy, high current velocities (20-40 cm/s), and sea level set-down at the coast. Within the shelf valley, net sediment flux (the product of near-bed concentration and velocity) was directed shoreward, up the axis of the valley. Current velocities and suspended sediment fluxes on the New York and New Jersey continental shelves were lower than within the shelf valley, and exhibited greater variability in alignment. Longer term meteorological data indicate that wind, setup, and wave conditions during the study period were more conducive to up-valley transport than seasonal data suggest as average. To relate the observed up-valley sediment flux to observed accumulation of contaminants within the Hudson Shelf Valley requires consideration of transport over longer timescales than those

  2. The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. B.; Meixner, F. X.; Sun, Z. G.; Chen, X. B.; Mamtimin, B.

    2009-04-01

    There are about 160.9 Mha of sandy land in China, about 17.6% of total Chinese area, which mainly distributed in 35°-50° N. The western Songnen Plain, which located in the semi-arid region of Northeastern China, is one of the main sandy soil distribution regions. The changes of land use in sandy soil are accompanied by changes in biogeochemical cycles of nutrients, particularly of the air-surface exchange of trace gases like nitric oxide. Our study, based on results obtained by a laboratory incubation technique, focuses on (a) NO production and consumption in sandy soils from two types of land use as function of soil temperature and soil moisture, and (b) The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils in semi-arid region. At 25˚C, average NO production (in terms of mass of N) was 0.016,and 0.013 ng kg-1s-1 in sandy soils from soybean land (SL) and man-made forest (MF), re¬spectively. NO consumption rate constant ranged from 0.26×10-6 to 7.28×10-6 m3 kg-1s-1. At 25˚C and under optimum soil moisture conditions for NO production, the NO compensation point mixing ratio was about 266 and 161 ug m-3 (465,and 281 ppb) for soils of SL and MF, respectively. Statistically sound relationships have been observed between NO fluxes and soil moisture (optimum curves). NO fluxes also increased exponentially with soil temperature at any given soil moisture. The optimum soil moisture for which maximum NO flux was observed was independent of soil temperature. The maximum of NO flux potentials for SL and MF soils (at 25°C) were 59.6 and 36.5 ng m-2s-1 at water-filled pore space (%WFPS) of 26 and 24, respectively. The NO flux potential was about 2 times larger for cropland soil than for man-made forest soils, most likely due to fertilizer application to the cropland soils.

  3. The algal lift: Buoyancy-mediated sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Federlein, Laura L.; Knie, Matthias; Mutz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The role of benthic algae as biostabilizers of sediments is well-known, however, their potential to lift and transport sediments remains unclear. Under low-flow conditions, matured algal mats may detach from the bed and may lift up sediment, thereby causing disturbance to the uppermost streambed sediment. We tested the potential of algal mats to lift sediments in 12 indoor flumes filled with sand (0.2 - 0.8 mm), gravel (2 - 8 mm) or a sand-gravel mixture (25/75% mass). After four weeks, the algal mats covered about 50% of the flumes area. Due to the accumulation of oxygen gas bubbles in the mats, that developed from high primary production at 4.5 weeks, about half of the algal mats detached from the bed carrying entangled sediments. Both the area covered by algal mats and detached area were similar among sediment types, but the amount of sediment transported tended to be higher for sand and sand-gravel mixture compared to gravel. Our results reveal that biologically mediated sediment transport mainly depends on the development of a dense filamentous algal matrix, that traps gas bubbles, increasing the mats buoyancy. This novel mechanism of sediment transport will occur in shallow ecosystems during low-flow periods, with the highest impact for sandy sediments.

  4. Hydrocarbon Bioaccumulation from contaminated sediment by a deposit feeding polychaete

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, D.P. )

    1990-01-09

    This study examined the role of sediment organic carbon content in aromatic hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and assessed the importance of two routes of hydrocarbon uptake: (1) uptake of the dissolved contaminant fraction from interstitial or overlying water; and (2) uptake of the particulate contaminant fraction from ingested sediments. The lugworm, Abarenicola pacifica, was exposed to three sediments contaminated with [[sup 3]H] benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). By manipulating the organic content of these sediments it was possible to establish three treatments with similar BaP concentrations in the interstitial water, but differing in the amount of BaP in the bulk sediment. BaP bioaccumulation over the first few days of exposure was correlated with feeding rate, implicating ingested sediments as a source of implicating ingested sediments as a source of BaP. The greatest body burden, however, was attained in those individuals held in sediments with the lowest organic carbon content and the lowest BaP concentration. Body burden at steady state was not correlated with either BaP concentrations in bulk sediment (dry weight or organic normalized basis) or the interstitial water. Increased organic matter decreased BaP bioavailability in a non-linear fashion. Bioaccumulation factors relative to water and organic content were relatively constant between 1 and 2% organic carbon in the sediment, but these same accumulation factors substantially underestimated body burden if applied to sandy sediments with little (0.3%) organic carbon.

  5. Biogeographic patterns in life history traits of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo S.; Defeo, Omar

    2004-11-01

    Biogeographic patterns in life history traits of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis were analyzed to determine latitudinal variations along its distribution, from tropical (9°N) to temperate (39°S) sandy beaches in Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Population features exhibited systematic geographical patterns of variation: (1) an increase in individual sizes and growth rates towards temperate beaches, following an inverse relationship with mean water temperature of the surf zone; (2) a shift from almost continuous to seasonal growth from subtropical to temperate Atlantic beaches and a positive relationship between amplitude of intra-annual growth oscillations and temperature range; (3) a linear decrease in life span and an increase in natural mortality from temperate to subtropical beaches; and (4) an increase in the individual mass-at-size (length-mass relationship) from subtropical to temperate beaches. Analyses discriminated by sex were consistent with the patterns illustrated above. Local effects of temperature and beach morphodynamics are discussed. Our results demonstrate that the population dynamics of E. braziliensis is highly plastic over latitudinal gradients, with large-scale variations in temperature and concurrent environmental variables leading to an adjustment of the phenotype-environment relationship.

  6. Hurricane Sandy and Adaptation Pathways in New York: Lessons from a First-Responder City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Solecki, William

    2014-01-01

    Two central issues of climate change have become increasingly evident: Climate change will significantly affect cities; and rapid global urbanization will increase dramatically the number of individuals, amount of critical infrastructure, and means of economic production that are exposed and vulnerable to dynamic climate risks. Simultaneously, cities in many settings have begun to emerge as early adopters of climate change action strategies including greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation. The objective of this paper is to examine and analyze how officials of one city - the City of New York - have integrated a flexible adaptation pathways approach into the municipality's climate action strategy. This approach has been connected with the City's ongoing response to Hurricane Sandy, which struck in the October 2012 and resulted in damages worth more than US$19 billion. A case study narrative methodology utilizing the Wise et al. conceptual framework (see this volume) is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the flexible adaptation pathways approach in New York City. The paper finds that Hurricane Sandy serves as a ''tipping point'' leading to transformative adaptation due to the explicit inclusion of increasing climate change risks in the rebuilding effort. The potential for transferability of the approach to cities varying in size and development stage is discussed, with elements useful across cities including the overall concept of flexible adaptation pathways, the inclusion of the full metropolitan region in the planning process, and the co-generation of climate-risk information by stakeholders and scientists.

  7. Aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, J.S.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Schreiber, L. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors present a literature review concerning sediment properties, interactions, and conditions. Topics of discussion include the following: biological activity and toxicity; nutrients; metals; organic compounds; dredging; radionuclides; oxygen demand and organic carbon; mathematical modeling; sediment transport and suspension; and paleolimnology.

  8. Linking macrobenthic communities structure and zonation patterns on sandy shores: Mapping tool toward management and conservation perspectives in Northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolet, Céline; Spilmont, Nicolas; Dewarumez, Jean-Marie; Luczak, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    In a context of intensifying anthropogenic pressures on sandy shores, the mapping of benthic habitat appears as an essential first step and a fundamental baseline for marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management and conservation efforts of soft-sediment intertidal areas. Mapping allows representing intertidal habitats that are basically characterised by abiotic (e.g sediments, exposure to waves…) and biotic factors such as macrobenthic communities. Macrobenthic communities are known to show zonation patterns across sandy beaches and many studies highlighted the existence of three biological zones. We tested this general model of a tripartite biological division of the shore at a geographical scale of policy, conservation and management decisions (i.e. Northern France coastline), using multivariate analyses combined with the Direct Field Observation (DFO) method. From the upper to the lower shores, the majority of the beaches exhibited three macrobenthic communities confirming the existence of the tripartite biological division of the shore. Nevertheless, in some cases, two or four zones were found: (1) two zones when the drying zone located on the upper shore was replaced by littoral rock or engineering constructions and (2) four zones on beaches and estuaries where a muddy-sand community occurred from the drift line to the mid shore. The correspondence between this zonation pattern of macrobenthic communities and the EUNIS habitat classification was investigated and the results were mapped to provide a reference state of intertidal soft-sediment beaches and estuaries. Our results showed evidence of the applicability of this EUNIS typology for the beaches and estuaries at a regional scale (Northern France coastline) with a macroecological approach. In order to fulfil the requirements of the European Directives (WFD and MFSD), this mapping appears as a practical tool for any functional study on these coastal ecosystems, for the monitoring of anthropogenic

  9. Non-cohesive silt turbidity current flow processes; insights from proximal sandy-silt and silty-sand turbidites, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Lorna J.; Bostock, Helen C.; Barnes, Philip M.; Neil, Helen L.; Gosling, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Silt-rich turbidites are commonly interpreted as distal marine deposits. They are associated with interlaminated clay and silt deposition from the upper and rear portions of turbidity currents. Here, multibeam bathymetry and shallow sediment core data from the intra-slope Secretary Basin, Fiordland, New Zealand, located < 10 km from shore, are used to describe a suite of late Holocene proximal sandy-silt and silty-sand turbidites that contain negligible clay and a wide variety of vertical grading patterns. The steep, rugged catchment to the Secretary Basin is dominated by a complex tributary turbidite channel network that feeds the low gradient Secretary Basin floor intra-slope lobe. Sediment core T49 is located within the lobe and positioned between shallow channels that are prone to deposition from decelerating, silty-sand and sandy-silt turbidity currents. The wide variety of sedimentary structures and vertical grading patterns, dominated by inversely graded beds, implies a range of non-cohesive flow processes, with deposition from multiphase, mixed mode (turbulent and laminar) flows that have undergone a variety of up-dip flow transformations. Most flows were initially erosive followed by deposition of partitioned 2- or 3- phase mixed mode flows that include high-density transitional and laminar flows that can be fore- or after-runners to low-density turbulent flow sections. Turbulence is inferred to have been suppressed in high-density flows by increasing flow concentration of both sands and silts. The very fine and fine sand modal grain sizes of sandy-silt and silty-sand turbidites are significantly coarser than classical abyssal plain silt turbidites and are generally coarser than overbank silt turbidites. While the low percentage of clays within Secretary Basin sandy-silt and silty-sand turbidites represents a fundamental difference between these and other silt and mud turbidites, we suggest these beds represent a previously undescribed suite of proximal

  10. In situ ingestion of microfibres by meiofauna from sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Felipe; Domenico, Maikon Di; Amaral, A Cecilia Z; Martínez, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Brett C; Worsaae, Katrine; Ivar do Sul, Juliana A; Cunha Lana, Paulo da

    2016-09-01

    Microfibres are widespread contaminants in marine environments across the globe. Detecting in situ ingestion of microfibres by small marine organisms is necessary to understand their potential accumulation in marine food webs and their role in marine pollution. We have examined the gut contents of meiofauna from six sandy beaches in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean. Out of twenty taxonomic groups, three species of the common sandy beach annelid Saccocirrus displayed in situ ingestion of microfibres in all sites. Laboratory observations showed that species of Saccocirrus are able to egest microfibres with no obvious physical injury. We suggest that their non-selective microphagous suspension-feeding behaviour makes Saccocirrus more prone to ingest microfibres. Although microfibres are rapidly egested with no apparent harm, there is still the potential for trophic transfer into marine food webs through predation of Saccocirrus.

  11. In situ ingestion of microfibres by meiofauna from sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Felipe; Domenico, Maikon Di; Amaral, A Cecilia Z; Martínez, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Brett C; Worsaae, Katrine; Ivar do Sul, Juliana A; Cunha Lana, Paulo da

    2016-09-01

    Microfibres are widespread contaminants in marine environments across the globe. Detecting in situ ingestion of microfibres by small marine organisms is necessary to understand their potential accumulation in marine food webs and their role in marine pollution. We have examined the gut contents of meiofauna from six sandy beaches in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean. Out of twenty taxonomic groups, three species of the common sandy beach annelid Saccocirrus displayed in situ ingestion of microfibres in all sites. Laboratory observations showed that species of Saccocirrus are able to egest microfibres with no obvious physical injury. We suggest that their non-selective microphagous suspension-feeding behaviour makes Saccocirrus more prone to ingest microfibres. Although microfibres are rapidly egested with no apparent harm, there is still the potential for trophic transfer into marine food webs through predation of Saccocirrus. PMID:27321884

  12. Vegetable oil spills on salt marsh sediments; comparison between sunflower and linseed oils.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M Glória; Mudge, Stephen M; Latchford, John

    2003-09-01

    The effects of a simulated spill of sunflower oil in salt marsh sediments were compared with an experiment with linseed oil. Sunflower and linseed oil penetrated the sediments at the same rates but different adsorption of the oils onto sediment particles resulted in the establishment of anaerobic conditions at shallower depths in sediments contaminated with linseed oil than with sunflower oil. The total lipid content of sunflower oil contaminated sediments remained almost stable for 6 months, whilst only 40% of linseed oil remained in the sediment after 2 months. Numbers of culturable heterotrophic bacteria and aerobic oil degrading bacteria in muddy sediment increased rapidly in response to the presence of the oils but bacterial numbers in sandy sediments increased more slowly for sunflower oil. Changes in fatty acid composition indicate similar degradation pathways for both oils but sunflower oil degraded more slowly than linseed oil and thus has the potential for longer lasting effects in marine environments.

  13. 75 FR 80047 - Equitrans, L.P., Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Joint Application for Abandonment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Equitrans, L.P., Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Joint Application... that on December 3, 2010, Equitrans L.P. (Equitrans) and Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC (Big Sandy), 625... to section 7(b) of the NGA authorizing Equitrans to abandon by transfer the Big Sandy Pipeline,...

  14. Rapid Response Survey Gauges Sandy's Impact on Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.; Austin, James A.; Flood, Roger D.; Christensen, Beth; Browne, Cassandra M.; Saustrup, Steffen

    2013-09-01

    In January 2013, approximately 2 months after Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the Mid-Atlantic Bight, scientists from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences (JSG), partnered with local colleagues at Adelphi and Stony Brook universities and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct marine surveys both offshore and within inshore bays of Long Island, N. Y. (Figure 1a). The primary goal was to assess the storm's impact on the seabed.

  15. Golden opportunities: A horizon scan to expand sandy beach ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Schoeman, David S.; Olds, Andrew D.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Connolly, Rod M.

    2015-05-01

    Robust ecological paradigms and theories should, ideally, hold across several ecosystems. Yet, limited testing of generalities has occurred in some habitats despite these habitats offering unique features to make them good model systems for experiments. We contend this is the case for the ocean-exposed sandy beaches. Beaches have several distinctive traits, including extreme malleability of habitats, strong environmental control of biota, intense cross-boundary exchanges, and food webs highly reliant on imported subsidies. Here we sketch broad topical themes and theoretical concepts of general ecology that are particularly well-suited for ecological studies on sandy shores. These span a broad range: the historical legacies and species traits that determine community assemblages; food-web architectures; novel ecosystems; landscape and spatial ecology and animal movements; invasive species dynamics; ecology of disturbances; ecological thresholds and ecosystem resilience; and habitat restoration and recovery. Collectively, these concepts have the potential to shape the outlook for beach ecology and they should also encourage marine ecologists to embrace, via cross-disciplinary ecological research, exposed sandy beach systems that link the oceans with the land.

  16. Feasibility of toxaphene transport through sandy soil

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquess, A.B.; Winterlin, W.; Peterson, D.

    1989-03-01

    Toxaphene, produced by the chlorination of camphene, is a chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide that was widely used to control a variety of insects on crops and to control livestock skin parasites. It is known to be a toxic and a highly persistent chemical in soil where its half-life can be in excess of ten years, depending on the environmental conditions. This study was conducted in an attempt to explain a finding in this lab of high concentrations of toxaphene (2600 ppm) in soil sampled at a depth of 1 m. The source of the sample was from a pesticide waste facility in northern California. The paradox of this discovery was that toxaphene, being hydrophobic, has been shown to be restricted in its movement from agricultural applications to a reported maximum of 30 cm, with the bulk of material concentrated in the upper 10 cm. Toxaphene is known to undergo anaerobic degradation that changes its gas chromatography profile. The toxaphene analyzed in this sample had an unweathered profile similar to technical toxaphene, implying that no degradation had occurred. Since a waste disposal facility is faced with abnormally high concentrations of pesticides and formulation components, it was of interest to ascertain if movement in a soil profile was possible when such concentrations prevail in a waste facility.

  17. Effect of Climate-Related Sea Level Rise on Sandy Flooding and Damages in New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, S. A.; Strauss, B.; Orton, P. M.; de Moel, H.; Vinogradov, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the contribution of climate change to observed extreme weather events and the damages they inflict is important for weighing costs and benefits of climate change mitigation efforts. Especially the attribution of observed extreme events, like hurricane Sandy, to climate change is often hotly debated. This can, however, be resolved in part for coastal flooding by evaluating the additional damage caused by the incremental increase in flood depth and extent from climate change-driven sea-level rise -- separate from the question of whether climate change contributed to the strength, path or origin of a storm. Here, we analyze Sandy by accurately simulating the observed flood with the ADCIRC model, and then simulating the same event but using a lower sea level. We find that in the absence of ~20cm of sea level rise caused by climate change, Sandy would have flooded significantly less land, houses and population, resulting in at least 10% less direct flooding damages in New York City than observed, translating into a difference in absolute terms in the billions of dollars.

  18. [Soil sandy desertification and salinization and their interrelationships in Yanghuang irrigated area of Hongsipu, Ningxia of northwest China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-guo; Song, Nai-ping

    2011-09-01

    By the methods of controlled and typical sampling, this paper analyzed the texture, salinization characteristics, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and their correlations in the 0-40 cm soil profiles of corn land, medlar land, and non-utilized land in Yanghuang irrigated area of Hongsipu, Northwest China. Under controlled sampling, the salt content in the soil profiles was 0.69-1.30 g x kg(-1) (except in non-utilized land where the 0-10 cm soil salt content was up to 1.74 g x kg(-1)), with no obvious salinization. The sodium adsorption ratio and exchangeable sodium percentage in the 20-40 cm soil layer of medlar land were 12.18 and 14.1%, respectively, and the total content of clay and silt in the 0-40 cm soil profile of medlar land was up to 37.3% whereas that in the 0-20 cm soil layer of corn land was only 13.5%. In the 20-40 cm soil layer of corn land, the indices of sandy desertification and salinization had significant correlations under controlled sampling but no correlations under typical sampling, while the CEC and the sandy desertification and salinization indices had significant correlations under typical sampling. In different land use types in the study area, soil sandy desertification and salinization had complicated interrelationships, and CEC could be used as the indicator for the changes in soil environmental quality.

  19. Dimpling in loose granular sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Hernández, Jose Luis; Yepes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Dimpling is the name given to the centimetre-scale collapse of granular deposits covering the interior of alteration shelters in semi-arid badlands. The development of micro-collapses is favoured by the stable conditions found in these shelters, where they are safe from water flows, rain impact, and animal or human traffic. The floor of these shelters is usually covered by several centimetres of sandy sediment resulting from the alteration of the rocky substratum and characterised by apparently very low density and high porosity. We have observed that the dimpling phenomenon does not depend on the mineralogy of the sands and occurs in dry conditions. The dimples are the shapes resulting from this process and are fragile, conical depressions ranging from 1 to 12 cm in diameter. They are generally over 3 cm in depth, depending on the depth of the sandy layer. The dimples can be classified into three groups by diameter (Ø): Ø≤1cm, 1cm≤Ø≤10 cm and Ø≥10 cm. These three morphometrical ranges suggest three evolutionary stages of the shapes. The main mechanisms of evolution are the coalescence of neighbouring dimples and the accommodation of the lateral walls towards more open, stable shapes. In this process, the slope of the dimple walls decreases to the angle of equilibrium, or internal friction angle of the sediment, when they acquire a more stable, dense structure. This evolution occurs naturally over several months. The process begins when sufficient sediment with low apparent density accumulates. This takes place by vertical accretion of particles from the shelter walls, which pile up in a stack-of-cards type structure. The increase in weight of the sediment column causes punctual micro-collapses when the limit of the sediment's self-supporting capacity is reached. The process is gravitational. Thermal variations can also condition the structural instability of the sediment due to the dilation-retraction changes undergone by the sediment grains. We can

  20. Putting Hurricane Sandy in Historical and Geological Context (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, J. P.; Lin, N.

    2013-12-01

    Damage from hurricanes has increased markedly over the last century, largely the result of increased coastal population and wealth. The recent impacts of Hurricane Sandy, a minimal category 1 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale (sustained winds of ~80 mph), in New York and New Jersey highlight the vulnerability of the northeastern United States to tropical cyclone strikes. Despite the relatively low sustained wind speeds associated with Sandy, the large size, shore-perpendicular track, and slow movement of the storm resulted in a significant surge along the New Jersey and New York coastline (e.g., 2.75 m in New York City). Making matters worse, the peak in surge in New York City (NYC) and surrounds coincided with a high tide, resulting in total storm tide heights of more than 3 meters above mean sea level in NYC. Current estimates of the damage resulting from Hurricane Sandy exceed 71 billion USD and 285 lives were lost. While direct hurricane strikes to NYC and New Jersey coast were rare in the 20th century (a cat 1 hurricane made landfall in southern NJ in 1903), hurricanes tracked slightly east and impacted Long Island and southern New England in 1938, 1944, 1954, 1960, 1976, 1985, and 1991. Looking back to the 19th and 18th centuries reveals that NYC and the New Jersey coast were struck by hurricanes in 1788, 1821 and 1893. The combination of documentary evidence and hydrodynamic modeling of these historic events indicates that the intensity of these storms were much greater than that of Hurricane Sandy, with the 1788 and 1821 storms likely making landfall at category 3 intensity. Given the increase in coastal population and development over the last two centuries, if storms like these were to occur today they would likely result in significantly more damage and loss of life than Hurricane Sandy. Overwash-deposit based reconstructions of hurricane landfalls suggest that the northeastern US may have at times experienced intense hurricane strikes much more

  1. Hydraulic potential in Lake Michigan bottom sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, K.; Hunt, C.S.; Hughes, G.M.; Brower, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of groundwater flux in the bottom sediments of Lake Michigan were deduced from measurements made during three shipboard cruises between 1973 and 1975. These factors affect the geochemical environment of the sediments and therefore the distribution of trace elements reported to be present. The near-shore, sandy-bottom and fine-grained, soft, deep-lake sediments were investigated; areas of hard till or bedrock were not included in the study. Thirty-three piezometers were placed in near-shore sands in waters 5-15 m deep. The piezometers were placed an average of 3 m into the bottom sediment. Water levels from the piezometers averaged 0.6 cm above the lake level, equivalent to an upward hydraulic gradient of about 0.002 cm/cm. Water samples taken from the piezometers have a distinctly different chemical composition from that of the lake water. The total dissolved mineral content and hardness of the groundwater are about twice those of the lake water. Twenty-two hydraulic gradient measurements were made in the fine-grained soft deep-lake sediments in waters 48-140 m deep by using a differential-pressure transducer dropped into the sediments. These measurements show an upward gradient averaging 0.2 cm/cm. No chemical data were obtained for the groundwater in the deep-lake sediments. The results of this study indicate that the groundwater flux is upward through the bottom sediments into Lake Michigan and that there is a chemical change in the water near the water-sediment contact. ?? 1979.

  2. Removal Efficiencies and Attachment Coefficients for Cryptosporidium in Sandy Alluvial Riverbank Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riverbank filtration has been shown to be effective at removing viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and, therefore, drinking water systems that employ riverbank filtration may receive additional treatment credits beyond that which they can obtain using traditional engineering a...

  3. Post-Wildfire Sedimentation in Saguaro National Park, Rincon Mountain District, and Effects on Lowland Leopard Frog Habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Rincon Mountain District of Saguaro National Park occupies about 272 square kilometers of mountains, canyons, and alluvial fans in southeastern Arizona just east of Tucson. The park contains some of the last remaining habitat in the Tucson Basin of the lowland leopard frog that lives in the bedrock pools called tinajas in canyons at elevations between 850 and 1,800 meters. Those tinajas that contain water year-round are critical winter habitat for tadpoles, and the breeding success of the leopard frogs depends on these features. In recent years, many tinajas that previously had provided habitat for the leopard frogs have been buried beneath large volumes of coarse sandy gravel that resulted from severe, stand-replacing wildfires in the watersheds above them. The U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service, conducted a study in 2004-06 to determine critical sediment-source areas, and the mechanisms of sediment delivery from hillslopes to stream channels to areas of leopard frog habitat and to estimate the increase in rates of sedimentation resulting from wildfires. Spatial data of watershed characteristics, as well as historical data, including photographs, monitoring surveys, precipitation and stream discharge records, were used in conjunction with field observations conducted between spring 2004 and fall 2005. The Helens II fire in 2003, the fifth largest wildfire to burn in the Rincon Mountains since 1989, offered an opportunity to observe mechanisms of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in the immediate post-fire environment. Reduction of the forest canopy, understory vegetation, and organic litter on the ground surface in severe burn areas caused increased surface runoff in the Joaquin Canyon watershed that led to intensified erosion of hillslopes. An initial flush of fine material, mostly ash, was transported to lower channel reaches with the first significant precipitation event following the fire. Subsequently, the main

  4. Desertification triggered by hydrological and geomorphological processes and palaeoclimatic changes in the Hunshandake Sandy Lands, Inner Mongolia, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Scuderi, L. A.; Wang, X.; Zhang, D.; Li, H.; Forman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Although Pleistocene and earlier aeolian sediments in the adjacent regions of deserts were used as indicators for the occurrence of the deserts in northern China, our multidisciplinary investigation in the Hunshandake Sandy Lands, Inner Mongolia, a typical landscape in the eastern portion of the Asian mid-latitude desert belt, demonstrates that this sandy desert is just ca. 4000 years old. Before the formation of the current sand dunes, Hunshandke was characterized with large and deep lakes and grasssland vegetation, as many sedimentary sections indicate. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) chronology shows that the three large former lakes where we have done detailed investigation, experienced high stands from early Holocene to ca. 5 ka. During the early and middle Holocene this desert was a temperate steppe environment, dominated by grasslands and trees near lakes and streams, as various palaeoenvironmental proxies suggest. While North Hemisphere's monsoonal regions experienced catastrophic precipitation decreases at ca. 4.2 ka, many parts of the presently arid and semi-arid zone in northern China were shifted from Green to Desert state. In the eastern portion of the Hunshandake, the desertification was, however, directly associated with groundwater capture by the Xilamulun River, as the palaeo-drainage remains show. The process of groundwater sapping initiated a sudden and irreversible region-wide hydrologic event that lowered the groundwater table and exacerbated the desertification of the Hunshandake, and further resulting in post-Humid period mass migration of northern China's Hongshan culture from that we think the modern Chinese civilization has been rooted.

  5. Directional Analysis of the Storm Surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with Applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport / Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years. PMID:25822480

  6. Directional analysis of the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport/Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years. PMID:25822480

  7. Meiofauna in sandy back-reef platforms differently exposed to the monsoons in the Maldives (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprucci, F.; Colantoni, P.; Sbrocca, C.; Baldelli, G.; Rocchi, M.; Balsamo, M.

    2011-09-01

    Maldives comprise some of the most characteristic and significant atoll systems, but the meiobenthic assemblages of these islands are still largely unknown. A study on meiofauna was conducted on three Maldivian sandy back-reef platforms differently exposed to stronger westerly monsoons. Clear high energy effects of the waves causing currents and erosions were observed at the completely exposed and isolated offshore reef of Thoddoo Island. Wave energy of medium intensity was confirmed at Rasdhoo by depositional structures ( finolhu), while a medium to low energy level was recorded at Gulhi on the basis of the presence of a low sandy bar. The meiofaunal assemblage counted 17 major taxa. Copepods and nematodes were dominant, followed by platyhelminthes and polychaetes. The nematode assemblage was rather rich and composed of 28 families and 84 genera. Desmodoridae were the most abundant family, followed by Draconematidae, Xyalidae, Epsilonematidae and Chromadoridae. The meiofauna resulted strongly affected by erosion effects, both in terms of abundance and richness, but we were not able to distinguish the two different sedimentation rates. Instead, the structure of the nematode community seemed to be more sensitive in distinguishing each type of hydrodynamic condition and energy level.

  8. Directional analysis of the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport/Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years.

  9. Burrowing abilities and swash behavior of three crabs, Emerita analoga Stimpson, Blepharipoda occidentalis Randall, and Lepidopa californica Efford (Anomura, Hippoidea), of exposed sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    Dugan; Hubbard; Lastra

    2000-12-20

    To investigate factors related to the distribution of intertidal species, and specific predictions of the swash exclusion hypothesis for exposed sandy beaches, we compared the burrowing abilities and swash behavior of three species of anomuran crabs in the superfamily Hippoidea (Emerita analoga, Blepharipoda occidentalis and Lepidopa californica) which commonly inhabit the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of beaches along the California coast. Burrowing times in the laboratory increased significantly with crab size for all species in five sediment grain sizes ranging from fine sand to gravel (0.15 to 3.24 mm). For each species, burrowing times differed significantly among sand grain sizes, ranging from 0.3 to 21.5 s. Burrowing times for the hippid crab, E. analoga, were relatively constant across sediment types, while those of the albuneid crabs, B. occidentalis and L. californica, were rapid in fine to medium sands, and much slower in coarser sediments. Our results indicate that E. analoga is a substrate generalist while L. californica and B. occidentalis are substrate sensitive. Pre-burrowing times and behavior, distance moved, and burrowing times differed among the species in the swash zone. Combined times of preburrowing and burrowing were shorter than the swash period (6 s) for most E. analoga individuals. Fifty percent of the individuals of L. californica reached the substrate and burrowed in the swash period, while no individuals of B. occidentalis burrowed in that time. Pre-burrowing behavior and time may be valuable in explaining spatial and temporal patterns in the distribution of hippoid crabs on California beaches. Our results support predictions of the swash exclusion hypothesis concerning the burrowing and locomotory abilities of sandy beach macrofauna. The substrate generalist characteristics, and unique orientation and swimming abilities of the hippid crab, E. analoga, in intertidal swash may help explain the success of this species and its

  10. Increased plastic litter cover affects the foraging activity of the sandy intertidal gastropod Nassarius pullus.

    PubMed

    Aloy, Alexander B; Vallejo, Benjamin M; Juinio-Meñez, Marie Antonette

    2011-08-01

    This study analyzed the foraging behavior of the gastropod Nassarius pullus on garbage-impacted sandy shores of Talim Bay, Batangas, Philippines. The effect of different levels of plastic garbage cover on foraging efficiency was investigated. Controlled in situ baiting experiments were conducted to quantify aspects of foraging behavior as affected by the levels of plastic litter cover in the foraging area. The results of the study indicated that the gastropod's efficiency in locating and in moving towards a food item generally decreased as the level of plastic cover increased. Prolonged food searching time and increased self-burial in sand were highly correlated with increased plastic cover. The accuracy of orientation towards the actual position of the bait decreased significantly when the amount of plastic cover increased to 50%. These results are consistent with the significant decreases in the abundance of the gastropod observed during periods of deposition of large amounts of plastic and other debris on the shore.

  11. Water level response in back-barrier bays unchanged following Hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Butman, Bradford; Ganju, Neil K.

    2014-01-01

    On 28–30 October 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused severe flooding along portions of the northeast coast of the United States and cut new inlets across barrier islands in New Jersey and New York. About 30% of the 20 highest daily maximum water levels observed between 2007 and 2013 in Barnegat and Great South Bay occurred in 5 months following Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy provided a rare opportunity to determine whether extreme events alter systems protected by barrier islands, leaving the mainland more vulnerable to flooding. Comparisons between water levels before and after Hurricane Sandy at bay stations and an offshore station show no significant differences in the transfer of sea level fluctuations from offshore to either bay following Sandy. The post-Hurricane Sandy bay high water levels reflected offshore sea levels caused by winter storms, not by barrier island breaching or geomorphic changes within the bays.

  12. Water level response in back-barrier bays unchanged following Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Butman, Bradford; Ganju, Neil K.

    2014-05-01

    On 28-30 October 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused severe flooding along portions of the northeast coast of the United States and cut new inlets across barrier islands in New Jersey and New York. About 30% of the 20 highest daily maximum water levels observed between 2007 and 2013 in Barnegat and Great South Bay occurred in 5 months following Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy provided a rare opportunity to determine whether extreme events alter systems protected by barrier islands, leaving the mainland more vulnerable to flooding. Comparisons between water levels before and after Hurricane Sandy at bay stations and an offshore station show no significant differences in the transfer of sea level fluctuations from offshore to either bay following Sandy. The post-Hurricane Sandy bay high water levels reflected offshore sea levels caused by winter storms, not by barrier island breaching or geomorphic changes within the bays.

  13. The Identification and Classification of Sandy Lands by Application of the Object Oriented Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changlong; Gao, Zhihai; Wang, Bengyu; Bai, Lina; Wu, Junjun; Sun, Bin; Ding, Xiangyuan

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, BJ-1 small satellite images as the data source, the optimal segmentation scales of various categories were determined by the Jefries-Matusita (J-M) method and the identification and classification of the Otindag sandy land was carried out based on the object-oriented method combined with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The research shows that the overall accuracy of sandy land classification, in this paper, is 81.52%, and Kappa coefficient is 0.7845, which indicate that the identification and classification of sandy lands by application of the object-oriented method is great. Finally, based on the research results of the classification methods and processes in sandy land, the sandy land of the Beijing-Tianjin dust and sandstorm source region (BTDSSR) was identified and classified. By doing this, it was determined basically that the distribution of the sandy lands in BTDSSR.

  14. Correlations Between Physical and Hydraulic Properties and Uranium Desorption in Contaminated, Intact Sediment Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockhold, M. L.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T. W.; Zachara, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    An unlined disposal pond in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site received uranium-bearing liquid effluents associated with nuclear reactor fuel rod processing from 1943 to 1975. Contaminated sediments from the base and sides of the former pond were excavated and removed from the site in the early 1990s, but a uranium plume has persisted in the groundwater at concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard. The former process pond is located adjacent to the Columbia River and seasonal fluctuations in the river stage and water table provide a mechanism for resupplying residual uranium from the vadose zone to the groundwater when the lower vadose zone is periodically rewetted. Intact cores were collected from the site for measurements of physical, hydraulic, and geochemical properties. Multistep outflow experiments were also performed on the intact cores to determine permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations. Pore water displaced during these experiments for two of the vadose zone cores was also analyzed for uranium. For a core containing finer-textured sediment classified as muddy sandy gravel, and a core containing coarser-textured sediment classified as gravel, the relative aqueous uranium concentrations increased by factors of 8.3 and 1.5, respectively, as the cores were desaturated and progressively smaller pore-size classes were drained. Aqueous concentrations of uranium in the extracted pore waters were up to 115 times higher than the current drinking water standard of 30 ppb. These results confirm that there is a continuing source of uranium in the vadose zone at the site, and are consistent with a hypothesis that the persistence of the groundwater uranium plume is also associated, in part, with rate-limited mass transfer from finer-textured sediments. The data from these and several other intact cores from the site are evaluated to explore relationships between physical and hydraulic properties and uranium desorption characteristics.

  15. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments: metal influence.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Raquel; Mucha, Ana P; Teixeira, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the potential effect of metals, such as Cd, Cu and Pb, on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments was investigated under laboratory conditions. Sandy and muddy non-vegetated sediments were collected in the Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) and spiked with crude oil and each of the metals. Spiked sediments were left in the dark under constant shaking for 15 days, after which crude oil biodegradation was evaluated. To estimate microbial abundance, total cell counts were obtained by DAPI staining and microbial community structure was characterized by ARISA. Culturable hydrocarbon degraders were determined using a modified most probable number protocol. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations were analysed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy after their extraction by sonication, and metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained showed that microbial communities had the potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with a maximum of 32 % degradation obtained for sandy sediments. Both crude oil and metals changed the microbial community structure, being the higher effect observed for Cu. Also, among the studied metals, only Cu displayed measurable deleterious effect on the hydrocarbons degradation process, as shown by a decrease in the hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance and in the hydrocarbon degradation rates. Both degradation potential and metal influence varied with sediment characteristics probably due to differences in contaminant bioavailability, a feature that should be taken into account in developing bioremediation strategies for co-contaminated estuarine sites.

  16. Soupy surface muds: a probable Sandy storm horizon with a potential source fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, B. A.; Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Browne, C. M.; Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Flood, R. D.; McHugh, C. M.; Dutton, J.; Hosseini, P.; Brownawell, B.

    2013-12-01

    Sandy, a powerful storm that impacted nearly half of the U.S., had a diameter in excess of 1000km. As it came onshore near Brigantine, NJ on October 29, 2012, it struck a devastating blow to Long Island's developed south shore (as well as NYC and much of NJ). Much of the south shore was affected by a 3 m or greater storm surge, measured as 1-2 m above ground level. A two-pronged assessment effort was undertaken in January and February 2013: a UTIG-led geophysical mapping/grab sampling effort that focused on sites offshore Fire Island and Long Beach, as well as Jones Inlet and some of the channels of the Western Bays, and an Adelphi-led sediments sampling effort that focused on the estuary. This study addresses the muddy sediments collected offshore in January and in the Western Bays of Nassau County in February. Three offshore regions were targeted for grab sampling in January off the R/V Seawolf: Fire Island (Fire Island East, FIE; Fire Island West, FIW) in Suffolk County and Long Beach (LB) in Nassau County. Offshore samples were also collected from Jones Inlet to the Rockaways in February off the R/V Pritchard. The high- energy, shallow offshore environment is typically characterized by coarse-grained sediments, but a discontinuous mud layer up to ~0.5 m thick is found at each location, overlying a coarser layer of sand or gravel. This suggests that the mud layer is a storm-related deposit. These muds are clearly observed as low-backscatter patches in the multi-beam data. We are not able to determine absolute thickness everywhere, but it is variable, ranging from a few cm thick to filling the grab sampler, which is ~ 20 cm high. The mud is observed in the CHIRP data as ponded regions; the thickest accumulations suggest up to ~0.5 m. Offshore of the breach on Fire Island (at Old Inlet), a thin layer of sand rests on the mud layer. The mud was not identified in Jones Inlet, but it was sampled in Hempstead Bay, on the south edge of Reynolds Channel. Previous

  17. Transport of microspheres and indigenous bacteria through a sandy aquifer: Results of natural- and forced-gradient tracer experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; George, L.H.; Smith, R.L.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Transport of indigenous bacteria through sandy aquifer sediments was investigated in forced- and natural-gradient tracer teste. A diverse population of bacteria was collected and concentrated from groundwater at the site, stained with a DNA-specific fluorochrome, and injected back into the aquifer. Included with the injectate were a conservative tracer (Br- or Cl-) and bacteria-sized (0.2-1.3-??m) microspheres having carboxylated, carbonyl, or neutral surfaces. Transport of stained bacteria and all types and size classes of microspheres was evident. In the natural-gradient test, both surface characteristics and size of microspheres affected attenuation. Surface characteristics had the greatest effect upon retardation. Peak break-through of DAPI-stained bacteria (forced-gradient experiment) occurred well in advance of bromide at the more distal sampler. Transport behavior of bacteria was substantially different from that of carboxylated microspheres of comparable size. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  18. Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.

    2003-10-01

    Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6 individuals km -1), estimated biomass (9.6 kg km -1), and species richness (5.5 species km -1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling ( Calidris alba), semipalmated plover ( Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled godwit ( Limosa fedoa), black-bellied plover ( Pluvialis squatarola), western sandpiper ( Calidris mauri), willet ( Catoptrophorus semipalmatus), surfbird ( Aphriza virgata), and whimbrel ( Numenius phaeopus), occurred in overall mean abundances >1 bird km -1 and accounted for 97% of the abundance and biomass of shorebirds. Sanderlings were the most abundant shorebird every year (64% of individuals and 35% of the biomass). Different species of abundant shorebirds exhibited distinct patterns of use of beach habitat, including fall, spring, and winter peaks in abundance. Temporal variation in shorebird use on seasonal and interannual scales was associated with migration patterns, and also with habitat availability and condition. Seasonal variation in monthly mean abundance and estimated biomass of shorebirds varied over more than an order of magnitude and followed a similar pattern in each year, reaching maxima in the fall or winter (161-280 individuals km -1 and 15.4-23.9 kg km -1) and minima in May or June (3-11 individuals km -1 and 0.8-2.2 kg km -1). A minor peak in shorebird abundance and biomass coinciding with spring migration was observed in April of most years. The number of species of shorebirds observed in individual surveys ranged from 0 to 11 species km -1 and was positively and significantly correlated with abundance. Monthly mean species richness and the total species observed monthly followed similar seasonal patterns, ranging from annual maxima of 7.4-9.1 and 12-17 species km -1 between August and October

  19. Use of colloid filtration theory in modeling movement of bacteria through a contaminated sandy aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    ??? A filtration model commonly used to describe removal of colloids during packed-bed filtration in water treatment applications was modified for describing downgradient transport of bacteria in sandy, aquifer sediments. The modified model was applied to the results of a small-scale (7 m), natural-gradient tracer test and to observations of an indigenous bacterial population moving downgradient within a plume of organically contaminated groundwater in Cape Cod, MA. The model reasonably accounted for concentration histories of labeled bacteria appearing at samplers downgradient from the injection well in the tracer experiment and for the observed 0.25-??m increase in average cell length for an unlabeled, indigenous bacterial population, 0.6 km downgradient from the source of the plume. Several uncertainties were apparent in applying filtration theory to problems involving transport of bacteria in groundwater. However, adsorption (attachment) appeared to be a major control of the extent of bacterial movement downgradient, which could be described, in part, by filtration theory. Estimates of the collision efficiency factor, which represents the physicochemical factors that determine adsorption of the bacteria onto the grain surfaces, ranged from 5.4 ?? 10-3 to 9.7 ?? 10-3.

  20. Instream wood as a driver of nutrient attenuation in a lowland sandy stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaar, Megan; Shelley, Felicity; Blaen, Phil; Dapelo, Davide; Trimmer, Mark; Bridgeman, John; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Our poster outlines our research to assess the potential of instream wood to enhance nutrient (nitrogen and carbon) attenuating potential in UK lowland rivers. Using cutting-edge distributed temperature sensing, geophysical technologies, novel microbial metabolic activity tracers and 15N isotope tracer applications, we are able to identify how instream wood alters hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence times which control the development and occurrence of biogeochemical hotspots, which facilitate nitrogen removal. Initial results show that instream wood increases surface water downwelling into the hyporheic, creating increased hyporheic mixing. Metabolic tracer, nutrient and modelling data reveal a correlation between these hyporheic exchange flow locations and increased denitrification hotspots. This data in conjunction with ongoing experimentation suggests that instream wood could be used in river basin management and river restoration efforts to improve water quality and hydromorphic integrity within lowland sandy streams. Ongoing work seeks to quantify the efficiency of alternative (stationary and transient) wood designs for controlled alteration and management of hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence times and nutrient turnover in the streambed. Outputs from this project will provide a quantitative understanding of the optimal design and efficiency of instream wood structures for removing excess nitrate from streambed sediments of nutrient impacted lowland rivers. This information will directly impact UK and European river restoration policies and inform decisions of whether wood restoration in UK lowland rivers should be promoted on a national level and how the most efficient strategies should be designed.

  1. The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Carracher, Lucy K; Porch, Nicholas; Connolly, Rod M; Olds, Andrew D; Gilby, Ben L; Ekanayake, Kasun B; Maslo, Brooke; Weston, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of birds breeding on ocean beaches and in coastal dunes are of global conservation concern. Most of these species rely on invertebrates (e.g. insects, small crustaceans) as an irreplaceable food source, foraging primarily around the strandline on the upper beach near the dunes. Sandy beaches are also prime sites for human recreation, which impacts these food resources via negative trampling effects. We quantified acute trampling impacts on assemblages of upper shore invertebrates in a controlled experiment over a range of foot traffic intensities (up to 56 steps per square metre) on a temperate beach in Victoria, Australia. Trampling significantly altered assemblage structure (species composition and density) and was correlated with significant declines in invertebrate abundance and species richness. Trampling effects were strongest for rare species. In heavily trafficked plots the abundance of sand hoppers (Amphipoda), a principal prey item of threatened Hooded Plovers breeding on this beach, was halved. In contrast to the consistently strong effects of trampling, natural habitat attributes (e.g. sediment grain size, compactness) were much less influential predictors. If acute suppression of invertebrates caused by trampling, as demonstrated here, is more widespread on beaches it may constitute a significant threat to endangered vertebrates reliant on these invertebrates. This calls for a re-thinking of conservation actions by considering active management of food resources, possibly through enhancement of wrack or direct augmentation of prey items to breeding territories.

  2. Meiofauna distribution in intertidal sandy beaches along China shoreline (18°-40°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Er; Zhang, Zhinan; Zhou, Hong; Mu, Fanghong; Li, Jia; Zhang, Ting; Cong, Bingqing; Liu, Xiaoshou

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the distribution pattern of meiofauna from nine sandy beaches at six latitudinal gradients along Chinese coast between 18 and 40°N was studied on their meiofauna abundance to examine the effect of latitudinal gradients. In general, meiofauna abundance was lower in four subtropical beaches in Xiamen (24°N) and Zhoushan (29°N) than that in other beaches. Meiofauna abundance differed little between tropical and temperate beaches. The taxonomic structure of meiofauna showed a dominance of nematode in colder area. The relative composition of turbellarians and polychaetes increased in warmer area. In addition to latitudinal gradient, salinity, oxygenation, sediment grain size affect also the meiofauna latitudinal distribution. As for horizontal distribution, the highest meiofauna abundance was found in low tidal zone at tropical beaches, and in middle tidal zone at temperate beaches. The horizontal distribution of meiofauna was controlled by both physical and biotic factors including feeding and anthropogenic activities. Although meiofauna abundance exhibited a horizontal difference, the composition of meiofaunal main taxa was unanimous horizontally at all beaches at the same sampling latitude.

  3. The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Carracher, Lucy K.; Porch, Nicholas; Connolly, Rod M.; Olds, Andrew D.; Gilby, Ben L.; Ekanayake, Kasun B.; Maslo, Brooke; Weston, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species of birds breeding on ocean beaches and in coastal dunes are of global conservation concern. Most of these species rely on invertebrates (e.g. insects, small crustaceans) as an irreplaceable food source, foraging primarily around the strandline on the upper beach near the dunes. Sandy beaches are also prime sites for human recreation, which impacts these food resources via negative trampling effects. We quantified acute trampling impacts on assemblages of upper shore invertebrates in a controlled experiment over a range of foot traffic intensities (up to 56 steps per square metre) on a temperate beach in Victoria, Australia. Trampling significantly altered assemblage structure (species composition and density) and was correlated with significant declines in invertebrate abundance and species richness. Trampling effects were strongest for rare species. In heavily trafficked plots the abundance of sand hoppers (Amphipoda), a principal prey item of threatened Hooded Plovers breeding on this beach, was halved. In contrast to the consistently strong effects of trampling, natural habitat attributes (e.g. sediment grain size, compactness) were much less influential predictors. If acute suppression of invertebrates caused by trampling, as demonstrated here, is more widespread on beaches it may constitute a significant threat to endangered vertebrates reliant on these invertebrates. This calls for a re-thinking of conservation actions by considering active management of food resources, possibly through enhancement of wrack or direct augmentation of prey items to breeding territories. PMID:27564550

  4. Microbial sewage contamination associated with Superstorm Sandy flooding in New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mullan, G.; Dueker, M.; Sahajpal, R.; Juhl, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The lower Hudson River Estuary commonly experiences degraded water quality following precipitation events due to the influence of combined sewer overflows. During Super-storm Sandy large scale flooding occurred in many waterfront areas of New York City, including neighborhoods bordering the Gowanus Canal and Newtown Creek Superfund sites known to frequently contain high levels of sewage associated bacteria. Water, sediment, and surface swab samples were collected from Newtown Creek and Gowanus Canal flood impacted streets and basements in the days following the storm, along with samples from the local waterways. Samples were enumerated for the sewage indicating bacterium, Enterococcus, and DNA was extracted and amplified for 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequence analysis. Waterways were found to have relatively low levels of sewage contamination in the days following the storm. In contrast, much higher levels of Enterococci were detected in basement and storm debris samples and these bacteria were found to persist for many weeks in laboratory incubations. These data suggest that substantial sewage contamination occurred in some flood impacted New York City neighborhoods and that the environmental persistence of flood water associated microbes requires additional study and management attention.

  5. Implications of fecal bacteria input from latrine-polluted ponds for wells in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knappett, Peter S K; McKay, Larry D; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E; Alam, Md J; Huq, Md R; Mey, Jacob; Feighery, John E; Culligan, Patricia J; Mailloux, Brian J; Zhuang, Jie; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael; Perfect, Edmund; Sayler, Gary S; Ahmed, Kazi M; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Ponds receiving latrine effluents may serve as sources of fecal contamination to shallow aquifers tapped by millions of tube-wells in Bangladesh. To test this hypothesis, transects of monitoring wells radiating away from four ponds were installed in a shallow sandy aquifer underlying a densely populated village and monitored for 14 months. Two of the ponds extended to medium sand. Another pond was sited within silty sand and the last in silt. The fecal indicator bacterium E. coli was rarely detected along the transects during the dry season and was only detected near the ponds extending to medium sand up to 7 m away during the monsoon. A log-linear decline in E. coli and Bacteroidales concentrations with distance along the transects in the early monsoon indicates that ponds excavated in medium sand were the likely source of contamination. Spatial removal rates ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 log(10)/m. After the ponds were artificially filled with groundwater to simulate the impact of a rain storm, E. coli levels increased near a pond recently excavated in medium sand, but no others. These observations show that adjacent sediment grain-size and how recently a pond was excavated influence the how much fecal contamination ponds receiving latrine effluents contribute to neighboring groundwater.

  6. The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Carracher, Lucy K; Porch, Nicholas; Connolly, Rod M; Olds, Andrew D; Gilby, Ben L; Ekanayake, Kasun B; Maslo, Brooke; Weston, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of birds breeding on ocean beaches and in coastal dunes are of global conservation concern. Most of these species rely on invertebrates (e.g. insects, small crustaceans) as an irreplaceable food source, foraging primarily around the strandline on the upper beach near the dunes. Sandy beaches are also prime sites for human recreation, which impacts these food resources via negative trampling effects. We quantified acute trampling impacts on assemblages of upper shore invertebrates in a controlled experiment over a range of foot traffic intensities (up to 56 steps per square metre) on a temperate beach in Victoria, Australia. Trampling significantly altered assemblage structure (species composition and density) and was correlated with significant declines in invertebrate abundance and species richness. Trampling effects were strongest for rare species. In heavily trafficked plots the abundance of sand hoppers (Amphipoda), a principal prey item of threatened Hooded Plovers breeding on this beach, was halved. In contrast to the consistently strong effects of trampling, natural habitat attributes (e.g. sediment grain size, compactness) were much less influential predictors. If acute suppression of invertebrates caused by trampling, as demonstrated here, is more widespread on beaches it may constitute a significant threat to endangered vertebrates reliant on these invertebrates. This calls for a re-thinking of conservation actions by considering active management of food resources, possibly through enhancement of wrack or direct augmentation of prey items to breeding territories. PMID:27564550

  7. Percolation and transport in a sandy soil under a natural hydraulic gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, C.T.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Bekins, B.A.; Akstin, K.C.; Schulz, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Unsaturated flow and transport under a natural hydraulic gradient in a Mediterranean climate were investigated with a field tracer experiment combined with laboratory analyses and numerical modeling. Bromide was applied to the surface of a sandy soil during the dry season. During the subsequent rainy season, repeated sediment sampling tracked the movement of bromide through the profile. Analysis of data on moisture content, matric pressure, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, and soil texture and structure provides insights into parameterization and use of the advective-dispersive modeling approach. Capturing the gross features of tracer and moisture movement with model simulations required an order-of-magnitude increase in laboratory-measured hydraulic conductivity. Wetting curve characteristics better represented field results, calling into question the routine estimation of hydraulic characteristics based only on drying conditions. Measured increases in profile moisture exceeded cumulative precipitation in early winter, indicating that gains from dew drip can exceed losses from evapotranspiration during periods of heavy ("Tule") fog. A single-continuum advective-dispersive modeling approach could not reproduce a peak of bromide that was retained near the soil surface for over 3 years. Modeling of this feature required slow exchange of solute at a transfer rate of 0.5-1 ?? 10-4 d-1 with an immobile volume approaching the residual moisture content.

  8. Origin and evolution of Ngaye River alluvial sediments, Northern Cameroon: Geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndjigui, Paul-Désiré; Beauvais, Anicet; Fadil-Djenabou, Soureiyatou; Ambrosi, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-01

    The origin of Ngaye River alluvial sediments and the evaluation of the weathering degree of their source rocks are assessed using trace and rare-earth element geochemistry in three bulk sediments and their different size fractions (2000-200 μm, 200-50 μm, 50-2 μm and <2 μm). The alluvial sediments consist of two sandy clay layers at the bottom and one sandy heavy clay layer at the top. Quartz and feldspars are the main minerals in the sand fractions while kaolinite and smectite are dominant in the finest sediments. The relatively low Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) indicates that the sediments and their potential source rocks are moderately weathered. Highest trace element contents are observed in the fine sands, which are the richest in Zr, Th, U, Sc and REE. La, Ce and Nd are the most abundant REE in this fraction. The coarse fractions are characterized by LREE-enrichment relative to HREE. The PAAS-normalized REE patterns exhibit large positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ∼3.1 to 3.9) in the coarse sand fraction of the sandy clay layers and strong negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ∼0.35 to 0.70) in the two sand fractions of the sandy heavy clay layer. Our results document the immaturity of the Ngaye River sediments, which derive mainly from the erosion of moderately weathered granitoids of the surrounding reliefs, and in some extent from greenstones and/or basic volcanics. The results also suggest an obvious dependence of trace and rare-earth element fractionation on mineral sorting and weathering in the different grain-sized fractions of the alluvial sediments.

  9. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: I. Biochemical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Filipe O; Lima, Gláucia; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    We report on biomarker responses conducted as part of a multi-level assessment of the chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments to the amphipod Gammarus locusta. A companion article accounts for organism and population-level effects. Five moderately contaminated sediments from two Portuguese estuaries, Sado and Tagus, were assessed. Three of them were muddy and two were sandy sediments. The objective was to assess sediments that were not acutely toxic. Three of the sediments met this criterion, the other two were diluted (50% and 75%) with clean sediment until acute toxicity was absent. Following 28-d exposures, the amphipods were analysed for whole-body metal bioaccumulation, metallothionein induction (MT), DNA strand breakage (SB) and lipid peroxidation (LP). Two of the muddy sediments did not cause chronic toxicity. These findings were consistent with responses at organism and population levels that showed higher growth rates and improvement of reproductive traits for amphipods exposed to these two sediments. Two other sediments, one muddy and one sandy, exhibited pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting SB, MT induction (in muddy sediment), survival and reproduction. Potential toxicants involved in these effects were identified. The last sandy sediment exhibited some loss of DNA integrity, however growth was also enhanced. Present results, together with the organism/population-level data, and also benthic communities information, were analysed under a weight-of-evidence approach. By providing evidence of exposure (or lack of it) to contaminants in sediments, the biomarkers here applied assisted in distinguishing toxicants' impacts in test organisms from the confounding influence of other geochemical features of the sediments. PMID:15649528

  10. The role of sediment structure in gas bubble storage and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wilkinson, J.; Koca, K.; Buchmann, C.; Lorke, A.

    2016-07-01

    Ebullition is an important pathway for methane emission from inland waters. However, the mechanisms controlling methane bubble formation and release in aquatic sediments remain unclear. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the dynamics of methane bubble formation, storage, and release in response to hydrostatic head drops in three different types of natural sediment. Homogenized clayey, silty, and sandy sediments (initially quasi-uniform through the depth of the columns) were incubated in chambers for 3 weeks. We observed three distinct stages of methane bubble formation and release: stage I—microbubble formation-displacing mobile water from sediment pores with negligible ebullition; stage II—formation of large bubbles, displacing the surrounding sediment with concurrent increase in ebullition; and stage III—formation of conduits with relatively steady ebullition. The maximum depth-averaged volumetric gas content at steady state varied from 18.8% in clayey to 12.0% in silty and 13.2% in sandy sediment. Gas storage in the sediment columns showed strong vertical stratification: most of the free gas was stored in an upper layer, whose thickness varied with sediment grain size. The magnitude of individual ebullition episodes was linearly correlated to hydrostatic head drop and decreased from clayey to sandy to silty sediment and was in excess of that estimated from gas expansion alone, indicating the release of pore water methane. These findings combined with a hydrodynamic model capable of determining dominant sediment type and depositional zones could help resolve spatial heterogeneities in methane ebullition at medium to larger scales in inland waters.

  11. Anthropopression markers in lake bottom sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadolna, Anna; Nowicka, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    top layer of sediments consists of organic sediment ("sapropel" type). The littoral zone is dominated by sandy material from the shores denudation. In river mouths sandy deltas are formed. The most contaminated sediments are deposited in the central pool, which is a natural trap for the substances flowing with the river that is draining wastewaters from urban areas. At its mouth the sediment samples were significantly contaminated with chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and mercury. A high content of total phosphorus was also detected. A different role is played by a large river flowing through the lake. While flushing the sediments it reduces their pollution. The lowest content of markers was detected in headwater areas and in littoral zones exposed to waving.

  12. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp. PMID:26647499

  13. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp.

  14. Benthic exchange and biogeochemical cycling in permeable sediments.

    PubMed

    Huettel, Markus; Berg, Peter; Kostka, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The sandy sediments that blanket the inner shelf are situated in a zone where nutrient input from land and strong mixing produce maximum primary production and tight coupling between water column and sedimentary processes. The high permeability of the shelf sands renders them susceptible to pressure gradients generated by hydrodynamic and biological forces that modulate spatial and temporal patterns of water circulation through these sediments. The resulting dynamic three-dimensional patterns of particle and solute distribution generate a broad spectrum of biogeochemical reaction zones that facilitate effective decomposition of the pelagic and benthic primary production products. The intricate coupling between the water column and sediment makes it challenging to quantify the production and decomposition processes and the resultant fluxes in permeable shelf sands. Recent technical developments have led to insights into the high biogeochemical and biological activity of these permeable sediments and their role in the global cycles of matter.

  15. Acoustic Volume Scattering from the Seafloor and the Small Scale Structure of Heterogeneous Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Anthony Patrick

    1995-11-01

    There has been little work on developing and testing seafloor volume scattering models and on the characterization of such volumes because of the complexity of the medium and the paucity of high resolution ground truth data. This dissertation addresses the different physical mechanisms responsible for backscattering from a seafloor volume and their relative importance. This was accomplished by: (1) examining and adapting theoretical and numerical techniques for predicting volume backscatter from seafloor environments in the frequency range from 5-50 kHz, (2) characterizing the physical properties of the seafloor volume that control acoustic backscatter in selected environmental regimes by using the high resolution techniques of CT scanning and p-wave logging and casting these descriptions in a form useful for scattering models, and (3) comparing model results constrained by ground truth information with acoustic data sets obtained in different seafloor environments in order to isolate physical scattering mechanisms which dominate scattering and to examine the effectiveness of the characterization and modeling components of this research. Specifically, a layered, gassy sediment and a sandy, shell hash sediment were examined. The gassy sediment was analyzed by using a continuum model for scattering from the surrounding sediment and a non-spherical bubble model for scattering from the included gas features. Simulations carried out with the bubble model showed that bubble scattering will dominate continuum scattering in soft mud containing gas bubbles. Results of calculations using the bubble scattering model compare well with data taken with the Naval Research Laboratory's Acoustic Sediment Classification System. The comparisons also show that bubbles smaller than those which could be found with CT scanning methods might be important at higher acoustic frequencies. The shell hash sediment was examined by using a single scattering model for the shell pieces instead of

  16. Hurricane Sandy's Fingerprint: Ripple Bedforms at an Inner Continental Shelf Sorted Bedform Field Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuVal, C.; Trembanis, A. C.; Beaudoin, J. D.; Schmidt, V. E.; Mayer, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrodynamics and seabed morphodynamics on the inner continental shelf and near shore environments have increasing relevance with continued development of near shore structures, offshore energy technologies and artificial reef construction. Characterizing the stresses on and response of the seabed near and around seabed objects will inform best practices for structural design, seabed mine and unexploded ordnance detection, and archaeological and benthic habitat studies. As part of an ONR funded project, Delaware's Redbird Reef is being studied for object scour and sorted bedform morphodynamics (Trembanis et al., in press). Central to this study are the effects of large storm events, such as Hurricane Sandy, which have had significant impact on the seafloor. Previous studies of inner shelf bedform dynamics have typically focused on near bed currents and bed stressors (e.g. Trembanis et al., 2004), sorted bedforms (e.g. Green et al., 2004) and object scour (e.g. Quinn, 2006; Trembanis et al., 2007; Mayer et al., 2007), but our understanding of the direct effects of objects and object scour on bedform morphodynamics is still incomplete. With prominent sorted bedform ripple fields, the Delaware Redbird artificial reef site, composed of 997 former New York City subway cars, as well as various military vehicles, tugboats, barges and ballasted tires, has made an ideal study location (Raineault et al., 2013 and 2011). Acoustic mapping of the Redbird reef three days prior to Sandy and two days after the following nor'easter, captured the extensive effects of the storms to the site, while acoustic Doppler current profilers characterized both the waves and bottom currents generated by the storm events. Results of the post-Sandy survey support the theory of sorted bedform evolution proposed by Murray and Thieler (2004). Acoustic imagery analysis indicates a highly energized and mobile bed during the storms, leading to self-organization of bedforms and creation of large

  17. Impact of Offshore Wind Energy Plants on the Soil Mechanical Behaviour of Sandy Seafloors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Nina; Lambers-Huesmann, Maria; Zeiler, Manfred; Zoellner, Christian; Kopf, Achim

    2010-05-01

    Over the last decade, wind energy has become an important renewable energy source. Especially, the installation of offshore windfarms offers additional space and higher average wind speeds than the well-established windfarms onshore. Certainly, the construction of offshore wind turbines has an impact on the environment. In the framework of the Research at Alpha VEntus (RAVE) project in the German offshore wind energy farm Alpha Ventus (north of the island Borkum in water depths of about 30 m) a research plan to investigate the environmental impact had been put into place. An ongoing study focuses on the changes in soil mechanics of the seafloor close to the foundations and the development of scour. Here, we present results of the first geotechnical investigations after construction of the plants (ca. 1 - 6 months) compared to geotechnical measurements prior to construction. To study the soil mechanical behaviour of the sand, sediment samples from about thirty different positions were measured in the laboratory to deliver, e.g., grain size (0.063 - 0.3 mm), friction angles (~ 32°), unit weight (~ 19.9 kN/m³) and void ratios (~ 0.81). For acoustic visualisation, side-scan-sonar (towed and stationary) and multibeam-echosounders (hull mounted) were used. Data show a flat, homogenous seafloor prior to windmill erection, and scouring effects at and in the vicinity of the foundations afterwards. Geotechnical in-situ measurements were carried out using a standard dynamic Cone Penetration Testing lance covering the whole windfarm area excluding areas in a radius < 50 m from the installed windmills (due the accessibility with the required research vessel). In addition, the small free-fall penetrometer Nimrod was deployed at the same spots, and furthermore, in the areas close to the tripod foundations (down to a distance of ~ 5 m from the central pile). Before construction, CPT as well as Nimrod deployments confirm a flat, homogenous sandy area with tip resistance values

  18. Coastline evolution of Portuguese low-lying sandy coast in the last 50 years: an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte Lira, Cristina; Nobre Silva, Ana; Taborda, Rui; Freire de Andrade, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Regional/national-scale information on coastline rates of change and trends is extremely valuable, but these studies are scarce. A widely accepted standardized methodology for analysing long-term coastline change has been difficult to achieve, but it is essential to conduct an integrated and holistic approach to coastline evolution and hence support coastal management actions. Additionally, databases providing knowledge on coastline evolution are of key importance to support both coastal management experts and users.The main objective of this work is to present the first systematic, national-scale and consistent long-term coastline evolution data of Portuguese mainland low-lying sandy coasts.The methodology used quantifies coastline evolution using a unique and robust coastline indicator (the foredune toe), which is independent of short-term changes.The dataset presented comprises (1) two polyline sets, mapping the 1958 and 2010 sandy beach-dune system coastline, both optimized for working at 1 : 50 000 scale or smaller; (2) one polyline set representing long-term change rates between 1958 and 2010, each estimated at 250 m; and (3) a table with minimum, maximum and mean of evolution rates for sandy beach-dune system coastline. All science data produced here are openly accessible at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136 and can be used in other studies.Results show beach erosion as the dominant trend, with a mean change rate of -0.24 ± 0.01 m year-1 for all mainland Portuguese beach-dune systems. Although erosion is dominant, this evolution is variable in signal and magnitude in different coastal sediment cells and also within each cell. The most relevant beach erosion issues were found in the coastal stretches of Espinho-Torreira and Costa Nova-Praia de Mira, Cova da Gala-Leirosa, and Cova do Vapor-Costa da Caparica. The coastal segments Minho River-Nazaré and Costa da Caparica

  19. Hurricane Sandy: observations and analysis of coastal change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sopkin, Kristin L.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Morgan, Karen L.M.; Guy, Kristy K.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy, the largest Atlantic hurricane on record, made landfall on October 29, 2012, and impacted a long swath of the U.S. Atlantic coastline. The barrier islands were breached in a number of places and beach and dune erosion occurred along most of the Mid-Atlantic coast. As a part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, the U.S. Geological Survey collected post-Hurricane Sandy oblique aerial photography and lidar topographic surveys to document the changes that occurred as a result of the storm. Comparisons of post-storm photographs to those collected prior to Sandy’s landfall were used to characterize the nature, magnitude, and spatial variability of hurricane-induced coastal changes. Analysis of pre- and post-storm lidar elevations was used to quantify magnitudes of change in shoreline position, dune elevation, and beach width. Erosion was observed along the coast from North Carolina to New York; however, as would be expected over such a large region, extensive spatial variability in storm response was observed.

  20. Mental health outcomes at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Kirchner, H Lester; Erlich, Porat M; Adams, Richard E; Figley, Charles R; Solhkhah, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the most densely populated region in the US. In New Jersey, thousands of families were made homeless and entire communities were destroyed in the worst disaster in the history of the state. The economic impact of Sandy was huge, comparable to Hurricane Katrina. The areas that sustained the most damage were the small- to medium-sized beach communities along New Jersey's Atlantic coastline. Six months following the hurricane, we conducted a random telephone survey of 200 adults residing in 18 beach communities located in Monmouth County. We found that 14.5% (95% CI = 9.9-20.2) of these residents screened positive for PTSD and 6.0% (95% CI = 3.1-10.2) met criteria for major depression. Altogether 13.5% (95% CI = 9.1-19.0) received mental health counseling and 20.5% (95% CI = 15.1-26.8) sought some type of mental health support in person or online, rates similar to those reported in New York after the World Trade Center disaster In multivariate analyses, the best predictors of mental health status and service use were having high hurricane exposure levels, having physical health limitations, and having environmental health concerns. Research is needed to assess the mental health status and service use of Jersey Shore residents over time, to evaluate environmental health concerns, and to better understand the storm's impact among those with physical health limitations. PMID:24558743

  1. Transformation of corn plant residues in loamy and sandy substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, A. N.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Pinskii, D. L.

    2014-05-01

    The mineralization and humification dynamics of corn plant residues in loamy and sandy substrates have been studied under laboratory conditions. It has been shown that the dynamics are determined by the undulating development laws of the microbial community under constant temperature and moisture conditions. At the same time, the intensity and final results of the processes significantly differ depending on the composition and properties of the mineral substrate. The loss of Corg during the mineralization and the content of newly formed humic substances reached the maximum values a month after the beginning of the experiment. The mineralization is more intensive in sand at the early stages, and the humification is more active in loam throughout the incubation period. The loamy substrate has better protective properties compared to the sand; therefore, it favors the accumulation of significant amounts of fulvic acids (FAs), along with humic acids (HAs), and causes the relative fulvatization of the humic substances. It has been found using densimetric fractionation and Fourier IR spectroscopy that the different mineralogy of the fractions results in differences in the chemical composition of the formed mineral-organic compounds of newly formed humic substances, mainly due to carboxyl and nitrogen-containing groups. The similarity of the humification products in the heavy fractions of the loamy and sandy substrates has been revealed.

  2. Mental health outcomes at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Kirchner, H Lester; Erlich, Porat M; Adams, Richard E; Figley, Charles R; Solhkhah, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the most densely populated region in the US. In New Jersey, thousands of families were made homeless and entire communities were destroyed in the worst disaster in the history of the state. The economic impact of Sandy was huge, comparable to Hurricane Katrina. The areas that sustained the most damage were the small- to medium-sized beach communities along New Jersey's Atlantic coastline. Six months following the hurricane, we conducted a random telephone survey of 200 adults residing in 18 beach communities located in Monmouth County. We found that 14.5% (95% CI = 9.9-20.2) of these residents screened positive for PTSD and 6.0% (95% CI = 3.1-10.2) met criteria for major depression. Altogether 13.5% (95% CI = 9.1-19.0) received mental health counseling and 20.5% (95% CI = 15.1-26.8) sought some type of mental health support in person or online, rates similar to those reported in New York after the World Trade Center disaster In multivariate analyses, the best predictors of mental health status and service use were having high hurricane exposure levels, having physical health limitations, and having environmental health concerns. Research is needed to assess the mental health status and service use of Jersey Shore residents over time, to evaluate environmental health concerns, and to better understand the storm's impact among those with physical health limitations.

  3. The impact of Hurricane Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf of Fire Island, New York: Large bedform migration but limited erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.; Flood, Roger D.; Austin, James A., Jr.; Schwab, William C.; Christensen, Beth; Browne, Cassandra M.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact of superstorm Sandy on the lower shoreface and inner shelf offshore the barrier island system of Fire Island, NY using before-and-after surveys involving swath bathymetry, backscatter and CHIRP acoustic reflection data. As sea level rises over the long term, the shoreface and inner shelf are eroded as barrier islands migrate landward; large storms like Sandy are thought to be a primary driver of this largely evolutionary process. The "before" data were collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a long-term investigation of the Fire Island barrier system. The "after" data were collected in January, 2013, ~two months after the storm. Surprisingly, no widespread erosional event was observed. Rather, the primary impact of Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf was to force migration of major bedforms (sand ridges and sorted bedforms) 10's of meters WSW alongshore, decreasing in migration distance with increasing water depth. Although greater in rate, this migratory behavior is no different than observations made over the 15-year span prior to the 2011 survey. Stratigraphic observations of buried, offshore-thinning fluvial channels indicate that long-term erosion of older sediments is focused in water depths ranging from the base of the shoreface (~13-16 m) to ~21 m on the inner shelf, which is coincident with the range of depth over which sand ridges and sorted bedforms migrated in response to Sandy. We hypothesize that bedform migration regulates erosion over these water depths and controls the formation of a widely observed transgressive ravinement; focusing erosion of older material occurs at the base of the stoss (upcurrent) flank of the bedforms. Secondary storm impacts include the formation of ephemeral hummocky bedforms and the deposition of a mud event layer.

  4. The impact of Hurricane Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf of Fire Island, New York: large bedform migration but limited erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, John A.; Flood, Roger D.; Austin, James A.; Schwab, William C.; Christensen, Beth A.; Browne, Cassandra M.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of superstorm Sandy on the lower shoreface and inner shelf offshore the barrier island system of Fire Island, NY using before-and-after surveys involving swath bathymetry, backscatter and CHIRP acoustic reflection data. As sea level rises over the long term, the shoreface and inner shelf are eroded as barrier islands migrate landward; large storms like Sandy are thought to be a primary driver of this largely evolutionary process. The “before” data were collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a long-term investigation of the Fire Island barrier system. The “after” data were collected in January, 2013, ~two months after the storm. Surprisingly, no widespread erosional event was observed. Rather, the primary impact of Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf was to force migration of major bedforms (sand ridges and sorted bedforms) 10’s of meters WSW alongshore, decreasing in migration distance with increasing water depth. Although greater in rate, this migratory behavior is no different than observations made over the 15-year span prior to the 2011 survey. Stratigraphic observations of buried, offshore-thinning fluvial channels indicate that long-term erosion of older sediments is focused in water depths ranging from the base of the shoreface (~13–16 m) to ~21 m on the inner shelf, which is coincident with the range of depth over which sand ridges and sorted bedforms migrated in response to Sandy. We hypothesize that bedform migration regulates erosion over these water depths and controls the formation of a widely observed transgressive ravinement; focusing erosion of older material occurs at the base of the stoss (upcurrent) flank of the bedforms. Secondary storm impacts include the formation of ephemeral hummocky bedforms and the deposition of a mud event layer.

  5. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  6. Morphodynamic Impacts of Hurricane Sandy on the Inner-shelf (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembanis, A. C.; Beaudoin, J. D.; DuVal, C.; Schmidt, V. E.; Mayer, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Through the careful execution of precision high-resolution acoustic sonar surveys over the period of October 2012 through July 2013, we have obtained a unique set of high-resolution before and after storm measurements of seabed morphology and in situ hydrodynamic conditions (waves and currents) capturing the impact of the storm at an inner continental shelf field site known as the 'Redbird reef' (Raineault et al., 2013). Understanding the signature of this storm event is important for identifying the impacts of such events and for understanding the role that such events have in the transport of sediment and marine debris on the inner continental shelf. In order to understand and characterize the ripple dynamics and scour processes in an energetic, heterogeneous inner-shelf setting, a series of high-resolution geoacoustic surveys were conducted before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our overall goal is to improve our understanding of bedform dynamics and spatio-temporal length scales and defect densities through the application of a recently developed fingerprint algorithm technique (Skarke and Trembanis, 2011). Utilizing high-resolution swath sonar collected by an AUV and from surface vessel multibeam sonar, our study focuses both on bedforms in the vicinity of manmade seabed objects (e.g. shipwrecks and subway cars) and dynamic natural ripples on the inner-shelf in energetic coastal settings with application to critical military operations such as mine countermeasures. Seafloor mapping surveys were conducted both with a ship-mounted multibeam echosounder (200 kHz and 400 kHz) and an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) configured with high-resolution side-scan sonar (900 and 1800 kHz) and a phase measuring bathymetric sonar (500 kHz). These geoacoustic surveys were further augmented with data collected by in situ instruments placed on the seabed that recorded measurements of waves and currents at the site before, during, and after the storm. Multibeam echosounder map of

  7. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (<0.1, 0.3 and 0.7 pore volume). The early time to peak breakthrough of anionic and microbial tracers indicated preferential flow paths, presumably from soil cracks, root channels, worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface. PMID:22885066

  8. Degradation pathway and field-scale DT50 determination of Boscalid in a sandy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anneli S.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The research on environmental fate of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades and the persistence of several compounds in soil matrices is well documented. However, the fate of the new fungicide Boscalid (introduced in 2003) is not yet completely investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of Boscalid in a sandy soil. Three years after the second application on a cropland site in Kaldenkirchen, Germany, 65 undisturbed soil samples from the plough layer were derived. Boscalid residues were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and measured with UPLC-MS/MS. The Boscalid residues ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 μg kg-1with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg-1. These results differed considerably from the predicted field concentration of 16.89 μg kg-1 (calculated from the application rate) and half-lives (DT50) of 104-182 days compared to 345 days reported in literature. Adjusting the extraction efficiency to 20% could not explain the large difference. Therefore, an incubation study with 14C-labeled Boscalid was conducted to measure the DT50 under controlled conditions. Here, the DT50 values were in the range of values stated in literature (297-337 days compared to 345 days) but still much larger than the DT50 based on the field-study values (104-182 days). Our results indicate that Boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. Future experiments with Boscalid will be conducted in two different soils with different particle size. A laboratory experiment with uniformly 13C-labeled Boscalid will provide insight into the uptake and incorporation in microbial biomass.

  9. Degradation pathway and field-scale DT50 determination of Boscalid in a sandy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anneli S.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The research on environmental fate of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades and the persistence of several compounds in soil matrices is well documented. However, the fate of the new fungicide Boscalid (introduced in 2003) is not yet completely investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of Boscalid in a sandy soil. Three years after the second application on a cropland site in Kaldenkirchen, Germany, 65 undisturbed soil samples from the plough layer were derived. Boscalid residues were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and measured with UPLC-MS/MS. The Boscalid residues ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 μg kg‑1with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg‑1. These results differed considerably from the predicted field concentration of 16.89 μg kg‑1 (calculated from the application rate) and half-lives (DT50) of 104-182 days compared to 345 days reported in literature. Adjusting the extraction efficiency to 20% could not explain the large difference. Therefore, an incubation study with 14C-labeled Boscalid was conducted to measure the DT50 under controlled conditions. Here, the DT50 values were in the range of values stated in literature (297-337 days compared to 345 days) but still much larger than the DT50 based on the field-study values (104-182 days). Our results indicate that Boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. Future experiments with Boscalid will be conducted in two different soils with different particle size. A laboratory experiment with uniformly 13C-labeled Boscalid will provide insight into the uptake and incorporation in microbial biomass.

  10. [Spatial patterns of seed dispersal in Hemiptelea davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Fei; Bai, Yun-Peng; Li, Jian-Dong; Li, Li

    2010-08-01

    In order to reveal the space expansion potential of Hemiptelea davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land in China, the quantitative spatial characteristics of the seed rain in the understory and at the woodsides, as well as the seed dispersal patterns at the woodsides and of the isolating trees, were analyzed through survey on sequential sampling away from seed source in different directions at the woodsides and isolating trees and random sampling in the understory. The results showed that among three sampling plots, the average density of the seed rain in the understory was the highest (13732.5 +/- 3106.2 seeds x m(-2)). For isolating trees, the seed rain had the highest density (5449.4 +/- 1429.3 seeds x m(-2)) in southeast transect, being significantly higher than that in other directions, and the lowest one (650.2 +/- 631.6 seeds x m(-2)) in the northwest transect, being significantly lower than that in other directions. At the woodsides, the seed rain density was significantly higher in the east and south transects than in the west and north transects. The variation of the seed density was greater, with the variation coefficient being 25.7%-106.3% in different directions in the two plots of isolating trees and woodsides. Same as other anemochorous plants, H. davidii had the characteristics of seed dispersal away from the seed source. In the eight sampling transects, there existed diversity in the patterns of the seed dispersal away from the seed source in per unit area and in accumulated area, including linear, power, exponential, quadratic parabola, and logarithmic functions. It was suggested that the space expansion potential of H. davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land would be greater in more frequency down wind directions such as the south, southeast, and east than in more frequency upwind directions such as the north, northwest, and west.

  11. Field scale boscalid residues and dissipation half-life estimation in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anneli Sofia; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of the fungicide boscalid in a sandy soil. Boscalid was applied in spring 2010/11 to a cropland site in western Germany. Three years after second application 65 undisturbed soil samples were taken. Boscalid was extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Boscalid contents in the plough horizon ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg(-1). These contents were considerably lower compared to calculation using literature DT50 values, whereby a concentration of 16.89 μg kg(-1) was expected assuming a literature DT50 value of 345 days. Therefore, the measured field boscalid concentration only yields 1.2% of the expected value. To test whether the unknown extraction efficiency, losses from spray drift and interception can explain the mismatch between calculated and measured concentrations all these uncertainties were taken into account into calculations, but field concentrations and DT50 were still lower as expected. Leaching to deeper horizons was also studied but could not explain the discrepancy either. Moreover, a short-term incubation experiment using (14)C labelled boscalid revealed also shorter DT50 values of 297-337 compared to the 345 days taken from literature. However, this DT50 value is still considerably larger compared to the 104-224 days that were calculated based on the field experiment. Our results indicate that boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. PMID:26688253

  12. Coastal topography–Northeast Atlantic coast, post-hurricane Sandy, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Fredericks, Xan

    2013-01-01

    This Data Series contains lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, dune elevations, and mean-high-water shoreline position datasets for most sandy beaches for Fire Island, New York, and from Cape Henlopen, Delaware to Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The data were acquired post-Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall as an extratropical cyclone on October 29, 2012.

  13. 76 FR 64341 - Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Cost and Revenue Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Cost and Revenue Study Take notice that on April 8, 2011, Big Sandy Pipeline, LLC filed its cost and revenue study in compliance with...

  14. The evolution of sediment acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotiros, Nicholas P.; Isakson, Marcia J.

    2012-11-01

    Sediment acoustic models contain two connected components, the geo-physical description of the sediment and the model of acoustic processes. Geo-physical descriptors are used in the classification of sediments, and they are based on grain size, density and other physical descriptors. Acoustic sediment models were initially fluid approximations that were simple to implement. As the need for accuracy increased, the fluid model was extended to stratified fluid and visco-elastic models. The latter, with five frequency-independent parameters, appeared to be consistent with sediment acoustic data up to the 1980s. More recent experimental data have revealed discrepancies in the frequency-dependence of attenuation and sound speed, particularly in the case of sandy sediments, which cover a large fraction of the continental shelves. Broad-band acoustic measurements of wave speeds and attenuations are more consistent with a poro-elastic model, consisting of Biot's theory with extensions to account for the physics of granular media. Aside from terminology, there is a fundamental difference between visco-elastic and poro-elastic theories. The former is based on two types of waves, a compressional wave and a shear wave, while the latter has an additional compressional wave, often called the Biot wave. There are currently two approaches to the development of sediment acoustic models: (a) visco-elastic models with frequency dependent parameters that mimic the observed behavior, and (b) poro-elastic models that reflect the physical processes. It is shown that (a) would be a significant improvement over existing models, but (b) is the preferred solution.

  15. Seasonal variation of bivalve larvae on an exposed sandy beach on Kashima-nada: Tips for the sandy beach recruitment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hideki; Saito, Hajime; Adachi, Kumiko; Toyohara, Haruhiko

    2011-02-01

    Bivalves are often the dominant macrobenthos species in exposed sandy beach environments. However, our understanding of their recruitment processes before post-settlement stages on sandy beaches with highly energetic environments is incomplete. To clarify the characteristics of the free-swimming planktonic stage that affects recruitment efficiency in sandy shore ecosystems, we investigated the temporal (weekly-biweekly) variation of bivalve planktonic larval concentration coupled with oceanographic conditions on an exposed sandy shore on the sea of Kashima-nada, Japan, from summer 2003 to autumn 2005. Larvae were observed throughout the year, but the surge of larval concentration composed of sandy beach and sessile bivalves occurred most prominently in summer, from August to September. The peak concentration of larvae during this season was more than 1000 times higher than in other seasons. The larval concentration was positively correlated with water temperature and northward wind velocity and negatively correlated with each of the nutrient concentrations. On the other hand, chlorophyll a concentration and salinity seemed to have little effect on the larval concentration. Based on this fundamental knowledge, further investigations about planktonic larvae in sandy beaches are needed.

  16. Retention and degradation of the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin in sediments - the role of sediment preconditioning and DOM composition.

    PubMed

    Klitzke, Sondra; Apelt, Susann; Weiler, Christiane; Fastner, Jutta; Chorus, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Recent results show that cylindrospermopsin is more frequent and widespread in surface waters than previously assumed. Studies on the fate of CYN in sediments are lacking, but this is important if these resources are used for drinking-water production via sediment passage. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine a) CYN retention in two sandy sediments as a function of flow rate, CYN concentration, the presence of DOM and the content of fines (1% and 4%, respectively) and b) the influence of sediment preconditioning and DOM composition of the water (aquatic DOM versus DOM released from lysed cells) on CYN degradation. Retention of CYN proved negligible under the investigated conditions. Degradation in virgin sediments showed the highest lag phases (20 days). Preconditioned sediments showed no lag phase. The presence of aquatic DOM yielded highest degradation rates (kappa(1)=0.46 and 0.49 day(-1)) without a lag phase. Readily available organic carbon sources were preferentially metabolized and hence induced a lag phase. Thus, the presence and composition of DOM in the water proved important for both CYN degradation rates in preconditioned sediments and for the lag phase. Cylindrospermopsin degradation took place solely in the sediment and not in the water body.

  17. Methane and organic matter as sources for excess carbon dioxide in intertidal surface sediments of the German Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Walpersdorf, E. C.; Heuer, V.; Hinrichs, K.; Hilker, Y.; Engelen, B.; Volkenborn, N.; Segl, M.

    2009-12-01

    The tidal areas of the German Wadden Sea form an important transition zone between the terrestrial and marine environment. Tidal areas represent highly productive marine coastal ecosystems that are under additional influence of riverine inputs. The re-mineralization of organic matter is coupled to reductive processes using oxygen, nitrate, Mn,Fe oxy(hydroxi)des and sulfate as final electron acceptors. Sulfate reduction is involved in the oxidation of DOC and methane, and is the most important anaerobic process leading to a re-flux of CO2 into the water column. CH4 and CO2 are important greenhouse gases. Both are produced in marine sediments but methane fluxes from marine sediments to the water column or the atmosphere are often limited by oxidation. Upon oxidation of organic matter and methane, carbon dioxide is added to pore waters, and both, carbon dioxide and methane may be liberated from intertidal surface sediments into the bottom waters or the atmosphere. Sizes and quality of OM pools and methane concentrations, transport properties as well as biogeochemical processs in intertidal sediments differ in different sediment types (sands, mixed and mud flats). Pore waters and surface sediments from the intertidal of the German Wadden Sea, North Sea, have been analyzed on a seasonal base for a number of (bio)geochemical parameters as, for instance, the contents and isotope composition of TOC, DIC, methane, sulphate reduction rates (SRR), sulfate, sulfide, pyrite, AVS. The typical sediments of the tidal area of Spiekeroog Island have been considered, as sands, mixed and mud flats. The C-13/C-12 partitioning was used to identify the major sources of DIC and key reactions in the coupled C-S cycles. SRR showed a control by season (temperature) and organic matter contents. Bulk organic matter in the surface sediments showed stable carbon isotope data between about -19 and -25 per mil with lighter data found in mixed and mud flats, indicating mixtures between marine and

  18. Hurricane Sandy: Shared Trauma and Therapist Self-Disclosure.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nyapati; Mehra, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most devastating storms to hit the United States in history. The impact of the hurricane included power outages, flooding in the New York City subway system and East River tunnels, disrupted communications, acute shortages of gasoline and food, and a death toll of 113 people. In addition, thousands of residences and businesses in New Jersey and New York were destroyed. This article chronicles the first author's personal and professional experiences as a survivor of the hurricane, more specifically in the dual roles of provider and trauma victim, involving informed self-disclosure with a patient who was also a victim of the hurricane. The general analytic framework of therapy is evaluated in the context of the shared trauma faced by patient and provider alike in the face of the hurricane, leading to important implications for future work on resilience and recovery for both the therapist and patient.

  19. Hurricane Sandy: Shared Trauma and Therapist Self-Disclosure.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nyapati; Mehra, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most devastating storms to hit the United States in history. The impact of the hurricane included power outages, flooding in the New York City subway system and East River tunnels, disrupted communications, acute shortages of gasoline and food, and a death toll of 113 people. In addition, thousands of residences and businesses in New Jersey and New York were destroyed. This article chronicles the first author's personal and professional experiences as a survivor of the hurricane, more specifically in the dual roles of provider and trauma victim, involving informed self-disclosure with a patient who was also a victim of the hurricane. The general analytic framework of therapy is evaluated in the context of the shared trauma faced by patient and provider alike in the face of the hurricane, leading to important implications for future work on resilience and recovery for both the therapist and patient. PMID:26168028

  20. Remediation of sandy soils using surfactant solutions and foams.

    PubMed

    Couto, Hudson J B; Massarani, Guilio; Biscaia, Evaristo C; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L

    2009-05-30

    Remediation of sandy soils contaminated with diesel oil was investigated in bench-scale experiments. Surfactant solution, regular foams and colloidal gas aphrons were used as remediation fluids. An experimental design technique was used to investigate the effect of relevant process variables on remediation efficiency. Soils prepared with different average particle sizes (0.04-0.12 cm) and contaminated with different diesel oil contents (40-80 g/kg) were used in experiments conducted with remediation fluids. A mathematical model was proposed allowing for the determination of oil removal rate-constant (k(v)) and oil content remaining in the soil after remediation (C(of)) as well as estimation of the percentage of oil removed. Oil removal efficiencies obtained under the central experimental design conditions were 96%, 88% and 35% for aphrons, regular foams and surfactant solutions, respectively. High removal efficiencies were obtained using regular foams and aphrons, demanding small amounts of surfactant.

  1. Performance of Social Network Sensors during Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Kryvasheyeu, Yury; Chen, Haohui; Moro, Esteban; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Cebrian, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Information flow during catastrophic events is a critical aspect of disaster management. Modern communication platforms, in particular online social networks, provide an opportunity to study such flow and derive early-warning sensors, thus improving emergency preparedness and response. Performance of the social networks sensor method, based on topological and behavioral properties derived from the “friendship paradox”, is studied here for over 50 million Twitter messages posted before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We find that differences in users’ network centrality effectively translate into moderate awareness advantage (up to 26 hours); and that geo-location of users within or outside of the hurricane-affected area plays a significant role in determining the scale of such an advantage. Emotional response appears to be universal regardless of the position in the network topology, and displays characteristic, easily detectable patterns, opening a possibility to implement a simple “sentiment sensing” technique that can detect and locate disasters. PMID:25692690

  2. Public support for policies to reduce risk after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R; Weiner, Marc D; Noland, Robert; Herb, Jeanne; Kaplan, Marjorie; Broccoli, Anthony J

    2014-06-01

    A phone survey was conducted in New Jersey in 2013 four months after the second of two major devastating tropical storms (Sandy in 2012 and Irene in 2011). The objective was to estimate public support for restricting land uses in flood zones, requiring housing to be built to resist storm waters, and otherwise increasing mitigation and resilience. Respondents who supported these mitigation and resilience policies disproportionately were concerned about global climate change, trusted climate scientists and the federal government, and were willing to contribute to a redevelopment program through taxes, bonds, and fees. They also tended to have collectivist and egalitarian worldviews. Half of the respondents supported at least four of the seven risk-reducing policies. How their support translates into public policy remains to be seen. Lack of willingness to personally fund these policies is an obstacle.

  3. Performance of social network sensors during Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Kryvasheyeu, Yury; Chen, Haohui; Moro, Esteban; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Cebrian, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Information flow during catastrophic events is a critical aspect of disaster management. Modern communication platforms, in particular online social networks, provide an opportunity to study such flow and derive early-warning sensors, thus improving emergency preparedness and response. Performance of the social networks sensor method, based on topological and behavioral properties derived from the "friendship paradox", is studied here for over 50 million Twitter messages posted before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We find that differences in users' network centrality effectively translate into moderate awareness advantage (up to 26 hours); and that geo-location of users within or outside of the hurricane-affected area plays a significant role in determining the scale of such an advantage. Emotional response appears to be universal regardless of the position in the network topology, and displays characteristic, easily detectable patterns, opening a possibility to implement a simple "sentiment sensing" technique that can detect and locate disasters.

  4. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E

    2014-01-01

    Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  5. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  6. [Effect of grazing on sandy grassland ecosystem in Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Halin; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhou, Ruilian

    2004-03-01

    This experiment was carried out for 5 years in Horqin sandy land, lnner Mongolia, which had 4 treatments: Non-grazing (NG), light grazing (LG), moderate grazing (MG) and over grazing (OG). The results showed that different grazing intensities resulted in different development trend of the pasture ecosystem, of which, the injury of OG on pasture ecosystem was very great. The plant diversity, vegetation coverage, plant height and primary productivity under continuous overgrazing for 5 year were 87.9%, 82.1%, 94.0% and 57.0%, respectively, lower than those in NG. The biomass on the OG pasture was only 2.1% of NG, and the contents of soil clay, C and N as well as the quantities of soil microbes and small animals in OG were respectively 6.0%, 31.9%, 25.0%, 95.0% and 75.9% lower than those in NG, but the soil hardness was raised by 274.0%. Especially, the secondary productivity of the pasture became negative from the third year, and the productive foundation of the pasture ecosystem was completely destroyed. Non-grazing was beneficial to pasture, and enclosure caused an increase in vegetation coverage, plant height and primary productivity. The vegetation coverage, plant height and soil status in LG and MG were not as good as those in NG, but were stable and didn't show worsening trend. Based on the above results, it's considered that on the sandy pasture in the semi-arid area of Inner Mongolia, the rational grass utilization ratio is 45%-50%, and the suitable loading capacity is 3-4 sheep unit.hm-2. PMID:15227991

  7. Sedimentation in mountain streams: A review of methods of measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, Lara B.; Anderson, James T.; Welsh, Stuart; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this review paper is to provide a list of methods and devices used to measure sediment accumulation in wadeable streams dominated by cobble and gravel substrate. Quantitative measures of stream sedimentation are useful to monitor and study anthropogenic impacts on stream biota, and stream sedimentation is measurable with multiple sampling methods. Evaluation of sedimentation can be made by measuring the concentration of suspended sediment, or turbidity, and by determining the amount of deposited sediment, or sedimentation on the streambed. Measurements of deposited sediments are more time consuming and labor intensive than measurements of suspended sediments. Traditional techniques for characterizing sediment composition in streams include core sampling, the shovel method, visual estimation along transects, and sediment traps. This paper provides a comprehensive review of methodology, devices that can be used, and techniques for processing and analyzing samples collected to aid researchers in choosing study design and equipment.

  8. Blood Gas Analyzers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Anthony L; Waddell, Lori S

    2016-03-01

    Acid-base and respiratory disturbances are common in sick and hospitalized veterinary patients; therefore, blood gas analyzers have become integral diagnostic and monitoring tools. This article will discuss uses of blood gas analyzers, types of samples that can be used, sample collection methods, potential sources of error, and potential alternatives to blood gas analyzers and their limitations. It will also discuss the types of analyzers that are available, logistical considerations that should be taken into account when purchasing an analyzer, and the basic principles of how these analyzers work. PMID:27451046

  9. Prediction of bedload sediment transport for heterogeneous sediments in shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durafour, Marine; Jarno, Armelle; Le Bot, Sophie; Lafite, Robert; Marin, François

    2015-04-01

    Key words: Particle shape, in-situ measurements, bedload transport, heterogeneous sediments Bedload sediment transport in the coastal area is a dynamic process mainly influenced by the type of hydrodynamic forcings involved (current and/or waves), the flow properties (velocity, viscosity, depth) and sediment heterogeneity (particle size, density, shape). Although particle shape is recognized to be a significant factor in the hydrodynamic behavior of grains, this parameter is not currently implemented in bedload transport formulations: firstly because the mechanisms of initiation of motion according to particle shape are still not fully understood, and secondly due to the difficulties in defining common shape parameters. In March 2011, a large panel of in-situ instruments was deployed on two sites in the Eastern English Channel, during the sea campaign MESFLUX11. Samples of the sediment cover available for transport are collected, during a slack period, per 2cm thick strata by divers and by using a Shipeck grab. Bedload discharges along a tidal cycle are also collected with a Delft Nile Sampler (DNS; Gaweesh and Van Rijn, 1992, 1994) on both sites. The first one is characterized by a sandy bed with a low size dispersion, while the other study area implies graded sediments from fine sands to granules. A detailed analysis of the data is performed to follow the evolution of in-situ bedload fluxes on the seabed for a single current. In-situ measurements are compared to existing formulations according to a single fraction approach, using the median diameter of the mixture, and a fractionwise approach, involving a discretization of the grading curve. Results emphasize the interest to oscillate between these two methods according to the dispersion in size of the site considered. The need to apply a hiding/exposure coefficient (Egiazaroff, 1965) and a hindrance factor (Kleinhans and Van Rijn, 2002) for size heterogeneous sediments is also clearly highlighted. A really good

  10. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Hurricane Sandy among Persons Exposed to the 9/11 Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M.; Stellman, Steven D.; Farfel, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic exposure during a hurricane is associated with adverse mental health conditions post-event. The World Trade Center Health Registry provided a sampling pool for a rapid survey of persons directly affected by Hurricane Sandy in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area in late October 2012. This study evaluated the relationship between Sandy experiences and Sandy-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals previously exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster. Methods A total of 4,558 surveys were completed from April 10-November 7, 2013. After exclusions for missing data, the final sample included 2,214 (53.5%) respondents from FEMA-defined inundation zones and 1,923 (46.5%) from non-inundation zones. Sandy exposures included witnessing terrible events, Sandy-related injury, fearing for own life or safety of others, evacuation, living in a home that was flooded or damaged, property loss, and financial loss. Sandy-related PTSD was defined as a score of ≥44 on a Sandy-specific PTSD Checklist. Results PTSD prevalence was higher in the inundation zones (11.3%) and lower in the non-inundation zones (4.4%). The highest prevalence of Sandy-related PTSD was among individuals in the inundation zone who sustained an injury (31.2%), reported a history of 9/11-related PTSD (28.8%), or had low social support prior to the event (28.6%). In the inundation zones, significantly elevated adjusted odds of Sandy-related PTSD were observed among persons with a prior history of 9/11-related PTSD, low social support, and those who experienced a greater number of Sandy traumatic events. Conclusions Sandy-related stress symptoms indicative of PTSD affected a significant proportion of persons who lived in flooded areas of the NYC metropolitan area. Prior 9/11-related PTSD increased the likelihood of Sandy-related PTSD, while social support was protective. Public health preparation for events similar to Sandy should incorporate outreach and

  11. Suspended Sediment Monitoring Strategies Reduce Model Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eads, R.; O'Connor, M.

    2007-12-01

    Regulatory agencies require development and implementation of Total Maximum Daily Loads for watersheds listed under section 303d of the Clean Water Act. For rivers identified as sediment impaired, methods are required to identify sediment sources and to estimate loading capacities, and models, such as sediment budgets, are often employed. Models can be tested and improved when stream monitoring provides accurate estimates of sediment loads. Motivated by proposed vineyard development on forested ridges in a sediment-listed watershed in the Coast Range of northern California, four tributaries to Gualala River ranging in size from 300 to 800 ha2 were monitored over two winter seasons. More than 1850 samples were analyzed for suspended sediment concentration. Inter- annual variability of sediment loads from wet and dry years is compared. Traditional methods for estimating suspended sediment loads often rely on measurements, such as water discharge, that are not well correlated to sediment concentration due to the highly variable routing of sediment to the channel from hillslopes, roads, and landslides. A method, such as Turbidity Threshold Sampling, that employs a parameter well correlated to suspended sediment concentration can improve sampling efficiency by collecting samples that are distributed over a range of rising and falling concentrations. The resulting set of samples can be used to estimate sediment loads by establishing a relationship between concentration and turbidity for any sampled period and applying it to the continuous turbidity record.

  12. Magnetic Characterization of Stream-Sediments From Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, Affected by Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, M. A.; Sinito, A. M.; Bidegain, J. C.; Gogorza, C. S.; Jurado, S.

    2001-12-01

    A wide urban area from Northeast of Buenos Aires Province is exposed to an important anthropogenic influence, mainly due to industrial activity. In this two water streams were chosen: one of them (Del Gato stream, G) next to La Plata City and the another one (El Pescado stream, P) on the outskirts of the city. Both streams have similar characteristics, although the first one (G) has a higher input of pollutants (fluvial effluents, fly ashes, solid wastes, etc.) than the last one (P). Sediments analyzed in this work are limes from continental origin of PostPampeano (Holocene). Although, some cores were affected by sandy-limy sediments with mollusc valves from Querandino Sea (Pleistocene - later Holocene) and limy sediments of chestnut color with calcareous concretions from the Ensenadense. Magnetic measurements and geochemical studies were carried out on the samples. Among the magnetic parameters, specific susceptibility (X), X frequency-dependence (Xfd%), X temperature-dependence, Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM), Saturation IRM (SIRM), coercivity of remanence (Bcr), S ratio and SIRM/X ratio, Anhysteric Remanent Magnetization (ARM), Magnetic and Thermal Demagnetization were studied. The magnetic characteristics for both sites indicate the predominance of magnetically soft minerals on G site and relatively hard minerals on P site. Magnetite is the main magnetic carrier, Pseudo Single Domain and Single Domain grains were found. Chemical studies show (in some cases) a high concentration for some heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe) on the upper 22-cm. Contents of heavy metals and ARM were correlated. Very good correlation (R> 0.81) is found for Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe and the sum (of Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni), and a weaker correlation for Pb.

  13. Benthic foraminifera records in marine sediments during the Holocene from Pescadero basin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, M.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Roy, P.; Monreal, M.; Fenero, R.

    2013-05-01

    Gravity core T-56 (256 cm length) was collected in Pescadero Basin located on the western side of the Gulf of California within the oxygen minim zone (OMZ) at 597 cm depth, aboard of the R/V "El Puma". Pescadero basin is located at mouth of the gulf; because of its location is sensitive to record the changes in the gulf and in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The sedimentary sequence is analyzed to contribute to the understanding the oceanographic variability in the southern part of the gulf of California during the Holocene using benthic foraminifera assemblages and organic carbon as proxies of organic matter flux and bottom water oxygenation. In general, the core is characterized by silty-clay sediments, and it exhibits a turbidite between 198 and 134 cm, distinguished by sandy sediments and reworking material. From 134 cm to the top shows a visible laminated structure. The initial chronology is based on three AMS radiocarbon dates, and estimated sedimentation rates are 0.22 and 0.19 mm/yr for the first 32 cm of the core. Six radiocarbon dates are in progress. Preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages showed that species of Bolivina are dominated, mainly megalospheric forms, from 134 cm to top of the core. They are small and thin-shelled forms (e.g., Bolivina subadvena, Bolivina minuta, Bolivina seminuda, Bolivina plicata), and also Buliminella, Cassidulina and Epistominella are abundant. In particular, species of Bolivina are environmental indicators and exhibit a typical reproductive dimorphism. The predominance of the genus Bolivina suggest organic flux variations, because of the productivity changes that might be related to changes in ocean circulation and in the environmental variability in the region.

  14. Turning the tide: effects of river inflow and tidal amplitude on sandy estuaries in laboratory landscape experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Maarten; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper; Baar, Anne; van der Vegt, Maarten; van Maarseveen, Marcel; Markies, Henk; Roosendaal, Chris; van Eijk, Arjan

    2016-04-01

    Many estuaries formed over the Holocene through a combination of fluvial and coastal influxes, but how estuary planform shape and size depend on tides, wave climate and river influxes remains unclear. Here we use a novel tidal flume setup of 20 m length by 3 m width, the Metronome (http://www.uu.nl/metronome), to create estuaries and explore a parameter space for the simple initial condition of a straight river in sandy substrate. Tidal currents capable of transporting sediment in both the ebb and flood phase because they are caused by periodic tilting of the flume rather than the classic method of water level fluctuation. Particle imaging velocimetry and a 1D shallow flow model demonstrate that this principle leads to similar sediment mobility as in nature. Ten landscape experiments recorded by timelapse overhead imaging and AGIsoft DEMs of the final bed elevation show that absence of river inflow leads to short tidal basins whereas even a minor discharge leads to long convergent estuaries. Estuary width and length as well as morphological time scale over thousands of tidal cycles strongly depend on tidal current amplitude. Paddle-generated waves subdue the ebb delta causing stronger tidal currents in the basin. Bar length-width ratios in estuaries are slightly larger to those in braided rivers in experiments and nature. Mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels are ubiquitous and appear to be formed by an instability mechanism with growing bar and bifurcation asymmetry. Future experiments will include mud flats and live vegetation.

  15. On the ecogeomorphological feedbacks that control tidal channel network evolution in a sandy mangrove setting

    PubMed Central

    van Maanen, B.; Coco, G.; Bryan, K. R.

    2015-01-01

    An ecomorphodynamic model was developed to study how Avicennia marina mangroves influence channel network evolution in sandy tidal embayments. The model accounts for the effects of mangrove trees on tidal flow patterns and sediment dynamics. Mangrove growth is in turn controlled by hydrodynamic conditions. The presence of mangroves was found to enhance the initiation and branching of tidal channels, partly because the extra flow resistance in mangrove forests favours flow concentration, and thus sediment erosion in between vegetated areas. The enhanced branching of channels is also the result of a vegetation-induced increase in erosion threshold. On the other hand, this reduction in bed erodibility, together with the soil expansion driven by organic matter production, reduces the landward expansion of channels. The ongoing accretion in mangrove forests ultimately drives a reduction in tidal prism and an overall retreat of the channel network. During sea-level rise, mangroves can potentially enhance the ability of the soil surface to maintain an elevation within the upper portion of the intertidal zone, while hindering both the branching and headward erosion of the landward expanding channels. The modelling results presented here indicate the critical control exerted by ecogeomorphological interactions in driving landscape evolution. PMID:26339195

  16. Wideband digital spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. A., Jr.; Wilck, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Modular spectrum analyzer consisting of RF receiver, fast fourier transform spectrum analyzer, and data processor samples stochastic signals in 220 channels. Construction reduces design and fabrication costs of assembled unit.

  17. Image quality analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Antoshkin, L. V.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Image quality analyzer (IQA) which used as device for efficiency analysis of adaptive optics application is described. In analyzer marketed possibility estimations quality of images on three different criterions of quality images: contrast, sharpnesses and the spectral criterion. At present given analyzer is introduced on Big Solar Vacuum Telescope in stale work that allows at observations to conduct the choice of the most contrasting images of Sun. Is it hereinafter planned use the analyzer in composition of the ANGARA adaptive correction system.

  18. Quaternary sedimentation in a tide-dominated estuary, northern New England

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, L.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Northern New England is characterized by rocky shorelines frequently interrupted by linear embayments or estuaries. In contrast to more commonly studied coastal plain estuaries further south, these embayments often have relatively limited fluvial sediment supply, are affected by ice, and are strongly influenced by bedrock geology. High resolution subbottom seismics, sidescan sonar, surficial sediment sampling and gravity coring were conducted in the Piscataqua River Estuary, New Hampshire, in order to describe the sedimentary environments. The study represents an initial step in determining the Quaternary history and developing a depositional modal of a transgressive, tide-dominated, bedrock influenced system, which is typical of cold, ice impacted estuarine environments of northern New England. The Piscataqua River Estuary is undergoing a relatively slow submergence (approximately 1.5--2.0 mm/yr) due largely to eustatic sea level rise. The upper regions of the estuary have large, fine-grained shoals, extensive tidal flats, and salt marsh deposits. Radionuclide dating (Pb-210 and Cs-137) of cores from these marshes indicates accretion rates range from 0.26 to 1.42 cm/yr, which exceed local sea level rise. By contrast, the lower Estuary which has a limited sediment supply has extensive bedrock outcrops which are found along the shores and subtidally. The dominant depositional environments include muddy intertidal flats, muddy to sandy subtidal flats, and sandy to gravelly channels. The most common surficial sediments types are moderately to poorly sorted muddy sands and sandy gravel deposits. Gravity coring along the flanks of the Estuary indicate that fine-grained Holocene sediments, typically less than a few meters thick, are underlain by marine sandy muds associated with the Presumpscot Formation, tills, or bedrock.

  19. [Soil condensation water in different habitats in Horqin sandy land: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ping; He, Yu-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Yong; Li, Yu-Lin; Li, Yu-Qiang; Li, Yan-Qing; Li, Shi-min

    2009-08-01

    Weighing method was adopted to study the formation time and the amount of soil condensation water in four habitats (mobile sandy land, fixed sandy land, farmland, and Mongolian pine forest land) in Horqin Sandy Land in August 2007. The soil condensation water began to form at 20:00-22:00, increased gradually at 22:00-4:00, and began to evaporate after 4:00. In the four habitats, soil condensation water was mainly formed in 0-9 cm layer, and the amount was the greatest in 0-3 cm layer, accounting for 40% of the total. The soil condensation water also formed in 9-30 cm layer, but in very small amount. There was a greater difference in the mean daily amount of soil condensation water in 0-3 cm layer in the four habitats, with the sequence of fixed sandy land > mobile sandy land > farmland > Mongolian pine forest land, which indicated that the habitat with better vegetation condition was not benefit the formation of soil condensation water. The mean daily amount of soil condensation water in 0-30 cm layer was 0.172 mm in fixed sandy land, 0.128 mm in Mongolian pine forest land, 0.120 mm in mobile sandy land, and 0.110 mm in farmland. PMID:19947212

  20. Groundwater acidification and the mobilization of trace metals in a sandy aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kjøller, Claus; Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming

    2004-05-15

    The acidification of groundwater due to acid rain impact and the mobilization of the trace metals Ni, Be, Cd and Co was studied in a noncalcareous sandy aquifer. The groundwater is acidified down to pH 4.4 in the upper 3-4 m of the saturated zone. There is a sharp acidification front and below that the pH increases to 5.2-6.5. The acid zone groundwater contains an Al concentration of approximately 0.2 mM. These observations could be explained by a reactive transport model for downward groundwater movement based on ion exchange and equilibrium with Al(OH)3. At the acidification front, the Al3+ in groundwater exchanges for sorbed Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the coupled dissolution of Al(OH)3 causes the pH to increase. The downward migration rate of the acidification front is 3.5-5.0 cm/yr. Trace metals (Ni, Be, Cd and Co) are found to accumulate near the acidification front. Downward moving, low pH, and trace metal containing groundwater passes the acidification front, and the trace metals adsorb as the pH increases. The acidification front moves downward at a slower rate, and in this process the heavy metals are desorbed. Accordingly, the acidification front functions as a geochemical trap where trace metals accumulate, and their amount will increase with time. Different surface complexation models were explored to explain the behavior of Ni. Neither a simple iron oxide surface complexation model nor ion exchange could explain the field observations of the Ni distribution. The sediment appeared, even at low pH, to have a much stronger affinity toward Ni than predicted by the iron oxide model. The discrepancy can be accounted for in the model by increasing the Ni binding strength constant in combination with an increased number of reactive sites.

  1. The Effect of Mangrove Leaf Litter Enrichment on Macrobenthic Colonization of Defaunated Sandy Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1999-11-01

    The importance of exported mangrove materials to nearshore macrobenthos has largely been predicted based upon decomposition and utilization studies conducted within the mangrove environment, and from quantitative measurements of export. The present study evaluated the impact of mangrove leaf litter enrichment on non-mangrove substrates in a high-salinity microcosm experiment. Fortnightly addition of Kandelia candel leaf detritus at levels equivalent to 0·66 and 0·33 mg cm -2day -1in defaunated sand in microcosms maintained under high salinity conditions and on a sandy substrate resulted in no significant differences from the control in total faunal dry biomass or ash-free dry weight (AFDW) after 28, 73, 137 and 217 days of experiment. Duration of experiment was significant in determining the biomass (both dry weight and AFDW) of the macrofaunal assemblage in the microcosms, but neither enrichment nor its interaction with time had an effect. Species richness, Shannon diversity and evenness, and the total number of individuals, however, decreased in the order control>low enrichment>high enrichment for almost all sampling dates. By contrast, soluble tannins in the microcosm sediment demonstrated the reverse pattern. Both duration of experiment and enrichment were significant in determining species richness and the total number of individuals. The interaction between time and enrichment level was significant in the former but not the latter case. Discriminant analysis performed on the species abundance data indicated distinct animal assemblages characteristic of the three enrichment levels. These findings suggest that mangrove organic matter may not necessarily result in enhancement effects on marine benthos but high concentrations of tannins may hamper colonization by the macrobenthos.

  2. Quantifying the process-product relationship in the large sandy Rio Paraná

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, P. J.; Amsler, M.; Best, J.; Orfeo, O.; Parsons, D.; Reesink, A.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Szupiany, R.

    2010-12-01

    Whilst recent technological advances have enabled the measurement and modelling of alluvial processes and dynamics, arguably less progress has been made in relating the morphodynamics to the resulting sedimentary alluvial architecture. This paper will present data from the sandy, multi-channel Rio Paraná, Argentina, where the evolution of km-scale braid-bars is being related directly to the resultant sedimentary deposits. Bathymetric data from the Rio Paraná was collected from survey vessels using single and multi-beam echo-sounding located by RTK dGPS. Flow data at various flow stages was also collected using acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) surveys at key cross-sections. The subsurface architecture was characterised at low flow using 10s of km of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), and ground-truthed using suction coring. GPR achieved penetration depths down to 10 m and reflections allowed quantification of the radar facies to within +/- 0.2 m in the vertical. These techniques, and the logistical considerations required in their deployment and integration in the field, will be discussed. The paper will also highlight how an integrated morphodynamic and GPR survey programme in one of the world’s largest rivers can provide high-resolution data that: (i) links blocks of sedimentation to specific, identifiable channel processes, (ii) quantifies the vertical and horizontal distribution of sedimentary facies in large rivers, and relates this to the temporal evolution of the channel, and (iii) is at sub-seismic resolution and therefore suitable for reservoir-scale lithofacies modelling.

  3. In situ tensile fracture toughness of surficial cohesive marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Barry, Mark A.; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Jumars, Peter A.; Dorgan, Kelly M.

    2012-02-01

    This study reports the first in situ measurements of tensile fracture toughness, K IC, of soft, surficial, cohesive marine sediments. A newly developed probe continuously measures the stress required to cause tensile failure in sediments to depths of up to 1 m. Probe measurements are in agreement with standard laboratory methods of K IC measurements in both potter's clay and natural sediments. The data comprise in situ depth profiles from three field sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Measured K IC at two muddy sites (median grain size of 23-50 μm) range from near zero at the sediment surface to >1,800 Pa m1/2 at 0.2 m depth. These profiles also appear to identify the bioturbated/mixed depth. K IC for a sandy site (>90% sand) is an order of magnitude lower than for the muddy sediments, and reflects the lack of cohesion/adhesion. A comparison of K IC, median grain size, and porosity in muddy sediments indicates that consolidation increases fracture strength, whereas inclusion of sand causes weakening; thus, sand-bearing layers can be easily identified in K IC profiles. K IC and vane-measured shear strength correlate strongly, which suggests that the vane measurements should perhaps be interpreted as shear fracture toughness, rather than shear strength. Comparison of in situ probe-measured values with K IC of soils and gelatin shows that sediments have a K IC range intermediate between denser compacted soils and softer, elastic gelatin.

  4. Depressurization and electrical heating of hydrate sediment for gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.; Ito, T.; Kimura, S.; Kaneko, H.; Noda, S.; Narita, H.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary for commercial recovery of natural gas from natural gas hydrate sediment. Thermal stimulation is an effective dissociation method, along with depressurization. In this study, we examined the efficiency of electrical heating of the hydrate core for gas production. In order to evaluate efficiency of electrical heating with depressurization, we investigated following subject. (1) electrical heating of Xe gas hydrate sediment, as a conventional simulation of methane hydrate sediment, (2) electrical heating of methane hydrate sediment, which was compared with Xe gas hydrate experiment, and (3) electrical heating of hydrate bearing sediment with fine sandy layer which was simulated faults with large displacement shear around hydrate sediment. These experiments revealed that depressurization and additional electrode heating of hydrate sediment saturated with electrolyte solution was confirmed to enable higher efficient and effective gas production from sedimentwith less electric power. This study is financially supported by METI and Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (the MH21 Research Consortium).

  5. Effects of the Marmot Dam Removal on Grain Size Distribution in the B Reaches of the Sandy River in Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devillier, K. N.; Podolak, C. J.; Wilcock, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    The Marmot dam, a medium-large sized dam on the Sandy River in Oregon, was removed in October 2007 to restore fish spawning habitat. This decommissioning project provided the opportunity to study fluvial geomorphologic changes as affected by the release of impounded sediment behind a dam. This research project examined change in grain size distribution (GSD) in Reach B in the downstream of the Sandy River, relatively close to the dam site. Data was collected in July 2008 and compared to data collected by others in July 2007, prior to the dam removal. Seven bars in this reach were facies mapped and pebble counted using the Wolman pebble counting technique. This study hypothesized that fine material had already traveled downstream without deposition whereas larger grains had yet to be transported to this reach. Therefore, Reach B should not have changed significantly since the dam removal. Data collected in 2008 suggest that the GSD of some individual bars changed though these changes are not apparent when evaluating the reach as a whole. In Reach B1, one of the three bars had noticeable changes in the size of finer grains though in contrast, the change in fraction of sand for the other two bars was more evident. In Reach B2, where four bars were studied, only one showed a noticeable change in D16. The data suggest that grain size in Reach B2 changed less than in Reach B1. Overall thus far, grain size in Reach B appears to be fairly the same, pre- and post-dam removal.

  6. [Fish community structure and its seasonal change in subtidal sandy beach habitat off southern Gouqi Island].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shou-Yu

    2011-05-01

    To understand the characteristics of fish community structure in sandy beach habitats of island reef water areas, and to evaluate the potential capacity of these habitats in local fish stock maintenance, fishes were monthly collected with multi-mesh trammel nets in 2009 from the subtidal sandy beach habitat off southern Gouqi Island, taking the adjacent rocky reef habitat as the control. alpha and beta species diversity indices, index of relative importance (IRI), relative catch rate, and dominance curve for abundance and biomass (ABC curve) were adopted to compare the fish species composition, diversity, and community pattern between the two habitats, and multivariate statistical analyses such as non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and cluster were conducted to discuss the fish assemblage patterns. A total of 63 fish species belonging to 11 orders, 38 families, and 56 genera were collected, of which, 46 fish species were appeared in the two habitats. Due to the appearance of more warm water species in sandy bottom, the fishes in subtidal sandy beach habitat showed much higher richness, and the abundance catch rate (ACR) from May to July was higher than that in rocky reef habitat. In most rest months, the ACR in subtidal sandy beach habitat also showed the similar trend. However, the species richness and diversity in spring and summer were significantly lower in subtidal sandy beach habitat than in rocky reef habitat, because of the high species dominance and low evenness in the sandy beach habitat. Japanese tonguefish (Paraplagusia japonica) was the indicator species in the sandy beach habitat, and dominated in early spring, later summer, autumn, and winter when the fishing pressure was not strong. In sandy bottom, a unique community structure was formed and kept in dynamic, due to the nursery use of sandy beach by Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) from May to July, the gathering of gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) in most months for feeding, and the large

  7. Estimating sediment discharge: Appendix D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Simões, Francisco J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment-discharge measurements usually are available on a discrete or periodic basis. However, estimates of sediment transport often are needed for unmeasured periods, such as when daily or annual sediment-discharge values are sought, or when estimates of transport rates for unmeasured or hypothetical flows are required. Selected methods for estimating suspended-sediment, bed-load, bed- material-load, and total-load discharges have been presented in some detail elsewhere in this volume. The purposes of this contribution are to present some limitations and potential pitfalls associated with obtaining and using the requisite data and equations to estimate sediment discharges and to provide guidance for selecting appropriate estimating equations. Records of sediment discharge are derived from data collected with sufficient frequency to obtain reliable estimates for the computational interval and period. Most sediment- discharge records are computed at daily or annual intervals based on periodically collected data, although some partial records represent discrete or seasonal intervals such as those for flood periods. The method used to calculate sediment- discharge records is dependent on the types and frequency of available data. Records for suspended-sediment discharge computed by methods described by Porterfield (1972) are most prevalent, in part because measurement protocols and computational techniques are well established and because suspended sediment composes the bulk of sediment dis- charges for many rivers. Discharge records for bed load, total load, or in some cases bed-material load plus wash load are less common. Reliable estimation of sediment discharges presupposes that the data on which the estimates are based are comparable and reliable. Unfortunately, data describing a selected characteristic of sediment were not necessarily derived—collected, processed, analyzed, or interpreted—in a consistent manner. For example, bed-load data collected with

  8. Electrochemically enhanced oxidation reactions in sandy soil polluted with mercury

    PubMed

    Thoming; Kliem; Ottosen

    2000-10-16

    For remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals, the electrodialytic remediation (EDR) method is a highly relevant method, see e.g. Hansen et al. (Hansen HK, Ottosen LM, Kliem BK, Villumsen A. Electrodialytic remediation of soils polluted with Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Zn. J Chem Tech Biotechnol 1997;70:67-73). During the process the heavy metals are transferred to the pore water in dissolved form or attached to colloids and move within the applied electric field. The method is found to be useful in many soil types, but has its strength in fine-grained soils. It is exactly in such soils that other remediation methods fail. Four cell experiments were made in order to investigate how relevant the method is for a more sandy soil and if it is suitable for non-ionic heavy metals such as elemental mercury. The duration was 27 days for two of the experiments and two experiments lasted 54 days, and the mercury within the soil was initially 1200-1900 mg kg(-1), of which 84% was elemental Hg. To monitor the process the pseudo-total mercury concentration was distinguished between elemental mercury and non-metallic mercury species by thermodesorption. During the electrodialytic treatment an increase of the content of non-metallic mercury occurred and a corresponding decrease of the content of elemental mercury which indicates a transformation of the latter species into any other non-metallic species. Generally, oxidation of Hg by dissolved oxygen in a solution is kinetically inhibited and thus quite slow. The redistribution of Hg was closely connected to a decrease of soil pH during the experiments. This corresponds very well to the thermodynamic calculations from which it was found that a decrease in the pH of the soil will result in an increase in the oxidation rate of elemental Hg. Results from this investigation show that the electrodialytic remediation method alone is not efficient in situations with sandy soils containing elemental mercury. As a solution for this

  9. Detached macroalgae: Its importance to inshore sandy beach fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Kyla K.; Wilding, Thomas A.; Horstmeyer, Lena; Weigl, Simon; Heymans, Johanna J.

    2014-10-01

    Kelp forests shed a large proportion of their biomass through storm-mediated defoliation, senescence of kelp blades, and constant erosion of particulate organic matter from the kelp fronds. Much of this detached macroalgae drifts in the water column and is deposited on intertidal zones of beaches. Detached macroalgae may provide inshore sandy beach fauna with refuge and food subsidies in an exposed and bare environment, with limited in situ primary production. We evaluated the relationship between detached macroalgae and the density of inshore fauna, where 'inshore' was the body of water extending from low water seawards for approximately 50 m. Inshore fauna were sampled using a push-net (1 mm mesh) on 11 beaches, and using a beam-trawl (4 mm mesh) on a subset of 8 beaches. On each beach, the density of detached macroalgae in the water column was quantified, together with a suite of physico-chemical beach characteristics. Push-net samples principally comprised omnivorous and detritivorous crustaceans such as gammarid amphipods, mysids and valviferan isopods, which have limited swimming abilities and reside inshore year-round. Beam-trawl fauna were mainly carnivorous decapods and fish, which undergo seasonal inshore-offshore migrations to utilize sandy beaches as nursery habitats. Linear models predicted increases of 11% (95% CI: 3.5-19%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 0.7-4.2%) in the density of push-net and beam-trawl fauna, respectively, with a 1 ℓ.100 m-3 increase in detached macroalgae. This suggests that detached macroalgae is more important in the provision of food and shelter to small, weak-swimming detritivores/omnivores than to larger and more mobile predators. The densities of large predators were mostly explained by physical beach characteristics, which overshadowed the role of macroalgae. Maximum abundances of decapods and fish were found on wide, flat beaches with low wave heights. Large accumulations of macroalgae may inhibit the foraging efficiencies of

  10. Decadal to Millennial Sedimentation Patterns of the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; McHugh, C. M.; Burckle, L.; Pekar, S.; Pereira, G.; Ryan, W. B.; Bell, R.; Carbotte, S.

    2002-12-01

    The Hudson River Estuary (HRE) is adjacent to large metropolitan areas including New York City. Understanding the variable energy conditions for transporting sediments is key to deal with environmental pollution such as the controversial burial and dredging of PCB's in the HRE. We studied sediment transport in the HRE by examining more than 150 cores and grab samples interpreted within the framework of acoustic images. The HRE sedimentary environments were defined based on quantitative estimates of grain size, sedimentary structures, bioturbation, and sedimentation rates and were divided into: channel, channel banks, subtidal flats, tributaries, and islands. Diatom assemblages were used to determine the extent of salt-water intrusion and sediment reworking in the estuary. Along a longitudinal profile, the estuary can be subdivided into: (1) sandy inner fluvial (furthest upstream), (2) muddy central portions, and (3) sandy outer marine. We classified sedimentary facies for the central and fluvial parts of the system (1 and 2). The HRE basin is nearly filled with sediment and tidal energy is focused within the channel and its banks. In the central basin where the estuary is wide (up to 4 km), flood currents are more energetic along the eastern channel bank and the ebb currents lead to minor sediment deposition on the western bank, but only where the system is out of equilibrium with its sediment load. The energy of the tides is accentuated along narrow segments of the estuary that are locally constrained by gorges of the Hudson Valley Highlands leading to erosion and the trapping of sediments. Beyond the banks of the channel, the subtidal flats that were filled with sediment by 0.5 to 3ka, are tranquil environments where the sediment is homogenized by bioturbation and reworked by waves as the estuary shallowed. Occasional high-energy events, (possibly flood-related) eroded the subtidal flats sediment as shown by rare rip-up clasts found in the cores. The inner

  11. Importance of Pore Size Distribution of Fine-grained Sediments on Gas Hydrate Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, G. C.; Park, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Gas hydrates have been considered as a new source of natural gases. For the gas hydrate production, the gas hydrate reservoir should be depressurized below the equilibrium pressure of gas hydrates. Therefore, it is important to predict the equilibrium of gas hydrates in the reservoir conditions because it can be affected by the pore size of the host sediments due to the capillary effect. In this study, gas hydrates were synthesized in fine-grained sediment samples including a pure silt sample and a natural clayey silt sample cored from a hydrate occurrence region in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea. Pore size distributions of the samples were obtained by the nitrogen adsorption and desorption test and the mercury intrusion porosimetry. The equilibrium curve of gas hydrates in the fine-grained sediments were found to be significantly influenced by the clay fraction and the corresponding small pores (>50 nm in diameter). For the clayey silt sample, the equilibrium pressure was higher by ~1.4 MPa than the bulk equilibrium pressure. In most cases of oceanic gas hydrate reservoirs, sandy layers are found interbedded with fine-grained sediment layers while gas hydrates are intensively accumulated in the sandy layers. Our experiment results reveal the inhibition effect of fine-grained sediments against gas hydrate formation, in which greater driving forces (e.g., higher pressure or lower temperature) are required during natural gas migration. Therefore, gas hydrate distribution in interbedded layers of sandy and fine-grained sediments can be explained by such capillary effect induced by the pore size distribution of host sediments.

  12. Soil characteristics of sediment-amended baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) swamps of coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Ming; Middleton, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Amendments of sediment from dredging activities have played an important role in raising the elevation of sinking coastal wetlands. This study compared the soil characteristics of sediment- amended coastal swamps in the Barataria Preserve unit of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve with natural swamps along Bayou des Familles. The sandy sediment amendments used in the coastal forests had different soil texture and characteristics than the more organic soils of the natural swamps. Three years after the application of these sediments on the sediment-amended swamps, dewatering and compaction of the sediment had occurred but the sediment still had high salinity and bulk density, and low organic matter content. The two sediment-amended swamps differed from each other in that Site 1 had a higher elevation (mean = 25 cm higher) and drier soil than Site 2. The effects of sediment in coastal forested wetlands require separate consideration from studies of salt marshes, e.g., the weight of the sediment might damage tree roots, or the amendments might influence soil stability during storms in a different way. Generally, this study suggests that shallower depths of sediment are more likely to yield environments beneficial to these sinking baldcypress swamps in coastal Louisiana.

  13. Sediment transport in the nearshore area of Phoenix Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rijun; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jianzheng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Shenghui; Xu, Yongchen; Zhu, Longhai; Wang, Nan; Liu, Aijiang

    2016-10-01

    Based on the measured data, suspended sediment concentration, surface sediment grain size, current and waves, the sediment transport mechanisms and pathways in the Phoenix Island area were analyzed using methods of flux decomposition and Grain Size Trend Analysis (GSTA). The results show that net suspended sediment is mainly transported by average current, Stokes drift, and gravitational circulation. The transport direction of suspended sediment is varying and basically following the direction of residual tidal currents. Surface sediment transport pathways are primarily parallel to the coastline along with two convergent centers. Waves and longshore currents have a significant influence on sediment transport, but the influence is limited due to a steep and deep underwater bank. Tidal current is the main controlling factor for sediment transport, especially in the deep water area. Neither suspended nor surface sediment is transported towards the southwest. The South Shandong Coastal Current (SSCC) has little effect on sediment transport processes in the nearshore area of Phoenix Island.

  14. Content Analysis of Select YouTube Postings: Comparisons of Reactions to the Sandy Hook and Aurora Shootings and Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric D

    2015-11-01

    This study details an innovative and methodical content analysis of 2,207 YouTube comments from four different YouTube videos (e.g., breaking news or memorials) related to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School and Aurora theater mass shootings and the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy. As expected, YouTube comments associated with the Sandy Hook shootings (particularly those from a memorial video) were especially likely to feature compassion and grief with lessened hostility. This study highlights differing online contexts by which individuals show grief and related emotions following man-made and natural calamities and how-even in an online environment-powerful situational contexts greatly guide behavior.

  15. Content Analysis of Select YouTube Postings: Comparisons of Reactions to the Sandy Hook and Aurora Shootings and Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric D

    2015-11-01

    This study details an innovative and methodical content analysis of 2,207 YouTube comments from four different YouTube videos (e.g., breaking news or memorials) related to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School and Aurora theater mass shootings and the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy. As expected, YouTube comments associated with the Sandy Hook shootings (particularly those from a memorial video) were especially likely to feature compassion and grief with lessened hostility. This study highlights differing online contexts by which individuals show grief and related emotions following man-made and natural calamities and how-even in an online environment-powerful situational contexts greatly guide behavior. PMID:26379103

  16. Simplified Digital Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    Spectrum analyzer computes approximate cross-correlations between noisy input signal and reference signal of known frequency, yielding measure of amplitude of sinusoidal component of input. Complexity and power consumed less than other digital spectrum analyzers. Performs no multiplications, and because processes data on each frequency independently, focuses on narrow spectral range without processing data on rest of spectrum.

  17. Analyzing Peace Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haavelsrud, Magnus; Stenberg, Oddbjorn

    2012-01-01

    Eleven articles on peace education published in the first volume of the Journal of Peace Education are analyzed. This selection comprises peace education programs that have been planned or carried out in different contexts. In analyzing peace pedagogies as proposed in the 11 contributions, we have chosen network analysis as our method--enabling…

  18. Portable automatic blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Analyzer employs chemical-sensing electrodes for determination of blood, gas, and ion concentrations. It is rugged, easily serviced, and comparatively simple to operate. System can analyze up to eight parameters and can be modified to measure other blood constituents including nonionic species, such as urea, glucose, and oxygen.

  19. Analyzing Costs of Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, James O.; Black, Talbot

    A simplified method to gather and analyze cost data is presented for administrators of Handicapped Children's Early Education Programs, and specifically for members of the Technical Assistance Development System, North Carolina. After identifying benefits and liabilities associated with analyzing program costs, attention is focused on the internal…

  20. The Dynamics of Sediment Oxygenation in Marsh Rhizospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop-Jakobsen, K.

    2014-12-01

    Many marsh grasses are capable of internal oxygen transport from aboveground sources to belowground roots and rhizomes, where oxygen may leak across the rhizodermis and oxygenate the surrounding sediment. In the field, the extent of sediment oxygenation in marshes was assessed in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass; Spartina anglica, inserting 70 optical fiber oxygen sensors into the rhizosphere. Two locations with S. anglica growing in different sediment types were investigated. No oxygen was detected in the rhizospheres indicating that belowground sediment oxygenation in S. anglica has a limited effect on the bulk anoxic sediment and is restricted to sediment in the immediate vicinity of the roots. In the laboratory, the presence of 1.5mm wide and 16mm long oxic root zones was demonstrated around root tips of S. anglica growing in permeable sandy sediment using planar optodes recording 2D-images of the oxygen distribution. Oxic root zones in S. anglica growing in tidal flat deposits were significantly smaller. The size of oxic roots zones was highly dynamic and affected by tidal inundations as well as light availability. Atmospheric air was the primary oxygen source for belowground sediment oxygenation, whereas photosynthetic oxygen production only played a minor role for the size of the oxic root zones during air-exposure of the aboveground biomass. During tidal inundations (1.5 h) completely submerging the aboveground biomass cutting off access to atmospheric oxygen, the size of oxic root zones were reduced significantly in the light and oxic root zones were completely eliminated in darkness. Sediment oxygenation in the rhizospheres of marsh grasses is of significant importance for marshes ability to retain inorganic nitrogen before it reaches the coastal waters. The presence of oxic roots zones promotes coupled nitrification-denitrification at depth in the sediment, which can account for more than 80% of the total denitrification in marshes.

  1. Evalution of sequential extractions on dry and wet sediments.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, W; Monteny, F; Leermakers, M; Bouillon, S

    2003-07-01

    A five-step sequential extraction procedure was applied on dried and wet Ballastplaat Scheldt estuary sediments. When wet (fresh) sediments were used, all sample handling up to the 3rd extraction step, inclusive, was carried out under inert atmosphere. The repeatability of the procedure was very good on dry samples. For Fe as for Mn, RSD values are lower than 4%, except for Mn in the fifth extraction step where a spread of 10% is observed. The observed RSDs for Pb are of the same order of magnitude as those for Mn. On wet samples the spread of the results is higher than on dried ones. The highest RSDs observed for Fe amount to 20%, for Mn to 15% but for Pb an RSD of up to 44% was found. Better homogenization of the solid sediment part of lyophilized sediments and different porosities of wet sediment sub-samples may be the explanation. These results also indicated that drying/oxidizing of the sediment sample causes a shift from less available/mobile metal fractions to more available/mobile fractions. The Mn and Fe oxyhydroxide spikes added to a wet sediment sample were recovered between 100+/-10%. The results obtained after changing the sequence of the extraction steps (multiple rotations and inversions were tested) corroborated the progressive increase in the aggressive nature of the extraction solutions in our standard scheme. Although there is also no need to change the ratio volume of extractant to amount of sediment, increasing the number of extraction repetitions in steps 1 to 3 resulted, for some of those extraction steps, in a partially modified analyte distribution. Finally the method was applied to sandy and muddy sediment cores of the Scheldt estuary and revealed clear differences between metal distributions in both types of sediment.

  2. Modification of sandy soil hydrophysical environment through bagasse additive under laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Halim, A. A.; Kumlung, Arunsiri

    2015-01-01

    Until now sandy soils can be considered as one roup having common hydrophysical problems. Therefore, a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of bagasse as an amendment to improve hydrophysical properties of sandy soil, through the determination of bulk density, aggregatesize distribution, total porosity, hydraulic conductivity, pore-space structure and water retention. To fulfil this objective, sandy soils were amended with bagasse at the rate of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4% on the dry weight basis. The study results demonstrated that the addition of bagasse to sandy soils in between 3 to 4% on the dry weight basis led to a significant decrease in bulk density, hydraulic conductivity, and rapid-drainable pores, and increase in the total porosity, water-holding pores, fine capillary pores, water retained at field capacity, wilting point, and soil available water as compared with the control treatment

  3. Nitrogen cycling between sediment and the shallow-water column in the transition zone of the Potomac River and estuary. I. Nitrate and ammonium fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-year study of seasonal variation in water-column and sediment nitrogen species was conducted in the transition zone of the Potomac River 35 m from the Virginia shore at a site with an average water-column depth of approximately 1 m over sandy sediment. A diffusion-controlled sampler was used to collect water samples from the water column, at the interface between the water column and sediment, and at several tens of centimeters into the sediment. Nitrate was the predominant dissolved nitrogen species in the water column. The importance of denitrification was inferred by nitrate fluxes which were directed into the sediment from the water column during approximately 75% of the sampling periods and ranged from 0??02 to 0??69 mmol m-2 day-1. Flux of nitrate from the sediment into the water column, ???0??1 mmol m-2 day-1, due possibly to nitrification in surficial sediment, occurred during one spring and two summer sampling periods. Ammonium fluxes were less than 0??1 mmol m-2 day-1 during 90% of the sampling periods. Of the ammonium fluxes that were >0??05 mmol m-2 day-1, all were fluxes into the sediment during sampling periods when sediment resuspension occurred, and all were into the water column during periods of calm. The mean value of ammonium flux (0??005 ?? 0??05 mmol m-2 day-1) from the sandy, shallow-water sediments was two orders of magnitude less than the ammonium fluxes from the deeper, silty channel sediments in the same reach of the river. Diffusive flux calculations suggest that approximately one order of magnitude more nitrate than ammonium is cycled between the shallow-water column and the sandy sediment in the transition zone of the Potomac River. ?? 1988.

  4. Toxicity of oiled sediments treated with bioremediation agents: A shoreline experiment in Delaware, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Mearna, A.; Doe, K.; Fisher, W.; Lee, K.; Mueller, C.

    1995-12-31

    Using a randomized complete block design, a battery of five pore water and sediment bioassays were used to monitor and compare toxicity among un-oiled, oiled (light Nigerian crude) and nutrient and bacteria-treated shoreline plots on a sandy beach. Tests included sea urchin fertilization, water and modified-solid phase microtox, 10-day amphipod survival and grass shrimp embryo bioassays. During the 13-week study, bioremediation treatment with nutrients and/or bacteria did not decrease toxicity relative to that in untreated plots. Results from at least one bioassay suggested that, relative to no treatment, treatment may have increased toxicity for several weeks. The least and most sensitive tests were sea urchin fertilization (pore water) and 10-day amphipod test, respectively. Coupled with chemical monitoring, the study produced a large data-base for evaluating toxic concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in sandy sediments.

  5. Effects of leachate on geotechnical characteristics of sandy clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, N. S.; Ali, Z. Rahman; Rahim, A. S.; Lihan, T.; Idris, R. M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Leachate is a hazardous liquid that poses negative impacts if leaks out into environments such as soil and ground water systems. The impact of leachate on the downgraded quality in terms of chemical characteristic is more concern rather than the physical or mechanical aspect. The effect of leachate on mechanical behaviour of contaminated soil is not well established and should be investigated. This paper presents the preliminary results of the effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit, compaction and shear strength of leachate-contaminated soil. The contaminated soil samples were prepared by mixing the leachate at ratiosbetween 0% and 20% leachate contents with soil samples. Base soil used was residual soil originated from granitic rock and classified as sandy clay soil (CS). Its specific gravity ranged between 2.5 and 2.64 with clay minerals of kaolinite, muscovite and quartz. The field strength of the studied soil ranged between 156 and 207 kN/m2. The effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit clearly indicated by the decrease in liquid and plastic limit values with the increase in the leachate content. Compaction tests on leachate-contaminated soil caused the dropped in maximum dry density, ρdry and increased in optimum moisture content, wopt when the amount of leachate was increased between 0% and 20%. The results suggested that leachate contamination capable to modify some geotechnical properties of the studied residual soils.

  6. Travel of pollution, and purification en route, in sandy soils

    PubMed Central

    Baars, J. K.

    1957-01-01

    The travel of pollution in sandy soils, and the extent to which purification takes place en route, are discussed, with special reference to the possible contamination of ground water—a problem which is of particular importance in the Netherlands, where the water-supply for many of the large towns is drawn from the water underneath the dunes. Specifically, two types of soil pollution are considered: (a) severe pollution of the surface layers with matter concentrated in a small volume of water (e.g., faecal matter from pit privies at camping-sites); and (b) moderate pollution of the surface layers with matter contained in large quantities of water (e.g., organic matter and bacteria in river water used for the artificial recharge of ground water). It is shown that in both these types of pollution the self-purification is sufficient to prevent contamination of the ground water, provided that the soil is very fine and—in the case of the first type—dry and well aerated, and provided that the ground-water level is not too high or the rate of infiltration too great. PMID:13472428

  7. [Structural characteristics of Hemiptelea davidii community on Kerqin sandy land].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun-Peng; Han, Da-Yong; Dong, Yan-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Jing; Li, Jian-Dong

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made on the species composition and eco-type of Hemiptelea davidii community on Kerqin sandy land. The results showed that in study area, no shrub layer existed in H. davidii forest, while arbor layer could be divided into two sub-layers, with a height of 4.05-7.86 m for the upper layer, and of 2.05-3.20 m for the lower layer. In the community, there were 32 herbal species belonging to 27 genera of 13 families and dominant by Poaceae, Fabaceae and Compositae, and 11 areal types, among which, the species number in Mongolian-Northeastern China-Dahuricia-North China areal type was the highest (34.38%), followed by that in Northeastern China-North China areal type (12.5%). Among three water ecological types, mesophytes occupied 59.37% of the total, and mesoxerophytes and xerophytes occupied 25% and 15.63%, respectively. Hemicryptophytes had a larger amount in six life forms, accounting for 31.25% of the total. H. davidii community had the typical life form characteristics of temperate steppe. PMID:18464628

  8. Extraction of sandy bedforms features through geodesic morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debese, Nathalie; Jacq, Jean-José; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    State-of-art echosounders reveal fine-scale details of mobile sandy bedforms, which are commonly found on continental shelfs. At present, their dynamics are still far from being completely understood. These bedforms are a serious threat to navigation security, anthropic structures and activities, placing emphasis on research breakthroughs. Bedform geometries and their dynamics are closely linked; therefore, one approach is to develop semi-automatic tools aiming at extracting their structural features from bathymetric datasets. Current approaches mimic manual processes or rely on morphological simplification of bedforms. The 1D and 2D approaches cannot address the wide ranges of both types and complexities of bedforms. In contrast, this work attempts to follow a 3D global semi-automatic approach based on a bathymetric TIN. The currently extracted primitives are the salient ridge and valley lines of the sand structures, i.e., waves and mega-ripples. The main difficulty is eliminating the ripples that are found to heavily overprint any observations. To this end, an anisotropic filter that is able to discard these structures while still enhancing the wave ridges is proposed. The second part of the work addresses the semi-automatic interactive extraction and 3D augmented display of the main lines structures. The proposed protocol also allows geoscientists to interactively insert topological constraints.

  9. Intraspecific diet shift in Talitrus saltator inhabiting exposed sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarria, Celia; Incera, Mónica; Garrido, Josefina; Rodil, Iván F.; Rossi, Francesca

    2009-09-01

    Talitrid amphipods are the most abundant herbivores on exposed sandy beaches. Despite their important role as trophic intermediates between macrophytes and higher levels (i.e. insect and bird) of beach food webs, very little information is available on their feeding patterns. The main aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific differences in the feeding behaviour of Talitrus saltator. We tested the hypotheses that: (1) adult females and males showed different isotope signatures and therefore relied on different sources of food; and (2) patterns of variation of isotope signatures of juveniles differed from those of adult specimens, evidencing a diet shift during the development. We used stable isotope signatures and tested for differences upon the level on the shore, times of the year and beaches experiencing similar morpho-dynamic and environmental conditions. Finally, we investigated the trophic significance of macrophyte detritus in the diet of males, females and juveniles. Results showed that adult males had a more variable diet than females and juveniles (inferred from δ 13C and δ 15N values). Dual-isotope graphs suggested that Sargassum muticum and Cystoseira baccata wrack could be among the main food sources for both juvenile and adult stage.

  10. Reversing storm hotspots on sandy beaches: Spatial and temporal characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, J.H.; Farris, A.S.; Sullivan, C.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal erosion hotspots are defined as sections of coast that exhibit significantly higher rates of erosion than adjacent areas. This paper describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of a recently identified type of coastal erosion hotspot, which forms in response to storms on uninterrupted sandy coasts largely free from human intervention. These are referred to here as reversing storm hotspots because the erosion is reversed by accretion of a similar magnitude to the storm-induced erosion. The accretion occurs within a few days or weeks of fair weather after the storm. Reversing storm hotspots observed here, on two US east coast beaches, have a longshore length averaging 3.86 km, a cross-shore excursion (magnitude of erosion or accretion) averaging 15.4 m, and a time scale of days to weeks associated with individual storm events. These spatial and temporal scales clearly distinguish reversing storm hotspots from previously described forms of longshore variability in erosion, including those attributed to several types of shoreline undulations and hotspots associated with long-term shoreline change. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sustained morphologic changes to the shoreface related to Hurricane Sandy: Fire Island, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, C. J.; Nelson, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    A variety of topographic and photographic data have revealed widespread impacts to the subaerial portion of the beach system during Hurricane Sandy in 2012 - from beach erosion to barrier island breaching. However, less is known about impacts to the offshore environment. In order to examine a more comprehensive response of the active beach system to Hurricane Sandy, we quantify morphologic changes to the shoreface using bathymetric data along the length of Fire Island, NY. Airborne bathymetric lidar data, collected two days before Sandy made landfall, are used as a pre-storm baseline. Morphologic changes are measured using field surveyed GPS profiles collected along a limited portion of western Fire Island two months following Sandy and along the length of the island one year after Sandy. The offshore extent of the data is variable and analyses are constrained by the resolving ability of the lidar sensor, which typically achieved penetration to depths of 6-8m. The surfzone morphology was extensively impacted by Hurricane Sandy and continued to evolve during subsequent winter storms. As is typical during large storm events, the outer bar moved offshore during Sandy. A year after the storm, however, the bar remains further offshore than it was prior to Sandy, resulting in a widened surfzone. Both the subaerial and submarine portions of the beach system lost considerable volumes of sand. The majority of the loss below mean high water (MHW) is in the surfzone, concentrated in the trough immediately landward of the outer bar and generally in the pre-storm location of the outer bar. The trough not only deepened in response to Sandy, but in many locations continued to deepen over the course of the following year, with an average change of more than a meter. The average volume of the shoreface seaward of the bar increased, which is attributed to the seaward translation of the outer bar and additional offshore transport and deposition of material from the inner surfzone

  12. Surface Sediment Geochemistry in and around the Hudson Shelf Valley Offshore of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecray, E. L.; ten Brink, M. B.; Butman, B.; Denny, J.; Murray, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    The Hudson Shelf Valley, an ancient submerged portion of the Hudson River, extends across the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. Between 1959 and 1987, the area near the head of the valley was used for disposal of approximately 1.20 x 108 m3 of dredged material and sewage sludge. The distribution of metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were used to investigate the transport and fate of the sediments and their associated contaminants. Surface (0-2cm) sediments collected at 440 stations throughout the New York Bight between 1993 and 1998 were used to establish the regional distribution of pollutant metals, grain size, organic carbon, and Clostridium perfringens spores. Sediments in the New York Bight are generally sandy, however fine-grained sediments are found in the axis of the Valley. Statistical methods identified common sources and chemical mobility within groups of anthropogenic and naturally-occurring elements. High metal concentrations, fine-grained sediments, and higher organic carbon concentrations co-occur in depo-centers within the Valley. Normalization of the metal concentrations to these factors shows higher metal concentrations on the fine-grained particles in sandy areas of the Bight, particularly along the southern shore of Long Island. These distributions have implications for evaluating the impact of the mass distribution for contaminated metals in different habitats and areas. Decreasing concentrations of pollutants with time are observed, reflecting reduced contaminant loading in the upper region of the Valley; however, concentrations are still above natural background levels.

  13. Simulations and Visualizations of Hurricane Sandy (2012) as Revealed by the NASA CAMVis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Storm Sandy first appeared as a tropical storm in the southern Caribbean Sea on Oct. 22, 2012, moved northeastward, turned northwestward, and made landfall near Brigantine, New Jersey in late October. Sandy devastated surrounding areas, caused an estimated damage of $50 billion, and became the second costliest tropical cyclone (TC) in U.S. History surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina (2005). To save lives and mitigate economic damage, a central question to be addressed is to what extent the lead time of severe storm prediction such as Sandy can be extended (e.g., Emanuel 2012; Kerr 2012). In this study, we present 10 numerical experiments initialized at 00 and 1200 UTC Oct. 22-26, 2012, with the NASA coupled advanced global modeling and visualization systems (CAMVis). All of the predictions realistically capture Sandy's movement with the northwestward turn prior to its landfall. However, three experiments (initialized at 0000 UTC Oct. 22 and 24 and 1200 UTC Oct. 22) produce larger errors. Among the 10 experiments, the control run initialized at 0000 UTC Oct. 23 produces a remarkable 7-day forecast. To illustrate the impact of environmental flows on the predictability of Sandy, we produce and discuss four-dimensional (4-D) visualizations with the control run. 4-D visualizations clearly demonstrate the following multiscale processes that led to the sinuous track of Sandy: the initial steering impact of an upper-level trough (appearing over the northwestern Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico), the blocking impact of systems to the northeast of Sandy, and the binary interaction with a mid-latitude, upper-level trough that appeared at 130degrees west longitude on Oct. 23, moved to the East Coast and intensified during the period of Oct. 29-30 prior to Sandy's landfall.

  14. BIG SANDY, WEST ELLIOTTS CREEK, AND REED BRAKE ROADLESS AREAS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys done in the Big Sandy, West Elliotts Creek, and Reed Brake Roadless Areas, Alabama, indicate that the areas have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. The three areas, however, have a probable potential for oil or gas. Probable coal resource potential exists in the Big Sandy and the West Elliotts Creek Roadless Areas. Clay and abundant sand resources occur in the roadless areas. Clayey sand has been used to stabilize roads and in road grade construction.

  15. Effects of ghost shrimp on zinc and cadmium in sediments from Tampa Bay, FL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klerks, P.L.; Felder, D.L.; Strasser, K.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects that ghost shrimp have on the distribution of metals in sediment. We measured levels of HNO3-extractable zinc and cadmium in surface sediment, in ghost shrimp burrow walls and in sediment ejected by the ghost shrimp from their burrows, at five sandy intertidal sites in Tampa Bay. Ghost shrimp densities and their rate of sediment ejection were also quantified, as were sediment organic content and silt + clay content. Densities of ghost shrimp (Sergio trilobata and Lepidophthalmus louisianensis) averaged 33/m2 at our sites, and they ejected sediment at an average rate of 28 g/burrow/day. Levels of both Zn and Cd were significantly higher in burrow walls than in surface sediments. Sediment ejected by the shrimp from their burrows had elevated levels of Zn (relative to surface sediments) at one of the sites. Sediment organic content and silt + clay content were higher in burrow-wall sediments than in ejected sediment, which in turn tended to have values above those of surface sediments. Differences in levels of HNO3-extractable Zn and Cd among sediment types may be a consequence of these sediments differing in other physiochemical characteristics, though the differences in metal levels remained statistically significant for some sites after correcting for differences in organic content and silt + clay content. We conclude that the presence of ghost shrimp burrows contributes to spatial heterogeneity of sedimentary metal levels, while the ghost shrimp bioturbation results in a significant flux of metals to the sediment surface and is expected to decrease heterogeneity of metal levels in sedimentary depth profiles.

  16. [A phytosociological interpretation of vegetation from sandy hills of the Peruvian desert].

    PubMed

    Galán de Mera, Antonio; Linares Perea, Eliana; Campos de la Cruz, José; Vicente Orellana, José Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    The vegetation of the sandy hills ("lomas") constitutes the main originality of the Peruvian and Chilean desert with a high number of endemics that shapes the vicarious associations. In this work, a phytosociological view of sandy environments of the Peruvian coastal desert is presented. According to the Braun-Blanquet method, we have made up 32 phytosociological inventories and added 138 ones from others authors. In each inventory, we have analyzed its floristic composition and ecological parameters, as altitude, soil and geomorphology. All releves were synthesized in a table to deduce the different associations, higher phytosociological units, and the distribu tion of its flora along the Peruvian coast and the Andean Cordillera. Using the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, the diversity of this flora is discussed making a comparison with historical data about the use of the territory with livestock during pre-Inca and Inca cultures, and Spanish invasion. As a result, two associations from Southern Peru -Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae and Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri-, two alliances -Nolanion humifusae from central Peru, and Nolanion spathulatae from the Southern Peru- and a new order -Tetragonio crystallinae-Plantaginetalia limensis- are described. In Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae, Dictyophragnus englerianus, Leptoglossis lomana, Nolana scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua velutina and Tetragonia vestita are the main characteristics, while in Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri association N. scaposa and P. velutina are replaced by Palaua camanensis and P. weberbaueri. Nolanion humifusae alliance integrates species as Geranium limae, Hymenocallis amancaes, Nolana humifusa, N. latipes, Palaua rhombifolia or Villanova oppositifolia. Likewise, Cistanthe weberbaueri, Cryptantha parviflora, Hoffmannseggia miranda, Lupinus mollendoensis, Nolana confinis, N. pallidula, N. scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua camanensis, P. velutina, P. weberbaueri, Tetragonia vestita and

  17. [A phytosociological interpretation of vegetation from sandy hills of the Peruvian desert].

    PubMed

    Galán de Mera, Antonio; Linares Perea, Eliana; Campos de la Cruz, José; Vicente Orellana, José Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    The vegetation of the sandy hills ("lomas") constitutes the main originality of the Peruvian and Chilean desert with a high number of endemics that shapes the vicarious associations. In this work, a phytosociological view of sandy environments of the Peruvian coastal desert is presented. According to the Braun-Blanquet method, we have made up 32 phytosociological inventories and added 138 ones from others authors. In each inventory, we have analyzed its floristic composition and ecological parameters, as altitude, soil and geomorphology. All releves were synthesized in a table to deduce the different associations, higher phytosociological units, and the distribu tion of its flora along the Peruvian coast and the Andean Cordillera. Using the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, the diversity of this flora is discussed making a comparison with historical data about the use of the territory with livestock during pre-Inca and Inca cultures, and Spanish invasion. As a result, two associations from Southern Peru -Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae and Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri-, two alliances -Nolanion humifusae from central Peru, and Nolanion spathulatae from the Southern Peru- and a new order -Tetragonio crystallinae-Plantaginetalia limensis- are described. In Nolanetum scaposo-spathulatae, Dictyophragnus englerianus, Leptoglossis lomana, Nolana scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua velutina and Tetragonia vestita are the main characteristics, while in Palauetum camanensis-weberbaueri association N. scaposa and P. velutina are replaced by Palaua camanensis and P. weberbaueri. Nolanion humifusae alliance integrates species as Geranium limae, Hymenocallis amancaes, Nolana humifusa, N. latipes, Palaua rhombifolia or Villanova oppositifolia. Likewise, Cistanthe weberbaueri, Cryptantha parviflora, Hoffmannseggia miranda, Lupinus mollendoensis, Nolana confinis, N. pallidula, N. scaposa, N. spathulata, Palaua camanensis, P. velutina, P. weberbaueri, Tetragonia vestita and

  18. Estimating unique soil hydraulic parameters for sandy media from multi-step outflow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il Hwang, Sang; Powers, Susan E.

    Estimating unique soil hydraulic parameters is required to provide input for numerical models simulating transient water flow in the vadose zone. In this paper, we analyze the capability of six soil hydraulic functions to provide unique parameter sets for sandy soils from multi-step outflow data. Initial parameter estimates and experimental boundary conditions were explored to determine their affect on the uniqueness of soil hydraulic functions. Of the hydraulic functions tested, the lognormal distribution-Mualem (LDM) function provided the best performance and a unique solution for error-free numerically generated multi-step outflow data. For experimental multi-step outflow data with inherent measurement errors, the LDM function again showed better performance and uniqueness than the van Genuchten-Mualem and Gardner-Mualem functions. In experiments with different boundary conditions, the LDM function provided the best fitting ability, resulting in unique parameter sets when the intrinsic permeability ( k) was fixed at its measured value. The experiment that had a greater number of pneumatic pressure steps, thereby causing a lower flow rate, provided better fitting ability and more unique solutions than faster experiments.

  19. Hydrogeological relationships of sandy deposits: modeling of two-dimensional unsaturated water and pesticide transport.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Bo V; van der Keur, Peter; Vosgerau, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the movement of water and solutes in the vadose zone requires information on the distribution of spatial trends and heterogeneities in porous media. The present study describes different lithofacies origination mainly from glaciofluvial deposits. Among different lithofacies, hydrological relationships were investigated. By means of a two-dimensional hydrological model it was evaluated how the flow of water and leaching of metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-4,5-dihydro-3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazin-5-one) was affected. Two selected large outcrop sections consisting of glacial outwash deposits were used in the modeling study. Eleven different lithofacies were distinguished and described in terms of texture distribution, sorting, bedding style, and external boundaries based on excavated soil profiles from 27 locations representing seven predominantly sandy landforms in Denmark. Undisturbed soil columns were sampled from each of the lithofacies and brought to the laboratory to be analyzed. With respect to their soil hydraulic properties, the different lithofacies formed four different hydrofacies having relatively homogeneous, hydrogeological properties. Two large outcrop sections from one of the locations (a gravel pit) located near the terminal moraine of the former Weichsel glacier were used for the HYDRUS-2D modeling. Modeling results revealed that the spatial distribution of sedimentary bodies affected water flow and the leaching of metribuzin. PMID:18689752

  20. Transport of E. coli in a sandy soil as impacted by depth to water table.

    PubMed

    Stall, Christopher; Amoozegar, Aziz; Lindbo, David; Graves, Alexandria; Rashash, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Septic systems are considered a source of groundwater contamination. In the study described in this article, the fate of microbes applied to a sandy loam soil from North Carolina coastal plain as impacted by water table depth was studied. Soil materials were packed to a depth of 65 cm in 17 columns (15-cm diameter), and a water table was established at 30, 45, and 60 cm depths using five replications. Each day, 200 mL of an artificial septic tank effluent inoculated with E. coli were applied to the top of each column, a 100-mL sample was collected at the water table level and analyzed for E. coli, and 100 mL was drained from the bottom to maintain the water table. Two columns were used as control and received 200 mL/day of sterilized effluent. Neither 30 nor 45 cm of unsaturated soil was adequate to attenuate bacterial contamination, while 60 cm of separation appeared to be sufficient. Little bacterial contamination moved with the water table when it was lowered from 30 to 60 cm.

  1. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping. PMID:26560103

  2. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  3. Effects of Storms on Coastal Vulnerability Through Revisiting Sites Impacted by Super Storm Sandy Offshore Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Yong, W. Y.; Delligatti, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent models indicate that due to climate change storm activity can intensify. Sea level rise as a result of climate change can lead to storm flooding and coastal damage in low-lying populated areas such as NE, USA. The New York metropolitan area experienced one of the highest storm surges in its history during Hurricane Sandy. The peak storm-tide elevation measured by USGS in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m higher than historical measurements in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation Rapid Response we surveyed from the R/V Pritchard and sampled the bays and inlets along the southern shore of Long Island after Super Storm Sandy in January 2013 and during June 2014 for assessing the impact of the storm. Short-lived radioisotopes, heavy metals and grain size variability were used to track the path of the storm. In 2013 high concentrations of metals (Pb 184 ppm) were deposited on the landward side of barrier islands and were tracked offshore for10 km. In 2014, we revisited the 2013 locations. The offshore, metal enriched mud layer was seen as small inclusions in sand and not present at the surface suggestive that natural processes are cleansing the sea-floor. Inland the cores showed three facies. From the base upwards: 1) coarse sand with low Pb 99 ppm. Interpreted as either sand transported landwards by the storm or in situ; 2) fine-grained, organic rich sediment with the high Pb 443 ppm and interpreted as seaward transport by the storm; 3) organic rich mud with lower Pb 200 ppm was found in the core tops. Most importantly the sea-floor was colonized by tubeworms suggestive that the environment is returning to normal conditions. These results coupled to other regional studies indicate that the storm was catastrophic and resulted in significant sediment transport. The surge brought sand inland modifying channel and inlet depths but most damaging was the seaward surge that brought contaminants offshore. It appears that the bays and inlets are

  4. Software Design Analyzer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    CRISP80 software design analyzer system a set of programs that supports top-down, hierarchic, modular structured design, and programing methodologies. CRISP80 allows for expression of design as picture of program.

  5. Automatic amino acid analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.; Oyama, V. I.

    1971-01-01

    Analyzer operates unattended or up to 15 hours. It has an automatic sample injection system and can be programmed. All fluid-flow valve switching is accomplished pneumatically from miniature three-way solenoid pilot valves.

  6. Analyzing binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  7. Evaluation of power outages in Connecticut during hypothetical future Hurricane Sandy scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanik, D. W.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Astitha, M.; Frediani, M. E.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable electric power is a staple of our modern society.The purpose of this work was to evaluate the occurrence of power outages under more intense, future Hurricane Sandy simulations in Connecticut. In addition, we also evaluated how many crews would be necessary to restore power in 7 days, and how different vegetation scenarios might contribute to a decrease in outages. We trained five pairwise models on each current Sandy runs (2012) as training using the random forest model (each validated using 10-fold cross-validation), and used each future Sandy run as an independent test. We predict that a future Sandy would have 2.5x as many outages as current Sandy, which would require 3.23x as many crews as current Sandy to restore power in 7 days. We also found that increased vegetation management might decrease outages, which has implications for both fair-weather and storm days of all types (i.e. blizzards, thunderstorms, ice storms). Although we have only evaluated outages for electric distribution networks, there are many other types (water supply, wastewater, telecommunications) that would likely benefit from an analysis of this type. In addition, given that we have the weather simulations already processed within our 2-km weather simulation domain, we would like to expand our vulnerability analyses to surrounding utilities in New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to facilitate regional coordination among electric distribution networks.

  8. Nonfatal injuries 1 week after hurricane sandy--New York city metropolitan area, October 2012.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, Robert M; Caramanica, Kimberly; Maliniak, Maret; Stellman, Steven D; Fairclough, Monique A; Farfel, Mark R; Turner, Lennon; Maslow, Carey B; Moy, Amanda J; Wu, David; Yu, Shengchao; Welch, Alice E; Cone, James E; Walker, Deborah J

    2014-10-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy (Sandy) made landfall in densely populated areas of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Flooding affected 51 square miles (132 square kilometers) of New York City (NYC) and resulted in 43 deaths, many caused by drowning in the home, along with numerous storm-related injuries. Thousands of those affected were survivors of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster of September 11, 2001 (9/11) who had previously enrolled in the WTC Health Registry (Registry) cohort study. To assess Sandy-related injuries and associated risk factors among those who lived in Hurricane Sandy-flooded areas and elsewhere, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene surveyed 8,870 WTC survivors, who had provided physical and mental health updates 8 to 16 months before Sandy. Approximately 10% of the respondents in flooded areas reported injuries in the first week after Sandy; nearly 75% of those had more than one injury. Injuries occurred during evacuation and clean-up/repair of damaged or destroyed homes. Hurricane preparation and precautionary messages emphasizing potential for injury hazards during both evacuation and clean-up or repair of damaged residences might help mitigate the occurrence and severity of injury after a hurricane. PMID:25340912

  9. Effects of Pisha sandstone content on solute transport in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Qing; Zheng, Jiyong; He, Honghua; Han, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xingchang

    2016-02-01

    In sandy soil, water, nutrients and even pollutants are easily leaching to deeper layers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of Pisha sandstone on soil solute transport in a sandy soil. The miscible displacement technique was used to obtain breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Br(-) as an inert non-adsorbed tracer and Na(+) as an adsorbed tracer. The incorporation of Pisha sandstone into sandy soil was able to prevent the early breakthrough of both tracers by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity compared to the controlled sandy soil column, and the impeding effects increased with Pisha sandstone content. The BTCs of Br(-) were accurately described by both the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R), and the T-R model fitted the experimental data slightly better than the CDE. The two-site nonequilibrium model (T-S) accurately fit the Na(+) transport data. Pisha sandstone impeded the breakthrough of Na(+) not only by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity but also by increasing the adsorption capacity of the soil. The measured CEC values of Pisha sandstone were up to 11 times larger than those of the sandy soil. The retardation factors (R) determined by the T-S model increased with increasing Pisha sandstone content, and the partition coefficient (K(d)) showed a similar trend to R. According to the results of this study, Pisha sandstone can successfully impede solute transport in a sandy soil column.

  10. Investigation of superstorm Sandy 2012 in a multi-disciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M.; Mühr, B.; Kunz-Plapp, T.; Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vannieuwenhuyse, M.; Comes, T.; Elmer, F.; Schröter, K.; Fohringer, J.; Münzberg, T.; Lucas, C.; Zschau, J.

    2013-03-01

    At the end of October 2012, Hurricane Sandy moved from the Caribbean Sea into the Atlantic Ocean and entered the United States not far from New York. Along its track, Sandy caused more than 200 fatalities and severe losses in Jamaica, Bahamas, Haiti, Cuba, and the US. This paper demonstrates the capability and potential for near-real time analysis of catastrophes. It is shown that the impact of Sandy was driven by the superposition of different extremes (high wind speeds, storm surge, heavy precipitation) and by cascading effects. In particular the interaction between Sandy and an extra-tropical weather system created a huge storm that affected large areas in the US. It is examined how Sandy compares to historic hurricane events, both from a hydro-meteorological and impact perspective. The distribution of losses to different sectors of the economy is calculated with simple input-output models as well as government estimates. Direct economic losses are estimated about 4.2 billion US in the Caribbean and between 78 and 97 billion US for the US. Indirect economic losses from power outages is estimated in the order of 16.3 billion US. Modelling sector-specific dependencies, quantifies total business interruption losses between 10.8 and 15.5 billion US. Thus, seven years after the record impact of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Hurricane Sandy is the second costliest hurricane in the history of the United States.

  11. Investigation of superstorm Sandy 2012 in a multi-disciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M.; Mühr, B.; Kunz-Plapp, T.; Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vannieuwenhuyse, M.; Comes, T.; Elmer, F.; Schröter, K.; Fohringer, J.; Münzberg, T.; Lucas, C.; Zschau, J.

    2013-10-01

    At the end of October 2012, Hurricane Sandy moved from the Caribbean Sea into the Atlantic Ocean and entered the United States not far from New York. Along its track, Sandy caused more than 200 fatalities and severe losses in Jamaica, The Bahamas, Haiti, Cuba, and the US. This paper demonstrates the capability and potential for near-real-time analysis of catastrophes. It is shown that the impact of Sandy was driven by the superposition of different extremes (high wind speeds, storm surge, heavy precipitation) and by cascading effects. In particular the interaction between Sandy and an extra-tropical weather system created a huge storm that affected large areas in the US. It is examined how Sandy compares to historic hurricane events, both from a hydro-meteorological and impact perspective. The distribution of losses to different sectors of the economy is calculated with simple input-output models as well as government estimates. Direct economic losses are estimated about USD 4.2 billion in the Caribbean and between USD 78 and 97 billion in the US. Indirect economic losses from power outages is estimated in the order of USD 16.3 billion. Modelling sector-specific dependencies quantifies total business interruption losses between USD 10.8 and 15.5 billion. Thus, seven years after the record impact of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Hurricane Sandy is the second costliest hurricane in the history of the United States.

  12. Nonfatal injuries 1 week after hurricane sandy--New York city metropolitan area, October 2012.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, Robert M; Caramanica, Kimberly; Maliniak, Maret; Stellman, Steven D; Fairclough, Monique A; Farfel, Mark R; Turner, Lennon; Maslow, Carey B; Moy, Amanda J; Wu, David; Yu, Shengchao; Welch, Alice E; Cone, James E; Walker, Deborah J

    2014-10-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy (Sandy) made landfall in densely populated areas of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Flooding affected 51 square miles (132 square kilometers) of New York City (NYC) and resulted in 43 deaths, many caused by drowning in the home, along with numerous storm-related injuries. Thousands of those affected were survivors of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster of September 11, 2001 (9/11) who had previously enrolled in the WTC Health Registry (Registry) cohort study. To assess Sandy-related injuries and associated risk factors among those who lived in Hurricane Sandy-flooded areas and elsewhere, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene surveyed 8,870 WTC survivors, who had provided physical and mental health updates 8 to 16 months before Sandy. Approximately 10% of the respondents in flooded areas reported injuries in the first week after Sandy; nearly 75% of those had more than one injury. Injuries occurred during evacuation and clean-up/repair of damaged or destroyed homes. Hurricane preparation and precautionary messages emphasizing potential for injury hazards during both evacuation and clean-up or repair of damaged residences might help mitigate the occurrence and severity of injury after a hurricane.

  13. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Processes in Long Bay of the Carolinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Xu, K.; He, R.; Wren, P. A.; Gong, Y.; Quigley, B.; Tarpley, D.

    2010-12-01

    The coastline along Long Bay of the Carolinas is a fast-growing and heavily-developed area supporting local populations, infrastructure, and a large tourism industry. Myrtle Beach and its adjacent sandy beaches are popular tourist destinations that attract millions of visitors each year, representing one of the state’s most essential natural resources. The economy of this region is closely related to the stability of the sandy beaches, which are vulnerable to coastal erosion during severe storm events. Quantifying the sediment transport processes in the nearshore and inner continental shelf regions is thus critical for both understanding the regional sediment budget and implementing effective coastal management. As a first step toward investigating the sediment transport processes, a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-sediment transport model for Long Bay in the Carolinas has been developed. The model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), spans from Cape Fear estuary in NC to Winyah Bay estuary in SC. It considers the delivery of fluvial sediment from the Cape Fear and Pee Dee Rivers, resuspension from seabed, and transport of suspended sediment by ambient currents and waves calculated using Simulating WAve Nearshore model (SWAN). Our model simulations are driven by observed wind fields, which were collected at nearby meteorological stations maintained by National Data Buoy Center as well as at six buoys by the Palmetto Wind Research Project at Coastal Carolina University. Spatially varying sea bed conditions consisting of both hard bottoms and sandy bodies are applied in the calculation. The model is one-way nested inside a large-scale coastal circulation model that covers both the Middle Atlantic Bight and the South Atlantic Bight and provides dynamically consistent and numerically accurate circulation open boundary conditions. Modeling results indicate both wind-driven currents and storm-induced waves are capable of resuspending sandy

  14. The Formation and Growth of Gravel Bars in Response to Increased Sediment Supply Following the Marmot Dam Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.; Wilcock, P.

    2009-12-01

    What makes some bars grow downstream, others grow upstream, while still others primarily grow in height with a nearly constant planform? The October 2007 removal of the Marmot Dam from the Sandy River, OR, and the subsequent liberation of nearly 750,000 cubic meters of sand and gravel served as an experimental setting to observe these various trajectories of bar growth. In the 2 kilometer reach immediately below the former dam site nearly 350,000 cubic meters were deposited during the first year following the removal. The sediment deposited downstream such that there exists a spatial as well as time variation in the amount of deposition seen by the downstream bars, providing an opportunity to measure different responses to various sediment supplies. This deposit both created bars where there were none the previous year, and increased the size of pre-existing bars. The formation and growth of the bars were analyzed using LIDAR, ground surveys, ground-level photographs, and aerial photography. Throughout the two year study period, new bars formed in an alternating lateral-bar sequence; a pre-existing point bar migrated downstream from the apex of a bend, and subsequently reset to the apex; and small riffle zones containing large (greater than 1 meter) boulders formed the skeleton for mid-channel bars which filled in and elongated upstream. The observations can be generalized by characterizing the pre-removal topography with a suite of topographic measures and observing relationships between the pre-removal measures, the post-removal measures, and the increased sediment supply. Newly formed bars in the portion of the reach with the highest rate of deposition had the greatest change in relief (measured from the thalweg to the top of the bar) while growth of the pre-existing bars was characterized by greater changes in length than in height or width. This study's observation of a small number of bars over a two-year period provides a base to which further observations

  15. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  16. Acute post-disaster medical needs of patients with diabetes: emergency department use in New York City by diabetic adults after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David C; Gupta, Vibha K; Carr, Brendan G; Malik, Sidrah; Ferguson, Brandy; Wall, Stephen P; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acute impact of disasters on diabetic patients, we performed a geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by New York City diabetic adults in the week after Hurricane Sandy. Research design and methods Using an all-payer claims database, we retrospectively analyzed the demographics, insurance status, and medical comorbidities of post-disaster ED patients with diabetes who lived in the most geographically vulnerable areas. We compared the patterns of ED use among diabetic adults in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall to utilization before the disaster in 2012. Results In the highest level evacuation zone in New York City, postdisaster increases in ED visits for a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes were attributable to a significantly higher proportion of Medicare patients. Emergency visits for a primary diagnosis of diabetes had an increased frequency of certain comorbidities, including hypertension, recent procedure, and chronic skin ulcers. Patients with a history of diabetes visited EDs in increased numbers after Hurricane Sandy for a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, prescription refills, drug dependence, dialysis, among other conditions. Conclusions We found that diabetic adults aged 65 years and older are especially at risk for requiring postdisaster emergency care compared to other vulnerable populations. Our findings also suggest that there is a need to support diabetic adults particularly in the week after a disaster by ensuring access to medications, aftercare for patients who had a recent procedure, and optimize their cardiovascular health to reduce the risk of heart attacks. PMID:27547418

  17. Integrated sequence stratigraphy of the postimpact sediments from the Eyreville core holes, Chesapeake Bay impact structure inner basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, J.V.; Miller, K.G.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Edwards, L.E.; Kulpecz, A.A.; Powars, D.S.; Wade, B.S.; Feigenson, M.D.; Wright, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville core holes provide the first continuously cored record of postimpact sequences from within the deepest part of the central Chesapeake Bay impact crater. We analyzed the upper Eocene to Pliocene postimpact sediments from the Eyreville A and C core holes for lithology (semiquantitative measurements of grain size and composition), sequence stratigraphy, and chronostratigraphy. Age is based primarily on Sr isotope stratigraphy supplemented by biostratigraphy (dinocysts, nannofossils, and planktonic foraminifers); age resolution is approximately ??0.5 Ma for early Miocene sequences and approximately ??1.0 Ma for younger and older sequences. Eocene-lower Miocene sequences are subtle, upper middle to lower upper Miocene sequences are more clearly distinguished, and upper Miocene- Pliocene sequences display a distinct facies pattern within sequences. We recognize two upper Eocene, two Oligocene, nine Miocene, three Pliocene, and one Pleistocene sequence and correlate them with those in New Jersey and Delaware. The upper Eocene through Pleistocene strata at Eyreville record changes from: (1) rapidly deposited, extremely fi ne-grained Eocene strata that probably represent two sequences deposited in a deep (>200 m) basin; to (2) highly dissected Oligocene (two very thin sequences) to lower Miocene (three thin sequences) with a long hiatus; to (3) a thick, rapidly deposited (43-73 m/Ma), very fi ne-grained, biosiliceous middle Miocene (16.5-14 Ma) section divided into three sequences (V5-V3) deposited in middle neritic paleoenvironments; to (4) a 4.5-Ma-long hiatus (12.8-8.3 Ma); to (5) sandy, shelly upper Miocene to Pliocene strata (8.3-2.0 Ma) divided into six sequences deposited in shelf and shoreface environments; and, last, to (6) a sandy middle Pleistocene paralic sequence (~400 ka). The Eyreville cores thus record the fi lling of a deep impact-generated basin where the timing of sequence boundaries is heavily infl uenced by eustasy. ?? 2009 The Geological

  18. [Effects of short-term fencing on organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Guo; Song, Nai-Ping; Li, Xue-Bin; Liu, Bing-Ru

    2012-12-01

    In order to explore the change patterns of organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe at the early stage of fencing, 0-40 cm soil samples were collected from a 5-year fenced desert steppe (inside the fence) and a free grazing steppe (outside the fence) in Yanchi County of Ningxia, Northwest China, with the soil organic carbon, labile organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon contents and soil particle composition analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the soil organic carbon content and soil particle composition inside and outside the fence. The average soil organic carbon inside and outside the fences was 3.25 g x kg(-1), the percentages of sand, silt, and clay were averagely 72%, 16%, and 12%, respectively, and the soil physical stability index was 1.30% -1.31%. The soil active organic carbon showed a significant change in 10-20 cm layer. The soil labile organic carbon content was 0.80 g x kg(-1) inside the fence, which was significantly higher than that outside the fence (0.62 g x kg(-1)). The percentage of soil particulate organic carbon was 50.9% inside the fence, which was also significantly higher than that outside the fence (31.7%). The soil texture inside the fence changed from sandy to loam, and the soil labile organic carbon content increased gradually; while the soil texture outside the fence was sandy, and its vertical change was relatively smooth. The organic carbon of sandy si- erozem in the desert steppe under the conditions of short-term fencing was still in a balance between consumption and accumulation, the soil texture was relatively stable, and the soil physical stability changed little. It was suggested that the soil active organic carbon content and its relative percentage in 10-20 cm layer could be used as the indicators of early soil quality change of desert steppe.

  19. [Effects of Different Residue Part Inputs of Corn Straws on CO2 Efflux and Microbial Biomass in Clay Loam and Sandy Loam Black Soils].

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-yi; Liang, Ai-zhen; Yang, Xue-ming; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Jia, Shu-xia; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Sun, Bing-jie; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-07-01

    The decomposed rate of crop residues is a major determinant for carbon balance and nutrient cycling in agroecosystem. In this study, a constant temperature incubation study was conducted to evaluate CO2 emission and microbial biomass based on four different parts of corn straw (roots, lower stem, upper stem and leaves) and two soils with different textures (sandy loam and clay loam) from the black soil region. The relationships between soil CO2 emission, microbial biomass and the ratio of carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) and lignin of corn residues were analyzed by the linear regression. Results showed that the production of CO2 was increased with the addition of different parts of corn straw to soil, with the value of priming effect (PE) ranged from 215. 53 µmol . g-1 to 335. 17 µmol . g -1. Except for corn leaves, the cumulative CO2 production and PE of clay loam soil were significantly higher than those in sandy loam soil. The correlation of PE with lignin/N was obviously more significant than that with lignin concentration, nitrogen concentration and C/N of corn residue. The addition of corn straw to soil increased the contents of MBC and MBN and decreased MBC/MBN, which suggested that more nitrogen rather than carbon was conserved in microbial community. The augmenter of microbial biomass in sandy loam soil was greater than that in clay loam soil, but the total dissolved nitrogen was lower. Our results indicated that the differences in CO2 emission with the addition of residues to soils were primarily ascribe to the different lignin/N ratio in different corn parts; and the corn residues added into the sandy loam soil could enhance carbon sequestration, microbial biomass and nitrogen holding ability relative to clay loam soil.

  20. South Florida Coastal Sediment Ecological Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the degree of sediment contamination in several South Florida estuaries. During the 2010 National Condition Assessment, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute collected water column, sediment and biotic data from estuaries across the entire state of Florida. Sediments were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, zinc and total polychlorinated biphenyls and were compared relative to empirically derived sediment quality guidelines. As a result of this data collection and assessment effort, it was determined that the degree of contamination with respect to sediment was low for all southern Florida estuaries assessed, except the Miami River which was determined to be considerably contaminated. However only one monitoring location was used to assess the Miami River, and as such should be viewed with caution. A low degree of contamination was determined for Biscayne Bay sediments, possibly indicating a recovery from its previously reported higher contaminant level. PMID:26084967

  1. NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-13

    Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end

  2. Stable isotope evidence for carbon transformations in the water column and the sediments of the tropical Beibu Gulf, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zijun; Kowalski, Nicole; Dellwig, Olaf; Escher, Peter; Endler, Michael; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2013-04-01

    The depositional environment of the Beibu Gulf is highly complex, and sediments are formed under dynamic changes in hydrodynamics and sediment sources. It is an ideal natural laboratory to study biogeochemical transformation processes and its responses to changes in hydrography and depositional conditions in a tropical shelf environment. In the present study, several water column profiles and a number of short (MUC) and long (GC) sediment cores were taken during a joint German-Chinese expedition with R/V Sonne (Cruise 219; December 2011) in the Beibu Gulf. The sampling stations may be separated into three different depositional zones, namely Northern Coastal Beibu Gulf with sandy sediment, Delta Deposits in Vicinity to Qiongzhou Strait affected by strong currents, and Central Beibu Gulf with stable depositional environments. We measured the geochemical composition and carbon isotope composition of DIC in the water column and pore waters. In the sediments, the TOC, TIC, TN and TS contents, the C isotope composition of organic matter (OM), and the C and O isotope composition of carbonates were analyzed to follow the fate of organic matter during pelagic and benthic transformations. Pelagic OM transformations are already demonstrated by stable isotopes in the water column. The carbon isotopic composition of pore water DIC give further evidence for the mineralization of mainly marine OM with minor or no contributions from methane at most sites. The coupled pore water profiles indicate that sulfate reduction is the most important source for the DIC added to the pore waters. No correlation was observed between TOC contents and net sulfate reduction rates for the investigated sites. Lithostratigraphic marker and 14C age in different depositional zones indicated sedimentation rate plays an important role in determining the preservation and pathway of organic decomposition. In the central Beibu Gulf, where higher sedimentation rates dominate, pore water profiles exhibit the

  3. Distribution and characteristics of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akito; Yano, Shinichiro; Hisano, Akihiro; Kindaichi, Michiaki; Sonoda, Ikuko; Tada, Akihide; Akagi, Hirokatsu

    2016-08-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the present-day chemical properties of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay where a dredging project was completed 28years ago. Present-day sediment from Minamata Bay consists of sandy silt, and the average loss-on-ignition in surface sediment was 7.0±2.3%. The average methylmercury concentrations in the upper sediment layers were significantly higher than those in the lower sediment layers. Currently, the concentrations in sediments in Minamata Bay do not exceed the Japanese regulatory standard value for mercury. The average concentration of methylmercury in Minamata Bay surface sediment was 1.74±1.0ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=107). The methylmercury concentration in Minamata Bay surface sediment was almost 16 times higher than that in surface sediment from Isahaya Bay surface sediment, which was 0.11±0.045ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=5).

  4. Sediment modification by seagrass beds: Muddification and sandification induced by plant cover and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Katwijk, M. M.; Bos, A. R.; Hermus, D. C. R.; Suykerbuyk, W.

    2010-09-01

    Seagrasses are well-known ecosystem engineers. They reduce water dynamics and sediment resuspension, and trap fine sediments. However, exceptions of this paradigm have been reported. To test whether these exceptions could be related to plant cover and environmental conditions, we investigated sediment modification under influence of seagrass presence in various annual eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds with varying plant cover and sediment composition. At the relatively wave-exposed, sandy sites, dense vegetation caused muddification (increase in fine sediments and organic content) of the sediments. Sparse vegetation (<35% cover) had no effect, as such confirming the classical sediment trapping paradigm. In contrast, at the sheltered sites with muddy sediments, dense vegetation had no effect on the sediment composition, and in sparse vegetation sandification (decrease in fine sediments and organic content) was recorded. Sandification was never recorded before and was probably related to turbulence enhancement. Both, muddification and sandification are likely to provide a feedback on seagrass performance. Muddification may increase the nutrient input and, depending on the nutrient status of the system, either stimulate or reduce seagrass development. Similarly, sandification may postpone and even prevent extinction of seagrass beds when it occurs in areas that may have become too muddy for seagrass growth.

  5. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  6. Electrosurgical unit analyzers.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    Electrosurgical unit (ESU) analyzers automate the testing and inspection of the output circuits and safety features of ESUs. They perform testing that would otherwise require several other pieces of equipment, as well as considerably more time and greater technician expertise. They are used largely by clinical engineering departments for routine inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) procedures and, less often, for accident investigations and troubleshooting. In this Evaluation, we tested three ESU analyzers from three suppliers. We rated all three analyzers Acceptable and ranked them in two groupings. In ranking the units, we placed the greatest weight on ease of use for routine ESU inspections, and gave additional consideration to versatility for advanced applications such as ESU research. The unit in Group 1 was the easiest to use, especially for infrequent users. The units in Group 2 were satisfactory but require more frequent use to maintain proficiency and to avoid user errors. PMID:9689540

  7. P-wave velocity features of methane hydrate-bearing turbidity sediments sampled by a pressure core tool, from the first offshore production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Santamarina, C. J.; Waite, W. F.; Winters, W. J.; Ito, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Kida, M.; Jin, Y.; Egawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Turbidite sediments around the production test site at Daini-Atsumi knoll were deposited under channel and lobe environments of a submarine fan. Changes in physical properties of the sediments are likely caused by differences in the depositional environments. In addition, methane hydrate (MH) crystals growing among sediment grains alter the sediment's original physical properties. Thus, distinguishing between hydrate-bearing sediment and hydrate-free sediment based only on physical property changes measured during downhole logging can be difficult. To more precisely analyze sediment properties, core samples of MH-bearing sediments were taken at the first offshore MH production test site. Samples were collected using a wireline hybrid pressure coring system (Hybrid PCS), which retains downhole pressure, thereby preventing dissociation of MH in the sampled cores. Nondestructive, high-pressure analyses were conducted in both the 2012 summer drilling campaign and a 2013 winter laboratory study in Sapporo. To handle Hybrid PCS cores during the pressure coring campaign in the summer of 2012, a pressure core analysis and transfer system (PCATS) was installed on the research vessel Chikyu (Yamamoto et al., 2012). PCATS P-wave velocity measurements were made at in situ water pressure without causing any core destruction or MH dissociation. In January 2013, Georgia Tech (GT), USGS, AIST, and JOGMEC researchers used pressure core characterization tools (PCCTs) developed by GT to re-measure the P-wave velocity of the MH-bearing sediments at high pressure and low, non-freezing temperature. In the PCATS analysis, results showed a difference of more than 1,200 m/s in P-wave velocities between the MH-bearing sandy and muddy layers. This difference in P-wave velocities was confirmed by PCCTs measurements. P-wave velocities within the turbidite interval tend to decrease upward with the textural grading of the turbidite. Our result implies that MH concentration, which is related to

  8. Geographic variation in sandy beach macrofauna community and functional traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodil, I. F.; Compton, T. J.; Lastra, M.

    2014-10-01

    Sandy beaches are a common ocean-dominated ecosystem along the north coast of Spain. We conducted field surveys at 39 beaches distributed between 1° and 9°W, ca. 2000 km along this geographic region to document broad patterns of macrobenthic communities, and to describe their association with variables characterising both the beach environment and the characteristics of the adjacent ocean waters. Macrofaunal functional traits are considered to be an informative measure that can be useful for many ecosystem-level questions, as they are based on what organisms do (i.e., their ecological function) rather than on their identification alone. Boosted regression-trees analysis showed that the occurrence of the main taxonomic groups and feeding guilds were differentially associated with the prevailing beach features along this coastline. The occurrence (presence/absence) of molluscs was best explained by the concentration of chlorophyll-a and wave exposure whereas those of crustaceans and polychaetes were best explained by an ensemble of variables including beach slope, sea surface temperature and grain size. A comparison of the feeding guilds demonstrated that the occurrence of suspension feeders was best explained by chlorophyll-a and wave exposure, whereas the occurrence of deposit feeders was best explained by beach slope, sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a. The occurrence of predators and scavengers was best explained by sea surface temperature and beach slope. Based on the patterns presented here, we confirm that the upwelling events that occur regularly on this coastline are a structuring agent for beach communities. Future work needs to examine the role of the oceanographic conditions of the region for they might represent the driving forces behind large-scale shifts in macrofauna communities.

  9. ANAEROBIC SOIL DISINFESTATION IN MICROCOSMS OF TWO SANDY SOILS.

    PubMed

    Stremińska, M A; Runia, W T; Termorshuizen, A J; Feil, H; Van Der Wurff, A W G

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been proposed as an alternative control method of soil-borne plant pathogens. It involves adding a labile carbon source, irrigating the soil to stimulate decomposition of organic material and then covering the soil with air-tight plastic to limit gas exchange. During the ASD process, soil microorganisms switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. As a result, by-products of anaerobic metabolism are released into the soil environment such as various organic acids and gases. These by-products are reported to have a negative effect on survival of soil-borne plant pathogens. However, the efficacy of ASD to reduce soil-borne pathogens in practice may vary significantly. Therefore, we studied the efficacy of the ASD process in two different soils. In addition, it was investigated whether a pre-treatment with an anaerobic bacterial inoculum prior to ASD affected the efficacy of the process. Two sandy soils (dune sand and glacial sand) were inoculated in 2 L soil microcosms. We tested the efficacy of ASD treatment against the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. For each soil, three treatments were used: control treatment (no Herbie addition, aerobic incubation), ASD 1 (organic substrate addition, anaerobic incubation) and ASD 2 (organic substrate and anaerobic bacterial inoculum addition, anaerobic incubation). Soil microcosms were incubated in the dark at 20°C for two weeks. We observed that anaerobic soil disinfestation treatments were highly effective against Potato Cyst Nematode (PCN), with pathogen being eradicated totally in all but one ASD treatment (glacial sand ASD2) within two weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes (spore-forming bacteria, often fermentative) in total bacteria increased significantly in ASD treated soils. Numbers of these bacteria correlated positively with increased concentrations of acetic and butyric acids in soil water phase in ASD treatments. PMID:26084078

  10. Diesel and silica monitoring at two sites following hurricane sandy.

    PubMed

    Freund, Alice; Zuckerman, Norman; Luo, Honghong; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Lucchini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy, which hit New York City and New Jersey in October 2012, industrial hygienists from the Mount Sinai and Belleview/New York University occupational medicine clinics conducted monitoring for diesel exhaust and silica in lower Manhattan and Rockaway Peninsula. Average daytime elemental carbon levels at three stations in lower Manhattan on December 4, 2012, ranged from 9 to18 μg/m(3). Sub-micron particle counts at various times on the same day were over 200,000 particles per cubic centimeter on many streets in lower Manhattan. In Rockaway Peninsula on December 12, 2012, all average daytime elemental carbon levels were below a detection limit of approximately 7 μg/m(3). The average daytime crystalline silica dust concentration was below detection at two sites on Rockaway Peninsula, and was 0.015 mg/m(3) quartz where sand was being replaced on the beach. The daily average levels of elemental carbon and airborne particulates that we measured are in the range of levels that have been found to cause respiratory effects in sensitive subpopulations like asthmatic patients after 2 hr of exposure. Control of exposure to diesel exhaust must be considered following natural disasters where diesel-powered equipment is used in cleanup and recovery. Although peak silica exposures were not likely captured in this study, but were reported by a government agency to have exceeded recommended guidelines for at least one cleanup worker, we recommend further study of silica exposures when debris removal operations or traffic create visible levels of suspended dust from soil or sand.

  11. Substrate- and nutrient-limited toluene biotransformation in sandy soil

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-King, R.M. . Dept. of Geology); Barker, J.F.; Gillham, R.W. . Waterloo Centre for Groundwater Research); Jensen, B.K. . Environmental Biotechnology Section)

    1994-05-01

    Lab microcosm tests of the rate of toluene biodegradation were performed using soil from the A, B, and C horizons of the unsaturated zone of a sandy field site. Toluene biodegradation was rapid, occurring at a time scale comparable to the rate of sorption in many of the microcosms and demonstrating the potential for bioremediation of these contaminants in unsaturated soil. In the A horizon, with an initial toluene concentration in the solution phase of 4.5 mg/L, degradation was controlled by substrate-limited growth on toluene as the primary substrate. Soil from the B and C horizons initially showed similar behavior with a lower toluene concentrations of about 2.5 mg/L. The maximum utilization rate ([mu][sub max]) for soil from all three depths was 2.0 d[sup [minus]1]. With repeated exposure to moderate to high concentrations of toluene, transformation in the B- and C-horizon soil appeared to be zero order, at a rate of 1.0 to 2.0 [mu]g toluene/g soil/d. In C-horizon soil that had been taken directly from the field, the transformation rate was almost immeasurably slow. Addition of nitrogens as either ammonium or nitrate accelerated the degradation, showing that nitrogen was the most limiting nutrient. The apparent adaptation period observed before rapid toluene removal was fit by a substrate-limited growth model. Greater numbers of toluene-degrading microorganisms were found in soil exposed to toluene than in unexposed soil, supporting biomass growth as the explanation for the adaptation period. The results of enumeration of heterotrophs compared to the numbers of toluene degraders suggested that a small proportion to the total viable microorganisms were responsible for degradation of toluene.

  12. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was <1.0% of applied P and not statistically different from controls. Largo biosolids, generated from a biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils. PMID:11931462

  13. Stream sediment sampling and analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.L.; Voris, P.V.; Headington, G.L.

    1986-04-01

    The objectives were to sample and analyze sediments from upstream and downstream locations (relative to the Goodyear Atomic plant site) of three streams for selected pollutants. The three streams sampled were the Scioto River, Big Beaver Creek, and Big Run Creek. Sediment samples were analyzed for EPA's 129 priority pollutants (Clean Water Act) as well as isotopic uranium (/sup 234/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 238/U) and technetium-99.

  14. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  15. Process-based modeling of tsunami inundation and sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, A.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Jaffe, B.

    2011-01-01

    The infrequent and unpredictable nature of tsunamis precludes the use of field experiments to measure the hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes that occur. Instead, these processes are often approximated from laboratory, numerical, and theoretical studies or inferred from observations of the resultant sediment deposits. Here Delft3D, a three-dimensional numerical model, is used to simulate the inundation and sediment transport of a tsunami similar in magnitude to the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami over one measured and three idealized morphologies. The model is first shown to match well the observations taken at Kuala Meurisi, Sumatra, and then used to examine in detail the processes that occur during the tsunami. The model predicts that at a given cross-shore location the onshore flow accelerates rapidly to a maximum as the wavefront passes, and then gradually decelerates before reversing direction and flowing offshore. The onshore flow does not tend to zero everywhere at maximum inundation, but instead flow reversal occurs near the shoreline even as the wavefront continues to inundate landward. While some sediment is eroded by the passing wavefront, the suspension of sandy sediment is dominated by the long-duration, high-velocity backwash that occurs along the beach face and offshore of the shoreline. Some of the sediment suspended during backwash is advected shoreward by the subsequent wave, creating large spatial gradients in the suspended sediment concentrations, which may not be in equilibrium with the local hydrodynamics. The inundation and transport of sediment during a tsunami can be affected by complexities in the morphological profile and interactions between multiple waves, and many of the hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes predicted here are similar to analogous processes previously observed in the swash zone. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Analyzing Bilingual Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Joe J.

    This paper examines the particular problems involved in analyzing the costs of bilingual education and suggests that cost analysis of bilingual education requires a fundamentally different approach than that followed in other recent school finance studies. Focus of the discussion is the Intercultural Development Research Association's (IDRA)…

  17. List mode multichannel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  18. Analyzing Workforce Education. Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Community & Technical Coll. Workforce Education Consortium.

    This monograph examines the issue of task analysis as used in workplace literacy programs, debating the need for it and how to perform it in a rapidly changing environment. Based on experiences of community colleges in Texas, the report analyzes ways that task analysis can be done and how to implement work force education programs more quickly.…

  19. Electronic sleep analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Electronic instrument automatically monitors the stages of sleep of a human subject. The analyzer provides a series of discrete voltage steps with each step corresponding to a clinical assessment of level of consciousness. It is based on the operation of an EEG and requires very little telemetry bandwidth or time.

  20. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  1. Let's Bet on Sediments! Hudson Canyon Cruise--Grades 9-12. Focus: Sediments of Hudson Canyon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    These activities are designed to teach about the sediments of Hudson Canyon. Students investigate and analyze the patterns of sedimentation in the Hudson Canyon, observe how heavier particles sink faster than finer particles, and learn that submarine landslides are avalanches of sediment in deep ocean canyons. The activity provides learning…

  2. Sediment, land use, and freshwater mussels: Prospects and problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brim-Box, J.; Mossa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in freshwater mussel populations in many river basins throughout North America has been attributed, in part, to land-use modifications that cause changes in sediment regimes. However, the specific associations that mussels have with stream sediments are poorly understood, making it difficult to assess the impacts of changes in sedimentation rates on unionid mussels. Both bed and suspended materials, and concomitant changes in channel form associated with changes in sediment supply, may affect mussels in numerous ways at various stages in their life cycle. Considerable debate and uncertainty remains regarding the strength of associations between sediments and mussels, including whether increased sedimentation is a cause of recent mussel declines. It is important to be aware of appropriate procedures for sampling and analyzing fluvial sediments, and the nature of sediment sources, to adequately assess relationships between unionid mussels and fluvial sediments.

  3. Gravelly to sandy braidplain deposition in the buntsandstein-facies bohdašin formation in northeastern bohemia (Czechoslovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prouza, Vladimír; Tásler, Radko; Valín, Frantisek; Holub, Vlastimil

    Buntsandstein-facies Bohdaín Formation is predominantly laid down in alluvial environment in alluvial fans, braided rivers and lakes of interchannel floodplain or playa type. The polymictic sandstones and conglomerates originate in ephemeral-type gravelly to sandy braided stream systems, with the material of conglomerates and coarse sandstones deriving from reworking of a chain of alluvial fans that seamed the crystalline massives of the Sovi and Bystické hory Mountains. The belt of marginal alluvial fans was surrounded by an only restricted braidplain. The feldspathic sandstones are formed in a similar periodical sandy braided river system which operated in a flatter and more extensive open braidplain. The kaolinitic quartzose sandstones originate in standing water bodies in a lower-energy fluvial braidplain or in shallow lakes of an extensive overbank sheet-flood flat. The onset of deposition of the Bohdaín Formation and the most intensive subsidence of the basin took place in the northeastern part of the Intra Sudetic Basin. With time, equalization of differences in elevation by downcutting was accompanied by expansion of the basin, as reflected by the onlap of the feldspathic sandstones. The depositional areas of the Intra Sudetic Basin and the eastern part of the Krkonoe Piedmont Basin (the Trutnov-Náchod Depression) were separated by a swell which caused a primary reduction of thickness of the sediments. The depositional history of the Bohdaín Formation is characterized by installation of a gravelly to sandy restricted braidplain that evolves into an extensive open braidplain with progressive downcutting of the source area relief and declining palaeoslope gradient.

  4. Diagenesis and Associated Sedimentary Environments of Subseafloor Argillaceous Sediments in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Kato, Y.; Matsumoto, R.

    2013-12-01

    The MD179 project was undertaken in 2010 by the Marion Dufresne aiming at recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate and deep sediments to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate the possible environmental impact of gas hydrate generation and decomposition for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Sediment samples below the seafloor were retrieved as long as 40 meters at the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Japan Basin, Nishi Tsugaru and Okushiri Ridge areas in Japan Sea. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Pleistocene and Holocene muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Those sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sands, and are sometimes tuffaceous. These sandy sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka according to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might have not been abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. It is important to clarify the relationship between burial depths and absolute porosities of the argillaceous sediments. Therefore, macroscopic observations and descriptions, measurements of porosities and the pore size distributions, thin-section observations, SEM-BEI (scanning electron microscope-backscattered electron image) observations, and the X-ray diffraction analyses have been performed. They consist of silt- to clay-grained particles, and they sometimes contain very fine- to medium-grained thin sandy layers. Average porosities are 50 % in all study areas, but mean pore sizes in the Nishi Tsugaru are around 1000 nm while 100 nm in the other areas, which tend to decrease as increasing of depths. It is suggested that repacking of the muddy particles dominantly advances by physical compaction in early diagenesis. They generally contain much opal-A, quartz, feldspar, illite and smectite that do not change definitely with depth, because they are

  5. Hydrology and sediment dynamics above and below the St. Croix Falls dam, MN/WI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, K. R.; Hornbach, D.; Hove, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sediment budgets in river networks are notoriously difficult to construct but key for quantifying both short and long-term changes to fluvial environments. Hydrologic and sedimentologic conditions in the St. Croix River, one of the first rivers in the US to be designated a National Wild and Scenic River, play a significant role in the stability of native freshwater mussel populations. The availability and transport of sediment controls overall geomorphology, riverbed composition, and water turbidity, all of which are important to mussel habitat. Mussel habitat analyses show a decrease in the grain size of bed sediment and a >90% decline in the juvenile mussel population in the last decade, but only in a region below the St. Croix Falls dam. This reach of the St. Croix River is home to two federally endangered mussel species; we need to better understand the controls on sediment transport into and out of this stretch of river to understand the causes for the mussel decline, and to evaluate future threats to these species. In conjunction with mussel habitat analyses, we collected surface and near-bed suspended sediment, as well as bedload transport samples below the dam. Since January 2008 we have collected suspended sediment samples weekly at four locations, two above the dam and two below. Comparison to data collected in the 1970's suggests a decrease in suspended sediment, although the frequency of summer/fall high flow events has increased. We measured near-bed sediment transport using a BL-84 bedload sampler at Wild River, a sandy habitat upstream of the St. Croix Falls dam and Interstate Park, a rockier habitat downstream of the dam. A significant relationship was found between water discharge and bed sediment transport at both high (>5000 cfs) and low flows at both sites. Using historical maps and recent bathymetric data, we used GIS to construct changes in reservoir volume over time. Our results indicate that there has been substantial sediment infilling

  6. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  7. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, H; Neubig, R

    2001-05-01

    A radioligand is a radioactively labeled drug that can associate with a receptor, transporter, enzyme, or any protein of interest. Measuring the rate and extent of binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility for various drugs. Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. For example, radioligand binding studies are used to study receptor regulation, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  8. Analyzing Optical Communications Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William K.; Burk, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    Optical Communication Link Analysis Program, OPTI, analyzes optical and near-infrared communication links using pulse-position modulation (PPM) and direct detention. Link margins and design-control tables generated from input parameters supplied by user. Enables user to save sets of input parameters that define given link and read them back into program later. Alters automatically any of input parameters to achieve desired link margin. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  9. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  10. Analyzing Leakage Through Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Two related computer programs written for use in analyzing leakage through cracks. Leakage flow laminar or turbulent. One program used to determine dimensions of crack under given flow conditions and given measured rate of leakage. Other used to determine rate of leakage of gas through crack of given dimensions under given flow conditions. Programs, written in BASIC language, accelerate and facilitate iterative calculations and parametric analyses. Solve equations of Fanno flow. Enables rapid solution of leakage problem.

  11. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  12. Morphological and sedimentary impacts and recovery on a mixed sandy to pebbly seabed exposed to marine aggregate extraction (Eastern English Channel, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, Sophie; Lafite, Robert; Fournier, Matthieu; Baltzer, Agnès; Desprez, Michel

    2010-10-01

    The impacts of marine aggregate dredging and the recovery levels, 1 and 10 years after cessation of dredging, are investigated for a commercial dredging site. The site consists of mixed sandy to pebbly sediments. Dredging intensity is low (generally less than 1 h/ha/year) and heterogeneous in space and time, allowing to distinguish adjacent areas of active extraction, fallow, recovery and overflow deposition. Surveys were conducted using a combination of acoustic (side-scan sonar), video and grab sampling techniques. Multivariate analysis has been utilized to define a seabed morphological and sedimentary zonation that provides a good habitat description and mapping. Sedimentary patchiness characterized by grain-size increased variability is identified as a feature indicative of seabed disturbance due to dredging activities. In the vicinity of the dredging areas, fine-sand content greater than 10% is indicative of overflow deposition resulting from dredging activities while coarse sand is found to be covering areas previously dredged but now recovered. Furrows created by dredging operations collapse within one year, and generally fully disappear within 10 years. They are usually covered by sands and bedforms, indicative of active sediment transport, are formed. This study confirms that a low dredging intensity strategy is recommended for mixed sediment areas under moderate hydrodynamic energy regimes as this of the study area. This allows natural recovery of the seabed to take place within a period of 10 years.

  13. Acidification, Buffering, and Salt Effects in the Unsaturated Zone of a Sandy Aquifer, Klosterhede, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bent KjæR.; Postma, Dieke

    1995-01-01

    Acidification of groundwater in a noncalcareous sandy aquifer at Klosterhede, Denmark, is the result of acid rain deposition. In the 4- to 5-m-thick unsaturated zone the pH ranges from 4.2 to 4.9 with Al concentrations of up to 0.8 mmol L-1. The groundwater at the top of the saturated zone still has a pH below 5. Deposition of sea salt affects the solute profiles, and its importance varies both spatially from the forest margin to the inner part of the forest and temporally through seasonal variations in infiltration and dry deposition. As a result, pulses of high solute concentrations travel downward through the unsaturated zone. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the sediments ranges between 0.2 and 1 meq 100 g-1, and in the acidified zone, base saturation is around 17%. The pore waters are close to equilibrium with gibbsite, supersaturated for kaolinite, and strongly undersaturated for other silicateminerals. Mass balance calculations on increases in dissolved silica over depth suggest that the buffering effect of silicate weathering is small. Buffering processes and solute transport were modeled with the code PHREEQM. Simulation of pre-acid rain weathering indicates that this process operates on a timescale of thousands of years, yielding minimum pH values near 5.2 and a base saturation of greater than 70%. The present leaching of Al3+ rich acid water from the soil yields acidification rates of 7 and 10 cm yr-1 for weathering of a naturally weathered and a pristine profile, respectively. Simulation of infiltration of sea-salt pulses indicates that the cation distribution quickly becomes attenuated by the exchanger composition. However, due to coupling of gibbsite equilibrium with ion exchange processes, downward traveling pulses with high solute concentrations will cause pH variations throughout the unsaturated zone by precipitation and dissolution of gibbsite. Accordingly, the general acidification pattern at Klosterhede is overprinted by salts effects in a

  14. Morphological impacts of extreme storms on sandy beaches and barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Sallenger, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Historical extreme storms that struck the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast regions of the United States caused several different styles of morphological response and resulted in a wide range of washover penetration distances. The post- storm erosional responses included dune scarps, channel incisions, and washouts, whereas depositional responses included perched fans, washover terraces, and sheetwash lineations. Maximum inland extent of washover penetration ranged from approximately 100 to 1000 m and estimated sediment volumes associated with these deposits ranged from about 10 to 225 m 3/m of beach. Unusual styles of morphological response (sheetwash lineations and incised channels) and maximum washover penetration distances are closely correlated, and they also correspond to storm intensity as denned by the Saffir-Simpson wind-speed scale. The regional morphological responses and washover penetration distances are controlled primarily by the interactions among heights and durations of storm surge relative to adjacent land elevations, differences in water levels between the ocean and adjacent lagoon, constructive and destructive interference of storm waves, and alongshore variations in nearshore bathymetry. For barrier segments that are entirely submerged during the storm, impacts can be enhanced by the combined influences of shallow water depths and organized flow within the wind field. The greatest washover penetrations and sediment accumulations are products of shallow water, confined flow, and high wind stress. Transport and deposition of washover sediments across barrier islands and into the adjacent lagoon are common processes along the Gulf of Mexico but not along the western Atlantic Ocean. This fundamental difference in storm impact underscores how microtidal and mesotidal barriers respond respectively to extreme storms, and provides insight into how different types of barrier islands will likely respond to future extreme storms and to a relative rise in sea

  15. Sediment supply versus local hydraulic controls on sediment transport and storage in a river with large sediment loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, David; Topping, David; Schmidt, John C.; Griffiths, Ronald; Sabol, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, undergoes rapid geomorphic changes as a result of its large sediment supply and variable hydrology; thus, it is a useful natural laboratory to investigate the relative importance of flow strength and sediment supply in controlling alluvial channel change. We analyzed a suite of sediment transport and geomorphic data to determine the cumulative influence of different flood types on changing channel form. In this study, physically based analyses suggest that channel change in the Rio Grande is controlled by both changes in flow strength and sediment supply over different spatial and temporal scales. Channel narrowing is primarily caused by substantial deposition of sediment supplied to the Rio Grande during tributary-sourced flash floods. Tributary floods have large suspended-sediment concentrations, occur for short durations, and attenuate rapidly downstream in the Rio Grande, depositing much of their sediment in downstream reaches. Long-duration floods on the mainstem have the capacity to enlarge the Rio Grande, and these floods, released from upstream dams, can either erode or deposit sediment in the Rio Grande depending upon the antecedent in-channel sediment supply and the magnitude and duration of the flood. Geomorphic and sediment transport analyses show that the locations and rates of sand erosion and deposition during long-duration floods are most strongly controlled by spatial changes in flow strength, largely through changes in channel slope. However, spatial differences in the in-channel sediment supply regulate sediment evacuation or accumulation over time in long reaches (greater than a kilometer).

  16. Multiscale Processes of Hurricane Sandy (2012) as Revealed by the CAMVis-MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.; Li, J. F.; Cheung, S.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Storm Sandy made landfall near Brigantine, New Jersey, devastating surrounding areas and causing tremendous economic loss and hundreds of fatalities (Blake et al., 2013). An estimated damage of $50 billion made Sandy become the second costliest tropical cyclone (TC) in US history, surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Central questions to be addressed include (1) to what extent the lead time of severe storm prediction such as Sandy can be extended (e.g., Emanuel 2012); and (2) whether and how advanced global model, supercomputing technology and numerical algorithm can help effectively illustrate the complicated physical processes that are associated with the evolution of the storms. In this study, the predictability of Sandy is addressed with a focus on short-term (or extended-range) genesis prediction as the first step toward the goal of understanding the relationship between extreme events, such as Sandy, and the current climate. The newly deployed Coupled Advanced global mesoscale Modeling (GMM) and concurrent Visualization (CAMVis) system is used for this study. We will show remarkable simulations of Hurricane Sandy with the GMM, including realistic 7-day track and intensity forecast and genesis predictions with a lead time of up to 6 days (e.g., Shen et al., 2013, GRL, submitted). We then discuss the enabling role of the high-resolution 4-D (time-X-Y-Z) visualizations in illustrating TC's transient dynamics and its interaction with tropical waves. In addition, we have finished the parallel implementation of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (PEEMD, Cheung et al., 2013, AGU13, submitted) method that will be soon integrated into the multiscale analysis package (MAP) for the analysis of tropical weather systems such as TCs and tropical waves. While the original EEMD has previously shown superior performance in decomposition of nonlinear (local) and non-stationary data into different intrinsic modes which stay within the natural

  17. Result of storage term measurements at a sandy grassland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintér, Krisztina; Barcza, Zoltán; Balogh, János; Nagy, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) technique is common technique to investigate fluxes over ecosystems. In the past 20 years the focus was on the carbon dioxide (CO2) budget of ecosystems measured as net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Night underestimation of fluxes is a frequent problem, addressed by several EC studies. When the turbulence is low the accumulation of CO2 close to the ground can be significant, so the storage term (rate of change of storage, RCS) has to be taken into account. In the case of tall vegetation storage measurements are routinely done, but in the case of short vegetation it is often neglected based on the assumption that its positive values after sunset and negative values at dawn extinguish each other when calculating daily and yearly sums. The EC system at the sandy grassland (Bugacpuszta, Hungary) was complemented by a 5-level (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4m) concentration profile measuring system and the storage term was calculated from the profile at half-hourly intervals. RCS was also calculated using only the concentration measurements of the EC system assuming linear concentration profile between the surface and the level of the measurement (linear approach). When comparing the uncorrected and the corrected (profile method) half-hourly fluxes storage correction did not affect the daytime NEE values (slope=1.0084, const=-0.0053, R2=0.9922) and had only a minor effect on the measured Reco values (slope=0.9577, const=0.0066, R2=0.9173). Yearly sums were calculated for the first whole year (August, 2013 - July, 2014) of the concentration profile measurement. Application of the linear approach storage correction enhanced the sink (more negative NEE) by 12 gC m-2 year-1 as compared to the uncorrected yearly sum. On the other hand, the use of storage terms calculated from the concentration profile measurements increased the sink activity by 54 gC m-2 year-1. Considering this more than 4 fold difference, concentration profiling should also be considered in case of

  18. Influence of a dam on fine-sediment storage in a canyon river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazel, J.E.; Topping, D.J.; Schmidt, J.C.; Kaplinski, M.

    2006-01-01

    Glen Canyon Dam has caused a fundamental change in the distribution of fine sediment storage in the 99-km reach of the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The two major storage sites for fine sediment (i.e., sand and finer material) in this canyon river are lateral recirculation eddies and the main-channel bed. We use a combination of methods, including direct measurement of sediment storage change, measurements of sediment flux, and comparison of the grain size of sediment found in different storage sites relative to the supply and that in transport, in order to evaluate the change in both the volume and location of sediment storage. The analysis shows that the bed of the main channel was an important storage environment for fine sediment in the predam era. In years of large seasonal accumulation, approximately 50% of the fine sediment supplied to the reach from upstream sources was stored on the main-channel bed. In contrast, sediment budgets constructed for two short-duration, high experimental releases from Glen Canyon Dam indicate that approximately 90% of the sediment discharge from the reach during each release was derived from eddy storage, rather than from sandy deposits on the main-channel bed. These results indicate that the majority of the fine sediment in Marble Canyon is now stored in eddies, even though they occupy a small percentage (???17%) of the total river area. Because of a 95% reduction in the supply of fine sediment to Marble Canyon, future high releases without significant input of tributary sediment will potentially erode sediment from long-term eddy storage, resulting in continued degradation in Marble Canyon. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. LIQUEFACTION POTENTIAL OF SEDIMENT IN THE NORTHERN BERING SEA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, William J.; ,

    1985-01-01

    The liquefaction potential of sediment in Norton Sound and the northern Bering Sea was evaluated by estimating the liquefaction susceptibility of the material from in-situ and laboratory tests in terms of earthquake and wave loads required to liquefy the material, and then comparing estimated behavior with anticipated loadings caused by frequent storm waves in the relatively shallow water depths and infrequent earthquakes. In-situ cone penetration tests (CPT) were performed at 13 stations. After the CPT data were transformed into equivalent standard penetration test (SPT) blow counts, analyses were performed that determined earthquake accelerations and sustained relative storm wave heights that would cause liquefaction. Vibratory core samples, up to 6 m long, were obtained in silty sand grading to sandy silt near many of the CPT locations. Results of cyclic triaxial tests performed on those samples were used to calculate earthquake accelerations and sustained storm wave heights that would liquefy the sediment.

  20. Morphology of Rain Water Channeling in Systematically Varied Model Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuli; Cejas, Cesare M.; Barrois, Rémi; Dreyfus, Rémi; Durian, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different rain conditions using a quasi-2D experimental setup and systematically determine the impact of the soil grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the water channeling phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of the soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed rain condition, we combine the effects of the grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to the rain water channeling phenomenon, including prewetting sandy soils at different levels before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  1. Genesis of Hurricane Sandy (2012) Simulated with a Global Mesoscale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; DeMaria, Mark; Li, J.-L. F.; Cheung, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the formation predictability of Hurricane Sandy (2012) with a global mesoscale model. We first present five track and intensity forecasts of Sandy initialized at 00Z 22-26 October 2012, realistically producing its movement with a northwestward turn prior to its landfall. We then show that three experiments initialized at 00Z 16-18 October captured the genesis of Sandy with a lead time of up to 6 days and simulated reasonable evolution of Sandy's track and intensity in the next 2 day period of 18Z 21-23 October. Results suggest that the extended lead time of formation prediction is achieved by realistic simulations of multiscale processes, including (1) the interaction between an easterly wave and a low-level westerly wind belt (WWB) and (2) the appearance of the upper-level trough at 200 hPa to Sandy's northwest. The low-level WWB and upper-level trough are likely associated with a Madden-Julian Oscillation.

  2. Geoacoustic character, sedimentology and chronology of a cross-shelf Holocene sediment deposit off Cabo Frio, Brazil (southwest Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Ursula; Ayres Neto, Arthur; C. Abuchacra, Rodrigo; Fernandes Barbosa, Cátia; G. Figueiredo, Alberto; C. Gomes, Manoela; Belem, Andre L.; Capilla, Ramsés; S. Albuquerque, Ana Luiza

    2014-08-01

    The Cabo Frio region in the state of Rio de Janeiro, southeast coast of Brazil, is characterized by a local coastal upwelling system and converging littoral sediment transport systems that are deflected offshore at Cabo Frio, as a consequence of which a thick cross-shelf sediment deposit has developed over time. To investigate the evolution of this muddy deposit, geophysical, sedimentological and geochemical data from four sediment cores (3.8-4.1 m in length) recovered in water depths between 88 and 141 m were analyzed. The high-resolution seismic data show variable sediment thicknesses ranging from 1 to 20 m, comprising two sedimentary units separated by a high-impedance layer at a depth of about 10 m below the seafloor at the coring sites. According to the available age datings, the upper sedimentary unit is late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, whereas the lower unit (not dated) must, by implication, be entirely Pleistocene in age. The boomer-seismic reflection signal can be divided into three echo-types, namely transparent (inner shelf), stratified (middle shelf) and reflective (outer shelf), each type seemingly related to the local sediment composition. The upper 4 m of the upper sedimentary unit is dominated by silty