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Sample records for sapelo island georgia

  1. Sulfate reduction in the salt marshes at Sapelo Island, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.W.; Giblin, A.

    1983-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rates were measured in stands of Spartina alterniflora at Sapelo Island, Georgia, in November 1980 by injecting tracer amounts of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into cores, incubating overnight, and analyzing for the incorporation of /sup 35/S into reduced sulfur compounds. Qualitatively, sulfate reduction in the Georgia marsh is very similar to that in the Massachusetts marshes the authors have studied: FeS/sup 2/ (pyrite or marcasite) is the major end product. Lesser amounts of soluble sulfides, iron monosulfides, and elemental sulfur are also formed. The rate of sulfate reduction (determined by the same method)is significantly lower during November in Georgia than in the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Massachusetts, 0.090 vs. 0.27 moles SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/xm/sup -2/xd/sup -1/ in stands of short Spartina. The lower rates in Georgia may reflect a lower rate of organic carbon input by below ground production. Sulfate reduction appears to be the major form of respiration in the sediments of salt marshes in Georgia as well as in Massachusetts.

  2. Home range and survival of breeding painted buntings on Sapelo Island, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Springborn, E.G.; Meyers, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The southeastern United States population of the painted bunting (Passerina ciris) has decreased approximately 75% from 1966-1996 based on Breeding Bird Survey trends. Partners in Flight guidelines recommend painted bunting conservation as a high priority with a need for management by state and federal agencies. Basic information on home range and survival of breeding painted buntings will provide managers with required habitat types and estimates of land areas necessary to maintain minimum population sizes for this species. We radiotracked after-second-year male and after-hatching-year female buntings on Sapelo Island, Georgia, during the breeding seasons (late April-early August) of 1997 and 1998. We used the animal movement extension in ArcView to determine fixed-kernel home range in an unmanaged maritime shrub and managed 60-80-year-old pine (Pinus spp.)-oak Quercus spp.) forest. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we estimated an adult breeding season survival of 1.00 for males (n = 36) and 0.94 (SE = 0.18) for females(n=27). Painted bunting home ranges were smaller in unmanaged maritime shrub (female: kernel (x) over bar = 3.5 ha [95% CI: 2.5-4.51; male: kernel (x) over bar = 3.1 ha [95% CI: 2.3-3.9]) compared to those in managed pine-oak forests (female: kernel (x) over bar = 4.7 ha [95% CI: 2.8-6.6]; male: kernel (x) over bar = 7.0 ha [95% CI: 4.9-9.1]). Buntings nesting in the managed pine-oak forest flew long distances (>= 300 m) to forage in salt marshes, freshwater wetlands, and moist forest clearings. In maritime shrub buntings occupied a compact area and rarely moved long distances. The painted bunting population of Sapelo Island requires conservation of maritime shrub as potential optimum nesting habitat and management of nesting habitat in open-canopy pine-oak sawtimber forests by periodic prescribed fire (every 4-6 years) and timber thinning within a landscape that contains salt marsh or freshwater wetland openings within 700 m of those forests.

  3. Distribution and sources of PCBs (Aroclor 1268) in the Sapelo Island National estuarine research reserve.

    PubMed

    Wirth, E F; Pennington, P L; Cooksey, C; Schwacke, L; Balthis, L; Hyland, J; Fulton, M H

    2014-12-01

    Aroclor 1268 is a highly chlorinated PCB mixture that was released into the aquatic environment near Brunswick, GA (BR), as a result of decades of local industrial activity. This extensive contamination has led to US EPA Superfund designation in estuarine areas in and around Purvis Creek, GA. Roughly 50 km to the northeast is the Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (SI) where previous studies have documented unexpectedly high Aroclor 1268-like PCB levels in blubber and plasma samples of resident bottlenose dolphins. This result led to a collaborative effort to assess the PCB patterns and concentrations in SI sediment and fish (as potential vectors for PCB transfer to SI resident dolphins). Thirty SI randomly assigned stations were sampled for sediment PCB levels. Additionally, fish were collected and analyzed from SI (n = 31) and BR (n = 33). Results were pooled with regional assessments of PCB concentrations from South Carolina and North Carolina in an effort to determine the association of Aroclor 1268 levels in SI samples. Results indicated that PCB levels in sediment and fish are much lower in the SI estuary compared to BR sediment and fish concentrations. However, PCB congener profiles for both sediments and fish were similar between the two locations and consistent with the Aroclor 1268 signature, indicating possible transport from the Brunswick area. A likely source of Aroclor 1268 in dolphins from SI is contaminated fish prey.

  4. Biogeography of Triatoma sanguisuga (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) on two barrier islands off the coast of Georgia, United States.

    PubMed

    Roden, Ashley E; Champagne, Don E; Forschler, Brian T

    2011-07-01

    Thirty-three Triatoma sanguisuga (LeConte) adults and nymphs were collected during June and July 2009, at five sites on Cumberland Island and two sites on Sapelo Island, Georgia, to assess genetic diversity within and between sites. All but three specimens were found in a peridomestic habitat. The entire length (699 bp) of the cytochrome oxidase II mitochondrial gene was sequenced for each specimen. Twelve haplotypes were identified, nine from Cumberland Island and three from Sapelo Island. No haplotypes were shared between the two islands, indicating there is limited or no movement of gene flow between the islands. Phylogenetic relationships among the haplotypes were determined using both neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses. The phylogenetic trees from both analyses were similar, with no distinct clades on either tree devoted to haplotypes from a single island. A haplotype network structure was determined using nested clade analysis, which produced two haplotype networks, one containing only specimens found on Cumberland Island. The second network included specimens from both islands, with the ancestral haplotype from Sapelo Island. This pilot study is the first to highlight triatomine populations in the southeastern United States using the cytochrome oxidase II mitochondrial gene, and indicates strong population structuring along the Georgia Coast.

  5. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″ N...

  6. SeaWinds - South Georgia Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Winds are blocked by an island mountain barrier that produces a long 'shadow' of low winds on the downwind side of the island stretching for hundreds of kilometers (about 500 miles long) in this image produced from data from NASA's SeaWinds instrument on the QuikScat satellite.

    South Georgia Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean (approximately 1,500 kilometers, or miles, east of the Falkland/Malvinas Islands, is only 170 kilometers long (about 106 miles) and 30 kilometers (about 19 miles)wide, but contains 13 peaks exceeding 2,000 meters (more than 6,500 feet) in height. The island thus acts as a significant barrier to the surface winds in this forbidding part of the world oceans.

    Mountainous islands and steep coastal topography can modify the surface wind field for many hundreds of kilometers seaward. The detailed air-sea-land interaction processes involved are not well understood, largely because of a lack of accurate, high-resolution, extensive wind speed and direction measurements. The broad-swath, all-weather SeaWinds instrument on NASA's QuikScat satellite is providing unique measurements of ocean winds, revealing previously unknown wind patterns caused by island topography and allowing development of improved models for coastal ocean winds.

    This image shows QuikScat measurements of wind speed and direction during a single pass over South Georgia Island on September 13, 1999. The island itself is shown as black (for heights less than 750 meters(less than half a mile), green (for heights between 750 and 1,500 meters (less than half a mile to about one mile), and red (for regions greater than 1,500 meters, or about one mile in altitude). The white area surrounding the island represents the region where land contamination does not allow wind measurements to be made. The horizontal and vertical coordinates are in kilometers, with origin on the island at latitude 54.5 degrees south, longitude 30 degrees east.

    This large-scale view shows regions of

  7. Altamaha River Delta, Georgia Sea Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The history of sea islands in the Altamaha River delta on the coast of Georgia is revealed in this image produced from data acquired by the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The outlines of long-lost plantation rice fields, canals, dikes and other inlets are clearly defined. Salt marshes are shown in red, while dense cypress and live oak tree canopies are seen in yellow-greens.

    Agricultural development of the Altamaha delta began soon after the founding of the Georgia Colony in 1733. About 25 plantations were located on the low-lying islands and shores by the 19th century, taking advantage of the rich alluvial flow and annual inundation of water required by some crops. The first major crop was indigo; when demand for that faded, rice and cotton took its place. A major storm in 1824 destroyed much of the town of Darien (upper right) and put many of the islands under 20 feet of water. The Civil War ended the plantation system, and many of the island plantations disappeared under heavy brush and new growth pine forests. Some were used as tree farms for paper and pulp industries, while the Butler Island (center left) plantation became a wildlife conservation site growing wild sea rice for migrating ducks and other waterfowl. Margaret Mitchell is reputed to have used the former owner of the Butler Plantation as a basis for the Rhett Butler character in her novel 'Gone With The Wind,' taking the first name from Rhett's Island (lower right).

    These data were obtained during a 1994-95 campaign along the Georgia coast. AIRSAR's ability to detect vegetation canopy density, hydrological features and other topographic characteristics is a useful tool in landscape archaeology. AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The analysis on the data shown was accomplished by Dr. Gary Mckay, Department of Archaeology and Geography, and Ian

  8. Altamaha River Delta, Georgia Sea Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The history of sea islands in the Altamaha River delta on the coast of Georgia is revealed in this image produced from data acquired by the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The outlines of long-lost plantation rice fields, canals, dikes and other inlets are clearly defined. Salt marshes are shown in red, while dense cypress and live oak tree canopies are seen in yellow-greens.

    Agricultural development of the Altamaha delta began soon after the founding of the Georgia Colony in 1733. About 25 plantations were located on the low-lying islands and shores by the 19th century, taking advantage of the rich alluvial flow and annual inundation of water required by some crops. The first major crop was indigo; when demand for that faded, rice and cotton took its place. A major storm in 1824 destroyed much of the town of Darien (upper right) and put many of the islands under 20 feet of water. The Civil War ended the plantation system, and many of the island plantations disappeared under heavy brush and new growth pine forests. Some were used as tree farms for paper and pulp industries, while the Butler Island (center left) plantation became a wildlife conservation site growing wild sea rice for migrating ducks and other waterfowl. Margaret Mitchell is reputed to have used the former owner of the Butler Plantation as a basis for the Rhett Butler character in her novel 'Gone With The Wind,' taking the first name from Rhett's Island (lower right).

    These data were obtained during a 1994-95 campaign along the Georgia coast. AIRSAR's ability to detect vegetation canopy density, hydrological features and other topographic characteristics is a useful tool in landscape archaeology. AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The analysis on the data shown was accomplished by Dr. Gary Mckay, Department of Archaeology and Geography, and Ian

  9. Shoreline Movements. Report 2. Tybee Island, Georgia, to Cape Fear, North Carolina, 1851-1983

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    COPY TECHNICAL REPORT CERC-83-1 £ **SHORELINE MOVEMENTS 0 - I.n Report 2 TYBEE ISLAND, GEORGIA , TO CAPE FEAR,S N NORTH CAROLINA, 1851-1983 I by...Include Security Classification) Shoreline Movements; Report 2, Tybee Island, Georgia , to Cape Fear, North Carolina, 1851- 1983 - 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...techniques to measure areal changes. Results are presented for the entire Atlantic coast from Tybee Island, Georgia to Cape Fear, North Carolina, in

  10. South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-02-28

    SL4-142-4577 (28 Jan. 1974) --- Two large ice islands in the vicinity of South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, as photographed from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit by one of the Skylab 4 crewmen. The camera used was a hand-held 70mm Hasselblad, with SO-368 medium-speed Ektachrome. One of the ice islands is partially obscured by clouds. Ice islands were observed as large as 45 by 60 kilometers (27 x 37 miles) and as far north as 45 degrees south latitude. The size and distribution of the "small" icebergs (to a ship they would look very large) can be used to study the local winds and currents. Recent research has suggested the possibility of towing such Antarctic icebergs to selected areas and using them as water supplies. One such iceberg would contain many times the water as in Lake Powell. Photo credit: NASA

  11. A 3000 yr paleostorm record from St. Catherines Island, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erick; Meyer, Brian; Deocampo, Daniel; Kiage, Lawrence M.

    2017-09-01

    Tropical cyclones (hurricanes in the northern hemisphere) are amongst the most devastating of the world's natural disasters and cause billions of dollars in damage every year. Data on the likelihood of a coastal site being struck by a major hurricane strike can potentially aid in planning and mitigation efforts that could save money and lives. However, forecasting requires data that are currently insufficient for the Georgia Bight. This study provides information to enhance the paleohurricane record by analysis of a 467 cm thick vibracore raised from St. Catherines Island, GA. Sediment geochemistry and foraminiferal assemblages indicate deposits attributable to seven paleohurricane events, five of which were likely major hurricanes when they made landfall on St. Catherines. Magnitudes were estimated by comparison to the overwash deposit left by ;The Sea Islands hurricane of 1893;, a major hurricane recorded by the recent sediment of St. Catherines Island. The St. Catherines record also shows a change in the activity levels on the Georgia coast with two distinct activity regimes over the past 3000 years.

  12. Relationship between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and ranging patterns in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from coastal Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Brian C; Schwacke, Lori H; Wells, Randall S; George, R Clay; Hoguet, Jennifer; Kucklick, John R; Lane, Suzanne M; Martinez, Anthony; McLellan, William A; Rosel, Patricia E; Rowles, Teri K; Sparks, Kate; Speakman, Todd; Zolman, Eric S; Pabst, D Ann

    2011-05-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are apex predators in coastal southeastern U.S. waters; as such they are indicators of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in coastal ecosystems. POP concentrations measured in a dolphin's blubber are influenced by a number of factors, including the animal's sex and ranging pattern in relation to POP point sources. This study examined POP concentrations measured in bottlenose dolphin blubber samples (n=102) from the Georgia, USA coast in relation to individual ranging patterns and specifically, distance of sightings from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) point source near Brunswick, Georgia. Dolphin ranging patterns were determined based upon 5years of photo-identification data from two field sites approximately 40km apart: (1) the Brunswick field site, which included the Turtle/Brunswick River Estuary (TBRE), and (2) the Sapelo field site, which included the Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (SINERR). Dolphins were categorized into one of three ranging patterns from photo-identification data. Individuals with sighting histories exclusively within one of the defined field sites were considered to have either Brunswick or Sapelo ranging patterns. Individuals sighted in both field sites were classified as having a Mixed ranging pattern. Brunswick males had the highest concentrations of PCBs reported for any marine mammal. The pattern of PCB congeners was consistent with Aroclor 1268, a highly chlorinated PCB mixture associated with a Superfund site in Brunswick. PCB levels in Sapelo males were lower than in Brunswick males, but comparable to the highest levels measured in other dolphin populations along the southeastern U.S. Female dolphins had higher Aroclor 1268 proportions than males, suggesting that the highly chlorinated congeners associated with Aroclor 1268 may not be offloaded through parturition and lactation, as easily as less halogenated POPs. Individuals sighted farther from the Superfund point

  13. Wilderness, wildness, and visitor access to Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia

    Treesearch

    Ryan L. Sharp; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    Cumberland Island National Seashore (CUIS), located off the coast of Georgia, was created in 1972 to preserve the island's ecosystem and primitive character. CUIS management staff has recently been charged with developing a Transportation Management Plan (TMP) to provide better access to the northern portion of the island, where several sites of historical...

  14. Development and morphology of point bars in tidal rivers, observations from Sapelo and the Altamaha River, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Z. J.; Georgiou, I. Y.; Howes, N. C.; Weathers, D.; Kulp, M.; FitzGerald, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Many tidal creeks and rivers exhibit bars associated with meander bends. However, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic studies of these point-bars are scarce, compared with the extensive studies of fluvial-point bars. The few studies that have been undertaken suggest significant differences between tidal bars and their fluvial counterparts, including low rates of channel migration, a unique planform morphology resulting from the bi-directional tidal flows and tidal asymmetry, and variation in stage-discharge behavior. We examine point-bars in two closely situated estuaries on the Georgia coast: the Altamaha and Sapelo. Both sites are meso-tidal; however, the Altamaha has significant fluvial input, whereas the Sapelo creeks have minimal fluvial input. Both sites exhibit mixed sand-mud point bars of various sizes. However, sites dominated by fluvial processes are coarser-grained and contain a higher percentage of sand. Velocity measurements from vessel-mounted and moored acoustic Doppler current profilers record the separation of flood and ebb flows to either side of the tidal bars, which results in a residual circulation over their surface. Large bedforms with opposing migration directions are observed on either side of the bar, suggesting that each side of the channel experiences a separate sediment transport regime. Shallow seismic data at two resolutions (Boomer and Chirp) indicate that the internal architecture of the tidal bars consists of lateral accretion surfaces with multi-directional strike orientations and dips, suggesting a more complex pattern of growth and development. We compare and contrast the hydrodynamics and the resulting morphologies of the bars and identify differences between fluvially-influenced and purely tidal environments. This data set also allows us to examine the hypothesis that these forms are scale invariant by examining a wide range of bars in both large and small channels.

  15. Momentum Flux Estimates for South Georgia Island Mountain Waves in the Stratosphere Observed via Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Broutman, Dave; Ma, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We show high-resolution satellite observations of mountain wave events in the stratosphere above South Georgia Island in the remote southern Atlantic Ocean and compute the wave momentum fluxes for these events. The fluxes are large, and they imply important drag forces on the circulation. Small island orography is generally neglected in mountain wave parameterizations used in global climate models because limited model resolution treats the grid cell containing the island as ocean rather than land. Our results show that satellite observations can be used to quantitatively constrain mountain wave momentum fluxes, and they suggest that mountain waves from island topography may be an important missing source of drag on the atmospheric circulation.

  16. Momentum Flux Estimates for South Georgia Island Mountain Waves in the Stratosphere Observed via Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Broutman, Dave; Ma, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We show high-resolution satellite observations of mountain wave events in the stratosphere above South Georgia Island in the remote southern Atlantic Ocean and compute the wave momentum fluxes for these events. The fluxes are large, and they imply important drag forces on the circulation. Small island orography is generally neglected in mountain wave parameterizations used in global climate models because limited model resolution treats the grid cell containing the island as ocean rather than land. Our results show that satellite observations can be used to quantitatively constrain mountain wave momentum fluxes, and they suggest that mountain waves from island topography may be an important missing source of drag on the atmospheric circulation.

  17. Coastal ground water at risk - Saltwater contamination at Brunswick, Georgia and Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krause, Richard E.; Clarke, John S.

    2001-01-01

    IntroductionSaltwater contamination is restricting the development of ground-water supply in coastal Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina and Florida. The principal source of water in the coastal area is the Upper Floridan aquifer—an extremely permeable and high-yielding aquifer—which was first developed in the late 1800s. Pumping from the aquifer has resulted in substantial ground-water-level decline and subsequent saltwater intrusion of the aquifer from underlying strata containing highly saline water at Brunswick, Georgia, and with encroachment of sea-water into the aquifer at the northern end of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. The saltwater contamination at these locations has constrained further development of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the coastal area and has created competing demands for the limited supply of freshwater. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GaEPD) has restricted permitted withdrawal of water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in parts of the coastal area (including the Savannah and Brunswick areas) to 1997 rates, and also has restricted additional permitted pumpage in all 24 coastal area counties to 36 million gallons per day above 1997 rates. These actions have prompted interest in alternative management of the aquifer and in the development of supplemental sources of water supply including those from the shallower surficial and upper and lower Brunswick aquifers and from the deeper Lower Floridan aquifer.

  18. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″ N., longitude 81°24′55″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 31°09′42″ N., longitude 81°25′10″ W.; thence westerly to the shoreline at latitude 31°09′45″ N., longitude 81°25′20″ W.; thence northeasterly along...

  19. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″ N., longitude 81°24′55″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 31°09′42″ N., longitude 81°25′10″ W.; thence westerly to the shoreline at latitude 31°09′45″ N., longitude 81°25′20″ W.; thence northeasterly along...

  20. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″ N., longitude 81°24′55″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 31°09′42″ N., longitude 81°25′10″ W.; thence westerly to the shoreline at latitude 31°09′45″ N., longitude 81°25′20″ W.; thence northeasterly along...

  1. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″ N., longitude 81°24′55″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 31°09′42″ N., longitude 81°25′10″ W.; thence westerly to the shoreline at latitude 31°09′45″ N., longitude 81°25′20″ W.; thence northeasterly along...

  2. Nest fate and productivity of American Oystercatchers, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Schweitzer, Sara H.; Meyers, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) is listed as a species of high priority by the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan and is state-listed as rare in Georgia; however, biologists have not focused on identifying the causes of egg and hatchling losses. In 2003 and 2004, continuous video monitoring was used to document reproductive success of American Oystercatchers and identify causes of nest failure at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia. The modified Mayfield method and program CONTRAST were used to determine and compare survival of eggs and nestlings. Eleven pairs made 32 nest attempts during two seasons. Nine attempts were successful, fledging 15 chicks. Daily survival of clutches was 0.973 (95% CI = 0.960-0.987) for 2003, 0.985 (95% CI = 0.974-0.995) for 2004, and 0.979 (95% CI = 0.970-0.987) for combined years. Daily survival was greater on the North End, than on the South End of the island (X21 = 7.211, P = 0.007). Eighteen of 20 nest failures during the egg stage and one of eight chick losses were documented. Egg predators included raccoon (Procyon lotor, N = 9), bobcat (Lynx rufus, N = 3), and American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos, N = 1). A ghost crab (Ocypode quadata) preyed on one chick. Other causes of nest failure were tidal overwash (N = 1), horse trampling (N = 1), abandonment (N = 2), and human destruction (N = 1). The North End of the island has one of the highest reproductive rates reported along the Atlantic coast. Predator control may be an effective means of increasing reproductive success on the South End of the island.

  3. Bryozoan diversity around the Falkland and South Georgia Islands: Overcoming Antarctic barriers.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Blanca; Barnes, David K A; Brickle, Paul; Brewin, Paul E

    2017-05-01

    There are a number of remote archipelagos distributed between 45 and 60 °S. The biota of these islands provide useful information to describe and understand patterns in biodiversity and biogeography as well as potential impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. They are in key locations either side of the Polar Front but also have limited influence from human activities. Here we investigate one taxon, bryozoans, on South Atlantic shelf habitats of the Falkland (FI) and the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia (SG). We present new data on spatial distribution in these islands, as well as an analysis of the bryozoological similarities between these and neighbouring regions. A total of 85 species of cheilostome bryozoans (351 samples) were found, belonging to 33 genera, including 18 potentially new genera and 23 new species. Remarkably 65% and 41% of species were reported for the first time at FI and SG, respectively. The highest and the lowest value of species richness and species/genus ratio were found at East (EFI) and West Falkland (WFI), respectively, likely showing a tendency for stronger intrageneric competition. New data from this study were jointly analysed with data from the literature and existing databases, revealing new bathymetric ranges in 32 species. The biogeographic affinities of the bryozoans found give further evidence of the hypothesis of sequential separation of Gondwana and support the changing concept that although the Polar Front acts as a circumpolar biogeographic barrier it is not as impermeable as originally thought. Potential dispersal mechanisms are also discussed.

  4. Gene flow and hybridization between numerically imbalanced populations of two duck species on the subantarctic island of South Georgia.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kevin G; Wilson, Robert E; Martin, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is common between species of animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae). One factor shown to promote hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when 2 species occur in sympatry but one is rare. According to the Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. We report the second of 2 independent examples of hybridization between 2 species of ducks inhabiting island ecosystems in the Subantarctic and South Atlantic Ocean. Yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica) and speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) are abundant in continental South America, where they are sympatric and coexist in mixed flocks. But on South Georgia, an isolated island in the Subantarctic, the pintail population of approximately 6000 pairs outnumbers a small breeding population of speckled teal 300∶1. Using 6 genetic loci (mtDNA and 5 nuclear introns) and Bayesian assignment tests coupled with coalescent analyses, we identified hybrid-origin speckled teal alleles in 2 pintails on South Georgia. While it is unclear whether introgression has also occurred into the speckled teal population, our data suggest that this hybridization was not a recent event, but occurred some time ago. We also failed to identify unequivocal evidence of introgression in a much larger sample of pintails and speckled teal from Argentina using a 3-population "Isolation-with-Migration" coalescent analysis. Combined with parallel findings of hybridization between these same 2 duck species in the Falkland Islands, where population ratios are reversed and pintails are outnumbered by speckled teal 1:10, our results provide further support for the desperation hypothesis, which predicts that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. While the South Georgia pintail population appears to be thriving, it's possible that low density of conspecific mates and inverse density dependence (Allee effect) may be

  5. Gene Flow and Hybridization between Numerically Imbalanced Populations of Two Duck Species on the Subantarctic Island of South Georgia

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kevin G.; Wilson, Robert E.; Martin, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is common between species of animals, particularly in waterfowl (Anatidae). One factor shown to promote hybridization is restricted mate choice, which can occur when 2 species occur in sympatry but one is rare. According to the Hubbs principle, or "desperation hypothesis," the rarer species is more likely to mate with heterospecifics. We report the second of 2 independent examples of hybridization between 2 species of ducks inhabiting island ecosystems in the Subantarctic and South Atlantic Ocean. Yellow-billed pintails (Anas georgica) and speckled teal (Anas flavirostris) are abundant in continental South America, where they are sympatric and coexist in mixed flocks. But on South Georgia, an isolated island in the Subantarctic, the pintail population of approximately 6000 pairs outnumbers a small breeding population of speckled teal 300∶1. Using 6 genetic loci (mtDNA and 5 nuclear introns) and Bayesian assignment tests coupled with coalescent analyses, we identified hybrid-origin speckled teal alleles in 2 pintails on South Georgia. While it is unclear whether introgression has also occurred into the speckled teal population, our data suggest that this hybridization was not a recent event, but occurred some time ago. We also failed to identify unequivocal evidence of introgression in a much larger sample of pintails and speckled teal from Argentina using a 3-population "Isolation-with-Migration" coalescent analysis. Combined with parallel findings of hybridization between these same 2 duck species in the Falkland Islands, where population ratios are reversed and pintails are outnumbered by speckled teal 1:10, our results provide further support for the desperation hypothesis, which predicts that scarcity in one population and abundance of another will often lead to hybridization. While the South Georgia pintail population appears to be thriving, it's possible that low density of conspecific mates and inverse density dependence (Allee effect) may be

  6. Population and genetic outcomes 20 years after reintroducing bobcats (Lynx rufus) to Cumberland Island, Georgia USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Hansen, Leslie; Bohling, Justin; Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    In 1988–1989, 32 bobcats Lynx rufus were reintroduced to Cumberland Island (CUIS), Georgia, USA, from which they had previously been extirpated. They were monitored intensively for 3 years immediately post-reintroduction, but no estimation of the size or genetic diversity of the population had been conducted in over 20 years since reintroduction. We returned to CUIS in 2012 to estimate abundance and effective population size of the present-day population, as well as to quantify genetic diversity and inbreeding. We amplified 12 nuclear microsatellite loci from DNA isolated from scats to establish genetic profiles to identify individuals. We used spatially explicit capture–recapture population estimation to estimate abundance. From nine unique genetic profiles, we estimate a population size of 14.4 (SE = 3.052) bobcats, with an effective population size (Ne) of 5–8 breeding individuals. This is consistent with predictions of a population viability analysis conducted at the time of reintroduction, which estimated the population would average 12–13 bobcats after 10 years. We identified several pairs of related bobcats (parent-offspring and full siblings), but ~75% of the pairwise comparisons were typical of unrelated individuals, and only one individual appeared inbred. Despite the small population size and other indications that it has likely experienced a genetic bottleneck, levels of genetic diversity in the CUIS bobcat population remain high compared to other mammalian carnivores. The reintroduction of bobcats to CUIS provides an opportunity to study changes in genetic diversity in an insular population without risk to this common species. Opportunities for natural immigration to the island are limited; therefore, continued monitoring and supplemental bobcat reintroductions could be used to evaluate the effect of different management strategies to maintain genetic diversity and population viability. The successful reintroduction and maintenance of a

  7. Population health of Fallow deer (Dama dama) on Little St. Simons Island, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Morse, Brian W; Miller, Debra L; Miller, Karl V; Baldwin, Charles A

    2009-04-01

    Fallow deer (Dama dama) were introduced to Little St. Simons Island, Georgia, USA in the 1920s and thrive at high population densities, to the exclusion of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginina). The presence of introduced pathogens and parasites as a result of their introduction is currently unknown, as is the impact of native disease on the exotic fallow deer. Hunter-killed fallow deer from 2003-2005 were necropsied and surveyed for evidence of infectious disease, parasitic agents, and toxicologic parameters. Fallow deer were positive for antibodies to bovine virus diarrhea virus I and II, bluetongue virus, and bovine adenovirus. Twenty species of bacteria were isolated from the internal organs, and 14 species of parasites were recovered including one abomasal nematode, Spiculopteragia asymmetrica, which is not known to occur in native North American ungulates. Concentrations of liver and copper were low, while lead, zinc, and iron were considered within normal levels. No clinical signs of disease were noted, and the overall health of the insular fallow deer was considered good.

  8. Seasonal patterns of daily net photosynthesis, transpiration and net primary productivity of Juncus roemerianus and Spartina alterniflora in a Georgia salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Giurgevich, J R; Dunn, E L

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the seasonal CO2 and water vapor exchange patterns of Juncus roemerianus and Spartina alterniflora were conducted in an undisturbed marsh community on Sapelo Island, Georgia. Daily patterns of net photosynthesis, transpiration, leaf diffusive conductance and water-use efficiency in response to ambient conditions were monitored on intact, in situ plants. Net primary productivity was calculated from the daytime CO2 fixation totals, nighttime CO2 loss, leaf standing stock and aboveground to belowground biomass ratios for each plant type.The tall form of S. alterniflora had higher rates of photosynthesis and higher water-use efficiency values which, in conjunction with low respiratory losses and large leaf standing crop, results in high values of net primary productivity. The environmental factors in the marsh which permit these physiological responses occur in less than 10% of the marsh. Overall, the physiological capabilities of the short form of S. alterniflora were reduced in comparison to the tall form, but the combination of environmental factors which determine the physiological responses of this form occur in a much greater portion of the marsh, and the short form of S. alterniflora dominates the Sapelo Island marshes.The response patterns of the C3 species, J. roemerianus, differed somewhat from the height forms of S. alterniflora. A large, seasonally constant leaf standing crop coupled with moderate rates of photosynthesis resulted in a net primary productivity value which was between the tall and short height forms of S. alterniflora. However, as with the tall S. alterniflora, the environmental conditions under which this high productivity and high water loss rate can be sustained are restricted to specific regions of the environmental gradient in the marsh.

  9. The South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands MPA: protecting a biodiverse oceanic island chain situated in the flow of the antarctic circumpolar current.

    PubMed

    Trathan, Philip N; Collins, Martin A; Grant, Susie M; Belchier, Mark; Barnes, David K A; Brown, Judith; Staniland, Iain J

    2014-01-01

    South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (SGSSI) are surrounded by oceans that are species-rich, have high levels of biodiversity, important endemism and which also support large aggregations of charismatic upper trophic level species. Spatial management around these islands is complex, particularly in the context of commercial fisheries that exploit some of these living resources. Furthermore, management is especially complicated as local productivity relies fundamentally upon biological production transported from outside the area. The MPA uses practical management boundaries, allowing access for the current legal fisheries for Patagonian toothfish, mackerel icefish and Antarctic krill. Management measures developed as part of the planning process designated the whole SGSSI Maritime Zone as an IUCN Category VI reserve, within which a number of IUCN Category I reserves were identified. Multiple-use zones and temporal closures were also designated. A key multiple-use principle was to identify whether the ecological impacts of a particular fishery threatened either the pelagic or benthic domain.

  10. Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert De Carrera; Mike Ohl

    2002-03-19

    Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology considered was the Pulse Enhanced Steam Reforming technology that was developed and patented by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion, International (MTCI) and is currently licensed to StoneChem, Inc., for use in North America. Pilot studies of steam reforming have been carried out on a 25-ton per day reformer at Inland Container's Ontario, California mill and on a 50-ton per day unit at Weyerhaeuser's New Bern, North Carolina mill.

  11. High Prevalence of Porocephalus crotali Infection on a Barrier Island (Cumberland Island) off the Coast of Georgia, with Identification of Novel Intermediate Hosts.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Cleveland, Christopher A; Ruckdeschel, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Porocephalus crotali is a pentastomid parasite that uses crotaline snakes as definitive hosts and a variety of rodents as intermediate hosts. A study of definitive and intermediate pentastome hosts on Cumberland Island, Georgia, revealed high prevalence of P. crotali infection in crotalid snakes as well as several mammalian species. Despite the presence of numerous nymphs in some animals, clinical signs of disease were not observed. In intermediate hosts, the liver, mesentery, and reproductive organs were most commonly infected. No gross evidence of tissue damage was noted in association with the numerous encysted nymphal pentastomes, and histopathology demonstrated minimal reaction to the encysted nymphs. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences confirmed the parasites were P. crotali. In contrast to many previous reports in rodents, the prevalence on this barrier island was high, and this is the first report of Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and any insectivore species as intermediate hosts. Although generally not considered pathogenic, the long-term consequences of high nymph intensities on individuals deserve attention.

  12. Spatial and temporal assessment of back-barrier erosion on Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, 2011–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, Daniel L.; Riley, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-15

    Much research has been conducted to better understand erosion and accretion processes for the seaward zones of coastal barrier islands; however, at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, the greater management concern is the effect that erosion is having on the resources of the island’s western shoreline, or the back barrier. Catastrophic slumping and regular rates of erosion greater than 1 meter per year threaten important habitat, historical and pre-historical resources, and modern infrastructure on the island. Prior research has helped National Park Service (NPS) staff identify the most severe and vulnerable areas, but in order to develop effective management actions, information is needed on what forces and conditions cause erosion. To this end, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NPS, conducted two longitudinal surveys, one each at the beginning and end of the approximately year-long monitoring period from late 2011 to early 2013, along five selected segments of the back barrier of the Cumberland Island National Seashore. Monitoring stations were constructed at four of these locations that had previously been identified as erosional hotspots. The magnitude of erosion at each location was quantified to determine the relative influence of causative agents. Results indicate that erosion is, in general, highly variable within and among these segments of the Cumberland Island National Seashore’s back barrier. Observed erosion ranged from a maximum of 2.5 meters of bluff-line retreat to some areas that exhibited no net erosion over the 1-year study period. In terms of timing of erosion, three of the four sites were primarily affected by punctuated erosional events that were coincident with above-average high tides and elevated wind speeds. The fourth site exhibited steady, low-magnitude retreat throughout the study period. While it is difficult to precisely subscribe certain amounts of erosion to specific agents, this study provides

  13. Water quality and aquatic communities of upland wetlands, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, April 1999 to July 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frick, Elizabeth A.; Gregory, M. Brian; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Hopkins, Evelyn H.

    2002-01-01

    Cumberland Island is the southernmost and largest barrier island along the coast of Georgia. The island contains about 2,500 acres of freshwater wetlands that are located in a variety of physical settings, have a wide range of hydroperiods, and are influenced to varying degrees by surface and ground water, rainwater, and seawater. In 1999-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, conducted a water-quality study of Cumberland Island National Seashore to document and interpret the quality of a representative subset of surface- and ground-water resources for management of the seashore's natural resources. As part of this study, historical ground-water, surface-water, and ecological studies conducted on Cumberland Island also were summarized. Surface-water samples from six wetland areas located in the upland area of Cumberland Island were collected quarterly from April 1999 to March 2000 and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and field water-quality constituents including specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, tannin and lignin, and turbidity. In addition, water temperature and specific conductance were recorded continuously from two wetland areas located near the mean high-tide mark on the Atlantic Ocean beaches from April 1999 to July 2000. Fish and invertebrate communities from six wetlands were sampled during April and December 1999. The microbial quality of the near-shore Atlantic Ocean was assessed in seawater samples collected for 5 consecutive days in April 1999 at five beaches near campgrounds where most recreational water contact occurs. Ground-water samples were collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer in April 1999 and from the surficial aquifer in April 2000 at 11 permanent wells and 4 temporary wells (drive points), and were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and field water-quality constituents (conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and

  14. Population and genetic outcomes 20 years after reintroducing bobcats (Lynx rufus) to Cumberland Island, Georgia USA.

    PubMed

    Diefenbach, Duane; Hansen, Leslie; Bohling, Justin; Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra

    2015-11-01

    In 1988-1989, 32 bobcats Lynx rufus were reintroduced to Cumberland Island (CUIS), Georgia, USA, from which they had previously been extirpated. They were monitored intensively for 3 years immediately post-reintroduction, but no estimation of the size or genetic diversity of the population had been conducted in over 20 years since reintroduction. We returned to CUIS in 2012 to estimate abundance and effective population size of the present-day population, as well as to quantify genetic diversity and inbreeding. We amplified 12 nuclear microsatellite loci from DNA isolated from scats to establish genetic profiles to identify individuals. We used spatially explicit capture-recapture population estimation to estimate abundance. From nine unique genetic profiles, we estimate a population size of 14.4 (SE = 3.052) bobcats, with an effective population size (N e) of 5-8 breeding individuals. This is consistent with predictions of a population viability analysis conducted at the time of reintroduction, which estimated the population would average 12-13 bobcats after 10 years. We identified several pairs of related bobcats (parent-offspring and full siblings), but ~75% of the pairwise comparisons were typical of unrelated individuals, and only one individual appeared inbred. Despite the small population size and other indications that it has likely experienced a genetic bottleneck, levels of genetic diversity in the CUIS bobcat population remain high compared to other mammalian carnivores. The reintroduction of bobcats to CUIS provides an opportunity to study changes in genetic diversity in an insular population without risk to this common species. Opportunities for natural immigration to the island are limited; therefore, continued monitoring and supplemental bobcat reintroductions could be used to evaluate the effect of different management strategies to maintain genetic diversity and population viability. The successful reintroduction and maintenance of a bobcat

  15. Maturity and fecundity of Champsocephalus gunnari, Chaenocephalus aceratus and Pseudochaenichthys georgianus in South Georgia and Shag Rocks Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militelli, M. I.; Macchi, G. J.; Rodrigues, K. A.

    2015-06-01

    The reproductive biology of three species of icefishes (family Channicthyidae), Champsocephalus gunnari, Pseudochaenichthys georgianus and Chaenocephalus aceratus in South Georgia and Shag Rocks Islands was studied by means of a histological analysis. Parental care, a widespread behaviour among icefishes such as C. aceratus, is not observed in C. gunnari, which has a broadcast spawning strategy. There were large differences in total fecundity mainly due to the different sizes reached by each species (total fecundity range was 2,500-21,300 hydrated oocytes). Nevertheless, when comparing relative fecundity values, the average results were, in general, similar for P. georgianus and C. aceratus (6-9 hydrated oocytes per female gram). However, relative fecundity estimated for C. gunnari was 10-37 hydrated oocytes per ovary-free female gram. The difference may be a consequence of the smaller oocyte size of the species as compared to other icefishes. The small diameter of hydrated oocytes was also associated with low values of dry weight. The high relative fecundity recorded for C. gunnnari may compensate, in part, for a broadcast spawning strategy.

  16. Hydrogeology, water quality, and saltwater intrusion in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the offshore area near Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and Tybee Island, Georgia, 1999-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Ransom, Camille; Landmeyer, James E.; Reuber, Eric J.; Edwards, Lucy E.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the hydrogeology, water quality, and the potential for saltwater intrusion in the offshore Upper Floridan aquifer, a scientific investigation was conducted near Tybee Island, Georgia, and Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Four temporary wells were drilled at 7, 8, 10, and 15 miles to the northeast of Tybee Island, and one temporary well was drilled in Calibogue Sound west of Hilton Head Island. The Upper Floridan aquifer at the offshore and Calibogue sites includes the unconsolidated calcareous quartz sand, calcareous quartz sandstone, and sandy limestone of the Oligocene Lazaretto Creek and Tiger Leap Formations, and the limestone of the late Eocene Ocala Limestone and middle Avon Park Formation. At the 7-, 10-, and 15-mile sites, the upper confining unit between the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers correlates to the Miocene Marks Head Formation. Paleochannel incisions have completely removed the upper confining unit at the Calibogue site and all but a 0.8-foot-thick interval of the confining unit at the 8-mile site, raising concern about the potential for saltwater intrusion through the paleochannel-fill sediments at these two sites. The paleochannel incisions at the Calibogue and 8-mile sites are filled with fine- and coarse-grained sediments, respectively. The hydrogeologic setting and the vertical hydraulic gradients at the 7- and 10-mile sites favored the absence of saltwater intrusion during predevelopment. After decades of onshore water use in Georgia and South Carolina, the 0-foot contour in the regional cone of depression of the Upper Floridan aquifer is estimated to have been at the general location of the 7- and 10-mile sites by the mid-1950s and at or past the 15-mile site by the 1980s. The upward vertical hydraulic gradient reversed, but the presence of more than 17 feet of upper confining unit impeded the downward movement of saltwater from the surficial aquifer to the Upper Floridan aquifer at the 7- and 10-mile sites. At the 10

  17. Effects of human activity of breeding American Oystercatchers, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Meyers, J.M.; Moore, C.T.; Schweitzer, Sara H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract.-Increased human use of coastal areas threatens the United States population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus), a species of special concern. Biologists often attribute its low numbers and reproductive success to human disturbance, but the mechanism by which human presence reduces reproductive success is not well understood. During the 2003 and 2004 breeding seasons, 32 nesting attempts of American Oystercatchers were studied on Cumberland Island National Seashore (CINS). Behavior was examined with and without human activity in the area to determine how human activity affected behavior. The oystercatchers' behavioral responses (proportion time) were analyzed with and without human or intraspecific disturbances using mixed models regression analysis. Proportions of time human activities were present (137 m and vehicular activity should be minimized at current levels or less.

  18. Molecular and Morphological Characterization of Xiphinema chambersi Population from Live Oak in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with Comments on Morphometric Variations.

    PubMed

    Handoo, Zafar A; Carta, Lynn K; Skantar, Andrea M; Subbotin, Sergei A; Fraedrich, Stephen W

    2016-03-01

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, GA, is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences, this nematode was thought to represent an undescribed species. However, on further examination, the morphometrics of the nematodes from live oak tend to agree with most of the morphometrics in the original description and redescription of X. chambersi except for few minor differences in V% relative to body length, slightly shorter stylet length, different c value, and the number of caudal pores. We consider these differences to be part of the normal variation within this species and accordingly image this new population of X. chambersi and redescribe the species. The new population is characterized by having females with a body length of 2.1 to 2.5 mm; lip region slightly rounded and set off from head; total stylet length 170 to 193 µm; vulva at 20.4% to 21.8% of body length; a monodelphic, posterior reproductive system; elongate, conoid tail with a blunt terminus and four pairs of caudal pores, of which two pairs are subdorsal and two subventral. Sequence data from the D2-D3 region of the 28S rRNA molecule subjected to GenBank sequence comparison using BLAST showed that the sequence had 96% and 99% similarity with X. chambersi from Alabama and Florida, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships of X. chambersi with other xiphinematids based on analysis of this DNA fragment are presented. This finding represents a new location of X. chambersi in Georgia on live oak for this species.

  19. Molecular and Morphological Characterization of Xiphinema chambersi Population from Live Oak in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with Comments on Morphometric Variations

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Carta, Lynn K.; Skantar, Andrea M.; Subbotin, Sergei A.; Fraedrich, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, GA, is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences, this nematode was thought to represent an undescribed species. However, on further examination, the morphometrics of the nematodes from live oak tend to agree with most of the morphometrics in the original description and redescription of X. chambersi except for few minor differences in V% relative to body length, slightly shorter stylet length, different c value, and the number of caudal pores. We consider these differences to be part of the normal variation within this species and accordingly image this new population of X. chambersi and redescribe the species. The new population is characterized by having females with a body length of 2.1 to 2.5 mm; lip region slightly rounded and set off from head; total stylet length 170 to 193 µm; vulva at 20.4% to 21.8% of body length; a monodelphic, posterior reproductive system; elongate, conoid tail with a blunt terminus and four pairs of caudal pores, of which two pairs are subdorsal and two subventral. Sequence data from the D2–D3 region of the 28S rRNA molecule subjected to GenBank sequence comparison using BLAST showed that the sequence had 96% and 99% similarity with X. chambersi from Alabama and Florida, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships of X. chambersi with other xiphinematids based on analysis of this DNA fragment are presented. This finding represents a new location of X. chambersi in Georgia on live oak for this species. PMID:27168649

  20. Seasonal abundance of Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) on Ossabaw Island, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Brinson, F J; Hagan, D V; Comer, J A; Strohlein, D A

    1992-03-01

    Population dynamics of Lutzomyia shannoni were monitored from April 1986 through December 1987 on Ossabaw Island, Ga. Most (99%) of the 19,788 adult sand flies were collected in light traps supplemented with dry ice; less than or equal to 1% were aspirated from diurnal resting sites. Adult sand flies first appeared in April and were followed by peaks of abundance during May 1986, and May and July 1987. Numbers of adults captured fell rapidly in October and November 1986 and in September and October 1987. No specimens were collected in December 1986 or in March, November, and December 1987. Light trap catch was affected positively by mean nightly air temperature and negatively by rainfall 14 d before collection, but not by wind speed or moon phase. Vesicular stomatitis viral activity, as measured by antibodies in feral and domestic swine, roughly corresponded to the seasonal appearance of adult L. shannoni during 1986 and 1987. Significantly more adults (72%) were collected in light traps at ground level (0.5m) than at heights of 4 and 8m. Most resting adults were collected from dark, moist tree holes and cavities of various hardwoods.

  1. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and spirochetes (spirochaetaceae: spirochaetales) recovered from birds on a Georgia Barrier Island.

    PubMed

    Durden, L A; Oliver, J H; Kinsey, A A

    2001-03-01

    From September 1997 through July 1999, 300 individuals and 46 species of birds were mist-netted and screened for ticks and spirochetes on St. Catherine's Island, Liberty County, GA. Seventy-six (25%) of the birds were parasitized by a meal intensity of 4.6 ticks. Seasonally, more birds were infested with ticks during the summer (50% in 1998, 34% in 1999) than in spring (15% in 1998, 11% in 1999) or fall (21% in 1997, 20% in 1998), mainly because of severe infestations on some birds by immature stages of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), during this season. Eight species ofticks were recovered from 14 species of birds during this study: A. americanum (74 nymphs, 168 larvae); the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say (11 nymphs, 28 larvae), the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch (two nymphs, 29 larvae); Ixodes minor Neumann (16 larvae); the rabbit tick. Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) (one nymph, 14 larvae); the bird tick Ixodes brunneus Koch (two larvae); the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (one nymph); and Ixodes affinis Neumann (one larva). The Carolina wren was parasitized by more species of ticks (seven) than any other bird species, followed by the northern cardinal (five), white-throated sparrow (four) and painted bunting (three). Spirochetes were isolated in BSK II medium from one tick (a nymphal A. americanum) and from skin biopsies of 12 (4%) of the individual birds (three downy woodpeckers, three northern waterthrushes, two Carolina wrens, one American redstart, one pine warbler, one Swainson's thrush, and one white-eyed vireo) all in fall 1997. This concentrated phenology of spirochete isolations might reflect periodic amplification or recrudescence of spirochetes in reservoir avian hosts.

  2. Submarine groundwater discharge and solute transport under a transgressive barrier island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Tyler B.; Wilson, Alicia M.

    2017-04-01

    Many recent investigations of groundwater dynamics in beaches employed groundwater models that assumed isotropic, numerically-convenient hydrogeological conditions. Real beaches exhibit local variability with respect to stratigraphy, sediment grain size and associated topographic profile, so that groundwater flow may diverge significantly from idealized models. We used a combination of hydrogeologic field methods and a variable-density, saturated-unsaturated, transient groundwater flow model to investigate SGD and solute transport under Cabretta Beach, a small transgressive barrier island seaward of Sapelo Island, Georgia. We found that the inclusion of real beach heterogeneity drove important deviations from predictions based on theoretical beaches. Cabretta Beach sustained a stronger upper saline plume than predicted due to the presence of a buried silty mud layer beneath the surface. Infiltration of seawater was greater for neap tides than for spring tides due to variations in beach slope. The strength of the upper saline plume was greatest during spring tides, contrary to recent model predictions. The position and width of the upper saline plume was highly dynamic through the lunar cycle. Our results suggest that field measurements of salinity gradients may be useful for estimating rates of tidally and density driven recirculation through the beach. Finally, our results indicate that several important biogeochemical cycles recently studied at Cabretta Beach were heavily influenced by groundwater flow and associated solute transport.

  3. Molecular and morphological characterization of a Xiphinema chambersi population from live oak trees in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with a redescription of the species and comments on its morphometric variations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, Georgia, USA is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences thi...

  4. Southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge: Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } age constraints on tectonic evolution of Southwestern Gondwanaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1996-11-01

    Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } isotopic ages have been determined on rocks from the southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge, to provide absolute time constraints on the kinematic evolution of southwestern Gondwanaland, until now known mainly from stratigraphic relations. The U-Pb systematics of four zircon fractions from one sample show that proto-marginal basin magmatism in the northern Scotia arc, creating the peraluminous Darwin granite suite and submarine rhyolite sequences of the Tobifera Formation, had begun by the Middle Jurassic (164.1 ± 1.7 Ma). Seven zircon fractions from two other Darwin granites are discordant with non-linear patterns, suggesting a complex history of inheritances and Pb loss. Reference lines drawn through these points on concordia diagrams give upper intercept ages of ca. 1500 Ma, interpreted as a minimum age for the inherited zircon component. This component is believed to have been derived from sedimentary rocks in the Gondwanaland margin accretionary wedge that forms the basement of the region, or else directly from the cratonic "back stop" of that wedge. Ophiolitic remnants of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin preserved in the Larsen Harbour complex on South Georgia yield the first clear evidence that Gondwanaland fragmentation had resulted in the formation of oceanic crust in the Weddell Sea region by the Late Jurassic (150 ± 1 Ma). The geographic pattern in the observed age range of 8 to 13 million years in these ophiolitic materials, while not definitive, is in keeping with propagation of the marginal basin floor northwestward from South Georgia Island to the Sarmiento Complex in southern Chile. Rocks of the Beagle granite suite, emplaced post-tectonically within the uplifted marginal basin floor, have complex zircon U-Pb systematics with gross discordances dominated by inheritances in some samples and Pb loss in others. Of eleven samples processed, only two had sufficient amounts of zircon for

  5. Interannual variability in reproductive traits of the Patagonian toothfish Dissostichus eleginoides around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia.

    PubMed

    Brigden, K E; Marshall, C T; Scott, B E; Young, E F; Brickle, P

    2017-07-01

    Commercial fisheries data, collected as part of an observer programme and covering the period 1997-2014, were utilized in order to define key reproductive traits and spawning dynamics of the Patagonian toothfish Dissostichus eleginoides at South Georgia. Multi-year spawning site fidelity of D. eleginoides was revealed through the identification of previously unknown spawning hotspots. Timing of female spawning was shown to have shifted later, leading to a shorter spawning duration. A decrease in length and mass of female and male spawning fish and a reduced number of large spawning fish was found, evidence of a change in size structure of spawning D. eleginoides. During the study period fewer later maturity stage females (including spawning stage) were observed in conjunction with increased proportions of early stage female D. eleginoides. The findings are discussed in the context of reproductive success, with consideration of the possible effects such spawning characteristics and behaviours may have on egg and larval survival. This work presents the first long-term assessment of D. eleginoides spawning dynamics at South Georgia and provides valuable knowledge for both the ecology of the species and for future fisheries management of this commercially important species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a summary of hybridization in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ruth M; Techow, N M S Mareile; Wood, Andrew G; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4-2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species.

  7. Hybridization and Back-Crossing in Giant Petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a Summary of Hybridization in Seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ruth M.; Techow, N. M. S. Mareile; Wood, Andrew G.; Phillips, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4–2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species. PMID:25815478

  8. Tracing the Holocene environmental evolution on the island of South Georgia by lipid biomarkers and compound-specific radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivcov, S.; Berg, S.; Kusch, S.; Viehberg, F. A.; Rethemeyer, J.; Melles, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present lipid biomarker data of a sedimentary record that spans the entire Holocene and was recovered from a marine inlet located at the northern coast of South Georgia (Cumberland West Bay) to adress two major objectives, namely: a) the identification of temporal variations in reservoir effects and b) the reconstruction of regional environmental changes during the last deglaciation. For objective a) we compare compound-specific radiocarbon ages of terrigeneous lipid biomarkers (n-alcohols) with 14C ages of bulk sedimentary organic matter to detect potential reservoir effects and changes over time. The study site experienced different environmental conditions following the retreat of the local glaciers in the early Holocene. After an initial freshwater stage when the inlet was separated from the sea, it passed into brackish and finally fully marine conditions. These hydrological changes probably resulted in variable reservoir ages. For objective b) we investigate biomarkers, comprising n-alkanes (C15-C35) and n-alcohols (C14-C28), including high molecular weight compounds typically derived from land plants and low molecular weight compounds like C17 n-alkanes and C16 n-alcohols, mostly originating from aquatic organisms. We noticed an abrupt increase in TOC values and sums of biomarkers after the glacier retreat, culminating in highest concentrations at the transition from freshwater to brackish conditions. Subsequently, the concentrations decline and vary at low levels until the inlet becomes fully marine. The marine stage is characterized by relatively constant TOC values but variable biomarker concentrations. Lowest biomarker levels occur around 1870±134 cal yr BP and between 6204±115 and 9666±161 cal yr BP and correspond to phases of glacier advance as suggested by studies of lake and peat deposits from South Georgia.

  9. A Biophysical and Economic Profile of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands as Potential Large-Scale Antarctic Protected Areas.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alex D; Yesson, Christopher; Gravestock, Pippa

    2015-01-01

    The current hiatus in the establishment of a network of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Antarctic means that other routes to conservation are required. The protection of overseas territories in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic represents one way to advance the initiation of such a network. This review of the physical and biological features of the United Kingdom (U.K.) overseas territories of South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands (SGSSI) is undertaken to estimate the importance of the islands in terms of marine conservation in the Southern Ocean and globally. The economy and management of SGSSI are also analysed, and the question of whether the islands already have sufficient protection to constitute part of an Antarctic network of MPAs is assessed. The SGSSI comprise unique geological and physical features, a diverse marine biota, including a significant proportion of endemic species and globally important breeding populations of marine predators. Regardless of past exploitation of biotic resources, such as seals, whales and finfish, SGSSI would make a significant contribution to biological diversity in an Antarctic network of MPAs. At present, conservation measures do not adequately protect all of the biological features that render the islands so important in terms of conservation at a regional and global level. However, a general lack of data on Antarctic marine ecosystems (particularly needed for SGSSSI) makes it difficult to assess this fully. One barrier to achieving more complete protection is the continuing emphasis on fishing effort in these waters by U.K. government. Other non-U.K. Antarctic overseas territories of conservation importance are also compromised as MPAs because of the exploitation of fisheries resources in their waters. The possible non-use values of SGSSI as well as the importance of ecosystem services that are indirectly used by people are outlined in this review. Technology is improving the potential for management of remote MPAs

  10. Molecular and morphological characterization of Xiphinema chambersi population from live oak in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with comments on morphometric variations

    Treesearch

    Zafar A. Handoo; Lynn K. Carta; Andrea M. Skantar; Sergei A. Subbotin; Stephen Fraedrich

    2016-01-01

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, GA, is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences, this nematode was thought to represent an undescribed species. However, on further...

  11. First evidence of widespread active methane seepage in the Southern Ocean, off the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, M.; Torres, M.; Kasten, S.; Kuhn, G.; Graham, A. G. C.; Mau, S.; Little, C. T. S.; Linse, K.; Pape, T.; Geprägs, P.; Fischer, D.; Wintersteller, P.; Marcon, Y.; Rethemeyer, J.; Bohrmann, G.

    2014-10-01

    An extensive submarine cold-seep area was discovered on the northern shelf of South Georgia during R/V Polarstern cruise ANT-XXIX/4 in spring 2013. Hydroacoustic surveys documented the presence of 133 gas bubble emissions, which were restricted to glacially-formed fjords and troughs. Video-based sea floor observations confirmed the sea floor origin of the gas emissions and spatially related microbial mats. Effective methane transport from these emissions into the hydrosphere was proven by relative enrichments of dissolved methane in near-bottom waters. Stable carbon isotopic signatures pointed to a predominant microbial methane formation, presumably based on high organic matter sedimentation in this region. Although known from many continental margins in the world's oceans, this is the first report of an active area of methane seepage in the Southern Ocean. Our finding of substantial methane emission related to a trough and fjord system, a topographical setting that exists commonly in glacially-affected areas, opens up the possibility that methane seepage is a more widespread phenomenon in polar and sub-polar regions than previously thought.

  12. Hydrologic conditions, recharge, and baseline water quality of the surficial aquifer system at Jekyll Island, Georgia, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Torak, Lynn J.

    2016-03-08

    Groundwater levels and specific-conductance measurements showed the dependence of freshwater resources on rainfall to recharge the water-table zone of the surficial aquifer system and to influence groundwater flow on Jekyll Island. The unseasonably dry conditions during November 2012 to April 2013 induced saline water infiltration to the water-table zone from the marshland separating the Jekyll River from the island. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.97) of specific conductance to chloride concentration in water samples from wells installed in the water-table zone provided support for the determination of seasonal directions of groundwater flow by confirming salinity changes in the water-table zone. Unseasonably wet conditions during the late spring to August caused groundwater-flow reversals in some areas. The high dependence of the water-table zone in the surficial aquifer system on precipitation to replenish the aquifer with freshwater underscored the importance of monitoring groundwater levels, water quality, and water use to identify aquifer-discharge conditions that have the potential to promote seawater encroachment and degrade freshwater resources on Jekyll Island.

  13. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    the impact of increased urban heating on air quality. The urban landscape impacts surface thermal energy exchanges that determine development of the UHI. This paper will illustrate how we are using high spatial remote sensing data collected over the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area in conjunction with other geographic information, to perform a detailed urban land cover classification and to determine the contribution of these land covers to the urban heat island effect. Also, the spatial arrangement of the land covers and the impact on urban heating from these selected patterns of development are evaluated. Additionally, this paper will show how these data are being used as inputs to improve air quality modeling for Atlanta, including potential benefits from UHI mitigation.

  14. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    the impact of increased urban heating on air quality. The urban landscape impacts surface thermal energy exchanges that determine development of the UHI. This paper will illustrate how we are using high spatial remote sensing data collected over the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area in conjunction with other geographic information, to perform a detailed urban land cover classification and to determine the contribution of these land covers to the urban heat island effect. Also, the spatial arrangement of the land covers and the impact on urban heating from these selected patterns of development are evaluated. Additionally, this paper will show how these data are being used as inputs to improve air quality modeling for Atlanta, including potential benefits from UHI mitigation.

  15. Hydrologic and Geophysical Constraints on Submarsh Groundwater Flow to an Estuary in the Georgia Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P.; Schultz, G.; Ruppel, C.

    2001-12-01

    Previous research in the Georgia coastal zone suggests that low-permeability muds clog the sediment matrix at the edges of uplands, thereby impeding freshwater flow to the estuary across seepage faces. A significant portion of fresh groundwater flux from upland to estuary may instead occur along intricate submarsh flow pathways. In this study, we combine hydrologic and geophysical measurements to directly constrain submarsh flow pathways and various scales of aquifer heterogeneity beneath a 100-200 m wide Spartina marsh that separates forested upland from a tidal creek at a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on North Sapelo Island. Our data provide both qualitative and quantitative constraints on hydraulic conductivity variations in the marsh sediments. Continuous vibracores (to depths of ~5 m) at the site of our monitoring well network reveal a complex distribution of sediments both vertically and horizontally. In general, the thin, near-surface layer of fine muds gives way to relatively clean sands and then a deeper layer of clay with sand stringers. Where these stringers are laterally continuous, they may serve as critical high permeability conduits for groundwater flow in submarsh sediments. Grain size analyses constrain hydraulic conductivity of the distinct lithologies within the cores, while time and spectral domain analyses of tidal pumping data bracket field-scale hydraulic conductivity near each marsh monitoring well. Our data also allow us to infer information about possible pathways for submarsh groundwater flow. Geophysical surveys (inductive EM and DC resistivity) and borehole conductivity logs suggest a complicated distribution of fresher and more saline pore waters in the submarsh. Preliminary analysis of the geophysical data implies the presence of fresher pore waters at depths of several meters beneath the marsh. A marsh monitoring well within ~10 m of the upland intersects this relatively fresh submarsh flow system. To first order, the

  16. Georgia's forests

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield; Herbert A. Knight

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with the Forest and rangeland renewable resources planning act(RPA) of 1974, the fifth inventory of Georgia’s forest was expanded to accommodate nontimber as well as timber resources. This report presents the principal findings concerning the extent of condition of forest lands, associated timber volumes, and rates of growth and removals. Nontimber...

  17. Georgia's timber

    Treesearch

    Robert W. Larson; Benjamin Spada

    1963-01-01

    The survey of Georgia's forests reported here was completed in August 1961. It is the third in a series conducted by the U. S. Forest Service. The first was completed in 1936 and the second in 1953. Comparisons between the three surveys show significant changes taking place in the timber supply outlook.

  18. Georgia Prisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

    Findings from a study of Georgia's 16 adult penal institutions indicate that the State's prison system is plagued by many problems. For example, inadequate funds are allocated to maintain facilities and services for its prisoners. As a result, many of the prisons are antiquated, overcrowded and understaffed. In addition, minorities are not hired…

  19. Simulation of saltwater movement in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Savannah, Georgia-Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, area, predevelopment-2004, and projected movement for 2000 pumping conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Provost, Alden M.; Payne, Dorothy F.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2006-01-01

    A digital model was developed to simulate ground-water flow and solute transport for the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Savannah, Georgia-Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, area. The model was used to (1) simulate trends of saltwater intrusion from predevelopment to the present day (1885-2004), (2) project these trends from the present day into the future, and (3) evaluate the relative influence of different assumptions regarding initial and boundary conditions and physical properties. The model is based on a regional, single-density ground-water flow model of coastal Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina and Florida. Variable-density ground-water flow and solute transport were simulated using the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element, variable-density solute-transport simulator SUTRA, 1885-2004. The model comprises seven layers: the surficial aquifer system, the Brunswick aquifer system, the Upper Floridan aquifer, the Lower Floridan aquifer, and the intervening confining units. The model was calibrated to September 1998 water levels, for single-density freshwater conditions, then refined using variable density and chloride concentration to give a reasonable match to the trend in the chloride distribution in the Upper Floridan aquifer inferred from field measurements of specific conductance made during 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2004. The model was modified to simulate solute transport by allowing saltwater to enter the system through localized areas near the northern end of Hilton Head Island, at Pinckney Island, and near the Colleton River, and was calibrated to match chloride concentrations inferred from field measurements of specific conductance. This simulation is called the 'Base Case.'

  20. Challenge 21. Building Tomorrow's Public Service. Report of the Multilevel Public Sector Leadership Symposium (Lake Lanier Islands, Georgia, March 22-23, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC.

    This document summarizes the discussions held at a conference of public sector executives and human resource managers designed to address the problems of attracting and keeping good workers in public service. Presentations made by the governor of Georgia, federal officials, educators, and regional representatives in three plenary sessions…

  1. [Spatial-temporal and environmental effects of catch rate on Antarctic krill fishery in the South Georgia Island in the austral winter season based on the fine scale data].

    PubMed

    Zhu Guo-Ping; Liu, Zi-Jun; Xu, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ji-Chang; Meng, Tao; Huang, Hong-Liang; Xu, Yi-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Liu-Xiong

    2014-08-01

    The waters around the South Georgia Island is one of the main fishing ground of Antarctic krill fishery and many predators such as sea seal and whale inhabited this island target Antarctic krill as a food source. So it is very important for further understanding Antarctic ecosystem to conduct the research on abundance fluctuation of Antarctic krill resource around this island. Consequently, based on the fine scale fishery data collected in the winter 2013, using the generalized additive model (GAM), the present study analyzed the relationship between environmental factors and the catch rate of Antarctic krill. The results showed the model could explain 32.0% of the accumulation of deviance of the catch rate. The variable that provided the maximum contribution was ten-day with a contribution rate of 21.4% and followed by the latitude (4.4%). Generally, the catch rate decreased from the first 10 days of July to September. Higher catch rates occurred in the eastern fishing ground, particularly the central-eastern part of survey area, and lower catch rates presented in the northern part. The mean catch rate deceased with the increasing change rate of bathymetry. The oceanographic condition with wind scale below 4 was suitable for fishing operation and associated with the higher catch rate, but the wind direction did not significantly affect the catch rate. The mean catch rate increased with the increasing sea surface temperature within 0.5 to 2.0 degrees C.

  2. Blackjack Complex Fire, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For the past week, fires have raged across southeast Georgia, consuming nearly 40,000 acres of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. This true-color image of the largest fire near Blackjack Island, Georgia, was acquired on May 3, 2002 (top), by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The fire was ignited by lightning strikes and has spread quickly over a large area of scrub brush in the swamp. Due to the unseasonably dry conditions and the difficult swamp terrain, firefighters have been struggling to keep the fire from spreading any further across the 400,000-acre refuge. Although the fire is now endangering some buildings in nearby Stephen Foster State Park, no one has been injured or killed. By May 8th (lower) the area covered by the fire itself-denoted by red pixels-had shrunk, but smoke continued to billow from the site. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. Georgia environmental compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    This paper is a digest of environmental issues and requirements most often encountered by clients navigating environmental law and regulations promulgated by Congress, US EPA, the Georgia General Assembly, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, and local authorities. The environmental compliance landscape in Georgia, as elsewhere, is changing with the introduction of active `private attorneys general` via federal citizen suit provisions. Also, this trend is complicated by an increasing awareness and obligation to manage corporate environmental compliance by auditing programs. While both EPA and the State of Georgia encourage self-critical analysis, there are currently no legal protections for such analysis other than audits developed under attorney-client privilege or attorney work product. The introduction of risk assessment principles in Georgia`s Hazardous Site Response Act and corrective action under Georgia`s Underground Storage Tank regulation is another interesting and challenging trend that pushes environmental compliance further beyond the ken of the ordinary man.

  4. Comparison of Pleistocene and Holocene barrier island beach-to-offshore sequences, Georgia and northeast Florida coasts, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James D.; Scott, Richard M.

    1983-03-01

    Well-exposed vertical sequences of Pleistocene shoreline deposits are rare on the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. An important exception is an exposure along the St. Mary's River on the Georgia-Florida state line. This outcrop contains an excellent depositional strike section of a prograding offshore, shoreface, foreshore and backshore sequence with well-preserved physical and biogenic sedimentary structures. Offshore sediments are composed of highly bioturbated, muddy fine sand. Distinct burrows and bedding become progressively more abundant upward through a transition zone into shoreface deposits. The shoreface is dominated by the trace fossil Ophiomorpha nodosa and physical sedimentary structures are poorly preserved. Foreshore sediments contain low-angle seaward dipping beds, high-angle landward dipping beds and ripple laminae. Heavy-mineral accumulations in the backshore accentuate bedding and biogenic structures such as ghost crab and insect burrows and bioturbation by amphipods. Direct correlation of most primary physical and biogenic sedimentary structures and textures can be made between the Pleistocene and Holocene beach-to-offshore facies assemblages. However, our studies of the Pleistocene indicate that the existing Holocene vertical sequence model for the Georgia coast needs to be modified to account for biogenically produced post-depositional effects.

  5. Testing and Evaluation of the 84 Sites and Reconnaissance of the Islands and Cleveland Property, Richard B. Russell Dam and Lake, Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    0 0 0 OD o t- N -N4 207 208 PART III SITE DESCRIPTIONS OF THE ISLANDS-CLEVELAND PROPERTY RECONNAISSANCE 209 Nk1 210 RECONNAISSANCE OF THE ISLANDS...FOUNDATONS-.. HADLR’SOL HUS .7 / IL 4b. /-&BRC 7ASEMEN / IR O OL/RDG -S 16 PEARLE MILL -- 30 11, *A,, S A" fl CIAI IfNt dNLE8S "Pwt NIISE ~0qc op,, STR 10 BRITR

  6. Operation and Maintenance, Savannah Harbor, Georgia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    on 1 September 1975. 2.54 Fort Pulaski, an important Civil War monument, is located 17 miles east of Savanah on Cockspur Island. Constructed in the...early 19th cautery (1829-1847), this facility, which served as a major Civil War fortification along the Georgia coast until its capture in 1862 by...8217 ; 2.55 Another Civil War relic, the sunken CSS GEORGIA, a Confederate vs is located about mile 11 near the confluence of Front and Back Rivers. The

  7. Molecular and morphological characterization of Xiphinema chambersi population from live oak in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with comments on morphometric variations

    Treesearch

    Zafar A Handoo; Lynn K. Carta; Andrea M. Skantar; Sergei A. Subbotin; Stephen W. Fraedrich

    2016-01-01

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, GA, is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences, this nematode was thought to represent...

  8. Reticulitermes nelsonae, a New Species of Subterranean Termite (Rhinotermitidae) from the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su Yee; Forschler, Brian T

    2012-01-06

    Reticulitermes nelsonae, a new species of Rhinotermitidae (Isoptera) is described based on specimens from Sapelo Island, GA, Thomasville, GA, Havelock, NC, and Branford, FL. Adult (alate) and soldier forms are described. Diagnostic characters are provided and incorporated into a supplemental couplet of a dichotomous key to the known species of Reticulitermes found in Georgia, USA.

  9. Reticulitermes nelsonae, a New Species of Subterranean Termite (Rhinotermitidae) from the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su Yee; Forschler, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Reticulitermes nelsonae, a new species of Rhinotermitidae (Isoptera) is described based on specimens from Sapelo Island, GA, Thomasville, GA, Havelock, NC, and Branford, FL. Adult (alate) and soldier forms are described. Diagnostic characters are provided and incorporated into a supplemental couplet of a dichotomous key to the known species of Reticulitermes found in Georgia, USA. PMID:26467949

  10. Georgia Mediagraphy. Second Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    This document is a guide to print and nonprint materials about Georgia and Georgians. Entries are arranged under the subject headings used in "Essential Skills for Georgia Schools." Criteria for inclusion were appropriateness for K-12 students and commercial availability of the item. Six books containing pictorial and photographic…

  11. Forests of Georgia, 2015

    Treesearch

    Thomas Brandeis; Consuelo Brandeis; Andy Hartsell; KaDonna Randolph; Sonja Oswalt

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Georgia based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Georgia Forestry Commission. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly....

  12. Georgia's forests, 2004

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Harper; Nathan D. McClure; Tony G. Johnson; J. Frank Green; James K. Johnson; David B. Dickinson; James L. Chamerlain; KaDonna C. Randolph; Sonja N. Oswalt

    2009-01-01

    Between 1997 and 2004, the Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program conducted the eighth inventory of Georgia forests. Forest land area remained stable at 24.8 million acres, and covered about two-thirds of the land area in Georgia. About 24.2 million acres of forest land was considered timberland and 92 percent of that was privately owned. Family forest...

  13. Forests of Georgia, 2013

    Treesearch

    T.J. Brandeis

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Georgia based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Georgia Forestry Commission. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly....

  14. Forests of Georgia, 2014

    Treesearch

    Thomas Brandeis; Andy Hartsell

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Georgia based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Georgia Forestry Commission. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly....

  15. Georgia Tech Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hignite, Karla

    2003-01-01

    Details the $1 billion in facilities projects being undertaken by Georgia Institute of Technology, including the 8-acre Technology Square, which involve partnerships with its neighbors to accomplish urban revitalization. (EV)

  16. Okefenokee Swamp Fire, Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-22

    Large smoke plumes were produced by the Blackjack complex fire in southeastern Georgia Okefenokee Swamp as seen by the MISR instrument aboard NASA Terra spacecraft May 8, 2002. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  17. Georgia's forests, 1989

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield; Tony G. Johnson

    1993-01-01

    This resource bulletin presents the principal findings of the sixth inventory of Georgia's forest resources. Data on the extent, condition, and classification of forest land and associated timber volumes, growth, removals, and mortality are described and interpreted. Whereas data on nontimber commodities associated with forests were also collected, evaluations of...

  18. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  19. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  20. Georgia: Okefenokee Swamp

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Large smoke plumes were produced by the Blackjack complex fire in southeastern Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp on May 8, 2002. Smoke ... is a natural part of the swamp ecosystem, however, and a number of key plant and animal species within the Okefenokee National Wildlife ...

  1. Georgia and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Georgia and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  2. The Georgia Centenarian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Leonard W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents theoretical rationale, hypotheses, models, and methods and procedures of Georgia Centenarian Study, interdisciplinary study of oldest-old which began in 1988 to investigate adaptational characteristics of long-lived individuals. Introduces other articles in journal issue: first four reports of study, summarizing data collected in first…

  3. South Georgia Autograph Parties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Geneva H.

    1978-01-01

    The manager of the South Georgia College Bookstore describes several autograph parties used as a sales promotion technique. The planning process, including initial contacts with the guest authors, are discussed, and the schedules and events of the authors' visits are reviewed. (JMD)

  4. Georgia's "Older Worker Specialists."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ard, John V.; Barbour, Charles

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Referral/Employment Network for Elderly Workers (RENEW) in Georgia funded by the Department of Labor under Title IX of the Older Americans Act. The program recruits and trains older people (over age 55) to help other seniors find jobs. (MF)

  5. My Classroom: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Khatuna Kharkheli is an English language teacher in the Faculty of Education, Exact, and Natural Sciences at Gori State Teaching University (GSTU) in Gori, Georgia. With her passion for developing innovative and creative lessons and with her commitment to professional development, Ms. Kharkheli works to inspire her students to achieve success both…

  6. The Georgia Centenarian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Leonard W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents theoretical rationale, hypotheses, models, and methods and procedures of Georgia Centenarian Study, interdisciplinary study of oldest-old which began in 1988 to investigate adaptational characteristics of long-lived individuals. Introduces other articles in journal issue: first four reports of study, summarizing data collected in first…

  7. Georgia's forests, 1997

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson; Larry W. Thompson

    2002-01-01

    Since 1989, area of timberland in Georgia increased by less than 1 percent and in 1997 totaled 23.8 million acres. Nonindustrial private forest owners controlled 72 percent of the State's timberland. Volume of softwood growing stock declined 3 percent, whereas hardwood growing-stock volume increased 7 percent to 16.5 billion cubic feet. Net annual growth for...

  8. South Georgia Autograph Parties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Geneva H.

    1978-01-01

    The manager of the South Georgia College Bookstore describes several autograph parties used as a sales promotion technique. The planning process, including initial contacts with the guest authors, are discussed, and the schedules and events of the authors' visits are reviewed. (JMD)

  9. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  10. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  11. Outdoor Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Providing an overview of the Outdoor Education Workshop provided by the Georgia Migrant Education Program to give migrant students and staff an opportunity to learn new skills which they can then share with other migrant children upon their return to the regular school setting, the paper briefly discusses the administrative steps necessary when…

  12. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  13. Health Careers in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    This guide gives a brief description, education requirements, and a list of approved schools in Georgia for thirty-eight health occupations. The appendix contains a list of health occupations classified according to career fields such as basic sciences and engineering, or dental services. In addition, lists of secondary schools offering…

  14. Georgia's Workforce Development Pipeline: One District's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melissa H.; Hufstetler, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in 2006, the Georgia Work Ready initiative seeks to improve the job training and marketability of Georgia's workforce and drive the state's economic growth. Georgia Work Ready is a partnership between the state and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of three components, Georgia's initiative focuses on job profiling, skills…

  15. Spatial Variation in Storm Surge in the Strait of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontiens, N. K.; Allen, S. E.; Latornell, D.; Le Souef, K.; Machuca, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a strongly stratified, deep body of water located between Vancouver Island and the mainland of British Columbia and is connected to the Pacific Ocean via the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the south and Johnstone Strait to the north. It is on average 220 km in length and 30 km wide and its maximum depth is 420 m. During the winter months, coastal communities in the Strait of Georgia are at risk to flooding caused by storm surges, a natural hazard that occurs when a strong wind storm with low atmospheric pressure coincides with an unusually high tide. This study presents storm surge hindcasts of significant events between 2006 and 2009 using a numerical model of the Straits of Georgia, Juan de Fuca, Johnstone and Puget Sound (together the Salish Sea). The model is based on the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) in a regional configuration. Realistic stratification is produced by including input from the surrounding rivers. A discussion on the sensitivity of modelled surge amplitude to open boundary conditions and atmospheric forcing will be presented. As barotropic models have previously shown, the surge entering the domain from the Pacific Ocean contributes most significantly. Surge amplitudes are found to be greater within the Strait of Georgia than those in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Local wind patterns cause spatial variations in the strength of the surge in the Strait of Georgia, generally leading to stronger surges on the Mainland side of the Strait.

  16. Forest statistics for Georgia, 1997

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1997 inventory of the forest resources for the State of Georgia. Major findings are highlighted in text and graphs; detailed data are presented in 51 tables. This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Georgia. Field work began in November 1995 and was completed in April 1998. Six previous surveys,...

  17. Age, Race and Regional Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates in Georgia between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; De, Subhendu; Wilkins, Thad; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates and mortality have been decreasing in the United States. Currently, states in the South have the smallest reduction in CRC mortality. The trends of CRC incidence rates in Georgia in comparison to the United States have not been investigated. We analyzed age-adjusted incidence rates of CRC in Georgia and the United States from 2000 to 2012 using data from SEER 18 registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were calculated as cases per 100,000 to the 2000 US Standard population. CRC incidence rates were calculated for groupings based on age at time of diagnosis, race, sex, and geographic location within Georgia. Incidence rates were higher in males compared to females in Georgia. In Georgians age 50–64, incidence rates were higher compared to the US, while those ages 65+ displayed lower incidence rates. Black Georgians age 50–64 generally exhibited higher incidence rates of CRC and lower rates of decrease in incidence compared to other races in Georgia. Asian/Pacific Islander females age 50–64 in Georgia exhibited an increasing trend in incidence rate. Whites and blacks Georgians age 50–64 displayed higher incidence rates compared to the US, while Asian/Pacific Islanders displayed lower incidence rates. Greater incidence rates of CRC in rural and Greater Georgia were seen across all races when compared to overall rates in Georgia. Efforts should be made to address disparities in Georgia based on race and geographic location. Increased screening by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, reduction of risk factors and promotion of healthy lifestyles can reduce CRC incidence rates. PMID:27042701

  18. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  19. Georgia Environmental Education Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This teacher resource guide provides a listing of resources available in Georgia for teaching students about the environment. Resource regions are divided into North Georgia, Coastal Georgia, Middle Georgia, and the Piedmont. Each listing includes offerings, educational focus, history/comments, handicap accessibility, and directions for each site…

  20. Demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Big Island

    SciTech Connect

    Robert DeCarrera

    2007-04-14

    This Final Technical Report provides an account of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific LLC's Big Island, VA facility. This report covers the period from May 5, 2000 through November 30, 2006.

  1. Droughts in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, Nancy L.; Stamey, Timothy C.

    2000-01-01

    Droughts do not have the immediate effects of floods, but sustained droughts can cause economic stress throughout the State. The word 'drought' has various meanings, depending on a person's perspective. To a farmer, a drought is a period of moisture deficiency that affects the crops under cultivation - even two weeks without rainfall can stress many crops during certain periods of the growing cycle. To a meteorologist, a drought is a prolonged period when precipitation is less than normal. To a water manager, a drought is a deficiency in water supply that affects water availability and water quality. To a hydrologist, a drought is an extended period of decreased precipitation and streamflow. Droughts in Georgia have severely affected municipal and industrial water supplies, agriculture, stream water quality, recreation at major reservoirs, hydropower generation, navigation, and forest resources. In Georgia, droughts have been documented at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gaging stations since the 1890's. From 1910 to 1940, about 20 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Since the early 1950's through the late 1980's, about 100 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Currently (2000), the USGS streamflow gaging network consists of more than 135 continuous-recording gages. Ground-water levels are currently monitored at 165 wells equipped with continuous recorders.

  2. The School Dropout in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA.

    It is a tragedy to know so much about school dropouts and to do so little about the problem. We know where; we know who; we know when; we know why. With all of this evidence, Georgia's ranking among the states had continued to decrease for several years. The school dropout is the symbol of our greatest failure in education in Georgia. In 10 years,…

  3. A Methodological Review of the Articles Published in "Georgia Educational Researcher" from 2003-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Griffin, Andrea E.; Zeiger, Samara R.; Falbe, Kristina N.; Freeman, Noreen A.; Taylor, Bridget E.; Westbrook, Amy F.; Lico, Cheryl C.; Starling, Cristy N.; Sprull, Nakiesha M.; Holt, Carolyn; Smith, Kristie; McAnespie, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Methodological reviews, reviews that concentrate on research methods rather than research outcomes, have been used in a variety of fields to improve research practice, inform debate, and identify islands of practice. In this article, we report on the results of a methodological review of all of the articles published in "Georgia Educational…

  4. Historic Flooding in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy rains in southern Georgia during March 27-April 3, 2009, and in northern Georgia during September 16-22, 2009, caused severe flooding and widespread damages to residential, public, and commercial structures. Of the 159 counties in Georgia, 69 were declared disaster areas because of flooding. The heavy rainfall in southern Georgia resulted in severe flooding in the Satilla-St. Marys and upper Ochlockonee Basins and caused approximately $60 million in damages to the public infrastructure. The heavy rainfall in northern Georgia resulted in severe flooding on many streams within the upper Chattahoochee, Altamaha, and Coosa-Tallapoosa Basins and caused 10 deaths, evacuation of thousands of residents, and approximately $500 million in damages. The U.S. Geological Survey computed annual exceedance probabilities of the peak flows in 2009 at 238 streamgages throughout the State. Record peak flows were recorded at 40 streamgages for the respective periods of record as a result of the heavy rainfall during the two multiday events. The peak flows at 33 streamgages exceeded the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (100-year recurrence interval), and 19 of these exceeded the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (500-year recurrence interval).

  5. Various aspects of sustainability analysis in Georgia

    Treesearch

    C. J. Cieszewski; M. Zasada; B. E. Borders; R. Lowe; M. L. Clutter; R. F. Daniels; R. Izlar

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Georgia Traditional Industries Program (TIP) sponsored a cooperative study at the D.B. Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, to analyze the long-term sustainability of the fiber supply in Georgia. The subject of this study is relevant to a diverse array of disciplines, and it offers the opportunity to explore various aspects of...

  6. Groundwater conditions in Georgia, 2010–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Gordon, Debbie W.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick areas of Georgia. In the Albany area, nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer during 2011 generally decreased from 2010; however, concentrations in two wells remained above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 10-milligrams-per-liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, specific conductance and chloride concentrations were measured in water samples from discrete depths in two wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer. Data from the two wells indicate that chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer showed little change during calendar years 2010 through 2011 and remained below the 250 mg/L USEPA secondary drinking-water standard. During calendar years 2010 through 2011, chloride concentrations in the Lower Floridan aquifer increased slightly at Tybee Island and Skidaway Island, remaining above the drinking-water standard. In the Brunswick area, maps showing the chloride concentration of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer constructed using data collected from 32 wells during August 2010 and from 30 wells during August 2011 indicate that chloride concentrations remained above the USEPA secondary drinking-water standard in an approximately 2-square-mile area. During calendar years 2010 through 2011, chloride concentrations generally decreased in over 70 percent of the wells sampled during 2011, with a maximum decrease of 200 mg/L in a well located in the north-central part of the Brunswick area.

  7. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  9. Legal abortion in Georgia, 1980.

    PubMed

    Spitz, A M; Oberle, M; Zaro, S M

    1984-02-01

    According to data reported to the Georgia Department of Human Resources (DHR), the number of induced abortions performedin Georgia in 1980 decreased for the 1st time since 1968 when the state legalized abortion. To verify this reported decrease, the DHR data were compared with statistics obtained by the Alan Guttmacher Institute in a 1980 survey of abortion providers in Georgia. Since the AGI contacts providers directly, its statistics are considered a more accurate reflection of abortions performed. According to the DHR, the number of abortions dropped from 36,579 in 1979 to 33,288 in 1980, a 9% decrease, and the abortion rate fell from 26.6/1000 women ages 15-44 years to 23.9/1000. AGI data indicated a drop from 38,760 abortions in 1979 to 37,890 in 1980, a 2% decrease. Since both sources noted a similar trend despite differences in data collection methods, the 1980 decline in abortion procedures in Georgia is considered to represent a true decline rather than s statistical artifact. The sociodemographic characteristics of women obtaining abortions in Georgia in 1980 were also analyzed on the basis of DHR data. Although the number of abortions in Georgia performed on Georgia residents increased 2.5% from 1979-80 to 90.7%, the abortion ratio for residents decreased from 367.7 to 327.4 abortions/1000 live births. There was little change in the age, race, or marital status distribution of women receiving abortions. The ratio for white women was 317 abortions/1000 live births and that for blacks was 342/1000. The abortion ratio for unmarried women (1166/1000) was 13 times that for married women (88/1000). The number of repeat abortions decreased form 34% in 1979 to 29% in 1980. Moreover, 93% of women obtaining abortions did so in the 1st 12 weeks of gestation compared with 89% in 1979. The percentage of abortions performed in clinics increased from 66.5% in 1979 to 75.3% in 1980, with suction curettage accounting for 85% of all abortions in the 1st 12 weeks of

  10. Hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Ankcorn, Paul D.; Peck, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (GaWSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 320 real-time streamgages, including 10 real-time lake-level monitoring stations and 63 real-time water-quality monitors. Additionally, the GaWSC operates more than 180 groundwater wells, 41 of which are real-time. One of the many benefits from this monitoring network is that the data analysis provides an overview of the hydrologic conditions of rivers, creeks, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  11. Sedimentary and atmospheric sources of iron around South Georgia, Southern Ocean: a modelling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrione, I.; Aumont, O.; Nielsdóttir, M. C.; Schlitzer, R.

    2013-07-01

    In high-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the western Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, an intense phytoplankton bloom is observed annually north of South Georgia, most likely due to an enhanced supply of the limiting micronutrient iron. Shallow sediments and atmospheric dust deposition are believed to be the main iron sources. However, their relative importance is still unclear and in the South Georgia region have yet not been ascertained because iron measurements are very few. In this study, we use austral summer dissolved iron (dFe) data around South Georgia (January and February 2008) with a coupled regional hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to investigate natural iron fertilization around the island. The biogeochemical component of the model includes an iron cycle, where sediments and dust deposition are the sources of iron to the ocean. The model captures the characteristic flow patterns around South Georgia, hence simulating a large phytoplankton bloom to the north, i.e., downstream, of the island. Modelled dFe concentrations agree well with observations (mean difference and root mean square errors of ~0.02 nM and ~0.81 nM) and form a large plume to the north of the island that extends eastwards for more than 800 km. In agreement with observations, highest dFe concentrations are located along the coast and decrease with distance from the island. Sensitivity tests indicate that most of the iron measured in the main bloom area originates from the coast and the very shallow shelf-sediments (depths < 20 m) while dust deposition plays a minor role, with almost no effects on surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Iron sources such as run-off not represented explicitly in the model, but that likely contribute to the iron plumes observed around South Georgia, are also discussed together with the potential effects their temporal variability may have on the system.

  12. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Library, MN.

    This factbook examines trends during the 1980s on 11 indicators of Georgia children's well-being. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (5) rate of child abuse and neglect; (6) juveniles committed to state…

  13. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Georgia Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Georgia state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  14. Fighting Corruption in Georgia's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janashia, Natia

    2004-01-01

    In the Republic of Georgia, about 240 institutions of higher education serve a population of 5 million. On the surface, these numbers suggest a prosperous, highly educated society. Behind this facade, however, lies a reality of degraded standards, crumbling infrastructure, rampant academic fraud, and deteriorating educational quality. At the…

  15. Georgia Guidebook: Job Placement Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Grady L.; Riordan, Richard J.

    Intended for potential and current job placement coordinators, this guidebook describes Georgia's placement service activities in the following five areas: (1) organization of a placement service, (2) developmental activities, (3) testing, (4) individual and group work activities, and (5) followup evaluation and research. The test's introductory…

  16. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Library, MN.

    This factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (5) rate of child abuse and neglect; (6) juveniles…

  17. Forest statistics for Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1989-01-01

    Since 1982, area of timberland in Georgia has declined by about 102,000 acres to 23.6 million acres. Nonindustrial private owners control 68 percent of the State's timberland. New pine stands established by artificial and natural means exceeded the area of pine harvested by over 3 percent. Number of softwood stems declined in all diameter classes through the 14-...

  18. The Negro in Revolutionary Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsby, Alton, Jr.

    One of a series of pamphlets about the American Revolution in Georgia, this document explores the role of the black population during the Revolutionary War. Designed for junior and senior high school students, it can be used as supplementary reading or a one-week unit. A teacher's guide is included. Black life in the Revolutionary era, for both…

  19. Movement and Dance on the Sea Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Mary Arnold

    1985-01-01

    Describes the role of movement and dance in the lives of Blacks living on the Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia. Claims that the isolation of this area helps preserve its Africanicity and culture. Focuses particularly on the uses of rhythmic chanting in worship and in children's games. (KH)

  20. Big Island Demonstration Project - Black Liquor

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-01

    Black liquor is a papermaking byproduct that also serves as a fuel for pulp and paper mills. This project involves the design, construction, and operation of a black liquor gasifier that will be integrated into Georgia-Pacific's Big Island facility in Virginia, a mill that has been in operation for more than 100 years.

  1. Upper-crustal structure beneath the strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dash, R.K.; Spence, G.D.; Riedel, M.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sedimentary basin and delineating the near-surface crustal faults associated with recent seismic activities (e.g. M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) in the region. Joint inversion of first-arrival traveltimes from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) and the 2002 Georgia Basin experiment provides a high-resolution velocity model of the subsurface to a depth of ???7 km. In the southcentral Georgia Basin, sedimentary rocks of the Cretaceous Nanaimo Group and early Tertiary rocks have seismic velocities between 3.0 and 5.5 km s-1. The basin thickness increases from north to south with a maximum thickness of 7 (??1) km (depth to velocities of 5.5 km s-1) at the southeast end of the strait. The underlying basement rocks, probably representing the Wrangellia terrane, have velocities of 5.5-6.5 km-1 with considerable lateral variation. Our tomographic model reveals that the Strait of Georgia is underlain by a fault-bounded block within the central Georgia Basin. It also shows a correlation between microearthquakes and areas of rapid change in basin thickness. The 1997/1975 earthquakes are located near a northeast-trending hinge line where the thicknesses of sedimentary rocks increase rapidly to the southeast. Given its association with instrumentally recorded, moderate sized earthquakes, we infer that the hinge region is cored by an active fault that we informally name the Gabriola Island fault. A northwest-trending, southwest dipping velocity discontinuity along the eastern side of Vancouver Island correlates spatially with the surface expression of the Outer Island fault. The Outer Island

  2. Photocopy of photograph (Original photograph from the Vanishing Georgia collection, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (Original photograph from the Vanishing Georgia collection, Georgia State Archives, Atlanta Georgia, Photo Number SUM-125A) Unknown Photographer, Circa 1920s. EAST PORCH, LOOKING WEST. - Wise Sanatorium No. 2, Hospital Street, Plains, Sumter County, GA

  3. Georgia Tech sonic boom simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Krish K.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the building and human response to sonic boom in the range 3 Hz to 30 Hz, Georgia Institute of Technology is building a special acoustic driver system to simulate sonic boom. To support the NASA LaRC program on building and human response, this simulator's capability has been extended to an upper frequency of 4 KHz. A residential test house was made available by Georgia Tech for these tests. At the time of preparation of this document, most of the acoustic drivers and the associated electronics have been built and assembled. The system has, however, not been fully tested. The following pages provide an overview of the progress to date. The acoustic driver systems, and the principle of their operation together with the test house are described. Future plans are also summarized.

  4. Georgia Tech sonic boom simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Krish K.

    1992-04-01

    To examine the building and human response to sonic boom in the range 3 Hz to 30 Hz, Georgia Institute of Technology is building a special acoustic driver system to simulate sonic boom. To support the NASA LaRC program on building and human response, this simulator's capability has been extended to an upper frequency of 4 KHz. A residential test house was made available by Georgia Tech for these tests. At the time of preparation of this document, most of the acoustic drivers and the associated electronics have been built and assembled. The system has, however, not been fully tested. The following pages provide an overview of the progress to date. The acoustic driver systems, and the principle of their operation together with the test house are described. Future plans are also summarized.

  5. Lessons from the Georgia floods.

    PubMed

    Clinton, J J; Hagebak, B R; Sirmons, J G; Brennan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, tropical storm Alberto brought heavy rains to parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. In South Georgia, rivers rose 44 feet above flood stage, muddy water covered 10,000 square miles, and 31 lives were lost. In implementing the Health and Medical Services portion of the FEMA Federal Response Plan, the Public Health Service learned lessons from this experience that can be applied to planning for other natural disasters. Continuous reassessment to assure the best utilization of resources in rapidly changing conditions, cross-training in the content of emergency plans at all levels, and on-going face-to-face liaison among response managers will improve response efforts. Populations with special medical needs must become part of any response design. The effects that any response activity may have on the community as a whole should be carefully considered before action is taken.

  6. Lessons from the Georgia floods.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, J J; Hagebak, B R; Sirmons, J G; Brennan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, tropical storm Alberto brought heavy rains to parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. In South Georgia, rivers rose 44 feet above flood stage, muddy water covered 10,000 square miles, and 31 lives were lost. In implementing the Health and Medical Services portion of the FEMA Federal Response Plan, the Public Health Service learned lessons from this experience that can be applied to planning for other natural disasters. Continuous reassessment to assure the best utilization of resources in rapidly changing conditions, cross-training in the content of emergency plans at all levels, and on-going face-to-face liaison among response managers will improve response efforts. Populations with special medical needs must become part of any response design. The effects that any response activity may have on the community as a whole should be carefully considered before action is taken. Images p685-a p687-a PMID:8570818

  7. Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    SUBTITLE Hantavirus Infection In The Republic Of Georgia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) 5d. PROJECT... Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia Tinatin Kuchuloria, Danielle V. Clark, Matthew J. Hepburn, Tengiz Tsertsvadze, Guillermo...Pimentel, and Paata Imnadze We describe a laboratory-confirmed case of hantavirus infection in the Republic of Georgia. Limited information is available

  8. Epic Flooding in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Atlanta-September 2009 Floods The epic floods experienced in the Atlanta area in September 2009 were extremely rare. Eighteen streamgages in the Metropolitan Atlanta area had flood magnitudes much greater than the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) annual exceedance probability. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that 23 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas due to this flood and that 16,981 homes and 3,482 businesses were affected by floodwaters. Ten lives were lost in the flood. The total estimated damages exceed $193 million (H.E. Longenecker, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., November 2009). On Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga., just north of Interstate 20, the peak stage was more than 6 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. Flood magnitudes in Cobb County on Sweetwater, Butler, and Powder Springs Creeks greatly exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) floods for these streams. In Douglas County, the Dog River at Ga. Highway 5 near Fairplay had a peak stage nearly 20 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. On the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage at Vinings reached the highest level recorded in the past 81 years. Gwinnett, De Kalb, Fulton, and Rockdale Counties also had record flooding.South Georgia March and April 2009 FloodsThe March and April 2009 floods in South Georgia were smaller in magnitude than the September floods but still caused significant damage. No lives were lost in this flood. Approximately $60 million in public infrastructure damage occurred to roads, culverts, bridges and a water treatment facility (Joseph T. McKinney, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., July 2009). Flow at the Satilla River near Waycross, exceeded the 0.5-percent (200-year) flood. Flows at seven other stations in South Georgia exceeded the 1-percent (100-year) flood.

  9. Testing models of ice cap extent, South Georgia, sub-Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, N. L. M.; Bentley, M. J.; Spada, G.; Evans, D. J. A.; Hansom, J. D.; Brader, M. D.; White, D. A.; Zander, A.; Berg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of Last Glacial Maximum ice in South Georgia is contested, with two alternative hypotheses: an extensive (maximum) model of ice reaching the edge of the continental shelf, or a restricted (minimum) model with ice constrained within the inner fjords. We present a new relative sea-level dataset for South Georgia, summarising published and new geomorphological evidence for the marine limit and elevations of former sea levels on the island. Using a glacial isostatic adjustment model (ALMA) specifically suited to regional modelling and working at high spatial resolutions, combined with a series of simulated ice-load histories, we use the relative sea-level data to test between the restricted and extensive ice extent scenarios. The model results suggest that there was most likely an extensive Last Glacial Maximum glaciation of South Georgia, implying that the island was covered by thick (>1000 m) ice, probably to the edge of the continental shelf, with deglaciation occurring relatively early (ca. 15 ka BP, though independent data suggest this may have been as early as 18 ka). The presence of an extensive ice cap extending to the shelf edge would imply that if there were any biological refugia around South Georgia, they must have been relatively localised and restricted to the outermost shelf.

  10. 86(th) Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Selina A; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The 86(th) annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13-14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12(th)) and post-conference (April 14(th)) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia's leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929-1936); during World War II (1941-1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year's conference. These included a "move and groove" physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy, Georgia's response to the

  11. Sediment transported by Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Vance C.

    1964-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of the sediment transported by selected Georgia streams during the period December 1957 to June 1959 was made to provide a general understanding of the physical quality of stream water in Georgia and to supply facts needed in planning more detailed work. The investigation was made by studying the variation of sediment concentration and sediment load with stream discharge at 33 sites and by relating the available data to topographic, geologic, climatic, and soil conditions in the State. In the Blue Ridge Mountains area of northern Georgia the great relief, moderately heavy precipitation, fast runoff, and loamy soils cause sediment concentrations and sediment loads which are above average for the State. During periods of moderate to low streamflow, the concentration of suspended sediment ranges from 1 to 25 ppm (parts per million). After heavy rainfall, sediment concentration increases rapidly as water discharge rises, and occasionally exceeds 1,000 ppm before decreasing again. The concentration may reach a maximum and decrease before the discharge peak is reached. A major part of the annual sediment load can be carried during a short period of time because of the great increase in both water discharge and sediment concentration during floods. The lower Coastal Plain differs from the mountainous areas in several respects. The topography is gently rolling to almost level, precipitation and runoff are less than average for the State, and topsoils generally consist of hard and loamy sand. Concentration of suspended sediment in streamflow commonly ranges from 1 to 20 ppm during periods of low to moderate discharge and increases to 15 to 60 ppm at high discharge. Because of the small increase in concentration with increasing stream discharge, the sediment load varies approximately in proportion to the discharge. The sediment characteristics of streams in the Piedmont, the Valley and Ridge area. and the upper Coastal Plain are intermediate

  12. Heat Islands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  13. Standards for Georgia Public Schools, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This edition contains two types of standards along with an interpretation of and/or reference to Georgia law or Georgia Board of Education policy. The first category includes standards that are required of either a school or local school system. The second category includes standards for field-test purposes from which future required standards…

  14. Deer browse resources of north Georgia

    Treesearch

    Thomas H. Ripley; Joe P. McClure

    1963-01-01

    Following tests in the coastal plain and Piedmont of Georgia (Moore et al. 1960), a procedure was developed and used to assess browse resources in 21 counties of north Georgia involving a total land area of approximately 4 million acres (fig. 1). Although the Forest Survey is designed primarily to yield information on timber, it also provides an excellent sampling...

  15. Forest statistics for North Georgia, 1998

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1998 inventory of the forest resources of a 21-county area of Georgia. Major findings are highlighted in text and graphs; detailed data are presented in 51 tables. This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of North Georgia. Field work began in October 1997 and was completed in April 1998. Six previous...

  16. The Georgia Centenarian Study: Comments from Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Ilene C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses five issues related to the Georgia Centenarian Study: recruitment of centenarians, birth cohort effects, the changing age structure of the population, religion, and cognition and survival. Concludes that Georgia Centenarian Study provides critically needed baseline data so characteristics of centenarians of the twenty-first century can…

  17. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1972

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Cathey

    1971-01-01

    Annual growth exceeded removals in this 43-county area by 219 million cubic feet, or 73 percent. Southern yellow pines account for about 61 percent of this surplus growth. The average annual growth rate for Central Georgia is 68 cubic feet per acre of-commercial forest land, substantially higher than that found in either Southeast or Southwest Georgia. The area of...

  18. Economic Yearbook from Georgia Trend Magazine, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John

    Based on information from "Georgia Trend" magazine examining economic conditions across Georgia, Gainesville College (GC) is expected to experience an expanding base of students over the next 5 years. With respect to Hall County and the nine contiguous counties that make up GC's service area, data indicate a population growth in the…

  19. Acculturation of Korean Residents in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Don Chang

    This report explores the acculturation of Korean residents; both Korean families and Korean American families who reside in an academic community (Athens, Georgia) and an urban community (Atlanta, Georgia). The study is based on the view that Korean residents in the United States are a distinctive subgroup that has not yet been studied in terms of…

  20. Child Care Licensing: Georgia Impact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Annette; And Others

    The state of Georgia revised its child care licensing regulations to include more stringent staff-to-child ratios, limits on group sizes, and increases in staff training hours. This study examined the impact of these changes in child care licensing rules and regulations on the child care industry in Georgia. The sample consisted of all licensed…

  1. Georgia History Plan Stirs Civil War Fuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 140 years have not erased Georgia's memory of the trail of destruction by General William T. Sherman and Union troops as they burned their way from Atlanta to Savannah during a critical campaign of the Civil War. Those weeks in late 1864 have left a lasting influence on the state's history and culture. This article deals with Georgia's…

  2. 78 FR 11724 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00051 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Georgia dated...

  3. 77 FR 37727 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated...

  4. 76 FR 59177 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated...

  5. 77 FR 1546 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Georgia dated...

  6. 77 FR 43411 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Georgia dated...

  7. 40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Georgia. 81.408 Section 81.408 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.408 Georgia. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  8. The Georgia Centenarian Study: Comments from Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Ilene C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses five issues related to the Georgia Centenarian Study: recruitment of centenarians, birth cohort effects, the changing age structure of the population, religion, and cognition and survival. Concludes that Georgia Centenarian Study provides critically needed baseline data so characteristics of centenarians of the twenty-first century can…

  9. Isabela Island, Galapagos Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-20

    STS072-732-072 (11-20 Jan. 1996) --- Three of the nineteen Galapagos Islands are visible in this image, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. The Galapagos Islands are located 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) to the west of Ecuador. The largest of the islands, Isabela, is at center (north is toward the upper right corner). The numerous circular features on the island, highlighted by clouds, are volcanoes. The Galapagos Islands owe their existence to a hot spot, or persistent heat source in the mantle, which also is located over a rift, or place where plates are separating and new crust is being created. The rift is located between the Cocos and Nazca Plates. The dark linear features on the islands are lava flows from past eruptions. The island to the left of Isabela is Fernandina, while the island to the right is San Salvador. The Galapagos Islands were visited by the English naturalist Charles Darwin in 1835.

  10. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  11. Hydrologic Streamflow Conditions for Georgia, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Joiner, John K.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (GaWSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 260 real-time streamflow stations and more than 100 noncontinuous streamflow stations throughout Georgia. This network is operated by the USGS GaWSC in cooperation with more than 50 different partners at Federal, State, and local government levels. One of the many benefits of data collected from this monitoring network is that it allows for the analysis of the overall hydrologic condition of streams and lakes of Georgia.

  12. Climate change adaptation through urban heat management in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brian; Vargo, Jason; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead

    2013-07-16

    This study explores the potential effectiveness of metropolitan land cover change as a climate change adaptation strategy for managing rising temperatures in a large and rapidly warming metropolitan region of the United States. Through the integration of a mesoscale meteorological model with estimated land cover data for the Atlanta, Georgia region in 2010, this study quantifies the influence of extensive land cover change at the periphery of a large metropolitan region on temperature within the city center. The first study to directly model a metropolitan scale heat transfer mechanism, we find both enhanced tree canopy and impervious cover in the suburban zones of the Atlanta region to produce statistically significant cooling and warming effects in the urban core. Based on these findings, we conclude that urban heat island management both within and beyond the central developed core of large cities may provide an effective climate change adaptation strategy for large metropolitan regions.

  13. Mapping Atlantic coastal marshlands, Maryland, Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Eastern coastal marshes are the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Groundbased and low-altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time-consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's Earth Resources Technology Satellite has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test sites selected were in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and Ossabaw Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS imagery, enlarged to 1:250,000: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; and (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  14. National Seismic Network of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanova, N.; Kakhoberashvili, S.; Omarashvili, V.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.

    2016-12-01

    Georgia, as a part of the Southern Caucasus, is tectonically active and structurally complex region. It is one of the most active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The deformation and the associated seismicity are due to the continent-continent collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Seismic Monitoring of country and the quality of seismic data is the major tool for the rapid response policy, population safety, basic scientific research and in the end for the sustainable development of the country. National Seismic Network of Georgia has been developing since the end of 19th century. Digital era of the network started from 2003. Recently continuous data streams from 25 stations acquired and analyzed in the real time. Data is combined to calculate rapid location and magnitude for the earthquake. Information for the bigger events (Ml>=3.5) is simultaneously transferred to the website of the monitoring center and to the related governmental agencies. To improve rapid earthquake location and magnitude estimation the seismic network was enhanced by installing additional 7 new stations. Each new station is equipped with coupled Broadband and Strong Motion seismometers and permanent GPS system as well. To select the sites for the 7 new base stations, we used standard network optimization techniques. To choose the optimal sites for new stations we've taken into account geometry of the existed seismic network, topographic conditions of the site. For each site we studied local geology (Vs30 was mandatory for each site), local noise level and seismic vault construction parameters. Due to the country elevation, stations were installed in the high mountains, no accessible in winter due to the heavy snow conditions. To secure online data transmission we used satellite data transmission as well as cell data network coverage from the different local companies. As a result we've already have the improved earthquake location and event magnitudes. We

  15. TRAY MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Chatman, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Tray Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Rocks underlying the Tray Mountain Roadless Area are suitable for crushed rock or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available closer to present markets. There is a possibility for the occurrence of hydrocarbon resources underlying the area at great depth, but no hydrocarbon potential was identified. Detailed studies are needed to establish the presence or absence and mineral-resource potential of olivine, nickel, cobalt, and chrome in the two mafic-ultramafic bodies in the Hayesville thrust sheet. The cause of the lead anomaly in pan concentrate samples taken from the southwest part of the roadless area has not been established; the mineral residence and source of the anomaly remain to be determined.

  16. Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Kerguelen Islands also known as the Desolation Islands, which are part of the French Southern and Antarctic lands. The islands are among the most isolated places on Earth.

  17. Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  18. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-07-15

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center".

  19. 86th Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Selina A.; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 86th annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13–14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12th) and post-conference (April 14th) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia’s leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929–1936); during World War II (1941–1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year’s conference. These included a “move and groove” physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy

  20. Seismicity map of the state of Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, B. Glen; Stover, C.W.; Algermissen, S.T.; Long, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    This map is one of a series of seimicity maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey that show earthquake data of individual states or groups of states at the scale of 1:1,000,000.  This map shows only those earthquakes with epicenters located within the boundaries of Georgia, even though earthquakes in nearby states or countries may have been felt or may have caused damage in Georgia.

  1. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

  2. The effects of Georgia's Choice curricular reform model on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phemister, Art W.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice reading curriculum on third grade science scores on the Georgia Criterion Referenced Competency Test from 2002 to 2008. In assessing the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model this causal comparative study examined the 105 elementary schools that implemented Georgia's Choice and 105 randomly selected elementary schools that did not elect to use Georgia's Choice. The Georgia's Choice reading program used intensified instruction in an effort to increase reading levels for all students. The study used a non-equivalent control group with a pretest and posttest design to determine the effectiveness of the Georgia's Choice curriculum model. Findings indicated that third grade students in Non-Georgia's Choice schools outscored third grade students in Georgia's Choice schools across the span of the study.

  3. The vulnerability of the Strait of Georgia (Canada) to future hypoxia and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianson, Debby; Allen, Susan; Moore-Maley, Ben; Haigh, Rowan; Johannessen, Sophia; Macdonald, Robie; Krogh, Jeremy; Simpson, Eleanor; Kohfeld, Karen; Hamme, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Pacific coast is filled with fjords and islands. Circulation in the region is dynamic, so that large changes in acidity (pH) and oxygen may occur both in space and time. The Strait of Georgia (Canada) is a large (200 X 30 km) semi-enclosed basin, that has relatively low pH with respect to the adjacent outer coast and yet hosts a lucrative aquaculture industry. On the other hand this region is relatively well oxygenated due to gas exchange in the turbulent (tidal) flow in the narrow Straits with sills connecting it with the outer coast. We investigate the role that this intense gas exchange plays in protecting the Strait of Georgia from future hypoxia and ocean acidification. Finally, we contrast surface water properties (including dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity) measured on large ships with those measured nearshore and at shore-based aquaculture sites within the Strait.

  4. Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This easterly looking view shows the seven major volcanic islands of the Canary Island chain (28.0N, 16.5W) and offers a unique view of the islands that have become a frequent vacation spot for Europeans. The northwest coastline of Africa, (Morocco and Western Sahara), is visible in the background. Frequently, these islands create an impact on local weather (cloud formations) and ocean currents (island wakes) as seen in this photo.

  5. Focus on institutional research at Georgia Tech: editorial.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gisele

    2014-11-01

    Applied Optics is launching new focus issues to highlight optics research at institutes, including government labs, universities, and industries. The following highlights research taking place at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech).

  6. Detailed Performance Calculations: Georgia Institute of Technology Group, Appendix E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for system intercomparison; signal strength evaluation; background total source strength; signal-to-noise ratio; performance of present Georgia Tech system; and special comments on current Georgia Tech system are discussed.

  7. Detailed Performance Calculations: Georgia Institute of Technology Group, Appendix E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for system intercomparison; signal strength evaluation; background total source strength; signal-to-noise ratio; performance of present Georgia Tech system; and special comments on current Georgia Tech system are discussed.

  8. Exploring Homophobia in Tbilisi, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Mestvirishvili, Maia; Zurabishvili, Tinatin; Iakobidze, Tamar; Mestvirishvili, Natia

    2016-10-04

    The purpose of this study is to determine statistical predictors of homophobic attitudes among the residents of Tbilisi, Georgia. We analyze 2013 survey data from a representative sample of the Tbilisi adult population. Residents were asked about their attitudes, beliefs, and political and social values in the context of the May 17, 2013 attack on LGBT activists on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT). Findings show that homophobia is significantly predicted by male gender, lower levels of education, acceptance of social inequality, nonliberal attitudes, and perceiving homosexuals as a "threat to national security." However, psychological perceptions and personal experiences also indirectly influence homophobic attitudes: the findings suggest that males report homophobic attitudes more often than females do and tend to be even more homophobic when they believe that homosexuality is inborn rather than acquired. The study also found that people without liberal attitudes tend to be more homophobic when they have personal contacts with homosexuals. This article highlights the need for a more comprehensive approach to education and the promotion of liberal values as well as legal equality for LGBTQ individuals to decrease the level of homophobia in Georgian society and, specifically, in Tbilisi.

  9. Lagtime relations for urban streams in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, Ernest J.

    2000-01-01

    Urban flood hydrographs are needed for the design of many highway drainage structures, embankments, and entrances to detention ponds. The three components that are needed to simulate urban flood hydrographs at ungaged sites are the design flood, the dimensionless hydrograph, and lagtime. The design flood and the dimensionless hydrograph have been presented in earlier studies for urban streams in Georgia. The objective of this study was to develop equations for estimating lagtime for urban streams in Georgia. Lagtimes were computed for 329 floods at 69 urban gaging stations in 11 cities in Georgia. These data were used to compute an average lagtime for each gaging station. Multiple regression analysis was then used to define relations between lagtime and certain physical basin characteristics, of which drainage area, slope, and impervious area were found to be significant. A qualitative variable was used to account for a geographical bias in flood-frequency region 4, a small area of southwestern Georgia. Information from this report can be used to simulate a flood hydrograph using a dimensionless hydrograph, the design flood, and the lagtime obtained from regression equations for any urban site with less than a 25-square-mile drainage area in Georgia.

  10. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  11. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. Georgia's law was enacted in May 2008 in order to assist low income students to transfer out of low performing public schools. Operations under the new act began in late 2008. The law permits taxpayers in Georgia to reduce their annual state taxes…

  12. Georgia and the United States Constitution 1787-1789.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, J. David

    This pamphlet on revolutionary Georgia is one of a series designed for use in the state's public schools. The objective is to present a clear, concise picture of Georgia's history during the American Revolution. The first and major part of the text presents an historical summary. It describes how Georgia was an early and strong supporter of the…

  13. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  14. DVD Database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Simonia, Ts.; Abuladze, T.; Chkhikvadze, N.; Samkurashvili, L.; Pataridze, K.

    2016-06-01

    Little known and unknown Georgian, Persian, and Arabic astronomical manuscripts of IX-XIX centuries are kept in the centers, archives, and libraries of Georgia. These manuscripts has a form of treaties, handbooks, texts, tables, fragments, and comprises various theories, cosmological models, star catalogs, calendars, methods of observations. We investigated this large material and published DVD database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia. This unique database contains information about astronomical manuscripts as original works. It contains also descriptions of Georgian translations of Byzantine, Arabic and other sources. The present paper is dedicated to description of obtained results and DVD database. Copies of published DVD database are kept in collections of the libraries of: Ilia State University, Georgia; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK; Congress of the USA, and in other centers.

  15. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, A.M.; Blackburn, D.K.; McSwain, K.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1999 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1999 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards.

  16. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1998 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1998 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards.

  17. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  18. Annotated checklist of Georgia birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W.; Parrish, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7x10-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

  19. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  20. Biological Safety at the University of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Daryl E.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Georgia (UGA) biosafety program was initiated in response to requirements for recombinant DNA experiments rather than laboratory-acquired infections. This and other environmental safety programs at UGA are described, considering three of the four recognized levels of biocontainment. A fire extinguisher inspection computer program…

  1. Georgia's Hope: A System in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Georgia's HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Economically) scholarship program, which provides financial reward to students in public and private colleges, universities, and technical institutes, is discussed in an interview with Juanita Baranco, a state system regent, and Stephen R. Porch, chancellor of the state system. Focus of these excerpts is…

  2. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  3. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopkins, Laurie B.; Carter, John; Beavers, Barbara

    This Kids Count factbook examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Georgia's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in five domains: family and community, economic well-being, health, education, and safety and security. The 21 indicators of well-being are: (1) child population; (2) public school enrollment; (3)…

  4. Educational Initiatives for Industrial Development in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Paul M.; Johnson, Berman E.

    Georgia's two-year technical institutes have played a prominant role in linking education with industry. Five major interrelated efforts have worked to transform the state from an agrarian economy to one utilizing advanced technologies. The first of these, the Quick-Start Program, offers state-paid services, such as consultation, employee…

  5. Descriptive Summary of Georgia Tech's Semiotics Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Charls

    This document is a descriptive summary of the Georgia Institute of Technology's semiotics laboratory. A review of the goals and objectives of the laboratory is followed by a description of the facilities, including the computer software. The capabilities and uses of the laboratory are outlined for classroom experiments, instructional experiments,…

  6. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

    This factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) kindergarten retention; (5) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (6) juvenile arrests; (7) youth…

  7. Forest statistics for Southwest Georgia, 1988

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1988-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the sixth forest survey in southwest Georgia. Field work began in October 1987 and was completed in January 1988. Five previous surveys, completed in 1934, 1951, 1960, 1971, and 1981, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 54 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and...

  8. Forest statistics for Southwest Georgia, 1981

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield

    1981-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the fifth forest survey of southwest Georgia, Fieldwork began in May 1980 and was completed in November 1980. Four previous surveys, completed in 1938, 1951, 1960, 1971, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 47 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and trends since 1971...

  9. Long Range Program for Georgia Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept of Education, Atlanta. Div. of Public Library Services.

    The development of each area of Georgia's long range plan required the identification of present and projected needs, the definition of objectives and action plans to meet those needs, establishment of periodic evaluation procedures, dissemination of information, coordination with all types of libraries and their programs, allocations of funds for…

  10. Building Literate Communities: Georgia's Blueprint for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeden, Kenneth H.; Bowen, Jean S.

    1990-01-01

    Georgia's Certified Literate Community Program is a state-supported, community-based effort that provides all levels of instruction--from basic skills to technical writing--to adults at all educational levels. The goal is to enable every capable adult to attain reading, speaking, writing, problem solving, and comprehension skills. (SK)

  11. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

    This Kids Count factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight babies; (2) infant mortality; (3) child deaths; (4) teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) juvenile arrests; (6) reading and math scores on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills;…

  12. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  13. Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George

    2017-04-01

    Georgia belongs to one of world's most complex mountainous regions according to the scale and frequency of Geological processes and damage caused to population, farmlands, and Infrastructure facilities. Geological hazards (landslide, debrisflow/mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.) are affecting many populated areas, agricultural fields, roads, oil and gas pipes, high-voltage electric power transmission towers, hydraulic structures, and tourist complexes. Landslides occur almost in all geomorphological zones, resulting in wide differentiation in the failure types and mechanisms and in the size-frequency distribution. In Georgia, geological hazards triggered by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic change; 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. The prediction and monitoring of Geological Hazards is a very wide theme, which involves different researchers from different spheres. Geological hazard monitoring is essential to prevent and mitigate these hazards. In past years in Georgia several monitoring system, such as Ground-based geodetic techniques, Debrisflow Early Warning System (EWS) were installed on high sensitive landslide and debrisflow areas. This work presents description of Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia.

  14. Implications of Georgia's 20-Week Abortion Ban.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sarah C M; Gould, Heather; Upadhyay, Ushma D

    2015-08-01

    We sought to understand more about women affected by a law enacted in January 2013 that led Georgia providers to stop providing abortion services at 24 weeks from a woman's last menstrual period (LMP), and who would be affected if Georgia enforces the law banning abortions at 22 weeks from LMP. We obtained data on women obtaining abortions at or after 20 weeks from LMP in 2012 and 2013 from 4 Georgia facilities providing later abortion care. We analyzed data descriptively and with the χ (2) test. More than half of the women were Black; one fourth were White. Close to half of the women had education beyond high school and a similar proportion had a previous live birth. Eighty-three percent of women at or after 24 weeks came from the South, 4% from the Northeast, and 13% from the Midwest; 99% of those at 20 to 24 weeks were from the South. One third of women at or after 24 weeks and half at 20 to 24 weeks were Georgia residents. These bans will likely affect women throughout the South, as well as the Midwest and Northeast.

  15. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  16. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  17. Forest statistics for North Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Brown; Michael T. Thompson

    1989-01-01

    Since 1983, area of timberland in North Georgia has decreased by 5 percent and now totals almost 3.0 million acres. Nonindustrial private owners account for two-thirds of the region's timberland. The annual rate of planting experienced a fourfold increase over the previous rate and averaged 22,000 acreas each year. Volume of softwood growing stock fell by 6...

  18. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1997

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Central Georgia. Field work began in November 1996 and was completed in August 1997. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1952, 1961, 1972, 1982, and 1989 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 61 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and trends...

  19. Forest statistics for North Central Georgia, 1998

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of North Central Georgia. Field work began in June 1997 and was completed in November 1997. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1953, 196 1, 1972, 1983, and 1989 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 6 1 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and...

  20. Forest statistics for Southwest Georgia, 1996

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield; Michael T. Thompson

    1997-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Southwest Georgia. Field work began in June 1995 and was completed in November 1995. Six previous surveys, completed in 1934, 1951, 1960, 1971, 1981, and 1988 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 62 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and trends...

  1. Student Enrollment Forecasting in Georgia: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Pool, Harbison; Davidson, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Study of school district enrollment forecasting in Georgia finds, for example, differences in forecasting accuracy between large and small school districts, the widespread use of the Cohort Survival Technique, a lag in small school districts' use of sophisticated, computer-based enrollment forecasting models. (Contains 34 references.) (PKP)

  2. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not…

  3. Climate change vulnerability assessment in Georgia

    Treesearch

    Binita KC; J. Marshall Shepherd; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is occurring in the Southeastern United States, and one manifestation is changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events. A vulnerability assessment is performed in the state of Georgia (United States) at the county level from 1975 to 2012 in decadal increments. Climate change vulnerability is typically measured as a function of exposure to physical...

  4. School-Based Businesses in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatewood, Elizabeth J.; DeLargy, Paul F.

    A school-based business program in Georgia is attempting to broaden the education of high school students by making them more aware of the role of small business in the United States economy and the economic possibilities offered by entrepreneurship. Goals of school-based businesses are to create profit-making enterprises that meet unfilled needs…

  5. Planning for Secondary Vocational Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asche, F. Marion

    A literature review and analysis was undertaken in order to present policymakers in Georgia with broad overview of the issues related to planning in vocational education and to propose a modified programmatic model for vocational education that would incorporate contemporary thinking about the mission of secondary vocational education and…

  6. Educational Initiatives for Industrial Development in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Paul M.; Johnson, Berman E.

    Georgia's two-year technical institutes have played a prominant role in linking education with industry. Five major interrelated efforts have worked to transform the state from an agrarian economy to one utilizing advanced technologies. The first of these, the Quick-Start Program, offers state-paid services, such as consultation, employee…

  7. Student Enrollment Forecasting in Georgia: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Pool, Harbison; Davidson, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Study of school district enrollment forecasting in Georgia finds, for example, differences in forecasting accuracy between large and small school districts, the widespread use of the Cohort Survival Technique, a lag in small school districts' use of sophisticated, computer-based enrollment forecasting models. (Contains 34 references.) (PKP)

  8. Forest statistics for North Central Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Tony G. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the sixth forest survey in North Central Georgia. Field work began in February 1989 and was completed in April 1989. Five previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1953, 1961, 1972, and 1983, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 53 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and...

  9. 77 FR 51099 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given that as a result...

  10. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  11. Georgia Turns to the West for Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Georgia, along with a number of other former Soviet countries, is rapidly reforming its higher-education system. Russian is being replaced by English in classrooms and textbooks. Western-trained professors are flooding campuses with new methods of teaching and liberal-arts courses are replacing vocational training. This change is part of broader…

  12. Goals for Education. Challenge to Lead: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board adopted Challenge to Lead education goals to focus and hold attention on educational improvement in its 16 states. This report provides an overview of Georgia's progress toward meeting these important goals. Challenge to Lead asserts: "With almost half of the new jobs created in America in the 1990s, Southern…

  13. Factors Contributing to Teacher Retention in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locklear, Tina M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method, survey-based inquiry was to determine how Georgia public high school faculty members perceive various pressures and experiences associated with a career in education. These perceptions were then analyzed as possible indicators of teacher attrition in order to improve retention rates. The independent demographic…

  14. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

    This factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) kindergarten retention; (5) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (6) juvenile arrests; (7) youth…

  15. School-Based Businesses in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatewood, Elizabeth J.; DeLargy, Paul F.

    A school-based business program in Georgia is attempting to broaden the education of high school students by making them more aware of the role of small business in the United States economy and the economic possibilities offered by entrepreneurship. Goals of school-based businesses are to create profit-making enterprises that meet unfilled needs…

  16. Milkweed, stink bugs, and Georgia cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, stink bugs, i.e., Nezara viridula (L.)(Say) and Chinavia hilaris (Say), develop in peanut and then disperse at the crop-to-crop interface to feed on fruit in cotton. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of a habitat of tropical milkwe...

  17. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  18. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not…

  19. Homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Shirley A.; Bennett, Gerald

    Two studies examined homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. The Key Informant Survey, conducted in 1987, involved interviewing individuals (N=42) knowledgeable about homeless people in the community. In the Shelter and Street Surveys of homeless people, conducted in March (N=51) and July (N=71) of 1988, homeless subjects were interviewed concerning…

  20. Jazz in Georgia Schools: Twin Residencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Mark; Blackman, Gary

    1984-01-01

    A very successful artist-in-education program in which jazz musicians introduced elementary students in Augusta (Georgia) to jazz music is described. Students were involved in many activities, including instrumental improvisation, singing, reading staff notation, choreography, and composing jazz. (RM)

  1. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  2. Examining School District Efficiency in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Eric A.; Rolle, R. Anthony; He, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relative production efficiency of school districts in Georgia using the modified quadriform method. Overall, we find that the modified quadriform allows state-level policymakers to access a basic tool for analysis that makes relative comparison of school district productivity for use in policy analysis and policy…

  3. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1989-01-01

    Since 1982, area of timberland in Central Georgia has increased 2.5 percent and now totals 7.2 million acres. Nonindustrial private owners control 68 percent of the region's timberland. The annual rate of stand regeneration more than doubled and averaged more than 217,000 acres each year. Number of live 2-inch softwood trees increased 17 percent. Volume of...

  4. Loss of Accreditation Rocks Georgia District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the end, six months of management reforms and the hiring of an experienced urban superintendent failed to keep the Clayton County, Georgia, school district from becoming the nation's first district in nearly four decades to have its accreditation stripped. Last week's decision by the Atlanta-based Southern Association of Colleges and Schools…

  5. Georgia Turns to the West for Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Georgia, along with a number of other former Soviet countries, is rapidly reforming its higher-education system. Russian is being replaced by English in classrooms and textbooks. Western-trained professors are flooding campuses with new methods of teaching and liberal-arts courses are replacing vocational training. This change is part of broader…

  6. Teacher Training in a Rural Georgia Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubright, Ronald L.; And Others

    This paper describes Project Alma, a cooperative effort between Georgia Southern College and Bacon County Schools that resulted in a field-based graduate teacher training program with a mandate to bring about new programs, approaches, and system renewal through teacher education. Project objectives are to: (a) design a field-based master's degree…

  7. Apollo 9 Mission image - Earth Observation - Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    AS09-23-3567 (3-13 March 1969) --- Oblique view of the Atlanta, Georgia area as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. The Chattahoochee River runs from Lake Sidney Lanier, near Gainesville (at upper left corner), south-westward by Atlanta and between Newnan and Carrollton (lower right). Allatoona Lake is at left center.

  8. Forest statistics for Southeast Georgia, 1996

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson; Raymond M. Sheffield

    1997-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Southeast Georgia. Field work began in November 1995 and was completed in November 1996. Six previous surveys, completed in 1934, 1952, 1960, 1971, 1981, and 1988 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 62 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and...

  9. Competition on the Georgia Education Marketplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnidze, Archil; Maglakelidze, Shorena

    2017-01-01

    Georgia implemented a nationwide, full scale school voucher program in 2005. The new voucher plan was designed with the intent to provide equitable distribution and efficient utilization of financial and human resources. By introducing the voucher scheme, the government hoped to promote competition among public as well as private schools to push…

  10. Institutional Research in Georgia Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cynthia L.; Sparks, June R.

    Questionnaires were sent to the Academic Deans of all two-year colleges in Georgia in order to obtain information on the status of institutional research in those institutions. Responses were received from all 17 of the public junior colleges and from all but three of the eight private junior colleges. Results of the study indicated: (1) 14% of…

  11. Automation at the University of Georgia Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoffersson, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Presents the design procedures, bibliographic system, file structures, acquisitions and circulation systems, functional implementation, and future development of the Managing Resources for University Libraries (MARVEL) data base at the University of Georgia Libraries, which accepts MARC input from OCLC and Library of Congress (LC) MARC tapes. (CWM)

  12. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  13. Biological Safety at the University of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Daryl E.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Georgia (UGA) biosafety program was initiated in response to requirements for recombinant DNA experiments rather than laboratory-acquired infections. This and other environmental safety programs at UGA are described, considering three of the four recognized levels of biocontainment. A fire extinguisher inspection computer program…

  14. Examining School District Efficiency in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Eric A.; Rolle, R. Anthony; He, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relative production efficiency of school districts in Georgia using the modified quadriform method. Overall, we find that the modified quadriform allows state-level policymakers to access a basic tool for analysis that makes relative comparison of school district productivity for use in policy analysis and policy…

  15. Health Clinic Environments in Georgia Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Susan Rogers

    2005-01-01

    Schools seem to be the logical place to serve the health needs of students, since children spend a majority of their time there. Design standards were not available for health clinics in Georgia elementary schools; therefore, this study examined key characteristics of an elementary school clinic in order to determine the importance of each design…

  16. GSCA (Georgia School Counselors Association) Journal, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Fran, Ed.; McCarthy, Susan, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    The articles presented in this journal issue include contributions that help meet the needs of all students. Six of the articles are based on programs presented at the Georgia School Counselor Association 2000 Fall Conference. The articles include: (1) "Effects of Group Counseling on Third Grade Students' Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement"…

  17. Groundwater conditions and studies in Georgia, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Leeth, David C.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2011-01-01

    Upper Floridan aquifer during 2008-2009 generally increased, with concentrations in two wells above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 10-milligrams-per-liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, measurement of specific conductance and chloride concentration in water samples from discrete depths in three wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate that chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer showed little change and remained below the 250 mg/L USEPA secondary drinking-water standard. Chloride concentrations in the Lower Floridan aquifer increased slightly at Tybee Island and Skidaway Island, remaining above the drinking-water standard. In the Brunswick area, maps showing the chloride concentration of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer were constructed using data collected from 28 wells during July 2008 and from 29 wells during July-August 2009, indicate that chloride concentrations remained above the USEPA secondary drinking-water standard in an approximately 2-square-mile area. During 2008-2009, chloride concentrations decreased, with a maximum decrease of 160 mg/L, in a well located in the northern part of the Brunswick area. In the Camden County area, chloride concentration during 2008-2009 was analyzed in water samples collected from eight wells, six of which were completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer and two in the Lower Floridan aquifer. In most of the wells sampled during this period, chloride concentrations did not appreciably change; however, since the closure of the Durango Paper Company in October 2002, chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer near the paper mill decreased from a high of 184 mg/L in May 2002 to 41 mg/L in September 2009. Groundwater studies conducted in Georgia during 2008-2009 include the following: * evaluation of groundwater flow, water-quality, and water-level monitoring in the Augusta-Richmond County area; * evaluation of groundwater flow, water-quality, and water

  18. Aleutian Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Remote, rugged and extraordinarily beautiful, Alaska’s Aleutian Islands are best known for wildlife reserves, military bases, fishing, furs and fog. The sprawling volcanic archipelago was brought into the spotlight by the Russian-supported expedition of Alexey Chirikov and Vitus Bering in 1741, and soon became controlled by the Russian-American Fur Company. In 1867 the United States purchased Alaska, including the Aleutian Islands, from Russia. By 1900 the port in Unalaska was well established as a shipping port for Alaska gold. The archipelago sweeps about 1,200 miles (1,800 km) from the tip of the Alaskan Peninsula to Attu, the most westward island. Four major island groups hold 14 large islands, about 55 smaller islands, and a large number of islets, adding up to roughly 150 islands/islets in total. This chain separates the Bering Sea (north) from the Pacific Ocean (south) and the islands are connected by the Marine Highway Ferry – at least as far as Unalaska. For the most remote islands, such as birding paradise of Attu, the western-most Aleutian Island, travel becomes trickier and relies primarily on custom charter. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flew over the region and captured this spectacular true-color image of the eastern Aleutian Islands on May 15, 2014. In this image, the Alaskan Peninsula protrudes from the mainland and sweeps to the southwest. The first set of islands are called the Fox Island group. Unalaska Island is part of this group and can be identified, with some imagination, as an island formed in the shape of a flying cherub, with two arms (peninsulas) outstretched towards the northeast, seemingly reaching for the round “balls” of Akutan and Akun Islands. The smallest islands in the west of the image belong to the group known as the Islands of Four Mountains. The Aleutians continue far to the west of this image. Fog surrounds the Aleutians, stretching from just off the southwestern Alaska mainland to the

  19. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  20. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Palaeolimnological reconstructions of mid-late Holocene climate change from South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nieuwenhuyze, Wim; Roberts, Stephen J.; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Verleyen, Elie; Sterken, Mieke; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    South Georgia's position within the Polar Frontal Zone, the core belt of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds, and between Antarctica and the mid-latitudes makes it a key location for studying the main drivers of past and present-day climate variability. We undertook multi-proxy analyses, including fossil diatom, pigment and μ-XRF analysis, of lake and peat cores from two sites: Annenkov Island, on the southern side of South Georgia, and Prince Olav Harbour on the northern coast of South Georgia to determine: 1) which proxies were most suitable for reconstructing Holocene palaeoclimatic change; 2) whether the climate change signals from these proxies were related to natural lake development, local catchment processes such as changes in ice extent, or regional-global scale climatic change. Deglaciation at both sites was completed by c. 7800 cal. yr. B.P. Low nutrient/low productivity environments, which persisted within lakes at both locations until c. 3500 cal. yr. B.P., are indicative of the relatively slow development of lake ecosystems following deglaciation, and suggest high altitude glaciers or persistent ice-cover remained in both catchments well into the mid Holocene. In contrast, the late Holocene (c. 3500 yr to present) was characterized by initially higher, and then highly variable within-lake biological productivity. On Annenkov Island, the late Holocene diatom composition in Fan Lake was dominated by a single species (Cyclotella stelligera), and we have identified four major phases of increased catchment disturbance (represented by Fragilaria capucina peaks in diatom data), some of which coincide with more numerous meltwater input events (identified from Ti and Sr peaks in μ-XRF data). In this poster we examine the links between these meltwater events, results from other proxies, and changes in the climate of the sub-Antarctic region.

  2. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ...; University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; and University of Georgia, Athens, GA AGENCY: National Park... Georgia, Athens, GA. The human remains were removed from Richmond County, GA. This notice is published as...

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Georgia. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2011 Georgia State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Georgia.

  4. Akpatok Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Akpatok Island lies in Ungava Bay in northern Quebec, Canada. Accessible only by air, Akpatok Island rises out of the water as sheer cliffs that soar 500 to 800 feet (150 to 243 m) above the sea surface. The island is an important sanctuary for cliff-nesting seabirds. Numerous ice floes around the island attract walrus and whales, making Akpatok a traditional hunting ground for native Inuit people. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 22, 2001. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  5. What Should Georgia Students Know To Be Successful? A 1992 Validation Survey: Desired Outcomes for Students of Georgia Vocational-Technical Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Gail

    A statewide survey was conducted by Georgia Assessment Project, Georgia State University during 1992 to determine if Georgia employers and educators agreed with Georgia policymakers that each of the 28 desired student outcomes (DSOs) was important to success in the workplace. Of 4,041 surveys mailed to a representative sample of educators and…

  6. Foodborne botulism in the Republic of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Varma, Jay K; Katsitadze, Guram; Moiscrafishvili, Maia; Zardiashvili, Tamar; Chikheli, Maia; Tarkashvili, Natalia; Jhorjholiani, Ekaterina; Chubinidze, Maia; Kukhalashvili, Teimuraz; Khmaladze, Irakli; Chakvetadze, Nelli; Imnadze, Paata; Sobel, Jeremy

    2004-09-01

    Foodborne botulism is a potentially fatal, paralytic illness that can cause large outbreaks. A possible increase in botulism incidence during 2001 in the Republic of Georgia prompted this study. We reviewed surveillance data and abstracted records of patients with botulism who were hospitalized from 1980 to 2002. During this period, 879 botulism cases were detected. The median annual incidence increased from 0.3 per 100,000 during 1980 to 1990 to 0.9 per 100,000 during 1991 to 2002. For 706 botulism patients hospitalized from 1980 to 2002, 80% of their cases were attributed to home-preserved vegetables. Surveillance evaluation verified that botulism incidence varied greatly by region. Georgia has the highest nationally reported rate of foodborne botulism in the world. A strategy addressing individual behaviors in the home is needed to improve food safety; developing this strategy requires a deeper understanding of why botulism has increased and varies by region.

  7. Foodborne Botulism in the Republic of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Katsitadze, Guram; Moiscrafishvili, Maia; Zardiashvili, Tamar; Chokheli, Maia; Tarkhashvili, Natalia; Jhorjholiani, Ekaterina; Chubinidze, Maia; Kukhalashvili, Teimuraz; Khmaladze, Irakli; Chakvetadze, Nelli; Imnadze, Paata; Sobel, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Foodborne botulism is a potentially fatal, paralytic illness that can cause large outbreaks. A possible increase in botulism incidence during 2001 in the Republic of Georgia prompted this study. We reviewed surveillance data and abstracted records of patients with botulism who were hospitalized from 1980 to 2002. During this period, 879 botulism cases were detected. The median annual incidence increased from 0.3 per 100,000 during 1980 to 1990 to 0.9 per 100,000 during 1991 to 2002. For 706 botulism patients hospitalized from 1980 to 2002, 80% of their cases were attributed to home-preserved vegetables. Surveillance evaluation verified that botulism incidence varied greatly by region. Georgia has the highest nationally reported rate of foodborne botulism in the world. A strategy addressing individual behaviors in the home is needed to improve food safety; developing this strategy requires a deeper understanding of why botulism has increased and varies by region. PMID:15498162

  8. Astronomy in Georgia - Present Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todua, M.

    2016-09-01

    Astronomy in Georgia is generally represented in Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory found in 1932. It is one of the leading scientific institutes in the country. Main fields of research are solar system bodies (including near-Earth asteroids), various aspects of solar physics, stellar astronomy (including binary stars and open clusters), extragalactic objects (AGNs), theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, atmospheric and solar-terrestrial physics. Several telescopes are operational today, as well as the instruments for atmospheric studies. In 2007 the Observatory was integrated with Ilia State University, merging scientific research and education which facilitated the growth of a new generation of researchers. There are groups of astronomers and astrophysicists in other Georgian universities and institutions as well. Georgian scientists collaborate with research centers and universities worldwide. Research groups participate in various international scientific projects. The interest in astronomy in Georgia has been growing, which increases future perspectives of its development in the country.

  9. Biogeochemical cycling in the Strait of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, S C; Macdonald, R W; Burd, B; van Roodselaar, A

    2008-12-01

    The papers in this special issue present the results of a five-year project to study sedimentary biogeochemical processes in the Strait of Georgia, with special emphasis on the near-field of a large municipal outfall. Included in this special issue are overviews of the sedimentology, benthic biology, status of siliceous sponge reefs and distribution of organic carbon in the water column. Other papers address the cycling of contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs) and redox metals in the sediment, a method to map the extent of the influence of municipal effluent from staining on benthic bivalves, and the relationships among geochemical conditions and benthic abundance and diversity. The latter set of papers addresses the role of municipal effluent as a pathway of organic carbon and other contaminants into the Strait of Georgia and the effect of the effluent on benthic geochemistry and biology.

  10. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

  11. Bioregional Planning in Central Georgia, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-02

    Chattahoochee, Harris, Marion, Muscogee, and Talbot—have joined with Taylor County and the cities of Manchester in Meriwether County and West Point in Troup...Image Archive Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84321-5230, USA Available online 2 November 2005 Abstract Human influences in the five- county ... county study region The region for this study is the five- county area around Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern United States (Fig. 1). These

  12. Water Supply and Use, Dalton Lake, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Manual, Appendix H, July 1979. * Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Coosa River Basin , Water Quality Management Plan, 1978. * J.S. Geological ...Water Resources Data, 1983. In addition, various maps are available for the basin . Those found to be most useful include, * U.S. Geological Survey...Application Authority Acknowledgements Low Streamflow in the Coosa Basin ....... .............. 10 USGS Water Supply Data Low-Flow Frequency Analysis

  13. Forest statistics for North Georgia, 1972

    Treesearch

    Herbert A. Knight

    1973-01-01

    Commercial forests occupy 3.2 million acres, or 75 percent of the total land in the 21-county area of North Georgia. There has been less forestry activity in this area than in any other part of the State. In the latest Forest Survey, 7 out of every:10 acres now classified as commercial forest showed no evidence of treatment or major disturbance over the past 11...

  14. Georgia, 2011 - forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Harper

    2012-01-01

    Georgia contains the largest area of forest cover in the South with 24.8 million acres, accounting for 67 percent of the State’s land area (table 1). The forest area has remained relatively stable over the last 50 years. Commercial timberland area (land available for production of forest products) comprises >98 percent of the total forest land area. The remaining...

  15. Georgia harvest and utilization study, 2009

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout Georgia. There were 1,981 total trees measured: 1,453 or 73 percent were softwood, while 528 or 27 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 88 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 12 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-...

  16. Georgia harvest and utilization study, 2004

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Richard a. Harper

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 96 operations throughout Georgia. There were 2,368 total trees measured, 1,581 or 67 percent were softwood, while 787 or 33 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while the other 14 percent was left as logging...

  17. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joiner, C.N.; Cressler, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water conditions during 1993 and recent ground-water level and quality trends in Georgia were evaluated using data from precipitation, ground-water, and ground-water quality monitoring networks. Data for 1993 included in this report are from precipitation records from 10 National Weather Service stations, continuous water-level records from 72 wells, and chloride analyses from 13 wells. Annual mean ground-water levels in Georgia in 1993 ranged from about 3.2 feet higher to about 9.6 feet lower than in 1992. Of the 72 wells summarized in this report, 30 wells had annual mean water levels that were higher and 42 wells had annual mean water levels that were lower in 1993 than in 1992. Record-high daily mean water levels were recorded in one well tapping the surficial aquifer, one well tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, one well tapping the Claiborne aquifer, and one well tapping the crystalline- rock aquifers. These record highs were from about 0.1 to 0.7 feet higher than previous record highs. Record-low daily mean water levels were recorded in one well tapping the surficial aquifer, two wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, four wells tapping the Cretaceous aquifer, one well tapping the Dublin-Midville aquifer system, and one well tapping the crystalline-rock aquifers. These record lows were from about 0.1 foot to 7.2 feet lower than the previous record lows. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was below drinking water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking water standards.

  18. Ground-Water Data for Georgia, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joiner, Charles N.; Peck, Michael F.; Reynolds, Mark S.; Stayton, Welby L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous water-level records from 144 wells and water-level measurements from an additional 617 wells in Georgia during 1988 provide the basic data for this report. Daily mean water-level hydrographs for selected wells illustrate the effects that changes ln recharge and discharge have had on the ground-water reservoirs in the State during 1988. Monthly mean water levels are shown for the 10-year period 1979-88. Maps showing the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for Hay 1988 and the Claiborne and Clayton aquifers for October 1988 also are presented. Annual mean water levels in Georgia generally were below those measured in 1987; water levels ranged from 6.9 feet higher to 7.3 feet lower. Record-low water levels were measured during the last half of 1988 in 18 wells tapping the crystalline rock aquifer, the Cretaceous rock aquifer system, the Midville aquifer system, and the Clayton, Upper Floridan, and upper Brunswick aquifers. These record lows were from 0.1 to 1.4 feet lower than the previous record lows. A prolonged drought resulted in decreased recharge to the aquifers and increased ground-water pumping, which caused water levels to decline. Water-quality samples collected periodically throughout Georgia are analyzed as part of areal and regional ground-water studies. Maps showing chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer in October 1988 in coastal Georgia and in the Savannah and Brunswick areas are presented. Periodic monitoring of water quality in the Savannah and Brunswick areas indicates that chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan generally have remained stable.

  19. Forest statistics for southeast Georgia, 1988

    Treesearch

    Tony G. Johnson

    1988-01-01

    Since 1981, area of timberland in Southeast Georgia increased less than 1 percent and now totals 7.2 million acres. About 39 percent of the timberland is under forest industry control. Pine plantation acreage increased by 37 percent to 2.5 million acres. New pine stands were established annually on 155,000 acres, exceeding pine stands harvested by 4 percent. Number of...

  20. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  1. Solar Data Mining at Georgia State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angryk, R.; Martens, P. C.; Schuh, M.; Aydin, B.; Kempton, D.; Banda, J.; Ma, R.; Naduvil-Vadukootu, S.; Akkineni, V.; Küçük, A.; Filali Boubrahimi, S.; Hamdi, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    In this talk we give an overview of research projects related to solar data analysis that are conducted at Georgia State University. We will provide update on multiple advances made by our research team on the analysis of image parameters, spatio-temporal patterns mining, temporal data analysis and our experiences with big, heterogeneous solar data visualization, analysis, processing and storage. We will talk about up-to-date data mining methodologies, and their importance for big data-driven solar physics research.

  2. 76 FR 28120 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Meriwether, Monroe, Morgan, Rabun. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Georgia: ] Bibb, Crawford,...

  3. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  4. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Brick Storage Vaults under Jones Street, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  5. Cesium-137 levels detected in Georgia otters

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Jenkins, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    Beginning in the 1940's and continuing through the 50's and early 60's, nuclear devices were tested by aerial detonation in the United States and other countries around the world. Cesium-137 (/sup 137/Cs) is one of the most important radionuclide by-products due to its abundance and slow decay (30-year half-life). The uptake of /sup 137/Cs in animal tissue is the result of its similarity to potassium. The somatic and genetic effects of /sup 137/Cs, along with its effect on reproductive cells, can pose great hazards to wildlife species. A reported buildup of /sup 137/Cs in white-tailed deer in the lower coastal plain of Georgia during the 1960's was followed by a gradual decline during the 1970's. Although numerous studies have involved terrestrial mammals of Georgia, few have involved aquatic mammals such as the river otter. With continued atmospheric testing by some foreign countries and the increased use of nuclear power as an energy source, there is a need for continued monitoring of radionuclides in wildlife to ascertain the quality of the environment. This study was initiated as part of an overall study of environmental pollutants in the river otter of Georgia and deals with analysis of the /sup 137/Cs accumulations in this species.

  6. Water resources activities, Georgia District, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casteel, Carolyn A.; Ballew, Mary D.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, through its Water Resources Division , investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the surface and underground water that composes the Nation 's water resources. Much of the work is a cooperative effort in which planning and financial support are shared by state and local governments and other federal agencies. This report contains a brief description of the water-resources investigations in Georgia in which the Geological Survey participates, and a list of selected references. Water-resources data for the 1985 water year for Georgia consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and groundwater levels. These data include discharge records for 108 gaging stations; water quality for 43 continuous stations, 109 periodic stations, and miscellaneous sites; peak stage and discharge only for 130 crest-stage partial-record stations and 44 miscellaneous sites; and water levels of 27 observation wells. Nineteen Georgia District projects are summarized. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. Flood-flow characteristics of Nancy Creek at Georgia Highway 400 extension near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone; Hess, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    The Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, plans the extension of Georgia Highway 400 from Interstate 285 southward to Interstate 85. As part of this extension, the Highway Division plans construction of a bridge crossing Nancy Creek near Atlanta, Georgia. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Highway Division, determined the flood flow characteristics of Nancy Creek near the bridge crossing. The flood frequency, elevation discharge relation, flood profiles, floodway, and flood flow effects were determined. The maximum backwater effect for the proposed bridge and relocated channel was 0.2 ft for the 100-yr flood. The relocated channel will drastically shorten flow length near the proposed State Highway 400 extension and reduce the 100-yr flood elevation between one and two ft from existing conditions between the proposed site and Windsor Parkway. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Island Hopping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    At some institutions, it may feel as though faculty live on one island and advancement staff on another. The islands form part of an archipelago, and they exchange ambassadors and send emissaries occasionally, but interactions are limited. It may even seem as though the two groups speak different languages, deal in different currencies, and abide…

  9. Shackleton's men: life on Elephant Island.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jan R

    2004-09-01

    The experiences of the 22 men from Ernest Shackleton's Endurance expedition of 1914-1916 who were marooned on Elephant Island during the Antarctic winter are not as well known as the narrative of the ship being beset and sunk, and Shackleton's open boat journey to South Georgia to rescue them. Frank Wild was left in charge of the marooned men by Shackleton and saved them from starvation and despair. The morale of the men in the face of extreme exposure to the elements, the ingenuity of their devices for survival and their diet, conversation and entertainments all reveal heroic qualities of Shackletonian endurance.

  10. The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

  11. The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

  12. Nationwide Assessment of Seismic Hazard for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N. S.; Varazanashvili, O.; Mumladze, T.

    2014-12-01

    The work presents a framework for assessment of seismic hazards on national level for the Georgia. Based on a historical review of the compilation of seismic hazard zoning maps for the Georgia became evident that there were gaps in seismic hazard assessment and the present normative seismic hazard map needed a careful recalculation. The methodology for the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard used here includes the following steps: produce comprehensive catalogue of historical earthquakes (up to 1900) and the period of instrumental observations with uniform scale of magnitudes; produce models of seismic source zones (SSZ) and their parameterization; develop appropriate ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) models; develop seismic hazard curves for spectral amplitudes at each period and maps in digital format. Firstly, the new seismic catalog of Georgia was created, with 1700 eqs from ancient times on 2012, Mw³4.0. Secondly, were allocated seismic source zones (SSZ). The identification of area SSZ was obtained on the bases of structural geology, parameters of seismicity and seismotectonics. In constructing the SSZ, the slope of the appropriate active fault plane, the width of the dynamic influence of the fault, power of seismoactive layer are taken into account. Finally each SSZ was defined with the parameters: the geometry, the percentage of focal mechanism, predominant azimuth and dip angle values, activity rates, maximum magnitude, hypocenter depth distribution, lower and upper seismogenic depth values. Thirdly, seismic hazard maps were calculated based on modern approach of selecting and ranking global and regional ground motion prediction equation for region. Finally, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in terms of ground acceleration were calculated for the territory of Georgia. On the basis of obtained area seismic sources probabilistic seismic hazard maps were calculated showing peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral accelerations (SA) at

  13. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, Alan M.

    2000-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1999 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1999 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards. Ground-water-level and ground-water-quality data are essential for water assessment and management. Ground-water-level fluctuations and trends can be used to estimate changes in aquifer storage resulting from the effects of ground-water withdrawal and recharge from precipitation. These data can be used to address water-management needs and to evaluate the effects of management and conservation programs. As part of the ground-water investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State of Georgia and city and county governments, a Statewide water-level-measurement program was started in 1938. Initially, this program consisted of an observation-well network in the coastal area of Georgia to monitor variations in ground-water storage and quality. Additional wells were later included in areas where data could be used to aid in water resources development and management. During 1999, periodic water-level measurements were made in 46 wells, and continuous water-level measurements were obtained from 165 wells. Continuous water-level records were obtained using analog (pen and chart

  14. Belcher Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Belcher Islands - September 21st, 2001 Description: Like sweeping brushstrokes of pink and green, the Belcher Islands meander across the deep blue of Canada's Hudson Bay. The islands' only inhabitants live in the small town of Sanikiluaq, near the upper end of the middle island. Despite the green hues in this image, these rocky islands are too cold to sustain more than a smattering of low-growing vegetation. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 5 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  15. The amount and accumulation rate of plastic debris on marshes and beaches on the Georgia coast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard F; Sanders, Dorothea P

    2015-02-15

    The amount and accumulation rate of plastic debris at 20 sites along the Georgia coast were prepared using data reported by a number of volunteer organizations. The amount of plastic debris at highly visited barrier island beaches and estuarine marshes ranged from 300 to >1000 kg. Relatively large amount of plastics (180-500 kg) were found on less visited barrier island beaches, i.e. Blackbeard, Ossabaw and Cumberland Islands. A follow up monthly or quarterly collection study was carried out on two of the sites, a barrier beach and estuarine marsh, to determine accumulation rate in 8000 m(2) areas. Accumulation rates ranged from 0.18 to 1.28 kg/30 days-8000 m(2) on the barrier island beach and from 0.6 to 1.61 kg/30 days-8000 m(2) at the estuarine marsh site. The major type of plastics, e.g. bottles, food wrappers, plastic fragments, was highly variable at different seasons and sites. The authors recommend consideration of a standardization in reporting plastic debris, with respect to quantitation of debris and sample area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Upper Cretaceous subsurface stratigraphy and structure of coastal Georgia and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.

    1982-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous subsurface stratigraphy and structure of coastal Georgia and South Carolina is based on the study of 24 wells along two transects, one extending across the seaward-dipping sedimentary basin termed the 'Southeast Georgia Embayment' northeastward to the crest of the Cape Fear Arch, and the other alined east-west, parallel to the basin axis and including the COST GE-l well on the Outer Continental Shelf. A new biostratigraphic analysis, using calcareous nannofossils, of the Fripp Island, S.C., well and reinterpretations of the Clubhouse Crossroads corehole 1, South Carolina, and other wells in South Carolina, Georgia, and northernmost Florida have made possible the comparison and reevaluation of stratigraphic interpretations of the region made by G. S. Gohn and others in 1978 and 1980 and by P. M. Brown and others in 1979. The present study indicates that within the Upper Cretaceous section the stratigraphic units formerly assigned a Cenomanian (Eaglefordian and Woodbinian) age are Coniacian (Austinian) and Turonian (Eaglefordian) in age. A previously described hiatus encompassing Coniacian and Turonian time is not present. More likely, a hiatus is probably present in the upper Turonian, and major gaps in the record are present within the Cenomanian and between the Upper Cretaceous and the pre-Cretaceous basement. After an erosional episode in Cenomanian time that affected the section beneath eastern Georgia and South Carolina, Upper Cretaceous marine clastic and carbonate rocks were deposited on a regionally subsiding margin that extended to the present Blake Escarpment. In contrast, during Cenozoic time, especially in the Eocene, subsidence and sedimentation rates were uneven across the margin. A thick progradational sequence of carbonate rocks accumulated in the Southeast Georgia Embayment and also built the present Continental Shelf, whereas farther offshore a much thinner layer of sediments was deposited on the Blake Plateau. There is no general

  17. Ecological and physiological parameters of mercury and cesium-137 accumulation in the raccoon

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Raccoons from 4 regions in the southeastern Coastal Plain were evaluated for mercury content. Mercury content of hair when used as an indicator of total body mercury content was significantly different among 3 of the 4 areas: Okefenokee Swamp, Eglin Air Force Base, and Sapelo Island on the Georgia Coast. Raccoons from Echols County Georgia were not significantly different from those of the Okefenokee. Mercury in the liver and kidney was significantly different between Okefenokee and Sapelo. There was a strong correlation between the age of the raccoon and the mercury in hair, with older animals having higher concentrations. This relationship was also valid for most other tissues. There was evidence that mercury content in some tissues was correlated with the season and the body condition of the raccoon. Mercury was not transferred through the placenta to the fetal raccoons. There was a strong relationship of mercury content to raccoon behavioral characteristics. Raccoon body weight was slightly different between the areas studied. Cesium-137 values in raccoons were significantly different between the Okefenokee and Sapelo Island. Cesium-137 content was correlated with raccoon age, body weight, and mercury content. Generally non-detectable levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons and PCB were found in Okefenokee raccoons. Mercury concentrations in crayfish were generally low but probably of importance in the raccoon food chain. The biological half life of mercury in brain, gonad, pancreas, spleen, heart, and lung was approximately 52 days. The half-life of mercury in muscle was 35 days. Mercury content of hair, liver, and kidney decreased at very slow rates, with biological half lives of 229, 108, and 138 days. This was probably due to the role of these tissues in clearance of mercury from the body, and to the molting pattern of raccoon hair.

  18. Glacier changes on South Georgia since the late-19th century documented in historical photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, John; Haynes, Valerie

    2014-05-01

    South Georgia is one of the few landmasses in the Southern Ocean. It provides a crucial geographical datapoint for glacier responses to climate change over different timescales. As part of an ongoing glacier inventory of the island, we are compiling a database of historical glacier photographs. Since the late 19th century, the island has been visited by numerous scientific and survey expeditions, as well as being the land-base for a major whaling industry. Historical photographs of the island are available from the late-19th century, beginning with the 1882-83 German International Polar Year Expedition. Many more exist from the 20th century, notably from the South Georgia Surveys in the 1950s. An assessment of the value of the photographs indicates that spatial coverage is variable, many lack reference features to pinpoint glacier positions and, in the case of smaller glaciers, the presence of snowcover makes it difficult to define the ice edge. Nevertheless, the photographs provide useful corroboration of more advanced glacier positions during the late-19th century and recession of smaller mountain and valley glaciers during the mid-20th century, while larger tidewater and sea-calving glaciers generally remained in relatively advanced positions until the 1980s. Since then, nearly all the glaciers have retreated; some of these retreats have been dramatic and a number of small mountain glaciers have fragmented or disappeared. The response of the glaciers can be related to synoptic-scale warming, particularly since the 1950s, moderated by individual glacier geometry and topography.

  19. Manpower Requirements Report to 1980: Jobs for University of Georgia Graduates in Georgia and the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechowicz, Joseph S.

    This preliminary model deals with manpower requirements to 1980 and jobs for University of Georgia graduates. Emphasis is placed on suggested methodology for dealing with a projected output of graduates in terms of speciality fields and the correlation of this projected output with projected manpower requirements in the related speciality fields.…

  20. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

  1. Running around in Circles: Quality Assurance Reforms in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibladze, Elene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the implementation of a quality assurance system in Georgia as a particular case of "Bologna transplant" in a transitioning country. In particular, the article discusses to what extent new concepts, institutions and models framed as "European" have been institutionalised in Georgia. Based on an outcome…

  2. Focus on the Future of Georgia 1970-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabacker, William H., Ed.; And Others

    As part of the Georgia Assessment Project (GAP), initiated in January 1969 to provide statewide measurement of the impact of educational programs, services, and resources on children and youth, 19 position papers were prepared by specialists to assist the Advisory Commission on Education Goals. The papers, some with critiques, concern Georgia's…

  3. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  4. Perceived Effectiveness of Clinical E-Learning for Georgia Midwives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    In the state of Georgia, approximately nine out of every 1,000 babies die during birth and approximately 18.6 out of every 1,000 women die from a pregnancy-related cause (Georgia Department of Public Health, 2011). Continuing to build capacities for the continuing education of midwives--specifically Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)--can ensure they…

  5. The Stamp Act in Georgia, 1765-1766.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James F.

    Effects of the Stamp Act in the Colony of Georgia in 1765 are explored. The pamphlet is one in a series of materials about the American Revolution in Georgia. Designed for junior and senior high school students, it can be used as supplementary reading or a short unit. A teacher's guide is included. The Stamp Act was levied by Britain to force the…

  6. Running around in Circles: Quality Assurance Reforms in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibladze, Elene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the implementation of a quality assurance system in Georgia as a particular case of "Bologna transplant" in a transitioning country. In particular, the article discusses to what extent new concepts, institutions and models framed as "European" have been institutionalised in Georgia. Based on an outcome…

  7. Lessons Learned about Coaching from Reading First in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaty, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Reading First, the largest and most ambitious beginning reading initiative funded by the United States Department of Education, is entering its sixth and final year in Georgia. The author currently serves as a coordinator for the project as well as serve as a Regional Consultant to six schools near my home in South Georgia. She is one of fourteen…

  8. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Treesearch

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  9. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  10. The Evolution of the Georgia Tech Library Circulation Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Karen

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews the evolution of the Circulation Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Library and Information Center from 2001 to the present. It is shown how a traditional circulation department with poor customer relations transformed itself by adopting innovative policies and services leading to improved customer…

  11. 78 FR 45898 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Continuance Referendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia... document directs that a referendum be conducted among eligible producers of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia... Vidalia onions produced in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from September 9...

  12. The Georgia Health Education Study: A Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Health and Safety.

    This summary review of the Georgia Health Education Study is a statistical presentation of scores achieved by over four thousand freshman college students in the university system of Georgia to questions on health knowledge. Data compiled from the administration of the Fast-Tyson Health Knowledge Test (1975 revision) indicates that subject…

  13. Secondary School Counseling Job Description. Georgia Comprehensive Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Planning and Development.

    This booklet provides guidelines for writing job descriptions for secondary school counselors in Georgia, based on the "Program Planning Guide: Georgia Comprehensive Guidance" model. The counselor's role, as described in the document, focuses on four components: the guidance curriculum, individual planning, responsive services, and…

  14. Empowering Students: How Georgia College Early College Changes Student Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This case study examines the features of Georgia College Early College, including its partnership with Georgia College & State University. The school deliberately recruits students from the community who are performing below grade level and gives them the support they need to excel academically. The college-going culture, small class sizes,…

  15. Georgia's Balancing Act: Using, Protecting, and Legislating Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    By combining an overall vision for the use of data, a commitment to protecting student privacy and data integrity, and supportive legislation, Georgia emerged as a leader in the effective use of student data. But it easily could have gone another way. None of the three elements could be taken for granted when Georgia set out to develop its state…

  16. Georgia's Balancing Act: Using, Protecting, and Legislating Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    By combining an overall vision for the use of data, a commitment to protecting student privacy and data integrity, and supportive legislation, Georgia emerged as a leader in the effective use of student data. But it easily could have gone another way. None of the three elements could be taken for granted when Georgia set out to develop its state…

  17. Regional Child Care Trends: Comparing Georgia to Its Neighbors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Lauren; Monaco, Malina; Beck, Lisa; Edwards, Jennifer

    As child care becomes an increasingly important public policy issue on the national level, there is emerging concern about Georgia's readiness to meet the needs of its children in care. This study documented the state of child care in Georgia in comparison to other states, to national averages, and to national standards. A group of 12 comparison…

  18. 2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of section of panoramic map of 'Savannah, Georgia 1891' showing Savannah Repair Shops; drawn and published by Augustus Koch, Morning-News Lithograph, Savannah, GA. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  19. The Feasibility of Establishing Satellite Campuses for Georgia State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Wayne G.

    Georgia State University, one of the southeast's major urban universities, is considering new methods of delivering its educational services. This report addresses the concept of satellite campuses for Georgia State University by examining those factors affecting their development. Topics included are: the market potential for educational services…

  20. 77 FR 67639 - Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Gas Act (NGA) requesting the determination of a service area within which Liberty Georgia may, without..., to purchase natural gas distribution assets owned by Atmos Energy Corporation (Atmos) in Georgia.\\1... of paper. See, 18 CFR 385.2001(a)(1)(iii) and the instructions on the Commission's Web site under the...

  1. Dual Enrollment in Georgia's High Schools and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Richard; Hill, Frieda

    2008-01-01

    Georgia conducted a multiphase, mixed methods study over three years (2003-2006) to determine whether credit-based transition programs facilitate college access and success for students who participate in them. The study, conducted in collaboration with, and funding from, the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) and with cooperation from the…

  2. Genecology of Longleaf Pine in Georgia and Florida

    Treesearch

    John F. Kraus; Earl R. Sluder

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen seed sources of Pinus palustrisfrom Georgia, 5 from Florida, and 1 from Alabama were grown at five locations in Georgia and at two in Florida. Results through the 15th year show: (1) survival and early height growth were best for the northern sources; (2) individual stand or seed source contributed strongly to the components of variation; (3) the seed source x...

  3. Georgia's Health Professions: A Decade of Change, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.; Little, Catherine J.

    This report examines the supply of and demand for health care professionals in the state of Georgia, including information on education, demographics, and workforce changes. Supply data analyzed included licensure and certification records; a survey of Georgia's major health care institutions provided demand data. Additionally, institutions of…

  4. The Future Is Now: Latino Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Edmund T.

    Georgia's Latino student population has risen from less than 2,000 in 1976 to more than 28,000 in 1996. In 1995-96, Latinos were less likely than their peers to finish school, more likely to struggle in the classroom, and less likely to have instructors from their ethnic background. The current Georgia Department of Education, characterized by…

  5. Perceived Effectiveness of Clinical E-Learning for Georgia Midwives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    In the state of Georgia, approximately nine out of every 1,000 babies die during birth and approximately 18.6 out of every 1,000 women die from a pregnancy-related cause (Georgia Department of Public Health, 2011). Continuing to build capacities for the continuing education of midwives--specifically Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)--can ensure they…

  6. The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W., Ed.; Brown, Carvin L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers includes five articles on the education of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders participating in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network Program (GPN). "Training Needs of Fully Certified BD Teachers in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network" (Robert J. Stansberry) found, in a survey of 203 certified…

  7. The Evolution of the Georgia Tech Library Circulation Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Karen

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews the evolution of the Circulation Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Library and Information Center from 2001 to the present. It is shown how a traditional circulation department with poor customer relations transformed itself by adopting innovative policies and services leading to improved customer…

  8. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... administered by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division, was approved by..., Georgia Environmental Protection Division, 4244 International Parkway, Suite 100, Atlanta, GA 30354. (1... Regulatory Requirements Applicable to the Underground Storage Tank Program, 1995. (ii) The following statutes...

  9. Integrating Engineering Design into Technology Education: Georgia's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive research study reported on Georgia's secondary level (grades 6-12) technology education programs capability to incorporate engineering concepts and/or engineering design into their curriculum. Participants were middle school and high school teachers in the state of Georgia who currently teach technology education. Participants…

  10. Physical Environment and Student Safety in South Georgia Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Morgan, P. Lena

    The preservation of school safety should be a primary commitment of all educators. This paper presents findings of a study that examined school facility safety in 27 Georgia schools. Data were gathered from a survey of 9 elementary, 11 middle, and 7 high schools in south Georgia. The surveys elicited information related to both school-site safety…

  11. National Observatory Report on Vocational Education and Training in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glonti, Kote; Ejibadze, A.; Nanobashvili, K.; Mickaia, L.; Natsvlishvili, E.; Imedashvili, M.; Mikeladze, A.

    The state of vocational education and training (VET) in the Georgia Republic in 1999-2000 was examined. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the socioeconomic context of VET; (2) Georgia's labor market (the current labor market situation, employment, unemployment); (3) management of VET (legislation and policy, responsible bodies,…

  12. West Point Melange, remnants of a Lower Paleozoic ophiolitic, eclogite-bearing melange in the Southern Appalachians, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.F. III; Higgins, M.W.; Crawford, T.

    1985-01-01

    The lower Paleozoic West Point melange in the West Point thrust sheet is locally preserved beneath and commonly folded with ocean-floor Ropes Creek Metabasalt of the Ropes Creek thrust sheet in the crystalline terrane of Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. The melange overlies a calc-alkaline island arc assemblage known as the Paulding volcanic-plutonic complex in the Paulding thrust sheet. The matrix of the melange is generally highly sheared talc-actinolite schist and (or) highly deformed amphibolite, and less commonly sheared scaly pelitic schist. Most clasts in the melange are of a wide variety of mafic and ultramafic rocks, including dunite, coronite troctolite, olivine gabbro, wehrlite, cortlandite, pyroxenite, and olivine-pyroxenite. Eclogite clasts are found at several localities in northern Georgia, southern North Carolina, and in Alabama. The mostly mafic ophiolitic nature of the West Point melange, the clasts of eclogite, and its location between an island-arc assemblage and ocean-ridge basalts suggests that it is the remnants of a subduction melange formed between the mid-Iapetus ridge and the oceanic Paulding island arc. The melange also forms part of the Hillabee Greenstone in Alabama and the Lake Chatuge sill and Shooting Creek complex in northern Georgia and southern North Carolina.

  13. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1997 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1997 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 71 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. In 1997, annual mean ground-water levels in Georgia ranged from 6.2 feet (ft) lower to 5.6 ft higher than in 1996. Of the 71 wells summarized in this report, 23 wells had annual mean water levels that were higher, 35 wells had annual mean water levels that were lower, and 11 wells had annual mean water levels that were about the same in 1997 as during 1996. Data for two wells are incomplete because data collection was discontinued at one well, and the equipment was vandalized at one well. Record-low daily mean water levels were recorded in six wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, one well tapping the Caliborne aquifer, two wells tapping the Clayton aquifer, and three wells tapping Cretaceous aquifers. These record lows were from 0.2 to 5.6 ft lower than previous record lows. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standard. Ground-water-level and ground-water-quality data are essential for water assessment and management. Ground-water-level fluctuations and trends can be used to estimate changes in aquifer storage resulting from the effects of ground-water withdrawal and recharge from precipitation. These data can be used to address water-management needs and to evaluate the effects of management and conservation programs. As part of the ground

  14. Desertification risk in Kakheti Region, East Georgia.

    PubMed

    Basialashvili, Tsisana; Matchavariani, Lia; Lagidze, Lamzira

    2015-01-01

    Desertification or land degradation in drylands is caused by various factors. The most important of these is climate change, a significant global ecological problem. Desertification, like erosion, as an environmental process of ecosystem degradation, is often caused by human activity. It is a common misconception that droughts cause desertification. Well-managed lands can recover from drought if the rains return. These practices help to control erosion and maintain productivity during periods when moisture is available. Traditionally, the most vulnerable territories considered under the threat of desertification in Georgia is Kakheti region (East Georgia), which has been selected as one of the priority investigation area. In Eastern Georgia, intervals of atmospheric precipitation do not coincide with the phases of water demand of plants. In recent decades as a result of more frequent droughts in Kakheti, the region has already lost hundreds, thousands of hectares of fertile land. Based on the contemporary climate warming projections, the temperature is expected to increase and precipitation to decrease. This will lead to an increase in evaporation and reduction of river flow. Under such conditions the danger of desertification is evident. To mitigate the negative effects of desertification, it is recommended to put forward set of adaptation activities through rehabilitation of water use systems, prevention of loss of water, reconstruction and expansion of irrigation canals, accumulation of unused autumn-winter river water and spring floods in reservoirs, developing an optimal scheme of distributing water resources among water users, device windbreaks and work on breeding of drought resistant varieties, preparation of water volume forecasts of rivers and their role in planning of water use; application of apply drip and sprinkler irrigation, using artificial precipitation following increase as a result of active influence on clouds. All these activities will provide

  15. Streamlined Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-15

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a streamlined island in a broad channel in Chryse Planitia. The channel is part of the outflow region of Lobo Vallis, a northern branch of Kasei Valles.

  16. Devon Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mars Researchers Rendezvous on Remote Arctic Island   ... each summer since 1999, researchers from NASA's Haughton-Mars Project and the Mars Society reside at this "polar desert" location to study the geologic and ...

  17. Georgia, country of ancient medical traditions.

    PubMed

    Shengelia, R

    2000-06-01

    Georgian medicine as well as the whole culture of Georgia, is one of the oldest in the world. In more than the 500 medical manuscripts preserved and since described, there are traces of Sumerian medicine. Examples of Chinese, Indian and especially Arabic medicine are also clearly seen. At the same time close relationships with Graeco-Roman medical traditions are beyond doubt. Nursing homes established by Georgian healers, many of whom were canonized by the Orthodox Church are to be found in many churches and monasteries all over the world. They gave fruitful scientific research and practical help.

  18. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  19. Astronomical Beliefs in Medieval Georgia: Innovative Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Jefferson; Orchiston, W.; Stephenson, F.

    2014-01-01

    Written sources from medieval Georgia show, among other things, how astronomical ideas were adapted on the periphery of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. In this paper, we investigate a number of Georgian beliefs about the heavens from a calendrical work and a celestial prognostication text, but also from less expected sources including the medieval life of a saint and an epic poem. For the most part, these sources were derived from Byzantine or Persian models. We show the extent to which the sources nevertheless conform to a specifically Georgian view of the cosmos. We argue that, in so doing, medieval Georgian authors employed several innovative approaches hitherto unnoticed by modern scholars.

  20. Report of a Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer in Georgia (Atlanta, Georgia, July 24-25, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Mark C., Ed.

    A summary of the deliberations of the Georgia planning conference of the Solar Technology Transfer Program is presented in this report. Topic areas include background information on the Georgia conference and a summary of the discussions and recommendations dealing with solar information transfer within state systems and the need for greater…

  1. Report of a Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer in Georgia (Atlanta, Georgia, July 24-25, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Mark C., Ed.

    A summary of the deliberations of the Georgia planning conference of the Solar Technology Transfer Program is presented in this report. Topic areas include background information on the Georgia conference and a summary of the discussions and recommendations dealing with solar information transfer within state systems and the need for greater…

  2. 76 FR 25330 - Georgia Power Company; Project No. 485-063-Georgia and Alabama, Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Georgia Power Company; Project No. 485-063--Georgia and Alabama, Bartletts... Rule 2010 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and...

  3. A Study of an Intensive Educational Program Conducted in Six Georgia Counties by the Georgia Cooperative Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, William Horace

    Based on surveys in 1957 and 1960 in six Georgia counties, this study evaluated an intensive educational program by the University of Georgia, and investigated attitudes and other factors related to farmers' use of fertilizers. Respondents were ranked by amounts of plant nutrients applied per acre in 1957 and by fertility per farm. Findings…

  4. A Study of an Intensive Educational Program Conducted in Six Georgia Counties by the Georgia Cooperative Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, William Horace

    Based on surveys in 1957 and 1960 in six Georgia counties, this study evaluated an intensive educational program by the University of Georgia, and investigated attitudes and other factors related to farmers' use of fertilizers. Respondents were ranked by amounts of plant nutrients applied per acre in 1957 and by fertility per farm. Findings…

  5. Island of Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The island of Okinawa, (26.5N, 128.0E) largest of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. The Ryukyu island group lies south of the main home islands of Japan in an arc towards the Chinese island Republic of Taiwan. As is typical throughout the Japanese home islands, intense urban development can be observed all over the island in this near vertical view.

  6. Water-supply potential of major streams and the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the vicinity of Savannah, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garza, Reggina; Krause, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Surface- and ground-water resources in the Savannah, Georgia, area were evaluated for potential water-supply development. Stream-discharge and water-quality data were analyzed for two major streams considered to be viable water-supply sources. A ground-water flow model was developed to be used in conjunction with other previously calibrated models to simulate the effects of additional pumpage on water levels near areas of saltwater intrusion at Brunswick and seawater encroachment at Hilton Head Island. Hypothetical scenarios also were simulated involving redistributions and small increases, and decreases in pumpage.

  7. Tidally-driven Surface Flow in a Georgia Estuarine Saltmarsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.; Bruder, B. L.; Haas, K. A.; Webster, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Estuarine saltmarshes are diverse, valuable, and productive ecosystems. Vegetation dampens wave and current energy, thereby allowing the estuaries to serve as a nursery habitat for shellfish and fish species. Tidally-driven flow transports nutrients into and out of the estuary, nourishing inshore and offshore vegetation and animals. The effects of vegetation on the marsh hydrodynamics and on the estuary creek and channel flow are, unfortunately, poorly understood, and the knowledge that does exist primarily originates from modeling studies. Field studies addressing marsh surface flows are limited due to the difficulty of accurately measuring the water surface elevation and acquiring concurrent velocity measurements in the dense marsh vegetation. This study partially bridges the gap between the model observations of marsh flow driven by water surface elevation gradients and flume studies of flow through vegetation. Three current meters and three pressure transducers were deployed for three days along a transect perpendicular to the main channel (Little Ogeechee River) in a saltmarsh adjacent to Rose Dhu Island (Savannah, Georgia, USA). The pressure transducer locations were surveyed daily with static GPS yielding highly accurate water surface elevation data. During flood and ebb tide, water surface elevation differences between the marsh and Little Ogeechee River were observed up to 15 cm and pressure gradients were observed up to 0.0017 m of water surface elevation drop per m of linear distance. The resulting channel-to-saltmarsh pressure gradients substantially affected tidal currents at all current meters. At one current meter, the velocity was nearly perpendicular to the Little Ogeechee River bank. The velocity at this location was effectively modeled as a balance between the pressure gradient and marsh vegetation-induced drag force using the Darcy-Weisbach/Lindner's equations developed for flow-through-vegetation analysis in open channel flow.

  8. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  9. Geodiversity of Georgia: valorization of geotouristic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Georgia, as a country with a high geodiversity, boasts an infinite variety of landscapes, wealth of geological formations and surface water systems. These attributes have a significant influence on the development of geo-touristic potential. The prevalence of geotourism can positively improve the situation in the country. Unfortunately, many interesting places are not sufficiently well utilized, which makes them difficult to access. There is also a failure to provide or disseminate information about these places to visitors. Various sources describe numerous locations, but none of them carry a full inventory or database of categorized objects. Inventory based on studies and field work helped to create categorized geosites in Georgia (including the occupied territories). Evidential cards with detailed descriptions were prepared for every cataloged object. Categorized geosites were used to carry out a valorisation of geotouristic objects and geodiversity evaluation by QGIS and ArcGIS. Valorization of geotouristic potential determined two regions with an exceptionally huge attractiveness and geodiversity on a national scale. Results of the evaluation and valorisation were visualised and presented as an application in ArcGIS Online platform.

  10. Simulation of flood hydrographs for Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The O'Donnell method was used to compute unit hydrographs and lagtimes for 355 floods at 80 gaging stations in Georgia. An average unit hydrograph and an average lagtime were computed for each station. These average unit hydrographs were transformed to unit hydrographs having durations of one-fourth, one-third, one-half, and three-fourths lagtime, then reduced to dimensionless terms by dividing the time by lagtime and the discharge by peak discharge. Hydrographs were simulated for these 355 floods and their widths compared with the widths of the observed hydrographs at 50% and 75% of peak flow. The dimensionless hydrograph based on one-half lagtime duration provided the best fit of the observed data. Multiple-regression analysis was used to define relations between lagtime and certain physical basin characteristics. Drainage area and slope were significant for the rural stream equations and drainage area, slope, and impervious area were significant for the Atlanta urban-stream equation. A hydrograph can be simulated from the dimensionless hydrograph, the peak discharge of a specific recurrence interval, and the lagtime obtained from regression equations for any site with a < 500 sq mi drainage area in Georgia. For simulating hydrographs at sites with basins > 500 sq mi, the USGS computer model CONROUT can be used. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Ground-water data for Georgia, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, J.S.; Longsworth, S.A.; Joiner, C.N.; Peck, M.F.; McFadden, K.W.; Milby, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous water level records from 152 wells and water level measurements from an additional 750 wells in Georgia during 1986 provide the basic data for this report. Hydrographs for selected wells illustrate the effects that changes in recharge and discharge have had on the groundwater reservoirs in the State. Daily mean water levels are shown in hydrographs for 1986. Monthly mean water levels are shown for the 10-yr period 1977-86. During 1986, a prolonged drought resulted in water level declines throughout the State. Annual mean water levels were from 2.7 ft higher to 17.3 ft lower than in 1985, and record lows were measured in 33 wells in the summer and fall. The 1986 lows were from 0.02 ft to 29.2 ft lower than the previous record lows. The largest declines were measured in the Clayton aquifer in the southwestern part of the State. The declines can be attributed to reduced recharge and increased pumping that resulted from below-normal precipitation during the first half of the year. Water quality samples are collected periodically throughout Georgia and analyzed as part of areal and regional groundwater studies. Periodic monitoring of water quality in the Savannah and Brunswick areas indicates that the chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan aquifer there generally has remained stable. (USGS)

  12. Georgia Supreme Court invalidates involuntary sterilization statute.

    PubMed

    Harper, T D

    1983-11-01

    In the US, the concept of eugenics has been limited to restrictions on the reproductive capabilities of criminals and the mentally defective. Moreover, the rights of persons subject to this restriction have been enhanced by recent judicial recognition of procreation as a fundamental right. Constitutional challenges have been mounted on the grounds that sterilization statutes constitute cruel or unusual punishment, a violation of the Equal Protection clause, an unlawful delegation of legislative or judicial powers, a bill of attainder, or a violation of the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These challenges have resulted in a reduction in the number of state-mandated sterilizations. This paper reviews the Georgia Supreme Court's recent invalidation of a 1970 statute authorizing the sterilization of mentally incompetent persons (O.C.G.A. 31-20-3). Motes v. Hall County Department of Family and Children Services, filed on behalf of a 21-year old retarded woman, challenged the statute as a violation of Motes' constitutional rights to due process and equal protection and contended that the state was required to prove the necessity of sterilization by more than a simple preponderance of the evidence. The Georgia Supreme Court negated both the sterilization order and the statute upon which it was based. In its decision, the Court recognized that an intrusion upon so fundamental a right as the ability to bear children requires proof by the state of at least "clear and convincing evidence" of the necessity of such an act.

  13. Bugaboo Fire Rages in Georgia and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Subtropical Storm Andrea apparently did little to quench numerous large wildfires burning in the U.S. Southeast in early May 2007. On May 11, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Terra satellite captured this image, the remnants of the storm had dwindled to a small ball of clouds in the Atlantic Ocean, and huge plumes of smoke snaked across Georgia, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico. Areas where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. A huge fire is burning in and near the Okefenokee Swamp, which straddles the state line between Georgia and Florida. For logistical purposes, fire officials are calling the part of the fire in Florida the Florida Bugaboo Fire and the part in Georgia the Bugaboo Scrub Fire. The distinction is simply administrative, however; in reality, it is single, continuous swath of burning timber, swamp land, grass, and scrubland. The blaze was more than 133,000 thousand acres as of May 11, and it appeared to be spreading on virtually all perimeters at the time of the image, with active fire locations detected in a circle that surrounds an already burned (or partially burned) area. According to reports form the Southern Area Coordination Center, the fire grew by at least 20,000 acres on May 10. Numerous communities were threatened and hundreds of people were evacuated, while parts of Interstate 10 were closed to all but emergency vehicles. To the northeast of the Bugaboo Fire, other large wildfires were burning in Georgia as well. The Floyds Prairie Fire, to the immediate north, was threatening endangered species and their habitat, while farther north the 116,000-plus-acre Sweat Farm Road/Big Turnaround Complex Fire was still burning in the area south of the city of Waycross, nearly a month after the fires first started in mid-April. Southern Georgia and Florida are in the grip of moderate to extreme drought. The state line area where the Bugaboo Fire is burning is one of the areas in extreme drought. The

  14. Bugaboo Fire Rages in Georgia and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Subtropical Storm Andrea apparently did little to quench numerous large wildfires burning in the U.S. Southeast in early May 2007. On May 11, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Terra satellite captured this image, the remnants of the storm had dwindled to a small ball of clouds in the Atlantic Ocean, and huge plumes of smoke snaked across Georgia, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico. Areas where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. A huge fire is burning in and near the Okefenokee Swamp, which straddles the state line between Georgia and Florida. For logistical purposes, fire officials are calling the part of the fire in Florida the Florida Bugaboo Fire and the part in Georgia the Bugaboo Scrub Fire. The distinction is simply administrative, however; in reality, it is single, continuous swath of burning timber, swamp land, grass, and scrubland. The blaze was more than 133,000 thousand acres as of May 11, and it appeared to be spreading on virtually all perimeters at the time of the image, with active fire locations detected in a circle that surrounds an already burned (or partially burned) area. According to reports form the Southern Area Coordination Center, the fire grew by at least 20,000 acres on May 10. Numerous communities were threatened and hundreds of people were evacuated, while parts of Interstate 10 were closed to all but emergency vehicles. To the northeast of the Bugaboo Fire, other large wildfires were burning in Georgia as well. The Floyds Prairie Fire, to the immediate north, was threatening endangered species and their habitat, while farther north the 116,000-plus-acre Sweat Farm Road/Big Turnaround Complex Fire was still burning in the area south of the city of Waycross, nearly a month after the fires first started in mid-April. Southern Georgia and Florida are in the grip of moderate to extreme drought. The state line area where the Bugaboo Fire is burning is one of the areas in extreme drought. The

  15. Major advance of South Georgia glaciers during the Antarctic Cold Reversal following extensive sub-Antarctic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Alastair G. C.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Meisel, Ove; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Ehrmann, Werner; Wacker, Lukas; Wintersteller, Paul; Dos Santos Ferreira, Christian; Römer, Miriam; White, Duanne; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    The history of glaciations on Southern Hemisphere sub-polar islands is unclear. Debate surrounds the extent and timing of the last glacial advance and termination on sub-Antarctic South Georgia in particular. Here, using sea-floor geophysical data and marine sediment cores, we resolve the record of glaciation offshore of South Georgia through the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene. We show a sea-bed landform imprint of a shelf-wide last glacial advance and progressive deglaciation. Renewed glacier resurgence in the fjords between c. 15,170 and 13,340 yr ago coincided with a period of cooler, wetter climate known as the Antarctic Cold Reversal, revealing a cryospheric response to an Antarctic climate pattern extending into the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. We conclude that the last glaciation of South Georgia was extensive, and the sensitivity of its glaciers to climate variability during the last termination more significant than implied by previous studies.

  16. Major advance of South Georgia glaciers during the Antarctic Cold Reversal following extensive sub-Antarctic glaciation

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Alastair G. C.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Meisel, Ove; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Ehrmann, Werner; Wacker, Lukas; Wintersteller, Paul; dos Santos Ferreira, Christian; Römer, Miriam; White, Duanne; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    The history of glaciations on Southern Hemisphere sub-polar islands is unclear. Debate surrounds the extent and timing of the last glacial advance and termination on sub-Antarctic South Georgia in particular. Here, using sea-floor geophysical data and marine sediment cores, we resolve the record of glaciation offshore of South Georgia through the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene. We show a sea-bed landform imprint of a shelf-wide last glacial advance and progressive deglaciation. Renewed glacier resurgence in the fjords between c. 15,170 and 13,340 yr ago coincided with a period of cooler, wetter climate known as the Antarctic Cold Reversal, revealing a cryospheric response to an Antarctic climate pattern extending into the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. We conclude that the last glaciation of South Georgia was extensive, and the sensitivity of its glaciers to climate variability during the last termination more significant than implied by previous studies. PMID:28303885

  17. Major advance of South Georgia glaciers during the Antarctic Cold Reversal following extensive sub-Antarctic glaciation.

    PubMed

    Graham, Alastair G C; Kuhn, Gerhard; Meisel, Ove; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A; Ehrmann, Werner; Wacker, Lukas; Wintersteller, Paul; Dos Santos Ferreira, Christian; Römer, Miriam; White, Duanne; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-03-17

    The history of glaciations on Southern Hemisphere sub-polar islands is unclear. Debate surrounds the extent and timing of the last glacial advance and termination on sub-Antarctic South Georgia in particular. Here, using sea-floor geophysical data and marine sediment cores, we resolve the record of glaciation offshore of South Georgia through the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene. We show a sea-bed landform imprint of a shelf-wide last glacial advance and progressive deglaciation. Renewed glacier resurgence in the fjords between c. 15,170 and 13,340 yr ago coincided with a period of cooler, wetter climate known as the Antarctic Cold Reversal, revealing a cryospheric response to an Antarctic climate pattern extending into the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. We conclude that the last glaciation of South Georgia was extensive, and the sensitivity of its glaciers to climate variability during the last termination more significant than implied by previous studies.

  18. A Remote Sensing Approach for Urban Environmental Decision-Making: An Atlanta, Georgia Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Howell, Burgess F.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Unquestionably, urbanization causes tremendous changes in land cover and land use, as well as impacting a host of environmental characteristics. For example, unlike natural surfaces, urban surfaces have very different thermal energy properties whereby they store solar energy throughout the day and continue to release it as heat well after sunset. This effect, known as the 'Urban Heat Island', serves as a catalyst for chemical reactions from vehicular exhaust and industrial activities leading to the deterioration in air quality, especially exacerbating the production of ground level ozone. 'Cool Community' strategies that utilize remote sensing data, are now being implemented as a way to reduce the impacts of the urban heat island and its subsequent environmental impacts. This presentation focuses on how remote sensing data have been used to provide descriptive and quantitative data for characterizing the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area - particularly for measuring surface energy fluxes, such as the thermal or "heat" energy that emanates from different land cover types across the Atlanta urban landscape. In turn, this information is useful for developing a better understanding of how the thermal characteristics of the city surface affect the urban heat island phenomena and, ultimately, air quality and other environmental parameters over the Atlanta metropolitan region. Additionally, this paper also provides insight on how remote sensing, with its synoptic approach, can be used to provide urban planners, local, state, and federal government officials, and other decision-makers, as well as the general public, with information to better manage urban areas as sustainable environments.

  19. COHUTTA WILDERNESS, GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE AND HEMP TOP ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gair, Jacob E.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    A survey has found little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral-resources in the Cohutta Wilderness and the adjacent Hemp Top Roadless Area. The Cohutta Wilderness is located mainly in northern Georgia and extends a small distance into southeastern Tennessee; the Hemp Top Roadless Area borders part of the Cohutta Wilderness on the east and extends southward from the Georgia-Tennessee line. The study area is underlain by slightly metamorphosed folded and faulted sedimentary rocks of late Precambrian age. Detailed sampling in the vicinity of the known gold-bearing and tin-bearing samples might outline small areas of low-grade mineralization. The sedimentary rocks which are buried many thousands of feet beneath the surface of the Cohutta area have an unknown potential for oil and gas - probably gas at the inferred depth of burial and temperatures implicit at such depth. This potential could only be verified by a program of deep drilling.

  20. Mapping southern Atlantic coastal marshland, South Carolina-Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (Principal Investigator); Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Southeastern coastal marshes are among the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Ground based and low altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's ERTS-1 has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test site selected was an area from the South Carolina border to Saint Catherine's Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS-1 imagery: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities such as Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, Juncus roemerianus; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS-1 will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  1. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  2. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  3. Diomede Islands, Bering Straight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-30

    The Diomede Islands consisting of the western island Big Diomede, and the eastern island Little Diomede are two rocky islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska. This image was acquired by NASA Terra satellite.

  4. Isolation and transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete from the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J H; Chandler, F W; Luttrell, M P; James, A M; Stallknecht, D E; McGuire, B S; Hutcheson, H J; Cummins, G A; Lane, R S

    1993-08-01

    The isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) from the southeastern United States is reported. Three isolates, two from cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) and one from the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), were recovered from Sapelo Island, Georgia, in July and September 1991. The spirochetes were characterized by indirect fluorescent antibody assay using a battery of five monoclonal antibodies, by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) of whole cell lysates, and by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using primers for three DNA target sequences found in B. burgdorferi reference strain B-31. Transmission experiments indicate that the three Georgia isolates can infect experimentally inoculated hamsters and mice. Tick transmission of one of the isolates has been attempted so far; I. scapularis transmitted isolate SI-1 from hamsters to mice, but the lone-star tick, Amblyomma americanum, did not.

  5. Bahama Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-09

    STS006-45-097 (4-9 April 1983) --- This photograph was taken with a handheld 70mm camera aimed through the “ceiling” windows of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger during its five-day STS-6 mission. A beautiful photo shows the contrast between the islands, clouds, shallow water and deep water. Islands of the Bahamas seen are New Providence (upper left) and Eleuthera (right). Northeast Providence Channel is at the upper edge and Exuma Sound is at the lower left with the open Atlantic along the right edge. The wind, from the south, causes a long cloud to develop downwind from Eleuthera Point. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Georgia-Armenia Transboarder seismicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoladze, T.; Tvaradze, N.; Javakishvili, Z.; Elashvili, M.; Durgaryan, R.; Arakelyan, A.; Gevorgyan, M.

    2012-12-01

    In the presented study we performed Comprehensive seismic analyses for the Armenian-Georgian transboarder active seismic fault starting on Armenian territory, cutting the state boarder and having possibly northern termination on Adjara-Triealeti frontal structure in Georgia. In the scope of International projects: ISTC A-1418 "Open network of scientific Centers for mitigation risk of natural hazards in the Southern Caucasus and Central Asia" and NATO SfP- 983284 Project "Caucasus Seismic Emergency Response" in Akhalkalaki (Georgia) seismic center, Regional Summer school trainings and intensive filed investigations were conducted. Main goal was multidisciplinary study of the Javakheti fault structure and better understanding seismicity of the area. Young scientists from Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia were participated in the deployment of temporal seismic network in order to monitor seisimity on the Javakheti highland and particularly delineate fault scarf and identify active seismic structures. In the scope of international collaboration the common seismic database has been created in the southern Caucasus and collected data from the field works is available now online. Javakheti highland, which is located in the central part of the Caucasus, belongs to the structure of the lesser Caucasus and represents a history of neotectonic volcanism existed in the area. Jasvakheti highland is seismicalu active region devastating from several severe earthquakes(1088, 1283, 1899…). Hypocenters located during analogue network were highly scattered and did not describe real pattern of seismicity of the highland. We relocated hypocenters of the region and improved local velocity model. The hypocenters derived from recently deployed local seismic network in the Javakheti highland, clearly identified seismically active structures. Fault plane solutions of analogue data of the Soviet times have been carefully analyzed and examined. Moment tensor inversion were preformed

  7. U.S. Hydropower Resource Assessment - Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Conner; B. N. Rinehart; J. E. Francfort

    1998-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. For this purpose, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory developed a computer model called Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES). HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Georgia.

  8. OVERFLOW ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Davis, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    The Overflow Roadless Area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Georgia and North Carolina is underlain by complexly folded schist and gneiss of Proterozoic age. A mineral-resource survey found little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Minor isolated localities of mica pegmatite and amethyst gemstone occur in the area. Gneiss and schist suitable for rock aggregate are present in large quantities, but similar rocks abound outside the area. Natural gas may possibly be present at great depth beneath the overthrust of the Blue Ridge. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the natural gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  9. Low-flow frequency of Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, R.F.; Putnam, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of low-flow data and tabulation of computed low-flow frequency are presented for all stream sites in Georgia where suitable flow records have been collected. These include 147 continuous-record gaging stations and 102 partial-record gaging stations. Frequency records for gaging stations with short records have been adjusted where possible so as to more nearly represent results that would have been obtained from longer records. Areal variations in low-flow characteristics are indicated and the relationship of these characteristics to geology are discussed. Streamflow (per square mile of drainage area) during dry weather periods is generally greatest in the Blue Ridge province in the northern part of the State and in the upper zone of the Coastal Plain below the Fall Line. It is generally smallest in the lower zone of the Coastal Plain. Low streamflow in the Valley and Ridge and the Piedmont provinces is generally in an intermediate range. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Stream-temperature characteristics in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyar, T.R.; Alhadeff, S. Jack

    1997-01-01

    Stream-temperature measurements for 198 periodic and 22 daily record stations were analyzed using a harmonic curve-fitting procedure. Statistics of data from 78 selected stations were used to compute a statewide stream-temperature harmonic equation, derived using latitude, drainage area, and altitude for natural streams having drainage areas greater than about 40 square miles. Based on the 1955-84 reference period, the equation may be used to compute long-term natural harmonic stream-temperature coefficients to within an on average of about 0.4? C. Basin-by-basin summaries of observed long-term stream-temperature characteristics are included for selected stations and river reaches, particularly along Georgia's mainstem streams. Changes in the stream- temperature regimen caused by the effects of development, principally impoundments and thermal power plants, are shown by comparing harmonic curves and coefficients from the estimated natural values to the observed modified-condition values.

  11. Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-05

    STS062-85-147 (4-18 March 1994) --- Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. Atlanta is the cultural, industrial, transportation, financial and commercial center of the South. It has one of the busies air traffic hubs in the United States. A major aircraft assembly plant is located north of Atlanta in Marietta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

  12. Anatahan Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... Sea plate creates a series of island arc volcanoes and the Earth's deepest ocean trench. Anatahan had no known historical eruptions ... bomber, lies on the north side edge of the craters flat lands. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion ...

  13. Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) image of five Hawaiian Islands was acquired by the instrument's vertical- viewing (nadir) camera on June 3, 2000. The image shows the islands of Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and Kahoolawe. The prevailing Pacific trade winds bring higher levels of rainfall to the eastern slopes of the islands, leading to a greater abundance of vegetation on the windward coasts. The small change in observation angle across the nadir camera's field-of- view causes the right-hand portion of the image to be more affected by Sun glint, making the ocean surface appear brighter. Oahu is the westernmost of the islands seen in this image. Waikiki Beach and the city of Honolulu are located on the southern shore, to the west of Diamond Head caldera. MISR is one of several Earth-observing instruments on the Terra satellite, launched in December 1999. The Terra spacecraft, the flagship of a fleet of satellites dedicated to understanding our global environment, is part of NASA's Earth Sciences Enterprise, a long-term research program dedicated to understanding how human-induced and natural changes affect our world. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/JPL, MISR Team

  14. Simulation of flood hydrographs for Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, Ernest J.

    1987-01-01

    Flood hydrographs are needed for the design of many highway drainage structures and embankments. A method for simulating these flood hydrographs at ungaged sites in Georgia is presented in this report. The O'Donnell method was used to compute unit hydrographs and lagtimes for 355 floods at 80 gaging stations. An average unit hydrograph and an average lagtime were computed for each station. These average unit hydrographs were transformed to unit hydrographs having durations of one-fourth, one-third, one-half, and three-fourths lagtime, then reduced to dimensionless terms by dividing the time by lagtime and the discharge by peak discharge. Hydrographs were simulated for these 355 floods and their widths were compared with the widths of the observed hydrographs at 50 and 75 percent of peak flow. The dimensionless hydrograph based on one-half lagtime duration provided the best fit of the observed data. Multiple regression analysis was then used to define relations between lagtime and certain physical basin characteristics; of these characteristics, drainage area and slope were found to be significant for the rural-stream equations and drainage area, slope, and impervious area were found to be significant for the Atlanta urban-stream equation. A hydrograph can be simulated from the dimensionless hydrograph, the peak discharge of a specific recurrence interval, and the lagtime obtained from regression equations for any site in Georgia having a drainage area of less than 500 square miles. For simulating hydrographs at sites having basins larger than 500 square miles, the U.S. Geological Survey computer model CONROUT can be used. This model routes streamflow from an upstream channel location to a user-defined location downstream. The product of CONROUT is a simulated discharge hydrograph for the downstream site that has a peak discharge of a specific recurrence interval.

  15. Seismicity map of the state of Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, B. Glen; Stover, C.W.; Algermissen, S.T.; Long, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one of a series of seismicity maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey that show earthquake data of individual states or groups of states at the scale of 1:1,000,000. This maps shows only those earthquakes with epicenters located within the boundaries of Georgia, even though earthquakes in nearby states or countries may have been felt or may have cause damage in Georgia. The data in table 1 were used to compile the seismicity map; these data are a corrected, expanded, and updated (through 1987) version of the data used by Algermissen (1969) for a study of seismic risk in the United States. The locations and intensities of some earthquakes were revised and intensities were assigned where none had been before. Many earthquakes were added to the original list from new data sources as well as from some old data sources that has not been previously used. The data in table 1 represent best estimates of the location of the epicenter, magnitude, and intensity of each earthquake on the basis of historical and current information. Some of the aftershocks from large earthquakes are listed, but not all, especially for earthquakes that occurred before seismic instruments were universally used. The latitude and longitude coordinates of each epicenter were rounded to the nearest tenth of a degree and sorted so that all identical locations were grouped and counted. These locations are represented on the map by a triangle. The number of earthquakes at each location is shown on the map by the Arabic number to the right of the triangle. A Roman numeral to the left of a triangle is the maximum Modified Mercoili intensity (Wood and Neumann, 1931) of all earthquakes at that geographic location, The absence of an intensity value indicates that no intensities have been assigned to earthquakes at that location. The year shown below each triangle is the latest year for which the maximum intensity was recorded.

  16. Substance abuse among adolescents in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Phagava, H; Bakashvili, I; Chanturishvili, T; Abashidze, G; Pagava, K

    2006-05-01

    To estimate the substance abuse and thus assess the basic indicators of health risk behavior of the adolescents in Georgia: frequencies of their tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was adapted from the Swiss Survey (SMASH2002), translated into Georgian and other languages mainly used in schools (Russian, Armenian and Azeri). It contained 87 questions. Two-stage cluster sampling was devised. Weight was adjusted. A total of 599 classes were selected. Field work took place in 2004. All questionnaires (n=9499; 56,8% filled out by girls, 39,6% - by boys; the mean age was 15,5+/-1,1 years) before being processed into the Epidata were edited. The final data were analysed by SPSS 11.0. 10,4% of adolescents have reported to smoke. The average age of starting to smoke is 13,4 years. 61,2% girls and 67.8% boys drink vine. 56,7% out of the total number of respondents claimed to have been never drunk, 30,0% - answered positively. 2,3% said that they had intravenous drug injection. The drug of preference is cannabis - 6,8%. 72,2% of those who have had intravenous drug injections answered positively to the question "Have you ever been really drunk?" Performed survey is a first one done among adolescents in Georgia. It gave us basic information for planning and implementation of necessary measures in order to improve the health of adolescents and raise awareness of professionals involved in health care and prevention settings for adolescents.

  17. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there...

  18. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there...

  19. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there...

  20. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there...

  1. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there...

  2. 8. VIEW FROM TECHWOOD DRIVE LOOKING NORTH TOWARD GEORGIA TECH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW FROM TECHWOOD DRIVE LOOKING NORTH TOWARD GEORGIA TECH DORMITORY, 581-587 TECHWOOD DRIVE. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  3. CHE At Georgia Tech: A Period of Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlein, Gary W.

    1980-01-01

    Presents information on the Georgia Institute of Technology. This information includes: (1) a brief history of the institute; (2) names of the faculty members of the chemistry and metallurgy divisions; (3) undergraduate program; and (4) graduate program. (HM)

  4. Adult Education in Savannah, Georgia 1765-1789

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1973-01-01

    Advertisements in Savannah, Georgia, newspapers from 1765 through 1789 offered adults leisure-related topics for learning such as drawing, language, music and self-defense through private venture schools. (DS)

  5. CHE At Georgia Tech: A Period of Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlein, Gary W.

    1980-01-01

    Presents information on the Georgia Institute of Technology. This information includes: (1) a brief history of the institute; (2) names of the faculty members of the chemistry and metallurgy divisions; (3) undergraduate program; and (4) graduate program. (HM)

  6. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes in Georgia that are potential biomass energy sources.

  7. View east of brick railroad viaduct central of Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east of brick railroad viaduct - central of Georgia - spannin canal prism (now used as pedestrian walk) - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes in Georgia that are potential biomass energy sources.

  9. 230. Photocopy of Bird's Eye View of Savannah from Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    230. Photocopy of Bird's Eye View of Savannah from Georgia Historical Society Augustus Koch, Publisher, Savannah 1891 DETAIL - Savannah Victorian Historic District, Bounded by Gwinnett, East Broad, West Broad Street & Anderson Lane, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  10. Adult Education in Savannah, Georgia 1765-1789

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1973-01-01

    Advertisements in Savannah, Georgia, newspapers from 1765 through 1789 offered adults leisure-related topics for learning such as drawing, language, music and self-defense through private venture schools. (DS)

  11. 229. Photocopy of Bird's Eye View of Savannah from Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    229. Photocopy of Bird's Eye View of Savannah from Georgia Historical Society A. Ruger, Publisher, St. Louis 1871 DETAIL - Savannah Victorian Historic District, Bounded by Gwinnett, East Broad, West Broad Street & Anderson Lane, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. 5. Locomotive bays on S elevation. Central of Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Locomotive bays on S elevation. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Paint & Coach Barn, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. 6. Sawtooth skylights on roof. Central of Georgia Railway, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Sawtooth skylights on roof. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Paint & Coach Barn, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  14. View looking SE inside Electrical Shop Central of Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking SE inside Electrical Shop - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Electrical Shop, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  15. Featured Partner: Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Group as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability by improving its transportation efficiency and environmental performance in reducing fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions caused by in

  16. An Economic Valuation of Biotic Pollination Services in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Barfield, Ashley S; Bergstrom, John C; Ferreira, Susana; Covich, Alan P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2015-04-01

    As agriculture faces documented decline in bees and other insect pollinators, empirical assessments of potential economic losses are critical for contextualizing the impacts of this decline and for prioritizing research needs. For the state of Georgia, we show that the annual economic value of biotic pollinators is substantial--US$367 million, equivalent to 13 percent of the total production value of crops studied and 3 percent of the total production value of Georgia's agricultural sector. Our unique Geographic Information Systems analysis reveals an irregular pattern of vulnerability. While the Georgia counties displaying the highest economic values of pollination are clustered in southern Georgia, those with the highest dependency on pollinators in terms of their contribution to crop production value are more dispersed throughout the state. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A Cultural Resource Survey of Springfield Canal, Chatham County, Georgia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-17

    tools and remains of Pleistocene fauna in direct association, but such sites must surely exist. "’ Occasional Paleo -Indian projectile points are found...prehistoric diet , died off by 7,000 to 9,000 years ago. Deer, * 50,’. :-.’. small mammals and reptiles, and perhaps fish, would have been the main...The University of Georgia Press, Athens. 1968d Paleo -Indian remains in Georgia and South Carolina. In The Waring Papers, edited by S. Williams, pp

  18. Streamlined Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  19. Classifying Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (<20 years) transient islands are not included. The principal aim of the classification is to assess the spatial diversity of the geologic and geomorphic attributes of Pacific islands. It is intended to be valid at a regional scale and based on two attributes: five types of lithology (volcanic, limestone, composite, continental, surficial) and a distinction between high and low islands. These attributes yielded eight island types: volcanic high and low islands; limestone high and low islands; composite high and low islands; reef (including all unconsolidated) islands; and continental islands. Most common are reef islands (36 %) and volcanic high islands (31 %), whereas the least common are composite low islands (1 %). Continental islands, 18 of the 1779 islands examined, are not included in maps showing the distribution of island attributes and types. Rationale for the spatial distributions of the various island attributes is drawn from the available literature and canvassed in the text. With exception of the few continental islands, the distribution of island types is broadly interpretable from the proximity of island-forming processes. It is anticipated the classification will become the basis for more focused investigation of spatial variability of the climate and ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as

  20. Water quality in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain, Georgia and Florida, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berndt, Marian P.; Hatzell, Hilda H.; Crandall, Christy A.; Turtora, Michael; Pittman, John R.; Oaksford, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to summarize major findings that emerged between 1992 and 1995 from the water-quality assessment of the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Study Unit and to relate these findings to water-quality issues of regional and national concern. The information is primarily intended for those who are involved in water-resource management. Yet, the information contained here may also interest those who simply wish to know more about the quality of water in the rivers and aquifers in the area where they live.

  1. Groundwater conditions in Georgia, 2012–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2016-12-07

    The U.S. Geological Survey collects groundwater data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define groundwater resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. In Georgia, water levels were monitored continuously at 181 wells during calendar year 2012, 185 wells during calendar year 2013, and at 171 wells during calendar year 2014. Because of missing data or short periods of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 164 wells are discussed in this report. These wells include 17 in the surficial aquifer system, 18 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 68 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 15 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 16 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 6 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the well network indicate that water levels generally rose during the 2012 through 2014 calendar-year period, with water levels rising in 151 wells, declining in 12, and remained about the same in 1. Water levels declined over the long-term period of record at 94 wells, increased at 60 wells, and remained relatively constant at 10 wells.In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in the following areas in Georgia: the Brunswick-Glynn County area during August 2012 and October 2014 and in the Albany-Dougherty County area during November 2012 and November 2014. Periodic water-level measurements were also collected and used to construct potentiometric surface maps for the Cretaceous aquifer system in the Augusta-Richmond County area during August 2012 and July 2014. In general, water levels in these areas were higher during 2014 than during 2012; however, the configuration of the potetiometric surface in each of

  2. Seismoactive Structures Of Georgia: Map And Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamia, S. A.; Sadradze, N.; Lursmanashvili, N.; Gventsadze, A.; Chelidze, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    The southern Caucasus is an earthquake prone region where devastating earthquakes have repeatedly caused significant loss of lives, infrastructure and buildings. Two large devastating earthquakes occurred in the region in the last 20 - 25 years. The first one was the magnitude 6.9 Spitak Earthquake on December 7, 1988 whose epicenter located within the Lesser Caucasus - Northern Armenia near the Georgian border. The earthquake became widely known due to the immense losses it caused - no less than 25 000 people were killed, some 500 000 left homeless. Another large seismic event was the magnitude 7.2 Racha earthquake on April 29, 1991.This earthquake was the strongest one ever recorded in Georgia.The earthquake took about a hundred human lives and caused a great damage and destruction within densely populated areas. High geodynamic activity of the region expressed in both seismic and aseismic deformations, is conditioned by the still-ongoing convergence of lithospheric plates and northward propagation of the Africa-Arabian continental block at a rate of several cm/year. Considerable shortening of the Earth's crust has been realized in the region through different ways: (1) crustal deformation with wide development of compressional structures - folds, thrusts; (2) warping and displacement of crustal blocks with their uplifting, subsidence, underthrusting (a process sometimes referred to as "continental subduction") and (3) lateral escaping. Seismoactive structures of Georgia are identified mainly on the basis of the correlation between neotectonic structures of the region and earthquakes .The geometry of tectonic structures and morphology is largely determined by the wedge-shaped rigid Arabian block intensively indented into the Minor Asian-Caucasian region. All structural-morphological lines have a clearly expressed arcuate northward-convex configuration reflecting the contours of the Arabian block. However, farther north, the geometry of the fold-thrust belts is

  3. Abiotic Nitrous Oxide Production in Natural and Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, H.; Stanton, C. L.; Cavazos, A. R.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean contributes approximately one third of global sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. While nitrification is thought to be the dominant pathway for marine N2O production, mechanisms remain unresolved. Previous studies have carried the implicit assumption that marine N2O originates directly from enzymatic sources. However, abiotic production of N2O is possible via chemical reactions between nitrogenous intermediates and redox active trace metals in seawater. In this study, we investigated N2O production and isotopic composition in treatments with and without added hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitric oxide (NO), intermediates in microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and Fe(III). Addition of substrates to sterile artificial seawater was compared with filtered and unfiltered seawater from Sapelo Island, coastal Georgia, USA. N2O production was observed immediately after addition of Fe(III) in the presence of NH2OH at pH 8 in sterile artificial seawater. Highest N2O production was observed in the presence of Fe(III), NO, and NH2OH. The isotopomer site preference of abiotically produced N2O was consistent with previous studies (31 ± 2 ‰). Higher abiotic N2O production was observed in sterile artificial seawater (salinity: 35 ppt) than filtered Sapelo Island seawater (salinity: 25 ppt) whereas diluted sterile artificial seawater (18 ppt) showed lowest N2O production, suggesting that higher salinity promotes enhanced abiotic N2O production. Addition of Fe(III) to unfiltered Sapelo Island seawater stimulated N2O production. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which lack known N2O producing enzymes, in Sapelo Island seawater was confirmed by successful amplification of the archaeal amoA gene, whereas ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which contain N2O-producing enzymes were undetected. Given the few Fe-containing proteins present in AOA, it is likely that Fe(III) addition promoted N2O production via an abiotic vs. enzymatic N2O mechanism

  4. Intestinal parasites of the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) from eight populations in Georgia.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jessica L; Miller, Elizabeth A; Norton, Terry M; Raphael, Bonnie L; Spratt, Jeffrey S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), one of five tortoise species endemic in the USA, was recently classified as a candidate for federal listing as a threatened species. Fecal samples collected from 117 tortoises from eight sites in Georgia were examined for endoparasites using a combination of sedimentation and flotation. Samples from an island population were examined for parasitic oocysts and ova only by flotation, protozoan cysts by trichrome-stained direct smear, and Cryptosporidium by direct immunofluorescence assay and ProSpecT rapid assay. A total of 99 tortoises (85, range 0-100%) was infected with pinworms (Alaeuris spp.), 47 (40, 0-86%) with cestodes (Oochorstica sp.), 34 (41, 0-74%) with Chapiniella spp., 2 (3, 0-33%) with Eimeria paynei, and a single tortoise each with a capillarid and ascarid (1%). On the island, Entamoeba was detected in one tortoise (2%) while Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in eight (17%). In conclusion, at least eight species of parasites were detected including Cryptosporidium, a possible pathogen of tortoises. Interestingly, we detected spatial variation in the distribution of several parasites among populations suggesting additional work should be conducted across a gradient of tortoise densities, land use, and habitat characteristics.

  5. 77 FR 34037 - Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System of Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Energy, 1166 Athens Tech Road, Elberton, Georgia 30635-6711. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Virgil G... Administration, Department of Energy, 1166 Athens Tech Road, Elberton, Georgia, 30635-6711...

  6. 78 FR 44119 - Circle Environmental #1 Superfund Site; Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Environmental 1 Superfund Site located in Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia. The settlement addresses cost... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Circle Environmental 1 Superfund Site; Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia; Notice of Settlement...

  7. 78 FR 2878 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: New Source Review-Prevention of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...--Prevention of Significant Deterioration AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule..., 2013, to approve changes to the Georgia State Implementation Plan (SIP) New Source Review Prevention of... ``Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: New Source Review-- Prevention of...

  8. Hydrogeology, water quality, and water-supply potential of the Lower Floridan Aquifer, coastal Georgia, 1999-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Harrelson, Larry G.; Conlon, Kevin J.; Petkewich, Matthew D.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the upper permeable and Fernandina permeable zones of the Lower Floridan aquifer were studied at seven sites in the 24-county study area encompassed by the Georgia Coastal Sound Science Initiative. Although substantially less than the Upper Floridan aquifer in coastal Georgia, transmissivities for the Lower Floridan aquifer are in the same range as other water-supply aquifers in Georgia and South Carolina and could meet the needs of public drinking-water supply. Water of the upper permeable zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer exceeds the Federal secondary drinking-water standards for sulfate and total dissolved solids at most coastal Georgia sites and the Federal secondary drinking-water standard for chloride at the Shellman Bluff site. The top of the Lower Floridan aquifer correlates within 50 feet of the previously reported top, except at the St Simons Island site where the top is more than 80 feet higher. Based on the hydrogeologic characteristics, the seven sites are divided into the northern sites at Shellman Bluff, Richmond Hill, Pembroke, and Pineora; and southern sites at St Marys, Brunswick, and St Simons Island. At the northern sites, the Lower Floridan aquifer does not include the Fernandina permeable zone, is thinner than the overlying Upper Floridan aquifer, and consists of only strata of the middle Eocene Avon Park Formation. Transmissivities in the Lower Floridan aquifer are 8,300 feet squared per day at Richmond Hill and 6,000 feet squared per day at Shellman Bluff, generally one tenth the transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer at these sites. At the southern sites, the upper permeable zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer is thicker than the Upper Floridan aquifer and consists of porous limestone and dolomite interbedded with nonporous strata of the middle Eocene Avon Park and early Eocene Oldsmar Formations. Transmissivities for the upper permeable zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer are 500 feet squared per

  9. Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

  10. Geology of the Albany West quadrangle, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wait, Robert L.

    1962-01-01

    The Albany West Quadrangle is near the east edge of the Dougherty Plain of southwestern Georgia, an area of karst topography. The Ocala limestone (uppoer Eocene) underlies the quadrangle and crops out along the Flint River and its tributaries and sinkholes. Sinkholes of two ages are developed in the limestone. A gravelly argillaceous sand of Pliocene(?) age is exposed in ditches near the Flint River and in a sinkhole in the western part of the quadrangle. Reddish brown, argillaceous, older Pleistocene sand, believed to be part of a marine terrace deposit above altitude 160 feet, overlies the Pliocene(?) and is exposed in a sinkhole. River terraces are present along the Flint River at altitudes of 175 and 200 feet. Accumulations of dune sand east of the Flint River are believed to have been derived from the earliest river-terrace deposit. The quadrangle is covered by a mixture of reddish-brown, argillaceous, older Pleistocene sand, and residuum containing siliceous boulders from the Ocala limestone, which has been mapped as residuum.

  11. Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

  12. Tectonic architecture of central Georgia Eastern Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, H.D. Jr.; Brueggemann, M.; Pospisil, M. . Dept. of Geography and Geology); Boland, I.; Pray, J.; Secor, D.T.; Steinke, T.; West, T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Sacks, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests the following for the tectonic architecture of the central Georgia Eastern Piedmont. The Alleghenian-age, Modoc fault zone (MZ), first defined in S. Carolina, continues along strike (c. S60W) at least to the Ocmulgee R. (net length = 250 km), where it converges with the Ocmulgee (OF) and Goat Rock (GR) faults. Diverging to the S from the MZ is a sharp contact between migmatitic amphibolites and gneisses of the Sinclair Lake terrane (SLt) and lower grade metapelites and metapsammites of the Milledgeville terrane (Mt). Both are introduced by post-kinematic granites (likely Alleghanian). A previously undescribed, 10 km long ultramafite belt within SLt, the Shoulderbone zone (Sz), is concordantly foliated with respect to surrounding rocks--hence emplacement is considered as pre- or synkinematic. Numerous smaller ultramafite bodies exist within SLt, Metavolcanic rocks N of SLt and the intervening MZ are interpreted as Carolina slate belt (CSB) rocks extending farther SW than often depicted. Arc volcanism and plutonism, terrane amalgamation and subsequent Alleghanian plutonism, dextral shear zones (some with extensional components), and local tight folding contributed to the present architecture. Locally, accretionary wedge material may exist, but the authors find published views and maps describing the entire area as primarily an accretionary wedge thrust stack to be inappropriate.

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011–2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  14. Deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Charles Wythe; Shearer, Harold Kurtz

    1919-01-01

    In 1911 the Geological Survey of Georgia published as Bulletin 26 a "Preliminary report on the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia," by Otto Veatch and Lloyd William Stephenson, prepared in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey under the supervision of T. Wayland Vaughan, a geologist in charge of Coastal Plain investigations, who contributed the determinations of the invertebrate fossils of the Tertiary and Quaternary formations. Although this report constituted a decided advance in our knowledge of the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia, it was admittedly of reconnaissance character, and corrections and additions to it were to be expected. During the last few years field work has been prosecuted vigorously in the Coastal Plain of Georgia, and the additional information thus accumulated throws light upon certain problems of stratigraphy left unsolved by Veatch and Stephenson and alters considerably some of their correlations. The object of the present paper is to present the new evidence regarding the age and correlation of the Eocene formations of Georgia and to revise in accordance with present knowledge the descriptions of the deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age.

  15. Secrecy and risk among MSM in Tbilisi, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Costenbader, Elizabeth C.; Otiashvili, David; Meyer, William; Zule, William A.; Orr, Alex; Kirtadze, Irma

    2010-01-01

    There is concern that the tremendous economic, social, and political upheavals that the Republic of Georgia has undergone in the years since the fall of the Soviet Union may have created an environment fertile for HIV transmission. Notably absent from official statistics and HIV-related research in Georgia is discussion of men who have sex with men (MSM) and, therefore, little is known about the MSM population or its potential to acquire or transmit HIV. Data were collected from 30 MSM recruited through a testing and counseling center in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Two focus groups with six men each and 18 individual in-depth interviews were conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. The study participants described a Georgian culture that is largely intolerant of sexual contact between men. In describing the various forms of discrimination and violence that they would face should their sexual identities be discovered, the MSM in this sample described a variety of behaviors that they and other Georgian MSM undertake to conceal their sexual behavior. Many of these could put these men and their partners at risk for HIV. Although official HIV rates in Georgia are still low, results from this qualitative study indicate that efforts to educate and to provide unobtrusive and anonymous testing and counseling services to MSM may be critical to the deterrence of an HIV epidemic in the Republic of Georgia. PMID:19444667

  16. Implementation of telepathology in the republic of georgia.

    PubMed

    Kldiashvili, Ekaterina; Schrader, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Telepathology in the Republic of Georgia is still evolving. Although much progress has been made around the world, especially in the field of digital imaging and virtual slides, telepathology in Georgia still revolves around static telepathology. The results of the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology-Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the continuation of Virtual Health Care Center" are presented. It is a practical implementation of telepathology in Georgia as a best practice example. Using basic methodology: idea-analysis-conception-implementation-test/deployment, the ePathology server was created for the establishment of telepathology in Georgia. Two main services were made available on the server: Simple Machines Forum (eConsultation) and Moodle (eLearning) under the premise "keep it small, safe, and simple." The ePathology server works well. By its application, introduction of the Pap-smear technique and 2001 Bethesda System for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnosis has been done. The application of easily available and adaptable technology, together with the improvement of the infrastructure conditions, is the essential basis for telemedical applications. Telepathology is a very useful and applicable tool for consulting on difficult pathology cases. It has significantly increased knowledge exchange and thereby ensured a better medical service.

  17. Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nobles, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water network for Georgia currently consists of 170 wells in which ground-water levels are continuously monitored. Most of the wells are locatedin the Coastal Plain in the southern part of the State where ground-water pumping stress is high. In particular, there are large concentrations of wells in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, where there are issues related to ground-water pumping, saltwater intrusion along the coast, and diminished streamflow in southwestern Georgia due to irrigation pumping. The map at right shows the USGS ground-water monitoring network for Georgia. Ground-water levels are monitored in 170 wells statewide, of which 19 transmit data in real time via satellite and posted on the World Wide Web at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/current/?type=gw . A greater concentration of wells occurs in the Coastal Plain where there are several layers of aquifers and in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, which are areas with specific ground-water issues.

  18. Potential source for crushed granite aggregate in Heard County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, R.L.; Higgins, Michael W.; Dickerson, Robert P.

    1981-01-01

    The production of crushed stone suitable for highway and general construction is a major industry in Georgia. The state ranks eighth in the nation in overall crushed stone production, and first in crushed granite production. Crushed stone production in Georgia in 1979 was 40,902,000 short tons worth $154,021,000 (D.H. White, Jr., US Bureau of Mines, personal commun., Aug. 1980). More than 3,000 people were employed by the crushed stone industry in Georgia during that year.Presently, the only active quarry in Heard County is located in an amphibolite. Amphibolite is not a conventional aggregate. It has a high specific gravity, a tendency to make elongate fragments, and varies considerably in abrasion tests.Because the nearest approved aggregate quarry is more than 25 miles from Franklin, the county seat, the purpose of this brief report is to describe a body of granite gneiss that may provide suitable aggregate for the crushed stone industry, potential quarry operators and various agencies in Heard County. This report is part of a project to study the geology and mineral resources of the Piedmont south of the Brevard Zone, and is not intended to supplant detailed site investigations by industry or consultants. The report is a joint effort between the Georgia Geologic Survey and the Office of Materials and Research of the Georgia Department of Transportation.

  19. Ogasawara Islands, Japan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-12

    This image, acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, is of the volcanic Ogasawara Islands. The islands were listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, in recognition of an outstanding example of ongoing evolutionary processes in oceanic island ecosystems.

  20. Georgia's Pre-K Professional Development Evaluation: Final Report. Publication #2015-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Maxwell, Kelly L.; Skinner, Debra; Kraus, Syndee; Hume, Katie; Pan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Georgia has been at the forefront of the pre-kindergarten movement since implementing its pre-k program in 1992 and creating the nation's first state-funded universal pre-k program in 1995. Georgia's Pre-K, administered by "Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning" (DECAL), aims to provide high-quality…

  1. 77 FR 11452 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Georgia; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ...EPA is proposing a limited approval of a revision to the Georgia state implementation plan (SIP) submitted by the State of Georgia through the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), on February 11, 2010, as supplemented on November 19, 2010, that addresses regional haze for the first implementation period. This SIP revision, as supplemented,......

  2. An Evaluation of Lottery Expenditures for Public School Safety in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Knox H.; Kellermann, Arthur L.; Wald, Marlena; Lipscomb, Leslie; Fajman, Nancy

    In 1994, approximately $20 million of Georgia Lottery for Education funds were spent to make schools safer. This report presents the results of an evaluation of Georgia Lottery for Education expenditures for technologies related to school safety. The study evaluated the safety technology at 15 Georgia public schools. Data were gathered through…

  3. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina...

  4. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina...

  5. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate...

  6. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate...

  7. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate...

  8. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate...

  9. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate...

  10. 78 FR 28118 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Reporting and Assessment Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Reporting and... the marketing order for Vidalia onions grown in Georgia (order). The order regulates the handling of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia and is administered locally by the Vidalia Onion Committee...

  11. The Response of Local School Systems in Georgia to Fiscal and Economic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, James; Sjoquist, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The 2001 recession had a major effect on Georgia's fiscal condition. We explore how economic conditions affected state and local financing of K-12 education in Georgia. We find that the magnitude of postrecession cuts in state real revenue per student varied widely across the local school systems in Georgia. We then examine whether and how cuts in…

  12. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools. Special Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. The law permits individual taxpayers in Georgia to reduce annual state taxes up to $2,500 for joint returns when they divert funds to a student scholarship organization (SSO). Georgia's law providing tax credits for private school tuition grants or…

  13. The Georgia Express: Final Report. A 310 Planning Project for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin City - Spalding County Board of Education, GA.

    This report summarizes the work of the Georgia Express project staff and the five task teams that provided research services to the Georgia Task Force on Adult Education. (The purpose of the Task Force was to review Georgia Adult Education's current goals, objectives, and procedures and to make recommendations for program improvement.) The report…

  14. Georgia's Pre-K Professional Development Evaluation: Final Report. Publication #2015-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Maxwell, Kelly L.; Skinner, Debra; Kraus, Syndee; Hume, Katie; Pan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Georgia has been at the forefront of the pre-kindergarten movement since implementing its pre-k program in 1992 and creating the nation's first state-funded universal pre-k program in 1995. Georgia's Pre-K, administered by "Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning" (DECAL), aims to provide high-quality…

  15. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  16. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  17. 40 CFR 81.113 - Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.113 Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Savannah (Georgia)-Beaufort (South...

  18. Developing Competency-Based Preparation and Performance-Based Certification in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Lester M.

    The state of Georgia has been moving toward competency/performance-based education since the late 1960's. All of the groups concerned with education and the preparation of teachers (higher education institutions, the Georgia Teacher Education Council, professional organizations, and the Georgia Department of Education) have been involved. In…

  19. Measures of Student Success with Textbook Transformations: The Affordable Learning Georgia Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, the state of Georgia's budget supported a University System of Georgia (USG) initiative: Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG). The initiative was implemented via Textbook Transformation Grants, which provided grants to USG faculty, libraries and librarians, and institutions to "transform their use of textbooks and other learning…

  20. 78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, submitted...

  1. The Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front: physical and biological coupling at South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Peter; Whitehouse, Mick; Meredith, Mike; Murphy, Eugene; Shreeve, Rachael; Korb, Rebecca; Watkins, Jon; Thorpe, Sally; Woodd-Walker, Rachel; Brierley, Andrew; Cunningham, Nathan; Grant, Sharon; Bone, Doug

    2002-12-01

    The coupling of physics and biology was examined along a 160 km long transect running out from the north coast of South Georgia Island and crossing the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF) during late December 2000. Surface and near surface potential TS properties indicated the presence of three water types: a near-shore group of stations characterised by water which became progressively warmer and fresher closer to South Georgia, an offshore grouping in which sea surface temperatures and those at the winter water level were relatively warm (1.8°C and 0.5°C, respectively), and a third in which surface and winter water temperatures were cooler and reflected the presence of the SACCF. The transect bisected the SACCF twice, revealing that it was flowing in opposite directions, north-westward closest to South Georgia and south-eastwards at its furthest point from the island. The innermost limb was a narrow intense feature located just off the shelf break in 2000-3500 m of water and in which rapid surface baroclinic velocities (up to 35 cm s -1) were encountered. Offshore in the outermost limb, shown subsequently to be a mesoscale eddy that had meandered south from the retroflected limb of the SACCF, flow was broader and slower with peak velocities around 20 cm s -1. Chlorophyll a biomass was generally low (<1 mg m -3) over much of the transect but increased dramatically in the region of the innermost limb of the SACCF, where a deepening of the surface mixed layer was coincident with a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (7.4 mg m -3) and elevated concentrations down to 100 m. The bloom was coincident with depleted nutrient concentrations, particularly silicate, nitrate and phosphate, and although ammonium concentrations were locally depleted the bloom lay within an elevated band (up to 1.5 mmol m -3) associated with the frontal jet. Increased zooplankton abundance, higher copepod body carbon mass and egg production rates all showed a strong spatial

  2. LANDSAT data for state planning. [of transportation for Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, N. L.; Spann, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an effort to generate and apply automated classification of LANDSAT digital data to state of Georgia problems are presented. This phase centers on an analysis of the usefulness of LANDSAT digital data to provide land-use data for transportation planning. Hall County, Georgia was chosen as a test site because it is part of a seventeen county area for which the Georgia Department of Transportation is currently designing a Transportation Planning Land-Use Simulation Model. The land-cover information derived from this study was compared to several other existing sources of land-use data for Hall County and input into this simulation. The results indicate that there is difficulty comparing LANDSAT derived land-cover information with previous land-use information since the LANDSAT data are acquired on an acre by acre grid basis while all previous land-use surveys for Hall County used land-use data on a parcel basis.

  3. The emerging HIV/AIDS epidemic in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tkeshelashvili-Kessler, Alexander; del Rio, Carlos; Nelson, Kenrad; Tsertsvadze, Tergiz

    2005-01-01

    The first case of HIV in Georgia was diagnosed in 1989. Through December 2002, a total of 375 cases of HIV infection were reported. However, the World Health Organization estimates that the true number of infections may be closer to 1700. In all, 70% of reported cases are among injection drug users. Based on the UNAIDS classification, Georgia is a 'low-level HIV country' with an HIV prevalence of less than 1% in all groups, including drug users. However, there is a high prevalence of hepatitis B and C, suggesting a significant risk for the spread of HIV. Georgia, a newly independent republic, is experiencing an increase in injection drug use, a rise in sexually transmitted infections and commercial sex trade that create a fertile soil for the potential rapid spread of HIV. However, it is also a country with a unique window of opportunity for limiting the spread of HIV.

  4. Hybrid-Empirical Ground Motion Estimations for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Askan, Aysegul; Hamzehloo, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Ground motion prediction equations are essential for several purposes ranging from seismic design and analysis to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. In seismically active regions without sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models, hybrid models become vital. Georgia does not have sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models. In this study, we have applied the host-totarget method in two regions in Georgia with different source mechanisms. According to the tectonic regime of the target areas, two different regions are chosen as host regions. One of them is in Turkey with the dominant strike-slip source mechanism, while the other is in Iran with the prevalence of reverse-mechanism events. We performed stochastic finite-fault simulations in both host and target areas and employed the hybrid-empirical method as introduced in Campbell (2003). An initial set of hybrid empirical ground motion estimates is obtained for PGA and SA at selected periods for Georgia.

  5. Analysis of the effects of proposed pumping from the principal artesian aquifer, Savannah, Georgia area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randolph, R.B.; Krause, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-difference model of the principal artesian aquifer in the Savannah, Georgia, area, originally developed by Counts and Krause (1976), has been expanded and refined. The model was updated and the grid redesigned to provide more current and accurate detail for ground-water resources management alternatives. Improvements in the definition of the flow system were made possible by the acquisition of additional data in the area and by recently completed regional models that include the area. The model was initially calibrated by using the estimated predevelopment potentiometric surface of 1880. The flow system under predevelopment conditions was sluggish and only 100 cubic feet per second (65 million gallons per day) flowed through the model area. It was then tested for acceptance by using the May 1980 potentiometric surface and corresponding pumping stress of approximately 85 million gallons per day in the Savannah, Georgia-Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, area. The flow through the system under 1980 conditions was about 390 cubic feet per second (250 million gallons per day) and the vertical inflow from the overlying surficial aquifer more than doubled due to formerly rejected recharge that now flows vertically into the aquifer. Calibration was accurate + or - 10 feet. The absolute error per node was 3.4 feet. A hypothetical 25-percent increase in pumpage over the entire area was used to represent a gradual growth in commercial and municipal pumpage over the next 20 to 30 years. The increase produced a maximum decline of 30 feet below the existing water level of 135 feet below sea level at the center of the cone of depression in Savannah, and a 5-foot decline at a radius of 20 miles from the center of the cone of depression. (USGS)

  6. Albatross populations in peril: A population trajectory for Black-browed Albatrosses at South Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, J.M.; Brault, Solange; Croxall, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation modeling was used to reconstruct Black-browed Albatross (Diomedea melanophris) population trends. Close approximations to observed data were accomplished by annually varying survival rates, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years. The temporal shift in annual values coincided with the start of longline fishing at South Georgia and potential changes in krill abundance. We used 23 years of demographic data from long-term studies of a breeding colony of this species at Bird Island, South Georgia, to validate our model. When we used annual parameter estimates for survival, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years, our model trajectory closely followed the observed changes in breeding population size over time. Population growth rate was below replacement (lambda < 1) in most years and was most sensitive to changes in adult survival. This supports the recent IUCN uplisting of this species from “Vulnerable” to “Endangered.” Comparison of pre-1988 and post-1988 demography (before and after the inception of a longline fishery in the breeding area) reveals a decrease in lambda from 0.963 to 0.910. A life table response experiment (LTRE) showed that this decline in lambda was caused mostly by declines in survival of adults. If 1988–1998 demographic rates are maintained, the model predicts a 98% chance of a population of fewer than 25 pairs within 78 years. For this population to recover to a status under which it could be “delisted,” a 10% increase in survival of all age classes would be needed.

  7. Albatross populations in peril: a population trajectory for black-browed albatrosses at south Georgia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jennifer M; Brault, Solange; Croxall, John P

    2006-02-01

    Simulation modeling was used to reconstruct Black-browed Albatross (Diomedea melanophris) population trends. Close approximations to observed data were accomplished by annually varying survival rates, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years. The temporal shift in annual values coincided with the start of longline fishing at South Georgia and potential changes in krill abundance. We used 23 years of demographic data from long-term studies of a breeding colony of this species at Bird Island, South Georgia, to validate our model. When we used annual parameter estimates for survival, reproductive success, and probabilities of returning to breed given success in previous years, our model trajectory closely followed the observed changes in breeding population size over time. Population growth rate was below replacement (lambda < 1) in most years and was most sensitive to changes in adult survival. This supports the recent IUCN uplisting of this species from "Vulnerable" to "Endangered." Comparison of pre-1988 and post-1988 demography (before and after the inception of a longline fishery in the breeding area) reveals a decrease in lambda from 0.963 to 0.910. A life table response experiment (LTRE) showed that this decline in lambda was caused mostly by declines in survival of adults. If 1988-1998 demographic rates are maintained, the model predicts a 98% chance of a population of fewer than 25 pairs within 78 years. For this population to recover to a status under which it could be "delisted," a 10% increase in survival of all age classes would be needed.

  8. Tenarife Island, Canary Island Archipelago, Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-08-11

    Tenarife Island is one of the most volcanically active of the Canary Island archipelago, Atlantic Ocean, just off the NW coast of Africa, (28.5N, 16.5W). The old central caldera, nearly filled in by successive volcanic activity culminating in two stratocones. From those two peaks, a line of smaller cinder cones extend to the point of the island. Extensive gullies dissect the west side of the island and some forests still remain on the east side.

  9. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cola, G.; Failla, O.; Maghradze, D.; Megrelidze, L.; Mariani, L.

    2016-10-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late `1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  10. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cola, G; Failla, O; Maghradze, D; Megrelidze, L; Mariani, L

    2017-04-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late '1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  11. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cola, G.; Failla, O.; Maghradze, D.; Megrelidze, L.; Mariani, L.

    2017-04-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late `1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  12. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  13. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  14. Chironomus calligraphus (Diptera: Chironomidae), a new pest species in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elmer W; Royals, Candace; Epler, John H; Wyatt, Roger D; Brewer, Ben; Noblet, Ray

    2012-09-01

    Chironomid midges are ubiquitous and ecologically important aquatic insects. However, some species can become pests when they occur in extremely high numbers, particularly those that colonize man-made habitats. Chironomus calligraphus is a Neotropical, pan-American species that has recently been found in the Nearctic region. This paper represents the 1st reported occurrence of C. calligraphus in Georgia. Extensive larval populations were found in the leaf sheaths and root masses of cattails and in the firm sandy substrates of a wastewater lake at an industrial site in coastal Georgia. Chironomus calligraphus was causing a significant economic impact at this site.

  15. Extreme drought: summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Frantz, Eric R.; Peck, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (GaWSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 320 realtime streamgages, including 10 real-time lake-level monitoring stations and 63 realtime water-quality monitors. Additionally, the GaWSC operates more than 180 groundwater wells, 35 of which are real-time. One of the many benefits from this monitoring network is that the data analyses provide an overview of the hydrologic conditions of rivers, creeks, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  16. Extreme drought-summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Peck, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (GaWSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 330 real-time streamgages, including 10 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 63 real-time water-quality monitors, and 48 water-quality sampling stations. Additionally, the GaWSC operates more than 180 groundwater monitoring wells, 42 of which are real-time. One of the many benefits from this monitoring network is that the data analyses provide a well distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  17. Wood energy in Georgia: a five-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An increasing number of industrial plants and public and residential facilities in Georgia are using wood, Georgia's greatest renewable energy source, to replace gas, oil, coal, and electricity. All wood systems described in this report are or will soon be in operation in schools, prisons, hospitals, and other state facilities, and are producing substantial financial savings. The economic values from increased markets and jobs are important in all areas of the state, with total benefits projected at $2.9 million a year for state taxpayers. 2 figures.

  18. Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Ground water is an abundant resource in Georgia, providing 1.45 billion gallons per day, or 22 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in the State (Fanning, 2003). Contrasting geologic features and landforms of the physiographic provinces of Georgia affect the quantity and quality of ground water throughout the State. Most ground-water withdrawals are in the Coastal Plain in the southern one-half of the State, where aquifers are highly productive. For a more complete discussion of the State's ground-water resources, see Leeth and others (2005).

  19. Perspective in supportive care--practical experiences in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Rukhadze, Tamari; Kordzaia, Dimitri

    2011-10-01

    Authors describe the first steps of Palliative Care development in Georgia, including policy, educational issues, drug availability and services. It is underlined the importance and effectiveness of collaboration of Governmental institutions, NGOs and international organizations and experts to create the basis for Palliative care system in the Country. Georgian experience on revealing of problems of adequate pain control gained by survey with participation of advanced patients and their family members is also discussed. All current activities in the sphere of Palliative Care as well as the future models of Palliative Care provision in the capital and regions of Georgia is shown.

  20. Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Kalligeris, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    The 1 April 2007 magnitude Ms 8.1 earthquake off the New Georgia Group in the Solomon Islands generated a tsunami that killed 52 with locally focused run-up heights of 12 m, local flow depths of 5 m as well as tectonic uplift up to 3.6 m and subsidence down to -1.5 m. A reconnaissance team deployed within one week investigated 65 coastal settlements on 13 remote Islands. The ancestral heritage ``run to high ground after an earthquake'' passed on to younger generations by survivors of smaller historic tsunamis triggered an immediate spontaneous self evacuation containing the death toll.

  1. Proceedings of the Symposium on Electromagnetic Windows (17th) Held at Georgia Institute of Technology, Engineering Experiment Station, Atlanta, Georgia on 25-27 July 1984. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    00 George H. Adams Department of Continuing Education September 1984 0-I U. S. Army Research Office P. 0. No. 84-M-0346 GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30332 r ) (ELEctEK D JN22 1985 APPROvED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE 91STRIBUTION UNLIMITED 7 .7 .7 7rr - COMPONENT PART NOTICE THIS PAPER IS...A COMPONENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING COMPILATION REPORT: (TITLE): Proceedingzs of the Symposium on Electromagnetic Windows (17th) Held at Georgia

  2. Epidemiology of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Babuadze, Giorgi; Alvar, Jorge; Argaw, Daniel; de Koning, Harry P.; Iosava, Merab; Kekelidze, Merab; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tsereteli, David; Chakhunashvili, Giorgi; Mamatsashvili, Tamar; Beria, Nino; Kalandadze, Irine; Ejov, Mikhail; Imnadze, Paata

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transmission and prevalence of Leishmania parasite infection of humans in two foci of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in Georgia, the well known focus in Tbilisi in the East, and in Kutaisi, a new focus in the West of the country. The seroprevalence of canine leishmaniasis was investigated in order to understand the zoonotic transmission. Blood samples of 1575 dogs (stray and pet) and 77 wild canids were tested for VL by Kalazar Detect rK39 rapid diagnostic tests. Three districts were investigated in Tbilisi and one in Kutaisi. The highest proportions of seropositive pet dogs were present in District #2 (28.1%, 82/292) and District #1 (26.9%, 24/89) in Tbilisi, compared to 17.3% (26/150) of pet dogs in Kutaisi. The percentage of seropositive stray dogs was also twice as high in Tbilisi (16.1%, n = 670) than in Kutaisi (8%, n = 50); only 2/58 wild animals screened were seropositive (2. 6%). A total of 873 Phlebotomine sand flies were collected, with 5 different species identified in Tbilisi and 3 species in Kutaisi; 2.3% of the females were positive for Leishmania parasites. The Leishmanin Skin Test (LST) was performed on 981 human subjects in VL foci in urban areas in Tbilisi and Kutaisi. A particularly high prevalence of LST positives was observed in Tbilisi District #1 (22.2%, 37.5% and 19.5% for ages 5–9, 15–24 and 25–59, respectively); lower prevalence was observed in Kutaisi (0%, 3.2% and 5.2%, respectively; P<0.05). This study shows that Tbilisi is an active focus for leishmaniasis and that the infection prevalence is very high in dogs and in humans. Although exposure is as yet not as high in Kutaisi, this is a new VL focus. The overall situation in the country is alarming and new control measures are urgently needed. PMID:24603768

  3. Tectonics of the South Georgia Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, David M.

    Triassic rifting of the supercontinent Pangea left behind numerous basins on what is now the eastern North American margin. The South Georgia Rift (SGR) was thought to be the best preserved of these basins having been capped by thick basalt flows of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and later buried beneath the Cretaceous and younger Coastal Plain. Because it is buried beneath the Coastal Plain, the SGR is only known through sparse drilling and geophysical methods. Despite this limited dataset, the SGR is the only one of the eastern North American Triassic basins known to overlie the ancient Alleghanian suture between Laurentia and Gondwana, although it isn't clear what influence this lithospheric weakness played in formation of the rift. The SGR has been variably interpreted as a singular large basin or as isolated sub-basins separated by transfer zones. Transfer zones are rift-transverse structural features that link major faults of rift sub-basins and accommodate differences in extensional strain. Transfer zones have been previously hypothesized to be present in the SGR based on onshore projections of Central Atlantic fracture zones, but observations confirming their existence, such as reversal in sub-basin polarity, have been lacking. Three separate hypotheses are tested related to the SGR: 1) the J-Horizon corresponds everywhere with basalt; 2) transfer zones are an important structural component of the SGR; 3) structural features of the Central Atlantic Ocean are related to transfer zones of the SGR. Reanalysis of existing well and seismic data shows that the extent of the flood basalt in the SGR is restricted and that the J-Horizon coincides with the base of the Coastal Plain. Subsurface mapping reveals reversals in sub-basin polarity, confirming the existence of previously hypothesized transfer zones. Small circle projections of the transfer zones correlate with oceanic features, and Central Atlantic fracture zones project onshore into inferred

  4. Georgia and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Georgia's participation in SREB programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of targeted projects for educational…

  5. Georgia Compliance Review Self-Study FY 01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Intended for evaluation of local compliance with special education federal and state legal requirements, this compliance review document includes both the compliance requirements and the criteria by which compliance is determined during the onsite compliance review of Georgia local school systems and state-operated programs. Each legal requirement…

  6. Supply of Private Acreage for Recreational Deer Hunting in Georgia

    Treesearch

    Neelam C. Poudyal; J. M. Bowker; Gary T. Green; Michael A. Tarrant

    2012-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence the supply of private acreage for lease hunting has become increasingly important to sustaining hunting. Improving on existing studies that mostly utilized landowners’ responses from contingent surveys, we adopted a different approach to this question by analyzing 2009 market data from Georgia counties. Results from multivariate...

  7. Human Lymphadenopathy Caused by Ratborne Bartonella, Tbilisi, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kandelaki, George; Malania, Lile; Bai, Ying; Chakvetadze, Neli; Katsitadze, Guram; Imnadze, Paata; Nelson, Christina; Harrus, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy and fever that developed in a woman in Tbilisi, Georgia, most likely were caused by a ratborne Bartonella strain related B. tribocorum and B. elizabethae. The finding suggests that this Bartonella strain could be spread by infected rats and represents a potential human risk. PMID:26889959

  8. Career Education Curriculum Materials: (Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, North Carolina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The guide, which represents part of the product of the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in Vocational/Technical Education, presents descriptive and bibliographic information about career education curriculum materials submitted by representatives of Georgia, Mississippi, and North and South Carolina to the Research and Curriculum Unit…

  9. The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

  10. [Chicoric and chlorogenic acids in various plants growing in Georgia].

    PubMed

    Chkhikvishvili, I D; Kharebava, G I

    2001-01-01

    Chicoric acid was isolated from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Wigg.) leaves by column chromatography. Conditions for HPLC analysis of chicoric and chlorogenic acids were optimized. These acids were assayed in some plants growing in Georgia. The optimum conservation temperature for the preservation of chicoric and chlorogenic acids in leaves of dandelion and bilberry (Vaccinium arctostaphylos L.) was determined.

  11. Georgia Folklife: A Bibliography for Teachers, Art Administrators, and Fieldworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzberg, Maggie

    This bibliography lists books, articles, and journals as well as a selection of sound recordings and videotapes to assist individuals and teachers researching the folklife of Georgia. Print resources are organized under 10 major categories including: (1) "General Folklife Studies"; (2) "Fieldwork Methodology"; (3)…

  12. EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

  13. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  16. Seedling production and pest problems at a South Georgia nursery

    Treesearch

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; L. David Dwinell; Michelle M. Cram

    2002-01-01

    Pine seedling production and pest problems were evaluated in methyl bromide-fumigated and nonfumigated plots in two fields at a South Georgia nursery. In one field, fumigation increased loblolly pine seedling bed density in only 1 of 4 years. Seedlings were often significantly larger in fumigated than nonfumigated plots. In the other field, no differences were observed...

  17. A look at trees and reclamation in Georgia

    Treesearch

    Sanford P. Darby

    1980-01-01

    The author briefly reviews Georgia's land reclamation requirements when rehabilitating mined lands with trees as one's reclamation objective. Techniques used to establish two plantations are used to raise several important issues which, if resolved, can result in increased tree planting and lower land reclamation cost.

  18. Copper Deficiency in Pine Plantations in the Georgia Coastal Plain

    Treesearch

    David B. South; William A. Carey; Donald A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    Copper deficiencies have been observed on several intensively managed pine plantations in the Georgia Coastal Plain. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii Engelm.) displayed plagiotropic growth within a year after planting on very acid, sandy soils. Typically, symptoms show...

  19. Per Pupil Expenditures and Academic Achievement in Georgia School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beurden, Krista

    2011-01-01

    Student achievement and public school funding are national concerns. Federal, state, and local funding vary across the nation and within systems in each state. In the past several years, Georgia school systems have faced austerity cuts by the state legislature and governor, and function with less money while trying to improve student achievement…

  20. 77 FR 64946 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia AGENCY: Federal Communications... Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio... proposes to amend 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 1. The authority citation...

  1. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Georgia. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  2. [AEROPOLINOLOGIC MONITORING AND DISTRIBUTION OF ALLERGOALLERGENS IN WESTERN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Sepiashvili, R; Khachapuridze, D; Chikhladze, M; Gamkrelidze, S

    2015-06-01

    Climate and geographical conditions such as: air temperature, humidity and plant diversity represented in the region is of great importance for prevalence of allergic diseases. All these factors will maintain growing of allergization/sensitization of the body. It is known that allergic diseases (pollinosis, bronchial asthma), the highest percentage comes on the allergens- aeropolutants, that are represented in many plants and herbs in the form of dust (ragweed pollen, alder, birch, maple, walnut, mallow, cotton plant etc.). Thus, aeropolinologic study acquires special importance helping the clinicians to solve the following issues: which plant is common for the concrete region; what is the source of dust allergy; when are they particularly dangerous for the patient; when their dust is revealed and its concentrations in air pool or how they look. Georgia is the country with diverse flora and landscapes; the climate in Georgia varies across different parts of the country. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that the Western Georgia is characterized by the frequency of allergic diseases. The above raises the need to create a calendar of flowering plants in Imerety region of Georgia. 69 patients with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma from 7 to 60 years old (34 men and 35 women) were observed. The patients underwent allegro-diagnostic investigation. The results revealed high titers on weeds (WX2). On the basis of the conducted research annual calendar of aero-allergens spread in Imerety region was composed.

  3. Haymon-Morris Middle School: Keeping the Peace in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Haymon-Morris Middle School in Winder, Georgia. This highly successful Title I middle school is tucked behind the high school in a rural area 50 miles northeast of Atlanta. The staff is dedicated to creating a culture where it is believed that a calm, serene school setting results in less stress for both students and staff…

  4. Retention in Special Education Teachers in Georgia: A Phenomenological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Arndra N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was to identify and examine factors influencing the retention rate of special education teachers in rural and urban schools in middle Georgia. Provided in this study are factors that are related to retention in special education teachers. Semistructured interviews were used to…

  5. The College Reading Improvement Programs of Georgia, 1969-70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, A. J.; Stefurak, D. W.

    A questionnaire concerning the status of college reading improvement programs was sent to the 58 institutions of higher learning in Georgia in the fall of 1969. Thirty schools responded, representing a 52 percent return. Of the 30 schools replying, 21 (67 percent) had a college reading improvement program, while the remaining nine did not. Of the…

  6. Teachers' Perception on Pay-for-Performance Programs in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mighty, Nardiann Kenisha

    2013-01-01

    States are implementing performance programs to help reform compensation systems for teachers; however, little is known on teachers' perception on alternative pay plans. Accordingly, this research study examined the types of pay-for-performance programs Georgia teachers prefer by exploring their perceptions of pay for individual performance, pay…

  7. Minority Education in Georgia: Is It Delivering What Is Expected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatadze, Shalva

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the issue of minority education in the nation of Georgia, and this research aims to identify the reasons for minority educational problems. The results of school exit exams, literacy research studies, and the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment were used to highlight the differences in educational achievements…

  8. Building competencies for nurse administrators in the Republic of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, M; Wold, J L; Partskhladze, N

    2008-06-01

    To assess the level of competency among nurse administrators in the Republic of Georgia (Georgia) and to recommend interventions to implement effective nursing management practices in a resource constrained setting. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 resulted in deterioration of the healthcare system in Georgia. Even though the 1995 healthcare reformers recognized that baccalaureate educated nurses were essential resources for quality health care, limited resources delayed further steps. Hence, Georgia has struggled to raise nursing education levels and to establish nursing as a professional occupation. Using an exploratory descriptive research technique, surveys of nurse managers were conducted in 2004 and in 2005. This study assessed the level of practice among Georgian nurse administrators compared with the international competencies of the International Council of Nurses. There were no organized procedures to evaluate competencies of nurses on a regular basis. While minimal clinical nursing practice guidelines exist, nurse managers did not fully utilize them for either mentoring the staff nurses or assuring an adequate quality of nursing care. Many nurse managers viewed financial constraints as an obstacle to delivering better nursing care. Recommendations include: (1) establishing effective protocols to evaluate the competencies of nurses, (2) mandating the use of existing nursing guidelines, (3) establishing effective resource inventory systems, and (4) mandating safety education and ensuring a safe work environment.

  9. 79 FR 53430 - Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless... Department of Public Health, Tuberculosis (TB) Program. This award will be in the amount of $419,095.00. The purpose of this award is to halt the further spread of a drug- resistant strain of tuberculosis...

  10. Student Retention and Graduation, University System of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta. Office of Research and Planning.

    Describing outcomes related to student retention and graduation in the University System of Georgia, this six-part report discusses definitions and assumptions pertaining to retention and compares success rates for black, white, developmental studies, and regularly-admitted freshmen students in USG senior and two-year colleges. Section 1 provides…

  11. Retention in Special Education Teachers in Georgia: A Phenomenological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Arndra N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was to identify and examine factors influencing the retention rate of special education teachers in rural and urban schools in middle Georgia. Provided in this study are factors that are related to retention in special education teachers. Semistructured interviews were used to…

  12. Student Financial Aid Issues Hearing Report (Atlanta, Georgia,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes results of a hearing by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance in Atlanta, Georgia, on the delivery and disposition of higher education student financial assistance funds. Seventeen individuals offered testimony. They included representatives of guarantee agencies, the lending community, the financial aid…

  13. Georgia's Compensation Model: A Step in the Right Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppong, Nicholas; de Araujo, Zandra U.; Lowe, Laura; Marshall, Anne Marie; Singletary, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses House Bill 280 as a response to the state of Georgia's drastic need to recruit and produce highly qualified mathematics teachers. The bill attempts to address the shortage of fully certified secondary mathematics and science teachers by offering additional compensation to aide recruitment. The bill also provides incentives…

  14. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  15. Teachers' Perception on Pay-for-Performance Programs in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mighty, Nardiann Kenisha

    2013-01-01

    States are implementing performance programs to help reform compensation systems for teachers; however, little is known on teachers' perception on alternative pay plans. Accordingly, this research study examined the types of pay-for-performance programs Georgia teachers prefer by exploring their perceptions of pay for individual performance, pay…

  16. Observational and Cult Sites in Pre-Christian Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, Irakli; Jijelava, Badri; Gigauri, G.; Houston, Gordon

    In this chapter, we describe ancient cult and observational sites in Georgia together with cultural traditions that have astronomical significance from various parts of the country. In particular, we present the results of an archaeoastronomical investigation of the Shaori complex, and consider its possible role as an ancient "solar station" with cult significance.

  17. Systemic Efforts in Georgia to Improve Education Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Research points to links between school and school district leadership and student achievement. Local and national education reform has created rising expectations for student performance. Education leadership is both complex and high stakes. Key stakeholders in Georgia have developed a solution to improve factors in the work, workplace, and…

  18. Stop the World--West Georgia Is Getting On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Phyllis R.

    1996-01-01

    In 5 years, the schools and community of Carrollton, Georgia, created a school systemwide network of 1,400 computers and 70 CD-ROMs connected by a fiber wide-area network to other city institutions and the Internet with grants from local, state, and national industry. After incorporating the new technologies into the curriculum, the dropout rate…

  19. BIOGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF ORGANIC WASTE CONTAMINATION IN GEORGIA PIEDMONT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We monitored concentrations of nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nutrients and other parameters (T, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, DOC, DON, flow rate) in 17 headwater streams (watershed sizes from 0.5 to 3.4 km2) of the South Fork Broad River, Georgia wate...

  20. The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

  1. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  2. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use in Rural Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Ted L.; And Others

    To ascertain the incidence of drug use in a rural area and to provide insight into the covariates of illegal drug use which might be useful in developing prevention programs, data were collected in the spring of 1981 from 2,060 or 83.2% of all students grades 8 through 12 in a southern Georgia county. Data were collected during regularly scheduled…

  3. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to...

  5. An Automated Slide Classification System at Georgia Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresti, Maryellen

    1973-01-01

    The Georgia Tech Architecture Library slide collection is being revolutionized by adapting the Santa Cruz Slide Classification System. The slide catalog record is being transferred inexpensively to tapes and updated by the computer. Computer programs print out indexes in any of fifteen different sort fields. (Author)

  6. Nutrition Education Module Appeals to Students at Georgia State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kicklighter, Jana; Jonnalagadda, Satya S.; McClendon, Jamie; Hopkins, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of a nutrition education module, "Nutrition Survival Skills," for freshmen students at a large urban university. Students' perceptions of the module, presented by five nutrition graduate students as part of Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) and Georgia State University (GSU) 1010,…

  7. The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2016: Georgia Key Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2016

    2016-01-01

    "The Condition of College and Career Readiness" looks at the progress of the 2016 ACT®-tested graduating class relative to college and career readiness. This state briefing begins with statistics in the following categories for Georgia: performance, STEM, career readiness, impact, behaviors that impact access and opportunity, pipeline,…

  8. Duck hunters' perceptions of risk for avian influenza, Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Hope; Stallknecht, David; Cole, Dana

    2010-08-01

    To determine duck hunters'risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza, we surveyed duck hunters in Georgia, USA, during 2007-2008, about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We found they engage in several practices that could expose them to the virus. Exposures and awareness were highest for those who had hunted >10 years.

  9. Duck Hunters’ Perceptions of Risk for Avian Influenza, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Stallknecht, David; Cole, Dana

    2010-01-01

    To determine duck hunters’ risk for highly pathogenic avian influenza, we surveyed duck hunters in Georgia, USA, during 2007–2008, about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices. We found they engage in several practices that could expose them to the virus. Exposures and awareness were highest for those who had hunted >10 years. PMID:20678324

  10. Governor James Wright in Georgia, 1760-1782.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kenneth

    One of a series of pamphlets about the American Revolution in Georgia, this document examines the role of James Wright as British governor in the colony, and his viewpoints about revolution from 1765-1775. The pamphlet can be used as supplementary reading or as a one-week unit for junior or senior high school students. A brief teacher's guide is…

  11. NITROUS OXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are measuring the dissolved nitrous oxide concentration in 17 headwater streams in the South Fork Broad River, Georgia watershed on a monthly basis. The selected small streams drain watersheds dominated by forest, pasture, developed, or mixed land uses. Nitrous oxide concentr...

  12. Motor Performance Norms for Georgia Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, I. David, Comp.; And Others

    In a study of 2,546 Georgia children, researchers have established state norms for 8 measures of physical fitness at 3 grade levels. Motor test score percentile rankings for boys and girls in the second, fourth, and sixth grades are given (in 22 tables) for the following tests: (1) jump and reach; (2) sit ups; (3) shape-o-ball (measuring shape…

  13. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Quota System in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatadze, Shalva; Gorgadze, Natia

    2013-01-01

    This document is the report on research which was undertaken by the Center of Civil Integration and Inter-Ethnic Relations and financed by the United Nations Association in Georgia within the project "Advanced National Integration" funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The research aimed at the evaluation…

  14. Haymon-Morris Middle School: Keeping the Peace in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Haymon-Morris Middle School in Winder, Georgia. This highly successful Title I middle school is tucked behind the high school in a rural area 50 miles northeast of Atlanta. The staff is dedicated to creating a culture where it is believed that a calm, serene school setting results in less stress for both students and staff…

  15. 75 FR 67950 - The University of Georgia (UGA), et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 213 (Thursday, November 4, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 67950] [FR Doc No: 2010-27888] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration The University of... Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC. Docket Number: 10-054. Applicant: The University of Georgia (UGA...

  16. Suit Threatens Status of Georgia's Public Black Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Gail Hagans

    1997-01-01

    A recent lawsuit claims that Georgia's three historically black public colleges (Albany State, Fort Valley State, Savannah State) remain in second-class status and calls on the institutions to admit more whites and offer preferential admissions to students based on socioeconomics, not race. The lawyer also requests that black enrollment at…

  17. 76 FR 27739 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of...

  18. 76 FR 27141 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster Number GA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of...

  19. 76 FR 29285 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster Number GA-00033 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public...

  20. Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…