Science.gov

Sample records for satellite laser altimetry

  1. Sand dune tracking from satellite laser altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabboor, Mohammed

    Substantial problems arise from sand movement in arid and semi-arid countries. Sand poses a threat to infrastructure, agricultural and urban areas. These issues are caused by the encroachment of sand on roads and railway tracks, farmland, towns and villages, and airports, to name a few. Sand movement highly depends on geomorphology including vegetation cover, shape and height of the terrain, and grain size of the sand. However, wind direction and speed are the most important factors that affect efficient sand movement. The direction of the movement depends on the main direction of the wind, but it has been shown that a minimum wind speed is required, e.g. wind gusts, to initiate sand transport. This fact prevents a simple calculation of sand transport from conventional wind data as wind records rarely contain sub-minute intervals masking out any wind gusts. An alternative of predicting sand transport is the direct observation of sand advance by in situ measurements or via satellite. Until recently, satellite imagery was the only means to compare dune shape and position for predicting dune migration over several years. In 2003, the NASA laser altimetry mission ICESat became operational and monitors elevations over all surface types including sand dunes with an accuracy of about 10-20 cm. In this study, ICESat observations from repeat tracks (tracks overlapping eachother within 50 m) are used to derive sand dune advance and direction. The method employs a correlation of the elevation profiles over several dunes and was sucessfully validated with synthetic data. The accuracy of this method is 5 meters of dune advance. One of the most active areas exhibiting sand and dune movement is the area of the Arabian Peninsula. Approximately one-third of the Arabian Peninsula is covered by sand dunes. Different wind regimes (Shamal, Kaus) cause sand dune movement in the selected study area in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula between 20-25 degrees North and 45-55 degrees

  2. Satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Since altimetry data are not really old enough to use the term data archaeology, Mr. Cheney referred to the stewardship of these data. He noted that it is very important to document the basis for an altimetry data set as the algorithms and corrections used to arrive at the Geophysical Data Record (GDR) have been improving and are continuing to improve the precision of sea level data derived from altimetry. He noted that the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data set has recently been reprocessed by his organization in the National Ocean Service of NOAA and made available to the scientific community on CD/ROM disks by the National Oceanographic Data Center of the U.S. (NODC). The new data set contains a satellite orbit more precise by an order of magnitude together with an improved water vapor correction. A new, comprehensive GDR Handbook has also been prepared.

  3. A Super-Resolution Laser Altimetry Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2014-01-01

    A super-resolution laser altimetry technique has been proposed to provide improved lidar altimetry from Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar data, and it is applicable to other similar atmospheric profiling lidar with low-pass filters. To achieve high altimetry resolution, the new technique relies on an empirical relationship between the peak signal ratio and the distance between land surface and the peak signal range bin center, which is directly derived from the CALIPSO lidar measurements and does not require the CALIPSO's transient response. The CALIPSO surface elevation results in Northern America retrieved by the new technique agree with the National Elevation Database high resolution elevation maps, and the comparisons suggest that the precision of the technique is much better than 1.4 m. The preliminary data product of land surface elevation retrieved by the new technique from CALIPSO lidar measurements is available to the altimetry community for evaluation.

  4. Estimation of Sea Ice Thickness Distributions through the Combination of Snow Depth and Satellite Laser Altimetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Nathan T.; Markus, Thorsten; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Sparling, Lynn C.; Krabill, William B.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Sonntag, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of sea ice freeboard and snow depth measurements from satellite data have the potential to provide a means to derive global sea ice thickness values. However, large differences in spatial coverage and resolution between the measurements lead to uncertainties when combining the data. High resolution airborne laser altimeter retrievals of snow-ice freeboard and passive microwave retrievals of snow depth taken in March 2006 provide insight into the spatial variability of these quantities as well as optimal methods for combining high resolution satellite altimeter measurements with low resolution snow depth data. The aircraft measurements show a relationship between freeboard and snow depth for thin ice allowing the development of a method for estimating sea ice thickness from satellite laser altimetry data at their full spatial resolution. This method is used to estimate snow and ice thicknesses for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from ICESat, snow depth data over first-year ice from AMSR-E, and snow depth over multiyear ice from climatological data. Due to the non-linear dependence of heat flux on ice thickness, the impact on heat flux calculations when maintaining the full resolution of the ICESat data for ice thickness estimates is explored for typical winter conditions. Calculations of the basin-wide mean heat flux and ice growth rate using snow and ice thickness values at the 70 m spatial resolution of ICESat are found to be approximately one-third higher than those calculated from 25 km mean ice thickness values.

  5. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  6. Interdisciplinary Earth Science Applications Using Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Dai, C.; Yi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite altimetry was conceived as a space geodetic concept for ocean surface topography mapping in the NASA-sponsored 1969 Williamstown, MA Conference, and was tested as part of the passive and active radar payload (S192), along with a radiometer and a scatterometer, on Skylab-1 in May 14, 1973. Since then, numerous radar and laser satellite altimetry missions orbiting/flying-by the Earth, Mars, Mercury, Titan and the Moon have been launched, evolving from the original scientific objective of marine gravity field mapping to a geodetic tool to address interdisciplinary Earth and planetary sciences. The accuracy of the radar altimeter has improved from 0.9 m RMS for the S-192 Skylab Ku-band compressed-pulse altimeter, to 2 cm RMS (2 second average) for the dual-frequency pulse-limited radar altimetry and associated sensors onboard TOPEX/POSEIDON. Satellite altimetry has evolved into a unique cross-disciplinary geodetic tool in addressing contemporary Earth science problems including sea-level rise, large-scale general ocean circulation, ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial hydrology, and bathymetry. Here we provide a concise review and describe specific results on the additional recent innovative and unconventional applications of interdisciplinary science research using satellite radar altimetry, including geodynamics, land subsidence, snow depth, wetland and cold region hydrology.

  7. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  8. Geophysical applications of satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwell, D.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Publications related to geophysical applications of Seasat and Geosat altimetry are reviewed for the period 1987-1990. Problems discussed include geoid and gravity errors, regional geoid heights and gravity anomalies, local gravity field/flexure, plate tectonics, and gridded geoid heights/gravity anomalies. 99 refs.

  9. A photogrammetric DEM of Greenland based on 1978-1987 aerial photos: validation and integration with laser altimetry and satellite-derived DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjaer, K. H.; Nuth, C.; Khan, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present a DEM of Greenland covering all ice-free terrain and the margins of the GrIS and local glaciers and ice caps. The DEM is based on the 3534 photos used in the aero-triangulation which were recorded by the Danish Geodata Agency (then the Geodetic Institute) in survey campaigns spanning the period 1978-1987. The GrIS is covered tens of kilometers into the interior due to the large footprints of the photos (30 x 30 km) and control provided by the aero-triangulation. Thus, the data are ideal for providing information for analysis of ice marginal elevation change and also control for satellite-derived DEMs.The results of the validation, error assessments and predicted uncertainties are presented. We test the DEM using Airborne Topographic Mapper (IceBridge ATM) as reference data; evaluate the a posteriori covariance matrix from the aero-triangulation; and co-register DEM blocks of 50 x 50 km to ICESat laser altimetry in order to evaluate the coherency.We complement the aero-photogrammetric DEM with modern laser altimetry and DEMs derived from stereoscopic satellite imagery (AST14DMO) to examine the mass variability of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS). Our analysis suggests that dynamically-induced mass loss started around 2003 and continued throughout 2014.

  10. The Geoscience Laser Altimetry/Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.; Degnan, John J., III; Bufton, Jack L.; Garvin, James B.; Abshire, James B.

    1987-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimetry/Ranging System (GLARS), a combined laser ranging and altimetry system capable of subcentimeter position determinations of retroflector targets and subdecimeter profiling of topography, is described. The system uses advanced but currently available state-of-the-art components. Laboratory, field, and numerical experiments have indicated the suitability of GLARS as an instrument for Eos and other space platforms.

  11. Satellite altimetry over large hydrological basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmant, Stephane

    2015-04-01

    The use of satellite altimetry for hydrological applications, either it is basin management or hydrological modeling really started with the 21st century. Before, during two decades, the efforts were concentrated on the data processing until a precision of a few decimeters could be achieved. Today, several web sites distribute hundreds of series spread over hundeds of rivers runing in the major basins of the world. Among these, the Amazon basin has been the most widely studied. Satellite altimetry is now routinely used in this transboundary basin to predict discharges ranging over 4 orders of magnitude. In a few years, satellite altimetry should evolve dramatically. This year, we should see the launchs of Jason-3 and that of Sentinel-3A operating in SAR mode. With SAR, the accuracy and resolution of a growing number of measurements should be improved. In 2020, SWOT will provide a full coverage that will join in a unique framework all the previous and forthcoming missions. These technical and thematical evolutions will be illustrated by examples taken in the Amazon and Congo basin.

  12. Mapping lake level changes using ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry data: a case study in arid regions of central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JunLi; Fang, Hui; Yang, Liao

    2011-12-01

    Lakes in arid regions of Central Asia act as essential components of regional water cycles, providing sparse but valuable water resource for the fragile ecological environments and human lives. Lakes in Central Asia are sensitive to climate change and human activities, and great changes have been found since 1960s. Mapping and monitoring these inland lakes would improve our understanding of mechanism of lake dynamics and climatic impacts. ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry provides an efficient tool of continuously measuring lake levels in these poorly surveyed remote areas. An automated mapping scheme of lake level changes is developed based on GLAS altimetry products, and the spatial and temporal characteristics of 9 typical lakes in Central Asia are analyzed to validate the level accuracies. The results show that ICESat/GLAS has a good performance of lake level monitoring, whose patterns of level changes are the same as those of field observation, and the max differences between GLAS and field data is 3cm. Based on the results, it is obvious that alpine lakes are increasing greatly in lake levels during 2003-2009 due to climate change, while open lakes with dams and plain endorheic lakes decrease dramatically in water levels due to human activities, which reveals the overexploitation of water resource in Central Asia.

  13. Amundsen-coast grounding-line retreat mapped with satellite photogrammetry and Ice Bridge and ICESat laser altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. E.; Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Amundsen coast of Antarctica is at present the site of some of the largest ice-sheet contributions to global sea-level change. NASA's Ice Bridge program has made detailed ice-thickness and altimetry surveys on the principal glaciers in this region, including Pine Island, Thwaites, Pope and Smith, focusing attention on the grounding zones in each case, where warming ocean waters have led to thinning of the seaward ends of these glaciers. This has led to accelerated discharge in three ways: by directly removing ice from the glaciers, by steepening the surface profiles near the grounding zone, and by thinning the ice towards the flotation point, reducing the area in contact with the bed and removing basal shear stress. By combining data from IceSat and Ice Bridge laser altimetry with Worldview stereophotogrammetry, we have developed maps of elevation change throughout the basins of these glaciers. These, together with Ice Bridge and AGASEA ice-thickness measurements, allow us to estimate ice freeboard at any time between 2003 and 2011 for any point for which we have an ice thickness measurement. Based on this, we have mapped grounding line positions for the major surveyed glaciers in the area. These maps show extensive grounding-line retreat in Pine Island and Pope glaciers through 2010, and substantial thinning near the Thwaites ice shelf bringing further ice into flotation. Extrapolation of current thinning rates, under the assumption that their spatial pattern and magnitude will remain constant, gives one scenario for the near future rate of grounding line retreat. Under this scenario, the current rate grounding line retreat can continue, at least locally, for the next 20-30 years, with slower rates of retreat thereafter as the grounding line reaches ice with larger surface slopes. Alternately, if the thinning pattern follows the grounding line, with peak thinning rates in the 10-20 km immediately upstream of the grounding line, the initial phase of the retreat

  14. Land subsidence measured by satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Brooks, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Radar altimeter measurements from the GEOS-3 and SEASAT satellites are being evaluated to assess their potential contribution to terrain mapping. The primary evaluation area is the San Joaquin Valley of southern California; 40,000/sq km of the Valley have been mapped at a contour interval of 10 m from the satellite altimeter measurements. The accuracy of the altimeter derived terrain elevations is being assessed by comparison with 1:24,000 and digitized 1:250,000 maps and by intercomparisons at the crossover altimeter intersections. Comparisons of the altimeter derived elevations with historical maps archived at the U.S. Geological Survey confirms the USGS 1926-1972 subsidence contours for this area. Preliminary results from a similar analysis in the Houston-Galveston area of subsidence also demonstrates a capability of measuring land subsidence by satellite altimetry.

  15. Spaceborne Laser Altimetry On Icesat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, B.

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is planned for launch on ICESat in 2002, into a 600 km altitude, near polar orbit from Vandenberg, California. The sys- tem is designed to operate up to five years in orbit. GLAS is under development by NASA Goddard and it will be delivered to the spacecraft contractor, Ball Aerospace, for mating and testing with the spacecraft bus. The GLAS instrument will transmit both near infrared (1064 nm) and green (532 nm) pulses using a diode-pumped, Q- switched Nd:YAG laser. The 1064 wavelength will be used for surface altimetry, in- cluding dense clouds, and the 532 wavelength will be used for atmospheric backscat- ter measurements. The altitude measurement will produce elevation time series of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, which will enable determination of present-day elevation change and mass balance. Other applications of the altimetry channel in- clude precise measurements of land topography and vegetation canopy heights, sea ice roughness and thickness, and ocean surface elevations. The atmospheric channel will provide information on the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The laser pulse energy at 1064 nm is about 75 mJ with a width of about 5 ns and the pulse has a divergence of about 0.11 mrad, which illuminates a spot on the surface with a 66 m diameter. Three lasers are available (two are required for lifetime requirements and the third provides redundancy). The pulse echo is captured with a 1 m telescope mounted on the rigid GLAS optical bench. A Si analog detector receives the return pulse and an A/D converter digitizes the pulse with a 1 GHz sampling rate. Two detectors and two digitizers are available for redundancy. Unlike wide pulse radar altimeters, accurate knowledge of the laser beam direction is required for the laser altimeter. The pointing will be determined with the assistance of an innovative system of CCD cameras that will measure the direction of each laser pulse with respect to

  16. Laser Altimetry Sampling Strategies over Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Markus, Thorsten; Kwok, Ron; Connor, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    With the conclusion of the science phase of the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission in late 2009, and the planned launch of ICESat-2 in late 2015, NASA has recently established the IceBridge program to provide continuity between missions. A major goal of IceBridge is to obtain a sea-ice thickness time series via airborne surveys over the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Typically two laser altimeters, the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and the Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS), are utilized during IceBridge flights. Using laser altimetry simulations of conventional analogue systems such as ICESat, LVIS and ATM, with the multi-beam system proposed for ICESat-2, we investigate differences in measurements gathered at varying spatial resolutions and the impact on sea-ice freeboard. We assess the ability of each system to reproduce the elevation distributions of two seaice models and discuss potential biases in lead detection and sea-surface elevation, arising from variable footprint size and spacing. The conventional systems accurately reproduce mean freeboard over 25km length scales, while ICESat-2 offers considerable improvements over its predecessor ICESat. In particular, its dense along-track sampling of the surface will allow flexibility in the algorithmic approaches taken to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio for accurate and precise freeboard retrieval.

  17. An observational philosophy for GEOS-C satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiffenbach, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The parameters necessary for obtaining a 10 cm accuracy for GEOS-C satellite altimetry are outlined. These data include oceanographic parameters, instrument calibration, pulse propagation, sea surface effects, and optimum design.

  18. Arctic geodynamics: Arctic science and ERS-1 satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed gravity field map of the mid Arctic Ocean, spreading ridge system was produced on the basis of ERS-1 satellite altimetry data. Areas of special concern, the Barents and Kara Seas, and areas surrounding the islands of Svalbard, Frans Josef Land and Novoya Zemlya are reviewed. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 degrees. Before ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents Sea, portions of the Arctic Ocean and the Norwegian sea are shown. The largest gravity anomalies occur along the Greenland fracture zone as well as along transform faults near Svalbard.

  19. Satellite Altimetry, Ocean Circulation, and Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1999-01-01

    Ocean circulation is a critical factor in determining the Earth's climate. Satellite altimetry has been proven a powerful technique for measuring the height of the sea surface for the study of global ocean circulation dynamics. A major objective of my research is to investigate the utility of altimeter data for ocean circulation studies. The 6 years' data record of TOPEX/POSEIDON have been analyzed to study the spatial and temporal characteristics of large-scale ocean variability. A major result obtained in 1998 is the discovery of large-scale oscillations in sea level with a period of 25 days in the Argentine Basin of the South Atlantic Ocean (see diagram). They exhibit a dipole pattern with counterclockwise rotational propagation around the Zapiola Rise (centered at 45S and 317E), a small seamount in the abyssal plain of the basin. The peak-to-trough amplitude is about 10 cm over a distance of 500-1000 km. The amplitude of these oscillations has large seasonal-to-interannual variations. The period and rotational characteristics of these oscillations are remarkably similar to the observations made by two current meters deployed near the ocean bottom in the region. What TOPEX/POSEIDON has detected apparently are manifestations of the movement of the entire water column (barotropic motion). The resultant transport variation is estimated to be about 50 x 10(exp 6) cubic M/S, which is about 50% of the total water transport in the region. Preliminary calculations suggest that these oscillations are topographically trapped waves. A numerical model of the South Atlantic is used to investigate the nature of and causes for these waves. A very important property of sea surface height is that it is directly related to the surface geostrophic velocity, which is related to deep ocean circulation through the density field. Therefore altimetry observations are not only useful for determining the surface circulation but also for revealing information about the deep ocean. Another

  20. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  1. Laser Altimetry for Earth and Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2001-01-01

    Laser altimeters are presently operating on spacecraft at Mars (MOLA), at the asteroid 433 Eros (NLR), and an earlier system operated at the Moon (Clementine) several years ago. These systems have all advanced our understanding of the evolution of the primary body and several more laser altimeter systems will be launched in the next several years around Earth and other planets to address a wide range of scientific problems. Laser technology for precision altimetry and atmospheric lidar is still in its infancy but the promise of the technology and its demonstrated results already show that laser altimetry/lidar will play an important role in future space observations. To date, lasers have mapped the Moon, Mars, and an asteroid but in a short while they will help measure the planetary librations of Mercury, the tidal distortions of Europa, and tree heights, upper atmosphere winds and the icecaps of planet Earth. Major areas of interest for the immediate future are the development of long-life lasers that can withstand the rigors of long planetary missions in extreme thermal and radiation environments and continue to operate successfully for many years.

  2. Laser altimetry on Bepi Colombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.; Thomas, N.

    A consortium led by Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bern and the DLR Institut für Planetenforschung Berlin will be proposing a Laser Altimeter for the upcoming Bepi Colombo mission to Mercury. The Laser Altimeter will be measuring the figure of the planet to 10m accuracy and the topography to an accuracy of 1m with a grid spacing of a few hundred meter along-track. In addition, attempts will be made to measure the tidal deformation of the planet which, as calculations have shown, should be on the order of a meter. The Laser Altimeter data will also provide constraints on the surface roughness from the divergence of the reflected laser signal, terrain slopes, and the surface albedo. It is even possible that the Laser Altimeter may provide constraints on the possible existence of ice in permanently shaded craters near the poles. Here, the Laser Altimeter will profit from providing its own illumination source. The instrument will work synergetically with both the radio science experiment and the stereo camera on Bepi Colombo. The radio science experiment will measure the gravity field. The Laser Altimeter topography data will be used to correct these measurements for the effects of surface topography and thereby allow a more reliable assessment of the interior structure of the planet including the lateral variations of the crust thickness and of the core radius. The Laser Altmeter and the stereo camera will work together to provide an accurate digital terrain model. This model will be used to assess the morphology, the volcanism and the tectonics of the planet. Prominent features of the topography know to us today such as lobate scarps will be measured accurately and provide important constraints on the cooling history of the planet.

  3. Laser altimetry at the centimeter-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, R.; Koch, C.; Christensen, U.; Hilchenbach, M.; Michaelis, H.; Kracht, D.

    2007-08-01

    Laser altimetry is a powerful tool to map planetary surfaces. In addition to the static topography, time-dependent variations such as libration and tidal elevation can be extracted from laser altimeter data in order to investigate the internal structure of the planetary body. In the frame of the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter project, simulations on the extraction of the tidal amplitude on Mercury's surface due to the solar gravitation have been carried out. Based on these results, we evaluate the instrument requirements for a laser altimeter that orbits Jupiter's moon Europa. The tidal bulges of Europa's ice crust should be as high as 30 m, if there is a subsurface ocean, but less than 1 m, if there is solid ice all the way down to the bedrock. The measurement precision achievable with an altimeter applying a miniaturized diode laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a single photon counting technique is explored, and the potentials of the integration of the laser altimeter with a high-resolution camera are discussed.

  4. Using satellite altimetry and tide gauges for storm surge warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Cheng, Y.; Deng, X.; Steward, M.; Gharineiat, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The combination of the coarse temporal sampling by satellite altimeters in the deep ocean with the high temporal sampling at sparsely located tide gauges along the coast has been used to improve the forecast of high water for the North Sea along the Danish Coast and for the northeast coast of Australia. For both locations we have tried to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the use of satellite altimetry to capture high frequency signals (surges) using data from the past 20 years. The two regions are chosen to represent extra-tropical and tropical storm surge conditions. We have selected several representative high water events on the two continents based on tide gauge recordings and investigated the capability of satellite altimetry to capture these events in the sea surface height data. Due to the lack of recent surges in the North Sea we focused on general high water level and found that in the presence of two or more satellites we could capture more than 90% of the high water sea level events. In the Great Barrier Reef section of the northeast Australian coast, we have investigated several large tropical cyclones; one of these being Cyclone Larry, which hit the Queensland coast in March 2006 and caused both loss of lives as well as huge devastation. Here we demonstrate the importance of integrating tide gauges with satellite altimetry for forecasting high water at the city of Townsville in northeast Australia.

  5. Analysis and interpretation of lunar laser altimetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Sjogren, W. L.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    About 4.5 revolutions of laser altimetry were obtained by Apollo 15. This altimetry indicates a 2-km displacement of the center of mass from the center of figure toward the earthside. The terrae are quite rough, with frequent changes of 1 km or more in successive altitudes at about 33-km intervals. The mean altitude of terrae above maria is about 3 km with respect to the center of mass, indicating a thickness of about 24 km for a high-alumina crust. The maria are extremely level, with elevations varying not more than plus or minus 150 m about the mean over some stretches of 200 to 600 km. However, different maria have considerably different mean elevations. The largest unanticipated feature found is a 1400 km wide depression centered at about 180 deg longitude, and 2 km deep with respect to a 1737-km sphere (about 6 km deep with respect to the surrounding terrae). This basin has the appearance of typical terrae, although there are indications of a ring structure of about 600-km radius in the Orbiter photography. Altitudes across circum-Orientale features suggest that Mare Orientale is also a deep basin. The data appear to corroborate a model of early large-scale differentiation of a crust, followed a considerable time later by short intense episodes of mare filling with low viscosity lavas.

  6. The role of satellite altimetry in climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The results of three generations of satellite-borne radar altimetry experiments are summarized. The diverse measurements possible from this instrument are shown to be directly applicable to studies of the importance of the oceans in climate. The radar altimeter has unique value for investigations seeking knowledge of the interconnections between ocean dynamics, heat and momentum transfer across the air-sea interface, sea ice extent, and polar ice sheet thickness.

  7. Laser altimetry of Mercury, Moon, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.; Barnouin, O. S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Since March 29 of this year, the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been ranging twice daily to the surface of Mercury from orbit, collecting more than 1 million ranges each month. Mercury joins Earth, Moon, and Mars as a planetary body mapped precisely by laser altimetry from orbit. Ranging covers nearly all of the northern hemisphere. The southern hemisphere largely lies beyond the 1800-km range of MLA from MESSENGER's eccentric orbit, but the 10-cm-precision MLA data will eventually be complemented by less precise radio occultation and limb profiling measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft, as well as by digital topographic models produced by stereo photogrammetry. Mercury topography is distinguished from its larger and smaller counterparts by a relatively low (<10 km) dynamic range, less than half that of Earth, Moon, and Mars, and two-thirds that of its nearest neighbor, Venus. There are ample indications from the topography of Mercury impact structures as well as from its low-degree shape that Mercury's thermal evolution was complex and differed from those of other terrestrial planets. Central to the thermal history are the extensive contractional tectonic features for which altimetry quantifies accommodated strain. As well, MLA profiles of extensional graben within more than two dozen impact craters and basins, together with topographic and gravity field observations, will constrain the evolution of Mercury's upper crust and lithosphere. Lidar topographic data provide a wealth of geological contextual information regarding impact crater formation and modification, tectonics, volcanism, lithospheric strength, thermal evolution, and internal structure. Topography is essential for orthorectification of images and calibration of reflectance data. Geodetic topography, referenced to the center of mass, in conjunction with gravity, allows an assessment of the distribution of

  8. Mean sea level determination from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.; Agrawal, B. B.; Brown, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The primary experiment on the Geodynamics Experimental Ocean Satellite-3 (GEOS-3) is the radar altimeter. This experiment's major objective is to demonstrate the utility of measuring the geometry of the ocean surface, i.e. the geoid. Results obtained from this experiment so far indicate that the planned objectives of measuring the topography of the ocean surface with an absolute accuracy of + or - 5 meters can be met and perhaps exceeded. The GEOS-3 satellite altimeter measurements have an instrument precision in the range of + or - 25 cm to + or - 50 cm when the altimeter is operating in the short pulse mode.

  9. Mean sea level determination from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.; Agrawal, B. B.; Brown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The primary experiment on the Geodynamics Experimental Ocean Satellite-3 (GEOS-3) is the radar altimeter. This experiment's major objective is to demonstrate the utility of measuring the geometry of the ocean surface; i.e., the geoid. Results obtained from this experiment so far indicate that the planned objectives of measuring the topography of the ocean surface with an absolute accuracy of + or - 5 m can be met and perhaps exceeded. The GEOS-3 satellite altimeter measurements have an instrument precision in the range of + or - 25 cm to + or - 50 cm when the altimeter is operating in the 'short pulse' mode. After one year's operations of the altimeter, data from over 5000 altimeter passes have been collected. With the mathematical models developed and the altimeter data presently available, mapping of local areas of ocean topography has been realized to the planned accuracy levels and better. This paper presents the basic data processing methods employed and some interesting results achieved with the early data. Plots of mean sea surface heights as inferred by the altimeter measurements are compared with a detailed 1 by 1 deg gravimetric geoid.

  10. Detection of uncharted seamounts using satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarewicz, A.P.; Schwank, D.C.

    1982-04-01

    The topography of the marine geoid (and corresponding sea surface) contains characteristic local features caused by sediments. These features can be successfully detected and located using matched filters to process single tracks of satellite altimeter data. Comparison of detected seamount features with the SNYBAPS and Scripps bathymetric data bases can reveal uncharted seamounts. This technique has been applied to 33 Seasat tracks in a region of the western Pacific bounded by 0 to 15 degrees North and 160 and 165 degrees East. From this analysis, we find three uncharted seamounts in this region. In all three cases, a detailed examination of the bathymetry shows no known bathymetric feature consistent with the detected signature. The method used to estimate the size and location of these uncharted seamounts is discussed.

  11. New estimates of oceanic tidal energy dissipation from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David E.; Ray, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    As a novel approach to computing the flux of tidal power into shelf areas, tidal maps of an oceanic area near the Patagonian Shelf are derived from 11 months of altimetry records from the GEOSAT satellite. Power fluxes are computed from the maps through Laplace's tidal equations. Flux vectors for M2 clearly show a convergence on to the southern portion of the shelf sea and their total is nearly twice the loss computed by Miller for that area. A decrease of 'quality factor' with frequency from M2 to S2 is in keeping with Webb's hypothesis of shelf resonances at frequencies a little higher than the tidal band.

  12. ICESat laser altimetry over small mountain glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treichler, Désirée; Kääb, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Using sparsely glaciated southern Norway as a case study, we assess the potential and limitations of ICESat laser altimetry for analysing regional glacier elevation change in rough mountain terrain. Differences between ICESat GLAS elevations and reference elevation data are plotted over time to derive a glacier surface elevation trend for the ICESat acquisition period 2003-2008. We find spatially varying biases between ICESat and three tested digital elevation models (DEMs): the Norwegian national DEM, SRTM DEM, and a high-resolution lidar DEM. For regional glacier elevation change, the spatial inconsistency of reference DEMs - a result of spatio-temporal merging - has the potential to significantly affect or dilute trends. Elevation uncertainties of all three tested DEMs exceed ICESat elevation uncertainty by an order of magnitude, and are thus limiting the accuracy of the method, rather than ICESat uncertainty. ICESat matches glacier size distribution of the study area well and measures small ice patches not commonly monitored in situ. The sample is large enough for spatial and thematic subsetting. Vertical offsets to ICESat elevations vary for different glaciers in southern Norway due to spatially inconsistent reference DEM age. We introduce a per-glacier correction that removes these spatially varying offsets, and considerably increases trend significance. Only after application of this correction do individual campaigns fit observed in situ glacier mass balance. Our correction also has the potential to improve glacier trend significance for other causes of spatially varying vertical offsets, for instance due to radar penetration into ice and snow for the SRTM DEM or as a consequence of mosaicking and merging that is common for national or global DEMs. After correction of reference elevation bias, we find that ICESat provides a robust and realistic estimate of a moderately negative glacier mass balance of around -0.36 ± 0.07 m ice per year. This regional

  13. An Online Satellite Altimetry Data Processing System: Ads Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, A.; Braun, A.; Schöne, T.; Wen, H.; Reigber, C.

    To help solving important issues of climate change and sea level change and to un- derstand the complex system Earth, an interdisciplinary interpretation of various data sets is needed. Several groups on the national and international level are recently ac- tive in building up services to faciliate the access to geoscientific data to a broader community, especially the access to higher level products. In Germany, GFZ-Potsdam is currently building up the modular German Earth Science and Information System (GESIS). In the frame of GESIS the Altimeter Database System (ADS) has been com- pleted recently. This modul provides high quality data and processing capabilities for radar altimetry data to a wide range of users. The ADS modul can be accessed worldwide via the internet based user-interface "ADS Central" with a standard browser at (http://gesis.gfz-potsdam.de/ads). After a registra- tion process the system offers higher level standard products, calculated routinely from the harmonised and intercalibrated satellite database. Additionally, ADS allows to generate individual user specific products. The user is able to perform several processing and analysing steps, e.g. to generate mean sea sur- face height grids, to extract altimetry data time series around a given location, to anal- yse parameter variability, or to perform a crossover analysis. The user can specify general parameters like the satellite mission, time interval and region of the used data. Additionally, different available correction models can be choosen, which will be ap- plied to the data. It is further possible to enter several quality parameters to optimize the data for individual applications. These individual user defined products are au- tomatically processed by ADS at GFZ-Potsdam and are subsequently distributed via anonymous ftp. The system is an attempt to offer easy access to the daily growing satellite altime- try database and numerous correction models and orbits. Due to the effectiveness

  14. ICESat-2: Next-Generation Laser Altimetry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, C. E.; Neumann, T.; Markus, T.

    2014-12-01

    Despite technical challenges encountered after its launch in 2003, NASA's original Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) produced a rich topographic record, and provided our first large-scale assessments of elevation change and mass balance of the polar ice sheets. The lessons learned from this mission, combined with the availability of new technologies, have guided the design and development of the follow-on ICESat-2 mission and its Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). Scheduled for launch in 2017, ICESat-2 will operate year-round, at a lower orbit inclination, extending coverage to +/- 88 degrees latitude, and at a lower altitude, yielding 1,387 revolutions in a 91-day repeat ground track. The ATLAS instrument uses photon-counting detectors to record surface returns from six laser beams, grouped into three pairs, yielding denser spatial coverage and enabling direct measurements of local slopes. As a result, ICESat-2 will provide a more detailed view of the Earth's surface. Here, we discuss the mission design and concepts of operations. We focus primarily on the strategies being developed for collecting altimetry data over different surfaces, including the ice sheets, sea ice, oceans, vegetation and other scientific targets of opportunity.

  15. Fusion of Laser Altimetry Data with Dems Derived from Stereo Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, T.; Csatho, B. M.; Duncan, K.

    2016-06-01

    During the last two decades surface elevation data have been gathered over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from a variety of different sensors including spaceborne and airborne laser altimetry, such as NASA's Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS), as well as from stereo satellite imaging systems, most notably from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Worldview. The spatio-temporal resolution, the accuracy, and the spatial coverage of all these data differ widely. For example, laser altimetry systems are much more accurate than DEMs derived by correlation from imaging systems. On the other hand, DEMs usually have a superior spatial resolution and extended spatial coverage. We present in this paper an overview of the SERAC (Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection) system, designed to cope with the data complexity and the computation of elevation change histories. SERAC simultaneously determines the ice sheet surface shape and the time-series of elevation changes for surface patches whose size depends on the ruggedness of the surface and the point distribution of the sensors involved. By incorporating different sensors, SERAC is a true fusion system that generates the best plausible result (time series of elevation changes) a result that is better than the sum of its individual parts. We follow this up with an example of the Helmheim gacier, involving ICESat, ATM and LVIS laser altimetry data, together with ASTER DEMs.

  16. The ICESat-2 Laser Altimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, Waleed; Zwally, H. Jay; Bindschadler, Robert; Csatho, Bea; Farrell, Sinead Louise; Fricker, Helen Amanda; Harding, David; Kwok, Ronald; Lefsky, Michael; Markus, Thorsten; Marshak, Alexander; Neumann, Thomas; Palm, Stephen; Schutz, Bob; Smith, Ben; Spinhirne, James; Webb, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Satellite and aircraft observations have revealed that remarkable changes in the Earth s polar ice cover have occurred in the last decade. The impacts of these changes, which include dramatic ice loss from ice sheets and rapid declines in Arctic sea ice, could be quite large in terms of sea level rise and global climate. NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2), currently planned for launch in 2015, is specifically intended to quantify the amount of change in ice sheets and sea ice and provide key insights into their behavior. It will achieve these objectives through the use of precise laser measurements of surface elevation, building on the groundbreaking capabilities of its predecessor, the Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). In particular, ICESat-2 will measure the temporal and spatial character of ice sheet elevation change to enable assessment of ice sheet mass balance and examination of the underlying mechanisms that control it. The precision of ICESat-2's elevation measurement will also allow for accurate measurements of sea ice freeboard height, from which sea ice thickness and its temporal changes can be estimated. ICESat-2 will provide important information on other components of the Earth System as well, most notably large-scale vegetation biomass estimates through the measurement of vegetation canopy height. When combined with the original ICESat observations, ICESat-2 will provide ice change measurements across more than a 15-year time span. Its significantly improved laser system will also provide observations with much greater spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and accuracy than has ever been possible before.

  17. Revisiting the pole tide for and from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen; Wahr, John; Beckley, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Satellite altimeter sea surface height observations include the geocentric displacements caused by the pole tide, namely the response of the solid Earth and oceans to polar motion. Most users of these data remove these effects using a model that was developed more than 20 years ago. We describe two improvements to the pole tide model for satellite altimeter measurements. Firstly, we recommend an approach that improves the model for the response of the oceans by including the effects of self-gravitation, loading, and mass conservation. Our recommended approach also specifically includes the previously ignored displacement of the solid Earth due to the load of the ocean response, and includes the effects of geocenter motion. Altogether, this improvement amplifies the modeled geocentric pole tide by 15 %, or up to 2 mm of sea surface height displacement. We validate this improvement using two decades of satellite altimeter measurements. Secondly, we recommend that the altimetry pole tide model exclude geocentric sea surface displacements resulting from the long-term drift in polar motion. The response to this particular component of polar motion requires a more rigorous approach than is used by conventional models. We show that erroneously including the response to this component of polar motion in the pole tide model impacts interpretation of regional sea level rise by ± 0.25 mm/year.

  18. Satellite altimetry based rating curves throughout the entire Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, A.; Calmant, S.; Paiva, R. C.; Collischonn, W.; Silva, J. S.; Bonnet, M.; Seyler, F.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazonian basin is the largest hydrological basin all over the world. In the recent past years, the basin has experienced an unusual succession of extreme draughts and floods, which origin is still a matter of debate. Yet, the amount of data available is poor, both over time and space scales, due to factor like basin's size, access difficulty and so on. One of the major locks is to get discharge series distributed over the entire basin. Satellite altimetry can be used to improve our knowledge of the hydrological stream flow conditions in the basin, through rating curves. Rating curves are mathematical relationships between stage and discharge at a given place. The common way to determine the parameters of the relationship is to compute the non-linear regression between the discharge and stage series. In this study, the discharge data was obtained by simulation through the entire basin using the MGB-IPH model with TRMM Merge input rainfall data and assimilation of gage data, run from 1998 to 2010. The stage dataset is made of ~800 altimetry series at ENVISAT and JASON-2 virtual stations. Altimetry series span between 2002 and 2010. In the present work we present the benefits of using stochastic methods instead of probabilistic ones to determine a dataset of rating curve parameters which are consistent throughout the entire Amazon basin. The rating curve parameters have been computed using a parameter optimization technique based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler and Bayesian inference scheme. This technique provides an estimate of the best parameters for the rating curve, but also their posterior probability distribution, allowing the determination of a credibility interval for the rating curve. Also is included in the rating curve determination the error over discharges estimates from the MGB-IPH model. These MGB-IPH errors come from either errors in the discharge derived from the gage readings or errors in the satellite rainfall estimates. The present

  19. Monitoring drying up of Urmia lake with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohi, Shirzad; Sneeuw, Nico

    2013-04-01

    Urmia lake is a UNESCO protected area with more than a hundred small rocky islands. It is home to several species of birds and animals. Located in northwestern Iran, it is the largest lake in the Middle East and the third largest salty water lake on earth. It has a surface area of approximately 5200 km², and an average depth of 16 m. Unfortunately during the recently years Urmia lake has been shrinking. If the drought process continues at the current rate it would be disappear in the near future. The main factors that speeds up the drought rate of the lake, are dam construction on the main rivers which feeds the lake, evaporation and lack of precipitation during recent years as well as irrigation. The construction of a causeway in the middle of the lake also affects the natural ecosystem of the lake. The case of Urmia lake and similar cases in other parts of the word emphasize the role of new technology such as satellite altimetry in better management of water resource and monitoring such critical situations. In this research we show the current situation and recent past of the lake from processing 10 years of Envisat satellite radar altimetry data. For internal validation of the result, water level time series were built from ascending and descending tracks separately and for external validation in-situ gauge measurements were used. Internal and external comparisons indicates the result are consistent, i.e there is no bias and systematic error in Envisat data. The RMSE between ascending and descending tracks is several centimeters and between satellite and gauge data is 1m. Water level time series analysis shows that there is a declining rate of 0.3 m/year in the water level but after 2005 it seems to have accelerated. This rate increases the salinity of lake and expands receding shoreline rapidly so the lake bed will reveal fast because the lake is shallow especially in the south part. Following this research we are investigating to find the best re-tracker in

  20. Arctic Ocean Gravity Field Derived From ERS-1 Satellite Altimetry.

    PubMed

    Laxon, S; McAdoo, D

    1994-07-29

    The derivation of a marine gravity field from satellite altimetry over permanently ice-covered regions of the Arctic Ocean provides much new geophysical information about the structure and development of the Arctic sea floor. The Arctic Ocean, because of its remote location and perpetual ice cover, remains from a tectonic point of view the most poorly understood ocean basin on Earth. A gravity field has been derived with data from the ERS-1 radar altimeter, including permanently ice-covered regions. The gravity field described here clearly delineates sections of the Arctic Basin margin along with the tips of the Lomonosov and Arctic mid-ocean ridges. Several important tectonic features of the Amerasia Basin are clearly expressed in this gravity field. These include the Mendeleev Ridge; the Northwind Ridge; details of the Chukchi Borderland; and a north-south trending, linear feature in the middle of the Canada Basin that apparently represents an extinct spreading center that "died" in the Mesozoic. Some tectonic models of the Canada Basin have proposed such a failed spreading center, but its actual existence and location were heretofore unknown.

  1. Detailed gravity anomalies from Geos 3 satellite altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalapillai, G. S.; Mourad, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed gravity anomalies are computed from a combination of Geos 3 satellite altimeter and terrestrial gravity data using least-squares principles. The mathematical model used is based on the Stokes' equation modified for a nonglobal solution. Using Geos 3 data in the calibration area, the effects of several anomaly parameter configurations and data densities/distributions on the anomalies and their accuracy estimates are studied. The accuracy estimates for 1 deg x 1 deg mean anomalies from low density altimetry data are of the order of 4 mgal. Comparison of these anomalies with the terrestrial data and also with Rapp's data derived using collocation techniques show rms differences of 7.2 and 4.9 mgal, respectively. Indications are that the anomaly accuracies can be improved to about 2 mgal with high density data. Estimation of 30 in. x 30 in. mean anomalies indicates accuracies of the order of 5 mgal. Proper verification of these results will be possible only when accurate ground truth data become available.

  2. Equilibrium wave spectrum and sea state bias in satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Srokosz, Meric A.

    1991-01-01

    For a well-developed sea at equilibrium with a constant wind, the energy-containing range of the wavenumber spectrum for wind-generated gravity waves is approximated by a generalized power law involving the angular spread function and mu, interpreted as a fractal codimension of a small surface patch. Dependence of mu on the wave age is estimated, and the 'Phillips constant', beta, along with the low-wavenumber boundary, k0, of the inertial subrange are analyzed on the basis of the wave action and energy conservation principles. The resulting expressions are employed to evaluate various non-Gaussian statistics of a weakly nonlinear sea surface, which determine the sea state bias in satellite altimetry. The locally accelerated decay of the spectral density function in a high-wavenumber dissipation subrange is pointed out as an important factor of wave dynamics and the geometrical optics treatment of the sea state bias. The analysis is carried out in the approximation of a unidirectional wave field and confined to the case of a well-developed sea.

  3. Global gravity field to degree and order 30 from Geos 3 satellite altimetry and other data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the geopotential field in spherical harmonics to degree and order 30 is obtained from Geos 3 satellite to sea surface altimetry data, terrestrial gravity measurements and satellite perturbation analysis. A general perturbation solution is employed for the calculation of the orbits of 10 satellites based on satellite laser ranging data, and 1 deg x 1 deg surface gravity data are used to compute 550 km x 550 km block anomalies by means of autocovariance analysis. Altimeter-determined sea-surface heights, which are taken as the geoid, are averaged for each 1 deg x 1 deg ocean surface area and treated by autocovariance analysis to obtain 550 x 550 km block undulations. Observation and normal equations are formed from the altimeter and surface gravity data, which together cover 1635 out of 1654 possible surface elements, and are combined with the available satellite-derived normal equations to obtain a solution for the spherical harmonics coefficients. In addition, a value of 6,378,138.23 + or - 1.3 m is obtained for the earth's semimajor axis.

  4. Satellite Altimetry based River Forecasting of Transboundary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, F.; Siddique-E-Akbor, A.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.; Biancamaria, S.

    2012-12-01

    Forecasting of this transboundary flow in downstream nations however remains notoriously difficult due to the lack of basin-wide in-situ hydrologic measurements or its real-time sharing among nations. In addition, human regulation of upstream flow through diversion projects and dams, make hydrologic models less effective for forecasting on their own. Using the Ganges-Brahmaputra (GB) basin as an example, this study assesses the feasibility of using JASON-2 satellite altimetry for forecasting such transboundary flow at locations further inside the downstream nation of Bangladesh by propagating forecasts derived from upstream (Indian) locations through a hydrodynamic river model. The 5-day forecast of river levels at upstream boundary points inside Bangladesh are used to initialize daily simulation of the hydrodynamic river model and yield the 5-day forecast river level further downstream inside Bangladesh. The forecast river levels are then compared with the 5-day-later "now cast" simulation by the river model based on in-situ river level at the upstream boundary points in Bangladesh. Future directions for satellite-based forecasting of flow are also briefly overviewed.round tracks or virtual stations of JASON-2 (J2) altimeter over the GB basin shown in yellow lines. The locations where the track crosses a river and used for deriving forecasting rating curves is shown with a circle and station number (magenta- Brahmaputra basin; blue - Ganges basin). Circles without a station number represent the broader view of sampling by JASON-2 if all the ground tracks on main stem rivers and neighboring tributaries of Ganges and Brahmaputra are considered.

  5. Detailed gravity anomalies from GEOS-3 satellite altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalapillai, G. S.; Mourad, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for deriving mean gravity anomalies from dense altimetry data was developed. A combination of both deterministic and statistical techniques was used. The basic mathematical model was based on the Stokes' equation which describes the analytical relationship between mean gravity anomalies and geoid undulations at a point; this undulation is a linear function of the altimetry data at that point. The overdetermined problem resulting from the excessive altimetry data available was solved using Least-Squares principles. These principles enable the simultaneous estimation of the associated standard deviations reflecting the internal consistency based on the accuracy estimates provided for the altimetry data as well as for the terrestrial anomaly data. Several test computations were made of the anomalies and their accuracy estimates using GOES-3 data.

  6. Feasibility of Estimating Snow Depth in Complex Terrain Using Satellite Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Stoll, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Satellite retrievals of snow depth and water equivalent (SWE) are critical for monitoring watershed scale processes around the world. However, the problem is especially challenging in mountainous regions where complex heterogeneities limit the utility of low resolution satellite sensors. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) collected surface elevation data along near-repeat reference transects over land areas from 2003-2009. Although intended for monitoring ice caps and sea ice, the seven year global GLAS data base has provided unprecedented opportunity to test the capability of satellite lidar technology for estimating snow depth over land. GLAS single track and low repeat frequency does not provide data sufficient for operational estimates. However, its comparatively small footprint size of -65 m and its database of seasonal repeat observations during both snow and no-snow conditions have been sufficient to evaluate the potential of spacebased lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth. Recent analysis of ICESat elevations in the Uinta Mountains in NE Utah provide encouraging results for watershed scale estimates of snow depth. Research reported here focuses on the sensitivity of several versions of an ICESat snow depth algorithm to a range of landscape types defined by vegetation cover, slope and roughness. Results are compared to available SNOTEL data.

  7. Measuring tidal deformations by laser altimetry. A performance model for the Ganymede Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, G.; Stark, A.; Hussmann, H.; Sohl, F.; Oberst, J.

    2015-11-01

    Invaluable information about the interior of icy satellites orbiting close to the giant planets can be gained by monitoring the response of the satellite's surfaces to external tidal forces. Due to its geodetic accuracy, laser altimetry is the method of choice to measure time-dependent radial surface displacements from orbit. We present an instrument performance model with special focus on the capabilities to determine the corresponding tidal Love number h2 and apply the model to the Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) on board of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). Based on the instrument and spacecraft performance, we derive the range error and the measurement capabilities of the GALA instrument to determine the amplitude of the tide induced radial displacement of Ganymede's surface using the cross-over technique. We find that h2 of Ganymede can be determined with an accuracy of better than 2% by using data acquired during the nominal mission. Furthermore, we show that this accuracy is sufficient to confirm the presence of a putative subsurface water ocean and, additionally, to constrain the thickness of the overlaying ice shell to ± 20km.

  8. Studies of oceanic tectonics based on GEOS-3 satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poehls, K. A.; Kaula, W. M.; Schubert, G.; Sandwell, D.

    1979-01-01

    Using statistical analysis, geoidal admittance (the relationship between the ocean geoid and seafloor topography) obtained from GEOS-3 altimetry was compared to various model admittances. Analysis of several altimetry tracks in the Pacific Ocean demonstrated a low coherence between altimetry and seafloor topography except where the track crosses active or recent tectonic features. However, global statistical studies using the much larger data base of all available gravimetry showed a positive correlation of oceanic gravity with topography. The oceanic lithosphere was modeled by simultaneously inverting surface wave dispersion, topography, and gravity data. Efforts to incorporate geoid data into the inversion showed that the base of the subchannel can be better resolved with geoid rather than gravity data. Thermomechanical models of seafloor spreading taking into account differing plate velocities, heat source distributions, and rock rheologies were discussed.

  9. Analysis of Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) and altimetry data from GEOS-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, L.; Matthews, E.; Downs, W.

    1978-01-01

    Radar altimetry and satellite-to-satellite (SST) range and range rate tracking measurements were used to infer the exterior gravitational field of the earth and the structure of the geoid from GEOS-C metric data. Under the SST analysis, a direct point-by-point estimate of gravity disturbance by means of a recursive filter with backward smoothing was attempted but had to be forsaken because of poor convergence. The adopted representation consists of a more or less uniform grid of discrete masses at a depth of approximately 400 km from the earth's surface. The layer is superimposed on a spherical harmonics model. The procedure for smoothing the altimetry and inferring the fine-structured gravity field over the Atlantic test area is described. The local disturbances are represented by means of a density layer. The altimeter height biases were first estimated by a least squares adjustment at orbital crossover points. After taking out the bias, long wavelength contributions from GEM-6 as well as a calibration correction were subtracted. The residual heights were then represented by a mass distribution beneath the earth's surface.

  10. Toward Automated Generation of Reservoir Water Elevation Changes From Satellite Radar Altimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeowo, M. A.; Lee, H.; Hossain, F.

    2015-12-01

    Until now, processing satellite radar altimetry data over inland water bodies on a large scale has been a cumbersome task primarily due to contaminated measurements from their surrounding topography. It becomes more challenging if the size of the water body is small and thus the number of available high-rate measurements from the water surface is limited. A manual removal of outliers is time consuming which limits a global generation of reservoir elevation profiles. This has limited a global study of lakes and reservoir elevation profiles for monitoring storage changes and hydrologic modeling. We have proposed a new method to automatically generate a time-series information from raw satellite radar altimetry without user intervention. With this method, scientist with little knowledge of altimetry can now independently process radar altimetry for diverse purposes. The method is based on K-means clustering, backscatter coefficient and statistical analysis of the dataset for outlier detection. The result of this method will be validated using in-situ gauges from US, Indus and Bangladesh reservoirs. In addition, a sensitivity analysis will be done to ascertain the limitations of this algorithm based on the surrounding topography, and the length of altimetry track overlap with the lake/reservoir. ­­ Finally, a reservoir storage change will be estimated on the study sites using MODIS and Landsat water classification for estimating the area of reservoir and the height will be estimated using Jason-2 and SARAL/Altika satellites.

  11. Validation of multi-mission satellite altimetry for the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtseva, Nadia; Soomere, Tarmo; Giudici, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Currently, three sources of wave data are available for the research community, namely, buoys, modelling, and satellite altimetry. The buoy measurements provide high-quality time series of wave properties but they are deployed only in a few locations. Wave modelling covers large domains and provides good results for the open sea conditions. However, the limitation of modelling is that the results are dependent on wind quality and assumptions put into the model. Satellite altimetry in many occasions provides homogeneous data over large sea areas with an appreciable spatial and temporal resolution. The use of satellite altimetry is problematic in coastal areas and partially ice-covered water bodies. These limitations can be circumvented by careful analysis of the geometry of the basin, ice conditions and spatial coverage of each altimetry snapshot. In this poster, for the first time, we discuss a validation of 30 years of multi-mission altimetry covering the whole Baltic Sea. We analysed data from RADS database (Scharroo et al. 2013) which span from 1985 to 2015. To assess the limitations of the satellite altimeter data quality, the data were cross-matched with available wave measurements from buoys of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute and Finnish Meteorological Institute. The altimeter-measured significant wave heights showed a very good correspondence with the wave buoys. We show that the data with backscatter coefficients more than 13.5 and high errors in significant wave heights and range should be excluded. We also examined the effect of ice cover and distance from the land on satellite altimetry measurements. The analysis of cross-matches between the satellite altimetry data and buoys' measurements shows that the data are only corrupted in the nearshore domain within 0.2 degrees from the coast. The statistical analysis showed a significant decrease in wave heights for sea areas with ice concentration more than 30 percent. We also checked and

  12. Subglacial water transport throughout Antarctica from ICESAT laser altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Fricker, H. A.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2007-12-01

    A survey of the Antarctic ice sheet using satellite laser altimetry has detected 46 small regions of surface uplift or drawdown in twelve different glacier drainages around Antarctica. Surface displacements are measured relative to the best-fitting plane passing through multiple (5-11) elevation measurements on the same repeat-track, allowing correction for across-track slopes. Volume displacements are derived by interpolating displacements from multiple tracks to a common grid. These ECAs (Elevation Change Anomalies) range from less than four km to more than 60 km across, with vertical displacements ranging from a few decimeters to over ten meters. Typical volume displacements are on the order of 0.05 cubic kilometers over the three-year survey, and the largest displacement is more than 1.4 cubic kilometers. Although the majority of the ECAs are within the Filchner- Ronne catchment, others (including those discussed by Fricker and others, 2007), are found in the Ross Embayment, in the drainages of Byrd Glacier and Lambert Glaciera, and in the interior of Wilkes Land. As have other researchers who have observed ECAs, we take these features to result from water motion at the bed. In all cases where the ice sheet velocity structure is known, the ECAs are in regions of ice stream or tributary flow, which implies that they are associated with melting bed conditions. Some of the ECAs appear to be downstream of linear features in the ice sheet surface, suggesting that they are associated with local minima in the hydraulic potential at the bed. Others have no clear association with surface topography. The relatively small number of ECAs precludes drawing strong conclusions about spatial and temporal correlations between filling and drainage events. However, a few conclusions are clear: Because adjacent ECAs are more likely to have correlated filling or drainage rates than to have anticorrelated filling or drainage rates, it does not appear that water is conserved among

  13. Airborne laser altimetry survey of Glaciar Tyndall, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kristian; Casassa, Gino; Rivera, Andrés; Forsberg, Rene; Gundestrup, Niels

    2007-10-01

    The first airborne laser altimetry measurements of a glacier in South America are presented. Data were collected in November of 2001 over Glaciar Tyndall, Torres del Paine National Park, Chilean Patagonia, onboard a Twin Otter airplane of the Chilean Air Force. A laser scanner with a rotating polygon-mirror system together with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) were fixed to the floor of the aircraft, and used in combination with two dual-frequency GPS receivers. Together, the laser-INS-GPS system had a nominal accuracy of 30 cm after data processing. On November 23rd, a total of 235 km were flown over the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with 5 longitudinal tracks with a mean swath width of 300 m, which results in a point spacing of approximately 2 m both along and across track. A digital elevation model (DEM) generated using the laser altimetry data was compared with a DEM produced from a 1975 map (1:50,000 scale — Instituto Geográfico Militar (IGM), Chile). A mean thinning of - 3.1 ± 1.0 m a - 1 was calculated for the ablation area of Glaciar Tyndall, with a maximum value of - 7.7 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at the calving front at 50 m a.s.l. and minimum values of between - 1.0 and - 2.0 ± 1.0 m a - 1 at altitudes close to the equilibrium line altitude (900 m a.s.l.). The thinning rates derived from the airborne survey were similar to the results obtained by means of ground survey carried out at ˜ 600 m of altitude on Glaciar Tyndall between 1975 and 2002, yielding a mean thinning of - 3.2 m a - 1 [Raymond, C., Neumann, T.A., Rignot, E., Echelmeyer, K.A., Rivera, A., Casassa, G., 2005. Retreat of Tyndall Glacier, Patagonia, over the last half century. Journal of Glaciology 173 (51), 239-247.]. A good agreement was also found between ice elevation changes measured with laser data and previous results obtained with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. We conclude that airborne laser altimetry is an effective means for accurately detecting glacier elevation

  14. Water resource monitoring in Iran using satellite altimetry and satellite gravimetry (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaki, Mehdi; Sneeuw, Nico

    2015-04-01

    Human civilization has always been in evolution by having direct access to water resources throughout history. Water, with its qualitative and quantitative effects, plays an important role in economic and social developments. Iran with an arid and semi-arid geographic specification is located in Southwest Asia. Water crisis has appeared in Iran as a serious problem. In this study we're going to use various data sources including satellite radar altimetry and satellite gravimetry to monitor and investigate water resources in Iran. Radar altimeters are an invaluable tool to retrieve from space vital hydrological information such as water level, volume and discharge, in particular from regions where the in situ data collection is difficult. Besides, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provide global high resolution observations of the time variable gravity field of the Earth. This information is used to derive spatio-temporal changes of the terrestrial water storage body. This study isolates the anthropogenic perturbations to available water supplies in order to quantify human water use as compared to available resources. Long-term monitor of water resources in Iran is contain of observing freshwaters, lakes and rivers as well as exploring ground water bodies. For these purposes, several algorithms are developed to quantitatively monitor the water resources in Iran. The algorithms contain preprocessing on datasets, eliminating biases and atmospheric corrections, establishing water level time series and estimating terrestrial water storage considering impacts of biases and leakage on GRACE data. Our primary goal in this effort is to use the combination of satellite radar altimetry and GRACE data to study on water resources as well as methods to dealing with error sources include cross over errors and atmospheric impacts.

  15. Requirements for a marine geoid compatible with geoid deducible from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fubara, D. M. J.; Mourad, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Theory deficiencies, data, and potential computational procedures that make the physical determination of the ocean geoid with true scale, shape, and absolute orientation of an elusive target are outlined. Satellite altimetry potential, in combination with adequate ground support and sea truth to resolve accurate global marine geoid and other peripheral benefits associated with ocean physics, are stated. Results are given in tabular form.

  16. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  17. A review of satellite radar altimetry applied to coastal ocean studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignudelli, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Satellite radar altimetry is today considered a mature technique in open ocean. The data stream from the various satellite missions are routinely used for a number of applications. In the last decade, significant research has been carried out into overcoming the problems to extend the capabilities of radar altimeters to the coastal zone, with the aim to integrate the altimeter-derived measurements of sea level, wind speed and significant wave height into coastal ocean observing systems. More/better (and new) datasets are being produced. Moreover, the advent of new satellite missions, both nadir-viewing (e.g., Sentinel-3) and wide-swath (e.g. SWOT), should globally improve both quantity and quality of coastal altimetry data. In this talk, after a brief review of the challenges in coastal altimetry and description of the new products, we showcase some application examples how the new products can be exploited, and we discuss directions for a global coastal altimetry dataset as an asset for long term monitoring of sea level and sea state in the coastal ocean.

  18. GNSS, Satellite Altimetry and Formosat-3/COSMIC for Determination of Ionosphere Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Alizadeh Elizei, M.; Schuh, Harald; Schmidt, Michael; Todorova, Sonya

    The dispersion of ionosphere with respect to the microwave signals allows gaining information about the parameters of this medium in terms of the electron density (Ne), or the Total Elec-tron Content (TEC). In the last decade space geodetic techniques, such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), satellite altimetry missions, and Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satel-lites have turned into a promising tool for remote sensing the ionosphere. The dual-frequency GNSS observations provide the main input data for development of Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM). However, the GNSS stations are heterogeneously distributed, with large gaps particu-larly over the sea surface, which lowers the precision of the GIM over these areas. Conversely, dual-frequency satellite altimetry missions provide information about the ionosphere precisely above the sea surface. In addition, LEO satellites such as Formosat-3/COSMIC (F-3/C) pro-vide well-distributed information of ionosphere around the world. In this study we developed GIMs of VTEC from combination of GNSS, satellite altimetry and F-3/C data with temporal resolution of 2 hours and spatial resolution of 5 degree in longitude and 2.5 degree in latitude. The combined GIMs provide a more homogeneous global coverage and higher precision and reliability than results of each individual technique.

  19. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of

  20. Arctic geodynamics: Continental shelf and deep ocean geophysics. ERS-1 satellite altimetry: A first look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.; Marquart, Gabriele; Scherneck, Hans-Georg

    1993-01-01

    An overall review of the Arctic Geodynamics project is presented. A composite gravity field model of the region based upon altimetry data from ERS-1, Geosat, and Seasat is made. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 deg. Both areas contain large continental shelf areas, passive margins, as well as recently formed deep ocean areas. Until ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents sea, portions of the Arctic ocean, and the Norwegian sea north of Iceland are shown. The gravity anomalies around Svalbard (Spitsbergen) and Bear island are particularly large, indicating large isostatic anomalies which remain from the recent breakup of Greenland from Scandinavian. Recently released gravity data from the Armed Forces Topographic Service of Russia cover a portion of the Barents and Kara seas. A comparison of this data with the ERS-1 produced gravity field is shown.

  1. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  2. Geostatistical evaluation of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Lambert Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzfeld, Ute C.; Lingle, Craig S.; Lee, Li-Her

    1993-01-01

    The potential of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Antarctic ice streams is evaluated, using retracked and slope-corrected data from the Lambert Glacier and Amery Ice Shelf area, East Antarctica, acquired by Geosat during the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM), 1986-89. The map area includes lower Lambert Glacier north of 72.18 deg S, the southern Amery Ice Shelf, and the grounded inland ice sheet on both sides. The Geosat ERM altimetry is found to provide substantially more complete coverage than the 1978 Seasat altimetry, due to improved tracking. Variogram methods are used to estimate the noise levels in the data as a function of position throughout the map area. The spatial structure in the data is quantified by constructing experimental variograms using altimetry from the area of the grounding zone of Lambert Glacier, which is the area chiefly of interest in this topographically complex region. Kriging is employed to invert the along-track height measurements onto a fine-scale 3 km grid. The unsmoothed along-track Geosat ERM altimetry yields spatially continuous maps showing the main topographic features of lower Lambert Glacier, upper Amery Ice Shelf and the adjacent inland ice sheet. The probable position of the grounding line of Lambert Glacier is identified from a break in slope at the grounded ice/floating ice transition. The approximate standard error of the kriged map is inferred from the data noise levels.

  3. North Atlantic teleconnection patterns signature on sea level from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Isabel; Lázaro, Clara; Joana Fernandes, M.; Bastos, Luísa

    2015-04-01

    Presently, satellite altimetry record is long enough to appropriately study inter-annual signals in sea level anomaly and ocean surface circulation, allowing the association of teleconnection patterns of low-frequency variability with the response of sea level. The variability of the Atlantic Ocean at basin-scale is known to be complex in space and time, with the dominant mode occurring on annual timescales. However, interannual and decadal variability have already been documented in sea surface temperature. Both modes are believed to be linked and are known to influence sea level along coastal regions. The analysis of the sea level multiannual variability is thus essential to understand the present climate and its long-term variability. While in the open-ocean sea level anomaly from satellite altimetry currently possesses centimetre-level accuracy, satellite altimetry measurements become invalid or of lower accuracy along the coast due to the invalidity of the wet tropospheric correction (WTC) derived from on-board microwave radiometers. In order to adequately analyse long-term changes in sea level in the coastal regions, satellite altimetry measurements can be recovered by using an improved WTC computed from recent algorithms that combine wet path delays from all available observations (remote sensing scanning imaging radiometers, GNSS stations, microwave radiometers on-board satellite altimetry missions and numerical weather models). In this study, a 20-year (1993-2013) time series of multi-mission satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, OSTM/Jason-2, ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, CryoSat-2 and SARAL), are used to characterize the North Atlantic (NA) long-term variability on sea level at basin-scale and analyse its response to several atmospheric teleconnections known to operate on the NA. The altimetry record was generated using an improved coastal WTC computed from either the GNSS-derived path Delay or the Data Combination methodologies developed by University of

  4. Surface Change Detection Using Large Footprint Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laser altimeters provide a precise and accurate method for mapping topography at fine horizontal and vertical scales. A laser altimeter provides range by measuring the roundtrip flight time of a short pulse of laser light from the laser altimeter instrument to the target surface. The range is then combined with laser beam pointing knowledge and absolute position knowledge to provide an absolute measurement of the surface topography. Newer generations of laser altimeters measure the range by recording the shape and time of the outgoing and received laser pulses. The shape of the return pulse can also provide unique information about the vertical structure of material such as vegetation within each laser footprint. Distortion of the return pulse is caused by the time-distributed reflections adding together and representing the vertical distribution of surfaces within the footprint. Larger footprints (10 - 100m in diameter) can support numerous target surfaces and thus provide the potential for producing complex return pulses. Interpreting the return pulse from laser altimeters has evolved from simple timing between thresholds, range-walk corrections, constant-fraction discriminators, and multi-stop time interval units to actual recording of the time varying return pulse intensity - the return waveform. Interpreting the waveform can be as simple as digitally thresholding the return pulse, calculating a centroid, to fitting one or more gaussian pulse-shapes to the signal. What we present here is a new technique for using the raw recorded return pulse as a raw observation to detect centimeter-level vertical topographic change using large footprint airborne and spaceborne laser altimetry. We use the correlation of waveforms from coincident footprints as an indication of the similarity in structure of the waveforms from epoch to epoch, and assume that low correlation is an indicator of vertical structure or elevation change. Thus, using vertically and horizontally

  5. Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Elevation Changes Derived from Satellite Altimetry for Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurkmans, R.T.W.L.; Bamber, J.L.; Sorensen, L. S.; Joughin, I. R.; Davis, C. H.; Krabill, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of ice sheet mass balance from satellite altimetry requires interpolation of point-scale elevation change (dHdt) data over the area of interest. The largest dHdt values occur over narrow, fast-flowing outlet glaciers, where data coverage of current satellite altimetry is poorest. In those areas, straightforward interpolation of data is unlikely to reflect the true patterns of dHdt. Here, four interpolation methods are compared and evaluated over Jakobshavn Isbr, an outlet glacier for which widespread airborne validation data are available from NASAs Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM). The four methods are ordinary kriging (OK), kriging with external drift (KED), where the spatial pattern of surface velocity is used as a proxy for that of dHdt, and their spatiotemporal equivalents (ST-OK and ST-KED).

  6. Determination of Interannual to Decadal Changes in Ice Sheet Mass Balance from Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Busalacchi, Antonioa J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A major uncertainty in predicting sea level rise is the sensitivity of ice sheet mass balance to climate change, as well as the uncertainty in present mass balance. Since the annual water exchange is about 8 mm of global sea level equivalent, the +/- 25% uncertainty in current mass balance corresponds to +/- 2 mm/yr in sea level change. Furthermore, estimates of the sensitivity of the mass balance to temperature change range from perhaps as much as - 10% to + 10% per K. Although the overall ice mass balance and seasonal and inter-annual variations can be derived from time-series of ice surface elevations from satellite altimetry, satellite radar altimeters have been limited in spatial coverage and elevation accuracy. Nevertheless, new data analysis shows mixed patterns of ice elevation increases and decreases that are significant in terms of regional-scale mass balances. In addition, observed seasonal and interannual variations in elevation demonstrate the potential for relating the variability in mass balance to changes in precipitation, temperature, and melting. From 2001, NASA's ICESat laser altimeter mission will provide significantly better elevation accuracy and spatial coverage to 86 deg latitude and to the margins of the ice sheets. During 3 to 5 years of ICESat-1 operation, an estimate of the overall ice sheet mass balance and sea level contribution will be obtained. The importance of continued ice monitoring after the first ICESat is illustrated by the variability in the area of Greenland surface melt observed over 17-years and its correlation with temperature. In addition, measurement of ice sheet changes, along with measurements of sea level change by a series of ocean altimeters, should enable direct detection of ice level and global sea level correlations.

  7. An inversion method for retrieving soil moisture information from satellite altimetry observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebbing, Bernd; Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen; Braakmann-Folgmann, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture represents an important component of the terrestrial water cycle that controls., evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. Consequently, knowledge on soil moisture variability is essential to understand the interactions between land and atmosphere. Yet, terrestrial measurements are sparse and their information content is limited due to the large spatial variability of soil moisture. Therefore, over the last two decades, several active and passive radar and satellite missions such as ERS/SCAT, AMSR, SMOS or SMAP have been providing backscatter information that can be used to estimate surface conditions including soil moisture which is proportional to the dielectric constant of the upper (few cm) soil layers . Another source of soil moisture information are satellite radar altimeters, originally designed to measure sea surface height over the oceans. Measurements of Jason-1/2 (Ku- and C-Band) or Envisat (Ku- and S-Band) nadir radar backscatter provide high-resolution along-track information (~ 300m along-track resolution) on backscatter every ~10 days (Jason-1/2) or ~35 days (Envisat). Recent studies found good correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in upper layers, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, indicating the potential of satellite altimetry both to reconstruct and to monitor soil moisture variability. However, measuring soil moisture using altimetry has some drawbacks that include: (1) the noisy behavior of the altimetry-derived backscatter (due to e.g., existence of surface water in the radar foot-print), (2) the strong assumptions for converting altimetry backscatters to the soil moisture storage changes, and (3) the need for interpolating between the tracks. In this study, we suggest a new inversion framework that allows to retrieve soil moisture information from along-track Jason-2 and Envisat satellite altimetry data, and we test this scheme over the Australian arid and semi-arid regions. Our method consists of: (i

  8. Vertical land movements from the combined use of satellite altimetry and tide gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Marta; Woppelmann, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Vertical ground displacements at tide gauge sites were estimated from the differenced time series of monthly satellite altimetry sea level anomalies minus tide gauge. We have used the time series of satellite altimetry that are routinely processed and distributed by four major data providers (three gridded and one along-track products) together with monthly tide gauge records from the datum controlled data set of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Differenced time series were built using three variants of altimetric time series. Each resulting record was analyzed assuming a combination of white noise and power-law noise of a priori unknown spectral index. The rate uncertainties, computed taking into account the noise content in the differenced time series, will be discussed. In particular, in the context of the departures from the white noise (expected only if both the satellite altimeter and the tide gauge were recording mostly the same sea level signals and their instrumental errors were negligible) and its amplitude. The most suitable altimetric product in terms of correlation and variance reduction at tide gauges, among those investigated, will be identified. Rates of vertical land motion computed with Global Positioning System (GPS) and rates obtained from the combination of altimetry and tide gauge records will be finally compared for those stations where both measurements are available.

  9. The Geoscience Laser Altimetry/Ranging System (GLARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Degnan, J. J.; Bufton, J. L.; Garvin, J. B.; Abshire, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimetry Ranging System (GLARS) is a highly precise distance measurement system to be used for making extremely accurate geodetic observations from a space platform. It combines the attributes of a pointable laser ranging system making observations to cube corner retroreflectors placed on the ground with those of a nadir looking laser altimeter making height observations to ground, ice sheet, and oceanic surfaces. In the ranging mode, centimeter-level precise baseline and station coordinate determinations will be made on grids consisting of 100 to 200 targets separated by distances from a few tens of kilometers to about 1000 km. These measurements will be used for studies of seismic zone crustal deformations and tectonic plate motions. Ranging measurements will also be made to a coarser, but globally distributed array of retroreflectors for both precise geodetic and orbit determination applications. In the altimetric mode, relative height determinations will be obtained with approximately decimeter vertical precision and 70 to 100 meter horizontal resolution. The height data will be used to study surface topography and roughness, ice sheet and lava flow thickness, and ocean dynamics. Waveform digitization will provide a measure of the vertical extent of topography within each footprint. The planned Earth Observing System is an attractive candidate platform for GLARS since the GLAR data can be used both for direct analyses and for highly precise orbit determination needed in the reduction of data from other sensors on the multi-instrument platform. (1064, 532, and 355 nm)Nd:YAG laser meets the performance specifications for the system.

  10. Undersea volcano production versus lithospheric strength from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Sandwell, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    All seamount signatures apparent in the SEASAT altimeter profiles were located and digitized. In addition to locating the seamount signatures, their amplitudes were also estimated. The second phase consisted of determining what basic characteristics of a seamount can be extracted from a single vertical deflection profile. Seven seamounts that had both good bathymetric coverage and good satellite altimeter coverage were used to test a simple flexural model. A method was developed to combine satellite altimeter profiles from several different satellites to construct a detailed and accurate geoid.

  11. Five years of LRO laser altimetry at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    After five years of near-continuous operation at the Moon, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on LRO continues to collect altimetry, surface roughness, slope and normal reflectance data. LOLA has acquired over 6 billion altimeter measurements, all geodetically controlled to the center-of-mass of the Moon with a radial precision of around 10 cm and an accuracy of about 1 meter. The position of the measurements on the lunar surface is primarily limited by the knowledge of the position of the spacecraft in orbit and in the last few years the LRO orbit accuracy has improved significantly as a result of the accurate gravity model of the Moon developed by the GRAIL Discovery mission. Our present estimate of positional accuracy is less than 10 m rms but is only achievable with a GRAIL gravity model to at least degree and order 600 because of the perturbing gravitational effect of the Moon’s surface features. Significant improvements in the global shape and topography have assisted the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) stereo mapping program, and the identification of potential lunar landing sites for ESA and Russia, particularly in the high-latitude polar regions where 5- and 10-meter average horizontal resolution has been obtained. LOLA’s detailed mapping of these regions has improved the delineation of permanently-shadowed areas and assisted in the understanding of the LEND neutron data, and its relationship to surface slopes. Recently a global, calibrated LOLA normal albedo dataset at 1064 nm has been developed.

  12. Improvement of modelled discharge by iterative refinement constrained using satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmant, S.; Paris, A.; Paiva, R. C.; Collischonn, W.; Santos da Silva, J.; Bonnet, M.

    2013-05-01

    In a basin such as the Amazon basin, many parts of the basin are devoid of measurements, whatever it is rain or stage / discharge measurements. This specificity is even more dramatic since this occurs in the -Andean- upstream part of the rivers, where the largest rainfalls are encountered. Therefore, it is almost impossible to ascertain the quality of model outputs such as discharge series in these areas. In the present study, we present a methodology to check for the likelihood of discharge series by comparing the discharge values to stage values gained by satellite altimetry. An iterative refinement is searched until a plausible rating curve is found at the location of each altimetry series. A case study is presented for the Japura - Caqueta river, a Brazil-Colombia transboundary river for which satellite altimetry is the only source of information in the Colombian -upstream- part of the basin. Noteworthy, the computation of the rating curves implies the joint tuning of the Manning coefficients and mean depth of the cross sections.

  13. Satellite Altimetry And Radiometry for Inland Hydrology, Coastal Sea-Level And Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kuo-Hsin

    In this study, we demonstrate three environmental-related applications employing altimetry and remote sensing satellites, and exemplify the prospective usage underlying the current progressivity in mechanical and data analyzing technologies. Our discussion starts from the improved waveform retracking techniques in need for altimetry measurements over coastal and inland water regions. We developed two novel auxiliary procedures, namely the Subwaveform Filtering (SF) method and the Track Offset Correction (TOC), for waveform retracking algorithms to operationally detect altimetry waveform anomalies and further reduce possible errors in determination of the track offset. After that, we present two demonstrative studies related to the ionospheric and tropospheric compositions, respectively, as their variations are the important error sources for satellite electromagnetic signals. We firstly compare the total electron content (TEC) measured by multiple altimetry and GNSS sensors. We conclude that the ionosphere delay measured by Jason-2 is about 6-10 mm shorter than the GPS models. On the other hand, we use several atmospheric variables to study the climate change over high elevation areas. Five types of satellite data and reanalysis models were used to study climate change indicators. We conclude that the spatial distribution of temperature trend among data products is quite different, which is probably due to the choice of various time spans. Following discussions about the measuring techniques and relative bias between data products, we applied our improved altimetry techniques to three environmental science applications with helps of remote sensing imagery. We first manifest the detectability of hydrological events by satellite altimetry and radiometry. The characterization of one-dimensional (along-track) water boundary using former Backscattering Coefficient (BC) method is assisted by the two-dimensional (horizontal) estimate of water extent using the Moderate

  14. Mapping the grounding zone of Ross Ice Shelf using ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Fricker, Helen A.; Padman, Laurie; Scambos, Ted A.; O'Neel, Shad

    2010-01-01

    We use laser altimetry from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) to map the grounding zone (GZ) of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, at 491 locations where ICESat tracks cross the grounding line (GL). Ice flexure in the GZ occurs as the ice shelf responds to short-term sea-level changes due primarily to tides. ICESat repeat-track analysis can be used to detect this region of flexure since each repeated pass is acquired at a different tidal phase; the technique provides estimates for both the landward limit of flexure and the point where the ice becomes hydrostatically balanced. We find that the ICESat-derived landward limits of tidal flexure are, in many places, offset by several km (and up to ∼60 km) from the GL mapped previously using other satellite methods. We discuss the reasons why different mapping methods lead to different GL estimates, including: instrument limitations; variability in the surface topographic structure of the GZ; and the presence of ice plains. We conclude that reliable and accurate mapping of the GL is most likely to be achieved when based on synthesis of several satellite datasets

  15. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  16. The integration and application of multi-satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Timothy James

    Satellite altimeter data spanning twenty-five years from GEOS-3, SEASAT, GEOSAT, ERS-1, TOPEX, and ERS-2 have been gathered, improved, validated, and integrated. Satellite data were updated with TOPEX-level corrections where possible. Wet troposphere and ionosphere altimeter corrections were evaluated globally, along-track, and zonally. Global mean sea level (GMSL) trend adjustments were made to ERS-1 and ERS-2 to correct for radiometer drifts with respect to TOPEX, improving their GMSL comparisons. IRI-95 model ionosphere corrections were evaluated against TOPEX dual-frequency measurements. New orbits were computed with improved accuracy for GEOS-3 (20 to 30 cm), SEASAT (10 to 15 cm), and GEOSAT (7 to 9 cm). An adaptive sequential filter was utilized to remove residual one-cycle-per-revolution radial orbit error. Optimal state noise compensation parameters for the filter were determined using a genetic algorithm. The application of the filter reduced single-satellite internal crossover differences. Relative altimeter biases between TOPEX and the other missions were determined using tide gauges. Relative biases were estimated for GEOS-3 (173 cm), SEASAT (37 and 26 cm, for 17-day and 3-day repeats), GEOSAT (7.9 and 8.9 cm, for GM and ERM), ERS-1 (-44.7 and -48.0 cm, for Phases A-F and Phase G), and ERS-2 (-9.0 cm). These biases are consistent with several other recent bias determinations and calibration campaigns. GMSL trends estimated for GEOSAT (1985--1988), ERS-1 (1991--1996), TOPEX (1993--1999), and ERS-2 (1995--1997), are -3.4 +/- 2.4, 2.3 +/- 1.1, 3.2 +/- 0.6, and 6.0 +/- 2.2 mm/year, respectively. GEOS-3 MSL exhibits a large slope (˜40 cm/year) and does not provide truly global coverage, and therefore cannot be used for global analyses. The short duration of the two SEASAT missions (July to October 1978) prevent GMSL trend analysis. GMSL from ERS-1, TOPEX, and ERS-2 were integrated into a single time series having an estimated mean sea level trend of 3

  17. Satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, J. P.

    1992-03-01

    Laser ranging to satellites is one of the most precise methods for positio ning on the surface of the Earth. Reference is made to the need for precise posi tioning and to the improvement brought by the use of space techniques. Satellite Laser Ranging system is then described and in view of the high precision of the results derived from its measurements comments are made to some of the more important applications: high precision networks tectonic plate motion polar motion and earth''s rotation. Finally plans for system improvement in the near future are also presented.

  18. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, T.; Bacon, S.; Ridout, A.; Thomas, S. F.; Aksenov, Y.; Wingham, D.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed in the Arctic due to limitations of conventional observation techniques. We present the first basin-wide, monthly estimates of Arctic Ocean SSH from satellite radar altimetry and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ~4cm) is dominated by seasonal freshwater fluxes and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increases by 2.3±1.1cm between 2003-2012 before falling to ca. 2003 levels between 2012-2014. The total secular change in SSH between 2003-2014 is then dominated by a 1.8±0.6cm net increase in ocean mass. The well-documented doming of SSH in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with SSH reductions in the Siberian Arctic. Ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution modelled results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle. We also examine changes in Arctic Ocean geostrophic circulation and compare this with sea ice drift and atmospheric circulation. There is an increase in ocean geostrophic circulation around the Beaufort Gyre in late 2007, a year that saw large reductions in multiyear sea ice coverage in the Canadian Arctic as well as strong wintertime atmopheric forcing.

  19. Eddy properties in the Western Mediterranean Sea from satellite altimetry and a numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudier, Romain; Renault, Lionel; Pascual, Ananda; Brasseur, Pierre; Chelton, Dudley; Beuvier, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Three different eddy detection and tracking methods are applied to the outputs of a high-resolution simulation in the Western Mediterranean Sea in order to extract mesoscale eddy characteristics. The results are compared with the same eddy statistics derived from satellite altimetry maps over the same period. Eddy radii are around 30 km in altimetry maps whereas, in the model, they are around 20 km. This is probably due to the inability of altimetry maps to resolve the smaller mesoscale in the region. About 30 eddies are detected per day in the basin with a very heterogeneous spatial distribution and relatively short lifespans (median life around 13 days). Unlike other areas of the open ocean, they do not have a preferred direction of propagation but appear to be advected by mean currents. The number of detected eddies seems to present an annual cycle when separated according to their lifespan. With the numerical simulation, we show that anticyclones extend deeper in the water column and have a more conic shape than cyclones.

  20. Correcting the hooking effect in satellite altimetry data for time series estimation over smaller rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boergens, Eva; Dettmering, Denise; Schwatke, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Since many years the numbers of in-situ gauging stations are declining. Satellite altimetry can be used as a gap-filler even over smaller inland waters like rivers. However, since altimetry measurements are not designed for inland water bodies a special data handling is necessary in order to estimate reliable water level heights over inland waters. We developed a new routine for estimating water level heights over smaller inland waters with satellite altimetry by correcting the hooking effect. The hooking effect occurs when the altimeter is not measuring in nadir before and after passing a water body due to the stronger reflectance of the water than the surrounding land surface. These off-nadir measurements, together with the motion of the satellite, lead to overlong ranges and heights declining in a parabolic shape. The vertex of this parabola is on the water surface. Therefore, by estimating the parabola we are able to determine the water level height without the need of any point over the water body itself. For estimating the parabola we only use selected measurements which are effected by the hooking effect. The applied search approach is based on the RANSAC algorithm (random sample consensus) which is a non-deterministic algorithm especially designed for finding geometric entities in point clouds with many outliers. With the hooking effect correction we are able to retrieve water level height time series from the Mekong River from Envisat and Saral/Altika high frequency data. It is possible to determine reliable time series even if the river has only a width of 500m or less. The expected annual variations are clearly depicted and the comparison of the time series with available in-situ gauging data shows a very good agreement.

  1. The Use of Laser Altimetry in the Orbit and Attitude Determination of Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Luthcke, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    Altimetry from the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA) which is carried on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been analyzed for the period of the MOS mission known as Science Phasing Orbit 1 (SPO-1). We have used these altimeter ranges to improve orbit and attitude knowledge for MGS. This has been accomplished by writing crossover constraint equations that have been derived from short passes of MOLA data. These constraint equations differ from traditional Crossover constraints and exploit the small foot print associated with laser altimetry.

  2. Non-Stationary Internal Tides Observed with Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal variability of the internal tide is inferred from a 17-year combined record of Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellite altimeters. A global sampling of along-track sea-surface height wavenumber spectra finds that non-stationary variance is generally 25% or less of the average variance at wavenumbers characteristic of mode-l tidal internal waves. With some exceptions the non-stationary variance does not exceed 0.25 sq cm. The mode-2 signal, where detectable, contains a larger fraction of non-stationary variance, typically 50% or more. Temporal subsetting of the data reveals interannual variability barely significant compared with tidal estimation error from 3-year records. Comparison of summer vs. winter conditions shows only one region of noteworthy seasonal changes, the northern South China Sea. Implications for the anticipated SWOT altimeter mission are briefly discussed.

  3. Seasonal variability of the Gulf Stream from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Vazquez, Jorge; Parke, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    The nearly continuous 3.5 years of altimeter data in the western North Atlantic Ocean from the GEOS 3 mission (April 1975 to November 1978) have been used to study the seasonal variability of the Gulf Stream. The differences between altimetric measurements of sea surface height made at satellite ground track intersections, called crossovers, are utilized to construct time series of sea level variations. The results indicate that the Gulf Stream in the region off Cape Hatteras has a pronounced seasonal variability. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the seasonal cycle in terms of cross-stream sea level difference is about 15 cm, with a maximum in April and a minimum in December. The result is in good agreement with historic hydrographic observations and recent direct measurements of the Gulf Stream. The mechanisms responsible for the observed seasonal variability are discussed.

  4. Bottom Pressure Tides Along a Line in the Southeast Atlantic Ocean and Comparisons with Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Byrne, Deidre A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor pressure records, collected at 11 stations aligned along a single ground track of the Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellites, are analyzed for their tidal content. With very low background noise levels and approximately 27 months of high-quality records, tidal constituents can be estimated with unusually high precision. This includes many high-frequency lines up through the seventh-diurnal band. The station deployment provides a unique opportunity to compare with tides estimated from satellite altimetry, point by point along the satellite track, in a region of moderately high mesoscale variability. That variability can significantly corrupt altimeter-based tide estimates, even with 17 years of data. A method to improve the along-track altimeter estimates by correcting the data for nontidal variability is found to yield much better agreement with the bottom-pressure data. The technique should prove useful in certain demanding applications, such as altimetric studies of internal tides.

  5. Contribution of Satellite Altimetry Data in Geological Structure Research in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung Tran, Tuan; Ho, Thi Huong Mai

    2016-06-01

    The study area is bordered on the East China Sea, the Philippine Sea, and the Australian-Indo plate in the Northeast, in the East and in the South, respectively. It is a large area with the diversely complicated conditions of geological structure. In spite of over the past many years of investigation, marine geological structure in many places have remained poorly understood because of a thick seawater layer as well as of the sensitive conflicts among the countries in the region. In recent years, the satellite altimeter technology allows of enhancement the marine investigation in any area. The ocean surface height is measured by a very accurate radar altimeter mounted on a satellite. Then, that surface can be converted into marine gravity anomaly or bathymetry by using the mathematical model. It is the only way to achieve the data with a uniform resolution in acceptable time and cost. The satellite altimetry data and its variants are essential for understanding marine geological structure. They provide a reliable opportunity to geologists and geophysicists for studying the geological features beneath the ocean floor. Also satellite altimeter data is perfect for planning the more detailed shipboard surveys. Especially, it is more meaningful in the remote or sparsely surveyed regions. In this paper, the authors have effectively used the satellite altimetry and shipboard data in combination. Many geological features, such as seafloor spreading ridges, fault systems, volcanic chains as well as distribution of sedimentary basins are revealed through the 2D, 3D model methods of interpretation of satellite-shipboard-derived data and the others. These results are improved by existing boreholes and seismic data in the study area.

  6. Measuring Ganymede's Tidal Deformation by Laser Altimetry: A performance Analysis for the GALA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, G.; Hussmann, H.; Stark, A.; Sohl, F.; Oberst, J.

    2015-12-01

    Since measurements of Ganymede's induced magnetic field suggest a salty water layer underneath the satellite's icy crust [1], we studied the perspectives for the Ganymede Laser Altimeter (GALA) onboard ESA's JUICE mission to infer the ice-I thickness by measuring the dynamic response of Ganymede's ice shell to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter. We found that the uncertainties in the determination of the tidal Lover number h2 is 2% and we will demonstrate that this will constrain the ice-I thickness to ± 20 km. Our model also includes a detailed analysis of the instrument performance taking account of Ganymede's rough small-scale topography. The model is combined with the current mission scenario and spacecraft performance expectation of the JUICE mission giving an estimate for the accuracy of the range measurements in Ganymede orbit. However, the determination of the resulting ice thickness further depends on the tidally effective rheology of the outer ice shell [2]. Laboratory measurements of ice I (e.g. [3]) suggest that the rigidity can be constrained, however, the less well known viscosity can play a major role when inferring the thickness of the outer ice shell. As a consequence we further investigated under which conditions the ice I viscosity could be constrained by measuring the phase-lag of Ganymede's tidal response using laser altimetry. [1] Kivelson et al. 2002. [2] Moore and Schubert, 2003. [3] Sotin et al., 1998

  7. Mass Balance Changes and Ice Dynamics of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.

    2016-06-01

    During the past few decades the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost ice at accelerating rates, caused by increasing surface temperature. The melting of the two big ice sheets has a big impact on global sea level rise. If the ice sheets would melt down entirely, the sea level would rise more than 60 m. Even a much smaller rise would cause dramatic damage along coastal regions. In this paper we report about a major upgrade of surface elevation changes derived from laser altimetry data, acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite mission (ICESat) and airborne laser campaigns, such as Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). For detecting changes in ice sheet elevations we have developed the Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) method. It computes elevation changes of small surface patches by keeping the surface shape constant and considering the absolute values as surface elevations. We report about important upgrades of earlier results, for example the inclusion of local ice caps and the temporal extension from 1993 to 2014 for the Greenland Ice Sheet and for a comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness and mass changes for the Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  8. Reconfigurable Computing As an Enabling Technology for Single-Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley; Hicks, Edward; Pinchinat, Maxime; Dabney, Philip; McGarry, Jan; Murray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon-counting laser altimetry is a new measurement technique offering significant advantages in vertical resolution, reducing instrument size, mass, and power, and reducing laser complexity as compared to analog or threshold detection laser altimetry techniques. However, these improvements come at the cost of a dramatically increased requirement for onboard real-time data processing. Reconfigurable computing has been shown to offer considerable performance advantages in performing this processing. These advantages have been demonstrated on the Multi-KiloHertz Micro-Laser Altimeter (MMLA), an aircraft based single-photon-counting laser altimeter developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with several potential spaceflight applications. This paper describes how reconfigurable computing technology was employed to perform MMLA data processing in real-time under realistic operating constraints, along with the results observed. This paper also expands on these prior results to identify concepts for using reconfigurable computing to enable spaceflight single-photon-counting laser altimeter instruments.

  9. Measuring Agulhas Current strength and leakage from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, Dewi; De Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M.; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2013-04-01

    The Agulhas leakage is a flux of relatively warm and salty water from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic Ocean. It occurs south of the African continent where the Agulhas Current retroflects and sheds large anticyclonic eddies that quickly break up and mix with the surrounding water. This is one of the most energetic regions of the world ocean and the Agulhas leakage is therefore very difficult to quantify. In recent years two independent studies (Biastoch et al. 2009, Rouault et al. 2009) using different ocean models pointed out the possibility that the strength of the Agulhas leakage could have increased over the last decades. Unfortunately several discrepancies exist between these two studies on the magnitude and the causes of this increase showing the limitations of numerical modelling in this area. In this work we use a combination of along-track and mapped satellite geostrophic velocities to compute the strength of the Agulhas Current and to follow Lagrangian particles released in its core. The results confirm a positive trend of the volume of Agulhas leakage over the last two decades. This allows us to investigate the dependence of the leakage to upstream conditions like the Agulhas Current transport, the pattern and strength of the westerly winds and to test previous theories on the relations between these factors. Biastoch, A., Böning, C. W., Schwarzkopf, F. U. and Lutjeharms, J. R. E.: Increase in Agulhas leakage due to poleward shift of Southern Hemisphere westerlies, Nature, 462(7272), 495-498, doi:10.1038/nature08519, 2009. Rouault, M., Penven, P. and Pohl, B.: Warming in the Agulhas Current system since the 1980's, Geophys. Res. Lett, 36(L12602), doi:10.1029/2009GL037987, 2009.

  10. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: Calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velpuri, N.M.; Senay, G.B.; Asante, K.O.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of interand intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellitedriven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE) of 0.80 during the validation period (2004-2009). Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1-2m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4m between the years 1998-2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated satellite-driven water balance

  11. The FES2014 tidal atlas, accuracy assessment for satellite altimetry and other geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyard, Florent Henri; Carrère, Loren; Cancet, Mathilde; Boy, Jean-Paul; Gégout, Pascal; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2016-04-01

    The FES2014 tidal atlas (elaborated in a CNES-supported joint project involving the LEGOS laboratory, CLS and Noveltis) is the last release of the FES atlases series. Based on finite element hydrodynamic modelling with data assimilation, the FES atlases are routinely improved by taken advantage of the increasing duration of satellite altimetry missions. However, the most remarkable improvement in the FES2014 atlas is the unprecedentedly low level of prior misfits (i.e. between the hydrodynamic simulations and data), typically less than 1.3 centimeters RMS for the ocean M2 tide. This makes the data assimilation step much more reliable and more consistent with the true tidal dynamics, especially in shelf and coastal seas, and diminish the sensitivity of the accuracy to the observation distribution (extremely sparse or inexistent in the high latitudes). The FES2014 atlas has been validated and assessed in various geophysical applications (satellite altimetry corrections, gravimetry, etc…), showing significant improvements compared to previous FES releases and other state-of -the-art tidal atlases (such as DTU10, GOT4.8, TPXO8).

  12. The 26 December 2004 tsunami source estimated from satellite radar altimetry and seismic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Tony Y.; Ji, Chen; Fu, L. -L.; Zlotnicki, Victor; Shum, C. K.; Yi, Yuchan; Hjorleifsdottir, Vala

    2005-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was the first earthquake tsunami of its magnitude to occur since the advent of both digital seismometry and satellite radar altimetry. Both have independently recorded the event from different physical aspects. The seismic data has then been used to estimate the earthquake fault parameters, and a three-dimensional ocean-general-circulation-model (OGCM) coupled with the fault information has been used to simulate the satellite-observed tsunami waves. Here we show that these two datasets consistently provide the tsunami source using independent methodologies of seismic waveform inversion and ocean modeling. Cross-examining the two independent results confirms that the slip function is the most important condition controlling the tsunami strength, while the geometry and the rupture velocity of the tectonic plane determine the spatial patterns of the tsunami.

  13. Constraints on Energy Dissipation in the Earth's Body Tide From Satellite Tracking and Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Eanes, Richard J.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1992-01-01

    The phase lag by which the earth's body tide follows the tidal potential is estimated for the principal lunar semidiurnal tide M(sub 2). The estimate results from combining recent tidal solutions from satellite tracking data and from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Each data type is sensitive to the body-tide lag: gravitationally for the tracking data, geometrically for the altimetry. Allowance is made for the lunar atmospheric tide. For the tidal potential Love number kappa(sub 2) we obtain a lag epsilon of 0.20 deg +/- 0.05 deg, implying an effective body-tide Q of 280 and body-tide energy dissipation of 110 +/- 25 gigawatts.

  14. The Caspian Sea water dynamics based on satellite imagery and altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostianoy, Andrey G.; Lebedev, Sergey

    The Caspian Sea water dynamics is poorly known due to a lack of special hydrographic measurements. The known schemes of general circulation of the sea proposed by N.M. Knipovich in 1914-1915 and 1921, A.I. Mikhalevskiy (1931), G.N. Zaitsev (1935) and V.N. Zenin (1942) represent the basin-scale cyclonic gyres in the Middle and Southern Caspian, and no clear scheme for the shallow Northern Caspian. Later numerical models could move forward from these simple schemes of circulation to the more detailed seasonal or climatic schemes of currents, but different approaches and models give different results which significantly differ from each other (Trukhchev et al., 1995; Ibrayev et al., 2003, 2010; Popov, 2004, 2009; Knysh et al., 2008). Satellite monitoring of the Caspian Sea, we perform since 2000, is a useful tool for investigation of water dynamics in the Caspian Sea. To determine mesoscale water structure and dynamics, we used different kind of physical (SST and ice), chemical (suspended matter and water turbidity) and biological (chlorophyll concentration and algal bloom) tracers on satellite imagery. Satellite altimetry (sea level anomalies in combination with the mean dynamic level derived from numerical modeling) provides fields of currents in the whole Caspian Sea on a regular basis (every 10 days). Seasonal fields of currents derived from satellite altimetry also differ from those obtained in numerical models. Finally, we show the results of the first drifter experiment performed in the Caspian Sea in 2006-2008 in the framework of the MACE Project. Special attention is paid to the seasonal upwelling along the eastern coast of the sea, coastal currents, and a giant intrusion of warm water from the Southern to the Middle Caspian Sea.

  15. Mapping the Topography of Mercury with MESSENGER Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E..; Zubor, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter onboard MESSENGER involves unique design elements that deal with the challenges of being in orbit around Mercury. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of seven instruments on NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. MESSENGER was launched on 3 August 2004, and entered into orbit about Mercury on 18 March 2011 after a journey through the inner solar system. This involved six planetary flybys, including three of Mercury. MLA is designed to map the topography and landforms of Mercury's surface. It also measures the planet's forced libration (motion about the spin axis), which helps constrain the state of the core. The first science measurements from orbit taken with MLA were made on 29 March 2011 and continue to date. MLA had accumulated about 8.3 million laser ranging measurements to Mercury's surface, as of 31 July 2012, i.e., over six Mercury years (528 Earth days). Although MLA is the third planetary lidar built at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MLA must endure a much harsher thermal environment near Mercury than the previous instruments on Mars and Earth satellites. The design of MLA was derived in part from that of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on Mars Global Surveyor. However, MLA must range over greater distances and often in off-nadir directions from a highly eccentric orbit. In MLA we use a single-mode diode-pumped Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) laser that is highly collimated to maintain a small footprint on the planet. The receiver has both a narrow field of view and a narrow spectral bandwidth to minimize the amount of background light detected from the sunlit hemisphere of Mercury. We achieve the highest possible receiver sensitivity by employing the minimum receiver detection threshold.

  16. Salinity variability in the North Atlantic through synergetic analysis of Argo floats and satellite altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendardo, Ilaria; Rhein, Monika; Klein, Birgit; Roessler, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Salinity distribution in the North Atlantic is affected by changes in the circulation and freshwater fluxes. Changes in salinity are introduced into the ocean's interior by vertical processes like subduction or convection, and transported along circulation pathways. At a given location and depth, salinity could vary by water mass changes due to changes in the freshwater flux, or by vertical migration of density surfaces caused either by wind-driven changes of ocean ventilation or by thermodynamic processes, like poleward migration of isopycnals as a result of surface warming. Changes in the wind driven circulation with a consequence shift of the subpolar front, that separates the fresher subpolar from the saline subtropical gyre, also have a marked influence on upper ocean salinity in the subpolar North Atlantic. Due to the lack of temporal and spatial resolution of salinity observations, salinity anomalies in the last century could only be studied by 5-year means. Thanks to the Argo program, the temporal and spatial resolution of salinity and temperature profiles since early 2000 have significantly improved, allowing to calculate even monthly means. To further improve temporal and spatial resolution of salinity, Argo profiles are combined with altimetry data and a "Transfer function", the Gravest Empirical Mode (GEM), is calculated. The GEM technique exploits the relationship between T/S profiles and dynamic height in order to parameterize salinity data as a function of dynamic height from the satellite altimetry. This technique gives the opportunity to extend the investigation of the salinity variability, with extremely high temporal (daily) and spatial (1/4°) resolution, back to 1993, the beginning of the altimetry data. This method was tested on several regions of the North Atlantic and it works particularly well for some of them, for example in the regions where the North Atlantic Current plays an important role. Within these regions salinity variability in

  17. A model based on satellite altimetry and imagery to evaluate water volume changes in a reservoir in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Abreu, Luiza Gontijo Álvares; Maillard, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Different satellite missions have instruments to measure the water level variation of oceans and some of these instruments are being used in continental water applications with satisfying results. Altimeters on-board the Envisat and SARAL(Altika) satellites are consistently used to measure the water level in continental water bodies. Recent studies on satellite altimetry combined with satellite imagery have shown the great potential of this technique to estimate the water volume of rivers, lakes, wetlands and reservoirs and its temporal variation in response to climate and other environmental variables. A consistent monitoring of water level variations in reservoirs is crucial to the development policies and implementation of actions regarding the distribution and use of the stored water resource. The Trés Marias reservoir is located within the São Francisco river basin, known as the national integration" river, which provides water flow to the semi-arid region of Brazil. This study presents a method to combine satellite altimetry and imagery of the lake's surface to estimate volume changes and create a model from which volume changes could be computed from either the altimetry or the lake's surface area. Our intention with this study is to evaluate the method and its precision, and the possibility to apply it in other areas, such as wetlands and other lakes where in situ measurements are not available. Moreover, data of monitoring stations usually have an arbitrary altitude reference and are not available for the general public; the data from the satellite altimetry has the advantage of being of global reference (geoid) and compatible with the establishment of a worldwide lake and reservoir database. We combined Envisat and SARAL/Altika altimetry data from 2007-2014 period with Landsat imagery from the same time frame. The data was corrected using a novel processing technique resulting in a relative precision of 0.24 m (RMSE).

  18. Using Airborne Laser Altimetry to Detect Topographic Change at Long Valley Caldera California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofton, M. A.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Williams, N. P.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D. L.; Bufton, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The topography of the Long Valley caldera, California, was sampled using airborne laser altimetry in 1993, 1995, and 1997 to test the feasibility of using airborne laser altimetry for monitoring deformation of volcanic origin. Results show the laser altimeters are able to resolve subtle topographic features such as a gradual slope and to detect small transient changes in lake elevation. Crossover and repeat pass analyses of laser tracks indicate decimeter-level vertical precision is obtained over flat and low-sloped terrain for altimeter systems performing waveform digitization. Comparisons with complementary, ground-based CPS data at a site close to Bishop airport indicate that the laser and GPS-derived elevations agree to within the error inherent in the measurement and that horizontal locations agree to within the radius of the laser footprint. A comparison of the data at two sites, one where no change and the other where the maximum amount of vertical uplift is expected, indicates approximately 10 cm of relative uplift occurred 1993-1997, in line with predictions from continuous CPS measurements in the region. Extensive terrain mapping flights during the 1995 and 1997 missions demonstrate some of the unique abilities of laser altimetry; the straightforward creation of high resolution, high accuracy digital elevation models of overflown terrain, and the ability to determine ground topography in the presence of significant ground cover such as dense tree canopies. These capabilities make laser altimetry an attractive technique for quantifying topographic change of volcanic origin, especially in forested regions of the world where other remote sensing instruments have difficulty detecting the underlying topography.

  19. Using Airborne Laser Altimetry to Detect Topographic Change at Long Valley Caldera, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofton, M. A.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Williams, N. P.; Blair, J.-B.; Rabine, D. L.; Bufton, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The topography of the Long Valley caldera, California, was sampled using airborne laser altimetry in 1993, 1995, and 1997 to test the feasibility of using airborne laser altimetry for monitoring deformation of volcanic origin. Results show the laser altimeters are able to resolve subtle topographic features such as a gradual slope and to detect small transient changes in lake elevation. Crossover and repeat pass analyses of laser tracks indicate decimeter-level vertical precision is obtained over flat and low-sloped terrain for altimeter systems performing waveform digitization. Comparisons with complementary, ground-based GPS data at a site close to Bishop airport indicate that the laser and GPS-derived elevations agree to within the error inherent in the measurement and that horizontal locations agree to within the radius of the laser footprint. A comparison of the data at two sites, one where no change and the other where the maximum amount of vertical uplift is expected, indicates approximately 10 cm of relative uplift occurred 1993-1997, in line with predictions from continuous GPS measurements in the region. Extensive terrain mapping flights during the 1995 and 1997 missions demonstrate some of the unique abilities of laser altimetry; the straightforward creation of high resolution, high accuracy digital elevation models of overflown terrain, and the ability to determine ground topography in the presence of significant ground cover such as dense tree canopies. These capabilities make laser altimetry an attractive technique for quantifying topographic change of volcanic origin, especially in forested regions of the world where other remote sensing instruments have difficulty detecting the underlying topography.

  20. Digital elevation model of King Edward VII Peninsula, West Antarctica, from SAR interferometry and ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Braun, Andreas; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) of King Edward VII Peninsula, Sulzberger Bay, West Antarctica, developed using 12 European Remote Sensing (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes and 24 Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry profiles. We employ differential interferograms from the ERS tandem mission SAR scenes acquired in the austral fall of 1996, and four selected ICESat laser altimetry profiles acquired in the austral fall of 2004, as ground control points (GCPs) to construct an improved geocentric 60-m resolution DEM over the grounded ice region. We then extend the DEM to include two ice shelves using ICESat profiles via Kriging. Twenty additional ICESat profiles acquired in 2003-2004 are used to assess the accuracy of the DEM. After accounting for radar penetration depth and predicted surface changes, including effects due to ice mass balance, solid Earth tides, and glacial isostatic adjustment, in part to account for the eight-year data acquisition discrepancy, the resulting difference between the DEM and ICESat profiles is -0.57 ?? 5.88 m. After removing the discrepancy between the DEM and ICESat profiles for a final combined DEM using a bicubic spline, the overall difference is 0.05 ?? 1.35 m. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  1. Observing the oceanic mesoscale processes with satellite altimetry: the state of the art and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, L.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has enabled the study of global oceanic mesoscale variability with increasing accuracy and resolution for the past three decades. The combination of the series of precision missions beginning with TOPEX/Poseidon and the series of missions beginning with ERS-1 has created a data record of sea surface height measurement from at least two simultaneously operating altimeters. This 19-year record has fundamentally expanded our knowledge about the dynamics of ocean circulation, in particular at the mesoscale. The progress made to date from the data record will be briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the remaining open questions. Spectral analysis of the existing altimeter data suggests that the spatial resolution is about 150 km in wavelength in space-time gridded data, and about 70-100 km in along-track data. The unresolved short scales, however, have important roles in the energy balance of ocean dynamics as well as the transport and dissipation of many properties of the ocean such as heat and dissolved chemicals. The prospect of the technique of radar interferometry for making high-resolution wide-swath measurement of sea surface height will be discussed with an update on the development of the SWOT (Surface Water and Ocean Topography) Mission, which is being jointly developed by NASA and CNES with contributions from the Canadian Space Agency. SWOT is being designed for applications in both oceanography and land surface hydrology and setting a standard for the next-generation altimetry missions.

  2. Stage-discharge rating curves based on satellite altimetry and modeled discharge in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Adrien; Dias de Paiva, Rodrigo; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stephane; Garambois, Pierre-André; Collischonn, Walter; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frederique

    2016-05-01

    In this study, rating curves (RCs) were determined by applying satellite altimetry to a poorly gauged basin. This study demonstrates the synergistic application of remote sensing and watershed modeling to capture the dynamics and quantity of flow in the Amazon River Basin, respectively. Three major advancements for estimating basin-scale patterns in river discharge are described. The first advancement is the preservation of the hydrological meanings of the parameters expressed by Manning's equation to obtain a data set containing the elevations of the river beds throughout the basin. The second advancement is the provision of parameter uncertainties and, therefore, the uncertainties in the rated discharge. The third advancement concerns estimating the discharge while considering backwater effects. We analyzed the Amazon Basin using nearly one thousand series that were obtained from ENVISAT and Jason-2 altimetry for more than 100 tributaries. Discharge values and related uncertainties were obtained from the rain-discharge MGB-IPH model. We used a global optimization algorithm based on the Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Bayesian framework to determine the rating curves. The data were randomly allocated into 80% calibration and 20% validation subsets. A comparison with the validation samples produced a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (Ens) of 0.68. When the MGB discharge uncertainties were less than 5%, the Ens value increased to 0.81 (mean). A comparison with the in situ discharge resulted in an Ens value of 0.71 for the validation samples (and 0.77 for calibration). The Ens values at the mouths of the rivers that experienced backwater effects significantly improved when the mean monthly slope was included in the RC. Our RCs were not mission-dependent, and the Ens value was preserved when applying ENVISAT rating curves to Jason-2 altimetry at crossovers. The cease-to-flow parameter of our RCs provided a good proxy for determining river bed elevation. This proxy was validated

  3. Surface Soil Moisture from Satellite Altimetry- from CryoSat2 to Sentinel3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, P. A. M.; Balmbra, R.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring surface soil moisture using satellite radar altimetry is a comparatively novel application. Detailed models of surface brightness, regressed to dry earth conditions, are combined with multi-mission recalibrated backscatter to yield time series of surface soil moisture. This method can be utilized wherever the surface is dry for at least part of each year; thus the current application is over desert and semi-arid terrain where other remote sensing techniques encounter difficulties. Re-crafting these models for Cryosat2 has achieved model coherence better than 0.3dB. This paper presents results from surface soil moisture measurements from Cryosat2 data over desert surfaces in both SAR and LRM modes. The spatial resolution that can be achieved with Cryosat2 data is discussed, and results from both SAR and LRM mode are used to confirm the potential of this technique to retrieve surface soil moisture from Sentinel3 altimeter waveforms.

  4. New ERP predictions based on (sub-)daily ocean tides from satellite altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. We have started a project, SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth Rotation), with the goal to develop a new model of short period Earth rotation variations based on one of the best currently available empirical ocean tide models obtained from satellite altimetry. We employ the EOT11a model which is an upgrade of EOT08a, developed at DGFI, Munich. As EOT11a does not provide the tidal current velocities which are fundamental contributors to Earth rotation excitation, the calculation of current velocities from the tidal elevations is one of three main areas of research in project SPOT. The second key aspect is the conversion from ocean tidal angular momentum to the corresponding ERP variations using state-of-the-art transfer functions. A peculiar innovation at this step will be to consider the Earth's response to ocean tidal loading based on a realistic Earth model, including an anelastic mantle. The third part of the project deals with the introduction of the effect of minor tides. Ocean tide models usually only provide major semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal terms and the minor tides have to be inferred through admittance assumptions. Within the proposed project, selected minor tidal terms and the corresponding ERP variations shall be derived directly from satellite altimetry data. We determine ocean tidal angular momentum of four diurnal and five sub-daily tides from EOT11a and apply the angular momentum approach to derive a new model of ocean tidal Earth rotation variations. This poster gives a detailed description of project SPOT as well as the status of work progress. First results are presented as well.

  5. Monitoring changes in the water volume of Hulun Lake by integrating satellite altimetry data and Landsat images between 1992 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiajia; Ke, Changqing; Shao, Zhude; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Lake level and volume are sensitive to climate change, and their changes can affect the sustainable utilization of regional water resources. Satellite radar/laser altimetry has effectively been used for monitoring water-level changes in recent years. In this study, satellite altimetry data and optical images were used to assess the changes in water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake in north-eastern China. We derived a time series of lake levels for nearly two decades (1992 to 2010) from the altimetry data of two satellite sensors (Topex/Poseidon and Envisat RA-2); additionally, lake surface extent was extracted from Landsat TM/ETM+ images during the same period. The results indicate that the water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake decreased over the past two decades. The water level shows a significant decrease (-0.36 m/year) of a total of -5.21 m from 1992 to 2010, specifically including a slight decrease (-0.4 m) during 1992 to 1999 and a sudden drop (-4.81 m) during 2000 to 2010. There has also been a consistent and significant reduction in lake area (-355.35 km2) and volume (-12.92 km3). An integrated examination on changes in temperature, evaporation, precipitation, and runoff during 1992 to 2010 shows that the main changes in the Hulun Lake area are correlated with increasing temperature (0.47°C/year) and evaporation (13.61 mm/year), as well as decreasing precipitation (-6.58 mm/year) and runoff (-1.04×108 m3/year). Thus, we infer that climate warming is likely the main cause of the changes in water level, area, and volume of Hulun Lake. In addition, anthropogenic factors accelerate the degradation of the Hulun Lake wetland to some extent.

  6. Monitoring Small Bodies of Water Using Retracked Satellite Radar Altimetry: Feasibility Study as a GGOS Data Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Shum, C.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Lee, H.; Yang, T.; Tseng, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the framework of developing Global Geodetic Observing Systems (GGOS) data sets for hydrologic research and application, here we present a study to potentially exploit a recent new and innovative use of satellite radar altimetry data from abundant historic, present and future missions, including Geosat GM/ERM, ERS-1/-2, TOPEX/Poseidon, GFO, Envisat, Jason-1/-2/-3, CryoSat-2, AltiKa, HY-2, and Sentinel-3. Satellite altimetry has demonstrated its ability to measure accurate, long-term climate records such as the evolutions of sea-level and inland hydrologic water level changes. In particular, recent studies have demonstrated the ability of radar altimetry, via waveform retracking and other innovative processing, to monitor water level variations of small water bodies like rivers (as narrow as 100-200 m, approaching the along-track spatial sampling limit of a 20-Hz altimeter measurement onboard of a spacecraft with speed of ~7.5 km/sec) and small lakes over flat terrains. In this contribution, we address an additional challenge to examine the feasibility of the use of contemporary pulse-limited nadir radar altimetry to observe water level variations over mountainous or terrains with relatively steep gradients, or surfaces with varying seasonal land-covers. In this case, the returned radar waveforms from satellite radar altimetry, if the altimeter measurements remain locked, are much noisier over these complex and steep terrains or rough surfaces. This study will present results on the use of retracked Envisat altimetry data (i.e., not using the retracked heights already available on the GDR) via various waveform retracking algorithms over the Tseng Wen Reservoir, Taiwan, and evaluating the accuracy of retracked measurements by comparing to the available in situ water gauge records. The Tseng Wen Reservoir is a relatively small reservoir (12 km x 2 km, the width of the reservoir crossed by Envisat is 1.5~2 km), located in Chiayi County, Taiwan, with an elevation of

  7. Consistent patterns of Antarctic ice sheet interannual variations from ENVISAT radar altimetry and GRACE satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Martin; Legrésy, Benoît; Rémy, Frédérique; Blarel, Fabien; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    Interannual variations of the Antarctic ice sheet due to surface mass balance (SMB) fluctuations are important for mass balance estimates and interpretations. To date, these variations are primarily assessed by global or regional atmospheric modelling. Satellite altimetry and satellite gravimetry over the ice sheet provide complementary observations of the related volume and mass effects, respectively. Yet, so far the interannual signal contents of these observations have not been extensively studied. We compare and jointly interpret ENVISAT radar altimetry (RA) and GRACE satellite gravimetry results, relying on RA products from the along-track repeat satellite RA approach and on the GRACE 10-d solutions by CNES/GRGS. RA results and GRACE results are expressed in terms of variations of ice sheet thickness, Δz(t), and ice-equivalent thickness, Δzice(t), respectively. In view of the different errors and limitations of both techniques and of differences between Δz(t) and Δzice(t) expected due to firn-related processes, our principal approach is a comparison of qualitative patterns in space and time. To adjust the spatial resolution of both data sets, we describe the spatial filtering inherent to the regularization of the CNES/GRGS GRACE solutions and apply this filtering to the ENVISAT RA height changes in a consistent fashion. After correction for glacial isostatic adjustment, the spatial patterns of linear trends seen by ENVISAT RA and GRACE over the period 2002 October to 2009 August agree well, not only for the extreme ice losses in the West Antarctic Amundsen Sea Sector but also for an alternating sequence of gains and losses along the East Antarctic coast. Our main focus is on interannual signals, which we represent by the low-pass filtered non-linear, non-seasonal components of the Δz(t) and Δzice(t) time-series. These components should reflect interannual SMB variations, apart from effects of changes in ice flow. We find an agreement between the

  8. A computer code to process and plot laser altimetry data interactively on a microcomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safren, H. G.; Bufton, J. L.

    1987-05-01

    A computer program, written in FORTRAN, is described which uses a microcomputer to interactively process and plot laser altimetry data taken with a laser altimeter currently under development at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The program uses a plot routine written for a particular microcomputer, so that the program could only be implemented on a different computer by replacing the plot routine. The altimetry data are taken from an aircraft flying over mountainous terrain. The program unpacks the raw data, processes it into along-track distance and ground height and creates plots of the terrain profile. A zoom capability is provided to expand the plot to show greater detail, along either axis, and provision is made to interactively edit out spurious data points.

  9. A computer code to process and plot laser altimetry data interactively on a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safren, H. G.; Bufton, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    A computer program, written in FORTRAN, is described which uses a microcomputer to interactively process and plot laser altimetry data taken with a laser altimeter currently under development at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The program uses a plot routine written for a particular microcomputer, so that the program could only be implemented on a different computer by replacing the plot routine. The altimetry data are taken from an aircraft flying over mountainous terrain. The program unpacks the raw data, processes it into along-track distance and ground height and creates plots of the terrain profile. A zoom capability is provided to expand the plot to show greater detail, along either axis, and provision is made to interactively edit out spurious data points.

  10. Current and Future Applications of Laser Altimetry to Planetary Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Planetary orbital lidar mapping, first used by the Apollo Orbiters in 1971-72, achieved a new status with the mapping of Mars by the MOLA instrument aboard Mars Global Surveyor, 1998-2001. A new geodetic control network has been tied to MOLA altimetry, providing the basis for subsequent missions, and the crustal and lithospheric structure of Mars has been resolved. Further applications included measurement of seasonally-varying polar topography, atmospheric properties, orbital decay of Phobos due to tidal dissipation, and surface modifications produced by volatiles. The MLA instrument on the MESSENGER mission will measure the shape of Mercury and determine the amplitude of forced libration from orbit. Lidar instruments on earlier missions to the Moon and asteroid 433 Eros, in combination with radio tracking, have also revealed internal structure. We summarize the state of the art of lidar mapping and discuss advances in determination of gravity potential of solid bodies using altimetric crossovers.

  11. Integrated Analysis of Interferometric SAR, Satellite Altimetry and Hydraulic Modeling to Quantify Louisiana Wetland Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyongki; Kim, Jin-woo; Lu, Zhong; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Alsdorf, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Wetland loss in Louisiana has been accelerating due primarily to anthropogenic and nature processes, and is being advocated as a problem with national importance. Accurate measurement or modeling of wetland-wide water level changes, its varying extent, its storage and discharge changes resulting in part from sediment loads, erosion and subsidence are fundamental to assessment of hurricane-induced flood hazards and wetland ecology. Here, we use innovative method to integrate interferometric SAR (InSAR) and satellite radar altimetry for measuring absolute or geocentric water level changes and applied the methodology to remote areas of swamp forest in coastal Louisiana. Coherence analysis of InSAR pairs suggested that the HH polarization is preferred for this type of observation, and polarimetric analysis can help to identi:fy double-bonnce backscattering areas in the wetland. Envisat radar altimeter-measured 18- Hz (along-track sampling of 417 m) water level data processed with regional stackfile method have been used to provide vertical references for water bodies separated by levees. The high-resolution (approx.40 m) relative water changes measured from ALOS PALSAR L-band and Radarsat-l C-band InSAR are then integrated with Envisat radar altimetry to obtain absolute water level. The resulting water level time series were validated with in situ gauge observations within the swamp forest. Furthermore, we compare our water elevation changes with 2D flood modeling from LISFLOOD hydrodynamic model. Our study demonstrates that this new technique allows retrospective reconstruction and concurrent monitoring of water conditions and flow dynamics in wetlands, especially those lacking gauge networks.

  12. Spatiotemporal densification of river water level time series by multimission satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourian, M. J.; Tarpanelli, A.; Elmi, O.; Qin, T.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Sneeuw, N.

    2016-02-01

    Limitations of satellite radar altimetry for operational hydrology include its spatial and temporal sampling as well as measurement problems caused by local topography and heterogeneity of the reflecting surface. In this study, we develop an approach that eliminates most of these limitations to produce an approximately 3 day temporal resolution water level time series from the original typically (sub)monthly data sets for the Po River in detail, and for Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers. We follow a geodetic approach by which, after estimating and removing intersatellite biases, all virtual stations of several satellite altimeters are connected hydraulically and statistically to produce water level time series at any location along the river. We test different data-selection strategies and validate our method against the extensive available in situ data over the Po River, resulting in an average correlation of 0.7, Root-Mean-Square Error of 0.8 m, bias of -0.4 m, and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient of 0.5. We validate the transferability of our method by applying it to the Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers, which have very different geomorphological and climatic conditions. The methodology yields correlations above 0.75 and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.84 (Congo), 0.34 (Mississippi), and 0.35 (Danube).

  13. The use of satellite altimetry in the study of weakly defined and variable oceanic gyres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, George H.; Emery, W.; Rosborough, G.; Leben, R.

    1991-01-01

    Most of what is known about oceanic gyres comes from studies of the two main Northern Hemisphere subtropical gyres. Also important in the overall circulation of the world's oceans are the Southern Hemisphere subtropical gyres and the cyclonic Alaskan Gyre in the northern Pacific. Due in part to their weaker surface topography signatures and their variable character, these gyres have not been observed and studied as well as the northern subtropical gyres. The combination of satellite altimetry with in situ ocean measurements will lead to improved resolution of the interannual and seasonal change in the circulation of these ocean gyres. Also, it will provide initialization input and verification for numerical modeling work designed to better understand internal gyre dynamics. The objective of this proposal is to combine satellite and in situ data in a study dedicated to a better understanding of the basic structure and dynamics of the weakly defined Southern Hemisphere gyres and the Alaskan Gyre and their roles in oceanic heat and mass transport of the world ocean. Emphasis will be on description of the Alaskan Gyre.

  14. Laser altimetry simulator. Version 3.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Pacini, Linda K.; Blair, J. Bryan; Elman, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulator of a pulsed, direct detection laser altimeter has been developed to investigate the performance of space-based laser altimeters operating over surfaces with various height profiles. The simulator calculates the laser's optical intensity waveform as it propagates to and is reflected from the terrain surface and is collected by the receiver telescope. It also calculates the signal and noise waveforms output from the receiver's optical detector and waveform digitizer. Both avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier detectors may be selected. Parameters of the detected signal, including energy, the 50 percent rise-time point, the mean timing point, and the centroid, can be collected into histograms and statistics calculated after a number of laser firings. The laser altimeter can be selected to be fixed over the terrain at any altitude. Alternatively, it can move between laser shots to simulate the terrain profile measured with the laser altimeter.

  15. Improvement of global and regional mean sea level derived from satellite altimetry multi missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablain, M.; Faugere, Y.; Larnicol, G.; Picot, N.; Cazenave, A.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    With the satellite altimetry missions, the global mean sea level (GMSL) has been calculated on a continual basis since January 1993. 'Verification' phases, during which the satellites follow each other in close succession (Topex/Poseidon--Jason-1, then Jason-1--Jason-2), help to link up these different missions by precisely determining any bias between them. Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 are also used, after being adjusted on these reference missions, in order to compute Mean Sea Level at high latitudes (higher than 66°N and S), and also to improve spatial resolution by combining all these missions together. The global mean sea level (MSL) deduced from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 provide a global rate of 3.2 mm from 1993 to 2010 applying the post glacial rebound (MSL aviso website http://www.jason.oceanobs.com/msl). Besides, the regional sea level trends bring out an inhomogeneous repartition of the ocean elevation with local MSL slopes ranging from + 8 mm/yr to - 8 mm/year. A study published in 2009 [Ablain et al., 2009] has shown that the global MSL trend unceratainty was estimated at +/-0.6 mm/year with a confidence interval of 90%. The main sources of errors at global and regional scales are due to the orbit calculation and the wet troposphere correction. But others sea-level components have also a significant impact on the long-term stability of MSL as for instance the stability of instrumental parameters and the atmospheric corrections. Thanks to recent studies performed in the frame of the SALP project (supported by CNES) and Sea-level Climate Change Initiative project (supported by ESA), strong improvements have been provided for the estimation of the global and regional MSL trends. In this paper, we propose to describe them; they concern the orbit calculation thanks to new gravity fields, the atmospheric corrections thanks to ERA-interim reanalyses, the wet troposphere corrections thanks to the stability improvement, and also empirical corrections

  16. Multiple Scattering of Laser Pulses in Snow Over Ice: Modeling the Potential Bias in ICESat Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, A. B.; Varnai, T.; Marshak, A.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of NASA's current ICESat and future ICESat2 missions is to map the altitude of the Earth's land ice with high accuracy using laser altimetry technology, and to measure sea ice freeboard. Ice however is a highly transparent optical medium with variable scattering and absorption properties. Moreover, it is often covered by a layer of snow with varying depth and optical properties largely dependent on its age. We describe a modeling framework for estimating the potential altimetry bias caused by multiple scattering in the layered medium. We use both a Monte Carlo technique and an analytical diffusion model valid for optically thick media. Our preliminary numerical results are consistent with estimates of the multiple scattering delay from laboratory measurements using snow harvested in Greenland, namely, a few cm. Planned refinements of the models are described.

  17. Improved Estimates of Temporally Coherent Internal Tides and Energy Fluxes from Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite altimetry has opened a surprising new avenue to observing internal tides in the open ocean. The tidal surface signatures are very small, a few cm at most, but in many areas they are robust, owing to averaging over many years. By employing a simplified two dimensional wave fitting to the surface elevations in combination with climatological hydrography to define the relation between the surface height and the current and pressure at depth, we may obtain rough estimates of internal tide energy fluxes. Initial results near Hawaii with Topex/Poseidon (T/P) data show good agreement with detailed 3D (three dimensional) numerical models, but the altimeter picture is somewhat blurred owing to the widely spaced T/P tracks. The resolution may be enhanced somewhat by using data from the ERS-1 (ESA (European Space Agency) Remote Sensing) and ERS-2 satellite altimeters. The ERS satellite tracks are much more closely spaced (0.72 deg longitude vs. 2.83 deg for T/P), but the tidal estimates are less accurate than those for T/P. All altimeter estimates are also severely affected by noise in regions of high mesoscale variability, and we have obtained some success in reducing this contamination by employing a prior correction for mesoscale variability based on ten day detailed sea surface height maps developed by Le Traon and colleagues. These improvements allow us to more clearly define the internal tide surface field and the corresponding energy fluxes. Results from throughout the global ocean will be presented.

  18. Global determination of rating curves in the Amazon basin from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Adrien; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stéphane; Collischonn, Walter; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frédérique

    2014-05-01

    The Amazonian basin is the largest hydrological basin all over the world. Over the past few years, it has experienced an unusual succession of extreme droughts and floods, which origin is still a matter of debate. One of the major issues in understanding such events is to get discharge series distributed over the entire basin. Satellite altimetry can be used to improve our knowledge of the hydrological stream flow conditions in the basin, through rating curves. Rating curves are mathematical relationships between stage and discharge at a given place. The common way to determine the parameters of the relationship is to compute the non-linear regression between the discharge and stage series. In this study, the discharge data was obtained by simulation through the entire basin using the MGB-IPH model with TRMM Merge input rainfall data and assimilation of gage data, run from 1998 to 2009. The stage dataset is made of ~900 altimetry series at ENVISAT and Jason-2 virtual stations, sampling the stages over more than a hundred of rivers in the basin. Altimetry series span between 2002 and 2011. In the present work we present the benefits of using stochastic methods instead of probabilistic ones to determine a dataset of rating curve parameters which are hydrologicaly meaningful throughout the entire Amazon basin. The rating curve parameters have been computed using an optimization technique based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler and Bayesian inference scheme. This technique provides an estimate of the best value for the parameters together with their posterior probability distribution, allowing the determination of a credibility interval for calculated discharge. Also the error over discharges estimates from the MGB-IPH model is included in the rating curve determination. These MGB-IPH errors come from either errors in the discharge derived from the gage readings or errors in the satellite rainfall estimates. The present experiment shows that the stochastic approach

  19. Improved gravity anomaly fields from retracked multimission satellite radar altimetry observations over the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaki, M.; Forootan, E.; Sharifi, M. A.; Awange, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2015-09-01

    Satellite radar altimetry observations are used to derive short wavelength gravity anomaly fields over the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea, where in situ and ship-borne gravity measurements have limited spatial coverage. In this study the retracking algorithm `Extrema Retracking' (ExtR) was employed to improve sea surface height (SSH) measurements that are highly biased in the study regions due to land contaminations in the footprints of the satellite altimetry observations. ExtR was applied to the waveforms sampled by the five satellite radar altimetry missions: TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, JASON-2, GFO and ERS-1. Along-track slopes have been estimated from the improved SSH measurements and used in an iterative process to estimate deflections of the vertical, and subsequently, the desired gravity anomalies. The main steps of the gravity anomaly computations involve estimating improved SSH using the ExtR technique, computing deflections of the vertical from interpolated SSHs on a regular grid using a biharmonic spline interpolation and finally estimating gridded gravity anomalies. A remove-compute-restore algorithm, based on the fast Fourier transform, has been applied to convert deflections of the vertical into gravity anomalies. Finally, spline interpolation has been used to estimate regular gravity anomaly grids over the two study regions. Results were evaluated by comparing the estimated altimetry-derived gravity anomalies (with and without implementing the ExtR algorithm) with ship-borne free air gravity anomaly observations, and free air gravity anomalies from the Earth Gravitational Model 2008 (EGM2008). The comparison indicates a range of 3-5 mGal in the residuals, which were computed by taking the differences between the retracked altimetry-derived gravity anomaly and the ship-borne data. The comparison of retracked data with ship-borne data indicates a range in the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between approximately 1.8 and 4.4 mGal and a bias between 0

  20. Vertical Crustal Motion Derived from Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges, and Comparisons with DORIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2010-01-01

    A somewhat unorthodox method for determining vertical crustal motion at a tide-gauge location is to difference the sea level time series with an equivalent time series determined from satellite altimetry, To the extent that both instruments measure an identical ocean signal, the difference will be dominated by vertical land motion at the gauge. We revisit this technique by analyzing sea level signals at 28 tide gauges that are colocated with DORIS geodetic stations. Comparisons of altimeter-gauge vertical rates with DORIS rates yield a median difference of 1.8 mm/yr and a weighted root-mean-square difference of2.7 mm/yr. The latter suggests that our uncertainty estimates, which are primarily based on an assumed AR(l) noise process in all time series, underestimates the true errors. Several sources of additional error are discussed, including possible scale errors in the terrestrial reference frame to which altimeter-gauge rates are mostly insensitive, One of our stations, Male, Maldives, which has been the subject of some uninformed arguments about sea-level rise, is found to have almost no vertical motion, and thus is vulnerable to rising sea levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of COSPAR.

  1. Evaluation of the Argo network using statistical space-time scales derived from satellite altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuragano, Tsurane; Fujii, Yosuke; Kamachi, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates capability of the Argo observation network for monitoring ocean variation, especially for eddy-scale variation, by using an optimum interpolation (OI) procedure. Sea surface dynamic height anomalies (DHAs) are derived from Argo temperature and salinity profile data, and DHA fields are obtained by the OI based on the space-time correlation scales estimated from along-track sea level anomaly (SLA) data by satellite altimetry. The DHA fields are compared with the SLA fields derived from the same OI applied to the along-track SLA data. The results show that the equatorial Kelvin waves and tropical instability waves are well captured by Argo floats. Eddies are also monitored effectively in the subtropical western North Pacific. The OI results of DHA do not agree well with those of SLA in the high latitudes. A simple test of the space-time OI analysis shows that more than six data in the e-folding domain, where the correlation coefficient of ocean variation is above e-1, are required for the reliable analysis with 99% confidence level. Argo floats provide sufficient number of observations for the reliable analysis in the low latitudes and some areas in the North Pacific. Two to three times more Argo data would be required in most of midlatitudes and much more in high latitudes for capturing eddy-scale variation.

  2. Oceanic mesoscale variability and general circulation from satellite altimetry: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    Progress on the applications of satellite altimetry from SEASAT and Geos-3 to the study of oceanic mesoscale variability and general circulation is reviewed. The major conclusion for the applications to mesoscale variability is that an optimally designed altimetric mission with a lifetime of several years will improve our knowledge of the global mesoscale variability to an extent unattainable by any other practical means. The proposed Topex mission will allow one to view the global oceanic variability in such a wide range of periods and wavelengths: from 20 days to 3 to 5 years; from 50 to 10,000 km. However, the goal of determining the general circulation cannot be achieved by a single altimetric mission, because a highly accurate geoid needs to be determined independently. The scenario of the combination of Topex with Gravsat, a gravity mission that will give accurate geoid information, will allow the global general circulation to be determined at scales as small as 100 km. Areas of research needing to be performed with existing altimeter data are also discussed.

  3. Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented in satellite altimetry that attempts to simultaneously determine the geoid and sea surface topography with minimum wavelengths of about 500 km and to reduce the radial orbit error caused by geopotential errors. The modeling of the radial orbit error is made using the linearized Lagrangian perturbation theory. Secular and second order effects are also included. After a rather extensive validation of the linearized equations, alternative expressions of the radial orbit error are derived. Numerical estimates for the radial orbit error and geoid undulation error are computed using the differences of two geopotential models as potential coefficient errors, for a SEASAT orbit. To provide statistical estimates of the radial distances and the geoid, a covariance propagation is made based on the full geopotential covariance. Accuracy estimates for the SEASAT orbits are given which agree quite well with already published results. Observation equations are develped using sea surface heights and crossover discrepancies as observables. A minimum variance solution with prior information provides estimates of parameters representing the sea surface topography and corrections to the gravity field that is used for the orbit generation. The simulation results show that the method can be used to effectively reduce the radial orbit error and recover the sea surface topography.

  4. Determination of the Earth gravity Field Parameters in Persian Gulf and Oman Sea with the Satellite Altimetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emadi, S. R.; Najafi-Alamardi, M.; Toosi, K. N.; Sedighi, M.; Nankali, H. R.

    2006-07-01

    Satellite altimetry provides continuous, accur ate, and homogenous data ser ies in marine areas .Th e Sea Surf ace Heigh ts (SSH) ex tracted from altimetry data w as used in a method sear ching for the least squares of the sea surface topography to simultaneously d etermine the geoidal height and the sea surface topography as well in the Persian Gulf and the Oman sea. This is contrary to th e methods wh ich r equire the knowledge of one parameter to estimate the other. The North and East componen ts of the deflections of vertical w ere also estimated by differentiating the der ived geoid al heights in the corresponding directions, and finally the free- air grav ity anomalies w ere computed utilizing the inverse V ening- Meinesz integral.

  5. High Resolution Surface Geometry and Albedo by Combining Laser Altimetry and Visible Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.; vonToussaint, Udo; Cheeseman, Peter C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The need for accurate geometric and radiometric information over large areas has become increasingly important. Laser altimetry is one of the key technologies for obtaining this geometric information. However, there are important application areas where the observing platform has its orbit constrained by the other instruments it is carrying, and so the spatial resolution that can be recorded by the laser altimeter is limited. In this paper we show how information recorded by one of the other instruments commonly carried, a high-resolution imaging camera, can be combined with the laser altimeter measurements to give a high resolution estimate both of the surface geometry and its reflectance properties. This estimate has an accuracy unavailable from other interpolation methods. We present the results from combining synthetic laser altimeter measurements on a coarse grid with images generated from a surface model to re-create the surface model.

  6. The ICESat Arctic-Ocean Mean Sea Surface: Reference Field for Future Satellite and Airborne Altimetry over Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, S. L.; McAdoo, D. C.; Zwally, H. J.; Yi, D.

    2010-12-01

    The era of ICESat operations, between 2003 and 2009, encompassed a period of significant change in the sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data gathered during this period has been crucial for monitoring a decline in Arctic sea ice freeboard and thickness, particularly over perennial sea ice. An over-all loss of ice pack volume was recorded, including an observed 42 % loss of ice volume during the ICESat Fall (October/November) campaigns. Critical to the derivation of sea ice freeboard, and ice thickness, is precise mapping of the local reference sea level, the sea surface height (SSH). ICESat profiles over sea ice must be carefully assessed to discriminate leads from sea ice floes, so as to generate SSH profiles. Here we discuss methods for combining these local sea level measurements from the entire ICESat mission (using data from 16 ICESat campaigns) while maintaining the high along-track resolution of the GLAS footprints. We construct a high-resolution mean sea surface (MSS) model, which will be useful in itself as a reference field for retrieving sea ice freeboard from measurements gathered by CryoSat-2 and the Operation IceBridge aircraft campaigns. This Arctic MSS topography has additional oceanographic and geodetic applications. The MSS conforms closely to the marine geoid such that differences between these surfaces may be attributed to mean dynamic topography (MDT), from which mean ocean circulation may be derived. However, remaining errors in both the MSS field (e.g. unmodeled tidal effects) and the state-of-the-art geoids (particularly at short wavelengths), restrict the resolution at which MDT may be resolved. By combining this new ICESat MSS with geoids derived from satellite-only gravity data, such as data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellites, we show an improved capability for observing Arctic Ocean dynamic

  7. Mesoscale Eddies, Satellite Altimetry, and New Production in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, David A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Fields, Erik A.

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry and hydrographic observations are used to characterize the mesoscale eddy field in the Sargasso Sea near Bermuda and to address the role of physical processes on the supply of new nutrients to the euphotic zone. The observed sea level anomaly (SLA) field is dominated by the occurrence of westward propagating features with SLA signatures as large as 25 cm, Eulerian temporal scales of roughly a month, lifetimes of several months, spatial scales of approximately 200 km, and a propagation of approximately 5 cm/s . Hydrographic estimates of dynamic height anomaly (referenced to 4000 dbar) are well correlated with satellite SLA (r(sup 2) = 0.65), and at least 85% of the observed dynamic height variability is associated with the first baroclinic mode of motion. This allows us to apply the satellite observations to remotely estimate isopycnal displacements and the flux of nutrients into the euphotic zone due to eddy pumping. Eddy pumping is the process by which mesoscale eddies induce isopycnal displacements that lift nutrient- replete waters into the euphotic zone, driving new primary production. A kinematic approach to the estimation of the eddy pumping results in a flux of 0.24+/-0.1 mol N/sq m/yr (including a scale estimate for the small contribution due to 18 deg water eddies). This flux is more than an order of magnitude larger than the diapycnal diffusive flux as well as scale estimates for the vertical transport due to isopycnal mixing along sloping isopycnal surfaces. Eddy pumping and wintertime convection are the two dominant mechanisms transporting new nutrients into the euphotic zone, and the sum of all physical new nutrient supply fluxes effectively balances previous geochemical estimates of annual new production for this site. However, if biological transports (e.g., nitrogen fixation, etc.) are significant, the new nitrogen supply budget will be in excess of geochemical new production estimates. This suggests that the various physical and

  8. Mesoscale Eddies, Satellite Altimetry, and New Production in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, David A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Fields, Erik A.

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry and hydrographic observations are used to characterize the mesoscale eddy field in the Sargasso Sea near Bermuda and to address the role of physical processes on the supply of new nutrients to the euphotic zone. The observed sea level anomaly (SLA) field is dominated by the occurrence of westward propagating features with SLA signatures as large as 25 cm, Eulerian temporal scales of roughly a month, lifetimes of several months, spatial scales of approximately 200 km, and a propagation of approximately 5 cm/s. Hydrographic estimates of dynamic height anomaly (referenced to 4000 dbar) are well correlated with satellite SLA (r(exp 2) = 0.65), and at least 85% of the observed dynamic height variability is associated with the first baroclinic mode of motion. This allows us to apply the satellite observations to remotely sensed estimate isopycnal displacements and the flux of nutrients into the euphotic zone due to eddy pumping. Eddy pumping is the process by which mesoscale eddies induce isopycnal displacements that lift nutrient-replete waters into the euphotic zone, driving new primary production. A kinematic approach to the estimation of the eddy pumping results in a flux of 0.24 +/- 0.1 mol N/sq m (including a scale estimate for the small contribution due to 18 deg water eddies). This flux is more than an order of magnitude larger than the diapycnal diffusive flux as well as scale estimates for the vertical transport due to isopycnal mixing along sloping isopycnal surfaces. Eddy pumping and wintertime convection are the two dominant mechanisms transporting new nutrients into the euphotic zone, and the sum of all physical new nutrient supply fluxes effectively balances previous geochemical estimates of annual new production for this site. However, if biological transports (e.g., nitrogen fixation, etc.) are significant, the new nitrogen supply budget will be in excess of geochemical new production estimates. This suggests that the various physical

  9. Thirty years of elevation change on Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves from multimission satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, Helen Amanda; Padman, Laurie

    2012-02-01

    We use data acquired between 1978 and 2008 by four satellite radar altimeter missions (Seasat, ERS-1, ERS-2 and Envisat) to determine multidecadal elevation change rates (dhi/dt) for six major Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice shelves. In areas covered by the Seasat orbit (to 72.16°S), regional-averaged 30-year trends were negative (surface lowering), with rates between -0.03 and -0.16 m a-1. Surface lowering preceded the start of near-continuous radar altimeter operations that began with ERS-1 in 1992. The average rate of lowering for the first 14 years of the period was typically smaller than the 30-year average; the exception was the southern Wilkins Ice Shelf, which experienced negligible lowering between 2000 and 2008, when a series of large calving events began. Analyses of the continuous ERS/Envisat time series (to 81.5°) for 1992-2008 reveal a period of strong negative dhi/dt on most ice shelves between 1992 and 1995. Based on prior studies of regional atmospheric and oceanic conditions, we hypothesize that the observed elevation changes on Larsen C Ice Shelf are driven primarily by firn compaction while the western AP ice shelves are responding to changes in both surface mass balance and basal melt rates. Our time series also show that large changes in dhi/dt can occur on interannual time scales, reinforcing the importance of long time series altimetry to separate long-term trends associated with climate change from interannual to interdecadal natural variability.

  10. A wave investigation in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melice, J. L. E.

    2015-12-01

    The intra-annual variability of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is investigated with satellite altimetry Absolute Dynamic Topography data. Three regions of high variability are found. The first region, between 3°N and 11°N, is characterized by the presence of westward propagating eddies linked to the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC) retroflection in the vicinity of the Brazilian coast. In the second region, we observed the presence of westward propagating instability waves centered at 5°N between 30°W and 10°W. The third region, around the Equator, is characterized by the presence of eastward propagating Kelvin waves at the Equator, and westward propagating Rossby waves centered at 5°S and 5°N. The eddies linked to the NECC show a strong annual cycle: their number varies from ~4 per year in October to ~9 per year in March. The more powerful eddies occur in October around 40°W. Their diameter varies from 5° of longitude at 40°W to 2.5° at 60°W, and their speed is 18 cm/s. The instability waves also shows a strong seasonal cycle with maximum amplitude around August. They are generated by meridional winds at the African coast and by zonal winds at the Equator. The Kelvin waves at the Equator are generated by zonal wind anomalies at the Equator at 30°W with a 2.6 weeks delay, and their speed is 175 cm/s (2nd order baroclinic). The speed of the Rossby waves is 50 cm/s at 5°N, and 49 cm/s at 5°S.

  11. Twenty Years of Progress on Global Ocean Tides: The Impact of Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, Gary; Ray, Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the dawn of the era of high-precision altimetry, before the launch of TOPEX/Poseidon, ocean tides were properly viewed as a source of noise--tidal variations in ocean height would represent a very substantial fraction of what the altimeter measures, and would have to be accurately predicted and subtracted if altimetry were to achieve its potential for ocean and climate studies. But to the extent that the altimetry could be severely contaminated by tides, it also represented an unprecedented global-scale tidal data set. These new data, together with research stimulated by the need for accurate tidal corrections, led to a renaissance in tidal studies in the oceanographic community. In this paper we review contributions of altimetry to tidal science over the past 20 years, emphasizing recent progress. Mapping of tides has now been extended from the early focus on major constituents in the open ocean to include minor constituents, (e.g., long-period tides; non-linear tides in shelf waters, and in the open ocean), and into shallow and coastal waters. Global and spatially local estimates of tidal energy balance have been refined, and the role of internal tide conversion in dissipating barotropic tidal energy is now well established through modeling, altimetry, and in situ observations. However, energy budgets for internal tides, and the role of tidal dissipation in vertical ocean mixing remain controversial topics. Altimetry may contribute to resolving some of these important questions through improved mapping of low-mode internal tides. This area has advanced significantly in recent years, with several global maps now available, and progress on constraining temporally incoherent components. For the future, new applications of altimetry (e.g., in the coastal ocean, where barotropic tidal models remain inadequate), and new mission concepts (studies of the submesoscale with SWOT, which will require correction for internal tides) may bring us full circle, again pushing

  12. Sea level budget in the Arctic during the satellite altimetry era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carret, Alice; Cazenave, Anny; Meyssignac, Benoît; Prandi, Pierre; Ablain, Michael; Andersen, Ole; Blazquez, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Studying sea level variations in the Arctic region is challenging because of data scarcity. Here we present results of the sea level budget in the Arctic (up to 82°N) during the altimetry era. We first investigate closure of the sea level budget since 2002 using altimetry data from Envisat and Cryosat for estimating sea level, temperature and salinity data from the ORAP5 reanalysis and GRACE space gravimetry to estimate the steric and mass components. Two altimetry sea level data sets are considered (from DTU and CLS), based on Envisat waveforms retracking. Regional sea level trends seen in the altimetric map, in particular over the Beaufort Gyre and along the eastern coast of Greenland are of steric origin. However, in terms of regional average, the steric component contributes very little to the observed sea level trend, suggesting a dominant mass contribution in the Arctic region. This is confirmed by GRACE-based ocean mass time series that agree very well with the altimetry-based sea level time series. Direct estimate of the mass component is not possible prior to GRACE. Thus we estimated the mass contribution over the whole altimetry era from the difference between altimetry-based sea level and the ORAP5 steric component. Finally we compared altimetry-based coastal sea level with tide gauge records available along Norwegian, Greenland and Siberian coastlines and investigated whether the Arctic Oscillation that was the main driver of coastal sea level in the Arctic during the past decades still plays a dominant role or if other factors (e.g., of anthropogenic origin) become detectable.

  13. Improving Significant Wave Height detection for Coastal Satellite Altimetry: validation in the German Bight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Cipollini, Paolo; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana

    For more than two decades, it has been possible to map the Significant Wave Height (SWH) globally through Satellite Altimetry. SWH estimation is possible because the shape of an altimetric waveform, which usually presents a sharp leading edge and a slowly decaying trailing edge, depends on the sea state: in particular, the higher the sea state, the longer the rising time of the leading edge. The algorithm for SWH also depends on the width of the point target response (PTR) function, which is usually approximated by a constant value that contributes to the rising time. Particularly challenging for SWH detection are coastal data and low sea states. The first are usually flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter footprint; the second are characterized by an extremely sharp leading edge that is consequently poorly sampled in the digitalized waveform. ALES, a new algorithm for reprocessing altimetric waveforms, has recently been validated for sea surface height estimation (Passaro et al. 2014). The aim of this work is to check its validity also for SWH estimation in a particularly challenging area. The German Bight region presents both low sea state and coastal issues and is particularly suitable for validation, thanks to the extended network of buoys of the Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (BSH). In-situ data include open sea, off-shore and coastal sea conditions, respectively at the Helgoland, lighthouse Alte Weser and Westerland locations. Reprocessed data from Envisat, Jason-1 and Jason-2 tracks are validated against those three buoys. The in-situ validation is applied both at the nearest point and at points along-track. The skill metrics is based on bias, standard deviation, slope of regression line, scatter index, number of cycles with correlation larger than 90%. The same metrics is applied to the altimeter data obtained by standard processing and the validation results are compared. Data are evaluated at high

  14. Validating Satellite Radar Altimetry Estimates of Antarctic sea ice Thickness Using the ASPeCt Data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, K. A.; Laxon, S. W.; Worby, T.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of sea ice freeboard from spaceborne radar altimeters have been used to calculate Artic sea ice thickness on a basin wide scale during the winter. The same technique has the potential to be used in the Antarctic. The technique used to convert freeboard to thickness assumes hydrostatic equilibrium and uses estimates of snow depth and density and water and ice density from climatology. The nature of the Arctic climate means that the sea ice has a positive freeboard and that it becomes entirely snow free during the summer months, which simplifies the analysis of the radar return from the sea ice. However, in the Antarctic the situation may be more complicated with negative ice freeboards and flooded and refrozen snow resulting in inaccurate estimate of sea ice freeboard and therefore ice thickness. We present, for the first time, a comparison of estimates of Antarctic sea ice thickness calculated from satellite radar altimetry measurements of sea ice freeboard with ship observation of sea ice thickness from the ASPeCt data set. We describe the both the satellite and ship borne estimates of Antarctic sea ice thickness, the method used to compare the two data sets and outcome of the validation. We also assess the future potential of satellite radar altimetry to provide sea ice thickness in the Antarctic.

  15. Relativity in Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, John C.

    2009-05-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) is the measurement of the round-trip light time of ultra-short laser pulses to satellites deploying specifically designed retroreflectors. The ranging data are used to determine cm-precision satellite orbits, temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field, mm/yr accuracy determinations of station motion on a global scale, and fundamental physical constants. The SLR stations form an important part of the international network of space geodetic observatories that define and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference System. Starting in 1964, the precision of satellite laser ranging has improved from a few meters to a few mm for the better stations. With a measurement accuracy better than the part-per-billion level, the effects General Relativity must be considered. These include additional perturbations to the orbit dynamics, corrections to the round-trip light-time computation, and fundamental aspects of space-time in the definition of the geocentric reference frame. While these effects are significant, they are generally not large enough to provide useful tests of General Relativity. An important exception, however, is the relativistic prediction of the Lense-Thirring orbit precession, i.e the effect of `frame-dragging’ on the satellite orbit due to the spinning Earth's mass. While the signal is large enough to be easily observed with satellite laser ranging, the Lense-Thirring measurement uncertainty is limited by the knowledge of the even zonal harmonics of the Earth's gravity field that also produce Newtonian secular orbit precessions. However, this problem has been overcome with the dramatically improved models resulting from the joint NASA-DLR Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Using laser ranging to the LAGEOS satellites, it is possible to confirm the General Relativity prediction of the Lense-Thirring precession with an uncertainty better than 15%. This research was supported by the National

  16. Lunar topography from Apollo 15 and 16 laser altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Sjogren, W. L.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the orbital plane of Apollo 15 the mean lunar radius is 1737.3 km, the mean altitude of terrae above maria is about 3 km, and the center-of-figure is displaced from the center-of-mass by about 2 km away from longitude 25 E. The Apollo 16 laser altimeter obtained a total of about 7.5 revolutions of partially overlapping data. The principal difference in results from Apollo 16 is the absence of any great far-side basin similar to the 1400-km wide feature found by Apollo 15, 1200 km to the south. This absence of a far-side depression in the Apollo 16 orbital plane largely accounts for a greater mean radius: 1738.1 km; a greater mean altitude of terrae above maria: about 4 km; and a greater offset of centers: about 3 km, also away from 25 E. In the Apollo 16, as well as Apollo 15, data the far-side terrae are much 'rougher' than the near-side terrae. Mare surfaces are generally smooth to within plus or minus 150 m, and have slopes of 1:500 to 1:2000 persisting over distances as great as 500 km.

  17. A New Burst of Seafloor Mapping and Discovery Driven By Advances in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Matthews, K. J.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Radar altimetry measurements of the ocean surface topography from two satellites have recently been used to construct a new global marine gravity model that is twice as accurate as previous models. The model reveals previously invisible abyssal hill (AH) fabric in many parts of the ocean basins, placing valuable additional constraints on tectonic events reflected in changes in the orientation of linear AHs, and thus in spreading direction. AH fabric, if dated via marine magnetic anomalies, puts much tighter temporal constraints on changes in seafloor spreading directions than fracture zones, which, depending on their offset, often take many millions of years to adjust to major plate motion events. The new data also reveal previously unmapped microplates in the Pacific and Indian oceans. They preferentially form in spreading corridors where spreading rates were very high, reaching plate tectonic speed limits, or in response to plate reorganization stresses. The mapping of previously unknown or poorly mapped ridge propagation events during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS), leading to pseudofaults and extinct ridges, is relevant for interpreting marine magnetic anomaly sequences during the CNS in terms of magnetic field variability. The new grid provides breathtakingly detailed views of individual fault structures, previously only mapped via expensive seismic surveys, in the North Falkland Basin. Here narrow vertical gravity gradient highs and lows can be shown to correspond to seismically imaged horsts and grabens bounded by normal faults. The new gravity field allows us to create a detailed regional fault map outside of existing seismic coverage. The fault network that emerges illustrates that this eastern region of the Falkland Plateau is characterised by broadly distributed faulting, reflecting a wide rift that typically occurs in regions of higher than normal heat flow with relatively thick crust, where local crustal buoyancy effects dominate localising

  18. Thinning of the Patagonian Icefields From Recent Laser Altimetry, SRTM and Earlier Cartographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassa, G.; Rivera, A.; Rignot, E.; Thomas, R.; Acuna, C.; Brecher, H.; Frederick, E.; Krabill, W.; Manizade, S.; Russell, R.; Sonntag, J.; Swift, R.; Yungel, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Northern and Southern Patagonia icefields of southern South America (NPI and SPI respectively), are one of the largest temperate glacier systems of mid-latitudes. The glaciers are fed by abundant precipitation of 1-11 m/yr water equivalent (w.e.) due to westerly air flow, and are affected by large ablation (>10 m/yr w.e.) and calving on fjords and freshwater lakes on the lower reaches, with an important east-west gradient. Outlet glaciers are known to be affected by generalized retreat and thinning over the past century, being explained by atmospheric warming and also decreased precipitation. Recently the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data in combination with 1968, 1975 and 1995 cartographic data of Chile and Argentina and a few limited ground survey points have allowed the calculation of volume change for the largest 63 glaciers (Rignot et al., in press). Although SRTM data provide a complete coverage with a vertical precision of 7 m and a horizontal resolution of 90 m, the existing cartographic data do not map adequately the accumulation areas because of lack of stereoscopic coverage in the original aerial photographs used to compile the existing maps. In November/December 2002 two flights were made from Punta Arenas by the Centro de Estudios Cient¡ficos (CECS) aboard a Chilean Navy P-3 Orion aircraft, equipped with NASA sensors that included a scanning laser altimeter that yielded measurements of surface elevation to an accuracy of +/- 0.2 m along a total 4000 km flight track over the glaciers. Surveys covered most of NPI and provided a partial coverage of SPI as well. These data provide a unique opportunity for computing glacier thickness changes over the ablation and accumulation areas. Here we provide preliminary computations of ice thickness changes between the existing cartographic data, limited ground surveys, SRTM data and the laser altimetry data at selected glaciers over SPI and NPI. The data confirm the thinning observed in recent

  19. Study of landwater variation over Chao Phraya river basin using GRACE, satellite altimetry and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Nakaegawa, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2009-12-01

    A project to assess the effects of human activities on the subsurface environment in Asian developing cities has been in progress (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, 2009). Bangkok, Thailand is one of the study cities in this project. Using GRACE satellite gravity data, we previously recovered landwater mass variation over the Chao Phraya river basin, where Bangkok is located on downstream. However, mainly because of insufficient spatial resolution of the GRACE data then released, it was difficult to distinguish mass variation over the Chao Phraya basin with the ones of the neighboring Mekong, Irrawaddy and Salween river basins. Recently, some new versions of GRACE data sets have been available, and thus we estimated again the mass variations over these basins using version 2 of CNS/GRGS data set. The result shows that mass variations of the each basin could be distinguished due to improvement of the spatial resolution of the data. One of the interesting things is that a negative interannual mass trend is observed only over the Chao Phraya river basin, while the other basins show positive trend values. One of our concerns was which of the landwater components were decreasing. Because GRACE can only detect total terrestrial water storage, we further used satellite altimeter data to separate surface- and groundwater components. EnviSat data were mainly used as satellite altimetry data in this study, because the mission period is overlapping with GRACE mission and the ground track separation is relatively small. River water levels were recovered from satellite altimetry data, and converted to river water storage. Estimated river water storage was subtracted from the GRACE data. Thus, interannual surface- and groundwater trends were discussed separately. Another concern is whether the landwater decrease is caused by meteorological factors or factors of human activities. Thus, we also compared above results with global hydrological simulation model and

  20. Digital Elevation Models of Greenland based on combined radar and laser altimetry as well as high-resolution stereoscopic imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Simonsen, S. B.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A number of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Greenland exist, each of which are applicable for different purposes. This study presents two such DEMs: One developed by merging contemporary radar and laser altimeter data, and one derived from high-resolution stereoscopic imagery. All products are made freely available. The former DEM covers the entire Greenland. It is specific to the year 2010, providing it with an advantage over previous models suffering from either a reduced spatial/ temporal data coverage or errors from surface elevation changes (SEC) occurring during data acquisition. Radar data are acquired with Envisat and CryoSat-2, and laser data with the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor, and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Correcting radar data for errors from slope effects and surface penetration of the echoes, and merging these with laser data, yields a DEM capable of resolving both surface depressions as well as topographic features at higher altitudes. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km, making the DEM ideal for application in surface mass balance studies, SEC detection from radar altimetry, or for correcting such data for slope-induced errors. The other DEM is developed in a pilot study building the expertise to map all ice-free parts of Greenland. The work combines WorldView-2 and -3 as well as GeoEye1 imagery from 2014 and 2015 over the Disko, Narsaq, Tassilaq, and Zackenberg regions. The novelty of the work is the determination of the product specifications after elaborate discussions with interested parties from government institutions, the tourist industry, etc. Thus, a 10 m DEM, 1.5 m orthophotos, and vector maps are produced. This opens to the possibility of using orthophotos with up-to-date contour lines or for deriving updated coastlines to aid, e.g., emergency management. This allows for a product development directly in line with the needs of parties with specific interests in Greenland.

  1. From satellite altimetry to operational oceanography and Argo: three revolutions in oceanography (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Traon, P. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The launch of the US/French mission Topex/Poseidon (T/P) (CNES/NASA) in August 1992 was the start of a revolution in oceanography. For the first time, a very precise altimeter system optimized for large scale sea level and ocean circulation observations was flying. Topex/Poseidon revolutionized our vision and understanding of the ocean. It provided new views of the large scale seasonal and interannual sea level and ocean circulation variations. T/P alone could not observe the mesoscale circulation. In the 1990s, the ESA satellites ERS-1/2 were flying simultaneously with T/P. The ERS-1/2 orbit was well adapted for mesoscale circulation sampling but the orbit determination and altimeter performance were much less precise than for T/P. We demonstrated that we could use T/P as a reference mission for ERS-1/2 and bring the ERS-1/2 data to an accuracy level comparable to T/P. This was an essential first step for the merging of T/P and ERS-1/2. The second step required the development of a global optimal interpolation method. Near real time high resolution global sea level anomaly maps were then derived. These maps have been operationally produced as part of the SSALTO/DUACS system for the last 15 years. They are now widely used by the oceanographic community and have contributed to a much better understanding and recognition of the role and importance of mesoscale dynamics. The unique capability of satellite altimetry to observe the global ocean in near real time at high resolution was essential to the development of global ocean forecasting, a second revolution in oceanography. The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) (1998-2008) was phased with the T/P and ERS-1/2 successors (Jason-1 and ENVISAT) and was instrumental in the development of global operational oceanography capabilities. Europe played a leading role in GODAE. In 1998, the global in-situ observing system was inadequate for the global scope of GODAE. This led to the development of Argo, an

  2. Monitoring glacial elevation differences on the Tibetan plateau, using ICESat laser altimetry data from 2003 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, V. H.; Lindenbergh, R.; Menenti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Tibetan plateau (TP) is the highest and largest plateau of the world, and stores a large amount of glaciers. Recent studies concluded that the glacial area on the TP and surroundings has decreased significantly in the last decades. However, these studies were performed for different time intervals and for individual sub-regions such as Himalaya, Mt. Tien Shan, Mt. Middle Qilian, or Mt. Everest. Most of them used local measurements and maps to monitor the glacier shrinkage. Last year, Kaab [1] quantified the glacial thinning at glacial ablation areas in the Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya region from 2003 to 2008, using satellite laser altimetry and a global elevation model. In this study, we also monitor glacial elevation differences using ICESat laser altimetry data and SRTM data for the complete TP. Main data are the ICESat/GLA14 laser altimetry data, the SRTM data, and the so-called CAREERI glacier mask. The GLA14 data supports surface elevations from 2003 to 2009. In addition, the GLA14 data include data quality parameters, e.g. saturation indicators and the number of waveform peaks. The SRTM data are used as a base map to compare to check their elevations against the elevations derived from the GLA14 data. Terrain surface properties such as slope and roughness are also computed for the whole of Tibet. The glacier mask is formatted in polygon vectors, where each polygon presents a glacier outline with attributes, e.g. area, length, direction, altitude, etc. Based on the glacier mask, footprints of all ICESat campaigns within glaciers are extracted. These footprints are formatted in points and attributed with UTC date, elevation, saturation indicators, the number of waveform peaks, slope, roughness, and SRTM elevation. Subsequently average elevation differences between GLA14 data and SRTM data on the Tibetan glaciers sampled by ICESat campaigns are obtained. Anomalies of elevation differences are removed by statistical analysis and footprint attributes. As a

  3. The use of laser altimetry data in Chang'E-1 precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yong; Li, Pei-Jia; Hu, Xiao-Gong; Fan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Accurate altimetric measurement not only can be applied to the calculation of a topography model but also can be used to improve the quality of the orbit reconstruction in the form of crossovers. Altimetry data from the Chang'E-1 (CE-1) laser altimeter are analyzed in this paper. The differences between the crossover constraint equation in the form of height discrepancies and in the form of minimum distances are mainly discussed. The results demonstrate that the crossover constraint equation in the form of minimum distances improves the CE-1 orbit precision. The overlap orbit performance has increased ∼ 30% compared to the orbit using only tracking data. External assessment using the topography model also shows orbit improvement. The results will be helpful for recomputing ephemeris and improving the CE-1 topography model.

  4. Topography of the northern hemisphere of Mercury from MESSENGER laser altimetry.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Neumann, Gregory A; Hauck, Steven A; Peale, Stanton J; Barnouin, Olivier S; Head, James W; Johnson, Catherine L; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H; Freed, Andrew M; Klimczak, Christian; Margot, Jean-Luc; Oberst, Jürgen; Perry, Mark E; McNutt, Ralph L; Balcerski, Jeffrey A; Michel, Nathalie; Talpe, Matthieu J; Yang, Di

    2012-04-13

    Laser altimetry by the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a topographic model of the northern hemisphere of Mercury. The dynamic range of elevations is considerably smaller than those of Mars or the Moon. The most prominent feature is an extensive lowland at high northern latitudes that hosts the volcanic northern plains. Within this lowland is a broad topographic rise that experienced uplift after plains emplacement. The interior of the 1500-km-diameter Caloris impact basin has been modified so that part of the basin floor now stands higher than the rim. The elevated portion of the floor of Caloris appears to be part of a quasi-linear rise that extends for approximately half the planetary circumference at mid-latitudes. Collectively, these features imply that long-wavelength changes to Mercury's topography occurred after the earliest phases of the planet's geological history. PMID:22438510

  5. Topography of the Northern Hemisphere of Mercury from MESSENGER Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber,Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Hauck, Steven A., Jr.; Peale, Stanton J.; Barnouin, Oliver S.; Head, James W.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Freed, Andrew M.; Klimczak, Christian; Margot, Jean-Luc; Oberst, Juergen; Perry, Mark E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Balcerski, Jeffrey A.; Michel, Nathalie; Talpe, Matthieu J.; Yang, Di

    2012-01-01

    Laser altimetry by the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a topographic model of the northern hemisphere of Mercury. The dynamic range of elevations is considerably smaller than those of Mars or the Moon. The most prominent feature is an extensive lowland at high northern latitudes that hosts the volcanic northern plains. Within this lowland is a broad topographic rise that experienced uplift after plains emplacement. The interior of the 1500-km-diameter Caloris impact basin has been modified so that part of the basin floor now stands higher than the rim. The elevated portion of the floor of Caloris appears to be part of a quasi-linear rise that extends for approximately half the planetary circumference at mid-latitudes. Collectively, these features imply that long-wavelength changes to Mercury s topography occurred after the earliest phases of the planet s geological history.

  6. Adaptive re-tracking algorithm for retrieval of water level variations and wave heights from satellite altimetry data for middle-sized inland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Lebedev, Sergey; Soustova, Irina; Rybushkina, Galina; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Panyutin, Andrey

    One of the recent applications of satellite altimetry originally designed for measurements of the sea level [1] is associated with remote investigation of the water level of inland waters: lakes, rivers, reservoirs [2-7]. The altimetry data re-tracking algorithms developed for open ocean conditions (e.g. Ocean-1,2) [1] often cannot be used in these cases, since the radar return is significantly contaminated by reflection from the land. The problem of minimization of errors in the water level retrieval for inland waters from altimetry measurements can be resolved by re-tracking satellite altimetry data. Recently, special re-tracking algorithms have been actively developed for re-processing altimetry data in the coastal zone when reflection from land strongly affects echo shapes: threshold re-tracking, The other methods of re-tracking (threshold re-tracking, beta-re-tracking, improved threshold re-tracking) were developed in [9-11]. The latest development in this field is PISTACH product [12], in which retracking bases on the classification of typical forms of telemetric waveforms in the coastal zones and inland water bodies. In this paper a novel method of regional adaptive re-tracking based on constructing a theoretical model describing the formation of telemetric waveforms by reflection from the piecewise constant model surface corresponding to the geography of the region is considered. It was proposed in [13, 14], where the algorithm for assessing water level in inland water bodies and in the coastal zone of the ocean with an error of about 10-15 cm was constructed. The algorithm includes four consecutive steps: - constructing a local piecewise model of a reflecting surface in the neighbourhood of the reservoir; - solving a direct problem by calculating the reflected waveforms within the framework of the model; - imposing restrictions and validity criteria for the algorithm based on waveform modelling; - solving the inverse problem by retrieving a tracking point

  7. Two Decades of Elevation Changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Radar and Laser Altimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Forsberg, R.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Meister, R.; Simonsen, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been mapped by radar altimetry since the launch of ERS-1 in 1991, which was followed by ERS-2, Envisat and currently CryoSat-2. For the period 2003-2009 the ice sheet topography was also mapped by laser altimetry by the ICESat mission. Here, we apply suitable elevation change algorithms to radar data from ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, and CryoSat-2 data, with the goal to derive continuous, ice sheet-wide elevation changes for the period 1992 to 2015. This analysis has been made possible through the recent release of data from the REAPER project, in which ERS-1 and ERS-2 radar have been reprocessed in a consistent way to that used for Envisat data. Over this 23-year period, the pattern of elevation changes varies significantly. Whilst thickening and thinning can both be observed during different periods, the overall trend of the elevation of the ice sheet is negative, i.e. an overall lowering can be seen during the two decades studied. This work is part of the ESA Greenland Ice Sheet CCI project. We compare elevation changes derived from radar and laser altimetry (2003-09) and find a complex pattern of difference between the two sensor types, and we explain how some of this pattern can be explained by changes in firn compaction and accumulation rates, obtained from a regional climate model and an offline firn model. Also we show how this pattern changes if using differently retracked Envisat data. A special focus will be on results obtained from the CryoSat-2 measurements that provide radar heights of unprecedented coverage and resolution. Here we present the results of a validation exercise carried out as part of the ESA-funded CryoVAL-LI project in which the accuracy of the CryoSat-2 measurements of land ice is assessed. The results presented here signify an important milestone in measuring the surface elevation of the ice sheet: providing us with an insight into past as well as recent changes, providing up-to-date information on the behaviour

  8. Assessment of SRTM Precision for River Slope and Cross Section by Comparison with Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmant, S.; Seyler, F.; Bonnet, M.; Santos da Silva, J.; Leon, J. G.; Medeiros, D. M.; Roux, E.

    2008-12-01

    Slope of the river is a widely used parameter for discharge estimation. In poorly monitored basins, SRTM have been used to determine river slope (Le Favour et Alsdorf, 2005). Also, SRTM is expected to constrain long wavelength slope in future altimetry mission, such as SWOT. It is then important to assess the quality of SRTM data over river surface, floodplains and wetlands, in particular in case of dense vegetated cover of the river banks, in order to evaluate if such data can reach modeling requirements. We present two types of analysis : river longitudinal profiles and river cross sections extracted from SRTM compared with altitudes computed from altimetry data (ENVISAT, T/P, ICESAT, GPS surveys).

  9. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  10. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  11. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-09-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  12. Advances in Measuring Antarctic Sea-Ice Thickness and Ice-Sheet Elevations with ICESat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) has been measuring elevations of the Antarctic ice sheet and sea-ice freeboard elevations with unprecedented accuracy. Since February 20,2003, data has been acquired during three periods of laser operation varying from 36 to 54 days, which is less than the continuous operation of 3 to 5 years planned for the mission. The primary purpose of ICESat is to measure time-series of ice-sheet elevation changes for determination of the present-day mass balance of the ice sheets, study of associations between observed ice changes and polar climate, and estimation of the present and future contributions of the ice sheets to global sea level rise. ICESat data will continue to be acquired for approximately 33 days periods at 3 to 6 month intervals with the second of ICESat's three lasers, and eventually with the third laser. The laser footprints are about 70 m on the surface and are spaced at 172 m along-track. The on-board GPS receiver enables radial orbit determinations to an accuracy better than 5 cm. The orbital altitude is around 600 km at an inclination of 94 degrees with a 8-day repeat pattern for the calibration and validation period, followed by a 91 -day repeat period for the rest of the mission. The expected range precision of single footprint measurements was 10 cm, but the actual range precision of the data has been shown to be much better at 2 to 3 cm. The star-tracking attitude-determination system should enable footprints to be located to 6 m horizontally when attitude calibrations are completed. With the present attitude calibration, the elevation accuracy over the ice sheets ranges from about 30 cm over the low-slope areas to about 80 cm over areas with slopes of 1 to 2 degrees, which is much better than radar altimetry. After the first period of data collection, the spacecraft attitude was controlled to point the laser beam to within 50 m of reference surface tracks over the ice sheets. Detection of ice

  13. The gravity anomaly field in the Gulf of Bothnia spatially characterized from satellite altimetry and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noréus, J. P.; Nyborg, M. R.; Hayling, K. L.

    1997-06-01

    The gravity anomaly field in the Gulf of Bothnia has been investigated using (1) in situ high-precision measurements conducted on the sea ice during cold winters, and (2) gravity anomaly profiles computed from collinear satellite radar altimeter data from the Geosat ERM and the Topex/Poseidon missions. The in situ measurements were obtained from a collaboration between the Finnish Geodetic Institute, the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) and the National Survey of Sweden (LMV), and were processed with the geostatistical method called kriging. These data were used to calibrate the altimetric gravity. Altimetry generally resolves features of 20 km wavelength or longer, and in some cases detects shorter features when a sampling interval of 10 Hz is used. The precision of the along-track one-dimensional altimetric profiles corresponds to a gravity uncertainty of 2-3 mGal, and comparison with in situ measured gravity show 4 mGal discrepancy. The precision of the in situ measurements is better. However, depending on the sampling distance, the estimation uncertainty interior the in situ data areas may be up to 5 mGal between neighbouring data points. In regions with in situ data gaps, the estimation uncertainty of the in situ gravity measurements is rapidly increasing to a maximum of 9 mGal. An improved estimation uncertainty of 4-9 mGal was obtained in the same data gap regions with the support of satellite altimetry. Altimetric gravity is therefore used to estimate the gravity field in such regions, and to spatially characterize the gravity field in the Gulf of Bothnia.

  14. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Thomas W. K.; Bacon, Sheldon; Ridout, Andy L.; Thomas, Sam F.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Wingham, Duncan J.

    2016-06-01

    Arctic sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed by radar altimeters due to the poor coverage of the polar oceans provided by conventional altimeter missions and because large areas are perpetually covered by sea ice, requiring specialized data processing. We utilize SSH estimates from both the ice-covered and ice-free ocean to present monthly estimates of Arctic Dynamic Ocean Topography (DOT) from radar altimetry south of 81.5°N and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. Our SSH and steric height estimates show good agreement with tide gauge records and geopotential height derived from Ice-Tethered Profilers. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ˜5 cm) is dominated by seasonal steric height variation associated with seasonal freshwater fluxes, and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increased by 2.2 ± 1.4 cm between 2003 and 2012 before falling to circa 2003 levels between 2012 and 2014 due to large reductions on the Siberian shelf seas. The total secular change in SSH between 2003 and 2014 is then dominated by a 2.1 ± 0.7 cm increase in ocean mass. We estimate that by 2010, the Beaufort Gyre had accumulated 4600 km3 of freshwater relative to the 2003-2006 mean. Doming of Arctic DOT in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with regional reductions in the Siberian Arctic. We estimate that the Siberian shelf seas lost ˜180 km3 of freshwater between 2003 and 2014, associated with an increase in annual mean salinity of 0.15 psu yr-1. Finally, ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution model results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle.

  15. Absolute measurement by satellite altimetry of dynamic topography of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1983-01-01

    The three-month Seasat mission has shown that altimetry is capable of providing global observations of oceanic variability. It is shown that data from this short, suboptimum mission are also adequate for a determination of the absolute sea-surface topography of the ocean on large scales. An absolute determination of the subtropical gyre of the North Pacific Ocean is obtained. This is believed to be the first direct measurement showing the existence of such a feature that does not depend on conventional hydrography and a series of assumptions.

  16. Orbit Determination of the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft Using Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, M. T.; Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the scientific investigations of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission require high precision orbital information and some are limited entirely by its quality. These include the laser altimeter (MOLA) the Mars gravity field and atmospheric occultation investigations by radio science, and the planetary dynamics and celestial mechanics investigations. The precision of the orbits can usually be assessed by comparing overlapping orbits for a given period; but these results tend to reflect the repeatability rather than the accuracy. The re-constructed orbits from the doppler and range tracking data on MGS are (to date) at the few meter level radially, and a few hundreds of meters horizontally, using the best gravity models, presently available. With the laser altimeter on MGS we have a mechanism to measure the quality and to actually make significant improvements in the orbital accuracy by incorporating the altimetry data as a tracking datatype. By adding the altimeter measurements at orbital cross-over locations we have been able to reduce die radial error to 1 meter of less on average and have reduced the along track and out of plane error by almost 2 orders of magnitude down to a few meters. It is apparent that the altimeter observation provides a geometric strength to the orbit that it is not possible to obtain from the present doppler and the range data alone. We discuss the results obtained for the first year of the MGS mapping orbit. This work is supported by the NASA Mars Program.

  17. Impact study of the Argo array definition in the Mediterranean Sea based on satellite altimetry gridded data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Roman, Antonio; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Guinehut, Stéphanie; Mourre, Baptiste

    2016-04-01

    The existing Argo network provides essential data in near real time to constrain monitoring and forecasting centers and strongly complements the observations of the ocean surface from space. The comparison of Sea Level Anomalies (SLA) provided by satellite altimeters with in-situ Dynamic Heights Anomalies (DHA) derived from the temperature and salinity profiles of Argo floats contribute to better characterize the error budget associated with the altimeter observations. In this work, performed in the frame of the E-AIMS FP7 European Project, we focus on the Argo observing system in the Mediterranean Sea and its impact on SLA fields provided by satellite altimetry measurements in the basin. Namely, we focus on the sensitivity of specific SLA gridded merged products provided by AVISO in the Mediterranean to the reference depth (400 or 900 dbar) selected in the computation of the Argo Dynamic Height (DH) as an integration of the Argo T/S profiles through the water column. This reference depth will have impact on the number of valid Argo profiles and therefore on their temporal sampling and the coverage by the network used to compare with altimeter data. To compare both datasets, altimeter grids and synthetic climatologies used to compute DHA were spatially and temporally interpolated at the position and time of each in-situ Argo profile by a mapping method based on an optimal interpolation scheme. The analysis was conducted in the entire Mediterranean Sea and different sub-regions of the basin. The second part of this work is devoted to investigate which configuration in terms of spatial sampling of the Argo array in the Mediterranean will properly reproduce the mesoscale dynamics in this basin, which is comprehensively captured by new standards of specific altimeter products for this region. To do that, several Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) were conducted assuming that altimetry data computed from AVISO specific reanalysis gridded merged product for

  18. Exploring New Challenges of High-Resolution SWOT Satellite Altimetry with a Regional Model of the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, P.; Verron, J. A.; Djath, B.; Duran, M.; Gaultier, L.; Gourdeau, L.; Melet, A.; Molines, J. M.; Ubelmann, C.

    2014-12-01

    The upcoming high-resolution SWOT altimetry satellite will provide an unprecedented description of the ocean dynamic topography for studying sub- and meso-scale processes in the ocean. But there is still much uncertainty on the signal that will be observed. There are many scientific questions that are unresolved about the observability of altimetry at vhigh resolution and on the dynamical role of the ocean meso- and submesoscales. In addition, SWOT data will raise specific problems due to the size of the data flows. These issues will probably impact the data assimilation approaches for future scientific or operational oceanography applications. In this work, we propose to use a high-resolution numerical model of the Western Pacific Solomon Sea as a regional laboratory to explore such observability and dynamical issues, as well as new data assimilation challenges raised by SWOT. The Solomon Sea connects subtropical water masses to the equatorial ones through the low latitude western boundary currents and could potentially modulate the tropical Pacific climate. In the South Western Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits very intense eddy kinetic energy levels, while relatively little is known about the mesoscale and submesoscale activities in this region. The complex bathymetry of the region, complicated by the presence of narrow straits and numerous islands, raises specific challenges. So far, a Solomon sea model configuration has been set up at 1/36° resolution. Numerical simulations have been performed to explore the meso- and submesoscales dynamics. The numerical solutions which have been validated against available in situ data, show the development of small scale features, eddies, fronts and filaments. Spectral analysis reveals a behavior that is consistent with the SQG theory. There is a clear evidence of energy cascade from the small scales including the submesoscales, although those submesoscales are only partially resolved by the model. In parallel

  19. Novel Algorithms for Retrieval of Hydrology and Ice Regimes of Middle-sized Inland Water Bodies from Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Y. I.; Rybushkina, G. V.; Kuznetsova, A. M.; Baidakov, G. A.; Soustova, I.

    2014-12-01

    A novel method of regional adaptive re-tracking based on constructing a theoretical model describing the formation of telemetric waveforms by reflection from the piecewise constant model surface corresponding to the geography of the region is considered. The algorithm includes four consecutive steps: a) constructing a local piecewise model of a reflecting surface in the neighbourhood of the reservoir; b) solving a direct problem by calculating the reflected waveforms within the framework of the model; c) imposing restrictions and validity criteria for the algorithm based on waveform modelling; d) solving the inverse problem by retrieving a tracking point by the improved threshold algorithm. The results obtained on the basis of standard algorithm and method for adaptive re-tracking at Rybinsk , Gorky, Kuibyshev, Saratov and Volgograd reservoirs and middle-sized lakes of Russia: Chany, Segozero, Hanko, Onego, Beloye are compared to each other and to the field data of hydrological stations in reservoirs and lakes. The possibility of determination of significant wave height (SWH) in the lakes through a two-step adaptive retracking is investigated. Comparing results of retracting of SGDR data and ground measurements shows, that retrieving wave parameters in medium sized water bodies still meets difficulties. The direction of improvement of the existing algorithm is associated with comprehensive use of altimetry data, field studies and numerical modeling of high resolution. A simple method for timing of water freezing and ice break-up in lakes based on analysis of along-track dependencies of brightness temperatures at 18.7 and 34 GHz registered by microwave radiometer of altimetry satellite Jason-2. Comparison with in situ data of Russian Register of hydraulic structures on the example of reservoirs of the Volga River and the Don River confirms ability of the proposed method to determine quantitatively the freezing and break-up times for middle-sized inland water bodies.

  20. Volumetric evolution of Surtsey, Iceland, from topographic maps and scanning airborne laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garvin, J.B.; Williams, R.S.; Frawley, J.J.; Krabill, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    The volumetric evolution of Surtsey has been estimated on the basis of digital elevation models derived from NASA scanning airborne laser altimeter surveys (20 July 1998), as well as digitized 1:5,000-scale topographic maps produced by the National Land Survey of Iceland and by Norrman. Subaerial volumes have been computed from co-registered digital elevation models (DEM's) from 6 July 1968, 11 July 1975, 16 July 1993, and 20 July 1998 (scanning airborne laser altimetry), as well as true surface area (above mean sea level). Our analysis suggests that the subaerial volume of Surtsey has been reduced from nearly 0.100 km3 on 6 July 1968 to 0.075 km3 on 20 July 1998. Linear regression analysis of the temporal evolution of Surtsey's subaerial volume indicates that most of its subaerial surface will be at or below mean sea-level by approximately 2100. This assumes a conservative estimate of continuation of the current pace of marine erosion and mass-wasting on the island, including the indurated core of the conduits of the Surtur I and Surtur II eruptive vents. If the conduits are relatively resistant to marine erosion they will become sea stacks after the rest of the island has become a submarine shoal, and some portions of the island could survive for centuries. The 20 July 1998 scanning laser altimeter surveys further indicate rapid enlargement of erosional canyons in the northeastern portion of the partial tephra ring associated with Surtur I. Continued airborne and eventually spaceborne topographic surveys of Surtsey are planned to refine the inter-annual change of its subaerial volume.

  1. Global navigation satellite sounding of the atmosphere and GNSS altimetry : prospects for geosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Tom P.; Hajj, George A.

    2003-01-01

    The vast illuminating power of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which transformed space geodesy in the 199Os, is now serving to probe the earth's fluid envelope in unique ways. Three distinct techniques have emerged: ground-based sensing of the integrated atmospheric moisture; space-based profiling of atmospheric refractivity, pressure, temperature, moisture, and other properties by active limb sounding; and surface (ocean and ice) altimetry and scatterometry with reflected signals detected from space. Ground-based GPS moisture sensing is already in provisional use for numerical weather prediction. Limb sounding, while less mature, offers a bevy of attractions, including high accuracy, stability, and vertical resolution; all-weather operation; and exceptionally low cost. GPS bistatic radar, r 'reflectometry,' is the least advanced but shows promise for a number of niche applications.

  2. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  3. An investigation of ensemble-based assimilation of satellite altimetry and tide gauge data in storm surge prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etala, Paula; Saraceno, Martín; Echevarría, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Cyclogenesis and long-fetched winds along the southeastern coast of South America may lead to floods in populated areas, as the Buenos Aires Province, with important economic and social impacts. A numerical model (SMARA) has already been implemented in the region to forecast storm surges. The propagation time of the surge in such extensive and shallow area allows the detection of anomalies based on observations from several hours up to the order of a day prior to the event. Here, we investigate the impact and potential benefit of storm surge level data assimilation into the SMARA model, with the objective of improving the forecast. In the experiments, the surface wind stress from an ensemble prediction system drives a storm surge model ensemble, based on the operational 2-D depth-averaged SMARA model. A 4-D Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (4D-LETKF) initializes the ensemble in a 6-h cycle, assimilating the very few tide gauge observations available along the northern coast and satellite altimeter data. The sparse coverage of the altimeters is a challenge to data assimilation; however, the 4D-LETKF evolving covariance of the ensemble perturbations provides realistic cross-track analysis increments. Improvements on the forecast ensemble mean show the potential of an effective use of the sparse satellite altimeter and tidal gauges observations in the data assimilation prototype. Furthermore, the effects of the localization scale and of the observational errors of coastal altimetry and tidal gauges in the data assimilation approach are assessed.

  4. Ancient multiring basins on the moon revealed by clementine laser altimetry.

    PubMed

    Spudis, P D; Gillis, J J; Reisse, R A

    1994-12-16

    Analysis of laser altimetry data from Clementine has confirmed and extended our knowledge of nearly obliterated multiring basins on the moon. These basins were formed during the early bombardment phase of lunar history, have been filled to varying degrees by mare lavas and regional ejecta blankets, and have been degraded by the superposition of large impact craters. The Mendel-Rydberg Basin, a degraded three-ring feature over 600 kilometers in diameter on the lunar western limb, is about 6 kilometers deep from rim to floor, only slightly less deep than the nearby younger and much better preserved Orientale Basin (8 kilometers deep). The South Pole-Aitken Basin, the oldest discernible impact feature on the moon, is revealed as a basin 2500 kilometers in diameter with an average depth of more than 13 kilometers, rim crest to floor. This feature is the largest, deepest impact crater yet discovered in the solar system. Several additional depressions seen in the data may represent previously unmapped ancient impact basins.

  5. Ancient Multiring Basins on the Moon Revealed by Clementine Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, Paul D.; Reisse, Robert A.; Gillis, Jeffrey J.

    1994-12-01

    Analysis of laser altimetry data from Clementine has confirmed and extended our knowledge of nearly obliterated multiring basins on the moon. These basins were formed during the early bombardment phase of lunar history, have been filled to varying degrees by mare lavas and regional ejecta blankets, and have been degraded by the superposition of large impact craters. The Mendel-Rydberg Basin, a degraded three-ring feature over 600 kilometers in diameter on the lunar western limb, is about 6 kilometers deep from rim to floor, only slightly less deep than the nearby younger and much better preserved Orientale Basin (8 kilometers deep). The South Pole-Aitken Basin, the oldest discernible impact feature on the moon, is revealed as a basin 2500 kilometers in diameter with an average depth of more than 13 kilometers, rim crest to floor. This feature is the largest, deepest impact crater yet discovered in the solar system. Several additional depressions seen in the data may represent previously unmapped ancient impact basins.

  6. Simultaneous determination of global topography, tidal Love number and libration amplitude of Mercury by laser altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christian; Christensen, Ulrich; Kallenbach, Reinald

    2008-07-01

    Solar tidal forces generate elevation changes of Mercury's surface of the order 1 m within one Hermean year, and solar torques on the non-symmetric permanent mass distribution of the planet cause an uneven rotation of Mercury's surface with a libration amplitude of the order of 40 arcsec. Knowledge of the precise reaction of the planet to tidal forcing, expressed by the Love numbers h2 and k2, as well as accurate knowledge of the amplitude of forced libration Φlib, puts constraints on the internal structure, for example the state and the size of the core. The MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions to Mercury carry laser altimeters, whose primary goal is to accurately map the topography. Here we investigate if the Love number h2 and the amplitude of forced libration can be determined together with the static topography of the planet from a global altimetry record. We do this by creating synthetic altimeter data for the nominal orbit of BepiColombo over the nominal mission duration of approximately four Mercury years and inverting them for the static and time-dependent parts of the topography. We assume purely Gaussian noise. We find that it is possible to extract both parameters h2 and Φlib with an accuracy of approximately 10%, while the static topography coefficients of a spherical harmonic expansion can be determined simultaneously with an accuracy at the centimetre level. Extraction of the static topography to higher harmonic degrees improves the precision of the measurement of h2 and Φlib. The simulation results demonstrate that it seems feasible to test current models on Mercury's interior with sufficient precision using BepiColombo Laser Altimeter data.

  7. Planetary dynamics from laser altimetry: Spin and tidal deformation of the Moon and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of planetary bodies can provide valuable, and often unique, information on their interior structure. For instance, surface tidal deformation indicates how a body responds to the gravitational tidal forcing, and can thus give an indication of how the internal structure and temperature varies with depth. In addition, the orientation and spin rate of a planetary body are affected by its interior mass distribution and thermal evolution. In this contribution, we describe recent work to constrain the tidal deformation of the Moon and spin state and orientation of Mercury using altimetric crossovers measured by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and MESSENGER Laser Altimeter (MLA). Altimetric crossovers are ideal for detecting the desired small surface changes, as they avoid the problem of aliasing topographic changes due to small-scale, unpredictable and uncorrelated, geologic relief. On the Moon, the tidal surface deformation is small (amplitude ~10 cm), but, using the highest quality LOLA crossovers, Mazarico et al. (2014) made the first measurement of the radial Love number h2 from an orbiting spacecraft. In a follow-up to that work, we are incorporating more crossovers to improve the temporal sampling of the tidal signal, thus enabling analysis of the spatial variation of the tidal amplitude, as might be expected given the thicker and cooler far side crust and the potential presence of a partial melt region below the PKT. Due to tidal torques from the Sun, Mercury experiences longitudinal librations about its 3:2 spin-orbit resonance with an amplitude of ~450 m at the equator. This amplitude is significantly larger than the geolocation uncertainty of the MLA altimetry (~10/100 m in radial/horizontal), and could, thus, be detectable from crossovers alone. However, given the sparse coverage near the equator, where the libration amplitude is largest, it may be necessary to incorporate into the analysis stereo-derived DEMs from the Mercury Dual Imaging

  8. Laser beamed power: Satellite demonstration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Westerlund, Larry H.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible to use a ground-based laser to beam light to the solar arrays of orbiting satellites, to a level sufficient to provide all or some of the operating power required. Near-term applications of this technology for providing supplemental power to existing satellites are discussed. Two missions with significant commercial pay-off are supplementing solar power for radiation-degraded arrays and providing satellite power during eclipse for satellites with failed batteries.

  9. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, K. M.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.; Amundson, J. M.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Cook, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to space-borne determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to both Greenland (April 2012) and Alaska (July 2014) to provide data needed for: 1) satellite algorithm development; 2) to simulate key elements of this photon-counting sampling strategy; and 3) to assess elements of this sampling strategy that may vary seasonally. Here, we compare seasonal aspects of the two datasets, with a focus on results from the latter campaign, where in situ observations in southeastern Alaska help to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier melt ponds.

  10. Transport of the Norwegian Atlantic current as determined from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistek, Pavel; Johnson, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Relatively warm and salty North Atlantic surface waters flow through the Faeroe-Shetland Channel into the higher latitudes of the Nordic Seas, preserving an ice-free winter environment for much of the exterior coast of northern Europe. This flow was monitored along the Norwegian coast using Geosat altimetry on two ascending arcs during the Exact Repeat Mission in 1987-1989. Concurrent undertrack CTD surveys were used to fix a reference surface for the altimeter-derived SSH anomalies, in effect creating time series of alongtrack surface dynamic height topographies. Climatologic CTD casts were then used, with empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, to derive relationships between historical surface dynamic heights and vertical temperature and salinity profiles. Applying these EOF relationships to the altimeter signals, mean transports of volume, heat, and salt were calculated at approximately 2.9 Sverdrups, 8.1 x 10 exp 11 KCal/s and 1.0 x 10 exp 8 Kg/s, respectively. Maximum transports occurred in February/March and minimum in July/August.

  11. An Original Processing Method of Satellite Altimetry for Estimating Water Levels and Volume Fluctuations in a Series of Small Lakes of the Pantanal Wetland Complex in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Costa, Paulo; Oliveira Pereira, Eric; Maillard, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry is becoming a major tool for measuring water levels in rivers and lakes offering accuracies compatible with many hydrological applications, especially in uninhabited regions of difficult access. The Pantanal is considered the largest tropical wetland in the world and the sparsity of in situ gauging station make remote methods of water level measurements an attractive alternative. This article describes how satellites altimetry data from Envisat and Saral was used to determine water level in two small lakes in the Pantanal. By combining the water level with the water surface area extracted from satellite imagery, water volume fluctuations were also estimated for a few periods. The available algorithms (retrackers) that compute a range solution from the raw waveforms do not always produce reliable measurements in small lakes. This is because the return signal gets often "contaminated" by the surrounding land. To try to solve this, we created a "lake" retracker that rejects waveforms that cannot be attributed to "calm water" and convert them to altitude. Elevation data are stored in a database along with the water surface area to compute the volume fluctuations. Satellite water level time series were also produced and compared with the only nearby in situ gauging station. Although the "lake" retracker worked well with calm water, the presence of waves and other factors was such that the standard "ice1" retracker performed better on the overall. We estimate our water level accuracy to be around 75 cm. Although the return time of both satellites is only 35 days, the next few years promise to bring new altimetry satellite missions that will significantly increase this frequency.

  12. On estimating the basin-scale ocean circulation from satellite altimetry. Part 1: Straightforward spherical harmonic expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Chang-Kou

    1988-01-01

    Direct estimation of the absolute dynamic topography from satellite altimetry has been confined to the largest scales (basically the basin-scale) owing to the fact that the signal-to-noise ratio is more unfavorable everywhere else. But even for the largest scales, the results are contaminated by the orbit error and geoid uncertainties. Recently a more accurate Earth gravity model (GEM-T1) became available, providing the opportunity to examine the whole question of direct estimation under a more critical limelight. It is found that our knowledge of the Earth's gravity field has indeed improved a great deal. However, it is not yet possible to claim definitively that our knowledge of the ocean circulation has improved through direct estimation. Yet, the improvement in the gravity model has come to the point that it is no longer possible to attribute the discrepancy at the basin scales between altimetric and hydrographic results as mostly due to geoid uncertainties. A substantial part of the difference must be due to other factors; i.e., the orbit error, or the uncertainty of the hydrographically derived dynamic topography.

  13. A new high frequency Earth rotation model based on an empirical ocean tide model from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. The current high frequency Earth rotation model mentioned in the IERS Conventions 2010 and thus used by most analysis institutions was developed in 1994. Since then several satellite missions have collected lots of altimetry data and were used to obtain new ocean tide models. Due to the increase of accuracy and resolution of these models, we will develop an improved Earth rotation model for (sub-) daily periods. In order to reduce (hydrodynamic) modeling effects, we use the empirical ocean tide model EOT11a, provided by DGFI, Munich. Global oceanic currents, which are required for ocean tidal angular momentum but not included in empirical models, are obtained using a linearized and simplified Navier-Stokes equation (Ray, 2001). We compare the new model with the model from the IERS Conventions 2010 as well as with an empirical Earth rotation model (Artz et al., 2011) and show the expected differences in the analysis of VLBI observations. For this purpose we use the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS).

  14. DAHITI - An Innovative Approach for Estimating Water Level Time Series over Inland Water using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, for some years, this technology has also been used to retrieve water levels from lakes, reservoirs, rivers, wetlands and in general any inland water body. In this contribution, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is presented. The method is the basis for the computation of time series of rivers and lakes available through the web service 'Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Water' (DAHITI). It is based on an extended outlier rejection and a Kalman filter approach incorporating cross-calibrated multi-mission altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa, including their uncertainties. The new approach yields RMS differences with respect to in situ data between 4 cm and 36 cm for lakes and 8 cm and 114 cm for rivers, respectively. Within this presentation, the new approach will be introduced and examples for water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers will be shown featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparisons with in situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases.

  15. Retrieval of short scale geophysical signals and improved coastal data from SAR satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Buchhaupt, Christopher; Dinardo, Salvatore; Scharroo, Remko; Benveniste, Jerome; Becker, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The Delay Doppler/Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimeter offers a new quality of observational data in comparison to the pulse-limited low resolution mode (LRM) data collected over the past twenty years. Due to the reduced noise in the measurements an improved retrieval of the geophysical signal is expected in SAR. The goal of this study is to characterize these improvements both in open ocean and coastal zone using standard Level 2 and Level 1 data reprocessed with improved algorithms. We have carried out, from CryoSat-2 Level 1a Full Bit Rate (L1a FBR) data, a Delay-Doppler processing and waveform retracking tailored specifically for coastal zone by applying Hamming Window and Zero-Padding, using an extended vertical swath window in order to minimize tracker errors and a dedicated SAMOSA-based coastal retracker (named SAMOSA+). SAMOSA+ accepts mean square slope as free parameter and the epoch's first guess fitting value is decided according to the peak in correlation between 20 consecutive waveforms (in order to mitigate land off-ranging effect). Those products can be extracted from ESA-ESRIN GPOD service (named SARvatore). In order to quantify the improvement with respect to pulse-limited altimetry, we build 20 Hz PLRM (pseudo-LRM) data from CryoSat-1 L1a FBR and retrack them with numerical convolutional Brown-based retracker. Hence, here, PLRM is used as a proxy for real pulse-limited products (LRM), since there is no direct comparison of SAR and LRM possible otherwise. The PLRM data are built and retracked by Technical University of Darmstadt (TUDa). In the open ocean the study consists on the retrieval of short scale geophysical, as the swell signals. The selected areas are the CryoSat-2 Pacific and Atlantic Boxes in which it operated in SAR mode. In the coastal zone of the North Sea the study concentrates on the reduction of land and ships contamination by dedicated procedures including improved retracking. Effects of different options and retracking

  16. Water level fluctuations in the Congo Basin derived from ENVISAT satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Santos Da Silva, J.; Conchi, T.; Calmant, S.; Seyler, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the Congo Basin, the elevated vulnerability of the food security and water supply implicates that the sustainable development strategies must take into account the climate change impacts. However, there are only a limited number of studies focusing on climate change impacts for the Congo basin, mainly due to the lack of observational climate and hydrological data. Recent improvements in remote sensing technology provide more data than ever before to support hydrological studies in tropical regions. In this work, 130 time series of water level in major rivers of the Congo basin are extracted using ENVISAT altimetry over the period 2002-2010. This dataset offers an unprecedented distributed view of the spatio-temporal variations of river stage throughout the basin. In order to provide valuable indications to improve the understanding of the dominant physical phenomena in the Congo Basin, we performed a K-Means cluster analysis of the altimeter-derived river level height variations to identify groups of hydrologically similar catchments. Each group is represented through a parsimonious set of morphometric (location, elevation and distance to the mouth) and hydrologic variables (amplitude), including also indexes that attempt to synthesize the variability (dates of low and high stages) and correlation properties (lag-1, Hurst exponent). This analysis revealed nine distinct regions. For each region the seasonal and interannual variabilities of the mean river level are discussed and compared to the TRMM rainfall data and to ordinary climate indices such as MEI, TNA, TSA and IOD. This analysis allowed us to identify the most sensitive subregions to climate change of the Congo Basin.

  17. Study of Sub-basin Scale Groundwater Variations in Asia Using GRACE, Satellite Altimetry and in-situ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Taniguchi, M.

    2008-12-01

    A project to assess the effects of human activities on the subsurface environment in Asian developing cities is now in progress (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature., 2008). In the project, precise in situ gravity and landwater observations combined with GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite gravity data is proposed to evaluate local groundwater level changes of the developing urban areas in Asia. It is necessary for precise and accurate estimation of the local groundwater variations to separate local groundwater level changes from regional or global scale landwater variations. GRACE data is useful to estimate large scale landwater variations. Using GRACE Level 2 monthly gravity field solutions, we previously recovered landwater mass variation around Bangkok, in Thailand, which is one of the test areas of the project and located on the downstream of Chao Phraya river basin in the Indochina Peninsula. However, it is difficult to distinguish landwater signal of Chao Phraya river basin itself with the neighboring 3 large river basins because of the limitation of the spatial resolution of the GRACE monthly solutions. In this study, we recovered mass variation of Chao Phraya river basin using GRACE"fs along track range rate data instead of the monthly solutions. We used the method developed by Chen et al (2007), which uses GRACE"fs line-of-sight range acceleration measurements. We also tested the recoveries of landwater mass variations in other small scale river basins including Jakarta, Seoul and Taipei, which are also study areas of the project. Using the sub-basin scale landwater mass variation recovered by GRACE, we estimated groundwater level change in the project study areas by combing with in situ landwater and gravity observations. Satellite altimetry data is also used to separate groundwater variation from other landwater components as a constraint of river water storage variations.

  18. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Amundson, Jason M.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Moussavi, Mahsa S.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.; Cook, William B.; Markus, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in late 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to satellite determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for satellite-algorithm development and ICESat-2 error analysis. MABEL was deployed out of Fairbanks, Alaska, in July 2014 to provide a test dataset for algorithm development in summer conditions with water-saturated snow and ice surfaces. Here we compare MABEL lidar data to in situ observations in Southeast Alaska to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier surface melt ponds and a wet snowpack. Results indicate the following: (1) based on MABEL and in situ data comparisons, the ATLAS 90 m beam-spacing strategy will provide a valid assessment of across-track slope that is consistent with shallow slopes (< 1°) of an ice-sheet interior over 50 to 150 m length scales; (2) the dense along-track sampling strategy of photon counting systems can provide crevasse detail; and (3) MABEL 532 nm wavelength light may sample both the surface and subsurface of shallow (approximately 2 m deep) supraglacial melt ponds. The data associated with crevasses and melt ponds indicate the potential ICESat-2 will have for the study of mountain and other small glaciers.

  19. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome

    J. Benveniste (1), V. Rosmorduc (2) S. Niemeijer (3), N. Picot (4) (1) European Space Agency (2) CLS, France, (3) STCorp, NL (4) CNES, France (www.altimetry.info) The field of satellite radar altimetry has matured to a point where it is now time to encourage a multimission approach (between various altimetry systems) and conceive an "all-altimeter" toolbox and tutorial. Such an integrated approach and view is vital not only for assessing the current status of what offers altimeter products but also to show the system and consistency with the past. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox (BRAT) is a collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data for altimetry users, experienced as well as beginners, and particularly the users of the upcoming CryoSat mission. It is able . to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 and 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, and the future Cryosat missions, . to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, . and to visualise the results. A version 2 is being developed with additional visualisation features such as waveform viewing. Also, a release for the MacOS is planned. As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data BRAT is being developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info

  20. Measuring Ganymede's tidal deformation by laser altimetry: application to the GALA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrügge, Gregor; Hussmann, Hauke; Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of Ganymede's induced magnetic field suggest a salty water layer under the icy crust (Kivelson et al. 2002), in agreement with thermal models based on heat transfer and energy balance equations (e.g., Spohn and Schubert, 2003). Due to the small density contrast between ice-I and liquid water, interior structure models (e.g. Sohl et al. 2003) consistent with Ganymede's moment of inertia and total mass cannot constrain the ice thickness or ocean depth. In order to reduce the ambiguity of the structural models and to constrain the ice thickness, it has been proposed to measure the dynamic response of Ganymede's ice shell to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter characterized by the Love numbers h2 and k2. Similar strategies have been investigated in application to Europa (Wu 2001, Wahr 2006, Hussmann 2011). The body tide Love number h2 depends on the tidal frequency (main tidal cycle is the 7.15 days period of revolution), the internal structure, and the rheology, in particular on the presence of fluid layers, and the thickness and rigidity of an overlaying ice shell. Combined with measurements of the Love number k2, which can be inferred from radio science experiments, and a simultaneous determination of linear combinations of h2 and k2 the obtained data would significantly reduce the ambiguity in structural models (Wahr et al. 2006). A way to determine tidal effects in Ganymede's topography and therefore the h2 value by a spacecraft in orbit is the crossover method: Different orbit tracks will intersect at certain surface locations at different times so that the tidal signal can be extracted from a differential altimetry measurement. The Ganymede Laser Altimeter GALA is one of the instruments selected for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE). The GALA instrument will perform globally distributed altitude measurements from a low circular orbit. The main challenges for the determination of the tidal amplitude are Ganymede's high surface roughness and low

  1. Spatio-temporal analysis of the sea level in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea using Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon and Envisat satellite altimetry data from 2002 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghakarimi, Armin; Demir, Coşkun; Onur Karslıoǧlu, Mahmut; Kılıçoǧlu, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Altimetry satellites basically determine the distance from the satellite to a target surface by measuring the satellite-to-surface round-trip time of a radar pulse, and thus the sea surface height from the reference ellipsoid. Satellite altimetry, supplying continuous long term observations, has been contributing to understanding the sea surface height variations. Spatial and temporal variability of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea have been investigated in this work using 10 years data of four satellite altimetry missions; Jason-1, Jason-2 , Topex/Poseidon and Envisat. In order to perform time series analysis, altimetry data points along each pass are clustered in a way that each cluster contains only one observation of a cycle. The method of clustering is referred to a pattern of the altimetry data along the geodetic latitude. Sea Surface Height (SSH) of all data points of the clusters have been projected to the center of the clusters using the geoidal trend which is calculated on the basis of a global gravitational model, namely EGM08. Harmonic analysis has been performed for time series of all clusters and then trends of them have been computed. Also in this step Pope Test has been used for outlier detection. The significance of the calculated trends has been investigated using t-test. For analyzing the spatial variability of the sea level through the seas, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been used. Spline interpolation is applied to fill the possible data gaps in time series. PCA is also used for investigating the dominant variability of the sea level. For this purpose the sea level variation signal has been reconstructed by using the first three principal components. Results show that there is a general decreasing but very small tendencies in the most of clusters for all altimetry missions in both seas. Keywords: satellite altimetry, sea level change, time series, PCA

  2. Surface topography of the Greenland Ice Sheet from satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A.; Zwally, H. Jay; Major, Judith A.; Brenner, Anita C.

    1989-01-01

    Surface elevation maps of the southern half of the Greenland subcontinent are produced from radar altimeter data acquired by the Seasat satellite. A summary of the processing procedure and examples of return waveform data are given. The elevation data are used to generate a regular grid which is then computer contoured to provide an elevation contour map. Ancillary maps show the statistical quality of the elevation data and various characteristics of the surface. The elevation map is used to define ice flow directions and delineate the major drainage basins. Regular maps of the Jakobshavns Glacier drainage basin and the ice divide in the vicinity of Crete Station are presented. Altimeter derived elevations are compared with elevations measured both by satellite geoceivers and optical surveying.

  3. Investigation of the seasonal spatial variability of the Caspian Sea level by satellite altimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarov, Elnur; Mammadov, Ramiz; Cretaux, Jean-Francois; Arsen, Adalbert; Safarov, Said; Amrahov, Elvin

    2016-07-01

    Sea level fluctuations are among the most outstanding and debated issues of the Caspian Sea. Precipitation, underground water and river input are consistent parts of the inflow of the Caspian Sea water balance. The river input is also considered to be the main driver of the seasonal level changes of the Caspian Sea. Sufficiently large amount of this input is provided by the Volga. Although there is a good network of sea level stations covering the coastline of the sea, these facilities are not capable to reflect the sea level variations over the all surface. Meanwhile, the Caspian Sea is well observed by satellites Jason 1, Jason 2 and ENVISAT. Altimetric data taken from these satellites covers the surface of the sea much better than the data from the in-situ network stations. In this paper we investigate the spatial variability of the sea level that could provide more insight into the influence of river input (especially the Volga river), precipitation and other hydro-meteorological parameters on the Caspian Sea level.The altimetric data was averaged per every 10 square kilometers through all the tracks by means of the pre-prepared program made especially for this work. Also new maps of seasonal spatial variability of amplitude and phase of the annual signal of the Caspian Sea level for each investigated satellite were created by employing ARCGIS software. Moreover, these peaks of sea level amplitude and phase of annual signal results were comparatively analyzed with the corresponding river discharge of the Volga.

  4. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography Satellite Mission - An Assessment of Swath Altimetry Measurements of River Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Matthew D.; Durand, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Chul-Jung, Hahn; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Lee, Hyongki

    2012-01-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission, scheduled for launch in 2020 with development commencing in 2015, will provide a step-change improvement in the measurement of terrestrial surface water storage and dynamics. In particular, it will provide the first, routine two-dimensional measurements of water surface elevations, which will allow for the estimation of river and floodplain flows via the water surface slope. In this paper, we characterize the measurements which may be obtained from SWOT and illustrate how they may be used to derive estimates of river discharge. In particular, we show (i) the spatia-temporal sampling scheme of SWOT, (ii) the errors which maybe expected in swath altimetry measurements of the terrestrial surface water, and (iii) the impacts such errors may have on estimates of water surface slope and river discharge, We illustrate this through a "virtual mission" study for a approximately 300 km reach of the central Amazon river, using a hydraulic model to provide water surface elevations according to the SWOT spatia-temporal sampling scheme (orbit with 78 degree inclination, 22 day repeat and 140 km swath width) to which errors were added based on a two-dimension height error spectrum derived from the SWOT design requirements. Water surface elevation measurements for the Amazon mainstem as may be observed by SWOT were thereby obtained. Using these measurements, estimates of river slope and discharge were derived and compared to those which may be obtained without error, and those obtained directly from the hydraulic model. It was found that discharge can be reproduced highly accurately from the water height, without knowledge of the detailed channel bathymetry using a modified Manning's equation, if friction, depth, width and slope are known. Increasing reach length was found to be an effective method to reduce systematic height error in SWOT measurements.

  5. Hydraulic visibility and effective cross sections based on hydrodynamical modeling of flow lines gained by satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancamaria, S.; Garambois, P. A.; Calmant, S.; Roux, H.; Paris, A.; Monnier, J.; Santos da Silva, J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrodynamic laws predict that irregularities in a river bed geometry produce spatial and temporal variations in the water level, hence in its slope. Conversely, observation of these changes is a goal of the SWOT mission with the determination of the discharge as a final objective. In this study, we analyse the relationship between river bed undulations and water surface for an ungauged reach of the Xingu river, a first order tributary of the Amazon river. It is crosscut more than 10 times by a single ENVISAT track over a hundred of km. We have determined time series of water levelsat each of these crossings, called virtual stations (VS), hence slopes of the flow line. Using the discharge series computed by Paiva et al. (2013) between 1998 and 2009, Paris et al. (submitted) determined at each VS a rating curve relating these simulated discharge with the ENVISAT height series. One parameter of these rating curves is the zero-flow depth Z 0 . We show that it is possible to explain the spatial and temporal variations of the water surface slope in terms of hydrodynamical response of the longitudinal changes of the river bed geometry given by the successive values of Z 0 . Our experiment is based on an effective, single thread representation of a braided river, realistic values for the Manning coefficient and river widths picked up on JERS images. This study confirms that simulated flow lines are consistent with water surface elevations (WSE) and slopes gained by satellite altimetry. Hydrodynamical signatures are more visible where the river bed geometry varies significantly, and for reaches with a strong downstream control. Therefore, this study suggests that the longitudinal variations of the slope might be an interesting criteria for the question of river segmentation into elementary reaches for the SWOT mission which will provide continuous measurements of the water surface elevation, the slope and the reach width.

  6. MABEL Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry Data for ICESat-2 Simulations and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, K. M.; Neumann, T.; Walsh, K. M.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2016 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which represents a new approach to space-borne determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for 1) algorithm development and 2) to simulate key elements of this new sampling strategy. Instrument precision is critical to satellite algorithm development. We present precision estimates for MABEL surface elevations associated with 2011-2012 surveys. The greatest changes in elevation in Greenland and Antarctica are happening along the margins of the ice sheets where the surface frequently has significant slopes. For this reason the ICESat-2 mission utilizes pairs of laser altimeter beams that are perpendicular to the flight direction in order to extract slope information in addition to elevation. We present local slopes as determined by MABEL and compare them to those determined by the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) over the same flight lines on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Results from MABEL suggest that 1) MABEL precision is within the design goals aimed at algorithm development and 2) ICESat-2 beam geometry is appropriate for the determination of slope on ~90 m spatial scales, a measurement that will be fundamental to deconvolving the effects of surface slope from the ice-sheet surface change derived from ICESat-2.

  7. Sea-Ice Freeboard Retrieval Using Digital Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Brunt, Kelly M.; Ruth, Julia M.; Kuhn, John M.; Connor, Laurence N.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne and spaceborne altimeters provide measurements of sea-ice elevation, from which sea-ice freeboard and thickness may be derived. Observations of the Arctic ice pack by satellite altimeters indicate a significant decline in ice thickness, and volume, over the last decade. NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a next-generation laser altimeter designed to continue key sea-ice observations through the end of this decade. An airborne simulator for ICESat-2, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to gather pre-launch data for mission development. We present an analysis of MABEL data gathered over sea ice in the Greenland Sea and assess the capabilities of photon-counting techniques for sea-ice freeboard retrieval. We compare freeboard estimates in the marginal ice zone derived from MABEL photon-counting data with coincident data collected by a conventional airborne laser altimeter. We find that freeboard estimates agree to within 0.03m in the areas where sea-ice floes were interspersed with wide leads, and to within 0.07m elsewhere. MABEL data may also be used to infer sea-ice thickness, and when compared with coincident but independent ice thickness estimates, MABEL ice thicknesses agreed to within 0.65m or better.

  8. About uncertainties in sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite radar altimetry: results from the ESA-CCI Sea Ice ECV Project Round Robin Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, S.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Skourup, H.; Rinne, E.; Parsakhoo, Z. S.; Djepa, V.; Wadhams, P.; Sandven, S.

    2014-03-01

    One goal of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative sea ice Essential Climate Variable project is to provide a quality controlled 20 year long data set of Arctic Ocean winter-time sea ice thickness distribution. An important step to achieve this goal is to assess the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrieval based on satellite radar altimetry. For this purpose a data base is created comprising sea ice freeboard derived from satellite radar altimetry between 1993 and 2012 and collocated observations of snow and sea ice freeboard from Operation Ice Bridge (OIB) and CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) air-borne campaigns, of sea ice draft from moored and submarine Upward Looking Sonar (ULS), and of snow depth from OIB campaigns, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer aboard EOS (AMSR-E) and the Warren Climatology (Warren et al., 1999). An inter-comparison of the snow depth data sets stresses the limited usefulness of Warren climatology snow depth for freeboard-to-thickness conversion under current Arctic Ocean conditions reported in other studies. This is confirmed by a comparison of snow freeboard measured during OIB and CryoVEx and snow freeboard computed from radar altimetry. For first-year ice the agreement between OIB and AMSR-E snow depth within 0.02 m suggests AMSR-E snow depth as an appropriate alternative. Different freeboard-to-thickness and freeboard-to-draft conversion approaches are realized. The mean observed ULS sea ice draft agrees with the mean sea ice draft computed from radar altimetry within the uncertainty bounds of the data sets involved. However, none of the realized approaches is able to reproduce the seasonal cycle in sea ice draft observed by moored ULS satisfactorily. A sensitivity analysis of the freeboard-to-thickness conversion suggests: in order to obtain sea ice thickness as accurate as 0.5 m from radar altimetry, besides a freeboard estimate with centimetre accuracy, an ice-type dependent sea ice density is as mandatory

  9. On determining the large-scale ocean circulation from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.

    1983-01-01

    It is contended that a spherical harmonic expansion of the difference between the altimeter-derived mean sea surface and the geoid estimate should reveal the large-scale circulation of the ocean surface layer when the low-degree terms are examined. Methods based on this principle are proposed and partially demonstrated over the Pacific Ocean with the aid of the mean sea surface derived from the Seasat altimeter and the Goddard Earth Model 9 earth gravity model. The preliminary results reveal a well-defined clockwise gyre in the North Pacific and a much less well defined counterclockwise gyre in the South Pacific. When the dynamic topography thus obtained is compared with Wyrtki's (1975) dynamic topography derived from hydrographic data, the agreement is found to be within the limit of geoid uncertainties and satellite orbital errors.

  10. Ocean eddy structure by satellite radar altimetry required for iceberg towing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.J.; Cheney, R.E.; Marsh, J.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    Models for the towing of large tabular icebergs give towing speeds of 0.5 knots to 1.0 knots relative to the ambient near surface current. Recent oceanographic research indicates that the world oceans are not principally composed of large steady-state current systems, like the Gulf Stream, but that most of the ocean momentum is probably involved in intense rings, formed by meanders of the large streams, and in mid-ocean eddies. These rings and eddies have typical dimensions on the order of 200 km with dynamic height anomalies across them of tens-of-centimeters to a meter. They migrate at speeds on the order of a few cm/sec. Current velocities as great as 3 knots have been observed in rings, and currents of 1 knot are common. Thus, the successful towing of icebergs is dependent on the ability to locate, measure, and track ocean rings and eddies. To accomplish this systematically on synoptic scales appears to be possible only by using satelliteborne radar altimeters. Ocean current and eddy structures as observed by the radar altimeters on the GEOS-3 and Seasat-1 satellites are presented and compared. Several satellite programs presently being planned call for flying radar altimeters in polar or near-polar orbits in the mid-1980 time frame. Thus, by the time tows of large icebergs will probably be attempted, it is possible synoptic observations of ocean rings and eddies which can be used to ascertain their location, size, intensity, and translation velocity will be a reality. ?? 1980.

  11. Geographical representation of radial orbit perturbations due to ocean tides: Implications for satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas V.; Eanes, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    In analogy to the geographical representation of the zeroth-order radial orbit perturbations due to the static geopotential, similar relationships have been derived for radial orbit perturbations due to the ocean tides. At each location these perturbations are seen to be coherent with the tide height variations. The study of this singularity is of obvious importance to the estimation of ocean tides from satellite altimeter data. We derive analytical expressions for the sensitivity of altimeter derived ocean tide models to the ocean tide force model induced errors in the orbits of the altimeter satellite. In particular, we focus on characterizing and quantifying the nonresonant tidal orbit perturbations, which cannot be adjusted into the empirical accelerations or radial perturbation adjustments commonly used during orbit determination and in altimeter data processing. As an illustration of the utility of this technique, we study the differences between a TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived ocean tide model and the Cartwright and Ray 1991 Geosat model. This analysis shows that nearly 60% of the variance of this difference for M(sub 2) can be explained by the Geosat radial orbit eror due to the omission of coefficients from the GEM-T2 background ocean tide model. For O(sub 1), K(sub 1), S(sub 2), and K(sub 2) the orbital effects account for approximately 10 to 40% of the variances of these differences. The utility of this technique to assessment of the ocean tide induced errors in the TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived tide models is also discussed.

  12. Understanding the Value of Satellite Altimetry for Monitoring Water Level Dynamics of Large Rivers in Bangladesh Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, F.; Akbor, S.; Sustainability, Satellites, Water; Environment (Saswe) Research Group

    2010-12-01

    Although transboundary river flow accounts for more than 40% of global surface flow across 145 nations (many of them water-stressed and conflict-prone), most of this flow is difficult to monitor in developing nations at operational timescales. For Bangladesh, this situation is particularly acute because it comprises only 7% of the entire Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna basin and is located at the downstream end of the basin. Thus more than 90% of the water is generated in upstream nations and yet this information is hard to obtain in Bangladesh due to lack of transboundary instrumentation or international treaties. This work therefore investigates the value of satellite radar altimetry in detecting the water level changes for large rivers in the Bangladesh Delta. It is founded on the hypothesis that a satellite altimeter can detect water level to the same accuracy for both inside and outside of Bangladesh. First, the river hydraulic model called HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Center, River Analysis System) is set up and calibrated over Bangladesh using a comprehensive database on in-situ river bathymetry and observed water level records. Next, the calibrated HEC-RAS model is provided boundary flow conditions upstream and downstream of the model domain. At the upstream end where the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghan enter Bangladesh, high resolution flow data modeled from a well calibrated hydrologic model called MIKE BASIN is provided as input. The observed tidal flow records of the Meghna estuary near the Bay of Bengal are used as the downstream boundary conditions. HEC-RAS is then used to simulate daily water level data for the period of 2003-2005 for major rivers of Bangladesh. These water level simulations are directly compared with altimeter estimates of water level from the ENVISAT mission. Accuracy of ENVISAT data is characterized as a function of season, flow regime and river type. The important question that this study aims to answer is, “To what extent can

  13. Altimetry, Orbits and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the orbit error and its effect on the sea surface heights calculated with satellite altimetry are explained. The elementary concepts of celestial mechanics required to follow a general discussion of the problem are included. Consideration of errors in the orbits of satellites with precisely repeating ground tracks (SEASAT, TOPEX, ERS-1, POSEIDON, amongst past and future altimeter satellites) are detailed. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated with the numerical results of computer simulations. The nature of the errors in this type of orbits is such that this error can be filtered out by using height differences along repeating (overlapping) passes. This makes them particularly valuable for the study and monitoring of changes in the sea surface, such as tides. Elements of tidal theory, showing how these principles can be combined with those pertinent to the orbit error to make direct maps of the tides using altimetry are presented.

  14. The first satellite laser echoes recorded on the streak camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the streak camera with the circular sweep for the satellite laser ranging is described. The Modular Streak Camera system employing the circular sweep option was integrated into the conventional Satellite Laser System. The experimental satellite tracking and ranging has been performed. The first satellite laser echo streak camera records are presented.

  15. Characterization of Terrestrial Water Dynamics in the Congo Basin Using GRACE and Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lyongki; Beighley, R. Edward; Alsdorf, Douglas; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Duan, Jianbin; Guo, Junyi; Yamazaki, Dai; Andreadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (approximately 3.7 million km^2), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (approximately 40,200 cms annual average). However, the hydrological dynamics of seasonally flooded wetlands and floodplains remains poorly quantified. Here, we separate the Congo wetland into four 3 degree x 3 degree regions, and use remote sensing measurements (i.e., GRACE, satellite radar altimeter, GPCP, JERS-1, SRTM, and MODIS) to estimate the amounts of water filling and draining from the Congo wetland, and to determine the source of the water. We find that the amount of water annually filling and draining the Congo wetlands is 111 km^3, which is about one-third the size of the water volumes found on the mainstem Amazon floodplain. Based on amplitude comparisons among the water volume changes and timing comparisons among their fluxes, we conclude that the local upland runoff is the main source of the Congo wetland water, not the fluvial process of river-floodplain water exchange as in the Amazon. Our hydraulic analysis using altimeter measurements also supports our conclusion by demonstrating that water surface elevations in the wetlands are consistently higher than the adjacent river water levels. Our research also highlights differences in the hydrology and hydrodynamics between the Congo wetland and the mainstem Amazon floodplain.

  16. Characterization of Terrestrial Water Dynamics in the Congo Basin Using GRACE and Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyongki; Beighley, R. Edward; Alsdorf, Douglas; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Duan, Jianbin; Guo, Junyi; Yamazaki, Dai; Andreadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (approx.3.7 million sq km), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (approx.40,200 cu m/s annual average). However, the hydrological dynamics of seasonally flooded wetlands and floodplains remains poorly quantified. Here, we separate the Congo wetland into four 3deg 3deg regions, and use remote sensing measurements (i.e., GRACE, satellite radar altimeter, GPCP, JERS-1, SRTM, and MODIS) to estimate the amounts of water filling and draining from the Congo wetland, and to determine the source of the water. We find that the amount of water annually filling and draining the Congo wetlands is 111 cu km, which is about one-third the size of the water volumes found on the mainstem Amazon floodplain. Based on amplitude comparisons among the water volume changes and timing comparisons among their fluxes, we conclude that the local upland runoff is the main source of the Congo wetland water, not the fluvial process of river-floodplain water exchange as in the Amazon. Our hydraulic analysis using altimeter measurements also supports our conclusion by demonstrating that water surface elevations in the wetlands are consistently higher than the adjacent river water levels. Our research highlights differences in the hydrology and hydrodynamics between the Congo wetland and the mainstem Amazon floodplain.

  17. Ocean variability around Cape Verde Archipelago from near real time satellite altimetry and SST images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, C.; Fernandes, M. J.

    2003-04-01

    In this work, the synergy of data acquired by the radar altimeter (RA) and the infrared radiometer (ATSR-2/IRR) aboard the ERS-2 satellite, presently available in near real time, is exploited. The aim is to extract valid oceanographic information for the characterisation of ocean circulation around the Cape Verde Archipelago (North Atlantic Ocean) and its seasonal variability. For the data acquisition period (June 2001 to May 2002, ERS-2 cycles 64 to 73), synoptic maps representing sea surface temperature (SST) and absolute dynamic topography (ADT) values for each cycle were created. The methodology adopted for the near real time data processing is described. As the accuracy of the orbit and geophysical corrections is a fundamental issue in the evaluation of altimetric data, the near real time products were compared with the OPR products, which have several months of latency. Based upon the ADT values, intensity and direction of surface geostrophic currents were calculated. The SST variability was investigated and compared with the absolute dynamic topography variability. The seasonal cycle of the oceanographic characteristics, as extracted from the combined analysis of the two variables, is perfectly visible along the year of study.

  18. Global Inland Water Monitoring From Satellite Radar Altimetry- What Can We Really Do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, P. A. M.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    The series of satellite radar altimeter missions has provided a huge database of altimeter waveforms over the earth's inland water surfaces. This paper outlines the current measurement capability. A comprehensive global analysis shows that waveforms from 22,223 targets have been identified from ERS2; just under 50% of these targets are currently producing useable time series. For EnviSat, 25,363 targets yield 59% of useable time series. This is attributed in part to the dynamic mode-switching capability of the RA-2. The 10-day repeat cycles of TOPEX, Jason1 and Jason2 produce lower numbers; reasons for these retrieval differences are identified and discussed. Using data from CryoSat-2, and 1800Hz 'burst echo' data from EnviSat, the additional potential for inland water measurement from Sentinel-3 is explored. The results demonstrate that the high along track sampling rate of Sentinel-3 SAR FBR waveforms can transforms the measurement technique to a true global monitoring capability for entire river systems.

  19. Sea surface height variability in the North East Atlantic from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke; Katsman, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Data from 21 years of satellite altimeter measurements are used to identify and understand the major contributing components of sea surface height variability (SSV) on monthly time-scales in the North East Atlantic. A number of SSV drivers is considered, which are categorised into two groups; local (wind and sea surface temperature) and remote (sea level pressure and the North Atlantic oscillation index). A multiple linear regression model is constructed to model the SSV for a specific target area in the North Sea basin. Cross-correlations between candidate regressors potentially lead to ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. We therefore use an objective hierarchical selection method based on variance inflation factors to select the optimal number of regressors for the target area and accept these into the regression model if they can be associated to SSV through a direct underlying physical forcing mechanism. Results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and that it can be represented well with a regression model that uses local wind, sea surface temperature and sea level pressure as primary regressors. The regression model developed here helps to understand sea level change in the North East Atlantic. The methodology is generalised and easily applied to other regions.

  20. Improvement of walking speed prediction by accelerometry and altimetry, validated by satellite positioning.

    PubMed

    Perrin, O; Terrier, P; Ladetto, Q; Merminod, B; Schutz, Y

    2000-03-01

    Activity monitors based on accelerometry are used to predict the speed and energy cost of walking at 0% slope, but not at other inclinations. Parallel measurements of body accelerations and altitude variation were studied to determine whether walking speed prediction could be improved. Fourteen subjects walked twice along a 1.3 km circuit with substantial slope variations (-17% to +17%). The parameters recorded were body acceleration using a uni-axial accelerometer, altitude variation using differential barometry, and walking speed using satellite positioning (DGPS). Linear regressions were calculated between acceleration and walking speed, and between acceleration/altitude and walking speed. These predictive models, calculated using the data from the first circuit run, were used to predict speed during the second circuit. Finally the predicted velocity was compared with the measured one. The result was that acceleration alone failed to predict speed (mean r = 0.4). Adding altitude variation improved the prediction (mean r = 0.7). With regard to the altitude/acceleration-speed relationship, substantial inter-individual variation was found. It is concluded that accelerometry, combined with altitude measurement, can assess position variations of humans provided inter-individual variation is taken into account. It is also confirmed that DGPS can be used for outdoor walking speed measurements, opening up new perspectives in the field of biomechanics.

  1. Ice Velocity Mapping of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica by Matching Surface Undulations Measured by Icesat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Yu, Jaehyung; Scambos, Ted A.; Seo, Ki-Weon

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating the surface horizontal velocity on ice shelves using laser altimetrydata from the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat; 20032009). The method matches undulations measured at crossover points between successive campaigns.

  2. Intercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived from satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ričko, Martina; Birkett, Charon M.; Carton, James A.; Crétaux, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Satellite radar altimeter measurements of lake and reservoir water levels complement in situ observations by providing stage information for ungauged basins and by filling data gaps in existing gauge records. Such additional measurements assist both research and operational programs. However, for a particular lake or reservoir, altimetric products offered to end-users may differ due to choice of employed instrument, processing technique, and applied geophysical corrections. To explore these differences, particularly with their potential impact on climate-based research, an intercomparison of three web-based water-level products (produced by Laboratoire d'Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiale, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/United States Department of Agriculture, and European Space Agency/De Montfort University) has been undertaken based on 18 lakes and reservoirs. The products are well correlated with each other (r=0.87 to 0.99) and where in situ data are available are quite well correlated with the gauge measurements (r=0.73 to 0.99). Despite variations in data processing, the poorest root-mean-square differences between any altimeter product and gauge data (˜0.20 to 1.41 m) occur for the narrow reservoirs and smaller lakes. The largest discrepancies between the altimeter products occur for the lakes that freeze (Lake Athabasca and Woods). The current altimeter products provide acceptable accuracy, long-term trends and seasonality for climate applications. We discuss the merits of each product system, but recommend further validations and the provision of ice-detection flags.

  3. Glacier mass change evaluation in Lambert-Amery Area from 2002 to 2012 using ASTER stereo images and ICESat GLAS laser altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Tong, Xiaohua; Liu, Shijie; Liu, Shuang; Li, Lingyun; Hong, Zhonghua; Xu, Yusheng

    2014-03-01

    Currently, one of the major issues is to transform different remote sensing observations into a global reference for sustainable global-scale glacier change monitoring. In order to put glacier changes into a broader temporal context, it is desirable to extend the glacier observation time as far back as possible. In this paper, we present a case study of registering ASTER satellite stereo images to ICESat GLAS laser altimetry data, by matching terrain features identified from the ICESat measurements to those corresponding in the ASTER images. Features like ridges and nunatak can be extracted from ICESat data, and these features can also be measured in ASTER stereo images. A rigid body transformation (3 translations, 3 rotations) is applied for an optimal fit of these two sets of feature points. After transforming the ASTER photogrammetry measurements into the ICESat reference frame, we compute elevation change rates at each ICESat point by using a linear interpolation to obtain an estimate of surface elevation from ASTER. The surface firn/ice density model is used in converting the elevation changes to mass changes. Our study indicates that Lambert Glacier is close to being in mass balance between 2002 and 2012.

  4. Surface Elevation Changes in West Antarctica from Satellite Altimetry: Mass Balance Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Cornejo, Helen; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Time-series of surface elevation change, which are constructed from 7-years (1992-1999) of ERS-1 and 2 satellite radar altimeter data of Antarctica, show significant seasonal, inter-annual, and long-term changes. Elevation time-series are created from altimeter crossovers among 90-day data periods on a 50 km grid to 81.5 degrees S and fit with a multivariate linear/sinusoidal function to give the average rate of elevation change (dH/dt) and account for seasonal changes. On the major Ronne, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves, the dH/dt are small or near zero. In contrast, the ice shelves of the Antarctic Peninsula and along the West Antarctic coast appear to be thinning significantly, with a 23 +/- 3 cm a(exp -1) surface elevation decrease on the Larsen ice shelf and a 65 +/- 4 cm a(exp -1) decrease on the Dotson ice shelf. Significant elevation decreases are obtained over most of the drainage basins of the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. Significant increases are obtained over most of the other grounded ice in Marie Byrd Land, the Antarctic Peninsula, and Coates Land. Over the sector from 85 degrees W to 115 degrees W, which includes the Pine Island and Thwaites basins, the average elevation is significantly decreasing by 8.1 cm a(exp -1). The corresponding ice thickness change is about -11 cm a(exp -1), with a corresponding mass loss of 82 Gt a(exp -1), and a 0.22 mm a(exp -1) contribution to global sea level rise. In terms of elevation change, the decrease in the Pine Island-Thwaites sector is largely balanced by the increase in the Marie Byrd Land, but only balanced by about 1/4 in terms of ice thickness change and contribution to sea level rise. The overall average elevation change for the grounded ice is + 1.2 cm a(exp -1). Using an average bedrock uplift of 2.5 cm a(exp -1), implies an average ice thickness decrease of 1.3 cm a(exp -1), a mass loss of 22 Gt a(exp -1), and a 0.06 mm a(exp -1) contribution to global sea level rise.

  5. Multi-year elevation changes near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet from satellite radar altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lingle, C.S.; Brenner, A.C.; Zwally, H.J.; DiMarzio, J.P.

    1992-03-01

    Mean changes in the surface elevation near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet are measured using Seasat altimetry and altimetry from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The Seasat data extend from early July through early October 1978. The ERM data extend from winter 1986-87 through fall 1988. Both seasonal and multi-year changes are measured using altimetry referenced to GEM T2 orbits. The possible effects of orbit error are minimized by adjusting the orbits into a common ocean surface. Seasonal mean changes in the surface height are recognizable during the Geosat ERM. The multi-year measurements indicate the surface was lower by 0.4 +/- 0.4 m on average in late summer 1987 than in late summer 1978. The surface was lower by 0.2 +/- 0.5 m on average in late summer 1988 than in late summer 1978. As a control case, the computations are also carried out using altimetry referenced to orbits not adjusted into a common ocean surface.

  6. Multi-Year Elevation Changes Near the West Margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.; Brenner, Anita C.; Zwally, H. Jay; DiMarzio, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Mean changes in the surface elevation near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet are measured using Seasat altimetry and altimetry from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The Seasat data extend from early July through early October 1978. The ERM data extend from winter 1986-87 through fall 1988. Both seasonal and multi-year changes are measured using altimetry referenced to GEM T2 orbits. The possible effects of orbit error are minimized by adjusting the orbits into a common ocean surface. Seasonal mean changes in the surface height are recognizable during the Geosat ERM. The multi-year measurements indicate the surface was lower by 0.4 +/- 0.4 m on average in late summer 1987 than in late summer 1978. The surface was lower by 0.2 +/- 0.5 m on average in late summer 1988 than in late summer 1978. As a control case, the computations art also carried out using altimetry referenced to orbits not adjusted into a common ocean surface.

  7. Satellites Would Transmit Power By Laser Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Walker, Gilbert H.; HUMES D. H.; Kwon, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Arrays of diode lasers concentrate power into narrow beams. Baseline design of system formulated with regard to two particular missions that differ greatly in power requirements, thus showing scalability and attributes of basic system. Satellite system features large-scale array amplifier of high efficiency, injection-locked amplifiers, coherent combination of beams, and use of advanced lithographic technology to fabricate diode lasers in array. Extremely rapid development of applicable technologies make features realizable within decade.

  8. Height Estimation and Error Assessment of Inland Water Level Time Series calculated by a Kalman Filter Approach using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise; Boergens, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Originally designed for open ocean applications, satellite radar altimetry can also contribute promising results over inland waters. Its measurements help to understand the water cycle of the system earth and makes altimetry to a very useful instrument for hydrology. In this paper, we present our methodology for estimating water level time series over lakes, rivers, reservoirs, and wetlands. Furthermore, the error estimation of the resulting water level time series is demonstrated. For computing the water level time series multi-mission satellite altimetry data is used. The estimation is based on altimeter data from Topex, Jason-1, Jason-2, Geosat, IceSAT, GFO, ERS-2, Envisat, Cryosat, HY-2A, and Saral/Altika - depending on the location of the water body. According to the extent of the investigated water body 1Hz, high-frequent or retracked altimeter measurements can be used. Classification methods such as Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) are applied for the classification of altimeter waveforms and for rejecting outliers. For estimating the water levels we use a Kalman filter approach applied to the grid nodes of a hexagonal grid covering the water body of interest. After applying an error limit on the resulting water level heights of each grid node, a weighted average water level per point of time is derived referring to one reference location. For the estimation of water level height accuracies, at first, the formal errors are computed applying a full error propagation within Kalman filtering. Hereby, the precision of the input measurements are introduced by using the standard deviation of the water level height along the altimeter track. In addition to the resulting formal errors of water level heights, uncertainties of the applied geophysical correction (e.g. wet troposphere, ionosphere, etc.) and systematic error effects are taken into account to achieve more realistic error estimates. For validation of the time series, we

  9. Imaging Laser Altimetry in the Amazon: Mapping Large Areas of Topography, Vegetation Height and Structure, and Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Nelson, B.; dosSantos, J.; Valeriano, D.; Houghton, R.; Hofton, M.; Lutchke, S.; Sun, Q.

    2002-01-01

    A flight mission of NASA GSFC's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is planned for June-August 2003 in the Amazon region of Brazil. The goal of this flight mission is to map the vegetation height and structure and ground topography of a large area of the Amazon. This data will be used to produce maps of true ground topography, vegetation height, and estimated above-ground biomass and for comparison with and potential calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Approximately 15,000 sq. km covering various regions of the Amazon will be mapped. The LVIS sensor has the unique ability to accurately sense the ground topography beneath even the densest of forest canopies. This is achieved by using a high signal-to-noise laser altimeter to detect the very weak reflection from the ground that is available only through small gaps in between leaves and between tree canopies. Often the amount of ground signal is 1% or less of the total returned echo. Once the ground elevation is identified, that is used as the reference surface from which we measure the vertical height and structure of the vegetation. Test data over tropical forests have shown excellent correlation between LVIS measurements and biomass, basal area, stem density, ground topography, and canopy height. Examples of laser altimetry data over forests and the relationships to biophysical parameters will be shown. Also, recent advances in the LVIS instrument will be discussed.

  10. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox and radar Altimetry Tutorial: A New Set of Tools for All Altimetry Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.; Benveniste, J.; Picot, N.; Dorandeu, J.; Earith, D.; Lauret, O.; Niemeijer, S.; Poilbarbe, P.; Sicard, P.

    2006-07-01

    For more than 15 years now, each altimetry satellite has come with its own, specific data format. There are lots of very good reasons for that, but, on the point of view of the data user, this is quite impractical to manage. Several approaches were used to overcome this, mainly by processing "value-added" data, i.e. producing data with several adds-on, specific computations and enhancements, and using the same format as output, whatever the satellite. However, this supposes that the user is interested in that kind of processing (ocean, mostly). Some users still need the level-2 Geophysical Data Records, or the waveforms, or are interested in using several different levels at the same time (e.g. higher levels for quick-looks, lower for in-depth studies). Moreover no specific tool was ever made for altimetry data in general, nor any altimetry tutorial. Upon this statement, ESA and CNES decided to support the realisation of an "all-altimeter" radar altimetry tutorial and toolbox: A general Radar Altimetry Tutorial (RAT) taking into account 15 years of efforts in outreach on satellite altimetry, as well as the need of information of new users An "Open Source" Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox (BRAT) able of handling several altimetry missions' data products, of performing advanced data processing, and of visualizing the data. Such an integrated approach is vital not only for assessing the current status of what altimeter products offer but also to show the system sustainability (Cryosat, Jason-2, AltiKa, Sentinel missions, NPoess missions) and consistency with the past. The main beneficiaries of these toolbox and tutorial will be the altimetry users, experienced as well as beginners, and particularly the users of the upcoming missions. The toolbox & tutorial overall objective is to facilitate the use of satellite altimetry products for altimetry users and answer to particular needs of specific applications (cryospheric science, oceanography, marine meteorology, land

  11. Laser power beaming for satellite applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.

    1993-09-22

    A serious consideration of laser power beaming for satellite applications appears to have grown out of a NASA mission analysis for transmitting power to lunar bases during the two week dark period. System analyses showed that laser power beaming to the moon in conjunction with efficient, large area solar cell collection panels, were an attractive alternative to other schemes such as battery storage and nuclear generators, largely because of the high space transportation costs. The primary difficulty with this scheme is the need for very high average power visible lasers. One system study indicated that lasers in excess of 10 MW at a wavelength of approximately 850 nm were required. Although such lasers systems have received much attention for military applications, their realization is still a long term goal.

  12. Satellite laser station Helwan status 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cech, M.; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Novotny, Antonin; Prochazka, Ivan; Baghos, B. B.; Helali, Y.; Tawadros, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Satellite Laser Station Helwan has been operated jointly by the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics in Helwan, Egypt and the Czech Technical University in Prague, Czechslovakia. The station components have been carefully tuned to increase the systems overall stability and reliability critical for the remote location. The mount correction model based on the Gaussian smoothing has been implemented to simplify the blind satellite acquisition and tracking. The on-site normal points generation algorithm has been implemented, the station has been connected to the international information network. The ERS-1 satellite has been included into the tracking schedule. The station range capability has been verified by experimental Etalon 1 ranging by April 1992. The ranging precision of 2-3 centimeters is obtained when ranging to ERS-1, Starlette, and Lageos satellites.

  13. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  14. Sea level change in the Gulf of Thailand from GPS-corrected tide gauge data and multi-satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisirisatayawong, Itthi; Naeije, Marc; Simons, Wim; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana

    2011-04-01

    Investigation of long-term tidal data and short-term altimetry measurements reveals that sea level in the Gulf of Thailand is rising significantly faster than global average rates. Upward land motion detected from repeated precise GPS campaign measurements is used to correct the apparent sea level change from tide gauge, yielding absolute long-term trends as follows: Sattahip (1942-2004) 5.0 ± 1.3 mm/yr, Ko Sichang (1940-1999) 4.5 ± 1.3 mm/yr and Ko Mattaphon (1964-2004) 4.4 ± 1.1 mm/yr. Dual-crossover minimization of multi-mission altimetry data covering the 1993-2009 period reveals the following absolute sea level rates: Sattahip 4.8 ± 0.7 mm/yr, Ko Sichang 5.8 ± 0.8 mm/yr, Ko Lak 3.6 ± 0.7 mm/yr and Ko Mattaphon 3.2 ± 0.7 mm/yr. In other parts of the Gulf, the 1993-2009 rising rates are also in the range of 3 to 5.5 mm/yr. In the entire Gulf we don't find any evidence of sea level falling. At Ko Lak where the collocation of Topex-class altimetry ground track and the tidal station is extremely good, vertical land motion derived from the difference of sea level change rates detected by altimetry and tidal data is used to correct the apparent rate, yielding an absolute long-term (1940-2004) rate of 3.0 ± 1.5 mm/yr. The differences between the altimetry-based rates and the absolute tide gauge sea level trends can be explained by interannual variations like ENSO and decadal variations due to solar activity and lunar nutation. Post-2004 tidal data have been treated separately in our study because reliable values of region-wide vertical co-seismic displacements and post-seismic velocities caused by the 2004 Mw9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake are still not accurately known. Exclusion of these data will not significantly change the determined long-term absolute sea level change rates because of the relatively short time span of post-earthquake sea level data compared to the complete tidal record. The impact of fast rising sea level combined with high rates of post

  15. Sea Ice Topography Profiling using Laser Altimetry from Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Roger Ian

    Arctic sea ice is undergoing a dramatic transition from a perennial ice pack with a high prevalence of old multiyear ice, to a predominantly seasonal ice pack comprised primarily of young first-year and second-year ice. This transition has brought about changes in the sea ice thickness and topography characteristics, which will further affect the evolution and survivability of the ice pack. The varying ice conditions have substantial implications for commercial operations, international affairs, regional and global climate, our ability to model climate dynamics, and the livelihood of Arctic inhabitants. A number of satellite and airborne missions are dedicated to monitoring sea ice, but they are limited by their spatial and temporal resolution and coverage. Given the fast rate of sea ice change and its pervasive implications, enhanced observational capabilities are needed to augment the current strategies. The CU Laser Profilometer and Imaging System (CULPIS) is designed specifically for collecting fine-resolution elevation data and imagery from small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), and has a great potential to compliment ongoing missions. This altimeter system has been integrated into four different UAS, and has been deployed during Arctic and Antarctic science campaigns. The CULPIS elevation measurement accuracy is shown to be 95±25 cm, and is limited primarily by GPS positioning error (<25 cm), aircraft attitude determination error (<20 cm), and sensor misalignment error (<20 cm). The relative error is considerably smaller over short flight distances, and the measurement precision is shown to be <10 cm over a distance of 200 m. Given its fine precision, the CULPIS is well suited for measuring sea ice topography, and observed ridge height and ridge separation distributions are found to agree with theoretical distributions to within 5%. Simulations demonstrate the inability of course-resolution measurements to accurately represent the theoretical distributions

  16. The impact of snow depth, snow density and ice density on sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite radar altimetry: results from the ESA-CCI Sea Ice ECV Project Round Robin Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, S.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Skourup, H.; Rinne, E.; Parsakhoo, Z. S.; Djepa, V.; Wadhams, P.; Sandven, S.

    2015-01-01

    We assess different methods and input parameters, namely snow depth, snow density and ice density, used in freeboard-to-thickness conversion of Arctic sea ice. This conversion is an important part of sea ice thickness retrieval from spaceborne altimetry. A data base is created comprising sea ice freeboard derived from satellite radar altimetry between 1993 and 2012 and co-locate observations of total (sea ice + snow) and sea ice freeboard from the Operation Ice Bridge (OIB) and CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) airborne campaigns, of sea ice draft from moored and submarine upward looking sonar (ULS), and of snow depth from OIB campaigns, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Warren climatology (Warren et al., 1999). We compare the different data sets in spatiotemporal scales where satellite radar altimetry yields meaningful results. An inter-comparison of the snow depth data sets emphasizes the limited usefulness of Warren climatology snow depth for freeboard-to-thickness conversion under current Arctic Ocean conditions reported in other studies. We test different freeboard-to-thickness and freeboard-to-draft conversion approaches. The mean observed ULS sea ice draft agrees with the mean sea ice draft derived from radar altimetry within the uncertainty bounds of the data sets involved. However, none of the approaches are able to reproduce the seasonal cycle in sea ice draft observed by moored ULS. A sensitivity analysis of the freeboard-to-thickness conversion suggests that sea ice density is as important as snow depth.

  17. Radar altimetry systems cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoe, D.; Heuring, F. T.; Denman, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    This report discusses the application and cost of two types of altimeter systems (spaceborne (satellite and shuttle) and airborne) to twelve user requirements. The overall design of the systems defined to meet these requirements is predicated on an unconstrained altimetry technology; that is, any level of altimeter or supporting equipment performance is possible.

  18. Development of State of the Art Solid State Lasers for Altimetry and other LIDAR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes work performed and research accomplished through the end of 1997. During this time period, we have designed and fabricated two lasers for flight LIDAR applications to medium altitudes (Laser Vegetation Imaging System designs LVIS 1 and LVIS 2), designed one earth orbiting LIDAR transmitter (VCL-Alt), and continued work on a high rep-rate LIDAR laser (Raster Scanned Altimeter, RASCAL). Additionally, a 'White Paper' was prepared which evaluates the current state of the art of Nd:YAG lasers and projects efficiencies to the year 2004. This report is attached as Appendix 1 of this report.

  19. SAR Altimetry for Mean Sea Surface Determination in the Arctic DTU15MSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccioni, G.; Andersen, O. B.; Stenseng, L.

    2015-12-01

    A reliable MSS that includes high-latitude regions within the 82 degree parallel is required for the Sentinel-3 data processing. In this paper we present the new DTU15MSS which is an update of the DTU13MSS with more years of CryoSat-2. CryoSat-2 offers a unique dataset in the Arctic Ocean for testing SAR altimetry with nearly five years of high-resolution SAR altimetry. In the Arctic Ocean older conventional altimetry satellites (ERS-1/ERS-2/Envisat) have only been able to provide sparse data for the past 20 years. Here we present the development of the DTU13MSS in the Arctic being the latest release of the global high resolution mean sea surface from DTU Space based on 4 years/repeat of Cryostat-2. The analysis shows that Laser Altimetry from the ICESat satellite being the basis of DTU10 and DTU13MSS between 82 and 86N is now obsolete for mean sea surface determination. The study also highlight the problems of integrating altimetry from various modes (LRM, SAR and SAR-in) as well as the problems relating to the fact that the averaging period of CryoSat-2 is adjacent to the 20 years (1993-2012) period used to develop DTU13MSS. Evaluation of the new MSS is performed and comparison with existing MSS models is performed to evaluate the impact of these updates into MSS computation.

  20. Earth-to-geosynchronous satellite laser beam transmission.

    PubMed

    Aruga, T; Araki, K; Hayashi, R; Iwabuchi, T; Takahashi, M; Nakamura, S

    1985-01-01

    Some experimental results for detection of a ground-based laser beacon by a geosynchronous satellite are reported. A 50-cm diam telescope and silicon intensifier tube camera were used for optical observation of the satellite. The transmitted argon laser beam was detected by the visible channel of a radiometer on board the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite. Two activities, (1) orbit prediction correction using optical observation and (2) detection of the earth laser beacon by the radiometer, are described.

  1. Analysis of laser jamming to satellite-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si-wen; Guo, Li-hong; Guo, Ru-hai

    2009-07-01

    The reconnaissance satellite, communication satellite and navigation satellite used in the military applications have played more and more important role in the advanced technique wars and already become the significant support and aid system for military actions. With the development of all kinds of satellites, anti-satellite laser weapons emerge as the times require. The experiments and analyses of laser disturbing CCD (charge coupled detector) in near ground have been studied by many research groups, but their results are not suitable to the case that using laser disturbs the satellite-based detector. Because the distance between the satellite-based detector and the ground is very large, it is difficult to damage it directly. However the optical receive system of satellite detector has large optical gain, so laser disturbing satellite detector is possible. In order to determine its feasibility, the theoretical analyses and experimental study are carried out in the paper. Firstly, the influence factors of laser disturbing satellite detector are analyzed in detail, which including laser power density on the surface of the detector after long distance transmission, and laser power density threshold for disturbing etc. These factors are not only induced by the satellite orbit, but dependence on the following parameters: laser average power in the ground, laser beam quality, tracing and aiming precision and atmospheric transmission. A calculation model is developed by considering all factors which then the power density entering into the detector can be calculated. Secondly, the laser disturbing experiment is performed by using LD (laser diode) with the wavelength 808 nm disturbing CCD 5 kilometer away, which the disturbing threshold value is obtained as 3.55×10-4mW/cm2 that coincides with other researcher's results. Finally, using the theoretical model, the energy density of laser on the photosensitive surface of MSTI-3 satellite detector is estimated as about 100m

  2. Altimetry and lidar using AlGaAs lasers modulated with pseudo-random codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Manizade, Serdar S.

    1992-01-01

    We have demonstrated a prototype laser altimeter and lidar which uses a low power AlGaAs laser modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code, a 20 cm diameter telescope, and a photon counting receiver. Measurements to tree canopies over a 400 m horizontal path show strong signals with 5.3 mW average power and a 6.4 msec averaging time. Computer simulations predict lidar performance for various types of scattering performance.

  3. Satellite height determination using satellite-to-satellite tracking and ground laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1972-01-01

    The height of the GEOS-C spacecraft was utilized as measured by the onboard radar altimeter, for an improved determination of the earth's gravitational field and for the determination of the variation of the physical surface of the oceans. Two tracking system approaches to accurately determine the spacecraft height (orbit) are described and their results stated. These are satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and ground laser tracking (GLT). Height variations can be observed in the dm-regions using SST and in the m-region using present GLT.

  4. Satellite height determination using satellite-to-satellite tracking and ground laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to use GEOS-C spacecraft height, as measured by the onboard radar altimeter, for an improved determination of the earth's gravitational field and for the determination of the variation of the physical surface of the oceans. Two tracking system approaches to accurately determine the spacecraft height (orbit) are described and their results stated. These are satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and ground-laser tracking (GLT). Height variations can be observed in the dm-regions using SST and in the m-region using present GLT.

  5. Design and analysis of the satellite laser communications network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Pei-an; Qian, Fengchen; Liu, Qiang; Jin, Linlin

    2015-02-01

    A satellite laser communications network structure with two layers and multiple domains has been proposed, which performance has been simulated by OPENT. To simulation, we design several OPNET models of the network's components based on a satellite constellation with two layers and multiple domains, as network model, node model, MAC layer protocol and optical antenna model. The network model consists of core layer and access layer. The core network consists of four geostationary orbit (GEO) satellites which are uniformly distributed in the geostationary orbit. The access network consists of 6 low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites which is the walker delta (walk-δ) constellation with three orbit planes. In access layer, each plane has two satellites, and the constellation is stably. The satellite constellation presented for space laser network can meet the demand of coverage in the middle and low latitude by a few satellites. Also several terminal device models such as the space laser transmitter, receiver, protocol layer module and optical antenna have been designed according to the inter-satellite links in different orbits t from GEO to LEO or GEO to ground. The influence to network of different transmitting throughput, receiving throughput, network protocol and average time delay are simulated. Simulation results of network coverage, connectivity and traffic load performance in different scenes show that the satellite laser network presented by the paper can be fit for high-speed satellite communications. Such analysis can provide effective reference for the research of satellite laser networking and communication protocol.

  6. Earth laser beacon sensor for earth-oriented geosynchronous satellites.

    PubMed

    Sepp, G

    1975-07-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often required to maintain accurately their orientation with respect to a selected point at the earth surface. Precise attitude determination of these satellites may be achieved using a laser beacon from ground to the satellite as a directional reference. Four simple implementations of this principle are analyzed, and the influence of the cloudy atmosphere on the laser beacon and, therefore, on the accuracy of the method is discussed. All-weather operation is not possible; for normal cloudiness conditions, however, two analyzed systems (pulsed Nd:YAG laser with photomultiplier and CO(2) laser with cryogenic detector) appear to be feasible.

  7. Influence of ocean circulation on phytoplankton biomass distribution in the Balearic Sea: Study based on Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor and altimetry satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Antoni; Basterretxea, Gotzon; AnglèS, SíLvia

    2009-11-01

    This paper analyzes the spatial time series of surface chlorophyll (Chl) from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor and sea level anomaly (SLA) from altimetry satellite data from July 2002 to December 2007 in order to characterize the influence of the regional circulation on the phytoplankton biomass in the Balearic Sea. Correlations between Chl and SLA at seasonal and interannual time scales were examined using the singular value decomposition (SVD) method of the cross-covariance matrix between Chl and SLA. Both seasonal cycles are negatively correlated in the whole basin, indicating that the nutrient availability in the surface layer for biological uptake is associated with the changes in the water column stratification. The coupled patterns, by applying the SVD method to Chl and SLA deviations from their seasonal cycles, identify three distinct biological responses to the circulation. The first pattern (explaining 70% of the covariance between Chl and SLA) indicates Chl enhancements around the Balearic Islands related to the Balearic current reinforced by the Northern current. The second pattern (12% of the covariance) shows that the peninsular coast is rather isolated from the regional surface circulation and its behavior is determined by the Ebro river discharges and land runoff. The third pattern (9%) represents higher Chl values along the peninsular slope and lower Chl around the Balearic Islands linked to the Northern current crossing the Ibiza channel without feeding the Baleric current.

  8. Satellite laser ranging and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Eanes, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) provides an important capability for precise orbit determination and for geophysical parameter estimation to support a number of contemporary geodynamic and oceanographic investigations. The precision of the SLR measurement has improved from the early meter-level systems to the current capabilities of a few centimeters for the best systems. The accuracy of the orbits and geophysical parameter recovery have shown an associated improvement. Polar motion with accuracies of 2 mas, station coordinates better than 10 cm, and interstation baseline rates indicative of tectonic motion are determined routinely with the current set of global SLR data. This discussion reviews the SLR measurement, analysis approach, and some of the recent results derived from the current SLR data set.

  9. A global water cycle reanalysis (2003-2012) merging satellite gravimetry and altimetry observations with a hydrological multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; Wada, Y.; Tregoning, P.

    2014-08-01

    We present a global water cycle reanalysis that merges water balance estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, satellite water level altimetry and off-line estimates from several hydrological models. Error estimates for the sequential data assimilation scheme were derived from available uncertainty information and the triple collocation technique. Errors in four GRACE storage products were estimated to be 11-12 mm over land areas, while errors in monthly storage changes derived from five global hydrological models were estimated to be 17-28 mm. Prior and posterior water storage estimates were evaluated against independent observations of river water level and discharge, snow water storage and glacier mass loss. Data assimilation improved or maintained agreement overall, although results varied regionally. Uncertainties were greatest in regions where glacier mass loss and subsurface storage decline are both plausible but poorly constrained. We calculated a global water budget for 2003-2012. The main changes were a net loss of polar ice caps (-342 Gt yr-1) and mountain glaciers (-230 Gt yr-1), with an additional decrease in seasonal snowpack (-18 Gt yr-1). Storage increased due to new impoundments (+16 Gt yr-1), but this was compensated by decreases in other surface water bodies (-10 Gt yr-1). If the effect of groundwater depletion (-92 Gt yr-1) is considered separately, subsurface water storage increased by +202 Gt yr-1 due particularly to increased wetness in northern temperate regions and in the seasonally wet tropics of South America and southern Africa. The reanalysis results are publicly available via www.wenfo.org/wald/.

  10. On an assessment of surface roughness estimates from lunar laser altimetry pulse-widths for the Moon from LOLA using LROC narrow-angle stereo DTMs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Poole, William

    2013-04-01

    Neumann et al. [1] proposed that laser altimetry pulse-widths could be employed to derive "within-footprint" surface roughness as opposed to surface roughness estimated from between laser altimetry pierce-points such as the example for Mars [2] and more recently from the 4-pointed star-shaped LOLA (Lunar reconnaissance Orbiter Laser Altimeter) onboard the NASA-LRO [3]. Since 2009, the LOLA has been collecting extensive global laser altimetry data with a 5m footprint and ?25m between the 5 points in a star-shape. In order to assess how accurately surface roughness (defined as simple RMS after slope correction) derived from LROC matches with surface roughness derived from LOLA footprints, publicly released LROC-NA (LRO Camera Narrow Angle) 1m Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) were employed to measure the surface roughness directly within each 5m footprint. A set of 20 LROC-NA DTMs were examined. Initially the match-up between the LOLA and LROC-NA orthorectified images (ORIs) is assessed visually to ensure that the co-registration is better than the LOLA footprint resolution. For each LOLA footprint, the pulse-width geolocation is then retrieved and this is used to "cookie-cut" the surface roughness and slopes derived from the LROC-NA DTMs. The investigation which includes data from a variety of different landforms shows little, if any correlation between surface roughness estimated from DTMs with LOLA pulse-widths at sub-footprint scale. In fact there is only any perceptible correlation between LOLA and LROC-DTMs at baselines of 40-60m for surface roughness and 20m for slopes. [1] Neumann et al. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter pulse width measurements and footprint-scale roughness. Geophysical Research Letters (2003) vol. 30 (11), paper 1561. DOI: 10.1029/2003GL017048 [2] Kreslavsky and Head. Kilometer-scale roughness of Mars: results from MOLA data analysis. J Geophys Res (2000) vol. 105 (E11) pp. 26695-26711. [3] Rosenburg et al. Global surface slopes and roughness of the

  11. Towards a Multi-Surface and Multi-Sensor Altimetry Calibration Site in Churchill, Manitoba, Hudson Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Renganathan, V.; Fotopoulos, G.; Shum, C.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite altimetry is a space-based geodetic sensor primarily designed and employed to monitor ocean and ice sheets, however, new missions such as ICESat (laser) and upcoming/planned missions such as CryoSat-2 and WATer (interferometric radar altimeters) will also target more complex surface types including sea ice, wetlands, rivers, and land. Presently, most altimetry calibrations sites are located in low-latitude oceans, e.g. Corsica, Gavdos (Crete), Harvest Oil platform (California), and thus cannot deliver calibration information on sea ice, ice, snow or land surface. We propose the first calibration site of its kind at Churchill, Manitoba (58N,94W), located on the western shores of Hudson's Bay. This is a unique location as it provides long-term co-located GPS (13 yrs), tide gauge (66 yrs), and absolute gravimetry data (19 yrs). The surrounding area is comprised of wetlands, rivers, sea ice, snow, and seasonal ice/land surface with vegetation. These surface types exhibit distant height change signals including annual and inter-annual variability, which can be used for altimetry calibration that goes beyond the traditional tide gauge-altimetry comparison. Data from the geodetic sensors as well as data collected in leveling surveys in 2006 along the altimeter ground tracks will be used to compare a number of radar and laser altimetry missions over different surface types. Over coastal ocean, the interaction of ocean tides and sea ice freeboard height measured by laser or radar altimetry data will be investigated. Over land and wetlands, the heights are compared with in situ measurements which include ellipsoidal heights measured by permanent GPS and leveling, vegetation height and terrain slope. The site is assessed as a potential calibration site for dedicated ice, land and hydrology altimetry missions.

  12. Laser crosslink configurations for RF satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebacher, K. S.; Lambert, S. G.; Pautler, J. A.; Carter, J. P.

    Predictions of future satellite communications traffic indicate that an increased capacity for satellite communications systems is required. Crosslinks between satellites provide improvements in communications throughput for these systems. Crosslinks also increase system flexibility and remove the dependence of world-wide information flow on relay ground stations located outside the continental United States. Laser crosslinks provide the additional advantage of eliminating susceptibility to space-based or ground-based jammers. Laser terminals are also smaller and require smaller antennas than an RF terminal. This paper describes the advantages of adding laser crosslinks to RF satellite communications systems. Characteristics of the required RF/optical interfaces on-board the satellites are addessed. Terminal configurations that provide reliable, accurate laser communications at high data rates are described.

  13. Time comparison in nanosecond laser synchronization via geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, H. P.

    1980-01-01

    Laser pulse transmission from ground stations to the Sirio 2 satellite will allow intercontinental synchronization of high-precision clocks with an accuracy of several nanoseconds. Time comparison methods currently in use are examined and compared with reference to the increasing user demands. The laser synchronization experiment LASSO is described in detail. Existing operational laser ground facilities are listed and operational aspects are discussed.

  14. Five Year Changes in Surface Elevations Of The Greenland Ice Sheet Measured by Aircraft Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Frederick, E. B.; Manizade, S. M.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Swift, R. N.; Thomas, R. H.; Wright, C. W.; Yungel, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ice Mapping group (Project AIM) at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility has been conducting systematic topographic surveys of the Greenland Ice Sheet since 1993, using scanning airborne laser altimeters combined with GPS positioning technology. Flight lines were planned to cover all major ice drainage basins, with the intention to repeat the surveys after a 5-year interval in order to detect changes in the ice-sheet volume. The first resurvey was completed in June/July, 1998, along flight lines in the southern half of Greenland which had been first surveyed in 1993. The northern half of the ice sheet will be resurveyed in 1999. The resulting data sets will provide the first comprehensive examination of regional changes in the the surface elevation of the World's second largest ice sheet. This analysis includes the ice sheet fringe areas, which are expected to be much more climatically sensitive than the interior. Data will be presented which demonstrate the combination of the ATM (Airborne Topographic Mapper) sensors and GPS (Global Positioning System) yields measurements which are repeatable at the 10 cm level over baselines in excess of 1000 km.

  15. High-Altitude Laser Altimetry from the Global Hawk UAV for Regional Mapping of Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Wake, S.; Hofton, M. A.; Michell, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) is a high-altitude, full-waveform, geodetic-imaging laser altimeter system of which a UAV-based version (LVIS-GH) is currently being tested. From 20 km above the surface in the Global Hawk UAV, LVIS-GH images surface topography and roughness (including forest height) across a 4 km wide swath using 15 m diameter footprints. In recent years, the LVIS has been flown at altitudes of up to 14 km over Greenland and Antarctica on flights up to 12 hours in duration, enabling the efficient and precise mapping of large areas from the air. The Global Hawk will extend this capability to up to 32 hours and altitudes approaching 20 km. In order to achieve decimeter level vertical precision and accuracy from high altitude, advanced parameter estimation techniques, based on those implemented in NASA's GEODYN software, are used to estimate the angular, spatial, and temporal biases required to accurately georeference the component lidar data sets. Data from specific in-air maneuvers are utilized in order to isolate the effects of different error sources and to break correlations between biases. Examples of high-altitude data and airborne/spaceborne sensor intercomparison and fusion will be shown. For example, the comparison of data from NASA's ICESat-1 mission with coincident LVIS data collected around 86S (the maximum extent of data collected during ICESat) to quantify inter-campaign biases in Icesat-1 elevation measurements and improve estimates of long -term elevation change rates of ice sheets will be shown. These results illustrate the utility of high-altitude wide swath imaging, particularly from platforms such as the Global-Hawk, for enhancing spacebased data sets.

  16. Experimental Verification of Ocean Bounced GPS Signals and Analysis of their Application to Ionospheric Corrections for Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrad, P.; Cox, A. E.; Crumpton, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which uses observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface and acquired by a GPS receiver onboard an altimetric satellite to compute the ionospheric delay present in the altimeter measurement. This eliminates the requirement for a dual frequency altimeter for many Earth observing missions. A ground-based experiment is described which confirms the presence of these ocean-bounced signals and demonstrates the potential for altimeter ionospheric correction at the centimeter level.

  17. A Study on Along-Track and Cross-Track Noise of Altimetry Data by Maximum Likelihood: Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry (Mola) Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmołowski, Wojciech; Łukasiak, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    The work investigates the spatial correlation of the data collected along orbital tracks of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) with a special focus on the noise variance problem in the covariance matrix. The problem of different correlation parameters in along-track and crosstrack directions of orbital or profile data is still under discussion in relation to Least Squares Collocation (LSC). Different spacing in along-track and transverse directions and anisotropy problem are frequently considered in the context of this kind of data. Therefore the problem is analyzed in this work, using MOLA data samples. The analysis in this paper is focused on a priori errors that correspond to the white noise present in the data and is performed by maximum likelihood (ML) estimation in two, perpendicular directions. Additionally, correlation lengths of assumed planar covariance model are determined by ML and by fitting it into the empirical covariance function (ECF). All estimates considered together confirm substantial influence of different data resolution in along-track and transverse directions on the covariance parameters.

  18. Comparison of Surface Elevation Changes of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Radar and Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Barbieri, Kristine; DiMarzio, John P.; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    A primary purpose of satellite altimeter measurements is determination of the mass balances of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes with time by measurement of changes in the surface elevations. Since the early 1990's, important measurements for this purpose have been made by radar altimeters on ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and CryoSat and a laser altimeter on ICESat. One principal factor limiting direct comparisons between radar and laser measurements is the variable penetration depth of the radar signal and the corresponding location of the effective depth of the radar-measured elevation beneath the surface, in contrast to the laser-measured surface elevation. Although the radar penetration depth varies significantly both spatially and temporally, empirical corrections have been developed to account for this effect. Another limiting factor in direct comparisons is caused by differences in the size of the laser and radar footprints and their respective horizontal locations on the surface. Nevertheless, derived changes in elevation, dHldt, and time-series of elevation, H(t), have been shown to be comparable. For comparisons at different times, corrections for elevation changes caused by variations in the rate offrrn compaction have also been developed. Comparisons between the H(t) and the average dH/dt at some specific locations, such as the Vostok region of East Antarctic, show good agreement among results from ERS-l and 2, Envisat, and ICESat. However, Greenland maps of dHidt from Envisat and ICESat for the same time periods (2003-2008) show some areas of significant differences as well as areas of good agreement. Possible causes of residual differences are investigated and described.

  19. Laser Experiments with ARTEMIS Satellite in Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkov, Volodymyr; Sodnik, Zoran; Kuzkov, Sergii; Caramia, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    In July 2001, the ARTEMIS satellite with laser communication terminal OPALE on board was launched. 1789 laser communications sessions were performed between ARTEMIS and SPOT-4 (PASTEL) from 01 April 2003 to 09 January 2008 with total duration of 378 hours. In addition ESA's Optical Ground Station (OGS) performed laser communication experiments with OPALE in various atmospheric conditions. Since the launch of ARTEMIS, the amount of information handled by geostationary telecommunication satellites has increased dramatically and so has the demand for data rate that needs to be transmitted from ground. With limited bandwidth allocations in the radio frequency bands interest has grown for laser communication feeder link technology. In this respect there is interest to compare the influence of atmosphere conditions in different atmospheric regions with respect to laser transmission. Two locations are being compared, namely ESA's OGS (located in an altitude of 2400 m above sea level) and the Main Astronomical Observatory of Ukraine (MAO) (located at an altitude of 190 m above sea level). In 2002 MAO started the development of a ground laser communication system for the AZT-2 telescope. The MAO developed compact laser communication system is called LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication Experiments with Satellites) [1] and the work was supported by the National Space Agency of Ukraine and by ESA. The beacon laser from OPALE was occasionally detected even in cloudy conditions and an anomalous atmospheric refraction at low elevation angles was observed. The main results of laser experiments with ARTEMIS through clouds are presented in the paper.

  20. Interannual variation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from a combined analysis of satellite gravimetry and altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, A.; Flament, T.; Alizier, B.; Watson, C.; Rémy, F.

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of the long term mass balance of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, and thus the determination of its contribution to sea level rise, requires an understanding of interannual variability and associated causal mechanisms. We performed a combined analysis of surface-mass and elevation changes using data from the GRACE and Envisat satellite missions, respectively. Using empirical orthogonal functions and singular value decompositions of each data set, we find a quasi 4.7-yr periodic signal between 08/2002 and 10/2010 that accounts for ∼ 15- 30% of the time variability of the filtered and detrended surface-mass and elevation data. Computation of the density of this variable mass load corresponds to snow or uncompacted firn. Changes reach maximum amplitude within the first 100 km from the coast where it contributes up to 30-35% of the annual rate of accumulation. Extending the analysis to 09/2014 using surface-mass changes only, we have found anomalies with a periodicity of about 4-6 yrs that circle the AIS in about 9-10 yrs. These properties connect the observed anomalies to the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) which is known to affect several key climate variables, including precipitation. It suggests that variability in the surface-mass balance of the Antarctic Ice Sheet may also be modulated by the ACW.

  1. Observing tectonic plate motions and deformations from satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Klosko, S. M.; Torrence, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The scope of geodesy has been greatly affected by the advent of artificial near-earth satellites. The present paper provides a description of the results obtained from the reduction of data collected with the aid of satellite laser ranging. It is pointed out that dynamic reduction of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data provides very precise positions in three dimensions for the laser tracking network. The vertical components of the stations, through the tracking geometry provided by the global network and the accurate knowledge of orbital dynamics, are uniquely related to the center of mass of the earth. Attention is given to the observations, the methodologies for reducing satellite observations to estimate station positions, Lageos-observed tectonic plate motions, an improved temporal resolution of SLR plate motions, and the SLR vertical datum.

  2. The geoid spectrum from altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Satellite altimetry information from the world's major oceans was analyzed to arrive at a geoid power spectrum. Using the equivalent of about 7 revolutions of data (mostly from GEOS-3) the power spectrum of the sea surface generally follows the expected values from Kaula's rule applied to the geoid. Analysis of overlapping altimetry arcs (and oceanographic data) shows that the surface spectrum is dominated by the geoid to about 500 cycles (40 km half wavelength) but that sea state departures are significant starting at about 250 cycles (80 km). Estimates of geopotential variances from a derived (smooth) geoid spectrum show significantly less power than Kaula's rule to about 60 cycles, but somewhat more from there to about 400 cycles. At less than 40 km half wavelength, the total power in the marine geoid may be negligible.

  3. The potential of satellite radar altimetry in flood forecasting: concept and implementation for the Niger-Benue river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R.; Amarnath, G.

    2015-06-01

    Flood forecasting in the downstream part of any hydrological basin is extremely difficult due to the lack of basin-wide hydrological information in near real-time and the absence of a data-sharing treaty among the transboundary nations. The accuracy of forecasts emerging from a hydrological model could be compromised without prior knowledge of the day-to-day flow regulation at different locations upstream of the Niger and Benue rivers. Only satellite altimeter monitoring allows us to identify the actual river levels upstream that reflect the human intervention at that location. This is critical for making accurate downstream forecasts. This present study aims to demonstrate the capability of altimeter-based flood forecasting along the Niger-Benue River in Nigeria. The study includes the comparison of decadal (at every 10 days from Jason-2) or monthly (at every 35 days from Envisat/AltiKa) observations from 2002 to 2014, with historical in situ measurements from 1990 to 2012. The water level obtained from these sources shows a good correlation (0.7-0.9). After validation of hydrological parameters obtained from two sources, a quantitative relation (rating curve) of upstream water level and downstream discharge is derived. This relation is then adopted for calculation of discharge at observation points, which is used to propagate the flow downstream at a desired location using a hydraulic river model. Results from this study from Jason-2 shows a promising correlation (R2 ≥ 90% with a Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of more than 0.70) with 5~days ahead of downstream flow prediction over the Benue stream.

  4. Estimation of the vertical distribution of tree biomass using last significant return laser altimetry returns from Eucalypt trees in New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, I. J.; Walker, J.; Gurney, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Snow mass and soil moisture are important features of the environment governing the availability of drinking and irrigation water, food and hydro-power. They are estimated globally by measuring the microwave emission of the Earth’s surface. Soil’s microwave emissivity is strongly affected by its liquid moisture content, and the attenuation of soil-emitted radiation by snow is a function of the snow mass. The high water content of vegetation affects these results through attenuation, scattering and emission, so improving knowledge of vegetation mass and distribution will enable more accurate global characterisation of snow and soil moisture. Airborne laser altimetry systems acquire information about the environment by pulsing laser light at the ground, and interpreting the returning light curve using onboard differential GPS and inertial navigation systems. Such systems are primarily used to acquire topography by assuming that the last light returning to the sensor has been returned from the ground. By continuously recording the intensity of the light returned before the ground return, information about the vegetation between the aircraft and the ground can be derived. Recording the full intensity curves consumes a large volume of recording space, however, and is a relatively new instrument innovation, having in the past usually been combined with a reduced pulse rate to conserve storage. Deriving some information from systems which only record the last light returned would be of use in characterising large areas without using complete light curve return recording systems, allowing greater spatial cover and resolution with the same instrument and resources. Our previous work has characterised the error budget of single-return laser altimetry systems, and used this to distinguish different soil roughness at the centimetric scale, and show vegetation density variations within crops around 2m high. This work shows the vertical information on vegetation density that

  5. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  6. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Albrecht, G.; Beach, R.

    1994-12-31

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  7. Diode laser satellite systems for beamed power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Kwon, J. H.; Walker, G. H.; Humes, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    A power system composed of an orbiting laser satellite and a surface-based receiver/converter is described. Power is transmitted from the satellite to the receiver/converter by laser beam. The satellite components are: (1) solar collector; (2) blackbody; (3) photovoltaic cells; (4) heat radiators; (5) laser system; and (6) transmission optics. The receiver/converter components are: receiver dish; lenticular lens; photocells; and heat radiator. Although the system can be adapted to missions at many locations in the solar system, only two are examined here: powering a lunar habitat; and powering a lunar rover. Power system components are described and their masses, dimensions, operating powers, and temperatures, are estimated using known or feasible component capabilities. The critical technologies involved are discussed and other potential missions are mentioned.

  8. Laser Communications Airborne Testbed: Potential For An Air-To-Satellite Laser Communications Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert J.

    1988-05-01

    The Laser Communications Airborne Testbed (LCAT) offers an excellent opportunity for testing of an air-to-satellite laser communications link with the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The direct detection laser portion of the ACTS is suitable for examining the feasibility of an airborne terminal. Development of an airborne laser communications terminal is not currently part of the ACTS program; however, an air-to-satellite link is of interest. The Air Force performs airborne laser communications experiments to examine the potential usefulness of this technology to future aircraft. Lasers could be used, for example, by future airborne command posts and reconnaissance aircraft to communicate via satellite over long distances and transmit large quantities of data in the fastest way possible from one aircraft to another or to ground sites. Lasers are potentially secure, jam resistant and hard to detect and in this regard increase the survivability of the users. Under a contract awarded by Aeronautical Systems Division's Avionics Laboratory, a C-135E testbed aircraft belonging to ASD's 4950th Test Wing will be modified to create a Laser Communications Airborne Testbed. The contract is for development and fabrication of laser testbed equipment and support of the aircraft modification effort by the Test Wing. The plane to be modified is already in use as a testbed for other satellite communications projects and the LCAT effort will expand those capabilities. This analysis examines the characteristics of an LCAT to ACTS direct detection communications link. The link analysis provides a measure of the feasibility of developing an airborne laser terminal which will interface directly to the LCAT. Through the existence of the LCAT, the potential for development of an air-to-satellite laser communications terminal for the experimentation with the ACTS system is greatly enhanced.

  9. On siphons and sediments: A new model for draining active subglacial lakes in Antarctica informed with satellite radar and laser altimeter observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of repeat-pass satellite-based surface altimetry over much of Antarctica, approximately 130 new subglacial lakes have been discovered entirely from observations of surface uplift and subsidence; these are commonly referred to as "active lakes". In contrast to the ~160 lakes detected by radar sounding ("RES" lakes), which are typically in mountains bedrock terrain near the ice divide and static with residence times spanning millenia, active lakes are typically located in fast flowing ice streams far from the divides, and have short residence times. To understand how water transfers through active lake systems we have developed a new model based on earlier theoretical work and informed by lake-volume estimates inferred from of ice surface displacements detected by satellite radar and laser altimetry. We find that although the overall pattern of filling and drainage is similar to that for ice dammed lakes in alpine regions via channels thermally eroded into the ice that then creeps shut as water pressure declines, Antarctic lake drainage is better simulated by invoking a channel mechanically eroded into the underlying sediment. The necessity of an erodable deformable substrate to explain lake drainage suggests that the distribution of active lakes is an indicator for the presence of sediment. Furthermore the process of lake drainage appears quite sensitive to the composion and strength of the underlying till. We explore these possibilities by testing the model on subglacial lakes in both East and West Antarctica, including Recovery Glacier and MacAyeal Ice stream.

  10. Radar altimetry and global climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, E.B.; Monaldo, F.M.; Porter, D.L.; Robinson, A.R.; Kilgus, C.C.; Goldhirsh, J.; Glenn, S.M. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ )

    1992-09-01

    The use of satellite radar altimetry for monitoring global climatic variables is examined in the context of the altimeter for the Geosat Follow-On program. The requirements of studying climate and ocean circulation are described for the particular case of the North Atlantic, and the use of spaceborne altimetry is discussed for three measurement types. Altimeters measure sea-surface height and the ice edge to give data on mesoscale variability and circulation, interannual variability, and air-sea interactions. The altimeters for the Geosat program are expected to include orbit-determination systems for removal of the orbital signature and a radiometer for measuring water vapor. The altimeters are expected to be useful in studying ocean circulation and climate, and existing data support in situ measurements. Spaceborne radar altimetry can provide important data for understanding CO[sub 2] uptake, biogeochemical fluxes, and the thermocline conveyor belt. 30 refs.

  11. Demonstration of centimeter-level precision, swath mapping, full-waveform laser altimetry from high altitude on the Global Hawk UAV for future application to cryospheric remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Wake, S.; Rabine, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Mitchell, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Land Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) is a high-altitude, wide-swath laser altimeter that has, for over 15 years, demonstrated state-of-the-art performance in surface altimetry, including many aspects of remote sensing of the cryosphere such as precise topography of ice sheets and sea ice. NASA Goddard, in cooperation with NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO), has developed a new, more capable sensor that can operate autonomously from a high-altitude UAV aircraft to further enhance the LVIS capability and extend its reach and coverage. In June 2012, this latest sensor, known as LVIS-GH, was integrated onto NASA's Global Hawk aircraft and completed a successful high-altitude demonstration flight over Death Valley, Owens Valley, and the Sierra Nevada region of California. Data were collected over a wide variety of terrain types from 58,000' (> 17 km) altitude during the 6 hour long test flight. The full-waveform laser altimetry technique employed by LVIS and LVIS-GH provides precise surface topography measurements for solid earth and cryospheric applications and captures the vertical structure of forests in support of territorial ecology studies. LVIS-GH fully illuminates and maps a 4 km swath and provides cm-level range precision, as demonstrated in laboratory and horizontal range testing, as well as during this test flight. The cm range precision is notable as it applies to accurate measurements of sea ice freeboard and change detection of subtle surface deformation such as heaving in permafrost areas. In recent years, LVIS has primarily supported Operation IceBridge activities, including deployments to the Arctic and Antarctic on manned aircraft such as the NASA DC-8 and P-3. The LVIS-GH sensor provides an major upgrade of coverage capability and remote access; LVIS-GH operating on the long-duration Global Hawk aircraft can map up to 50,000 km^2 in a single flight and can provide access to remote regions such as the entirety of Antarctica. Future

  12. Power transmission by laser beam from lunar-synchronous satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Deyoung, R. J.; Schuster, G. L.; Choi, S. H.; Dagle, J. E.; Coomes, E. P.; Antoniak, Z. I.; Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Chiu, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of beaming power from synchronous lunar orbits (the L1 and L2 Lagrange points) to a manned long-range lunar rover is addressed. The rover and two versions of a satellite system (one powered by a nuclear reactor, the other by photovoltaics) are described in terms of their masses, geometries, power needs, missions, and technological capabilities. Laser beam power is generated by a laser diode array in the satellite and converted to 30 kW of electrical power at the rover. Present technological capabilities, with some extrapolation to near future capabilities, are used in the descriptions. The advantages of the two satellite/rover systems over other such systems and over rovers with onboard power are discussed along with the possibility of enabling other missions.

  13. Ground to space atmospheric turbulence monitoring by satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, L.; Nemec, M.; Prochazka, I.; Hamal, K.; Kirchner, G.; Koidl, F.; Fumin, Y.

    The millimeter accuracy Satellite Laser Ranging SLR is becoming of certain interest for geodesy and geophysics on a global scale We are presenting a new method of atmospheric turbulence monitoring on slant ground to space paths by means of high repetition rate SLR followed by a special data analysis algorithm The method is based on the relation between the integral strength of the turbulence along the laser beam path which is the unknown quantity and the contribution of the turbulence to the laser ranging error budget which is determined from the SLR data We have already proved applicability of the theoretical model describing this relation by direct measurements performed at the satellite laser ranging station in Graz Austria equipped by a 2 kHz laser system During these measurements the turbulence along the beam path was measured independently and compared to the values obtained from the SLR data analysis The results show a good agreement between the theory and experiment for a horizontal path to a ground-based target as well as for slant paths to space when ranging to satellites Using the Portable Calibration Standard based on a three picosecond resolution Pico Event Timer and Seeing Monitor we have been applying and planning to carry out this procedure at different SLR sites -- Chinese SLR network and some others as well

  14. Prospects of the ICESat-2 laser altimetry mission for savanna ecosystem structural studies based on airborne simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenzi, David; Lefsky, Michael A.; Suchdeo, Vijay P.; Harding, David J.

    2016-08-01

    The next planned spaceborne lidar mission is the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2), which will use the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) sensor, a photon counting technique. To pre-validate the capability of this mission for studying three dimensional vegetation structure in savannas, we assessed the potential of the measurement approach to estimate canopy height in an oak savanna landscape. We used data from the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), an airborne photon counting lidar sensor developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. ATLAS-like data was generated using the MATLAS simulator, which adjusts MABEL data's detected number of signal and noise photons to that expected from the ATLAS instrument. Transects flown over the Tejon ranch conservancy in Kern County, California, USA were used for this work. For each transect we chose to use data from the near infrared channel that had the highest number of photons. We segmented each transect into 50 m, 25 m and 14 m long blocks and aggregated the photons in each block into a histogram based on their elevation values. We then used an automated algorithm to identify cut off points where the cumulative density of photons from the highest elevation indicates the presence of the canopy top and likewise where such cumulative density from the lowest elevation indicates the mean terrain elevation. MABEL derived height metrics were moderately correlated to discrete return lidar (DRL) derived height metrics (r2 and RMSE values ranging from 0.60 to 0.73 and 2.9 m to 4.4 m respectively) but MATLAS simulation resulted in more modest correlations with DRL indices (r2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.64 and RMSE from 3.6 m to 4.6 m). Simulations also indicated that the expected number of signal photons from ATLAS will be substantially lower, a situation that reduces canopy height estimation precision especially in areas of low density vegetation cover. On the basis of the simulated

  15. Evaluation of a satellite laser ranging technique using pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Carolyn Kay

    1987-01-01

    Several types of Satellite Laser Ranging systems exist, operating with pulsed, high-energy lasers. The distance between a ground point and an orbiting satellite can be determined to within a few centimeters. A new technique substitutes pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes, which are much more compact, reliable and less costly, for the lasers now used. Since laser diode technology is only now achieving sufficiently powerful lasers, the capabilities of the new technique are investigated. Also examined are the effects of using an avalanche photodiode detector instead of a photomultiplier tube. The influence of noise terms (including background radiation, detector dark and thermal noise and speckle) that limit the system range and performance is evaluated.

  16. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 3: Laser SPS analysis, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential use of lasers for transmitting power to Earth from Solar Power Satellites was examined. Free electron lasers appear most promising and would have some benefits over microwave power transmission. Further research in laser technology is needed.

  17. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondéjar, Albert; Benveniste, Jérôme; Naeije, Marc; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Études Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  18. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolà, Roger; Garcia-Mondejar, Albert; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Naeije, Marc; Ambrozio, Americo; Restano, Marco; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  19. Geodetic Imaging Lidar: Applications for high-accuracy, large area mapping with NASA's upcoming high-altitude waveform-based airborne laser altimetry Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Citrin, E.; Luthcke, S. B.; Misakonis, A.; Wake, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform laser altimetry has demonstrated its ability to capture highly-accurate surface topography and vertical structure (e.g. vegetation height and structure) even in the most challenging conditions. NASA's high-altitude airborne laser altimeter, LVIS (the Land Vegetation, and Ice Sensor) has produced high-accuracy surface maps over a wide variety of science targets for the last 2 decades. Recently NASA has funded the transition of LVIS into a full-time NASA airborne Facility instrument to increase the amount and quality of the data and to decrease the end-user costs, to expand the utilization and application of this unique sensor capability. Based heavily on the existing LVIS sensor design, the Facility LVIS instrument includes numerous improvements for reliability, resolution, real-time performance monitoring and science products, decreased operational costs, and improved data turnaround time and consistency. The development of this Facility instrument is proceeding well and it is scheduled to begin operations testing in mid-2016. A comprehensive description of the LVIS Facility capability will be presented along with several mission scenarios and science applications examples. The sensor improvements included increased spatial resolution (footprints as small as 5 m), increased range precision (sub-cm single shot range precision), expanded dynamic range, improved detector sensitivity, operational autonomy, real-time flight line tracking, and overall increased reliability and sensor calibration stability. The science customer mission planning and data product interface will be discussed. Science applications of the LVIS Facility include: cryosphere, territorial ecology carbon cycle, hydrology, solid earth and natural hazards, and biodiversity.

  20. Baseline estimation from simultaneous satellite laser tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dedes, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous Range Differences (SRDs) to Lageos are obtained by dividing the observing stations into pairs with quasi-simultaneous observations. For each of those pairs the station with the least number of observations is identified, and at its observing epochs interpolated ranges for the alternate station are generated. The SRD observables are obtained by subtracting the actually observed laser range of the station having the least number of observations from the interpolated ranges of the alternate station. On the basis of these observables semidynamic single baseline solutions were performed. The aim of these solutions is to further develop and implement the SRD method in the real data environment, to assess its accuracy, its advantages and disadvantages as related to the range dynamic mode methods, when the baselines are the only parameters of interest. Baselines, using simultaneous laser range observations to Lageos, were also estimated through the purely geometric method. These baselines formed the standards the standards of comparison in the accuracy assessment of the SRD method when compared to that of the range dynamic mode methods. On the basis of this comparison it was concluded that for baselines of regional extent the SRD method is very effective, efficient, and at least as accurate as the range dynamic mode methods, and that on the basis of a simple orbital modeling and a limited orbit adjustment. The SRD method is insensitive to the inconsistencies affecting the terrestrial reference frame and simultaneous adjustment of the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) is not necessary.

  1. Site evaluation for laser satellite-tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, N. H.; Mohr, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-six locations for potential laser satellite-tracking stations, four of them actually already occupied in this role, are reviewed in terms of their known local and regional geology and geophysics. The sites are also considered briefly in terms of weather and operational factors. Fifteen of the sites qualify as suitable for a stable station whose motions are likely to reflect only gross plate motion. The others, including two of the present laser station sites (Arequipa and Athens), fail to qualify unless extra monitoring schemes can be included, such as precise geodetic surveying of ground deformation.

  2. Efficient, reliable, long-lifetime, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for space-based vegetation topographical altimetry.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Donald B; Kay, Richard B; Stysley, Paul R; Poulios, Demetrios

    2004-09-20

    A highly efficient, diode-pumped, Nd:YAG laser is described. The oscillator utilizes an unstable resonator design with a Gaussian reflectivity output coupler and a side-pumped zigzag slab gain medium. The laser produces 18-mJ, 10-ns pulses at a repetition rate of 242 Hz in a near-TEM00 mode with an optical efficiency of up to 14%. An extended performance test was recently concluded in which the transmitter operated at reduced output for more than 4.8 x 10(9) shots with no optical damage. Design criteria, beam quality, and lifetime data are presented. PMID:15473245

  3. Laser beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S.

    1993-12-31

    Laser power beaming to satellites and orbital transfer vehicles requires the accurate pointing of a low-divergence laser beam to its target, whether the target is in the sunlight or the earth`s shadow. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) has demonstrated reduction in the image size of stars by a factor of 10 or more by using laser beacons and adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation. This same technology is applicable to reducing the divergence of laser beams propagated from earth to space. A team of Phillips Laboratory, COMSAT Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories plans to demonstrate the state of the art in this area with laser-beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites. The demonstrations will utilize the 1.5-m diameter telescope with adaptive optics at the AFPL Starfire Optical Range (SOR) and a ruby laser provided by the Air Force and Sandia (1--50 kill and 6 ms at 694.3 nm). The first targets will be corner-cube retro-reflectors left on the moon by the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 landings. We will attempt to use adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation to demonstrate accurate and reliable beam projection with a series of shots over a span of time and shot angle. We will utilize the return signal from the retro-reflectors to help determine the beam diameter on the moon and the variations in pointing accuracy caused by atmospheric tilt. This will be especially challenging because the retro-reflectors will need to be in the lunar shadow to allow detection over background light. If the results from this experiment are encouraging, we will at a later date direct the beam at a COMSAT satellite in geosynchronous orbit as it goes into the shadow of the earth. We will utilize an onboard monitor to measure the current generated in the solar panels on the satellite while the beam is present. A threshold irradiance of about 4 W/m{sup 2} on orbit is needed for this demonstration.

  4. The precision of today's satellite laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter J.; Torrence, Mark H.; Hussen, Van S.; Pearlman, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent improvements in the accuracy of modern satellite laser ranging (SLR) systems are strengthened by the new capability of many instruments to track an increasing number of geodetic satellite targets without significant scheduling conflict. This will allow the refinement of some geophysical parameters, such as solid Earth tidal effects and GM, and the improved temporal resolution of others, such as Earth orientation and station position. Better time resolution for the locations of fixed observatories will allow us to monitor more subtle motions at the stations, and transportable systems will be able to provide indicators of long term trends with shorter occupations. If we are to take advantage of these improvements, care must be taken to preserve the essential accuracy of an increasing volume of range observations at each stage of the data reduction process.

  5. Assessment Study of Small Space Debris Removal by Laser Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Papa, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Space debris in Earth orbit poses significant danger to satellites, humans in space, and future space exploration activities. In particular, the increasing number of unidentifiable objects, smaller than 10 cm, presents a serious hazard. Numerous technologies have been studied for removing unwanted objects in space. Our approach uses a short wavelength laser stationed in orbit to vaporize these small objects. This paper discusses the power requirements for space debris removal using lasers. A short wavelength laser pumped directly or indirectly by solar energy can scan, identify, position, and illuminate the target, which will then be vaporized or slow down the orbital speed of debris by laser detonation until it re-enters the atmosphere. The laser-induced plasma plume has a dispersive motion of approximately 105 m/sec with a Lambertian profile in the direction of the incoming beam [1-2]. The resulting fast ejecting jet plume of vaporized material should prevent matter recombination and condensation. If it allows any condensation of vaporized material, the size of condensed material will be no more than a nanoscale level [3]. Lasers for this purpose can be indirectly pumped by power from an array of solar cells or directly pumped by the solar spectrum [4]. The energy required for vaporization and ionization of a 10 cm cube ( 2700 gm) of aluminum is 87,160 kJ. To remove this amount of aluminum in 3 minutes requires a continuous laser beam power of at least 5.38 MW under the consideration of 9% laser absorption by aluminum [5] and 5% laser pumping efficiency. The power needed for pumping 5.38 MW laser is approximately 108 MW, which can be obtained from a large solar array with 40% efficiency solar cells and a minimal area of 450 meters by 450 meters. This solar array would collect approximately 108 MW. The power required for system operation and maneuvering can be obtained by increasing solar panel size. This feasibility assessment covers roughly the power requirement

  6. Precise attitude determination of defunct satellite laser ranging tragets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittet, Jean-Noel; Schildknecht, Thomas; Silha, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to determine the dynamics of objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to range to the spacecraft with very high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits. Non-active spacecraft, which are not any more attitude controlled, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques. Such a spinning can be around one constant axis of rotation or it can be more complex, when also precession and nutation motions are present. The rotation of the RRA around the spacecraft's centre of mass can create both a oscillation pattern of laser range signal and a periodic signal interruption when the RRA is hidden behind the satellite. In our work we will demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique to cooperative targets can be used to determine precisely their attitude state. The processing of the obtained data will be discussed, as well as the attitude determination based on parameters estimation. Continuous SLR measurements to one target can allow to accurately monitor attitude change over time which can be further used for the future attitude modelling. We will show our solutions of the attitude states determined for the non-active ESA satellite ENVISAT based on measurements acquired during year 2013-2015 by Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. The angular momentum shows a stable behaviour with respect to the orbital plane but is not aligned with orbital momentum. The determination of the inertial rotation over time, shows it evolving between 130 to 190 seconds within two year. Parameter estimation also bring a strong indication of a retrograde rotation. Results on other former satellites in low and medium Earth orbit such as TOPEX/Poseidon or GLONASS type will be also presented.

  7. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  8. Prelaunch optical characterization of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite (LAGEOS 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, Peter O.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Varghese, Thomas; Seldon, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The optical range correction (the distance between the apparent retroreflective skin of the satellite and the center of mass) of the LAGEOS 2 was determined using computer analysis of theoretical and experimentally measured far field diffraction patterns, and with short pulse lasers using both streak camera-based range receivers and more conventional PMT-based range receivers. The three measurement techniques yielded range correction values from 248 to 253 millimeters dependent on laser wavelength, pulsewidth, and polarization, location of the receiver in the far field diffraction pattern and detection technique (peak, half maximum, centroid, or constant fraction). The Lidar cross section of LAGEOS 2 was measured at 4 to 10 million square meters, comparable to the LAGEOS 1.

  9. Earth rotation and polar motion from laser ranging to the moon and artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aardoom, L.

    1978-01-01

    Earth-based laser ranging to artificial satellites and to the moon is considered as a technique for monitoring the Earth's polar motion and diurnal rotation. The kinematics of Earth rotation as related to laser ranging is outlined. The current status of laser ranging as regards its measuring capabilities is reviewed. The relative merits of artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging are pointed out. It appears that multistation combined artificial satellite and lunar laser ranging is likely to ultimately meet a 0.002 arcseconds in pole position and 0.1 msec in UT1 daily precision requirement.

  10. Evaluation of IGS Orbits with Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, M. M.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Yuan, D. N.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy with which orbits for the Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft, can be computed directly affects the accuracy of the resulting site coordinates and polar motion. Several groups routinely analyze GPS ground tracking data to compute precise orbits and terrestrial reference frame solutions. In this paper, we infer the accuracy of the orbits of two of the GPS satellites by comparing to independent laser ranges of subcentimeter accuracy obtained by a small but reasonably well distributed network of tracking sites. We find that all seven International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS) analysis centers achieve range residual root mean square (rms) errors at or below the 100 mm level. The best orbit solutions, from JPL, CODE, and the IGS combined product, yield a residual rms of about 50 mm. These residuals are consistent with three dimensional orbit errors of less than 150 mm. Estimating yaw rates for the spacecraft during shadow events, and using these estimates to compute the laser residual, significantly improves the fit. A small mean residual value of -15 to -30 mm seems to exist for most centers and laser sites which is not fully explained at present, but may be due to uncertainties in the corrections to the laser data, such as the reflector to spacecraft center of mass vector or small reference frame differences between the SLR sites and the GPS orbits.

  11. Prelaunch testing of the laser geodynamic satellite (LAGEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Minott, P. O.; Abshire, J. B.; Rowe, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The LAGEOS was extensively tested optically prior to launch. The measurement techniques used are described and resulting data is presented. Principal emphasis was placed on pulse spreading characteristics, range correction for center of mass tracking, and pulse distortion due to coherent effects. A mode-locked freqeuncy doubled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse width of about 60 ps was used as the ranging transmitter and a crossfield photo-multiplier was used in the receiver. High speed sampling electronics were employed to increase receiver bandwidth. LAGEOS reflected pulses typically had a width of 250 ps with a variability in the range correction of less than 2 mm rms. Pulse distortion due to coherent effects was inferred from average waveforms and appears to introduce less than + or - 50 ps jitter in the location of the pulse peak. Analytic results on this effect based on computer simulations are also presented. Theoretical and experimental data on the lidar cross section were developed in order to predict the strength of lidar echoes from the satellite. Cross section was measured using a large aperture laser collimating system to illuminate the LAGEOS. Reflected radiation far-field patterns were measured using the collimator in an autocollimating mode. Data were collected with an optical data digitzer and displayed as a three-dimensional plot of intensity versus the two far-field coordinates. Measurements were made at several wavelengths, for several types of polarizations, and as a function of satellite orientation.

  12. Evaluation Of The Potential Of Gravity Anomalies From Satellite Altimetry By Merging With Gravity Data From Various Sources - Application To Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. J.; Bastos, L.; Tomé, P.

    The region of the Azores archipelago is a natural laboratory for gravity field studies, due to its peculiar geodynamic and oceanographic features, related to rough structures in the gravity field. As a consequence, gravity data from various sources have been collected in the scope of various observation campaigns. The available data set comprises marine, airborne and satellite derived gravity anoma- lies. The satellite data have been derived by altimetric inversion of satellite altimeter data (Topex/Poseidon and ERS), to which processing methods tuned for optimal data recovery in coastal areas have been applied. Marine and airborne data along coinci- dent profiles, some of them coincident with satellite tracks, were collected during an observation campaign that took place in the Azores in 1997, in the scope of the Eu- ropean Union project AGMASCO. In addition, gravity anomalies from an integrated GPS/INS system installed aboard an aircraft, have also been computed from the posi- tion and navigation data collected during the AGMASCO campaign. This paper presents a comparison study between all available data sets. In particular, the improvement of the satellite derived anomalies near the shoreline is assessed with respect to existing satellite derived models and with the high resolution geopotential model GPM98. The impact of these data sets in the regional geoid improvement will also be presented.

  13. Potential utility of three-dimensional temperature and salinity fields estimated from satellite altimetry and Argo data for improving mesoscale reproducibility in regional ocean modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Miyazaki, D.; Takano, A.; Miyazawa, Y.; Yamazaki, H.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale oceanic structure and variability are required to be reproduced as accurately as possible in realistic regional ocean modeling. Uchiyama et al. (2012) demonstrated with a submesoscale eddy-resolving JCOPE2-ROMS downscaling oceanic modeling system that the mesoscale reproducibility of the Kuroshio meandering along Japan is significantly improved by introducing a simple restoration to data which we call "TS nudging" (a.k.a. robust diagnosis) where the prognostic temperature and salinity fields are weakly nudged four-dimensionally towards the assimilative JCOPE2 reanalysis (Miyazawa et al., 2009). However, there is not always a reliable reanalysis for oceanic downscaling in an arbitrary region and at an arbitrary time, and therefore alternative dataset should be prepared. Takano et al. (2009) proposed an empirical method to estimate mesoscale 3-D thermal structure from the near real-time AVISO altimetry data along with the ARGO float data based on the two-layer model of Goni et al. (1996). In the present study, we consider the TS data derived from this method as a candidate. We thus conduct a synoptic forward modeling of the Kuroshio using the JCOPE2-ROMS downscaling system to explore potential utility of this empirical TS dataset (hereinafter TUM-TS) by carrying out two runs with the T-S nudging towards 1) the JCOPE2-TS and 2) TUM-TS fields. An example of the comparison between the two ROMS test runs is shown in the attached figure showing the annually averaged surface EKE. Both of TUM-TS and JCOPE2-TS are found to help reproducing the mesoscale variance of the Koroshio and its extension as well as its mean paths, surface KE and EKE reasonably well. Therefore, the AVISO-ARGO derived empirical 3-D TS estimation is potentially exploitable for the dataset to conduct the T-S nudging to reproduce mesoscale oceanic structure.

  14. Benefits Derived From Laser Ranging Measurements for Orbit Determination of the GPS Satellite Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current research is examining methods to lower the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. Two GPS satellites that are currently in orbit carry retro-reflectors onboard. One notion to reduce the error in the satellite ephemerides is to utilize the retro-reflectors via laser ranging measurements taken from multiple Earth ground stations. Analysis has been performed to determine the level of reduction in the semi-major axis covariance of the GPS satellites, when laser ranging measurements are supplemented to the radiometric station keeping, which the satellites undergo. Six ground tracking systems are studied to estimate the performance of the satellite. The first system is the baseline current system approach which provides pseudo-range and integrated Doppler measurements from six ground stations. The remaining five ground tracking systems utilize all measurements from the current system and laser ranging measurements from the additional ground stations utilized within those systems. Station locations for the additional ground sites were taken from a listing of laser ranging ground stations from the International Laser Ranging Service. Results show reductions in state covariance estimates when utilizing laser ranging measurements to solve for the satellite s position component of the state vector. Results also show dependency on the number of ground stations providing laser ranging measurements, orientation of the satellite to the ground stations, and the initial covariance of the satellite's state vector.

  15. Theoretical Investigation of Laser-Radiation Effects on Satellite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Hadi, Yasser; El-Hameed, Afaf; Hamdy, Ola

    This research concerns with the studying of laser-powered solar panels for space applications. A model describing the laser effects on satellite solar cell has been developed. These effects are studied theoretically in order to determine the performance limits of the solar cells when they are powered by laser radiation during the satellite eclipse. A comparison between some different common types of the solar cells used for these purpose is considered in this study. The obtained results are reported to optimize the use of laser-powered satellites.

  16. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox: tools to teach altimetry for ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Bronner, Emilie; Niemeijer, Sander; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Dinardo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the next mission to be launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. More than 2000 people downloaded it (January 2013), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2 and 3. Others are in discussion for the future, including addition of the future Sentinel-3. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, including the one from future missions like Saral, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways, including as an educational tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. Example from education uses will be presented, and feedback from those who used it as such will be most welcome. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  17. The role of satellite laser ranging through the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Contributions of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) in the fields of geodesy, oceanography, geodynamics, and geopotential are reviewed. With the best current systems SLR has successfully defined an absolute vertical datum to 3 cm and a relative horizontal datum with comparable accuracy. In the areas of Earth and space physics SLR has demonstrated its ability to provide information regarding the vertical and horizontal movements of the lithosphere, the rheology of the Earth, improved understanding of the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, the Earth's albedo and upper atmosphere, the polar wander, the frequency structure of the polar motion and in the definition of fundamental constants. Future options are discussed. It is indicated that SLR will continue to provide a unique and powerful tool for the study of space and geosciences.

  18. Determination of crustal motions using satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging has matured over the last decade into one of the essential space geodesy techniques. It has demonstrated centimeter site positioning and millimeter per year velocity determinations in a frame tied dynamically to the mass center of the solid Earth hydrosphere atmosphere system. Such a coordinate system is a requirement for studying long term eustatic sea level rise and other global change phenomena. Earth orientation parameters determined with the coordinate system have been produced in near real time operationally since 1983, at a relatively modest cost. The SLR ranging to Lageos has also provided a rich spectrum of results based upon the analysis of Lageos orbital dynamics. These include significant improvements in the knowledge of the mean and variable components of the Earth's gravity field and the Earth's gravitational parameter. The ability to measure the time variations of the Earth's gravity field has opened as exciting area of study in relating global processes, including meteorologically derived mass transport through changes in the satellite dynamics. New confirmation of general relativity was obtained using the Lageos SLR data.

  19. Contribution of satellite laser ranging to combined gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Krauss, S.; Hausleitner, W.; Baur, O.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of satellite-only gravity field modeling, satellite laser ranging (SLR) data is typically exploited to recover long-wavelength features. This contribution provides a detailed discussion of the SLR component of GOCO02S, the latest release of combined models within the GOCO series. Over a period of five years (January 2006 to December 2010), observations to LAGEOS-1, LAGEOS-2, Ajisai, Stella, and Starlette were analyzed. We conducted a series of closed-loop simulations and found that estimating monthly sets of spherical harmonic coefficients beyond degree five leads to exceedingly ill-posed normal equation systems. Therefore, we adopted degree five as the spectral resolution for real data analysis. We compared our monthly coefficient estimates of degree two with SLR and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) at Austin, Texas. Significant deviations in C20 were noted between SLR and GRACE; the agreement is better for the non-zonal coefficients. Fitting sinusoids together with a linear trend to our C20 time series yielded a rate of (-1.75 ± 0.6) × 10-11/yr; this drift is equivalent to a geoid change from pole to equator of 0.35 ± 0.12 mm/yr or an apparent Greenland mass loss of 178.5 ± 61.2 km3/yr. The mean of all monthly solutions, averaged over the five-year period, served as input for the satellite-only model GOCO02S. The contribution of SLR to the combined gravity field model is highest for C20, and hence is essential for the determination of the Earth's oblateness.

  20. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox & Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Breebaart, Leo; Bronner, Emilie; Dinardo, Salvatore; Earith, Didier; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Niejmeier, Sander; Picot, Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the last mission launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. Nearly 1200 people downloaded it (as of end of June 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason- 1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and also the future Saral and Sentinel 3 missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool both, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data, additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  1. Portable calibration standard for satellite laser ranging, capabilities, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel

    2002-01-01

    The precision and accuracy of the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is one of the biggest issues for the entire network to perform as a calibrator of the other space-born geodetic systems and to establish millimeter level accurate terrestrial reference frame. The principal idea behind the Portable Calibration Standard (PCS) is the high degree of redundancy in measuring hardware, data analysis software and operational procedures. The most rigorous calibration would involve a complete reference SLR system, which would collocate with the system under test, a more economical approach allows the laser, telescope and optical detectors of the system under test to be shared. In this configuration, the output timing signals from the optical detectors are processed in an independent device - Portable Calibration Standard. It consists of the Pico Event Timer, GPS time and frequency receiver, meteorological sensor and a personal computer with the software package. The main parameters of the PCS based on a Pico Event Timer are: single shot precision 3 psec rms, timing linearity 2.5 psec, stability +/- 0.5 psec/hour, drift below 0.1 psec/K, the accuracy traceable down to US National Standards.

  2. Envisat Radar Altimetry Products For Cryospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Roca, M.; Baker, S.; Wingham, D.; Laxon, S.; Zanife, O.-Z.; Legresy, B.; Remy, F.

    Ice sheets and sea ice play a key role in the global climate system due to their albedo and as a huge store of freshwater. Sea-ice is also a barrier between the ocean and the atmosphere and drives the thermohaline circulation of the oceans. These critical components of the climate system are not well modelled but are clearly important if accurate predictions of the consequences of global warming are to be made. The vast, remote and inhospitable polar regions experience frequent cloud cover and long periods of darkness. They are best observed by satellite-borne active radars. The Altimetry mission on-board ENVISAT, ESA's largest environmental remote sens- ing satellite to be launched on 1st March 2002, is designed to guarantee the continu- ity of observations started by ERS-1 and ERS-2. It includes an advanced dual fre- quency new generation Radar Altimeter (RA-2), the Microwave Radiometer (MWR), the positioning instrument DORIS and the laser retro reflector (LRR). RA-2 has a new tracker philosophy: robust collection of accurately quantified radar echo data, particularly robust at handling non-ocean like echoes and conversion to meaningful geophysical quantities (re-tracking) done solely on ground. Moreover, RA-2 switches autonomously between 3 different range window width to adapt to different surfaces and avoid losing track. RA-2 has also the new capability of providing limited bursts of individual, i.e. un-averaged, Ku-band echoes at 1800 Hz, for theoretical research on backscattering and precise monitoring of bright targets. The data products are greatly improved. All data -over all surfaces- are processed si- multaneously by 4 different retrackers (Ocean, Ice1, Ice2 and Sea-Ice) to let the users choose the most suitable for their particular application. The Ice1 retracking is the range estimation technique for ice-sheet echoes used on ERS data. Ice 2 retracking is aimed at ocean-like echoes returned from ice-sheets. The Sea-Ice retracking is for specular echoes

  3. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  4. Experimental verification of fiber-coupling efficiency for satellite-to-ground atmospheric laser downlinks.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Hideki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa

    2012-07-01

    Optical communication is a high-capacity method that can handle considerable satellite data. When common-fiber optical devices such as optical fiber amplifiers based on single mode fibers are used in free-space laser communication systems, the laser beam has to be coupled to a single-mode fiber. Under atmospheric turbulence it would be difficult to make the required fiber coupling efficiency in satellite-to-ground laser propagation paths. A fast-steering mirror that can operate at high frequencies under atmospheric turbulence is fabricated, and its tracking performance is verified in real satellite-to-ground laser communication experiments. The measured fiber coupling loss of 10-19 dB in satellite-to-ground laser communication links under atmospheric turbulence shows good agreement with the predicted fiber coupling efficiency of 17 dB.

  5. Clock synchronization by the Symphonie and Laser Synchronization from Stationary Orbit (LASSO) geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, M.

    The use of atomic clocks is described, and the use of satellites to assure their intercontinental synchronization is discussed. The Symphonie satellites assure a transatlantic (France-Canada) synchronization in the 4 to 6 GHz band with nanosec accuracy. Atmospheric and relativistic effects are corrected to within 5 nsec, but instrument delay calibration remains a problem. The Laser Synchronization from Stationary Orbit (LASSO) experiment is based on the measurement of the time it takes a laser pulse to complete the return journey from a ground station to the satellite. The LASSO was designed for the SIRIO-2 satellite, whose launch failed, and is now proposed for Meteosat-2.

  6. Testing the gravitational interaction in the field of the Earth via satellite laser ranging and the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, D. M.; Anselmo, L.; Bassan, M.; Pardini, C.; Peron, R.; Pucacco, G.; Visco, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE) is presented. This is a research program that aims to perform new refined tests and measurements of gravitation in the field of the Earth in the weak field and slow motion (WFSM) limit of general relativity (GR). For this objective we use the free available data relative to geodetic passive satellite lasers tracked from a network of ground stations by means of the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique. After a brief introduction to GR and its WFSM limit, which aims to contextualize the physical background of the tests and measurements that LARASE will carry out, we focus on the current limits of validation of GR and on current constraints on the alternative theories of gravity that have been obtained with the precise SLR measurements of the two LAGEOS satellites performed so far. Afterward, we present the scientific goals of LARASE in terms of upcoming measurements and tests of relativistic physics. Finally, we introduce our activities and we give a number of new results regarding the improvements to the modelling of both gravitational and non-gravitational perturbations to the orbit of the satellites. These activities are a needed prerequisite to improve the forthcoming new measurements of gravitation. An innovation with respect to the past is the specialization of the models to the LARES satellite, especially for what concerns the modelling of its spin evolution, the neutral drag perturbation and the impact of Earth's solid tides on the satellite orbit.

  7. Controlling laser beam irradiation area using an optical duplicate system to improve satellite-ground laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Kodate, Kashiko

    2016-08-01

    To improve the quality of ground to satellite laser communications, we propose an optical duplicate system of the optical ground station. Our proposed approach can be used to control the beam irradiation area for a satellite position without changing the total power of the output beam and the mechanical drive unit; this is performed by controlling the input pattern of a liquid crystal filter inserted in the input plane of the optical duplicate system. Most of the power of the diffracted laser beam emitted from the ground is focused on the optical axis. By distributing the power to side lobes, it is possible to extend the coverage area for a satellite position. This system allows the laser beam irradiation area to be controlled by a sufficient degree by adjusting the threshold of the satellite reception level. We verify the efficacy of the system using wave optics numerical calculations.

  8. Tectonic motion and deformation from satellite laser ranging to Lageos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Kolenkiewicz, Ronald; Dunn, Peter J.; Robbins, John W.; Torrence, Mark H.; Klosko, Steve M.; Williamson, Ronald G.; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Douglas, Nancy B.

    1990-01-01

    Data on satellite laser ranging (SLR) to Lageos aquired during the period 1978-1988 are analyzed on the basis of the precise modeling of the orbit dynamics of Lageos, producing estimates of tectonic motion for 22 sites located on seven major plates. It was estimated that intraplate motion within northern Europe is below the 2 mm/yr level in absolute rate, in agreement with conclusions of Zoback et al. (1989) regarding the stress across the region. A comparison of SLR geodesic rates with those from NUVEL-1 and AMO-2 models showed high correlations between tracking sites that are well within plate interiors, but displayed small but significant departures from unity in slope which are attributed to the possibility of recent changes in relative velocities or geologic time scale uncertainties. For lines crossing the Nnorth Atlantic, the San Andreas fault, and within the Basin and Range province, the geodesic rates determined by SLR are in good agreement with those determined by VLBI.

  9. Aviso: altimetry products & services in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, F.; Bronner, E.; Rosmorduc, V.; Maheu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Since the launch of Topex/Poseidon, more than 20 years ago, satellite altimetry has evolved in parallel with the user community and oceanography. As a result of this evolution, we now have: - a wide range of products, more and more easy-to-use, spanning complete GDRs to pre-computed sea level anomalies, gridded datasets and indicators such as MSL index or ENSO index. - a wide range of applications in the oceanographic community: ocean observation, biology, climate, ... - a mature approach, combining altimetric data from various satellites and merging data acquired using different observation techniques, including altimetry, to give us a global view of the ocean; - data available in real or near-real time for operational use. Different services are available either to choose between the various datasets, or to download, extract or even visualize the data. An Ipad-Iphone application, AvisOcean has also been opened in September 2012, for information about the data and their updates. 2013 has seen major changes in Aviso data distribution, both in data products themselves and in their distribution, including an online extraction tool in preparation (Online Data Extraction Service). An overview of available products & services, how to access them today, will be presented.

  10. Aviso: altimetry products and services in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Bronner, Emilie; Maheu, Caroline; Mertz, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Since the launch of Topex/Poseidon, more than 20 years ago, satellite altimetry has evolved in parallel with the user community and oceanography. As a result of this evolution, we now have: - A bigger choice of products, more and more easy-to-use, spanning complete GDRs to pre-computed sea level anomalies and gridded datasets and indicators such as MSL index or ENSO index. - a mature approach, combining altimetric data from various satellites and merging data acquired using different observation techniques, including altimetry, to give us a global view of the ocean; - data available in real or near-real time for operational use. Different services are available either to choose between the various datasets, or to download, extract or even visualize the data. An Ipad-Iphone application, AvisOcean has also been opened in September 2012, for information about the data and their updates. 2013 will see major changes in Aviso data distribution, both in data products themselves and in their distribution, including an online extraction tool in preparation (Online Data Extraction Service). An overview of available products & services, how to access them today, will be presented.

  11. The statistics of laser returns from cube-corner arrays on satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehr, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    A method first presented by Goodman is used to derive an equation for the statistical effects associated with laser returns from satellites having retroreflecting arrays of cube corners. The effect of the distribution on the returns of a satellite-tracking system is illustrated by a computation based on randomly generated numbers.

  12. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox & Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Bronner, Emilie; Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Niejmeier, Sander; Picot, Nicolas; Breebaart, Leo; Earith, Didier

    2010-05-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the next mission to be launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. About 900 people downloaded it (January 2009), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, Jason- 2, and the furure CryoSat and Saral missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. Version 2 has been released in April 2009, including, among other improvements, a Mac OS X version, River&Lake data reading capability, full waveform processing and plotting, new plotting capabilities, export in GeoTiff, including a Google Earth export feature, easier export in Ascii, a rethinking of the Graphical user

  13. Laser ranging application to time transfer using geodetic satellite and to other Japanese space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunimori, Hiroo; Takahashi, Fujinobu; Itabe, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    1993-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has been developing a laser time transfer system using a satellite laser ranging (SLR) system. We propose Japanese geodetic satellite 'AJISAI', launched in 1986 as a target satellite. The surface is covered not only with corner cube reflectors but also with mirrors. The mirrors are originally designed for observation of flushing solar light reflected by the separate mirrors while the satellite is spinning. In the experiment, synchronized laser pulses are transferred via specified mirror from one station to another while the satellite is up on the horizon to both stations. The system is based on the epoch timing ranging system with 40 ps ranging precision, connected together with UTC(CRL). Simulation study indicates that two stations at thousands of km distance from each other can be linked with signal strength of more than 10 photons and the distributed images of laser beam from AJISAI mirrors give many chances for two stations to link each other during a single AJISAI pass. Retro-reflector In Space for Advanced Earth Observation Satellite (ADEOS) and RendDezVous docking mission of Experimental Technology Satellite-7 (ETS-7) are briefly presented.

  14. MLRS - A lunar/artificial satellite laser ranging facility at the McDonald Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experience from lunar and satellite laser ranging experiments carried out at McDonald Observatory has been used to design the McDonald Laser Ranging Station (MLRS). The MLRS is a dual-purpose installation designed to obtain observations from the LAGEOS satellite and lunar targets. The instruments used at the station include a telescope assembly 0.76 meters in diameter; a Q-switched doubled neodymium YAG laser with a pulse rate of three nanoseconds; and a GaAs photodetector with Fabry-Perot interferometric filter. A functional diagram of the system is provided. The operating parameters of the instruments are summarized in a table.

  15. Intensity fluctuations in laser links between the ground and a satellite.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Masahiro

    2005-12-01

    Laser-beam-intensity fluctuations between an uplink (ground to satellite) and a downlink (satellite to ground) are described. The dependence of the beam radius on log-intensity variance in the uplink and the dependence of receiving-aperture diameter on the log-intensity variance in the downlink using a known theory were calculated. Statistical analysis of the experimental data on the laser links was performed, and high correlation coefficients of 0.94 between the normalized intensity variances of the uplink and those of the stellar scintillation were obtained. The beam-pointing error in the satelliteborne laser transmitter chiefly caused fluctuations in the downlink. PMID:16353808

  16. Intensity fluctuations in laser links between the ground and a satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Masahiro

    2005-12-01

    Laser-beam-intensity fluctuations between an uplink (ground to satellite) and a downlink (satellite to ground) are described. The dependence of the beam radius on log-intensity variance in the uplink and the dependence of receiving-aperture diameter on the log-intensity variance in the downlink using a known theory were calculated. Statistical analysis of the experimental data on the laser links was performed, and high correlation coefficients of 0.94 between the normalized intensity variances of the uplink and those of the stellar scintillation were obtained. The beam-pointing error in the satelliteborne laser transmitter chiefly caused fluctuations in the downlink.

  17. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  18. The link availability analysis of GEO satellite-to-ground laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erhu; Mei, Haiping; Zhang, Changquan; Chang, Chengwu

    2015-08-01

    The performance of satellite-to-ground laser communication is affected by the atmospheric environment seriously, so it is a key issue for system design and operation to analyze the link availability quantitatively according to the channel characteristics. Firstly, the basic concept of laser communication link availability is put forward. Secondly, the preliminary theory model and calculation method of geostationary satellite-to-ground laser communication link availability are established by analyzing influencing factors. Lastly, the link availability of 77°E GEO satellite-to-ground laser communication is analyzed, combining with the atmospheric statistics data of typical optical ground stations in China. The results show that, it is feasible to achieve more than 90% joint link availability by implementing two stations, or to achieve more than 95% joint link availability by implementing three stations.

  19. Atmospheric Corrections in Coastal Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonita, Maria; Kumar, Raj

    2012-07-01

    The range measurements from the altimeter are associated with a large number of geophysical corrections which needs special attention near coasts and the shallow water regions. The corrections due to ionosphere, dry and wet troposphere and that due to sea state are of primary importance in altimetry. Water vapor dominates the wet tropospheric corrections by several factors which is more complex with higher spatio-temporal variations and thus needs a careful attention near coasts. In addition to this rain is one of the major atmospheric phenomena which attenuate the backscatter altimeter measurements which in turn affect the altimeter derived wind and wave measurements. Thus during rain events utmost care should be taken while deriving the altimeter wind speeds and wave heights. The first objective of the present study involves the comparison of the water vapor corrections estimated from radiosonde measurements near the coastal regions with the model estimated corrections applied in the altimeter range measurements. Analysis has been performed for the Coastal Altimeter products provided by the PISTACH to observe these corrections. The second objective is to estimate the rain rate using altimeter backscatter measurements. The differential attenuation of KU band over C band due to rain has been utilized to identify the rain events and to estimate the amount of rain fall. JASON-2 altimeter data during two tropical cyclonic events over Bay of Bengal have been used for this purpose. An attempt is made to compare the estimated rain rate from altimeter measurements with the other available collocated satellite observations like KALPANA and TRMM-TMI. The results are encouraging and can be used to provide valid rain flags in the altimeter products in addition to the radiometer rain flags.

  20. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of satellite altimetry as valuable tool for taking quantitative sea ice monitoring beyond the traditional surface extent measurements and into estimates of sea ice thickness and volume, parameters that arc fundamental to improved understanding of polar dynamics and climate modeling. Several studies have now demonstrated the use of both microwave (ERS, Envisat/RA-2) and laser (ICESat/GLAS) satellite altimeters for determining sea ice thickness. The complexity of polar environments, however, continues to make sea ice thickness determination a complicated remote sensing task and validation studies remain essential for successful monitoring of sea ice hy satellites. One such validation effort, the Arctic Aircraft Altimeter (AAA) campaign of2006. included underflights of Envisat and ICESat north of the Canadian Archipelago using NASA's P-3 aircraft. This campaign compared Envisat and ICESat sea ice elevation measurements with high-resolution airborne elevation measurements, revealing the impact of refrozen leads on radar altimetry and ice drift on laser altimetry. Continuing this research and validation effort, the Canada Basin Sea Ice Thickness (CBSIT) experiment was completed in April 2009. CBSIT was conducted by NOAA. and NASA as part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, a gap-filling mission intended to supplement sea and land ice monitoring until the launch of NASA's ICESat-2 mission. CBIST was flown on the NASA P-3, which was equipped with a scanning laser altimeter, a Ku-band snow radar, and un updated nadir looking photo-imaging system. The CB5IT campaign consisted of two flights: an under flight of Envisat along a 1000 km track similar to that flown in 2006, and a flight through the Nares Strait up to the Lincoln Sea that included an overflight of the Danish GreenArc Ice Camp off the coast of northern Greenland. We present an examination of data collected during this campaign, comparing airborne laser altimeter measurements

  1. Somali current studied from SEASAT altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perigaud, C.; Minster, J. F.; Zlotnicki, V.; Balmino, G.

    1984-01-01

    Mesoscale variability has been obtained for the world ocean from satellite altimetry by using the repetitive tracks data of SEASAT. No significant results were obtained for the Somali current area for two main reasons: the repetitive tracks are too sparse to cover the expected eddy pattern and these data were obtained in late September and early October when the current is strongly decaying. The non-repetitive period of SEASAT offers the possibility to study a dozen of tracks parallel to the eddy axis or crossing it. These are used here to deduce the dynamic topography of the Somali current. Data error reduction and tide and orbit corrections are addressed. A local geoid was built using a collocation inverse method to combine surface gravity data and altimetry: the repetitive tracks show no variability (which confirms that the current is quasi-inexistent at that time) and can be used as data for the local geoid. This should provide a measure of the absolute dynamic topography of the Somali current.

  2. Progress in Coastal Altimetry: the experience of the COASTALT Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Gommenginger, C.; Coelho, H.; Fernandes, J.; Gomez-Enri, J.; Martin-Puig, C.; Vignudelli, S.; Woodworth, P.; Dinardo, S.; Benveniste, J.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite altimetry over the open ocean is a mature discipline, and data are routinely assimilated for operational applications. In contrast, global altimetry data collected over the coastal ocean remain largely unexploited in the data archives, simply because intrinsic difficulties in the corrections (especially the wet tropospheric component, the high-frequency atmospheric signal and the tides) and issues of land contamination in the footprint have so far resulted in systematic flagging and rejection of these data. In the last couple of years, significant research has been carried out into overcoming these problems and extending the capabilities of current and future altimeters to the coastal zone, with the aim to integrate the altimeter-derived measurements of sea level, wind speed and significant wave height into coastal ocean observing systems. At the same time the major Space Agencies have recognized the importance of the topic and are sustaining coastal altimetry research through projects such as COASTALT (ESA), PISTACH (CNES) and some OSTST (NASA/CNES) initiatives. A number of crucial improvements to the processing of the altimetric waveforms in the coastal zone and to the correction of the measurements for path delay and geophysical effects (tides and atmospheric) are being implemented and tested. The first custom-processed coastal altimetry data are now available, and many more data from Jason-1, Jason-2 and Envisat will become available during 2009. This new "coastal altimetry" community, inherently interdisciplinary, has already had two well-attended international workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/pisaworkshop08/). In this paper we will report on the progress of the COASTALT Project, funded by the European Space Agency, which aims at defining, developing and testing a prototype software processor to generate new Envisat radar altimeter products in the coastal zone. Ultimately, the plans are for ESA to routinely generate and distribute these new

  3. Technology assessment of high pulse energy CO(2) lasers for remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Schryer, D. R.; Miller, I. M.; Bair, C. H.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments and needs for research to extend the lifetime and optimize the configuration of CO2 laser systems for satellite based on remote sensing of atmospheric wind velocities and trace gases are reviewed. The CO2 laser systems for operational satellite application will require lifetimes which exceed 1 year. Progress in the development of efficient low temperature catalysts and gas mixture modifications for extending the lifetime of high pulse energy closed cycle common and rare isotope CO2 lasers and of sealed CW CO2 lasers is reviewed. Several CO2 laser configurations are under development to meet the requirements including: unstable resonators, master oscillator power amplifiers and telescopic stable resonators, using UV or E-beam preionization. Progress in the systems is reviewed and tradeoffs in the system parameters are discussed.

  4. Proposal of Liquid Cannon Target Driven by Fiber Laser for Micro-Thruster in Satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Yabe, Takashi; Ohzono, Hirokazu; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Baasandash, Choijil; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Oku, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Kazumoto; Miyazaki, Sho; Akoh, Ryosuke; Ogata, Yoichi; Rosenberg, Benjamin; Yoshida, Minoru

    2004-03-30

    We propose a new concept controlling a satellite by a fiber laser loaded in it and demonstrated the acceleration of pendulum with 7kW/2n and 2kHz fiber laser, and measured the Cm of 16Ns/MJ corresponding to the scaling of YAG laser. This laser can be easily bundled to generate much larger power. For more efficient acceleration, we propose 'metal-free water cannon target', the new concept of propulsion using only water. The momentum coupling coefficient of 2500[Ns/MJ] was achieved with vacuum pump oil instead of water, and we succeeded in controlling the driving direction by the system based on the new concept. This can be used for thrusting a satellite and controlling its posture in combination with fiber lasers.

  5. Gulf of Mexico satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, C. G.; Forsythe, R. G.; Parsons, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic topography of the sea surface was measured. The radar altimeter measurements yield average ocean topographic data which are mapped. Seasonal deviations from a 3 year mean topography are presented. The altimeters are also instrumented with sample and hold gates which provide information about the shape and amplitude of the return waveform. Parameters including ocean surface wind speed and the significant wave height are determined. One hundred eighty six wind speed and significant wave height histograms are presented.

  6. Thermal rocketing and the Laser Geodynamic Satellite (LAGEOS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. LAGEOS is the most accurately tracked satellite in orbit. It is a totally passive, dense spherical satellite covered with 426 cube corner reflectors. Besides its great utility in measuring the Earth`s length of day and polar wobble, this satellite can be used to measure, for the first time, the general relativistic frame-dragging effect. Of the five dominant error sources in such an experiment, the largest one involves surface interaction of thermal forces (thermal rocketing) and its influence on the orbital nodal precession. The project objective was to enhance an already available theoretical model (computer code) developed at Los Alamos based on new optical-spin data obtained at the University of Maryland. The project objective was met and the enhanced code will serve as the new spin-dynamics model for future LAGEOS satellite missions.

  7. Power transmission by laser beam from lunar-synchronous satellites to a lunar rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Deyoung, R. J.; Schuster, G. L.; Choi, S. H.; Dagle, J. E.; Coomes, E. P.; Antoniak, Z. I.; Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Chiu, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of beaming laser power from synchronous lunar orbits (L1 and L2 LaGrange points) to a manned long-range lunar rover. The rover and two versions of a satellite system (one powered by a nuclear reactor; the other by photovoltaics) are described in terms of their masses, geometry, power needs, mission and technological capabilities. Laser beam power is generated by a laser diode array in the satellite and converted to 30 kW of electrical power at the rover. Present technological capabilities, with some extrapolation to near future capabilities, are used in the descriptions. The advantages of the two satellite/rover systems over other such systems and over rovers with on-board power are discussed along with the possibility of enabling other missions.

  8. Method for Ground-to-Satellite Laser Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukashin, Constantine (Inventor); Wielicki, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention comprises an approach for calibrating the sensitivity to polarization, optics degradation, spectral and stray light response functions of instruments on orbit. The concept is based on using an accurate ground-based laser system, Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration (GSLC), transmitting laser light to instrument on orbit during nighttime substantially clear-sky conditions. To minimize atmospheric contribution to the calibration uncertainty the calibration cycles should be performed in short time intervals, and all required measurements are designed to be relative. The calibration cycles involve ground operations with laser beam polarization and wavelength changes.

  9. Preliminary results from the portable standard satellite laser ranging intercomparison with MOBLAS-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selden, Michael; Varghese, Thomas K.; Heinick, Michael; Oldham, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Conventional Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) instrumentation has been configured and successfully used to provide high-accuracy laboratory measurements on the LAGEOS-2 and TOPEX cube-corner arrays. The instrumentation, referred to as the Portable Standard, has also been used for field measurements of satellite ranges in tandem with MOBLAS-7. Preliminary results of the SLR measurements suggest that improved range accuracy can be achieved using this system. Results are discussed.

  10. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  11. Intercomparison of satellite laser ranging accuracy of three NASA stations through collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, T.; Husson, V.; Wetzel, S.; Degnan, J. J.; Zagwodzki, T.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of laser ranging has been evaluated through comparisons of simultaneous LAGEOS satellite-borne laser ranging data received at three NASA tracking stations in support of the Crustal Dynamics project. Single-shot satellite ranging precisions of 8, 14, and 30 mm have been demonstrated at the three ground stations, with a stability better than 3 mm. The data-processing software used were POLYQUICK and GEODYN; a consistent degree of agreement between the three stations of less than 1 cm is obtained.

  12. Prototype Test Results for the Single Photon Detection SLR2000 Satellite Laser Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; McGarry, Jan F.; Degnan, John J.; Cheek, Jack W.; Dunn, Peter J.; Patterson, Don; Donovan, Howard

    2004-01-01

    NASA's aging Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) network is scheduled to be replaced over the next few years with a fully automated single photon detection system. A prototype of this new system, called SLR2000, is currently undergoing field trials at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland to evaluate photon counting techniques and determine system hardware, software, and control algorithm performance levels and limitations. Newly developed diode pumped microchip lasers and quadrant microchannel plate-based photomultiplier tubes have enabled the development of this high repetition rate single photon detection SLR system. The SLR2000 receiver threshold is set at the single photoelectron (pe) level but tracks satellites with an average signal level typically much less than 1 pe. The 2 kHz laser fire rate aids in satellite acquisition and tracking and will enable closed loop tracking by accumulating single photon count statistics in a quadrant detector and using this information to correct for pointing errors. Laser transmitter beamwidths of 10 arcseconds (FWHM) or less are currently being used to maintain an adequate signal level for tracking while the receiver field of view (FOV) has been opened to 40 arcseconds to accommodate point ahead/look behind angular offsets. In the near future, the laser transmitter point ahead will be controlled by a pair of Risley prisms. This will allow the telescope to point behind and enable closure of the receiver FOV to roughly match the transmitter beam divergence. Bandpass filters (BPF) are removed for night tracking operations while 0.2 nm or 1 nm filters are used during daylight operation. Both day and night laser tracking of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites has been achieved with a laser transmitter energy of only 65 microjoules per pulse. Satellite tracking is presently limited to LEO satellites until the brassboard laser transmitter can be upgraded or replaced. Simultaneous tracks have also been observed with NASA s

  13. Testing fundamental physics with laser ranged satellites: perspectives and goals of the LARASE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Visco, Massimo

    Passive laser-ranged satellites, launched for geodynamics and geophysics purposes, not only have contributed to significant measurements in space geodesy that enabled, among several aspects, a deeper knowledge of the Earth's geopotential (both in its static and dynamic behavior), as well as of the geocenter motion and GM value up to the definition of the terrestrial reference frame, but they also provided an outstanding test bench to fundamental physics, as in the case of the first measurement of the Lense-Thirring precession on the combined nodes of the two LAGEOS satellites, or in the case of the total relativistic precession of the argument of pericenter of LAGEOS II. Indeed, the physical characteristics of such satellites -- such as their low area-to-mass ratio -- as well as those of their orbits, and the availability of high-quality tracking data provided by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), allow for precise tests of gravitational theories. The aim of LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) is to go a step further in the tests of the gravitational interaction in the field of Earth, i.e. in the weak-field and-slow motion limit of general relativity, by the joint analysis of the orbits of the two LAGEOS satellites and that of the most recent LARES satellite. One of the key ingredients to reach such a goal is to provide high-quality updated models for the perturbing non-gravitational forces acting on the surface of such satellites. A large amount of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II has been analyzed using a set of dedicated models for satellite dynamics, and the related post-fit residuals have been analyzed. A parallel work is on-going in the case of LARES that, due to its much lower altitude, is subject to larger gravitational and non-gravitational effects; the latter are mitigated in part by its much lower area-to-mass ratio. Recent work on the data analysis of the orbit of such satellites will be presented together

  14. Normalized GNSS Interference Pattern Technique for Altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér–Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals. PMID:24922453

  15. Normalized GNSS interference pattern technique for altimetry.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-06-11

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals.

  16. Normalized GNSS interference pattern technique for altimetry.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals. PMID:24922453

  17. Global coastal altimetry data enable an improved look at coastal dynamics and sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Cipollini, P.; Calafat, F. M.; Passaro, M.; Cotton, D.

    2015-12-01

    The field of research aiming at recovering meaningful measurements of sea level and significant wave height from satellite altimetry in the coastal strip, known as coastal altimetry, has reached maturity thanks to the concerted effort of a lively community of scientists (www.coastalt.eu/community). We illustrate the improvements in radar waveform retracking, as well as those in the corrections of atmospheric and surface effects, that together enable coastal altimetry to achieve a precision comparable to the 2-cm level at 1-Hz seen over the open ocean. We present design and implementation of a multi-mission coastal altimetry processor based on the ALES retracking algorithm that has been used to generate products from the Jason-1, Jason-2 and Envisat altimeters in the 50-km coastal band globally; these products are freely available. We show examples of the validation of satellite altimetry data against tide gauges and wave buoys in dynamically different regions of the world's coasts (Northern Adriatic, UK coast, South Africa, South-East Australia). We demonstrate the intrinsically superior performance of SAR mode (delay-Doppler) altimetry from ESA Cryosat-2 mission, showing measurement noise of around 5 cm or lower for the 20-Hz data almost all the way to the coast when the orientation of the satellite track is favourable. This is extremely promising for the Sentinel-3 altimeter, due for launch in late 2015, which will be in SAR mode everywhere. We finally illustrate with examples two very different applications of the reprocessed data, both having significant societal impact: a) the observation of the offshore-to-coast sea level profile during extreme events (storm surges), which is of great value to surge modellers and forecasters; and b) the use of long (>20 years) time series of coastal altimetry to derive the rates of global and regional sea level rise in the coastal strip, therefore enabling a link between the open-ocean estimates and those from tide gauges.

  18. Compensation for the distortion in satellite laser range predictions due to varying pulse travel times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A method for compensating for the effect of the varying travel time of a transmitted laser pulse to a satellite is described. The 'observed minus predicted' range differences then appear to be linear, which makes data screening or use in range gating more effective.

  19. Measurement of dragging of inertial frames and gravitomagnetic field using laser-ranged satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, I.; Lucchesi, D.; Vespe, F.; Mandiello, A.

    1996-05-01

    By analysing the observations of the orbits of the laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, using the program GEODYN, the authors have obtained the first direct measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect, or dragging of inertial frames and the first direct experimental evidence for the gravitomagnetic field. The accuracy of their measurement is of about 30%.

  20. Satellite Laser Ranging in the 1990s: Report of the 1994 Belmont Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    An international network of 43 stations in 30 countries routinely collects satellite ranging data which is used to study the solid Earth and its interactions with the oceans, atmosphere, and Moon. Data products include centimeter accuracy site positions on a global scale, tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformation, long wavelength gravity field and geoid, polar motion, and variations in the Earth's spin rate. By calibrating and providing precise orbits for spaceborne microwave altimeters, satellite laser ranging also enables global measurement of sea and ice surface topography, mean sea level, global ocean circulation, and short wavelength gravity fields and marine geoids. It provides tests of general relativity and a means or subnanosecond time transfer. This workshop was convened to define future roles and directions in satellite laser ranging.

  1. Compact, Passively Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser for the MESSENGER Mission to the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X.; Lindauer, Steven J.; Afzal, Robert S.; Yu, Antony

    2004-01-01

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument which is an instrument on the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4 percent efficiency with a near diffraction limited beam. It has passed all space flight environmental tests at system, instrument, and satellite integration. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically ISESAT and Mars Global Surveyor; but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury.

  2. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Dunn, P. J.; Plotkin, H. H.; Johnson, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    Laser ranges to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single Goddard Space Flight Center tracking system were used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arcsecs rms was obtained for the latitude during a five-month period in 1970.

  3. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Kolenkiewicz, R; Dunn, P J; Plotkin, H H; Johnson, T S

    1972-10-27

    Measurements of the range to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single laser tracking system at Goddard Space Flight Center have been used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arc second was obtained for the latitude during a 5-month period in 1970.

  4. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Plotkin, H. H.; Johnson, T. S.; Dunn, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the range to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single laser tracking system at Goddard Space Flight Center have been used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arc second was obtained for the latitude during a 5-month period in 1970.

  5. The design and fabrication of the satellite relative-movement trajectory simulator for inter-satellite laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Liu, Liren; Yun, Maojin; Zhang, Dejiang; Xu, Nan

    2005-08-01

    The characteristics of the terminals for the inter-satellite laser communication must be tested and verified on ground before flight test. Satellite relative-movement trajectory optical simulator is one of the most important devices of the ground test and verification system. It is used for simulation of the relative-movement between arbitrary satellites. Cooperating with the standard satellite laser communication terminal, the dynamical performance such as acquisition time and probability, pointing accuracy and tracking accuracy etc, of the terminal to be tested can be obtained. To keep the base of the terminal to be tested fixed, the clear aperture must be relatively large compare to the terminal's effect aperture. And for the practical application as well as in considering the size of optical glass commercially available, the optical aperture of the scanner was determined as φ420mm, the random accuracy for the simulation is 50-200μrad, Scanning angular coverage: azimuth +/-180°, elevation +/-15°. So the satellite relative-movement trajectory simulator belongs to the large-scale high-precision opto-mechanic and electrical equipment. In this paper, the design and fabrication of the simulator are introduced in detail. The simulator has the features as compact in construction, high accuracy in measurement, simple realization of the far-field condition in the near-field use, and direct simulation of 2D trajectory and consists of eight main elements: two wedge prisms, two pairs of worm and gear, damping gears, two actuating motors, two damping motors, rotating optical encoders, control computer and relevant electronics and mechanisms. The motivation of the design is to improve the accuracy as high as possible. The fabrication of the element of the simulator is stringent because of large-scale and high accuracy. For example, to solve the gap problem of the transmission mechanics, the damping method is introduced to the system. During the progress of the design and

  6. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) laser studies. Volume 1: Laser environmental impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The environmental impact of space to Earth power transmission using space borne laser subsystems is emphasized. A laser system is defined, estimates of relevant efficiencies for laser power generation and atmospheric transmission are developed, and a comparison is made to a microwave system. Ancillary issues, such as laser beam spreading, safety and security, mass and volume estimates and technology growth are considered.

  7. Laser satellite constellations for strategic defense - an analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentola, J.A.; Milton, A.F.

    1987-10-01

    Using mainly geometric reasoning, an analytic model is constructed that predicts the required characteristics of an orbiting constellation of laser battle stations, each of which is designed to destroy ballistic missiles during their boost phase. The geometry of the constellation configuration and some general aspects of the coverage problem are discussed. The determination of the absentee ratio falls into two main categories that depend upon whether the Soviet ICBM threat is concentrated at a single location or whether it is distributed as it is now. A point-threat model and a distributive threat model are considered, the determination of the respective kill rates for these models is discussed, and the scaling properties of the laser constellation with respect to a change in the quantitative nature of the two types of ICBM threats are considered.

  8. Stability of coordinates of the borowiec SLR station (7811) on the basis of satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, E.; Schillak, S.; Kuźmicz-Cieślak, M.

    2002-07-01

    Borowiec satellite laser ranging station belongs to the global tracking stations network conducting continuous observations in the last decade. The accuracy of measurements has reached the level of 1-2cm for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites. The satellite laser ranging system has been generally stable in terms of the range bias since 1994. One of the important tasks of geodynamics is a determination of the station coordinates and the control of their stability. The paper presents results of determination of the position of the Borowiec SLR station (7811) calculated on the basis of the data provided by the LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 laser ranging from the results of selected 15 laser ranging stations in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 97 system. The calculations were performed with the use of the GEODYN II program and ALPHA computers in Borowiec and Poznań Observatories. The coordinates of the Borowiec station were determined from monthly arcs for 1999, the best year in the terms of quantity and quality of Borowiec LAGEOS data. The final stability of the Borowiec SLR coordinates for all components per one year is equal to ±9 mm.

  9. A Global Ocean Tide Model From TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimetry: GOT99.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Goddard Ocean Tide model GOT99.2 is a new solution for the amplitudes and phases of the global oceanic tides, based on over six years of sea-surface height measurements by the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimeter. Comparison with deep-ocean tide-gauge measurements show that this new tidal solution is an improvement over previous global models, with accuracies for the main semidiurnal lunar constituent M2 now below 1.5 cm (deep water only). The new solution benefits from use of prior hydrodynamic models, several in shallow and inland seas as well as the global finite-element model FES94.1. This report describes some of the data processing details involved in handling the altimetry, and it provides a comprehensive set of global cotidal charts of the resulting solutions. Various derived tidal charts are also provided, including tidal loading deformation charts, tidal gravimetric charts, and tidal current velocity (or transport) charts. Finally, low-degree spherical harmonic coefficients are computed by numerical quadrature and are tabulated for the major short-period tides; these are useful for a variety of geodetic and geophysical purposes, especially in combination with similar estimates from satellite laser ranging.

  10. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude R.

    1993-05-01

    Laser impulse space propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors, and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science -- ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we discuss these most immediate applications, leaving LEO-LISP -- the application requiring the longest reach -- for another venue.

  11. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  12. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  13. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, C. R.

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science - ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  14. UV laser approach to doppler tropospheric wind sounding from a satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Jack A.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Heller, Donald F.; Walling, John C.

    1995-12-01

    The possibility of direct detection of tropospheric wind speed Doppler shift with an ultraviolet laser is considered. The use of the UV eliminates all practical concerns of eye safety, permits the use of uncooled detectors, and yields enhanced aerosol and Rayleigh backscatter signals. The Rayleigh signal, which in the free troposphere can exceed the aerosol signal by three orders of magnitude, is itself a candidate for wind speed measurement, despite the Doppler broadening of this signal. The basis of this approach is a diode-pumped, frequency-doubled alexandrite laser, which offers very high electrical to optical energy efficiency, an estimated 9%, in generating UV output. Efficiency is critical for a satellite based lidar system due to the size, cost, and mass of solar power generation and waste heat disposal subsystems. Pumping of alexandrite with 680 nm laser diodes has been demonstrated. Narrow linewidth, high spectral purity, and high frequency stability have been obtained with laser diode injection seeding of a ring alexandrite laser. The tunable diode laser control allows tuning of the laser for spacecraft velocity compensation. The potential performance of a wind sounding lidar scaled to match the 300 W power capability of a mid-sized satellite is evaluated for the extremely weak aerosol conditions of the southern hemisphere oceans. A 20 W output laser system, with 1 m aperture telescope, at 350 km altitude, may yield measurement precisions better than plus or minus 3 m/s through most of the troposphere, deteriorating to plus or minus 10 m/s under extreme conditions. A Rayleigh backscatter system will yield plus or minus 3 m/s precision to 8 km altitude, plus or minus 5 m/s at 15 km, even with zero aerosol content.

  15. The Benefit of Multi-Mission Altimetry Series for the Calibration of Hydraulic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Castellarin, Attilio; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of satellite altimetric time series during last decades has fostered their use in many hydrological and hydraulic applications. However, the use of remotely sensed water level series still remains hampered by the limited temporal resolution that characterizes each sensor (i.e. revisit time varying from 10 to 35 days), as well as by the accuracy of different instrumentation adopted for monitoring inland water. As a consequence, each sensor is characterized by distinctive potentials and limitations that constrain its use for hydrological applications. In this study we refer to a stretch of about 140 km of the Po River (the longest Italian river) in order to investigate the performance of different altimetry series for the calibration of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic information. The usefulness of remotely sensed water surface elevation is tested using data collected by different altimetry missions (i.e., ERS-2, ENVISAT, TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-2 and SARAL/Altika) by investigating the effect of (i) record length (i.e. number of satellite measurements provided by a given sensor at a specific satellite track) and (ii) data uncertainty (i.e. altimetry measurements errors). Since the relatively poor time resolution of satellites constrains the operational use of altimetric time series, in this study we also investigate the use of multi-mission altimetry series obtained by merging datasets sensed by different sensors over the study area. Benefits of the highest temporal frequency of multi-mission series are tested by calibrating the quasi-2d model referring in turn to original satellite series and multi-mission datasets. Jason-2 and ENVISAT outperform other sensors, ensuring the reliability on the calibration process for shorter time series. The multi-mission dataset appears particularly reliable and suitable for the calibration of hydraulic model. If short time periods are considered, the performance of the multi-mission dataset

  16. Performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist adjustment.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ming-Wei; Kam, Pooi-Yuen

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, we propose the idea of dynamic beam waist adjustment for laser inter-satellite communications, and study the performance of this dynamic-beam scheme. The beam waist adjustment is based on continuous detection of the instantaneous pointing error angle, which is performed at the transmitter side. Using a square to approximate the circular detector region, we obtain a closed-form expression for calculating the proportion of power that can be collected by the receiver aperture, and derive a simple algebraic solution for the optimum dynamic beam waist. Due to its simple form, the dynamic beam waist value can be computed in real time at the transmitter, and therefore, the adjustment is practically implementable. It is shown that the performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist is better than that with fixed beam waist. PMID:27410117

  17. Research on denoising in WDM laser inter-satellites communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chuanhua; Su, Yang; Li, Yuquan; Zhou, Li

    2006-09-01

    This paper proposes a method of wavelet analysis for de-noising at receiver system in WDM laser inter-satellites communication. Background noises such as galactic noise, sunlight and etc make the received power reduce. The noisy signal is decomposed using wavelets and wavelet packets; then is transformed into wavelet coefficients and the lower order coefficients are removed by applying a soft threshold. De-noised signal is obtained by reconstructing with the remaining coefficients. In this paper, we evaluate different wavelet analysis for de-noising at receiver system in inter-satellites laser communication. Simulation results indicate that if the wavelet de-noising method is used with different wavelet analyzing functions, it will improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) about 2 dB when the signal frequency is 1.5 GHz.

  18. Massive information sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longteng; Li, Cong; Liu, Naijin

    2015-10-01

    With the development of big data and information globalization, the requirements of massive information transmitting and sharing among data centers are expanding, especially among those data centers which are extremely far away from each other. In the above field, conventional optical fiber transmission faces many problems such as complex networking, poor security, long node switching delay, high lease and maintain cost and low migration flexibility. Besides, in the near future, data centers may tend to be built in the remote Polar Regions or on the sea for natural cooling. For the above situation, sharing the massive information among global data centers based on satellite laser communication is proposed in this paper. This proposal includes advantage analysis, research of restraining atmosphere interference, etc. At last, by comparison with conventional technology, the research result shows that massive information transmitting and sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication has far reaching application potential.

  19. Performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist adjustment.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ming-Wei; Kam, Pooi-Yuen

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, we propose the idea of dynamic beam waist adjustment for laser inter-satellite communications, and study the performance of this dynamic-beam scheme. The beam waist adjustment is based on continuous detection of the instantaneous pointing error angle, which is performed at the transmitter side. Using a square to approximate the circular detector region, we obtain a closed-form expression for calculating the proportion of power that can be collected by the receiver aperture, and derive a simple algebraic solution for the optimum dynamic beam waist. Due to its simple form, the dynamic beam waist value can be computed in real time at the transmitter, and therefore, the adjustment is practically implementable. It is shown that the performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist is better than that with fixed beam waist.

  20. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  1. SAR Satellite Images and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Forest Damages Mapping in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Hyyppa, Juha; Holopainen, Markus; Lyytikainen-Saarenmaa, Paivi; Krooks, Anssi; Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2010-12-01

    Forests are of high importance for the Finnish economy and environment. Forests inventories should not only provide information about the volume of growing stock, but also about the health status of forests, which is an indicator of the annual growth of forests and Carbon balance. One of the forest damage types is defoliation, which causes forest growth reduction and consequently potentially economical losses to the forest owners, but can be seen as an environmental indicator also. For example, in the past ten years, extensive and persistent needle defoliation caused by insects has been observed in the areas of Palokangas and Outokumpu in Eastern Finland. It is expected that the insect outbreaks are becoming more common and new species of insects may be spreading out in Finland due to the climate warming. Traditionally the intensity of needle defoliation has been estimated using visual observations, which are prone to errors and their areal extent is limited. Therefore, remote sensing can be seen as a potential tool for mapping defoliation. In this study, both Terrestrial Laser Scanning data and SAR satellite images have been exploited. On the one hand, Terrestrial Laser Scanning provides means to rapidly and objectively measure critical forest related information. On the other hand, SAR satellite images enable wide-area mapping and constant monitoring, which would be impossible in Finland using optical satellite images due to the cloudiness. The fusion of Laser scanning and SAR information could make a difference in forest health mapping. In this paper, preliminary results of the estimation of the needle defoliation intensity based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning and ERS and Envisat SAR (non-interferometric) satellite data are presented.

  2. Scintillation statistics caused by atmospheric turbulence and speckle in satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Iyer, R. S.; Taylor, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    We study the statistics of scintillation at the ground-based receiver for the earth-space-earth retroreflector configuration of satellite laser ranging. These statistics are governed by the joint effects of atmospheric turbulence and speckle produced by the retroreflector array. An expression for the probability density function of scintillation is obtained and evaluated numerically. Comparison of the normalized variance of scintillation calculated by using this function shows good agreement with results obtained by other methods.

  3. Proposed satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry sites for crustal dynamics investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D.; Allenby, R. J.; Frey, H. V.

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations are presented for a global network of 125 sites for geodetic measurements by satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry. The sites were proposed on the basis of existing facilities and scientific value for investigation of crustal dynamics as related to earthquake hazards. Tectonic problems are discussed for North America peripheral regions and for the world. The sites are presented in tables and maps, with bibliographic references.

  4. New progress of ranging technology at Wuhan Satellite Laser Ranging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Zhiz-Hong; Ye, Wen-Wei; Cai, Qing-Fu

    1993-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging system with an accuracy of the level of centimeter has been successfully developed at the Institute of Seismology, State Seismological Bureau with the cooperation of the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Science. With significant improvements on the base of the second generation SLR system developed in 1985, ranging accuracy of the new system has been upgraded from 15 cm to 3-4 cm. Measuring range has also been expanded, so that the ETALON satellite with an orbit height of 20,000 km launched by the former U.S.S.R. can now be tracked. Compared with the 2nd generation SLR system, the newly developed system has the following improvements. A Q modulated laser is replaced by a mode-locked YAG laser. The new device has a pulse width of 150 ps and a repetition rate of 1-4 pps. A quick response photomultiplier has been adopted as the receiver for echo; for example, the adoption of the MCP tube has obviously reduced the jitter error of the transit time and has improved the ranging accuracy. The whole system is controlled by an IBM PC/XT Computer to guide automatic tracking and measurement. It can carry out these functions for satellite orbit calculation, real-time tracking and adjusting, data acquisition and the preprocessed of observing data, etc. The automatization level and reliability of the observation have obviously improved.

  5. State-of-the-art satellite laser range modeling for geodetic and oceanographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klosko, Steve M.; Smith, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in the modeling and accuracy of Satellite Laser Range (SLR) data since the launch of LAGEOS in 1976. Some of these include: improved models of the static geopotential, solid-Earth and ocean tides, more advanced atmospheric drag models, and the adoption of the J2000 reference system with improved nutation and precession. Site positioning using SLR systems currently yield approximately 2 cm static and 5 mm/y kinematic descriptions of the geocentric location of these sites. Incorporation of a large set of observations from advanced Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking systems have directly made major contributions to the gravitational fields and in advancing the state-of-the-art in precision orbit determination. SLR is the baseline tracking system for the altimeter bearing TOPEX/Poseidon and ERS-1 satellites and thus, will play an important role in providing the Conventional Terrestrial Reference Frame for instantaneously locating the geocentric position of the ocean surface over time, in providing an unchanging range standard for altimeter range calibration, and for improving the geoid models to separate gravitational from ocean circulation signals seen in the sea surface. Nevertheless, despite the unprecedented improvements in the accuracy of the models used to support orbit reduction of laser observations, there still remain systematic unmodeled effects which limit the full exploitation of modern SLR data.

  6. Daily Earth orientation parameters from satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E.

    2003-04-01

    The JCET/GSFC Associate Analysis Center for the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) participated over the past year in a Pilot Project of the ILRS Analysis Working Group. The goal of the Pilot Project is the optimal combination of laser ranging data from ETALON 1 and 2 with the nominal data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2, which ILRS normally uses in our series of Earth Orientation Parameters EOP, submitted to the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). We present here the new re-analysis of the expanded data set for the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and its crust-fixed orientation. This latest analysis of the SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 with the addition of the data from ETALON 1 and 2, examines the possibility of improving the results for the TRF and EOP, with only a small increase in the processing effort. This work is being done in the framework of the ILRS Pilot Project for, amongst other things, the precise estimation of the EOP from SLR data in a routine fashion. Along with the Earth orientation and the static parameters of the TRF we determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the instantaneous center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). The data from the two newly included targets, ETALON 1 and 2, come from an enhanced data set which is the result of a dedicated tracking campaign by the ILRS network of stations, initiated at the request of the ILRS Analysis Working Group on April 1, 2001 and currently in progress. Due to the different orbital geometry and tracking pattern of the two “constellations” (LAGEOS vs. ETALON), it was required to carefully evaluate the relative weight between the two data sets in order to optimally combine them. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard’s GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting in a final RMS error of about 8 mm. We will discuss our weighting scheme, vis-à-vis our solution for the EOP and geocenter, compare them to our previous solutions based

  7. The geodetic-geophysical flight mission GEOHALO to acquire measurements of the gravity and magnetic fields, of GNSS remote sensing and of laser altimetry over the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinert, Mirko

    2013-04-01

    The new German research aircraft HALO was equiped with an ensemble of geodetic-geophysical instrumentation to carry out geoscientific research in the tectonically active region of the Mediterranean and to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this instrumentation. This so-called GEOHALO flight mission could finally be realized in the time period from June 2 to 12, 2012. The mission flights took place taking off and landing at the special airfield Oberpfaffenhofen (near Munich, Germany), close to the premises of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The flights were conducted over Italy and the adjacent seas, comprising seven parallel profiles directing from north-west to south-east, in a height of about 3,500 m, with a length of about 1,000 km each and a line spacing of about 40 km. These long profiles were complemented by four crossing profiles and a profile at an altitude of approx. 10 km along the same track as the center long profile. We will give an overview on the challenges to integrate the scientific instrumentation aboard the aircraft, which comprised two airborne spring-type gravity meters, scalar and vector magnetometers, GNSS zenith, sideward and nadir antennas, and a laser altimeter. We discuss the performance of this instrumentation and present preliminary results to accomplish measurements of the gravity and magnetic fields, of GNSS reflectometry, scatterometry and occultation, and of laser altimeter distances over the ocean. The gathered data shall finally be used to investigate the lithospheric structure in the working area, which is characterized by a puzzle of tectonic microplates, yielding to an increased georisk of earthquakes and volcanism. Altogether, GEOHALO is the first geoscientific mission utilizing HALO. Its success was possible only by the joint efforts of the group of German, Swiss and Spanish universities and research institutions, Italian authorities and institutions as well as by the financial and logistic support of the

  8. Daily Earth Orientation Parameters From Satellite Laser Ranging to the LAGEOS and ETALON Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2002-05-01

    The JCET/GSFC Associate Analysis Center for the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) participated over the past year in a Pilot Project of the ILRS Analysis Working Group. The goal of the Pilot Project is the optimal combination of laser ranging data from ETALON 1 and 2 with the nominal data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2, which ILRS normally uses in our series of Earth Orientation Parameters -EOP, submitted to the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS). We present here our analysis of the expanded data set for the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and its crust-fixed orientation. The TRF plays an important role in the multi-technique monitoring of temporal variations in the gravitational field and its very low degree and order components, as well as changes in the inertia tensor as a result of angular momentum exchanges in the Earth system. This latest analysis of the SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 with the addition of the data from ETALON 1 and 2, examines the possibility of improving the results for the TRF, with only a small increase in the processing effort. This work is being done in the framework of the ILRS Pilot Project for, amongst other things, the precise estimation of the EOP from SLR data in a routine fashion. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the instantaneous center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). The data from the two newly included targets, ETALON 1 and 2, come from an enhanced data set which is the result of a dedicated tracking campaign by the ILRS network of stations, initiated at the request of the ILRS Analysis Working Group on April 1, 2001 and currently in progress. Due to the different orbital geometry and tracking pattern of the two "constellations" (LAGEOS vs. ETALON), it was required to carefully evaluate the relative weight between the two data sets in order to optimally combine them. The data were reduced using

  9. Coherent detection of position errors in inter-satellite laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Liu, Liren; Liu, De'an; Sun, Jianfeng; Luan, Zhu

    2007-09-01

    Due to the improved receiver sensitivity and wavelength selectivity, coherent detection became an attractive alternative to direct detection in inter-satellite laser communications. A novel method to coherent detection of position errors information is proposed. Coherent communication system generally consists of receive telescope, local oscillator, optical hybrid, photoelectric detector and optical phase lock loop (OPLL). Based on the system composing, this method adds CCD and computer as position error detector. CCD captures interference pattern while detection of transmission data from the transmitter laser. After processed and analyzed by computer, target position information is obtained from characteristic parameter of the interference pattern. The position errors as the control signal of PAT subsystem drive the receiver telescope to keep tracking to the target. Theoretical deviation and analysis is presented. The application extends to coherent laser rang finder, in which object distance and position information can be obtained simultaneously.

  10. Analytical study of pulsed laser irradiation on some materials used for photovoltaic cells on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hameed, Afaf M.

    2015-12-01

    The present research concerns on the study of laser-powered solar panels used for space applications. A mathematical model representing the laser effects on semiconductors has been developed. The temperature behavior and heat flow on the surface and through a slab has been studied after exposed to nano-second pulsed laser. The model is applied on two different types of common active semiconductor materials that used for photovoltaic cells fabrication as silicon (Si), and gallium arsenide (GaAs). These materials are used for receivers' manufacture for laser beamed power in space. Various values of time are estimated to clarify the heat flow through the material sample and generated under the effects of pulsed laser irradiation. These effects are theoretically studied in order to determine the performance limits of the solar cells when they are powered by laser radiation during the satellite eclipse. Moreover, the obtained results are carried out to optimize conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells and may be helpful to give more explanation for layout of the light-electricity space systems.

  11. Design and Development of High-Repetition-Rate Satellite Laser Ranging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Bang, Seong-Cheol; Sung, Ki-Pyoung; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Jung, Chan-Gyu; Kim, In-Yeung; Choi, Jae-Seung

    2015-09-01

    The Accurate Ranging System for Geodetic Observation ? Mobile (ARGO-M) was successfully developed as the first Korean mobile Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system in 2012, and has joined in the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) tracking network, DAEdeoK (DAEK) station. The DAEK SLR station was approved as a validated station in April 2014, through the ILRS station ¡°data validation¡± process. The ARGO-M system is designed to enable 2 kHz laser ranging with millimeter-level precision for geodetic, remote sensing, navigation, and experimental satellites equipped with Laser Retroreflector Arrays (LRAs). In this paper, we present the design and development of a next generation high-repetition-rate SLR system for ARGO-M. The laser ranging rate up to 10 kHz is becoming an important issue in the SLR community to improve ranging precision. To implement high-repetition-rate SLR system, the High-repetition-rate SLR operation system (HSLR-10) was designed and developed using ARGO-M Range Gate Generator (A-RGG), so as to enable laser ranging from 50 Hz to 10 kHz. HSLR-10 includes both hardware controlling software and data post-processing software. This paper shows the design and development of key technologies of high-repetition-rate SLR system. The developed system was tested successfully at DAEK station and then moved to Sejong station, a new Korean SLR station, on July 1, 2015. HSLR-10 will begin normal operations at Sejong station in the near future.

  12. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  13. Packet error rate analysis of OOK, DPIM, and PPM modulation schemes for ground-to-satellite laser uplink communications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yijun; Tao, Kunyu; Song, Yiwei; Fu, Sen

    2014-03-01

    Performance of on-off keying (OOK), digital pulse interval modulation (DPIM), and pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes are researched for ground-to-satellite laser uplink communications. Packet error rates of these modulation systems are compared, with consideration of the combined effect of intensity fluctuation and beam wander. Based on the numerical results, performances of different modulation systems are discussed. Optimum divergence angle and transmitted beam radius of different modulation systems are indicated and the relations of the transmitted laser power to them are analyzed. This work can be helpful for modulation scheme selection and system design in ground-to-satellite laser uplink communications.

  14. Satellite laser ranging using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at 1064  nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Zhulian; Zhang, Labao; Zhai, Dongsheng; Li, Yuqiang; Zhang, Sen; Li, Ming; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng; Xiong, Yaoheng

    2016-08-15

    Satellite laser ranging operating at 1064 nm wavelength using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) is successfully demonstrated. A SNSPD with an intrinsic quantum efficiency of 80% and a dark count rate of 100 cps at 1064 nm wavelength is developed and introduced to Yunnan Observatory in China. With improved closed-loop telescope systems (field of view of about 26''), satellites including Cryosat, Ajisai, and Glonass with ranges of 1600 km, 3100 km, and 19,500 km, respectively, are experimentally ranged with mean echo rates of 1200/min, 4200/min, and 320/min, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of laser ranging for satellites using SNSPDs at 1064 nm wavelength. Theoretical analysis of the detection efficiency and the mean echo rate for typical satellites indicate that it is possible for a SNSPD to range satellites from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit. PMID:27519105

  15. Temporal variations of the earth's gravitational field from satellite laser ranging to LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Au, A. Y.; Chan, J. C.; Klosko, S. M.; Pavlis, N. K.; Williamson, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Monthly values of the J2 and J3 earth gravitational coefficients were estimated using LAGEOS satellite laser ranging data collected between 1980 and 1989. Monthly variations in gravitational coefficients caused by atmospheric mass redistribution were calculated using measurements of variations in surface atmospheric pressure. Results for correlation studies of the two time series are presented. The LAGEOS and atmospheric J2 time series agree well and it appears that variations in J2 can be attributed to the redistribution of atmospheric mass. Atmospheric and LAGEOS estimates for J3 show poorer agreement, J3 estimates appear to be very sensitive to unmodeled forces acting on the satellite. Results indicate that the LAGEOS data can be used to detect small variations in the gravitational field.

  16. A Fuzzy Logic Study of Weighting Scheme for Satellite-Laser-Ranging Global Tracking Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VIGO, I. M.; SOTO, J.; FLORES, A.; FERRANDIZ, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    In satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data processing, oftentimes the weighting scheme of station observations is subjective or even quasi-arbitrary, and a somewhat arbitrary cutoff of say, 1m is applied prior to the data processing. This practice leaves something to be decided in terms of making optimal use of the available data. We intend to improve the situation by applying fuzzy-logic techniques in the editing and weighting of the data in an objective way. Many authors (e.g., Katja Heine (2001) and others in the Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Robust Statistics and Fuzzy Techniques in Geodesy an GIS ) have demonstrated the potential utility of the fuzzy logic methods in geodetic problems. The aim of this work is to test a fuzzy logic method as a tool to provide a reliable criteria for weighting scheme for satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) station observations, seeking to optimize their contribution to the precise orbit determination (POD) problem. The data regarding the stations were provided by the International Laser Ranging Service, NASA/CDDIS provided the satellite data for testing the method. The software for processing the data is GEODYN II provided by NASA/GSFC. Factors to be considered in the fuzzy-logic clustering are: the total number of LAGEOS passes during the past 12 months, the stability measure of short and long term biases, the percentage of LAGEOS normal points that were accepted in CSR weekly LAGEOS analysis, and the RMS uncertainty of the station coordinates. Fuzzy logic statistical method allows classifying the stations through a clear membership degree to each station group. This membership degree translates into a suitable weight to be assigned to observations from each station in the global solution. The first tests carried out show improvements in the RMS of the global POD solution as well as individual stations, to within a few millimeters. We expect further work would lead to further improvements.

  17. Laser-based satellite communication systems stabilized by non-mechanical electro-optic scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Gann, Derek; Luey, Benjamin; Gamble, Joseph D.; Anderson, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Laser communications systems provide numerous advantages for establishing satellite-to-ground data links. As a carrier for information, lasers are characterized by high bandwidth and directionality, allowing for fast and secure transfer of data. These systems are also highly resistant to RF influences since they operate in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, far from radio bands. In this paper we will discuss an entirely non-mechanical electro-optic (EO) laser beam steering technology, with no moving parts, which we have used to form robust 400 Mbps optical data connections through air. This technology will enable low cost, compact, and rugged free space optical (FSO) communication modules for small satellite applications. The EO beam-steerer at the heart of this system is used to maintain beam pointing as the satellite orbits. It is characterized by extremely low values for size, weight and power consumption (SWaP) - approximately 300 cm3, 300 g, and 5 W respectively, which represents a marked improvement compared to heavy, and power-consuming gimbal mechanisms. It is capable of steering a 500 mW, 1 mm short wave infrared (SWIR) beam over a field of view (FOV) of up to 50° x 15°, a range which can be increased by adding polarization gratings, which provide a coarse adjust stage at the EO beam scanner output. We have integrated this device into a communication system and demonstrated the capability to lock on and transmit a high quality data stream by modulation of SWIR power.

  18. Effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging to satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. All the formulas assume the atmospheric refractivity profile is spherically symmetric. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles are constructed from radiosonde data. The results indicate that the horizontal gradients introduce an rms error of approximately 3 cm when the satellite is near 10 deg elevation. The error decreases to a few millimeters near zenith.

  19. Orbital analysis of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II laser ranged satellites: relativistic effects and geophysical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Peron, Roberto

    2005-03-16

    We present here the results of a recent analysis of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II laser range data. The higher accuracy in determining the orbits of these satellites makes it possible to see very tiny relativistic effects like frame-dragging and a wide variety of other phenomena at work. In particular, it is apparent the need of better understanding some effects of non-gravitational origin. The importance of these orbital fits as a geophysical probe is also stressed with a particular example. The analysis is carried out with GEODYN II Software, whose broad structure and use is described.

  20. Orbital analysis of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II laser ranged satellites: relativistic effects and geophysical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto

    2005-03-01

    We present here the results of a recent analysis of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II laser range data. The higher accuracy in determining the orbits of these satellites makes it possible to see very tiny relativistic effects like frame-dragging and a wide variety of other phenomena at work. In particular, it is apparent the need of better understanding some effects of non-gravitational origin. The importance of these orbital fits as a geophysical probe is also stressed with a particular example. The analysis is carried out with GEODYN II Software, whose broad structure and use is described.

  1. Quick topological method for acquiring the beacon in inter-satellite laser communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-11-20

    Background starlight can lead to some spot noise in the image collected by a CCD, disturbing the beacon acquisition in inter-satellite laser communications. Removing the spot noise takes much time by using the existing method that is based on the reference star calendar table. We present a novel method to reduce the processing time in this paper. The key point is to use the topological characteristic of the spot noise in the graph that is obtained through threshold segmentation to the image on the CCD. The method helps to improve the acquisition probability and to save valuable onboard computing resources. PMID:25607859

  2. Quick topological method for acquiring the beacon in inter-satellite laser communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-11-20

    Background starlight can lead to some spot noise in the image collected by a CCD, disturbing the beacon acquisition in inter-satellite laser communications. Removing the spot noise takes much time by using the existing method that is based on the reference star calendar table. We present a novel method to reduce the processing time in this paper. The key point is to use the topological characteristic of the spot noise in the graph that is obtained through threshold segmentation to the image on the CCD. The method helps to improve the acquisition probability and to save valuable onboard computing resources.

  3. Orthogonal phase modulation with self homodyne detect laser communication method for the satellite-to-ground link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Hou, Peipei; Ma, Xiaoping; Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    Signal laser propagation will pass through the random atmosphere turbulence channel in satellite-to-ground laser communication application. The turbulence will cause the wavefront distortion in the receiver telescope front. For direct detection laser communication system, atmospheric turbulence can affect the coupling efficiency from space laser to the detector. For coherent detection laser communication system, Atmosphere turbulence not only affects the coupling efficiency, but also can seriously reduce the heterodyne detection efficiency. Coherent detection communication receiver must use small aperture telescopes or large aperture telescope with adaptive wavefront compensation system. To mitigate the influence of the atmosphere turbulence, we proposed a new method base orthogonal phase modulation with self homodyne detect. This method can not only mitigate the influence of the turbulence, but also adjust the communication date rate steplessly. The experiment results show that the method is very suitable to the satellite-to-ground link.

  4. Antarctic ice shelf thickness from CryoSat-2 radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuter, Stephen; Bamber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The Antarctic ice shelves provide buttressing to the inland grounded ice sheet, and therefore play a controlling role in regulating ice dynamics and mass imbalance. Accurate knowledge of ice shelf thickness is essential for input-output method mass balance calculations, sub-ice shelf ocean models and buttressing parameterisations in ice sheet models. Ice shelf thickness has previously been inferred from satellite altimetry elevation measurements using the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, as direct measurements of ice thickness do not provide the spatial coverage necessary for these applications. The sensor limitations of previous radar altimeters have led to poor data coverage and a lack of accuracy, particularly the grounding zone where a break in slope exists. We present a new ice shelf thickness dataset using four years (2011-2014) of CryoSat-2 elevation measurements, with its SARIn dual antennae mode of operation alleviating the issues affecting previous sensors. These improvements and the dense across track spacing of the satellite has resulted in ˜92% coverage of the ice shelves, with substantial improvements, for example, of over 50% across the Venable and Totten Ice Shelves in comparison to the previous dataset. Significant improvements in coverage and accuracy are also seen south of 81.5° for the Ross and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelves. Validation of the surface elevation measurements, used to derive ice thickness, against NASA ICESat laser altimetry data shows a mean bias of less than 1 m (equivalent to less than 9 m in ice thickness) and a fourfold decrease in standard deviation in comparison to the previous continental dataset. Importantly, the most substantial improvements are found in the grounding zone. Validation of the derived thickness data has been carried out using multiple Radio Echo Sounding (RES) campaigns across the continent. Over the Amery ice shelf, where extensive RES measurements exist, the mean difference between the datasets is 3

  5. Antarctic ice shelf thickness from CryoSat-2 radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuter, Stephen; Bamber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The Antarctic ice shelves provide buttressing to the inland grounded ice sheet, and therefore play a controlling role in regulating ice dynamics and mass imbalance. Accurate knowledge of ice shelf thickness is essential for input-output method mass balance calculations, sub-ice shelf ocean models and buttressing parameterisations in ice sheet models. Ice shelf thickness has previously been inferred from satellite altimetry elevation measurements using the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, as direct measurements of ice thickness do not provide the spatial coverage necessary for these applications. The sensor limitations of previous radar altimeters have led to poor data coverage and a lack of accuracy, particularly the grounding zone where a break in slope exists. We present a new ice shelf thickness dataset using four years (2011-2014) of CryoSat-2 elevation measurements, with its SARIn dual antennae mode of operation alleviating the issues affecting previous sensors. These improvements and the dense across track spacing of the satellite has resulted in ˜92% coverage of the ice shelves, with substantial improvements, for example, of over 50% across the Venable and Totten Ice Shelves in comparison to the previous dataset. Significant improvements in coverage and accuracy are also seen south of 81.5° for the Ross and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelves. Validation of the surface elevation measurements, used to derive ice thickness, against NASA ICESat laser altimetry data shows a mean bias of less than 1 m (equivalent to less than 9 m in ice thickness) and a fourfold decrease in standard deviation in comparison to the previous continental dataset. Importantly, the most substantial improvements are found in the grounding zone. Validation of the derived thickness data has been carried out using multiple Radio Echo Sounding (RES) campaigns across the continent. Over the Amery ice shelf, where extensive RES measurements exist, the mean difference between the datasets is 3

  6. Precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.; Ries, John C.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1994-11-01

    The ability to determine accurate global sea level variations is important to both detection and understanding of changes in climate patterns. Sea level variability occurs over a wide spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, and precise global measurements are only recently possible with the advent of spaceborne satellite radar altimetry missions. One of the inherent requirements for accurate determination of absolute sea surface topography is that the altimetric satellite orbits be computed with sub-decimeter accuracy within a well defined terrestrial reference frame. SLR tracking in support of precision orbit determination of altimetric satellites is significant. Recent examples are the use of SLR as the primary tracking systems for TOPEX/Poseidon and for ERS-1 precision orbit determination. The current radial orbit accuracy for TOPEX/Poseidon is estimated to be around 3-4 cm, with geographically correlated orbit errors around 2 cm. The significance of the SLR tracking system is its ability to allow altimetric satellites to obtain absolute sea level measurements and thereby provide a link to other altimetry measurement systems for long-term sea level studies. SLR tracking allows the production of precise orbits which are well centered in an accurate terrestrial reference frame. With proper calibration of the radar altimeter, these precise orbits, along with the altimeter measurements, provide long term absolute sea level measurements. The U.S. Navy's Geosat mission is equipped with only Doppler beacons and lacks laser retroreflectors. However, its orbits, and even the Geosat orbits computed using the available full 40-station Tranet tracking network, yield orbits with significant north-south shifts with respect to the IERS terrestrial reference frame. The resulting Geosat sea surface topography will be tilted accordingly, making interpretation of long-term sea level variability studies difficult.

  7. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox and Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Niejmeier, Sander; Bronner, Emilie; Benveniste, Jérôme

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the next mission to be launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. About 900 people downloaded it (January 2009), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: • to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, Jason-2, and the furure CryoSat and Saral missions, • to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, • and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: • as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL • as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode • as an educational and a quick-look tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documen-tation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. Version 2 has been released in April 2009, including, among other improvements, a Mac OS X version, RiverLake data reading capability, full waveform processing and plotting, new plotting capabilities, export in GeoTiff, including a Google Earth export feature, easier export in Ascii, a rethinking of the Graphical

  8. Time Transfer by Laser Link - the T2L2 Experiment on JASON-2 and Further Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samain, Étienne; Weick, Jonathan; Vrancken, Patrick; Para, Franck; Albanese, Dominique; Paris, Jocelyn; Torre, Jean-Marie; Zhao, Cheng; Guillemot, Philippe; Petitbon, Isabelle

    The new generation of optical time transfer will allow the synchronization of remote ultra stable clocks and the determination of their performances over intercontinental distances. The principle of T2L2 (Time Transfer by Laser Link) is based on the techniques of satellite laser ranging coupled with time-frequency metrology. It consists of synchronizing ground and space clocks using short laser pulses travelling between ground clocks and satellite equipment. The instrument will be integrated on the ocean altimetry satellite Jason-2 that is scheduled for launch in 2008. The experiment should enhance the performance of time transfer by one or two magnitudes compared to existing microwave techniques such as GPS and Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT).

  9. Determination of station positions and velocities from laser ranging observations to Ajisai, Starlette and Stella satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, P.; Schillak, S.

    2011-02-01

    The positions and velocities of the four Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) stations: Yarragadee (7090), Greenbelt (7105), Graz (7839) and Herstmonceux (7840) from 5-year (2001-2005) SLR data of low orbiting satellites (LEO): Ajisai, Starlette and Stella were determined. The orbits of these satellites were computed from the data provided by 20 SLR stations. All orbital computations were performed by means of NASA Goddard’s GEODYN-II program. The geocentric coordinates were transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West and Vertical components in reference to ITRF2005. The influence of the number of normal points per orbital arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on the quality of station coordinates was studied. To get standard deviation of the coordinates determination lower than 1 cm, the number of the normal points per site had to be greater than 50. The computed positions and velocities were compared to those derived from LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 data. Three parameters were used for this comparison: station coordinates stability, differences from ITRF2005 positions and velocities. The stability of coordinates of LEO satellites is significantly worse (17.8 mm) than those of LAGEOS (7.6 mm), the better results are for Ajisai (15.4 mm) than for Starlette/Stella (20.4 mm). The difference in positions between the computed values and ITRF2005 were little bit worse for Starlette/Stella (6.6 mm) than for LAGEOS (4.6 mm), the results for Ajisai were five times worse (29.7 mm) probably due to center of mass correction of this satellite. The station velocities with some exceptions were on the same level (≈1 mm/year) for all satellites. The results presented in this work show that results from Starlette/Stella are better than those from Ajisai for station coordinates determination. We can applied the data from LEO satellites, especially Starlette and Stella for determination of the SLR station coordinates but with two times lower accuracy than when using LAGEOS

  10. Horizontal crustal motion in the central and eastern Mediterranean inferred from Satellite Laser Ranging measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Robbins, J.W.; Dunn, P.J.; Torrence, M.H. |

    1994-09-01

    Four campaigns to acquire Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements at sites in the Mediterranean region have been completed. These measurements to the LAGEOS satellite, made largely by mobile systems, cover a time span beginning in November 1985 and ending in June 1993. The range data from 18 sites in the central and eastern Mediterranean have been simultaneously analyzed with data acquired by the remainder of the global laser tracking network. Estimates of horizontal motion were placed into a regional, northern Europe-fixed, kinematic reference frame. Uncertainties are on the order of 5 mm/yr for sites having at least four occupations by mobile systems and approach 1 mm/yr for permanently located sites with long histories of tracking. The resulting relative motion between sites in the Aegean exhibit characteristics of broadly distributed pattern of radial extension, but at rates that are about 50% larger than those implied from studies of seismic strain rates based on seismicity of magnitude 6 or greater or across the region. The motion estimated for sites in Turkey exhibit velocity components associated with the westward motion of the Anatolian Block relative to Eurasia. These results provide a present-day `snapshot` of ongoing deformational processes as experienced by the locations occupied by SLR systems.

  11. Compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Danny J; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X; Lindauer, Steven J; Afzal, Robert S; Yu, Anthony W

    2005-03-20

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter, an instrument on the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4% efficiency with a near-diffraction-limited beam. It passed all space-flight environmental tests at subsystem, instrument, and satellite integration testing and successfully completes a postlaunch aliveness check en route to Mercury. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically the Ice Cloud and Elevation Satellite and the Mars Global Surveyor, but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury. PMID:15813276

  12. Short note: Crustal deformation in the key stone network detected by satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillak, S.; Wnuk, E.; Kunimori, H.; Yoshino, T.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents the results of crustal deformation, as evidenced by changed station coordinates, in the Tokyo metropolitan area detected by the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique. The coordinates of two Key Stone SLR stations, Tateyama and Kashima, were determined from 4 weeks of orbital arcs of the LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites with respect to 16 SLR stations kept fixed in the ITRF2000 reference frame. The station coordinates were calculated using the NASA GEODYN-II orbital program. The orbital RMS-of-fit for both satellites was 16 mm. The standard deviation of the estimated positions was 3 mm. A jump of about 5 cm in the baseline length between the Kashima and Tateyama stations was detected in June August 2000 by VLBI and GPS techniques. This work confirms this crustal deformation as determined by SLR and vice versa. Analysis of coordinates of these stations shows that this effect was caused by a 4.5-cm displacement of the Tateyama station in the north-east direction. The change in the vertical component was not significant.

  13. SLR2000: a microlaser-based single photoelectron satellite laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; McGarry, Jan F.

    1998-01-01

    SLR2000 is an autonomous and eyesafe satellite laser ranging (SLR) station with an expected single shot range precision of about one centimeter and a normal point (time-averaged) precision better than 3 mm. The system wil provide continuous 24 hour tracking coverage for a constellation of over twenty artificial satellites. Replication costs are expected to be roughly an order of magnitude less than current operational systems, and the system will be about 75% less expensive to operate and maintain relative to manned systems. Computer simulations have predicted a daylight tracking capability to GPS and lower satellites with telescope apertures of 40 cm and have demonstrated the ability of our current autotracking algorithm to extract mean signal strengths below .001 photoelectrons per pulse from daytime background noise. The dominant cost driver in present SLR systems is the onsite and central infrastructure manpower required to operate the system, to service and maintain the complex subsystems, and to ensure that the transmitted laser beam is not a hazard to onsite personnel or to overflying aircraft. To keep development, fabrication, and maintenance costs at a minimum, we adopted the following design philosophies: (1) use off the shelf commercial components wherever possible; this allows rapid component replacement and "outsourcing" of engineering support; (2) use smaller telescopes (less than 50 cm) since this constrains the cost, size, and weight of the telescope and tracking mount; and (3) for low maintenance and failsafe reliability, choose simple versus complex technical approaches and, where possible, use passive techniques and components rather than active ones. Adherence to these philosophies has led to the SLR2000 design described here.

  14. Comparison of Arabian plate motion using satellite laser ranging and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A. O.; Fernandes, R. M.; Schillak, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Two different space based observations have been used to estimate the velocity of the Arabian plate motion. The first set of observations is using the Saudi Arabia Laser Ranging Observatory (SALRO - 7832), which is situated in the middle of Arabian tectonic plate. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) observations of about 20 global SLR stations to LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites collected for 14 years (1996-2009) have been used to determine Riyadh SLR station positions. The NASA Godard's GEODYN-II orbital software has been used to perform orbit determination of these two satellites. The velocities of SALRO were computed in reference to the ITRF2008 terrestrial reference frame. The second set of observations consists of Global Positioning System (GPS) observations of 15 GPS stations acquired in campaign and continuous mode for the period 2003 to 2009 (having at least 3 years' data span). Multi-year processing of stations having at least 3 years' time span and excluding stations within the deformation zone of Red Sea Ridge, such that they are distributed evenly within the rigid (interior) part of the Arabian plate. The Bernese 5.0/ADNEQ2 and GIPSY/OASIS 6.1 software packages were used to compute the daily solutions of coordinate time series applying the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) strategy. The velocities were estimated with respect to ITRF2008 and four estimates of the angular velocities for the Arabian plate have been computed using different datasets: independent Bernese and GIPSY solutions, combination of the GPS solutions only, and including the SLR solution. We present direct comparison between all different solutions showing that the Arabian tectonic plate motion determined from Riyadh SLR data and GPS data are in a good agreement with recent estimates, in particular with the global geodetic model GEODVEL and the geophysical MORVEL model.

  15. Societal Benefits of Ocean Altimetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasen, Margaret; Leben, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/CNES Jason satellite, follow-on to the highly successful TOPEX/Poseidon mission, continues to provide oceanographers and marine operators across the globe with a continuous twelve-year, high quality stream of sea surface height data. The mission is expected to extend through 2007, when the NASA/NOAA/CNES follow-on mission, OSTM, will be launched with the wide-swath ocean altimeter on board. This unprecedented resource of valuable ocean data is being used to map sea surface height, geostrophic velocity, significant wave height, and wind speed over the global oceans. Altimeter data products are currently used by hundreds of researchers and operational users to monitor ocean circulation and improve our understanding of the role of the oceans in climate and weather. Ocean altimeter data has many societal benefits and has proven invaluable in many practical applications including; a) Ocean forecasting systems; b) Climate research and forecasting; c) Ship routing; d) Fisheries management; e) Marine mammal habitat monitoring; f) Hurricane forecasting and tracking; g) Debris tracking; and h) Precision marine operations such as cable-laying and oil production. The data has been cited in nearly 2,000 research and popular articles since the launch of TOPEX/Poseidon in 1992, and almost 200 scientific users receive the global coverage altimeter data on a monthly basis. In addition to the scientific and operational uses of the data, the educational community has seized the unique concepts highlighted by these altimeter missions as a resource for teaching ocean science to students from grade school through college. This presentation will highlight societal benefits of ocean altimetry data in the areas of climate studies, marine operations, marine research, and non-ocean investigations.

  16. Influence of beam wander on uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication and optimization for transmitter beam radius.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Bin; Ren, Yongxiong; Zhao, Sinan; Dang, Anhong

    2010-06-15

    We restudy the influence of beam wander on the uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication, using the effective pointing error method, for a collimated untracked Gaussian beam under a weak atmospheric turbulence condition. It shows that the beam wander may cause significant increase in bit error rate (BER), and there exists an optimal transmitter radius for minimizing the value of BER. Further studies manifest that this optimal radius only changes with the laser wavelength and zenith angle, while independent on the satellite altitude and the fade threshold at the receiver. These results can be used in system design and optimization for the transmitter.

  17. Influence of beam wander on bit-error rate in a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Jiang, Yijun; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Du, Wenhe

    2008-11-15

    Based on weak fluctuation theory and the beam-wander model, the bit-error rate of a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system is analyzed, in comparison with the condition in which beam wander is not taken into account. Considering the combined effect of scintillation and beam wander, optimum divergence angle and transmitter beam radius for a communication system are researched. Numerical results show that both of them increase with the increment of total link margin and transmitted wavelength. This work can benefit the ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  18. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox: Tools and Tutorial To Use Radar Altimetry For Cryosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J. J.; Bronner, E.; Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B. M.; Rosmorduc, V.; Earith, D.

    2010-12-01

    Radar altimetry is very much a technique expanding its applications. If quite a lot of efforts have been made for oceanography users (including easy-to-use data), the use of those data for cryosphere application, especially with the new ESA CryoSat-2 mission data is still somehow tedious, especially for new Altimetry data products users. ESA and CNES thus had the Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox developed a few years ago, and are improving and upgrading it to fit new missions and the growing number of altimetry uses. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data. The software is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and the future Saral missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. It is an opportunity to teach remote sensing with practical training. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. About 1200 people downloaded it (Summer 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them, including teachers

  19. Coastal and mesoscale dynamics characterization combining glider and altimetry: case study over the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerome, Bouffard; Pascual, Ananda; Ruiz, Simon; Isabelle Pujol, Marie; Faugere, Yannice; Larnicol, Gilles; Tintore, Joaquin

    Satellite altimetry allows a direct computation of geostrophic velocity anomalies. However, conventional altimetry measurements remain largely spurious in coastal zone, due to several factors such as inaccurate geophysical corrections (e.g. atmospheric and tidal signals) as well as environmental issues (land contamination in the altimetric and radiometric footprints). At the present time and in the attempt of future relevant technologies (cf. SWOT satellite), experimen-tal coastal altimeter products are under development (XTRACK, PISTACH, COASTALT. . . ). The main efforts consist in the application of coastal-oriented corrections and the review of the data recovery strategies near the coast. The new coastal altimetric products need to be assessed with independent data before to be used in synergy with other measurements and fully exploited for scientific applications. This is the frame of this study as part of an intensive observational program conducted in the Western Mediterranean Sea. We present here the main outcomes resulting from the combination of coastal altimetry and gliders. Gliders -autonomous underwater vehicles -allow to provide precise and high resolution data complementary to altimetry (temperature, salinity, pressure, velocity. . . ) both at surface and over the whole water column. Since July 2007, several glider missions have been performed along Jason-1, Jason-2 and ENVISAT altimeters. The altimetric sea level anomalies have been processed from both standard and coastal-oriented strategies. Furthermore, new methodologies have also been developed in order to combine surface glider geostrophic velocities (derived from CTD measurements) with integrated currents estimated by the glider (derived from GPS locations every 6 hours). These approaches prove to be very efficient to improve the budget errors and homogenize the physical contents of altimetry and glider data. Further, the combined analysis of the two datasets provides interesting insights of

  20. Outreaching a space technique through its climate applications: altimetry and COP21 meeting example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Bronner, Emilie; De Staerke, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    Climate, and Climate change, are among the main general public interests. Altimetry is one of the most important tools for monitoring ocean dynamics, and as such is a source of vital data for including in forecasting models of ocean-atmosphere coupled events such as El Niño, monsoons, the North Atlantic Oscillation or decadal oscillations. Seasonal climate forecasting is also showing interesting results. The oceans are in turn affected by climate variations, as the sea level rises and falls in response to their fluctuations. Two radar altimetry satellites will be launched in 2015, with a strong French contribution (Jason-3 is a CNES/EUMETSAT/NASA/NOAA mission, Sentinel-3 is an ESA mission, with support from French expertise for the altimeter and altimetry processing). On another plan, the United Nations Climate Change Conference 21st yearly session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) meeting will take place in Paris end of 2015 (30 November to 11 December 2015). Outreaching radar altimetry through its climate-related applications using both the conference and the launches is thus an evidence. However, how, what and when? We will detail the points we consider as focus for this outreach (e.g. sea level rise measurement, but also El Niño, monsoons, etc.), how to broach them in order to reach the general public interest, via web, journalists, teachers etc. In particular, the Argonautica educational project (http://www.cnes.fr/web/CNES-fr/7161-argonautica.php) will focus in 2015 on climate issue, in relation also with formal school curricula, other satellite data and animal tracking. Past experience will be detailed, from the Aviso altimetry data distribution center, but also from partners, and future plans.

  1. Radar altimetry assimilation in catchment-scale hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Gottwein, P.; Michailovsky, C. I. B.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite-borne radar altimeters provide time series of river and lake levels with global coverage and moderate temporal resolution. Current missions can detect rivers down to a minimum width of about 100m, depending on local conditions around the virtual station. Water level time series from space-borne radar altimeters are an important source of information in ungauged or poorly gauged basins. However, many water resources management applications require information on river discharge. Water levels can be converted into river discharge by means of a rating curve, if sufficient and accurate information on channel geometry, slope and roughness is available. Alternatively, altimetric river levels can be assimilated into catchment-scale hydrological models. The updated models can subsequently be used to produce improved discharge estimates. In this study, a Muskingum routing model for a river network is updated using multiple radar altimetry time series. The routing model is forced with runoff produced by lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff models in each subcatchment. Runoff is uncertain because of errors in the precipitation forcing, structural errors in the rainfall-runoff model as well as uncertain rainfall-runoff model parameters. Altimetric measurements are translated into river reach storage based on river geometry. The Muskingum routing model is forced with a runoff ensemble and storages in the river reaches are updated using a Kalman filter approach. The approach is applied to the Zambezi and Brahmaputra river basins. Assimilation of radar altimetry significantly improves the capability of the models to simulate river discharge.

  2. Mesoscale resolution capability of altimetry: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufau, Claire; Orsztynowicz, Marion; Dibarboure, Gérald; Morrow, Rosemary; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves

    2016-07-01

    Wavenumber spectra of along-track Sea Surface Height from the most recent satellite radar altimetry missions [Jason-2, Cryosat-2, and SARAL/Altika) are used to determine the size of ocean dynamical features observable with the present altimetry constellation. A global analysis of the along-track 1-D mesoscale resolution capability of the present-day altimeter missions is proposed, based on a joint analysis of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band and the error levels observed for horizontal wavelengths lower than 20km. The global sea level spectral slope distribution provided by Xu and Fu with Jason-1 data is revisited with more recent altimeter missions, and maps of altimeter error levels are provided and discussed for each mission. Seasonal variations of both spectral slopes and altimeter error levels are also analyzed for Jason-2. SARAL/Altika, with its lower error levels, is shown to detect smaller structures everywhere. All missions show substantial geographical and temporal variations in their mesoscale resolution capabilities, with variations depending mostly on the error level change but also on slight regional changes in the spectral slopes. In western boundary currents where the signal to noise ratio is favorable, the along-track mesoscale resolution is approximately 40 km for SARAL/AltiKa, 45 km for Cryosat-2, and 50 km for Jason-2. Finally, a prediction of the future 2-D mesoscale sea level resolution capability of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is given using a simulated error level.

  3. Reduction of Influences of the Earth's Surface Fluid Loads on GPS Site Coordinate Time Series and Global Satellite Laser Ranging Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, H.; Otsubo, T.; Fukuda, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Temporal change of surface loadings due to the mass redistribution of the fluid envelope of the Earth, deform the Earth and cause the coordinate changes of the observation sites. We estimated the crustal displacements due to the atmospheric load (AL), the non-tidal ocean load (NTOL), the continental water load (CWL) and the snow load (SL) influences using the several meteorological data and model. And then, we tried to eliminate the load influences from the GPS site coordinate time series and global Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) analysis. As the time series of GPS site coordinates, we employed a solution of IGS which was calculated by using GIPSY-OASIS II (Heflin et al., 2002) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the routine solution of GEONET called F2 solution which was calculated by Bernese version 4.2 software (Hatanaka et al., 2003) by the Geographical Survey Institute. To eliminate periodic signals of the loading effects, we calculated Corrected GPS = GPS - (Load1 + Load2 + . . . . . + Loadn). The results show that a combination of atmospheric, non-tidal ocean, continental water, and snow loads can eliminate about 20% of the annual signal in the coordinate time series for vertical components. We applied the loading correction to the data of the 1997 Bungo channel slow slip event and showed that the correction can benefit the analysis of such a non-periodic event. Next, we applied the time series of NTOL and CWL to precise SLR analysis that used the "concerto" program version 4 developed by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The LAGEOS orbit analysis reveals that the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) model makes the root mean square (RMS) of the range residual 0.2% smaller, and that the CWL makes it 0.8% smaller, compared with the case where loading displacement is neglected. On the other hand, with the NTOL derived from Topex/Poseidon altimetry data, the SLR orbit fit is not improved.

  4. Impact of Cloud and Blowing Snow on Ice Sheet Altimetry: a Comparison between ICESat and ICESat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Marshak, A.; Palm, S. P.; Varnai, T.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and blowing snow have long been a concern for lidar altimetry. Scattering inside the layer increases the photon path and makes the surface appear further away from the satellite. This effect is referred to as "atmospheric path delay". The ICESat and ICESat-2 missions' high accuracy requirement on the ice/snow surface elevation measurements makes understanding and quantifying this effect essential. We have developed a comprehensive framework that can simulate the analog waveform behavior of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard ICESat and the photon counting signal of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) onboard ICESat-2. In this presentation, we will (1) review the cloud and blowing snow distributions over the polar ice sheets; (2) discuss how different factors affect the value of the atmospheric path delay, such as scattering layer height, optical thickness, and lidar field of view (FOV); (3) demonstrate that the delay is much less for ICESat-2 (centimeter level) compared to ICESat (decimeter level) due to the much smaller lidar FOV; (4) show the cloud detectability difference between ICESat and ICESat-2 and its implication to path delay corrections. The effect of cloud and blowing snow on first photon bias will also be discussed.

  5. A Hybrid Fiber/Solid-State Regenerative Amplifier with Tunable Pulse Widths for Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Barry; Poulios, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    A fiber/solid-state hybrid seeded regenerative amplifier, capable of achieving high output energy with tunable pulse widths, has been developed for satellite laser ranging applications. The regenerative amplifier cavity uses a pair of Nd:YAG zigzag slabs oriented orthogonally to one another in order to make thermal lensing effects symmetrical and simplify optical correction schemes. The seed laser used is a fiber-coupled 1,064-nm narrowband (<0.02 nm) diode laser that is discretely driven in a new short-pulsed mode, enabling continuously tunable seed pulse widths in the 0.2-to-0.4-ns range. The amplifier gain unit consists of a pair of Brewster-cut 6-bounce zigzag Nd:YAG laser slabs, oriented 90deg relative to each other in the amplifier head. This arrangement creates a net-symmetrical thermal lens effect (an opposing singleaxis effect in each slab), and makes thermo-optical corrections simple by optimizing the curvature of the nearest cavity mirror. Each slab is pumped by a single 120-W, pulsed 808-nm laser diode array. In this configuration, the average pump beam distribution in the slabs had a 1-D Gaussian shape, which matches the estimated cavity mode size. A half-wave plate between the slabs reduces losses from Fresnel reflections due to the orthogonal slabs Brewster-cut end faces. Successful "temporal" seeding of the regenerative amplifier cavity results in a cavity Q-switch pulse envelope segmenting into shorter pulses, each having the width of the input seed, and having a uniform temporal separation corresponding to the cavity round-trip time of approx. =10 ns. The pulse energy is allowed to build on successive passes in the regenerative amplifier cavity until a maximum is reached, (when cavity gains and losses are equal), after which the pulse is electro- optically switched out on the next round trip The overall gain of the amplifier is approx. =82 dB (or a factor of 1.26 million). After directing the amplified output through a LBO frequency doubling

  6. Simultaneous Laser Ranging and Communication from an Earth-Based Satellite Laser Ranging Station to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Skillman, David R.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Neumann, Gregory A.; McIntire, Leva; Zellar, Ronald S.; Davidson, Frederic M.; Fong, Wai H.; Krainak, Michael A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

    2013-01-01

    We report a free space laser communication experiment from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit through the on board one-way Laser Ranging (LR) receiver. Pseudo random data and sample image files were transmitted to LRO using a 4096-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) signal format. Reed-Solomon forward error correction codes were used to achieve error free data transmission at a moderate coding overhead rate. The signal fading due to the atmosphere effect was measured and the coding gain could be estimated.

  7. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C.K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and ice sheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm/yr with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm/yr. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm/yr and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  8. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C K; Galloway, Devin L; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992-2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California's San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr(-1) with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr(-1). Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr(-1) and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm. PMID:27324935

  9. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C K; Galloway, Devin L; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-21

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992-2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California's San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr(-1) with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr(-1). Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr(-1) and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  10. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C. K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr‑1 with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr‑1. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr‑1 and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  11. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C. K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr−1 with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr−1. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr−1 and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm. PMID:27324935

  12. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  13. Dielectronic satellites of the He{sub {beta}} line of the Si XIII ion in a dense laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya; Bartnik, A; Kostecki, J; Fiedorowicz, H; Szczurek, M; Jarocki, R; Behar, E; Doron, R; Mandelbaum, P; Schwob, J L; Dyakin, V M

    1998-08-31

    The first precision measurements of the wavelengths and identifications were made of the satellites of the Heb line of the Si XIII ion in the emission spectrum of a laser plasma. These satellites were the result of radiation decay of the 1s3l{sub 1}2l{sub 2} levels of the Si XII ion. The wavelengths were determined more accurately for the 1s3l{sub 1}3l{sub 2} configurations. The experimental results obtained were compared with calculations carried out by various methods. The structure of the relative intensities of the 1s3l{sub 1}3l{sub 2} satellites indicated that their emission occurred mainly in a thin overdense plasma region with N{sub e}>N{sub e}{sup cr}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. In-orbit verification of small optical transponder (SOTA): evaluation of satellite-to-ground laser communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Hideki; Koyama, Yoshisada; Akioka, Maki; Kolev, Dimitar; Iwakiri, Naohiko; Kunimori, Hiroo; Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Munemasa, Yasushi; Okamoto, Eiji; Toyoshima, Morio

    2016-03-01

    Research and development of space optical communications is conducted in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The NICT developed the Small Optical TrAnsponder (SOTA), which was embarked on a 50kg-class satellite and launched into a low earth orbit (LEO). The space-to-ground laser communication experiments have been conducted with the SOTA. Atmospheric turbulence causes signal fadings and becomes an issue to be solved in satellite-to-ground laser communication links. Therefore, as error-correcting functions, a Reed-Solomon (RS) code and a Low-Density Generator Matrix (LDGM) code are implemented in the communication system onboard the SOTA. In this paper, we present the in-orbit verification results of SOTA including the characteristic of the functions, the communication performance with the LDGM code via satellite-to-ground atmospheric paths, and the link budget analysis and the comparison between theoretical and experimental results.

  15. Dual-channel laser scanning microscopy for the identification and quantification of proliferating skeletal muscle satellite cells following synergist ablation.

    PubMed Central

    Brotchie, D; Davies, I; Ireland, G; Mahon, M

    1995-01-01

    Proliferating skeletal muscle satellite cells are the source of additional myonuclei which allow skeletal muscle to grow and regenerate. Previously, proliferating satellite cells were identified in situ by techniques which were limited either by tissue processing time or inability to observe complete muscle sections, or by errors made in separating these cells from proliferating nonmyogenic cells. To overcome these problems a new method has been devised for the identification and quantification of proliferating satellite cells in situ by light microscopy. The technique involves dual-channel laser scanning imaging of whole muscle sections for the localisation of both the muscle fibre basal lamina and the cell division marker bromodeoxyuridine. Using this technique satellite cell proliferation was quantified in mouse limb muscle following synergist ablation. Dual-channel laser scanning microscopy allowed precise localisation of proliferating satellite cells in the experimental model and, after 4 d, synergist ablation was shown to have produced significant satellite cell proliferation when compared with contralateral and sham-operated controls. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7649821

  16. Solid state laser communications in space (SOLACOS) high data rate satellite communication system verification program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribil, Klaus; Flemmig, Joerg

    1994-09-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current development status of the SOLACOS program and presents the highlights of the program. SOLACOS (Solid State Laser Communications in Space) is the national German program to develop a high performance laser communication system for high data rate transmission between LEO and GEO satellites (Inter Orbit Link, IOL). Two experimental demonstrator terminals are designed and developed in the SOLACOS program. The main development objectives are the Pointing Acquisition and Tracking subsystem (PAT) and the high data rate communication system. All key subsystems and components are straightway developed to be upgraded in follow- on projects to full space qualification. The main design objective for the system is a high degree of modularity which allows to easily upgrade the system with new upcoming technologies. Therefore, all main subsystems are interconnected via fibers to ease replacement of subsystems. The system implements an asymmetric data link with a 650 MBit/s return channel and a 10 MBit/s forward channel. The 650 MBit/s channel is based on a diode pumped Nd:YAG, Integrated Optics Modulator and uses the syncbit transmission scheme. In the syncbit system synchronization information which is necessary to maintain phase lock of the local oscillator of the coherent receiver is transmitted time multiplexed into the data stream. The PAT system comprises two beam detection sensors and three beam steering elements. For initial acquisition and tracking of the remote satellite a high speed CCD camera with an integrated image processing unit, the Acquisition and Tracking Sensor (ATS) is used. In the tacking mode the beam position is sensed via the Fibernutator sensor which is also used to couple the incoming signal into the receiver fiber. Incoming and outgoing beams are routed through the telescopes which are positioned with a 2 axis gimbal mechanism and a high speed beam steering mirror. The PAT system is controlled by a digital

  17. Determination of the tectonic plate motion by satellite laser ranging in 1999-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillak, S.; Wnuk, E.

    The paper presents results of the tectonic plates motion determination from satellite laser ranging in the period 1999-2003 The SLR station velocities were calculated from station geocentric coordinates determined from one month orbital arcs of Lageos-1 and Lageos-2 satellites for the first day of each arc The mean orbital RMS-of-fit for 5 years was equal to 15 mm The station velocities were determined for 29 stations and points in 1999-2003 it means for all SLR stations with data time span longer than 20 months The accuracy of station velocities determination varied from 0 4 mm year to 3 mm year dependent on quality of data and data span The difference of station velocities between ITRF2000 and the presented results were in the range 0-5 mm year Only for four stations Riyad Maidanak-2 Beijng and Arequipa after earthquake in 2001 the differences were statistically significant For the most stations is a good agreement with the NUVEL1A model of tectonic plates motion The significant differences were detected for stations Arequipa Concepcion Shanghai and Simosato The results differs from the model NUVEL1A in the station velocities and azimuths for South America tectonic plate and Japan

  18. Pointing and tracking errors due to localized deformation in inter-satellite laser communication links.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Yang, Yuqiang; Ma, Jing; Yu, Jianjie

    2008-08-18

    Instead of Zernike polynomials, ellipse Gaussian model is proposed to represent localized wave-front deformation in researching pointing and tracking errors in inter-satellite laser communication links, which can simplify the calculation. It is shown that both pointing and tracking errors depend on the center deepness h, the radiuses a and b, and the distance d of the Gaussian distortion and change regularly as they increase. The maximum peak values of pointing and tracking errors always appear around h=0.2lambda. The influence of localized deformation is up to 0.7microrad for pointing error, and 0.5microrad for tracking error. To reduce the impact of localized deformation on pointing and tracking errors, the machining precision of optical devices, which should be more greater than 0.2?, is proposed. The principle of choosing the optical devices with localized deformation is presented, and the method that adjusts the pointing direction to compensate pointing and tracking errors is given. We hope the results can be used in the design of inter-satellite lasercom systems.

  19. Do future commercial broadband communication satellites really need laser-communication intersatellite links (ISLs)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidell, James E.

    1997-04-01

    Large commercial satellite programs requiring ISLs are growing in number and maturing. An important segment of the commercial satellite market, and its ISL needs, is discussed in the paper. ISL value will increase as long-haul terrestrial backbones become increasingly congested. Providing interregional and intercontinental connectivity via ISL presents far lower cost and fewer problems than relying on terrestrial fiber-optic networks. To demonstrate this, a new metric is proposed which allows 'apples-to- apples' cost/performance comparisons between laser communications in GEO, LEO, and terrestrial fiber-optics. ISL requirements in to the next decade are predicted >= 50-100 Gb/s full duplex. Many attitudinal changes must be embraced among those who choose to focus on this new commercial business. Foremost among these is a preponderance to delivering fully acceptable hardware fast and at low cost, as opposed to merely designing such. Considerable attention must be given business considerations foreign to professionals who have spent time in the government or government contracting sectors. Successful ISL customers will come to recognize that ISLs are not commodity products. Failure to embrace these attitudes will nonetheless constitute decision to which the commercial market, and particularly the financial market, will appropriately respond.

  20. Evaluation of Gravitational Field Models Based on the Laser Range Observation of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-bo, Wang; Chang-yin, Zhao; Wei, Zhang; Jin-wei, Zhan; Sheng-xian, Yu

    2016-07-01

    The Earth gravitational field model is one of the most important dynamic models in satellite orbit computation. Several space gravity missions made great successes in recent years, prompting the publishing of several gravitational filed models. In this paper, two classical (JGM3, EGM96) and four latest (EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, EGM2008) models are evaluated by employing them in the precision orbit determination (POD) and prediction. These calculations are performed based on the laser ranging observation of four Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, including CHAMP, GFZ-1, GRACE-A, and SWARM-A. The residual error of observation in POD is adopted to describe the accuracy of six gravitational field models. The main results we obtained are as follows. (1) For the POD of LEOs, the accuracies of 4 latest models are at the same level, and better than those of 2 classical models; (2) Taking JGM3 as reference, EGM96 model's accuracy is better in most situations, and the accuracies of the 4 latest models are improved by 12%-47% in POD and 63% in prediction, respectively. We also confirm that the model's accuracy in POD is enhanced with the increasing degree and order if they are smaller than 70, and when they exceed 70, the accuracy keeps constant, implying that the model's degree and order truncated to 70 are sufficient to meet the requirement of LEO computation of centimeter precision.

  1. Short arc reduction of radar altimetry computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadgigeorge, G.; Trotter, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory computer program SARRA (Short Arc Reduction of Radar Altimetry) has been used for geoid determination with altimetric observations from the GEOS-3 satellite. An important feature of SARRA is the simultaneous recovery of the orbit parameters and the surface coefficients as defined by covariance function weights. Orbits good to approximately 20 meters are adequate for precise geoid determinations by virtue of the orbital adjustment in the reductions. Altimetric data over a portion of the North Atlantic Ocean have been processed to derive the regional geoid and gravity field. Analyses of altimeter residuals resulting from the short arc adjustment show that the residuals can be used to define the neglected higher order geoidal undulations with high fidelity and continuity.

  2. Today radar altimetry to prepare SWOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, adrien; Calmant, Stephane; Collischonn, Walter; Paiva, Rodrigo; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Seyler, Frederique

    2013-04-01

    We present a study conducted in the Amazon basin to compute distributed discharge with ENVISAT and JASON-2 altimetry in the one hand and the rain/discharge MGB model in the other hand. The MGB model is run over the 1998-2008 period with TRMM rain input. The altimetry data of ~500 series throughout the basin are used to determine rating curves that enable to tune the model parameters such as the depth and slope of small contributors still un-monitored, or the variations in Manning coefficient; and to make discharge series exceeding the time window of the model runs. With this case study, we show that the measurements collected today by conventional altimetry missions can be used to prepare SWOT in two directions: get geophysical values that will be necessary for the discharge algorithms of SWOT and compute discharge time series which will constitute an archive to be continued by SWOT.

  3. SAR Altimetry in Coastal Zone: Performances, Limits, Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, S.; Benveniste, J.

    2011-12-01

    Up to now, any effort to retrieve the coastal zone phenomena from the space has been hindered by the intrinsic incapacity of conventional radar altimeters to sample all but largest scales involved in the coastal processes due to its insufficient along- track resolution. However, nowadays, a new technology in Space-borne Altimetry has become reality: the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Altimeter. The acquisition of altimetric data in SAR mode ensures a higher resolving measurement power that shall enable scientists for the first time to aspire to measure even short-scale weak coastal phenomena, thanks to the 20- fold smaller along track radar resolution and 10 dB higher Signal to Noise ratio. The secondary, but significant in coastal zone, effect of the radar footprint shrinking is the expected reduced impact of land contamination on the radar waveforms in the proximity of the shore. As a consequence of this effect, the advent of SAR focusing promises to bring the satellite altimetry remote sensing closer to the shore up to around 500 meters. Anyway, this lower bound of 500 meter on coastal proximity is not always reachable, as the footprint shrinking occurs only in along track direction while the across track resolution shall remain basically unaltered. Hence, the orientation of the satellite ground-track with respect the coastline plays a role crucial for an effective filtering out of the off-nadir land-originated signals. In the present work, utilizing the current CryoSat-2 Altimeter Dataset (SAR L1b) acquired over coastal sea water, and by retracking the SAR L1b waveforms, a performances study of SAR altimetry in coastal zone will be addressed and the benefits and limits of this new technology highlighted. As particular study area, the Tyrrhenian Sea has been selected: statistics and metrics for sea surface height and significant wave height, as calculated from a cycle of passes, will be assessed, shown and interpreted. Finally, employing the Cryo

  4. First successful satellite laser ranging with a fibre-based transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampf, D.; Sproll, F.; Wagner, P.; Humbert, L.; Hasenohr, T.; Riede, W.

    2016-08-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) is an established technology used for geodesy, fundamental science and precise orbit determination. This paper reports on the first successful SLR measurement from the German Aerospace Center research observatory in Stuttgart. While many SLR stations are in operation, the experiment described here is unique in several ways: The modular system has been assembled completely from commercial off-the-shelf components, which increases flexibility and significantly reduces hardware costs. To our knowledge it has been the first time that an SLR measurement has been conducted using an optical fibre rather than a coudé path to direct the light from the laser source onto the telescope. The transmitter operates at an output power of about 75 mW and a repetition rate of 3 kHz, and at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Due to its rather small diameter of only 80 μm, the receiver detector features a low noise rate of less than 2 kHz and can be operated without gating in many cases. With this set-up, clear return signals have been received from several orbital objects equipped with retroreflectors. In its current configuration, the system does not yet achieve the same performance as other SLR systems in terms of precision, maximum distance and the capability of daylight ranging; however, plans to overcome these limitations are outlined.

  5. Design of 2*6 optical hybrid in inter-satellite coherent laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Liu, Liren; Liu, De'an; Wan, Lingyu; Zhou, Yu

    2008-08-01

    Compared with direct detection, homodyne binary phase shift keying receivers can achieve the best sensitivity theoretically, and became the trend of the research and application in inter-satellite coherent laser communications. In coherent optical communication systems an optical hybrid is an essential component of the receiver. It demodulates the incoming signal by mixing it with the local oscillator. We present a design of a 2*6 optical hybrid. 4 output ports of the hybrid give the narrow mixed beams of the incoming signal and the local oscillator shifted by 90°for communication, and the others give the wide mixed beams with a shifted degree of 180°for position errors detection. CCD captures the interference pattern from the wide beams, and then the pattern is processed and analyzed by the computer. Target position information is obtained from characteristic parameter of the interference pattern. The position errors as the control signals of PAT (pointing, acquisition and tracking) subsystem drive the receiver telescope to keep tracking to the target. The application extends to coherent laser rang finder.

  6. Satellite positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.; Watkins, Michael M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in satellite positioning techniques and their applications are reviewed on the basis of the theoretical and practical work published by U.S. researchers in 1987-1990. Current techniques are classified into two main categories: satellite laser tracking and radio tracking. Particular attention is given to the Geoscience Laser Ranging System, the Lunar Laser Ranging concept; GPS ephemerides determination, fiducial networks, and reference frame; static GPS positioning; and kinematic GPS positioning.

  7. Remote sensing of three-dimensional cirrus clouds from satellites: application to continuous-wave laser atmospheric transmission and backscattering.

    PubMed

    Liou, K N; Ou, Szu-Cheng; Takano, Yoshihide; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2006-09-10

    A satellite remote sensing methodology has been developed to retrieve 3D ice water content (IWC) and mean effective ice crystal size of cirrus clouds from satellite data on the basis of a combination of the conventional retrieval of cloud optical depth and particle size in a horizontal plane and a parameterization of the vertical cloud profile involving temperature from sounding and/or analysis. The inferred 3D cloud fields of IWC and mean effective ice crystal size associated with two impressive cirrus clouds that occurred in the vicinity of northern Oklahoma on 18 April 1997 and 9 March 2000, obtained from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, have been validated against the ice crystal size distributions that were collected independently from collocated and coincident aircraft optical probe measurements. The 3D cloud results determined from satellite data have been applied to the simulation of cw laser energy propagation, and we show the significance of 3D cloud geometry and inhomogeneity and spherical atmosphere on the transmitted and backscattered laser powers. Finally, we demonstrate that the 3D cloud fields derived from satellite remote sensing can be used for the 3D laser transmission and backscattering model for tactical application.

  8. Preliminary design of a smart composite telescope for space laser communication on a satellite for the Geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Antin, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a smart composite telescope for space laser communication. The smart composite telescope will be mounted on a smart composite platform with Simultaneous Precision Positioning and Vibration Suppression (SPPVS), and then mounted on a satellite. The laser communication is intended for the Geosynchronous orbit. The high degree of directionality increases the security of the laser communication signal (as opposed to a diffused RF signal), but also requires sophisticated subsystems for transmission and acquisition. The shorter wavelength of the optical spectrum increases the data transmission rates, but laser systems require large amounts of power, which increases the mass and complexity of the supporting systems. In addition, the laser communication on the Geosynchronous orbit requires an accurate platform with SPPVS capabilities. Therefore, this work also addresses the design of an active composite platform to be used to simultaneously point and stabilize an inter-satellite laser communication telescope with micro-radian pointing resolution. The telescope is a Cassegrain receiver that employs two mirrors, one convex (primary) and the other concave (secondary). The distance, as well as the horizontal and axial alignment of the mirrors, must be precisely maintained or else the optical properties of the system will be severely degraded. The alignment will also have to be maintained during thruster firings, which will require vibration suppression capabilities of the system as well. The innovative platform has been designed to have tip-tilt pointing and simultaneous multi-degree-of- freedom vibration isolation capability for pointing stabilization.

  9. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox: Tools to Use Radar Altimetry for Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.; Benveniste, J. J.; Bronner, E.; Niejmeier, S.

    2010-12-01

    Radar altimetry is very much a technique expanding its applications and uses. If quite a lot of efforts have been made for oceanography users (including easy-to-use data), the use of those data for geodesy, especially combined witht ESA GOCE mission data is still somehow hard. ESA and CNES thus had the Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox developed (as well as, on ESA side, the GOCE User Toolbox, both being linked). The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data. The software is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and the future Saral missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. It is an opportunity to teach remote sensing with practical training. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. About 1200 people downloaded it (Summer 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been

  10. Mass balance of Icelandic ice caps from CryoSat swath mode altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresta, L.; Gourmelen, N.; Pálsson, F.; Willis, I. C.; Nienow, P. W.; Shepherd, A.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite altimetry has been traditionally used in the past to infer elevation of land ice, quantify changes in ice topography and infer mass balance over large and remote areas such as the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Radar Altimetry (RA) is particularly well suited to this task due to its all-weather year-round capability for observing the ice surface. However, monitoring of ice caps has proven more challenging. The large footprint of a conventional radar altimeter and relatively coarse ground track coverage are less suited to monitoring comparatively small regions with complex topography, so that mass balance estimates from RA rely on extrapolation methods to regionalize elevation change.Since 2010, the Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) on board the ESA radar altimetry CryoSat mission has collected ice elevation measurements over ice caps. Ground track interspacing (~4km at 60°) is one order of magnitude smaller than ERS/ENVISAT missions and half of ICESAT's, providing dense spatial coverage. Additionally the Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric (SARIn) mode of CryoSat provides a reduced footprint and the ability to locate accurately the position of the surface reflection. Conventional altimetry provides the elevation of the Point Of Closest Approach (POCA) within each waveform, every 250 m along the flight path. Time evolution of POCA elevation is then used to investigate ice elevation change.Here, we present an assessment of the geodetic mass balance of Icelandic ice caps using a novel processing approach, swath altimetry, applied to CryoSat SARIn mode data. In swath mode altimetry, elevation beyond the POCA is extracted from the waveform when coherent echoes are present providing between one and two orders of magnitude more elevations when compared to POCA. We generate maps of ice elevation change that are then used to compute geodetic mass balance for the period 2010 to 2015. We compare our results to estimates generated using

  11. A method to calculate zero-signature satellite laser ranging normal points for millimeter geodesy - a case study with Ajisai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Daniel; Kirchner, Georg; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Koidl, Franz

    2015-03-01

    High repetition-rate satellite laser ranging (SLR) offers new possibilities for the post-processing of the range measurements. We analyze 11 years of kHz SLR passes of the geodetic satellite Ajisai delivered by Graz SLR station (Austria) in order to improve the accuracy and precision of the principal SLR data product - normal points. The normal points are calculated by three different methods: 1) the range residuals accepted by the standard 2.5 sigma filter, 2) the range residuals accepted by the leading edge filter and 3) the range residuals given by the single corner cube reflector (CCR) panels of Ajisai.

  12. Sea-surface altimetry airborne observations using synoptic GNSS reflectometry at the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribó, Serni; Fabra, Fran; Cardellach, Estel; Li, Weiqiang; Rius, Antonio; Praks, Jaan; Rouhe, Erkka; Seppänen, Jaakko; Martín-Neira, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Recent GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflections) observations over the Baltic Sea have been taken using the SPIR (Software PARIS Interferometric Receiver) from an airborne platform at 3 km altitude. This newly developed instrument is capable of acquiring GNSS signals transmitted by multiple satellites simultaneously that have been reflected of the sea-surface. Reflections are usually gathered in off-nadir configuration using the instrument's beam-forming capabilities, which results in an increase of the instrument's swath. In this way, this technique opens the door to densify in space and time sea-altimetry observations to enhance future mesoscale and sub-mesoscale ocean altimetry. The altimetric observations collected during the Baltic Sea campaign have been analysed in terms of their power spectral densities. We consider the sequence of observations as an ergodic process that has contributions from the actual true altimetry as well as the observation noise. In this way it is possible to relate the expected ground resolution of the observations with the obtainable altimetric uncertainty. Results will be presented.

  13. Geoscience Applications of Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding David J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in lidar altimetry technology have enabled new methods to describe the vertical structure of the Earth's surface with great accuracy. Application of these methods in several geoscience disciplines will be described. Airborne characterization of vegetation canopy structure will be illustrated, including a validation of lidar-derived Canopy Height Profiles for closed-canopy, broadleaf forests. Airborne detection of tectonic landforms beneath dense canopy will also be illustrated, with an application mapping active fault traces in the Puget Lowland of Washington state for earthquake hazard assessment purposes. Application of data from the first and second flights of the Shuttle Laser Altimeter will also be discussed in an assessment of global digital elevation model accuracy and error characteristics. Two upcoming space flight missions will be described, the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) and the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Mission (ICESat), which will provide comprehensive lidar altimeter observations of the Earth's topography and vegetation cover.

  14. Why commercial broadband satellites absolutely must have laser intersatellite links (ISLs) and how the free-space laser communications community could let them down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidell, James E.

    1998-05-01

    Large commercial satellite programs needing high bandwidth inter-satellite links (ISLs) are growing rapidly in number. Precious few are visibly maturing. These commercial needs present greater customer diversity and opportunity for free- space laser communications application than the current plans of all the world's governments combined, multiplied manyfold. However, commercial customers generally do not have access to the independent, knowledgeable, but often heterogeneous laser communications expertise upon which government programs have historically relied. Moreover, commercial needs differ substantially from those of governments, particularly in the areas of price sensitivity and assured delivery on schedule and meeting all requirements. And the number of would-be laser ISL terminal suppliers also grows despite little verifiable expertise in actually delivering complete, working space-based laser ISL terminals, regardless of price or performance. Consequently, the opportunity for mistakes, disappointments, and outright failure is intensified. More 'red meatballs' are unfortunately on the horizon and neither customers nor suppliers recognize the warning signs. Is ignorance bliss? Virtually the entire space communications community appears oblivious to emerging terrestrial broadband communications projects which appear better backed with superior management far more attentive to time-to-market and other schedule and business considerations than any space venture. Space systems offer advantages through realizing global network operations not possible terrestrially, yet few promoters recogni the potential. Might these be omens worth capitalizing upon, or perhaps from which escape may be warranted? This paper provides a commercial market status update to that presented in preceding years' papers. Laser ISL applications are reviewed which enable commercial broadband satellite customer opportunities not yet recognized among most in the customer community, despite

  15. Use of high precision Satellite Laser Ranging Data in Space Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, S.

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) data analysis is one of the modern techniques used to derive the Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and to establish a Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) realization. Information on the ERP and TRF is widely used in astrometry, geodynamics and geodesy, in particular, in the Terrestrial and Celestial Reference Frames transformation. Algorithms developed to model the geodynamic satellite Lageos-1 and Lageos-2 motion are described in the paper. The model precision is at a few centimeter level at two-week intervals. The paper presents the recent results of the joint processing of Lageos-1 and Lageos-2 SLR data acquired by the global network of 103 stations in 1983--1996. The data were mainly obtained from the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS), NASA. The data analysis has been performed using KIEV-GEODYNAMICS 5.2 software which basically follows the IERS Conventions [2] with some exceptions. The aim of the analysis was to derive the Earth rotation parameters at 13.3-year time interval and SLR tracking stations coordinates and velocities. We have obtained a set of the Earth rotation parameters (xp, yp pole coordinates, UT1-UTC) on three-day intervals since MJD 45583 till MJD 50445, coordinates of 101 SLR stations at epoch January 1, 1993 (MJD 48898) and velocities of 50 sites (66 collocated stations) with good observing histories and sufficient amount of high quality data. The formal rms errors of the station coordinates are at the level of 0.1--1 cm for the majority of the stations. The derived station coordinates and velocities have been compared with ITRF94 [1]. The Terrestrial Reference Frame realization given by our solution is at the centimeter level in agreement with the ITRF94. Our solution for ERP has been compared with the {EOP(IERS) C 04} series. The formal errors are 0.4 milliarc second for pole coordinates and 0.03 millisecond for the Universal Time.

  16. Evaluation of Gravitational Field Models Based on the Laser Range Observation of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Zhao, C. Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhan, J. W.; Yu, S. X.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth gravitational filed model is a kind of important dynamic model in satellite orbit computation. In recent years, several space gravity missions have obtained great success, prompting a lot of gravitational filed models to be published. In this paper, 2 classical models (JGM3, EGM96) and 4 latest models, including EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, and EGM2008 are evaluated by being employed in the precision orbit determination (POD) and prediction, based on the laser range observation of four low earth orbit (LEO) satellites, including CHAMP, GFZ-1, GRACE-A, and SWARM-A. The residual error of observation in POD is adopted to describe the accuracy of six gravitational field models. We show the main results as follows: (1) for LEO POD, the accuracies of 4 latest models (EIGEN-CHAMP05S, GGM03S, GOCE02S, and EGM2008) are at the same level, and better than those of 2 classical models (JGM3, EGM96); (2) If taking JGM3 as reference, EGM96 model's accuracy is better in most situations, and the accuracies of the 4 latest models are improved by 12%-47% in POD and 63% in prediction, respectively. We also confirm that the model's accuracy in POD is enhanced with the increasing degree and order if they are smaller than 70, and when they exceed 70 the accuracy keeps stable, and is unrelated with the increasing degree, meaning that the model's degree and order truncated to 70 are sufficient to meet the requirement of LEO orbit computation with centimeter level precision.

  17. Assimilation of CryoSat-2 altimetry to a hydrodynamic model of the Brahmaputra river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raphael; Nygaard Godiksen, Peter; Ridler, Marc-Etienne; Madsen, Henrik; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing provides valuable data for parameterization and updating of hydrological models, for example water level measurements of inland water bodies from satellite radar altimeters. Satellite altimetry data from repeat-orbit missions such as Envisat, ERS or Jason has been used in many studies, also synthetic wide-swath altimetry data as expected from the SWOT mission. This study is one of the first hydrologic applications of altimetry data from a drifting orbit satellite mission, namely CryoSat-2. CryoSat-2 is equipped with the SIRAL instrument, a new type of radar altimeter similar to SRAL on Sentinel-3. CryoSat-2 SARIn level 2 data is used to improve a 1D hydrodynamic model of the Brahmaputra river basin in South Asia set up in the DHI MIKE 11 software. CryoSat-2 water levels were extracted over river masks derived from Landsat imagery. After discharge calibration, simulated water levels were fitted to the CryoSat-2 data along the Assam valley by adapting cross section shapes and datums. The resulting hydrodynamic model shows accurate spatio-temporal representation of water levels, which is a prerequisite for real-time model updating by assimilation of CryoSat-2 altimetry or multi-mission data in general. For this task, a data assimilation framework has been developed and linked with the MIKE 11 model. It is a flexible framework that can assimilate water level data which are arbitrarily distributed in time and space. Different types of error models, data assimilation methods, etc. can easily be used and tested. Furthermore, it is not only possible to update the water level of the hydrodynamic model, but also the states of the rainfall-runoff models providing the forcing of the hydrodynamic model. The setup has been used to assimilate CryoSat-2 observations over the Assam valley for the years 2010 to 2013. Different data assimilation methods and localizations were tested, together with different model error representations. Furthermore, the impact of

  18. Computation of a precise mean sea surface in the eastern north Pacific using SEASAT altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, James G.; Cheney, Robert E.; Martin, Thomas V.; McCarthy, John J.

    Satellite altimetry has application to both solid earth and ocean dynamics research. Because the mean surface of the ocean coincides with the geoid to within about 1 m, three-dimensional maps constructed from grids of altimeter measurements yield information about the gravity field and processes taking place in and beneath the earth's crust. At the same time, statistical analyses of the altimeter data used to construct the surface can provide a survey of the mesoscale eddy field [Cheney and Marsh, 1981].This short report presents results obtained by using SEASAT altimetry in a 5000×5000 km area of the eastern North Pacific. We hope to illustrate several points: the precision of the SEASAT data, the power of the crossing-arc technique employed in the data reduction, and the geodetic/oceanographic implications of precise altimetric maps.

  19. Tracking mesoscale ocean features in the Caribbean Sea using Geosat Altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Nystuen, J.A.; Andrade, C.A. )

    1993-05-15

    The authors use Geosat Exact Repeat Mission altimetry data to track mesoscale ocean features in the Caribbean Sea. Because of the topography of the basin extensive mesoscale features exist, and have been studied and modeled. Models indicate the presence of eddy flow patterns in parts of the basin. The meteorology of the region is dominated by the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts with the seasons. It has been shown that the seasonal wind stress curl positively correlates with total volume transport through the Caribbean Sea. Satellite altimetry provides an accepted means of studying mesoscale features of ocean dynamics which vary with time. The data reveals the appearance of two anticyclonic features, one each year, which appear and drift westward at speed considerably less that surface flow speeds. It also indicates the presence of a cyclonic feature in the southwest corner of the Columbian basin which varies with time. Marine geoid corrections unfortunately remove any features which are not time dependent from the data.

  20. ESA activities on satellite laser ranging to non-cooperative objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohrer, Tim; Krag, Holger; Funke, Quirin; Jilete, Beatriz; Mancas, Alexandru

    2016-07-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) to non-cooperative objects is an emerging technology that can contribute significantly to operational, modelling and mitigation needs set by the space debris population. ESA is conducting various research and development activities in SLR to non-cooperative objects. ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program supports specific activities in the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) segment. Research and development activities with operational aspects are run by ESA's Space Debris Office. At ESA SSA/SST comprises detecting, cataloguing and predicting the objects orbiting the Earth, and the derived applications. SST aims at facilitating research and development of sensor and data processing technologies and of related common components while staying complementary with, and in support of, national and multi-national European initiatives. SST promotes standardisation and interoperability of the technology developments. For SLR these goals are implemented through researching, developing, and deploying an expert centre. This centre shall coordinate the contribution of system-external loosely connected SLR sensors, and shall provide back calibration and expert evaluation support to the sensors. The Space Debris Office at ESA is responsible for all aspects related to space debris in the Agency. It is in charge of providing operational support to ESA and third party missions. Currently, the office studies the potential benefits of laser ranging to space debris objects to resolve close approaches to active satellites, to improve re-entry predictions of time and locations, and the more general SLR support during contingency situations. The office studies the determination of attitude and attitude motion of uncooperative objects with special focus on the combination of SLR, light-curve, and radar imaging data. Generating sufficiently precise information to allow for the acquisition of debris objects by a SLR sensor in a stare

  1. The Jcet/gsfc Satellite Laser Ranging Trf and Eop Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    We present the new re-analysis of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data to LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 for the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and its crust- fixed orientation (Earth Orientation Parameters - EOP). The TRF plays an important role in the multi-technique monitoring of temporal variations in the gravitational field and its very low degree and order components. This area is becoming extremely im- portant with the launch of recent and future geopotential mapping missions for the referencing and calibration of the data and products from these missions. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has for a long time monitored the continuous redistribution of mass within the Earth system through concomitant changes in the Stokes' coefficients of the terrestrial gravity field. Secular changes in J2 due to post-glacial relaxation have been observed since many years and similar changes in J3, J4 J5, etc. are attributed to changes in the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Seasonal changes in these coefficients have also been closely correlated with mass transfer in the atmosphere and oceans. The hydrological cycle contributions however are the most difficult to measure accurately so far. This latest analysis of the 1993-present SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 data for the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) TRF (ITRF) development includes the weekly monitoring of such compound changes in the low degree and order harmonics. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we have determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). These estimates provide a measure of the total motion due to all sources of mass transport within the Earth system and can be used to either complement the estimates from the future missions or to validate them through comparisons with their estimates for the same quantities. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard's GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting in a

  2. Radar Altimetry for Hydrological Modeling and Monitoring in the Zambezi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailovsky, C. I.; Berry, P. A.; Smith, R. G.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrological model forecasts are subject to large uncertainties stemming from uncertain input data, model structure, parameterization and lack of sufficient calibration/validation data. For real-time or near-real-time applications data assimilation techniques such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) can be used to reduce forecast uncertainty by updating model states as new data becomes available. The use of remote sensing data is attractive for such applications as it provides wide geographical coverage and continuous time-series without the typically long delays that exist in obtaining in-situ data. River discharge is one of the main hydrological variables of interest, and while it cannot currently be directly measured remotely, water levels in rivers can be obtained from satellite based radar altimetry and converted to discharge through rating curves. This study aims to give a realistic assessment of the improvements that can be derived from the use of satellite radar altimetry measurements from the Envisat mission for discharge monitoring and modeling on the basin scale for the Zambezi River. The altimetry data used is the Radar AlTimetry (RAT) product developed at the Earth and Planetary Remote Sensing Laboratory at the De Montfort University. The first step in analyzing the data is the determination of potential altimetry targets which are the locations at which the Envisat orbit and the river network cross in order to select data points corresponding to surface water. The quality of the water level time-series is then analyzed for all targets and the exploitable targets identified. Rating curves are derived from in-situ or remotely-sensed data depending on data-availability at the various locations and discharge time-series are established. A Monte Carlo analysis is carried out to assess the uncertainties on the computed discharge. It was found that having a single cross-section and associated discharge measurement at one point in time significantly reduces

  3. Spectroscopic method for Earth-satellite-Earth laser long-path absorption measurements using Retroreflector In Space (RIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Minato, Atsushi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The Retroreflector in Space (RIS) is a single element cube-corner retroreflector with a diameter of 0.5 m designed for earth-satellite-earth laser long-path absorption experiments. The RIS is to be loaded on the Advanced Earth Observing System (ADEOS) satellite which is scheduled for launch in Feb. 1996. The orbit for ADEOS is a sun synchronous subrecurrent polar-orbit with an inclination of 98.6 deg. It has a period of 101 minutes and an altitude of approximately 800 km. The local time at descending node is 10:15-10:45, and the recurrent period is 41 days. The velocity relative to the ground is approximately 7 km/s. In the RIS experiment, a laser beam transmitted from a ground station is reflected by RIS and received at the ground station. The absorption of the intervening atmosphere is measured in the round-trip optical path.

  4. The use of coastal altimetry to support storm surge studies in project eSurge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Harwood, P.; Snaith, H.; Vignudelli, S.; West, L.; Zecchetto, S.; Donlon, C.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most promising applications of the new field of coastal altimetry, i.e. the discipline aiming to recover meaningful estimates of geophysical parameters (sea level, significant wave height and wind speed) from satellite altimeter data in the coastal zone, is the study of storm surges. The understanding and realistic modelling of surges supports both preparation and mitigation activities and should eventually bring enormous societal benefits, especially to some of the world's poorest countries (like Bangladesh). Earth Observation data have an important role to play in storm surge monitoring and forecasting, but the full uptake of these data by users (such as environmental agencies and tidal prediction centres) must first be encouraged by showcasing their usefulness, and then supported by providing easy access. Having recognized the above needs, The European Space Agency has recently launched a Data User Element (DUE) project called eSurge. The main purposes of eSurge are a) to contribute to an integrated approach to storm surge, wave, sea-level and flood forecasting through Earth Observation, as part of a wider optimal strategy for building an improved forecast and early warning capability for coastal inundation; and b) to increase the use of the advanced capabilities of ESA and other satellite data for storm surge applications. The project is led by Logica UK, with NOC (UK), DMI (Denmark), CMRC (Ireland) and KNMI (Netherlands) as scientific partners. A very important component of eSurge is the development, validation and provision of dedicated coastal altimetry products, which is the focus of the present contribution. Coastal altimetry has a prominent role to play as it measures the total water level envelope directly, and this is one of the key quantities required by storm surge applications and services. But it can also provide important information on the wave field in the coastal strip, which helps the development of more realistic wave models that in

  5. Satellite remote sensing over ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides unique opportunities for observing ice-covered terrain. Passive-microwave data give information on snow extent on land, sea-ice extent and type, and zones of summer melting on the polar ice sheets, with the potential for estimating snow-accumulation rates on these ice sheets. All weather, high-resolution imagery of sea ice is obtained using synthetic aperture radars, and ice-movement vectors can be deduced by comparing sequential images of the same region. Radar-altimetry data provide highly detailed information on ice-sheet topography, with the potential for deducing thickening/thinning rates from repeat surveys. The coastline of Antarctica can be mapped accurately using altimetry data, and the size and spatial distribution of icebergs can be monitored. Altimetry data also distinguish open ocean from pack ice and they give an indication of sea-ice characteristics.

  6. Integrating optical satellite data and airborne laser scanning in habitat classification for wildlife management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijland, W.; Coops, N. C.; Nielsen, S. E.; Stenhouse, G.

    2015-06-01

    Wildlife habitat selection is determined by a wide range of factors including food availability, shelter, security and landscape heterogeneity all of which are closely related to the more readily mapped landcover types and disturbance regimes. Regional wildlife habitat studies often used moderate resolution multispectral satellite imagery for wall to wall mapping, because it offers a favourable mix of availability, cost and resolution. However, certain habitat characteristics such as canopy structure and topographic factors are not well discriminated with these passive, optical datasets. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) provides highly accurate three dimensional data on canopy structure and the underlying terrain, thereby offers significant enhancements to wildlife habitat mapping. In this paper, we introduce an approach to integrate ALS data and multispectral images to develop a new heuristic wildlife habitat classifier for western Alberta. Our method combines ALS direct measures of canopy height, and cover with optical estimates of species (conifer vs. deciduous) composition into a decision tree classifier for habitat - or landcover types. We believe this new approach is highly versatile and transferable, because class rules can be easily adapted for other species or functional groups. We discuss the implications of increased ALS availability for habitat mapping and wildlife management and provide recommendations for integrating multispectral and ALS data into wildlife management.

  7. Power availability at terrestrial receptor sites for laser-power transmission from the satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1982-01-01

    A statistical model was developed for relating the temporal transmission parameters of a laser beam from a solar power satellite to observable meteorological data to determine the influence of weather on power reception at the earth-based receiver. Sites within 100 miles of existing high voltage transmission lines were examined and the model was developed for clear-sky and clouded conditions. The cases of total transmission through clouds at certain wavelengths, no transmission, and partial transmission were calculated for the cloud portion of the model. The study covered cirriform, stratiform, cumiliform, and mixed type clouds and the possibility of boring holes through the clouds with the beam. Utilization of weapons-quality beams for hole boring, was found to yield power availability increases of 9-33%, although no beneficial effects could be predicted in regions of persistent cloud cover. An efficiency of 80% was determined as possible if several receptor sites were available within 200-300 miles of each other, thereby allowing changes of reception point in cases of unacceptable meteorological conditions.

  8. Impact of random jitter on a laser satellite communication system with an optical preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishuk, Anna; Arnon, Shlomi

    2004-01-01

    In this work we derive a model, which optimizes the performance of a laser satellite communication link with an optical preamplifier in the presence of random jitter in the transmitter-receiver line of sight. The system utilizes a transceiver containing a single telescope with a circulator. The telescope is used for both transmitting and receiving and thus reduces communication terminal dimensions and weight. The optimization model for optimal transmitted power and transceiver gain was derived under the assumption that the dominant noise source was amplifier spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. We investigate the effect of the amplifier spontaneous emission noise on the optimal transmitted power and gain by performing an optimization procedure for various combinations of amplifier gains and noise figures. It was shown that the amplifier noise figure determines the transmitted power needed to achieve the desired BER, but does not affect the transceiver telescope gain. We found in our numerical example that for a BER of 10-9, doubling the amplifier noise figure results in an 80% increase of minimal transmitted power for rms pointing jitter of 0.44 μrad.

  9. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people’s daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement, as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station’s geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth’s mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized, as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  10. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people's daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement,as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station's geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth's mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized,as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  11. The 1995-99 measurements of the Lense-Thirring effect using laser-ranged satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2000-06-01

    In general relativity a current of mass-energy, such as a spinning body, gives rise to peculiar phenomena on bodies, particles and clocks in its vicinity, which are not predicted by the Newtonian gravitational theory; one of these phenomena is the Lense-Thirring effect on particles orbiting a spinning central body. In this paper we first review the method used to measure the Lense-Thirring effect, by analysing the orbits of the two laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, that has provided a direct measurements of this effect; we then report on these detections of the Lense-Thirring effect, obtained by analysing the nodes of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II and the perigee of LAGEOS II with the orbital programs GEODYN-SOLVE, using the Earth gravitational models JGM-3 and EGM-96 and this new method. The first detection was obtained in 1995, the most accurate measurements were obtained in 1998 using EGM-96, with about 20-30% accuracy. Finally, we briefly review the proposed LARES experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring effect with an accuracy of about 2-3% and to provide other basic tests of general relativity and gravitation.

  12. Time-transfer experiments between satellite laser ranging ground stations via one-way laser ranging to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Sun, X.; Skillman, D. R.; Mcgarry, J.; Hoffman, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Torrence, M. H.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has long been used to measure the distance from a ground station to an Earth-orbiting satellite in order to determine the spacecraft position in orbit, and to conduct other geodetic measurements such as plate motions. This technique can also be used to transfer time between the station and satellite, and between remote SLR sites, as recently demonstrated by the Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) project by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiaes (CNES) and Observatorire de la Cote d'Azur (OCA) as well as the Laser Time Transfer (LTT) project by the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, where two-way and one-way measurements were obtained at the same time. Here we report a new technique to transfer time between distant SLR stations via simultaneous one-way laser ranging (LR) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft at lunar distance. The major objectives are to establish accurate ground station times and to improve LRO orbit determination via these measurements. The results of these simultaneous LR measurements are used to compare the SLR station times or transfer time from one to the other using times-of-flight estimated from conventional radio frequency tracking of LRO. The accuracy of the time transfer depends only on the difference of the times-of-flight from each ground station to the spacecraft, and is expected to be at sub-nano second level. The technique has been validated by both a ground-based experiment and an experiment that utilized LRO. Here we present the results to show that sub-nanosecond precision and accuracy are achievable. Both experiments were carried out between the primary LRO-LR station, The Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging (NGSLR) station, and its nearby station, Mobile Laser System (MOBLAS-7), both at Greenbelt, Maryland. The laser transmit time from both stations were recorded by the same event timer referenced to a Hydrogen maser. The results have been compared to data from a common All

  13. Precise Orbit Determination for GEOSAT Follow-On Using Satellite Laser Ranging Data and Intermission Altimeter Crossovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Pavlis, Despina E.; Marr, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On Spacecraft was launched on February 10, 1998 with the primary objective of the mission to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Following an extensive set of calibration campaigns in 1999 and 2000, the US Navy formally accepted delivery of the satellite on November 29, 2000. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler (Tranet-style) beacons track the spacecraft. Although limited amounts of GPS data were obtained, the primary mode of tracking remains satellite laser ranging. The GFO altimeter measurements are highly precise, with orbit error the largest component in the error budget. We have tuned the non-conservative force model for GFO and the gravity model using SLR, Doppler and altimeter crossover data sampled over one year. Gravity covariance projections to 70x70 show the radial orbit error on GEOSAT was reduced from 2.6 cm in EGM96 to 1.3 cm with the addition of SLR, GFO/GFO and TOPEX/GFO crossover data. Evaluation of the gravity fields using SLR and crossover data support the covariance projections and also show a dramatic reduction in geographically-correlated error for the tuned fields. In this paper, we report on progress in orbit determination for GFO using GFO/GFO and TOPEX/GFO altimeter crossovers. We will discuss improvements in satellite force modeling and orbit determination strategy, which allows reduction in GFO radial orbit error from 10-15 cm to better than 5 cm.

  14. Determination of orbits and SLR stations’ coordinates on the basis of laser observations of the satellites Starlette and Stella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, P.; Schillak, S.; Wnuk, E.

    Orbits of two low satellites Starlette and Stella have been determined on the basis of the observational data collected in 2001 from the best 14 Satellite Laser Ranging stations. The coordinates of seven SLR stations have been determined in the ITRF2000 coordinates frame and compared with the results calculated for the same stations on the basis of Lageos data. All the calculations have been made assuming two models of the Earth gravity field EGM96 and EIGEN-GRACE02S. It has been shown that the best results of satellite orbits determination are obtained with the latest model of the Earth gravity field proposed on the basis of the GRACE mission results. With respect to the results obtained assuming the EGM96 model, the improvement reaches 10-50% both in the values of orbital RMS, and the station coordinates. All the calculations have been performed with the use of GEODYN-II program. The RMS of the orbits of Starlette and Stella varies from 1.02 to 1.90 cm. Such RMS values permit determination of the laser stations to a high accuracy. The results presented in this work show that the data obtained for low satellites such as Starlette or Stella can be successfully applied for determination of the SLR station coordinates.

  15. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-10-01

    LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR) within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO) method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity) and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms) of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We conclude that

  16. Design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents design of smart composite platforms for adaptive trust vector control (TVC) and adaptive laser telescope for satellite applications. To eliminate disturbances, the proposed adaptive TVC and telescope systems will be mounted on two analogous smart composite platform with simultaneous precision positioning (pointing) and vibration suppression (stabilizing), SPPVS, with micro-radian pointing resolution, and then mounted on a satellite in two different locations. The adaptive TVC system provides SPPVS with large tip-tilt to potentially eliminate the gimbals systems. The smart composite telescope will be mounted on a smart composite platform with SPPVS and then mounted on a satellite. The laser communication is intended for the Geosynchronous orbit. The high degree of directionality increases the security of the laser communication signal (as opposed to a diffused RF signal), but also requires sophisticated subsystems for transmission and acquisition. The shorter wavelength of the optical spectrum increases the data transmission rates, but laser systems require large amounts of power, which increases the mass and complexity of the supporting systems. In addition, the laser communication on the Geosynchronous orbit requires an accurate platform with SPPVS capabilities. Therefore, this work also addresses the design of an active composite platform to be used to simultaneously point and stabilize an intersatellite laser communication telescope with micro-radian pointing resolution. The telescope is a Cassegrain receiver that employs two mirrors, one convex (primary) and the other concave (secondary). The distance, as well as the horizontal and axial alignment of the mirrors, must be precisely maintained or else the optical properties of the system will be severely degraded. The alignment will also have to be maintained during thruster firings, which will require vibration suppression capabilities of the system as well. The innovative platform has been

  17. Problem footprints in Magellan altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1992-01-01

    The intensity, time-delay, and frequency content of radar echoes from the Magellan altimetry system are reduced to several parameters that are of great use in addressing many geological issues of the surface of Venus. These parameters include planetary radius, power reflection coefficient (reflectivity, both uncorrected and corrected for diffuse scattering), rms slope, and scattering functions (the behavior of backscatter as a function of incidence angle). Because the surface of Venus often reflects radio energy in unpredictable ways, models of radar scattering and their associated algorithms occasionally fail to accurately solve for the above surface parameters. Methods for identifying possible 'problem' altimetry data footprints, and techniques for resolving some key ambiguities are presented.

  18. A double-focus collimator system for full PAT performance testing of inter-satellite laser communication terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Luan, Zhu; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, De'an; Liu, Liren

    2006-08-01

    A laser collimator is necessary for the testing and verification of the PAT performance of inter-satellite laser communication terminals. However, the terminals mostly have a large field of view for the acquisition and a high angular accuracy for the fine tracking needed to be examined. A single collimator has the conflict to reach at both a large field of view and a fine resolution. To compromise, a double-focus laser collimator is proposed. The collimator is mainly composed of a primary lens, a beam splitter, a secondary lens and some reflectors. The primary lens with a 9.9m focal length directly forms the long focal length arm of the collimator. The combination of the primary lens and the secondary lens has a new focal length of 1.3m and constructs the short focal length arm of the collimator. With two CMOS imaging sensors, the collimator can realize a 1.1mrad field of view with a <1μrad resolution in the focal plane of the long focal length arm and a 8.3mrad field of view with a 8.2μrad resolution in the focal plane of the short focal length arm. In combination with a coarse beam scanner (+/-15°) and a fine beam scanner (1mrad) to simulate the mutual angular movement between two satellites, the united system is capable to test the full PAT performance of inter-satellite laser communication terminals. The optical layouts of the collimator and two detecting units are illustrated. The optical design of the collimator is detailed. The mechanical design of the collimator is given.

  19. Terrain profiling from Seasat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    To determine their applicability for terrain profiling, Seasat altimeter measurements were analyzed for the following geographic areas: (1) Andean salars of southern Bolivia; (2) Alaska; (3) south-central Arizona; (4) imperial Valley of California; (5) Yuma Valley of Arizona; and (6) Great Salt Lake Desert. Analysis of the data over all of these geographic areas shows that the satellite altimeter servo did not respond quickly enough to changing terrain features. However, it is demonstrated that retracking of the archived surface return waveforms yields surface elevations over smooth terrain accurate to + or - 1 m when correlated with large scale maps. The retracking algorithm used and its verification over the salars of southern Bolivia are described. Results are presented for each of the six geographic areas.

  20. Calibration and evaluation of Skylab altimetry for geodetic determination of the geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourad, A. G. (Principal Investigator); Gopalapillai, S.; Kuhner, M.; Fubara, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Skylab altimeter experiment has proven the capability of the altimeter for measurement of sea surface topography. The geometric determination of the geoid/mean sea level from satellite altimetry is a new approach having significant applications in many disciplines including geodesy and oceanography. A generalized least squares collocation technique was developed for determination of the geoid from altimetry data. The technique solves for the altimetry geoid and determines one bias term for the combined effect of sea state, orbit, tides, geoid, and instrument error using sparse ground truth data. The influence of errors in orbit and a priori geoid values are discussed. Although the Skylab altimeter instrument accuracy is about plus or minus 1m, significant results were obtained in identification of large geoidal features such as over the Puerto Rico trench. Comparison of the results of several passes shows that good agreement exists between the general slopes of the altimeter geoid and the ground truth, and that the altimeter appears to be capable of providing more details than are now available with best known geoids.

  1. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry.

    PubMed

    Faghmous, James H; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993-2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System.

  2. Land altimetry using satellite data from the GEOSAT sea altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luft, Philip E.

    1989-01-01

    Several techniques are proposed or assessed from the GEOSAT sea altimeter, and changes are recommended in future RADAR altimeters. The first technique tried was to cross-correlate each waveform with the preceding one. Then the position giving the maximum correlation was taken as the correct placement of the new waveform in its data window. The resulting altitude profile was slightly more variable than that of the on-board tracker over flat rock (Salar de Uyuni), so apparently successive waveforms are too dissimilar to correlate. When cross-correlation failed, compensation was made for averaging. Raw waveforms are averaged in groups of 100 and it is these average waveforms which are available for ground processing. But while the 100 are being received, the window position is moved in time, at different constant rates for the first 50 and last 50. Assuming an unchanging waveform and a single window rate for the 100, first and last waveforms were obtained. Averaging their half-height arrival times gave an altitude profile similar to the median and centroid methods. The variability of this altitude profile suggests that even raw waveforms in a group of 100 may be too dissimilar to correlate. In other techniques, the pulse was judged to have arrived when one of these criteria was met: the wave amplitude meets a certain absolute threshold; wave amplitude meets a certain relative threshold; certain fraction of the area of the waveform has passed; and centroid of the waveform has passed. All methods gave altitude profiles at least as variable as the on-board tracker, and all were biased at least 0.5 meter to low altitudes, except the threshold detector. The threshold detector can be filtered spatially to resemble the on-board tracker, and perhaps it could be implemented without feedback. For operating over land, these changes are recommended in future altimeters: The window should not move while raw waveforms are being averaged; some of the raw waveforms should be telemetered to earth for study, placing the waveform in the window should allow for shape variety; and some form of threshold detector might be used to find the signal and place it.

  3. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Faghmous, James H.; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993–2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System. PMID:26097744

  4. Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Turntable Laser on a Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J.; Burgett, W.; Rhodes, J.

    We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As uncertainties on the photometry, due to imperfect knowledge of both telescope optics and the atmosphere, will in the near future begin to dominate the uncertainties on fundamental cosmological parameters such as WL (Omega_Lambda) and w in measurements from SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration to 0.1% and relative spectrophotometric calibration to better than 0.001% across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication. For further details please see http://www.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0604339.

  5. Estimability and simple dynamical analyses of range (range-rate range-difference) observations to artificial satellites. [laser range observations to LAGEOS using non-Bayesian statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangelder, B. H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Non-Bayesian statistics were used in simulation studies centered around laser range observations to LAGEOS. The capabilities of satellite laser ranging especially in connection with relative station positioning are evaluated. The satellite measurement system under investigation may fall short in precise determinations of the earth's orientation (precession and nutation) and earth's rotation as opposed to systems as very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and lunar laser ranging (LLR). Relative station positioning, determination of (differential) polar motion, positioning of stations with respect to the earth's center of mass and determination of the earth's gravity field should be easily realized by satellite laser ranging (SLR). The last two features should be considered as best (or solely) determinable by SLR in contrast to VLBI and LLR.

  6. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-05-01

    LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR) within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO) method, recently introduced by Kirchengast and Schweitzer (2011), that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity) and accurate altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. For enabling trace species retrieval based on differential transmission, the LIO signals are spectrally located as pairs, one in the centre of a suitable absorption line of a target species (absorption signal) and one close by but outside of any absorption lines (reference signal). Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss the atmospheric influences on the transmission and differential transmission of LIO signals. Refraction effects, trace species absorption (by target species, and cross-sensitivity to foreign species), aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering are studied in detail. The influences of clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation are discussed as well. We show that the influence of defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle and by a design with close frequency spacing of absorption and reference signals within 0.5 %. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and thermal radiation on the received signal intensities are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions but this influence can

  7. Impacts of reprocessed altimetry on the surface circulation and variability of the Western Alboran Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juza, Mélanie; Escudier, Romain; Pascual, Ananda; Pujol, Marie-Isabelle; Taburet, Guillaume; Troupin, Charles; Mourre, Baptiste; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2016-08-01

    New altimetry products in semi-enclosed seas are of major interest given the importance of the coastal-open ocean interactions. This study shows how reprocessed altimetry products in the Mediterranean Sea from Archiving, Validation and Interpolation of Satellite Oceanographic data (AVISO) have improved the representation of the surface circulation over the 1993-2012 period. We focus on the Alboran Sea, which is the highest mesoscale activity area of the western Mediterranean. The respective impacts of the new mean dynamic topography (MDT) and mapped sea level anomaly (MSLA) on the description of the Western Alboran Gyre (WAG) are quantitatively evaluated. The temporal mean and variability of the total kinetic energy have been significantly increased in the WAG considering both the new MDT and MSLA (by more than 50%). The new MDT has added 39% to the mean kinetic energy, while the new MSLA has increased the eddy kinetic energy mean (standard deviation) by 53% (30%). The new MSLA has yielded higher variability of total (eddy) kinetic energy, especially in the annual frequency band by a factor of 2 (3). The MDT reprocessing has particularly increased the low-frequency variability of the total kinetic energy by a factor of 2. Geostrophic velocities derived from the altimetry products have also been compared with drifter data. Both reprocessed MDT and MSLA products intensify the velocities of the WAG making them closer to the in situ estimations, reducing the root mean square differences and increasing the correlation for the zonal and meridional components. The results obtained using refined coastal processing of altimetry products and new observational data are very encouraging to better understand the ocean circulation variability and coastal-open ocean interactions, and for potential improvements in other sub-basins, marginal seas and coastal global ocean.

  8. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox, use for interactive teaching sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmorduc, V.; Benveniste, J.; Niejmeier, S.; Picot, N.

    2009-04-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data. Such an integrated approach and view is vital not only for assessing the current status of what altimeter products offers, but also to show the system and consistency with the past. It has been available (http://www.altimetry.info) from April 2007, and had been demonstrated since about six months before that, including during training courses and scientific meetings. Quite a large number of people downloaded it. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, show that some new interesting features could be added. It is able - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason-1, Envisat, Jason- 2, and the future Cryosat mission, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. Version 2 has just been developed, with, among other things, improved easiness-of-use of the graphical user interface, pre-selection of data files before computation (to speed it), additional visualization features such as waveform viewing or geo-localized output images. A release for MacOS is also made. As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of pas present and future missions, including information on how to access data and additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info People teaching oceanography and remote sensing are interested in practical courses. The presentation will stress the use and possibility of use of the Basic Radar

  9. Evaluation of altimetry-derived surface current products using Lagrangian drifter trajectories in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonggang; Weisberg, Robert H.; Vignudelli, Stefano; Mitchum, Gary T.

    2014-05-01

    Lagrangian particle trajectory models based on several altimetry-derived surface current products are used to hindcast the drifter trajectories observed in the eastern Gulf of Mexico during May to August 2010 (the Deepwater Horizon oil spill incident). The performances of the trajectory models are gauged in terms of Lagrangian separation distances (d) and a nondimensional skill score (s), respectively. A series of numerical experiments show that these altimetry-based trajectory models have about the same performance, with a certain improvement by adding surface wind Ekman components, especially over the shelf region. However, their hindcast skills are slightly better than those of the data assimilative numerical model output. After 3 days' simulation the altimetry-based trajectory models have mean d values of 75-83 and 34-42 km (s values of 0.49-0.51 and 0.35-0.43) in the Gulf of Mexico deep water area and on the West Florida Continental Shelf, respectively. These satellite altimetry data products are useful for providing essential information on ocean surface currents of use in water property transports, offshore oil and gas operations, hazardous spill mitigation, search and rescue, etc.

  10. Sea surface retracking and classification of CryoSat-2 altimetry observations in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, L.; Piccioni, G.; Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present the retracking and classification methods for CryoSat-2 SAR waveforms, developed for the determination of sea surface heights in the Arctic Ocean. The obtained sea surface heights (SSH) are used to decrease the gap in satellite observations from 82 degrees North to 88 degrees North in the DTU15 mean sea surface (MSS) and mean dynamic topography (MDT).Radar altimetry satellites has observed the sea surface for more than 25 years and thereby obtain data to determine accurate MSSs and estimate sea level trends related to climate changes. In combination with the improvements of global geoids it has furthermore provided an opportunity to improve the MDT related to ocean currents.After the launch of CryoSat-2 in 2010 the coverage was increased dramatically while the introduction of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and SAR interferometry (SARin) mode increased the amount of useful echoes in the Arctic Ocean. The new types of radar observation modes have been investigated and methods to retrack and classify the waveforms have been implemented in LARS the advanced retracking system (LARS). Finally the SSH observations obtained from CryoSat-2 with LARS is merged with previous satellite radar altimetry data to derive the DTU15 MSS.

  11. Estimates of Internal Tide Energy Fluxes from Topex/Poseidon Altimetry: Central North Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Cartwright, David E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Energy fluxes for first-mode M(sub 2) internal tides are deduced throughout the central North Pacific Ocean from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Temporally coherent internal tide signals in the altimetry, combined with climatological hydrographic data, determine the tidal displacements, pressures, and currents at depth, which yield power transmission rates. For a variety of reasons the deduced rates should be considered lower bounds. Internal tides were found to emanate from several large bathymetric structures, especially the Hawaiian Ridge, where the integrated flux amounts to about six gigawatts. Internal tides are generated at the Aleutian Trench near 172 deg west and propagate southwards nearly 2000 km.

  12. Determination of positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station using satellite laser ranging observations to Lageos1 and Lageos2 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A.; Schillak, S.

    2012-04-01

    Riyadh Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) station (7832) has been established since 1995 and situated in the Arabian plate which is countering a north east motion. Laser ranging observations of about 20 global SLR stations to the LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 for 13-year (1996-2010) have been used to determine station positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station. The NASA Godard's GEODYN-II orbital software has been used to perform orbit determination of these two satellites. The computations were performed based on 114 monthly arcs of observations with total number of normal points of 33708 and 40168 for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 respectively. The geocentric coordinates were computed and then transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West, and Vertical components in the ITRF2008 reference frame. Effects of normal points for each arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on estimated station coordinates have been investigated. In order to achieve a lower standard deviation (less than 1 cm) of estimated coordinates, the number of the normal points per SLR station had to be greater than 50. The range biases were 7.5mm and 7.2 mm with long term biases stability 2.5 mm and 2.0 mm for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites, respectively. RMS of fit was calculated for all stations and found to be 17.2 mm for the whole period. Time series of positions and velocities have been computed for Riyadh SLR station with stability of ±10.1 mm, ±9.3 mm, and ±9.0 mm for X, Y, and Z coordinates, respectively. The estimated velocity is 29.1 mm/year, 31.6 mm/year, and 1.9 mm/year in North-South, East-West and vertical directions, respectively, with a 3D velocity 42.9 mm/year. 3D deviation from the ITRF2008 was equal 4.5 mm. To recover tectonic motion affecting the station, further analysis of velocity estimates has shown general agreement of Riyadh SLR station in comparison with recent GPS estimates for the Arabian plate motion.

  13. Power Beaming for Space-Based Electricity on Earth: Near-Term Experiments with Radars, Lasers and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, E.; Soukup, P.; Hoffert, M.

    2004-12-01

    Power beaming experiments thus far have been done over distances close enough where receiver apertures approximately the same diameter as transmitters can capture most of the beam (the "near- field"). The best experimentally verified wireless power transmission DC-to-DC efficiencies are 54% for a microwave transmission measured over a short distance; the longest range wireless power transmission stands at 1.6 km in 1975 (Brown, 1998; Dickinson, 1975, 2002). The next logical step is longer-range, "far-field" power beaming, particularly Space-to-Earth, or its reciprocal, Earth-to-Space, to validate beam propagation models and establish a solid experimental basis for power transmission through the atmosphere. To minimize costs, we propose adapting ground-based microwave transmitters designed for radio astronomy (Arecibo), planetary communications (NASA Deep Space Network) and detection (USAF Space Surveillance Network) for Earth-to-Space beaming tests. The receiving end could, in principle, be an NRO satellite antenna reportedly orbiting today and/or rectennas unfurled by the International Space Station (ISS). Laser SSP has lower transmission efficiency; but smaller, more flexible, and potentially cheaper components make it worth exploring. Lasers require smaller components because diffraction effects are less at optical than at microwave wavelengths The Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS), with facilities for accurately firing lasers through ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics at targets in space, appears ideal for laser beaming tests in conjunction with orbiting PV arrays targets. Platforms like the ISS and/or GEO communication satellites may likewise have (or could easily have) lightweight PV arrays capable of converting light to DC for end-to-end power efficiency tests. If successful, these experiments might be followed with impressive demonstrations of SSP technology such as illumination of lamps visible from Earth's surface on orbiting satellites, or

  14. Turbulence-induced scintillation on Gaussian-beam waves: theoretical predictions and observations from a laser-illuminated satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, John D.

    1995-10-01

    Expressions for the variance and the power spectral density of turbulence-induced log-amplitude fluctuations are derived for Gaussian-beam waves in the regime of weak scattering. This formulation includes effects that are due to turbulence strength variations along the propagation path, offset of the observation point from the beam axis, and sensitivity to focus and beam diameter. Comparison of theoretical results with observed scintillation during experiments with a laser-illuminated satellite reveals good agreement. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  15. New Satellite Laser Ranging TRF and EOP Series for Mass Transport Studies in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    The new millennium has started on the right note for geodesy. We finally see a series of gravity mapping missions materialize. What now becomes important is that well-established geodetic techniques rise to the challenge of validating and complementing the data these new missions will deliver. An area where this is likely to be important is the temporal variations in the zonal gravitational field and its very low degree and order components in general. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has for a long time monitored the continuous redistribution of mass within the Earth system through concomitant changes in the Stokes' coefficients of the terrestrial gravity field. Secular changes in J2 due to post-glacial relaxation have been observed since many years and similar changes in J3, J4 J5, etc. are attributed to changes in the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Seasonal changes in these coefficients have also been closely correlated with mass transfer in the atmosphere and oceans. JCET's latest analysis of the 1993-present SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 data for the IERS (International Earth Rotation Service) Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) development, includes the weekly monitoring of such compound changes in the low degree and order harmonics. This latest solution (2001) incorporates several important changes in the modeling of SLR data with resulting improvements in the geophysical products. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we have determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). These estimates provide a measure of the total motion due to all sources of mass transport within the Earth system and can be used to either complement the estimates from the future missions or to validate them through comparisons with their estimates for the same quantities. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard's GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting to a final RMS error of ~8 mm - close to the

  16. Determination of the orbit of the CHAMP satellite based on the laser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, P.

    This work presents the results of orbit determination of the CHAMP satellite from observations of 14 the best SLR stations for year 2002 All computations were based on the Earth combined gravity field model EIGEN-CG01C Reigber et al 2005 In computations was taken the orbital programme GEODYN-II created and accesibled by NASA The got RMS value of the orbit of the CHAMP satellite is better than 30 cm The obtained results show that the orbit of the CHAMP satellite is highly perturbed by the Earth s gravity field and by the atmosphere of the Earth

  17. Seasonal variability in global sea level observed with Geosat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Fu, L.-L.; Patzert, W.

    1989-01-01

    Time changes in global mesoscale sea level variances were observed with satellite altimetry between November 1986 and March 1988, showing significant, geographically coherent seasonal patterns. The NE Pacific and NE Atlantic variances show the most reliable patterns, higher than their yearly averages in both the fall and winter. The response to wind forcing appears as the major contributor to the NE Pacific and Atlantic signals; errors in the estimated inverse barometer response due to errors in atmospheric pressure, residual orbit errors, and errors in sea state bias are evaluated and found to be negligible contributors to this particular signal. The equatorial regions also show significant seasonal patterns, but the uncertainties in the wet tropospheric correction prevent definitive conclusions. The western boundary current changes are very large but not statistically significant. Estimates of the regression coefficient between sea level and significant wave height, an estimate of the sea state bias correction, range between 2.3 and 2.9 percent and vary with the type of orbit correction applied.

  18. Global ocean tide mapping using TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Cartwright, D. E.; Estes, R. H.; Williamson, R. G.; Colombo, O. L.

    1991-01-01

    The investigation's main goals are to produce accurate tidal maps of the main diurnal, semidiurnal, and long-period tidal components in the world's deep oceans. This will be done by the application of statistical estimation techniques to long time series of altimeter data provided by the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission, with additional information provided by satellite tracking data. In the prelaunch phase, we will use in our simulations and preliminary work data supplied by previous oceanographic missions, such as Seasat and Geosat. These results will be of scientific interest in themselves. The investigation will also be concerned with the estimation of new values, and their uncertainties, for tidal currents and for the physical parameters appearing in the Laplace tidal equations, such as bottom friction coefficients and eddy viscosity coefficients. This will be done by incorporating the altimetry-derived charts of vertical tides as boundary conditions in the integration of those equations. The methodology of the tidal representation will include the use of appropriate series expansions such as ocean-basin normal modes and spherical harmonics. The results of the investigation will be space-determined tidal models of coverage and accuracy superior to that of the present numerical models of the ocean tides, with the concomitant benefits to oceanography and associated disciplinary fields.

  19. Variability in the Gulf of Alaska from Geosat altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Born, George H.; Emery, W. J.; Leben, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite altimetry was used to examine annual and interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska region. Crossover data from the Geosat Geodetic Mission (GM) and collinear data from the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) were processed separately to form sea surface height anomalies at grid points. The time series from the GM and ERM were then combined to produce a 3.75-year data set. The time series from the ERM data set agreed fairly well with hydrographic dynamic heights at several locations, with an average correlation of 0.70 between the two data sets. The combined and ERM altimetric data sets were analyzed using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These revealed variability that occurs primarily on annual and interannual time scales. A comparison with EOF analysis of the atmospheric pressure field during the same time periods showed that the annual variation in pressure seemed to be reflected in both the combined and ERM altimetric data sets. The amplitude time series of the first mode in the combined data set was very similar to the North Pacific pressure index during the 1985-1989 time frame. The maximum correlation was at a lag of 250 days. Finally, an interannual mode was present in all three data sets which was closely linked to the baroclinic variations measured by the hydrographic data.

  20. Energetics of global ocean tides from Geosat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David E.; Ray, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper focuses on resonance and energetics of the daily tides, especially in the southern ocean, the distribution of gravitational power input of daily and half-daily tides, and comparison with other estimates of global dissipation rates. The present global tidal maps, derived from Geosat altimetry, compare favorably with ground truth data at about the same rms level as the models of Schwiderski (1983), and are slightly better in lunar than in solar tides. Diurnal admittances clearly show Kelvin wave structure in the southern ocean and confirm the resonant mode of Platzman (1984) at 28.5 + or - 0.1 hr with an apparent Q of about 4. Driving energy is found to enter dominantly in the North Pacific for the daily tides and is strongly peaked in the tropical oceans for the half-daily tides. Global rates of working on all major tide constituents except S2 agree well with independent results from analyses of gravity through satellite tracking. Comparison at S2 is improved by allowing for the air tide in gravitational results but suggests deficiencies in all solar tide models.

  1. Precise Orbit Determination for GEOSAT Follow-On Using Satellite Laser Ranging Data and Intermission Altimeter Crossovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Chinn, D. S.; Pavlis, D. E.; Marr, G. C.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On Spacecraft was launched on February 10, 1998 and the primary objective of the mission was to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Following an extensive set of calibration campaigns in 1999 and 2000, the US Navy formally accepted delivery of the satellite on November 29, 2000. The spacecraft is tracked by satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler (Tranet-style) beacons. Although a limited amount of GPS data were obtained, the primary mode of tracking remains satellite laser ranging. In this paper, we report on progress in orbit determination for GFO using GFO/GFO and TOPEX/GFO altimeter crossovers. We have tuned the nonconservative force model for GFO and the gravity model using SLR, Doppler and altimeter crossover data spanning over one year. Preliminary results show that the predicted radial orbit error from the gravity field covariance to 70x70 on GEOSAT was reduced from 2.6 cm in EGM96 to 1.9 cm with the addition of only five months of the GFO SLR and GFO/GFO crossover data. Further progress is possible with the addition of more data, particularly the TOPEX/GFO crossovers. We will evaluate the tuned GFO gravity model (a derivative of EGM96) using altimeter data from the GEOSAT mission. In January 2000, a limited quantity of GPS data were obtained. We will use these GPS data in conjunction with the SLR and altimeter crossover data obtained over the same time span to compute quasi-reduced dynamic orbits which will also aid in the evaluation of the tuned GFO geopotential model.

  2. Coastal SAR Altimetry: An Experiment in the Northern Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno; Benveniste, Jerome

    2013-04-01

    As it has been already shown by previous works (Dinardo et al., 2011, 5th Coastal Altimetry Workshop proceedings), the CryoSat-2 SAR Echoes behave very well in accordance with the waveform physical models even in the very proximity of the coastline in case of favourable conditions (ground-tracks orthogonal to the coastline) whereas they can be still heavily land-contaminated in case the ground-track runs parallel to the coast line. This anisotropic effect is due to the shrinkage of the spatial resolution in SAR mode that occurs just in along-track direction, leaving unchanged the across-track resolution. As a consequence of this footprint shrinkage, the advent of SAR Mode promises to revolutionize the coastal zone satellite altimetry. Anyway, nowadays, all the current more mature SAR Re-tracking methodologies (SAMOSA and CNES/CLS CPP) are designed to offer the best performances over open ocean surfaces (diffusive surface scattering mechanism). Notwithstanding, they may perform also very well in coastal zones unless: 1) the echoes suffer a really "heavy" contamination from the surrounding land 2) the echoes originate from very shallow and still coastal waters (specular surface scattering mechanism). This second case is not very frequent in coastal zones but it may be observed now more often because in SAR mode we have finally the possibility, in favourable conditions, to really reach the shoreline where a still water scenario can be encountered. Following the initial work presented at 6th Coastal Altimetry Workshop (2012), we will attempt to adapt the original open ocean SAMOSA SAR Echo Model to a coastal still water scenario. Indeed, the SAMOSA SAR Echo Model is a "water" model and can be used to reproduce a SAR Echo originated either from rough water surface (open ocean) either from standing water surface (bays, wetlands, lakes and rivers). The model adaptation to coastal still water scenario will be operated estimating the water surface rms slope (RMSSS) from the

  3. GPS-Based Precision Orbit Determination for a New Era of Altimeter Satellites: Jason-1 and ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Rowlands, David D.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Williams, Teresa A.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate positioning of the satellite center of mass is necessary in meeting an altimeter mission's science goals. The fundamental science observation is an altimetric derived topographic height. Errors in positioning the satellite's center of mass directly impact this fundamental observation. Therefore, orbit error is a critical Component in the error budget of altimeter satellites. With the launch of the Jason-1 radar altimeter (Dec. 2001) and the ICESat laser altimeter (Jan. 2003) a new era of satellite altimetry has begun. Both missions pose several challenges for precision orbit determination (POD). The Jason-1 radial orbit accuracy goal is 1 cm, while ICESat (600 km) at a much lower altitude than Jason-1 (1300 km), has a radial orbit accuracy requirement of less than 5 cm. Fortunately, Jason-1 and ICESat POD can rely on near continuous tracking data from the dual frequency codeless BlackJack GPS receiver and Satellite Laser Ranging. Analysis of current GPS-based solution performance indicates the l-cm radial orbit accuracy goal is being met for Jason-1, while radial orbit accuracy for ICESat is well below the 54x1 mission requirement. A brief overview of the GPS precision orbit determination methodology and results for both Jason-1 and ICESat are presented.

  4. Laser range measurement for a satellite navigation scheme and mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuraski, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The functions of a laser rangefinder on board an autonomous Martian roving vehicle are discussed. The functions are: (1) navigation by means of a passive satellite and (2) mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. The feasibility of using a laser to make the necessary range measurements is explored and a preliminary design is presented. The two uses of the rangefinder dictate widely different operating parameters making it impossible to use the same system for both functions.

  5. New Technologic Development: Tide Station, Static and Towed GPS Buoys for Altimetry Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezen, C.; Calzas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The observation of the sea level variations and the ocean sea surface topography calibration is achieved thanks to a set of specific instruments developped for these missions by Technical Division of INSU (National Institute of Universe Science) in Brest (France). We present the tide recorder and the data transmission station dedicated to in situ measurements of tide and waves signals, the static and towed GPS buoys dedicated to altimetric satellites calibration and absolute sea level determination. Sites equipped with tide recorders and permanent GPS stations are linked to international sea level and tsunamis prevention programs: the GLOSS network for Global sea Level Observing System, and the FOAM project (From Ocean to inland waters Altimetry Monitoring) for CAL/VAL altimetric satellites height calibration.

  6. Helmand river hydrologic studies using ALOS PALSAR InSAR and ENVISAT altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Kim, J.-W.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Duan, J.; Ibaraki, M.; Akyilmaz, O.; Read, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helmand River wetland represents the only fresh-water resource in southern Afghanistan and one of the least mapped water basins in the world. The relatively narrow wetland consists of mostly marshes surrounded by dry lands. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) Interferometric SAR (InSAR) to detect the changes of the Helmand River wetland water level. InSAR images are combined with the geocentric water level measurements from the retracked high-rate (18-Hz) Environmental Satellite (Envisat) radar altimetry to construct absolute water level changes over the marshes. It is demonstrated that the integration of the altimeter and InSAR can provide spatio-temporal measurements of water level variation over the Helmand River marshes where in situ measurements are absent. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  7. Thermo-optical vacuum testing of Galileo In-Orbit Validation laser retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnello, S.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Ciocci, E.; Contessa, S.; Delle Monache, G.; Lops, C.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Salvatori, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Intaglietta, N.; Tuscano, P.; Mondaini, C.; Maiello, M.; Doyle, D.; García-Prieto, R.; Navarro-Reyes, D.

    2016-06-01

    The Galileo constellation is a space research and development program of the European Union to help navigate users all over the world. The Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) are the first test satellites of the Galileo constellation and carry satellite laser retroreflectors as part of their payload systems for precision orbit determination and performance assessment. INFN-LNF SCF_Lab (Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and Cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory) has been performing tests on a sample of the laser array segment under the Thermo-optical vacuum testing of Galileo IOV laser retro-reflectors of Galileo IOV LRA project, as defined in ESA-INFN Contract No. 4000108617/13/NL/PA. We will present the results of FFDP (Far Field Diffraction Pattern) and thermal relaxation times measurements in relevant space conditions of Galileo IOV CCRs (Cube Corner Retroreflectors) provided by ESA-ESTEC. A reference for the performance of laser ranging on Galileo satellites is the FFDP of a retroreflector in its design specifications and a Galileo retroreflector, in air and isothermal conditions, should have a minimum return intensity within the range [ 0.55 ×106m2- 2.14 ×106m2 ] (ESA-INFN, 2013). Measurements, performed in SCF_Lab facility, demonstrated that the 7 Galileo IOV laser retroreflectors under test were compliant with design performance expectations (Porcelli et al., 2015). The kind of tests carried out for this activity are the first performed on spare Galileo IOV hardware, made available after the launch of the four Galileo IOV satellites (2011 and 2012), which were the operational core of the constellation. The characterisation of the retroreflectors against their design requirements is important because LRAs (Laser Retroreflector Arrays) will be flown on all Galileo satellites.

  8. Space-Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier Transmitters for Coherent, Ranging, 3D-Imaging, Altimetry, Topology, and Carbon Dioxide Lidar and Earth and Planetary Optical Laser Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Mark; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes Fibertek, Inc.'s progress in developing space-qualified Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) transmitters for laser communications and ranging/topology, and CO2 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. High peak power (1 kW) and 6 W of average power supporting multiple communications formats has been demonstrated with 17% efficiency in a compact 3 kg package. The unit has been tested to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 standards. A 20 W EDFA suitable for CO2 lidar has been demonstrated with ~14% efficiency (electrical to optical [e-o]) and its performance optimized for 1571 nm operation.

  9. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  10. SEASAT altimetry for surface height of inland seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The capability of spaceborne altimetry to record the level, or monitor changes in the level, of inland seas was assessed. SEASAT altimetry data from Lake Baikal in Siberia; the Caspian, Black, and Aral Seas in the southern Soviet Union; the Great Salt Lake in the United States; lakes and reservoirs in northwestern and central China; and snow cover in northwestern India and on the Tibetan Plateau were examined.

  11. Identifiability of altimetry-based rating curve parameters in function of river morphological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Adrien; André Garambois, Pierre; Calmant, Stéphane; Paiva, Rodrigo; Walter, Collischonn; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frédérique; Monnier, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Estimating river discharge for ungauged river reaches from satellite measurements is not straightforward given the nonlinearity of flow behavior with respect to measurable and non measurable hydraulic parameters. As a matter of facts, current satellite datasets do not give access to key parameters such as river bed topography and roughness. A unique set of almost one thousand altimetry-based rating curves was built by fit of ENVISAT and Jason-2 water stages with discharges obtained from the MGB-IPH rainfall-runoff model in the Amazon basin. These rated discharges were successfully validated towards simulated discharges (Ens = 0.70) and in-situ discharges (Ens = 0.71) and are not mission-dependent. The rating curve writes Q = a(Z-Z0)b*sqrt(S), with Z the water surface elevation and S its slope gained from satellite altimetry, a and b power law coefficient and exponent and Z0 the river bed elevation such as Q(Z0) = 0. For several river reaches in the Amazon basin where ADCP measurements are available, the Z0 values are fairly well validated with a relative error lower than 10%. The present contribution aims at relating the identifiability and the physical meaning of a, b and Z0given various hydraulic and geomorphologic conditions. Synthetic river bathymetries sampling a wide range of rivers and inflow discharges are used to perform twin experiments. A shallow water model is run for generating synthetic satellite observations, and then rating curve parameters are determined for each river section thanks to a MCMC algorithm. Thanks to twin experiments, it is shown that rating curve formulation with water surface slope, i.e. closer from Manning equation form, improves parameter identifiability. The compensation between parameters is limited, especially for reaches with little water surface variability. Rating curve parameters are analyzed for riffle and pools for small to large rivers, different river slopes and cross section shapes. It is shown that the river bed

  12. Improve the ZY-3 Height Accuracy Using Icesat/glas Laser Altimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoyuan; Tang, Xinming; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chongyang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    ZY-3 is the first civilian high resolution stereo mapping satellite, which has been launched on 9th, Jan, 2012. The aim of ZY-3 satellite is to obtain high resolution stereo images and support the 1:50000 scale national surveying and mapping. Although ZY-3 has very high accuracy for direct geo-locations without GCPs (Ground Control Points), use of some GCPs is still indispensible for high precise stereo mapping. The GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimetry System) loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite), which is the first laser altimetry satellite for earth observation. GLAS has played an important role in the monitoring of polar ice sheets, the measuring of land topography and vegetation canopy heights after launched in 2003. Although GLAS has ended in 2009, the derived elevation dataset still can be used after selection by some criteria. In this paper, the ICESat/GLAS laser altimeter data is used as height reference data to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy. A selection method is proposed to obtain high precision GLAS elevation data. Two strategies to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy are introduced. One is the conventional bundle adjustment based on RFM and bias-compensated model, in which the GLAS footprint data is viewed as height control. The second is to correct the DSM (Digital Surface Model) straightly by simple block adjustment, and the DSM is derived from the ZY-3 stereo imaging after freedom adjustment and dense image matching. The experimental result demonstrates that the height accuracy of ZY-3 without other GCPs can be improved to 3.0 meter after adding GLAS elevation data. What's more, the comparison of the accuracy and efficiency between the two strategies is implemented for application.

  13. Satellite Power System (SPS) laser studies. Volume 2: Meteorological effects on laser beam propagation and direct solar pumped lasers for the SPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The primary emphasis of this research activity was to investigate the effect of the environment on laser power transmission/reception from space to ground. Potential mitigation techniques to minimize the environment effect by a judicious choice of laser operating parameters was investigated. Using these techniques, the availability of power at selected sites was determined using statistical meteorological data for each site.

  14. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite altimeters have been monitoring the global ocean for 20 years, with an excellent degree of accuracy; but in the coastal strip data are normally flagged as bad because of a number of technical problems, and therefore rejected. However this situation is rapidly changing: prompted by the tantalizing prospect of recovering 20 years of data over the coastal ocean, and encouraged by the improved suitability for coastal applications of new and future altimeters (like those on Cryosat-2, AltiKa and Sentinel-3), a lively community of researchers in coastal altimetry has coalesced in the last few years, and is developing techniques to recover useful measurements of sea level and significant wave height in the coastal strip, as well as implementing and promoting new applications. The major space agencies are strongly supporting R&D in this new field with initiatives like ESA's COASTALT (for Envisat) and CNES' PISTACH (for Jason-2). The coastal altimetry community holds regular workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/community) where the science and techniques of coastal altimetry are reviewed and various applications are showcased and discussed. The present contribution revisits briefly the many recent technical improvements that are contributing to the steady progress of this new field and in particular focuses on the results of the COASTALT project, which has recently concluded. COASTALT has been an excellent incubator of ideas and new techniques for the improvement of coastal altimetry: first of all it has contributed to establish user requirements for this new field, and it has defined detailed product specifications for the new coastal altimetry products and produced the relevant documentation. At the same time COASTALT has tackled the two main areas of improvement for coastal altimetry. These are: 1) retracking, i.e. fitting a waveform model to the waveforms to obtain an estimate of the geophysical parameters: and 2) designing and validating improved coastal

  15. gLISA: geosynchronous laser interferometer space antenna concepts with off-the-shelf satellites.

    PubMed

    Tinto, M; DeBra, D; Buchman, S; Tilley, S

    2015-01-01

    We discuss two geosynchronous gravitational wave (GW) mission concepts, which we generically name gLISA. One relies on the science instrument hosting program onboard geostationary commercial satellites, while the other takes advantage of recent developments in the aerospace industry that result in dramatic satellite and launching vehicle cost reductions for a dedicated geosynchronous mission. To achieve the required level of disturbance free-fall onboard these large and heavy platforms, we propose a new drag-free system, which we have named "two-stage" drag-free. It incorporates the Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (developed at Stanford University) and does not rely on the use of μN thrusters. Although both mission concepts are characterized by different technical and programmatic challenges, individually they could be flown and operated at a cost significantly lower than those of previously envisioned gravitational wave missions, and in the year 2015 we will perform at JPL a detailed selecting mission analysis. PMID:25638101

  16. gLISA: geosynchronous laser interferometer space antenna concepts with off-the-shelf satellites.

    PubMed

    Tinto, M; DeBra, D; Buchman, S; Tilley, S

    2015-01-01

    We discuss two geosynchronous gravitational wave (GW) mission concepts, which we generically name gLISA. One relies on the science instrument hosting program onboard geostationary commercial satellites, while the other takes advantage of recent developments in the aerospace industry that result in dramatic satellite and launching vehicle cost reductions for a dedicated geosynchronous mission. To achieve the required level of disturbance free-fall onboard these large and heavy platforms, we propose a new drag-free system, which we have named "two-stage" drag-free. It incorporates the Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (developed at Stanford University) and does not rely on the use of μN thrusters. Although both mission concepts are characterized by different technical and programmatic challenges, individually they could be flown and operated at a cost significantly lower than those of previously envisioned gravitational wave missions, and in the year 2015 we will perform at JPL a detailed selecting mission analysis.

  17. Analysis of Airborne Radar Altimetry Measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, Ellen J.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation presents an analysis of airborne altimetry measurements taken over the Greenland ice sheet with the 13.9 GHz Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter. This Ku-band instrument was refurbished in 1990 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts to obtain high-resolution altitude measurements and to improve the tracking, speed, storage and display capabilities of the radar. In 1991 and 1993, the AAFE altimeter took part in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiments over Greenland, along with two NASA laser altimeters. Altitude results from both experiments are presented along with comparisons to the laser altimeter and calibration passes over the Sondrestroem runway in Greenland. Although it is too early to make a conclusion about the growth or decay of the ice sheet, these results show that the instrument is capable of measuring small-scale surface changes to within 14 centimeters. In addition, results from these experiments reveal that the radar is sensitive to the different diagenetic regions of the ice sheet. Return waveforms from the wet- snow, percolation and dry-snow zones show varying effects of both surface scattering and sub-surface or volume scattering. Models of each of the diagenetic regions of Greenland are presented along with parameters such as rms surface roughness, rms surface slope and attenuation coefficient of the snow pack obtained by fitting the models to actual return waveforms.

  18. Improved inland water levels from SAR altimetry using novel empirical and physical retrackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Heidi; Deng, Xiaoli; Andersen, Ole B.; Stenseng, Lars; Nielsen, Karina; Knudsen, Per

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry has proven a valuable resource of information on river and lake levels where in situ data are sparse or non-existent. In this study several new methods for obtaining stable inland water levels from CryoSat-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimetry are presented and evaluated. In addition, the possible benefits from combining physical and empirical retrackers are investigated. The retracking methods evaluated in this paper include the physical SAR Altimetry MOde Studies and Applications (SAMOSA3) model, a traditional subwaveform threshold retracker, the proposed Multiple Waveform Persistent Peak (MWaPP) retracker, and a method combining the physical and empirical retrackers. Using a physical S