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Sample records for saturation recovery epr

  1. Saturation recovery EPR and ELDOR at W-band for spin labels.

    PubMed

    Froncisz, Wojciech; Camenisch, Theodore G; Ratke, Joseph J; Anderson, James R; Subczynski, Witold K; Strangeway, Robert A; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2008-08-01

    A reference arm W-band (94 GHz) microwave bridge with two sample-irradiation arms for saturation recovery (SR) EPR and ELDOR experiments is described. Frequencies in each arm are derived from 2 GHz synthesizers that have a common time-base and are translated to 94 GHz in steps of 33 and 59 GHz. Intended applications are to nitroxide radical spin labels and spin probes in the liquid phase. An enabling technology is the use of a W-band loop-gap resonator (LGR) [J.W. Sidabras, R.R. Mett, W. Froncisz, T.G. Camenisch, J.R. Anderson, J.S. Hyde, Multipurpose EPR loop-gap resonator and cylindrical TE(011) cavity for aqueous samples at 94 GHz, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 034701]. The high efficiency parameter (8.2 GW(-1/2) with sample) permits the saturating pump pulse level to be just 5 mW or less. Applications of SR EPR and ELDOR to the hydrophilic spin labels 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetra-methyl-3-pyrroline-1-yloxyl (CTPO) and 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE) are described in detail. In the SR ELDOR experiment, nitrogen nuclear relaxation as well as Heisenberg exchange transfer saturation from pumped to observed hyperfine transitions. SR ELDOR was found to be an essential method for measurements of saturation transfer rates for small molecules such as TEMPONE. Free induction decay (FID) signals for small nitroxides at W-band are also reported. Results are compared with multifrequency measurements of T(1e) previously reported for these molecules in the range of 2-35 GHz [J.S. Hyde, J.-J. Yin, W.K. Subczynski, T.G. Camenisch, J.J. Ratke, W. Froncisz, Spin label EPR T(1) values using saturation recovery from 2 to 35 GHz. J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 9524-9529]. The values of T(1e) decrease at 94 GHz relative to values at 35 GHz.

  2. Saturation recovery EPR and ELDOR at W-band for spin labels.

    PubMed

    Froncisz, Wojciech; Camenisch, Theodore G; Ratke, Joseph J; Anderson, James R; Subczynski, Witold K; Strangeway, Robert A; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2008-08-01

    A reference arm W-band (94 GHz) microwave bridge with two sample-irradiation arms for saturation recovery (SR) EPR and ELDOR experiments is described. Frequencies in each arm are derived from 2 GHz synthesizers that have a common time-base and are translated to 94 GHz in steps of 33 and 59 GHz. Intended applications are to nitroxide radical spin labels and spin probes in the liquid phase. An enabling technology is the use of a W-band loop-gap resonator (LGR) [J.W. Sidabras, R.R. Mett, W. Froncisz, T.G. Camenisch, J.R. Anderson, J.S. Hyde, Multipurpose EPR loop-gap resonator and cylindrical TE(011) cavity for aqueous samples at 94 GHz, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 034701]. The high efficiency parameter (8.2 GW(-1/2) with sample) permits the saturating pump pulse level to be just 5 mW or less. Applications of SR EPR and ELDOR to the hydrophilic spin labels 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetra-methyl-3-pyrroline-1-yloxyl (CTPO) and 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE) are described in detail. In the SR ELDOR experiment, nitrogen nuclear relaxation as well as Heisenberg exchange transfer saturation from pumped to observed hyperfine transitions. SR ELDOR was found to be an essential method for measurements of saturation transfer rates for small molecules such as TEMPONE. Free induction decay (FID) signals for small nitroxides at W-band are also reported. Results are compared with multifrequency measurements of T(1e) previously reported for these molecules in the range of 2-35 GHz [J.S. Hyde, J.-J. Yin, W.K. Subczynski, T.G. Camenisch, J.J. Ratke, W. Froncisz, Spin label EPR T(1) values using saturation recovery from 2 to 35 GHz. J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 9524-9529]. The values of T(1e) decrease at 94 GHz relative to values at 35 GHz. PMID:18547848

  3. Resolving Conformational and Rotameric Exchange in Spin-Labeled Proteins Using Saturation Recovery EPR

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Michael D.; Hideg, Kálmán

    2010-01-01

    The function of many proteins involves equilibria between conformational substates, and to elucidate mechanisms of function it is essential to have experimental tools to detect the presence of conformational substates and to determine the time scale of exchange between them. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) has the potential to serve this purpose. In proteins containing a nitroxide side chain (R1), multicomponent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra can arise either from equilibria involving different conformational substates or rotamers of R1. To employ SDSL to uniquely identify conformational equilibria, it is thus essential to distinguish between these origins of multicomponent spectra. Here we show that this is possible based on the time scale for exchange of the nitroxide between distinct environments that give rise to multicomponent EPR spectra; rotamer exchange for R1 lies in the ≈0.1–1 μs range, while conformational exchange is at least an order of magnitude slower. The time scales of exchange events are determined by saturation recovery EPR, and in favorable cases, the exchange rate constants between substates with lifetimes of approximately 1–70 μs can be estimated by the approach. PMID:20157634

  4. Long-Range Distance Measurements in Proteins at Physiological Temperatures Using Saturation Recovery EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with EPR is a powerful method for providing distances on the nm scale in biological systems. The most popular strategy, double electron–electron resonance (DEER), is carried out at cryogenic temperatures (50–80 K) to increase the short spin–spin relaxation time (T2) upon which the technique relies. A challenge is to measure long-range distances (20–60 Å) in proteins near physiological temperatures. Toward this goal we are investigating an alternative approach based on the distance-dependent enhancement of spin–lattice relaxation rate (T1–1) of a nitroxide spin label by a paramagnetic metal. With a commonly used nitroxide side chain (R1) and Cu2+, it has been found that interspin distances ≤25 Å can be determined in this way (Jun et al. Biochemistry2006, 45, 11666). Here, the upper limit of the accessible distance is extended to ≈40 Å using spin labels with long T1, a high-affinity 5-residue Cu2+ binding loop inserted into the protein sequence, and pulsed saturation recovery to measure relaxation enhancement. Time-domain Cu2+ electron paramagnetic resonance, quantum mechanical calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations provide information on the structure and geometry of the Cu2+ loop and indicate that the metal ion is well-localized in the protein. An important aspect of these studies is that both Cu2+/nitroxide DEER at cryogenic temperatures and T1 relaxation measurements at room temperature can be carried out on the same sample, allowing both validation of the relaxation method and assessment of the effect of freezing on protein structure. PMID:25290172

  5. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B.; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T−11) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T−11 can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T−11 profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥, obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T−11 and R⊥ profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz). PMID:21868272

  6. Saturation Recovery EPR and Nitroxide Spin Labeling for Exploring Structure and Dynamics in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael; Lerch, Michael T; Altenbach, Christian; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques capable of determining the structure and dynamics of proteins are continuously being developed in order to understand protein function. Among existing methods, site-directed spin labeling in combination with saturation recovery (SR) electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy contributes uniquely to the determination of secondary and tertiary protein structure under physiological conditions, independent of molecular weight and complexity. In addition, SR of spin labeled proteins was recently demonstrated to be sensitive to conformational exchange events with characteristic lifetimes on the order of μs, a time domain that presents a significant challenge to other spectroscopic techniques. In this chapter, we present the theoretical background necessary to understand the capabilities of SR as applied to spin labeled proteins, the instrumental requirements, and practical experimental considerations necessary to obtain interpretable data, and the use of SR to obtain information on protein: (1) secondary structure via solvent accessibility measurements, (2) tertiary structure using interspin distance measurements, and (3) conformational exchange. PMID:26477246

  7. Improvement of the EPR detection of irradiated dry plants using microwave saturation and thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina; Mansour, Issa

    2005-05-01

    The reported EPR studies on the dependence of the microwave saturation behavior as a function of temperature (up to 60 °C) and heating time of some dry plants demonstrate the possibility to distinguish naturally present from radiation induced EPR signals independently of the fact that they have equal g-factors in X- and Q-band spectra. Using these properties of the dry plants a new approach for identification of their previous radiation processing is considered. It is based on the fact that the intensity of the EPR line appearing after irradiation increases at high microwave power (for example 100 mW) and decreases at low microwave power (for example 1 mW) when the irradiated sample is recorded after thermal treatment (up to 60 °C, 60 min). The intensity of the naturally present EPR signal observed in non-irradiated samples remains, meanwhile, unchanged.

  8. The effects of dose and radiation quality on the shape and power saturation of the EPR signal in alanine.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, B; Wielopolski, L

    1994-10-01

    Variations in the shape and the power saturation of EPR spectra of L-alanine irradiated with photons, electrons, neutrons and protons are reported. It is shown that the ratio of the intensities of the satellite lines attributable to "spin flips" and the central line depend on the EPR microwave power, and it is proposed as a quantitative measure of the signal saturation effect. Dependence of this ratio on the microwave power is affected by the radiation quality and for doses in excess of 10 kGy by the absorbed dose. At high doses of low-LET radiation these changes are attributed to a high local density of free radicals, while for low doses of high-LET radiation these are due to changes induced in the crystal lattice. Consequently, the conventional peak-to-peak amplitude measurement of the EPR signal intensity is inaccurate when used for high doses and for comparison between radiations with different beam quality. The possibility to determine radiation quality from an EPR measurement is discussed. PMID:7938443

  9. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  10. Doppler-Resolved Kinetics of Saturation Recovery.

    PubMed

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L; Yu, Hua-Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J; Sears, Trevor J; Hall, Gregory E

    2015-07-16

    Frequency-modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground-state rotational energy-transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground-state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. Quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  11. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  12. A novel tamper detection-recovery and watermarking system for medical image authentication and EPR hiding.

    PubMed

    Tareef, Afaf; Al-Ani, Ahmad; Nguyen, Hung; Chung, Yuk Ying

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the literature has witnessed an increasing interest in the study of medical image watermarking and recovery techniques. In this article, a novel image tamper localization and recovery technique for medical image authentication is proposed. The sparse coding of the Electronic Patient Record (EPR) and the reshaped region of Interest (ROI) is embedded in the transform domain of the Region of Non-Interest (RONI). The first part of the sparse coded watermark is use for saving the patient information along with the image, whereas the second part is used for authentication purpose. When the watermarked image is tampered during transmission between hospitals and medical clinics, the embedded sparse coded ROI can be extracted to recover the tampered image. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed technique in term of tamper correction capability, robustness to attacks, and imperceptibility.

  13. Direct Oil Recovery from Saturated Carbon Nanotube Sponges.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiying; Xue, Yahui; Zou, Mingchu; Zhang, Dongxiao; Cao, Anyuan; Duan, Huiling

    2016-05-18

    Oil adsorption by porous materials is a major strategy for water purification and industrial spill cleanup; it is of great interest if the adsorbed oil can be safely recovered from those porous media. Here, direct oil recovery from fully saturated bulk carbon nanotube (CNT) sponges by displacing oil with water in controlled manner is shown. Surfactant-assisted electrocapillary imbibition is adopted to drive aqueous electrolyte into the sponge and extrude organic oil out continuously at low potentials (up to -1.2 V). More than 95 wt % of oil adsorbed within the sponge can be recovered, via a single electrocapillary process. Recovery of different oils with a wide range of viscosities is demonstrated, and the remaining CNT sponge can be reused with similar recovery capacity. A direct and efficient method is provided to recover oil from CNT sponges by water imbibition, which has many potential environmental and energy applications.

  14. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  15. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10-3 to 10-7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  16. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  17. Direct reconstruction of T1 from k-space using a radial saturation-recovery sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liyong; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2011-03-01

    Contrast agent concentration ([CA]) must be known accurately to quantify dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Accurate concentrations can be obtained if the longitudinal relaxation rate constant T1 is known both pre- and post-contrast injection. Post-contrast signal intensity in the images is often saturated and an approximation to T1 can be difficult to obtain. One method that has been proposed for accurate T1 estimation effectively acquires multiple images with different effective saturation recovery times (eSRTs) and fits the images to the equation for T1 recovery to obtain T1 values. This was done with a radial saturation-recovery sequence for 2D imaging of myocardial perfusion with DCE MRI. This multi-SRT method assumes that the signal intensity is constant for different readouts in each image. Here this assumption is not necessary as a model-based reconstruction method is proposed that directly reconstructs an image of T1 values from k-space. The magnetization for each ray at each readout pulse is modeled in the reconstruction with Bloch equations. Computer simulations based on a 72 ray cardiac DCE MRI acquisition were used to test the method. The direct model-based reconstruction gave accurate T1 values and was slightly more accurate than the multi-SRT method that used three sub-images.

  18. Toward Two-Color Sub-Doppler Saturation Recovery Kinetics in CN (x, v = 0, J)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Forthomme, Damien; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory; Dagdigian, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Collision-induced rotational energy transfer among rotational levels of ground state CN (X 2σ+, v = 0) radicals has been probed by saturation recovery experiments, using high-resolution, polarized transient FM spectroscopy to probe the recovery of population and the decay of alignment following ns pulsed laser depletion of selected CN rotational levels. Despite the lack of Doppler selection in the pulsed depletion and the thermal distribution of collision velocities, the recovery kinetics are found to depend on the probed Doppler shift of the depleted signal. The observed Doppler-shift-dependent recovery rates are a measure of the velocity dependence of the inelastic cross sections, combined with the moderating effects of velocity-changing elastic collisions. New experiments are underway, in which the pulsed saturation is performed with sub-Doppler velocity selection. The time evolution of the spectral hole bleached in the initially thermal CN absorption spectrum can characterize speed-dependent inelastic collisions along with competing elastic velocity-changing collisions, all as a function of the initially bleached velocity group and rotational state. The initial time evolution of the depletion recovery spectrum can be compared to a stochastic model, using differential cross sections for elastic scattering as well as speed-dependent total inelastic cross sections, derived from ab initio scattering calculations. Progress to date will be reported. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  19. Ultrafast recovery time and broadband saturable absorption properties of black phosphorus suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingwei; Huang, Guanghui; Chen, Jiazhang; Xiao, Si He, Jun; Mu, Haoran; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2015-08-31

    As a new type of two-dimensional crystal material, black phosphorus (BP) exhibits excellent electronics and optical performance. Herein, we focus on carrier relaxation dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of BP suspension. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission spectrum are employed to characterize the structure and linear optical properties of the BP. Additionally, pump-probe experiments at wavelength of 1550 nm were carried out to study the carrier dynamics in BP suspension, and ultrafast recovery time was observed (τ{sub s} = 24 ± 2 fs). Furthermore, we demonstrate the saturable absorption signals by open aperture Z-scan experiments at wavelengths of 1550 nm, 532 nm, and 680 nm. The results indicate that BP has broadband saturable absorption properties and the nonlinear absorption coefficients were determined to be β{sub 2} = −0.20 ± 0.08 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (532 nm), β{sub 2} = −0.12 ± 0.05 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (680 nm), and β{sub 2} = −0.15 ± 0.09 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (1550 nm)

  20. Recovery of soil base saturation following termination of N deposition: Increased biological weathering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Current models suggest the removal rate of base cations (i.e. calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium) from forest soils due to forest growth or forest management practices is greater than the resupply rate in many areas of North America and Europe. This is particularly concerning given the recent historical depletion of base cations from forest soils during times of high acid deposition and their critical role in buffering against acidity changes in both soils and surface waters. Because base cations are not easily replaced in soil, being primarily supplied through slow processes such as the primary weathering of parent minerals or the decomposition of organic materials, rapid removals of base cations can jeopardize the long-term fertility of forests. Using a long-term nitrogen (N) addition experiment in a Pinus sylvestris forest that has been ongoing since 1970, we examined how the availability of inorganic N mediates the recovery of base cations in forest soil and tree pools in a boreal forest in northern Sweden. Contrary to model projections, exchangeable base cations in the top 10 cm of mineral soils recovered much faster than predicted. The base saturation of mineral soils in the high N addition treatment (90 kg N ha-1), which was applied annually from 1970-1990 and has been allowed to recover for the last 22 years, was 120% of that of soil in the control treatment. Similarly, the base saturation of the upper 10 cm of mineral soil in the medium N treatment (60 kg N ha-1 yr-1) increased from 30% of that of the control in 2007 following 37 years of N addition to 80% of that of the control in 2010 following two years of recovery. Importantly, the base saturation of the low N treatment (30 kg N ha-1 yr-1) continually declined from 1970 to 2007 and remained low in 2010. Furthermore, the total calcium pool in the top 10 cm of mineral soil was significantly lower in the high and medium N treatments than in the control treatment. These results suggest there may

  1. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  2. All-optical clock recovery, photonic balancing, and saturated asymmetric filtering for fiber optic communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Earl Ryan

    In this dissertation I investigated a multi-channel and multi-bit rate all-optical clock recovery device. This device, a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, had previously been demonstrated to simultaneously recover the clock signal from 10 wavelength channels operating at 10 Gb/s and one channel at 40 Gb/s. Similar to clock signals recovered from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator, the clock signal from the birefringent resonator suffers from a bit pattern effect. I investigated this bit pattern effect for birefringent resonators numerically and experimentally and found that the bit pattern effect is less prominent than for clock signals from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator. I also demonstrated photonic balancing which is an all-optical alternative to electrical balanced detection for phase shift keyed signals. An RZ-DPSK data signal was demodulated using a delay interferometer. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer then counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. This process created a differential signal which used all the signal power present in two consecutive symbols. I showed that this scheme could provide an optical alternative to electrical balanced detection by reducing the required OSNR by 3 dB. I also show how this method can provide amplitude regeneration to a signal after modulation format conversion. In this case an RZ-DPSK signal was converted to an amplitude modulation signal by the delay interferometer. The resulting amplitude modulated signal is degraded by both the amplitude noise and the phase noise of the original signal. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer again counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. Through limiting amplification and noise modulation this scheme provided amplitude regeneration and improved the Q-factor of the demodulated signal by 3.5 dB. Finally I investigated how SPM provided by the SOA can provide a method to reduce the in-band noise of a communication signal. The

  3. Simultaneous Imaging of CBF Change and BOLD with Saturation-Recovery-T1 Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A neuroimaging technique based on the saturation-recovery (SR)-T1 MRI method was applied for simultaneously imaging blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) contrast and cerebral blood flow change (ΔCBF), which is determined by CBF-sensitive T1 relaxation rate change (ΔR1CBF). This technique was validated by quantitatively examining the relationships among ΔR1CBF, ΔCBF, BOLD and relative CBF change (rCBF), which was simultaneously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry under global ischemia and hypercapnia conditions, respectively, in the rat brain. It was found that during ischemia, BOLD decreased 23.1±2.8% in the cortical area; ΔR1CBF decreased 0.020±0.004s-1 corresponding to a ΔCBF decrease of 1.07±0.24 ml/g/min and 89.5±1.8% CBF reduction (n=5), resulting in a baseline CBF value (=1.18 ml/g/min) consistent with the literature reports. The CBF change quantification based on temperature corrected ΔR1CBF had a better accuracy than apparent R1 change (ΔR1app); nevertheless, ΔR1app without temperature correction still provides a good approximation for quantifying CBF change since perfusion dominates the evolution of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1app). In contrast to the excellent consistency between ΔCBF and rCBF measured during and after ischemia, the BOLD change during the post-ischemia period was temporally disassociated with ΔCBF, indicating distinct CBF and BOLD responses. Similar results were also observed for the hypercapnia study. The overall results demonstrate that the SR-T1 MRI method is effective for noninvasive and quantitative imaging of both ΔCBF and BOLD associated with physiological and/or pathological changes.

  4. SolarSoft Desat Package for the Recovery of Saturated AIA Flare Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Richard Alan; Torre, Gabriele; Piana, Michele; Massone, AnnaMaria

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic range of EUV images has been limited by the problem of CCD saturation as seen countless times in movies of solare flares made using the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO AIA). Concurrent with the saturation are the eight rays emanating from the saturation locus which are the result of diffraction off the wire meshes that support the EUV passband filters. This is the problem and its solution in a nutshell. By utilizing techniques similar to those used for making images from the rotating modulation collimators on the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) we have developed a software package that can be used to make images of the EUV flare kernels in a highly automated way as described in Schwartz et al. (2014). Starting from cutouts centered around a flaring region, the software uses the point-spread-function (PSF) of the diffraction pattern to identify and reconstruct the region of the primary saturation. The software also uses the best information available to reconstruct the general scene obscured from overflow saturation and subtracts away the diffraction fringes. It is not a total correction for the PSF but is meant to provide the flare images above all. The software is freely available and distributed within the DESAT package of Solar Software.(Schwartz, R. A., Torre, G., & Piana, M. (2014), Astrophysical Journal Letters, 793, LL23 )

  5. Effect of iron saturation on the recovery of lactoferrin in rennet whey coming from heat-treated skim milk.

    PubMed

    Brisson, G; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of thermal treatments on the recovery of lactoferrin in whey coming from rennet-coagulated skim milk. The impact of lactoferrin iron saturation was also assessed using skim milk spiked with different lactoferrin iron forms. The recovery of lactoferrin in the rennet whey fraction was determined by reverse-phase HPLC. One- and 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE analyses were performed on rennet curds to characterize the protein interactions involving lactoferrin in heated milk. The extent of lactoferrin recovered in the whey fraction was found to reduce as the heating temperature increased. The binding of iron by lactoferrin improved its thermal stability and its recovery in the whey fraction. Poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis results showed that the association of lactoferrin in the unheated milk rennet curd involved noncovalent interactions, whereas upon heating, lactoferrin also interacted via an intermolecular disulfide link. Depending on the severity of the heat treatment, lactoferrin aggregates with Cys-containing proteins (beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, alpha(s2)-casein, and kappa-casein) occurred by intermolecular thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. These noncovalent and covalent interactions explained the lower recovery of lactoferrin in heated milk.

  6. Recovery of saturated video signals from vidicons by dynamic cathode biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.

    1991-05-01

    Vidicons used for imaging of pulsed or transient light sources must instantaneously record gray scale images on photoconductive targets. Typical targets, which store photocharge proportional to the varying light intensity in the optical image, have larger positive charge storage capacity than the negative charge available from the electron beam used for neutralizing the target during read-out. Therefore, the target has much higher dynamic range, typically 3 to 5 times larger than the beam. The result is that several scans of the target are required to obtain all the charge from a fully charged target. For applications where only one scan of the target is permissible, this can result in reading the target data in saturated form, with the loss of gray scale information. However, with dynamic rebiasing of the vidicon cathode, the data can be recovered unsaturated. This technique is extremely powerful because it allows instantaneous adjustment after the target has been exposed to light pulses but before the target is read out. In effect, a real time gain or sensitivity control function is implemented by the technique. Alternatively, the technique can be viewed as a means to dynamically select strategic portions of the vidicon transfer curve for immediate read-out, which otherwise would either be saturated if read out immediate read-out, which otherwise would either be saturated if read out immediately or would require several read-outs. Although only transient imaging applications (usually with single field read-out) are addressed, the technique should find application in conventional continuous read-write TV cameras. The principle of operation, associated circuitry, and examples of image retrieval are presented.

  7. Time-resolved saturated absorption recovery in malachite green-doped xerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canva, M.; Le Saux, G.; Georges, P.; Brun, A.; Chaput, F.; Boilot, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    We trapped malachite green dye molecules in a closed-porosity xerogel and measured the absorption recovery time of the S o → S 1 transition around 620 nm using the pump and probe technique with 100 fs pulses. An increase in the sample transmission from 3% to 40% was induced. From the time constants obtained, we deduce that the molecules are held with an apparent viscosity of about 25 cP. The lifetimes measured, the energy used and the transmission variation are such that this doped xerogel could have potential optical applications.

  8. Metallomic EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-09-01

    Based on explicit definitions of biomolecular EPR spectroscopy and of the metallome, this tutorial review positions EPR in the field of metallomics as a unique method to study native, integrated systems of metallobiomolecular coordination complexes subject to external stimuli. The specific techniques of whole-system bioEPR spectroscopy are described and their historic, recent, and anticipated applications are discussed.

  9. Simultaneous NIR-EPR spectroscopy of rat brain oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yasuko S; Grinberg, Oleg Y; Grinberg, Stalina; Springett, Roger; Swartz, Harold M

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cerebral oxygenation were simultaneously monitored by electric paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The tissue oxygen tension (t-pO2) was measured with an L-band (1.2 GHz) EPR spectrometer with an external loop resonator and the concentration of oxyhemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxyhemoglobin [Hb] were measured with a full-spectral NIRS system. Mean cerebral hemoglobin saturation (SmcO2) was calculated from the absolute [HbO2] and [Hb]. Six adult male rats were implanted with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals into the left cerebral cortex. The change in oxygenation of the brain was induced by altering the inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) in air from 0.30 at baseline to 0.0, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 for 1, 2, 5, and 5 minutes, respectively, followed by reoxygenation with an FiO2 = 0.30. Although both t-pO2 and SmcO2 values showed a decrease during reduced FiO2 followed by recovery on reoxygenation, it was found that SmcO2 recovered more rapidly than t-PO2 during the recovery phase. The recovery of t-pO2 is not only related to blood oxygenation, but also to delivery, consumption, and diffusion of oxygen into the tissue from the vascular system. Further studies will be required to determine the exact mechanisms for the delay between the recovery of SmcO2 and t-pO2. PMID:16594173

  10. Multifrequency EPR study on freeze-dried fruits before and after X-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.; Dimitrova, A.; Georgieva, L.; Tzvetkova, E.

    2006-09-01

    X-, K- and Q-band EPR studies on lyophilized whole pulp parts of blue plum, apricot, peach, melon as well as achens and pulp separately of strawberry before and after X-ray irradiation are reported. Before irradiation all samples show in X band a weak singlet EPR line with g=2.0030±0.0005, except melon, which is EPR silent. Immediately after irradiation all samples exhibit complex fruit-depending spectra, which decay with time and change to give, in ca. 50 days, an asymmetric singlet EPR line with g=2.0041±0.0005. Only apricot pulp gave a typical "sugar-like" EPR spectrum. Singlet EPR lines recorded after irradiation in X -band are K- and Q-band resolved as typical anisotropic EPR spectra with g=2.0023±0.0003 and g⊥=2.0041±0.0005. In addition, K- and Q-band EPR spectra of all samples show a superposition with the six EPR lines of Mn 2+ naturally present in the fruits. The saturation behavior of the EPR spectra of achens of lyophilized and fresh strawberry is also studied. The differences in g factors of samples before and after X-ray irradiation might be used for the identification of radiation processing of fruits in the case of pulp and the differences in the EPR saturation behavior might be used for the achens of strawberry.

  11. Pulsed EPR imaging of nitroxides in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Dharmaraj, Christopher; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-04-01

    Nitroxides, unlike trityl radicals, have shorter T2s which until now were not detectable in vivo by a time-domain pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer at 300 MHz since their phase memory times were shorter than the spectrometer recovery times. In the current version of the time-domain EPR spectrometer with improved spectrometer recovery times, the feasibility of detecting signals from nitroxide radicals was tested. Among the nitroxides evaluated, deuterated 15N-Tempone ( 15N-PDT) was found to have the longest T2. The signal intensity profile as a function of concentration of these agents was evaluated and a biphasic behavior was observed; beyond a nitroxide concentration of 1.5 mM, signal intensity was found to decrease as a result of self-broadening. Imaging experiments were carried out with 15N-PDT in solutions equilibrated with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 21% oxygen using the single point imaging (SPI) modality in EPR. The image intensity in these tubes was found to depend on the oxygen concentration which in turn influences the T2 of 15N-PDT. In vivo experiments were demonstrated with 15N-PDT in anesthetized mice where the distribution and metabolism of 15N-PDT could be monitored. This study, for the first time shows the capability to image a cell-permeable nitroxide in mice using pulsed EPR in the SPI modality.

  12. Taurine for EPR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, A; Mansour, A; Tarek, E

    2012-08-01

    EPR dosimetry is characterized by its non-destructive read-out and the possibility of dose archival. Here, taurine is proposed as a radiation dosimeter using EPR spectroscopy. The EPR spectrum of taurine was studied and assigned, and changes in the taurine EPR spectrum as a result of the change in both modulation amplitude and microwave power were quantified. For gamma radiation, the energy absorption coefficient and the collision mass stopping power of taurine were compared to the corresponding values of soft tissue and alanine, in addition to calculation of effective atomic numbers. The response of taurine to gamma radiation doses in the range from 0.1 to 50 kGy was investigated, as well as that in the range from 1.0 to 20.0 Gy using numerically enhanced EPR taurine spectra. Both response curves showed a linear behavior. In addition, the time dependence of radiation-induced radicals was studied for short (during the first 6 h after irradiation) and long (during about 3 months after irradiation) time periods, and a reasonable degree of stability of the taurine radicals was observed. It is concluded that taurine is a promising dosimeter, which is characterized by its simple spectrum, radical stability, and wide range of linear response to gamma radiation.

  13. Effects of Fluid Saturation on Gas Recovery from Class-3 Hydrate Accumulations Using Depressurization: Case Study of Yuan-An Ridge Site in Southwestern Offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jyun; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2016-04-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds in which guest gas molecules are trapped in host lattices of ice crystals. In Taiwan, the significant efforts have recently begun to evaluate the reserves of hydrate because the vast accumulations of gas hydrates had been recognized in southwestern offshore Taiwan. Class-3 type hydrate accumulations are referred to an isolated hydrate layer without an underlying zone of mobile fluids, and the entire hydrate layer may be well within the hydrate stability zone. The depressurization method is a useful dissociation method for gas production from Class-3 hydrate accumulations. The dissociation efficiency is controlled by the responses of hydrate to the propagating pressure disturbance, and the pressure propagation is relating to the amount (or saturation) of the mobile fluid in pore space of the hydrate layer. The purpose of this study is to study the effects of fluid saturation on the gas recovery from a class-3 hydrate accumulation using depressurization method. The case of a class-3 hydrate deposit of Yuan-An Ridge in southwestern offshore Taiwan is studied. The numerical method was used in this study. The reservoir simulator we used to study the dissociation of hydrate and the production of gas was the STARS simulator developed by CMG, which coupled heat transfer, geo-chemical, geo-mechanical, and multiphase fluid flow mechanisms. The study case of Yuan-An Ridge is located in southwestern offshore Taiwan. The hydrate deposit was found by the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). The geological structure of the studied hydrate deposit was digitized to build the geological model (grids) of the case. The formation parameters, phase behavior data, rock and fluid properties, and formation's initial conditions were assigned sequentially to grid blocks, and the completion and operation conditions were designed to wellbore blocks to finish the numerical model. The changes of reservoir pressure, temperature, saturation due to the hydrate

  14. 1.22 {mu}m GaInNAs Saturable Absorber Mirrors with Tailored Recovery Time

    SciTech Connect

    Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Tukiainen, Antti; Kivistoe, Samuli; Pessa, Markus; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2010-11-10

    The effect of in-situ N-ion irradiation on the recombination dynamics of GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors has been studied. The samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy using a radio frequency plasma source for nitrogen incorporation in the absorber layers as well as for the irradiation. The recombination dynamics of irradiated samples were studied by pump-probe measurements. The recombination time of the absorbers could be reduced by increasing the irradiation time. The effect of the reduced recombination time on the pulse dynamics of a mode-locked laser setup was studied with a Bi-doped fibre laser. The pulse quality was found to improve with increased irradiation time and reduced recombination time, demonstrating the potential of the in-situ irradiation method for device applications.

  15. Comparative study of some new EPR dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K. S.; Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    Investigations have been made of four new radiation dosimetry EPR candidates from the same family of materials: sulfamic acid, sulfanillic acid, homotaurine, and taurine. Mass energy attenuation coefficients, mass stopping power values and the time dependence of the radiation induced radicals are compared. Also investigated are the microwave saturation behavior and the effect of applied modulation amplitude on both peak-to-peak line width (WPP) and peak-to-peak signal height (HPP). The dosimeters are characterized by simple spectra and stable radiation-induced radicals over reasonable durations, especially in taurine dosimeters. Sulfamic acid dosimeters possessed the highest sensitivity followed by taurine and homotaurine and sulfanillic.

  16. Evidence that the two free sulfhydryl groups of plasma fibronectin are in different local environments. Saturation-recovery electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C S; Narasimhan, C; Yin, J J

    1989-01-01

    Human plasma fibronectin is a dimer consisting of two subunits; each contains two cryptic thiol groups that were selectively labeled with an 15N,2H-maleimide spin label. Previous studies using conventional X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) methods showed that the spectrum of the labeled protein displays a single strongly immobilized component with an effective rotational correlation time of approximately 17 ns, suggesting that the physical environments of the two labeled sites per chain are indistinguishable. Here we have used saturation-recovery ESR to measure directly electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the labeled protein in solution at 27 degrees C. Interestingly, the time evolution of the signal was found to be biphasic, which was deconvoluted into two T1 values of 1.37 and 4.53 microseconds. Thus, the two spin-labeled sulfhydryl sites of plasma fibronectin (Fn), being similar in rates of rotational diffusion, differ by a factor of 3.2 in T1. Parallel experiments using various fibronectin fragments showed that the 1.37-microseconds component is associated with the label attached onto the thiol located in between the DNA-binding and the cell-binding domains, and the 4.53-microseconds component is associated with the label attached onto the thiol located within the carboxyl-terminal fibrin-binding domain. The data suggest that the saturation-recovery ESR is a useful method for differentiating multiple spin-labeled sites on macromolecules in which the labels undergo similar rates of rotational motion. PMID:2550091

  17. Nitrification cessation and recovery in an aerated saturated vertical subsurface flow treatment wetland: Field studies and microscale biofilm modeling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Clodagh; Rajabzadeh, Amin R; Weber, Kela P; Nivala, Jaime; Wallace, Scott D; Cooper, David J

    2016-06-01

    In aerated treatment wetlands, oxygen availability is not a limiting factor in sustaining a high level of nitrification in wastewater treatment. In the case of an air blower failure, nitrification would cease, potentially causing adverse effects to the nitrifying bacteria. A field trial was completed investigating nitrification loss when aeration is switched off, and the system recovery rate after the aeration is switched back on. Loss of dissolved oxygen was observed to be more rapid than loss of nitrification. Nitrate was observed in the effluent long after the aeration was switched off (48h+). A complementary modeling study predicted nitrate diffusion out of biofilm over a 48h period. After two weeks of no aeration in the established system, nitrification recovered within two days, whereas nitrification establishment in a new system was previously observed to require 20-45days. These results suggest that once established resident nitrifying microbial communities are quite robust. PMID:26967335

  18. Combining Steady-State and Dynamic Methods for Determining Absolute Signs of Hyperfine Interactions: Pulsed ENDOR Saturation and Recovery (PESTRE)

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying causes of asymmetric intensities in Davies pulsed ENDOR spectra that are associated with the signs of the hyperfine interaction are reinvestigated. The intensity variations in these asymmetric ENDOR patterns are best described as shifts in an apparent baseline intensity that occurs dynamically following on-resonance ENDOR transitions. We have developed an extremely straightforward multi-sequence protocol that is capable of giving the sign of the hyperfine interaction by probing a single ENDOR transition, without reference to its partner transition. This technique, Pulsed ENDOR Saturatation and Recovery (PESTRE) monitors dynamic shifts in the ‘baseline’ following measurements at a single RF frequency (single ENDOR peak), rather than observing anomalous ENDOR intensity differences between the two branches of an ENDOR response. These baseline shifts, referred to as dynamic reference levels (DRLs), can be directly tied to the electron spin manifold from which that ENDOR transition arises. The application of this protocol is demonstrated on 57Fe ENDOR of a 2Fe-2S ferredoxin. We use the 14N ENDOR transitions of the S = 3/2 [Fe(II)NO]2+ center of the non-heme iron enzyme, anthranilate dioxygenase (AntDO) to examine the details of the relaxation model using PESTRE. PMID:21075026

  19. Broadband Transmission EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9–10 GHz range. Most (bio)molecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin – nuclear spin interactions and electron spin – electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8–2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed. PMID:23555819

  20. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  1. [Recovery].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. PMID:26363659

  2. EPR, Biology, and Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-03-01

    It seems that Darwin, in his concluding remark (1859, p490) ruled out the possibility of cosmic connection to evolution based on the fixed law of gravity, known then. More recent Dirac’s Large Number Hypothesis as described in http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040 v1 raises a possibility that the universal constant of gravity is decreasing and all coupling constants are increasing with time, so reported by some observations. Deeper investigation of the connection between evolution and the variation of the universal constant of gravity seems worthwhile to see if it impacts the passage of time in a stronger (gravitational according to the spirit of the above archive) field and affects the aging process, and explains locality and causality in random evolutionary mutations. If there is no physical locality and causality consistent with the special theory of relativity, there must be some spiritual locality and causality at superluminal speeds to explain the implicit hidden variables. Then there is a question of how to test spiritual locality and causality. Psychic effects and dream signals look promising, if they exist and can be tested with space age technology. This is neither about religion nor about Einstein’s orthodoxy in light of the spirit of EPR. This is about frontiers of science of the new millennium: biology, and consciousness.

  3. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski, J. Magn. Reson. 212 (2011) 418-425). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed's MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 4995-5004) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R||) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥. T1-1, R⊥, and R|| profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1-1, R⊥, and R||, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipid headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume, ˜30 n

  4. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski J. Magn. Reson. 212:418-425 [2011]). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1−1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed’s MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88:4995-5004 [1984]) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R∥) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R. T1−1, R⊥, and R∥ profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1−1, R⊥, and R∥, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipids headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume

  5. Influence of photoexcitation on the EPR spectra of Mo5+ in Li2Zn2(MoO4)3: Ce3+,Cu2+ crystals annealed in a CO2 atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryadun, A. A.; Nadolinny, V. A.; Pavlyuk, A. A.; Trifonov, V. A.

    2013-04-01

    The influence of recovery annealing in a CO2 atmosphere at 700°C on the properties of Li2Zn2(MoO4)3 crystals doped with cerium and copper ions has been studied. The EPR investigation of Li2Zn2(MoO4)3 crystals annealed in a CO2 atmosphere has revealed that the annealing leads to the formation of oxygen vacancies in positions adjacent to the oxygen octahedron of lithium, M3, and the oxygen tetrahedron of molybdenum, Mo1. In this case, the charge state of molybdenum becomes Mo5+ and appears in the EPR spectra in the form of one magnetically nonequivalent position. The analysis of the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum of Mo5+ made it possible to calculate the spectral parameters g ∥ = 1.862, g ⊥ = 1.933, A ∥ = 71.8 G, and A ⊥ = 34.1 G. The cross relaxation on the hyperfine structure from the molybdenum isotope 97Mo is found in the EPR spectra. The photoexcitation of Li2Zn2(MoO4)3 crystal doped with cerium ions leads to the saturation of the EPR spectrum of Mo5+ and to the formation of the hyperfine structure from one lithium ion with a hyperfine structure constant of 14 G. For Li2Zn2(MoO4)3 crystals doped with copper ions, a very weak EPR spectrum of Mo5+ is observed in the initial crystals. As a result of the photoexcitation, an increase in the intensity of this spectrum by an order of magnitude and manifestation of the EPR spectrum of Cu2+ ions take place. It is assumed that such a behavior of the EPR spectra of molybdenum ions in Li2Zn2(MoO4)3 crystals doped with cerium and copper ions under photoexcitation is caused by different positions of the energy levels of cerium and copper ions with respect to the energy level of the molybdenum ion.

  6. EPR: an Advanced Evolutionary Design

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Juergen; Bouteille, Francois; Hudson, Greg

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the main features of the EPR, an evolutionary design product that builds on French N4 plants (Chooz and Civaux) and Konvoi, the most recent reactor series built in Germany. This Franco-German project was driven by a common French and German desire to cooperate in several areas. In January 2001, Framatome SA and Siemens AG merged their nuclear activities to form Framatome ANP with three regional entities in France, Germany and the USA. The recent decision of Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) to select the EPR for construction in Olkiluoto of the fifth Nuclear Power Plant in Finland gave a new impetus to the project. Framatome ANP is committed to put the FOAK EPR in commercial operation on May 1, 2009. This challenging time schedule will set a new reference for 'Generation III +' LWR's. (authors)

  7. Saturation meter

    DOEpatents

    Gregurech, S.

    1984-08-01

    A saturation meter for use in a pressurized water reactor plant comprising a differential pressure transducer having a first and second pressure sensing means and an alarm. The alarm is connected to the transducer and is preset to activate at a level of saturation prior to the formation of a steam void in the reactor vessel.

  8. EPR and (57)Fe ENDOR investigation of 2Fe ferredoxins from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Cutsail, George E; Doan, Peter E; Hoffman, Brian M; Meyer, Jacques; Telser, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    We have employed EPR and a set of recently developed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies to characterize a suite of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin clusters from Aquifex aeolicus (Aae Fd1, Fd4, and Fd5). Antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe(II), S = 2, and Fe(III), S = 5/2, sites of the [2Fe-2S](+) cluster in these proteins creates an S = 1/2 ground state. A complete discussion of the spin-Hamiltonian contributions to g includes new symmetry arguments along with references to related FeS model compounds and their symmetry and EPR properties. Complete (57)Fe hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors for each iron, with respective orientations relative to g, have been determined by the use of "stochastic" continuous wave and/or "random hopped" pulsed ENDOR, with the relative utility of the two approaches being emphasized. The reported hyperfine tensors include absolute signs determined by a modified pulsed ENDOR saturation and recovery (PESTRE) technique, RD-PESTRE-a post-processing protocol of the "raw data" that comprises an ENDOR spectrum. The (57)Fe hyperfine tensor components found by ENDOR are nicely consistent with those previously found by Mössbauer spectroscopy, while accurate tensor orientations are unique to the ENDOR approach. These measurements demonstrate the capabilities of the newly developed methods. The high-precision hfc tensors serve as a benchmark for this class of FeS proteins, while the variation in the (57)Fe hfc tensors as a function of symmetry in these small FeS clusters provides a reference for higher-nuclearity FeS clusters, such as those found in nitrogenase. PMID:22872138

  9. Use of EPR to Solve Biochemical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Indra D.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy is a very powerful biophysical tool that can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on a wide variety of biological systems. The intent of this review is to provide a general overview for biochemists and biological researchers on the most commonly used EPR methods and how these techniques can be used to answer important biological questions. The topics discussed could easily fill one or more textbooks; thus, we present a brief background on several important biological EPR techniques and an overview of several interesting studies that have successfully used EPR to solve pertinent biological problems. The review consists of the following sections: an introduction to EPR techniques, spin labeling methods, and studies of naturally occurring organic radicals and EPR active transition metal systems which are presented as a series of case studies in which EPR spectroscopy has been used to greatly further our understanding of several important biological systems. PMID:23961941

  10. A cryogenic receiver for EPR.

    PubMed

    Narkowicz, R; Ogata, H; Reijerse, E; Suter, D

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic probes have significantly increased the sensitivity of NMR. Here, we present a compact EPR receiver design capable of cryogenic operation. Compared to room temperature operation, it reduces the noise by a factor of ≈2.5. We discuss in detail the design and analyze the resulting noise performance. At low microwave power, the input noise density closely follows the emission of a cooled 50Ω resistor over the whole measurement range from 20K up to room temperature. To minimize the influence of the microwave source noise, we use high microwave efficiency (≈1.1-1.7mTW(-1/2)) planar microresonators. Their efficient conversion of microwave power to magnetic field permits EPR measurements with very low power levels, typically ranging from a few μW down to fractions of nW.

  11. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    PubMed

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. PMID:26295168

  12. Temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation rate from pulsed EPR of CUA and heme a in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, C P; Janakiraman, R; Taylor, H; King, T E

    1984-01-01

    This work shows the feasibility of using pulsed, saturation recovery EPR to study directly the magnetic relaxation properties of metal centers in cytochrome c oxidase in the 1.5-20 K range. Heme a and CuA both showed remarkably similar Tn temperature dependences in their spin-lattice relaxation rates. Either both are in environments with very similar protein backbone configurations (Stapleton, H.J., J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, 1980, Phys. Rev. Lett., 45:1456-1459; Allen, J.P., J.T. Colvin, D.G. Stinson, C.P. Flynn, and H.J. Stapleton, 1982, Biophys. J., 38:299-310), or the CuA is relaxed by nearby heme a. Spin-lattice relaxation of the nitrosylferrocytochrome a3 center in mixed valence oxidase showed enhancement of relaxation by a nearby paramagnetic center, most likely heme a. PMID:6329343

  13. EPR-based material modelling of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Alani, Amir M.

    2013-04-01

    In the past few decades, as a result of the rapid developments in computational software and hardware, alternative computer aided pattern recognition approaches have been introduced to modelling many engineering problems, including constitutive modelling of materials. The main idea behind pattern recognition systems is that they learn adaptively from experience and extract various discriminants, each appropriate for its purpose. In this work an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR). EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial tests are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well-known conventional material models and it is shown that EPR-based models can provide a better prediction for the behaviour of soils. The main benefits of using EPR-based material models are that it provides a unified approach to constitutive modelling of all materials (i.e., all aspects of material behaviour can be implemented within a unified environment of an EPR model); it does not require any arbitrary choice of constitutive (mathematical) models. In EPR-based material models there are no material parameters to be identified. As the model is trained directly from experimental data therefore, EPR-based material models are the shortest route from experimental research (data) to numerical modelling. Another advantage of EPR-based constitutive model is that as more experimental data become available, the quality of the EPR prediction can be improved by learning from the additional data, and therefore, the EPR model can become more effective and robust. The developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis.

  14. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  15. EPR techniques for space biodosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.; Hayes, R.; Kenner, G.; Sholom, S.; Chumak, V.

    1996-12-31

    Retrospective dosimetry of tooth enamel has become an increasingly complex and difficult discipline to undertake while still attaining accuracy. The paper provides a review of the major obstacles, advances and pertinent phenomenon associated with low level retrospective dosimetry of human tooth enamel. Also covered is the many sources of error in EPR dosimetry, their potential solutions, as well as the different analysis and scanning techniques in use with their prospective pros and cons. Prospective directions for new approaches, methods, and instruments are also reviewed.

  16. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review.

    PubMed

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-11-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  17. Overview of LBB implementation for the EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Cauquelin, C.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the use of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for EPR reactors. EPR is an evolutionary Nuclear Island of the 4 loop x 1500 Mwe class currently in the design phase. Application of LBB to the main coolant lines and resulting design impacts are summarized. Background information on LBB analysis in France and Germany is also presented.

  18. EPR STUDIES OF THERMALLY STERILIZED VASELINUM ALBUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used for examination of free radicals in thermally treated vaselinum album (VA). Thermal treatment in hot air as sterilization process was tested. Conditions of thermal sterilization were chosen according to the pharmaceutical norms. Vaselinum album was heated at the following conditions (T--temperature, t--time): T = 160°C and t = 120 min, T = 170°C and t = 60 min and T = 180°C and t = 30 min. The aim of this work was to determine concentration and free radical properties of thermally sterilized VA. EPR analysis for VA was done 15 min after sterilization. EPR measurements were done at room temperature. EPR spectra were recorded in the range of microwave power of 2.2-70 mW. g-Factor, amplitudes (A) and line width (ΔBpp) of the spectra were determined. The shape of the EPR spectra was analyzed. Free radical concentration (N) in the heated samples was determined. EPR spectra were not obtained for the non heated VA. EPR spectra were detected for all thermally sterilized samples. The spectra revealed complex character, their asymmetry depends on microwave power. The lowest free radicals concentration was found for the VA sterilized at 180°C during 30 min. EPR spectroscopy is proposed as the method useful for optimization of sterilization process of drugs. PMID:26647625

  19. EPR dosimetry in chemically treated fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By using EPR measurements of radiation-induced radicals it is possible to utilize human fingernails to estimate radiation dose after-the-fact. One of the potentially limiting factors in this approach is the presence of artifacts due to mechanically induced EPR signals (MIS) caused by mechanical str...

  20. Distributed Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Ming-Ying; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The Saturation algorithm for symbolic state-space generation, has been a recent break-through in the exhaustive veri cation of complex systems, in particular globally-asyn- chronous/locally-synchronous systems. The algorithm uses a very compact Multiway Decision Diagram (MDD) encoding for states and the fastest symbolic exploration algo- rithm to date. The distributed version of Saturation uses the overall memory available on a network of workstations (NOW) to efficiently spread the memory load during the highly irregular exploration. A crucial factor in limiting the memory consumption during the symbolic state-space generation is the ability to perform garbage collection to free up the memory occupied by dead nodes. However, garbage collection over a NOW requires a nontrivial communication overhead. In addition, operation cache policies become critical while analyzing large-scale systems using the symbolic approach. In this technical report, we develop a garbage collection scheme and several operation cache policies to help on solving extremely complex systems. Experiments show that our schemes improve the performance of the original distributed implementation, SmArTNow, in terms of time and memory efficiency.

  1. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Jesse E; James, Zachary M; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below.

  2. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below.

  3. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Jesse E; James, Zachary M; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below. PMID:25514061

  4. Optimization of Bicelle Lipid Composition and Temperature for EPR Spectroscopy of Aligned Membranes

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now be possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below. PMID:25514061

  5. EPR oximetry of tumors in vivo in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šentjurc, Marjeta; Čemažar, Maja; Serša, Gregor

    2004-05-01

    The partial oxygen pressure ( pO 2) in tumors is considered to be one of important factors that affect the response of tumors to different treatment. Therefore, we anticipate that the information about the variation of oxygen concentration in tumors can be used as a guide for individualizing radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and especially the combined therapies. There is thus a need to obtain quantitative data on the effects of different therapies on tumor oxygenation under in vivo conditions. One of the methods, which enable these measurements is EPR oximetry. In this work basic principles of the method will be described as well as some examples of tumor oxygenation changes after application of chemotherapeutic drugs (vinblastine, cisplatin, bleomycin) or electric pulses in combination with cisplatin or bleomycin to fibrosarcoma SA-1 tumors in mice. A paramagnetic probe, a char of Bubinga tree, was implanted into the tumor (center and periphery) and in the muscle or subcutis. EPR spectra line-width, which is proportional to oxygen concentration, was measured with time after the treatments. Tumor oxygenation was reduced for 58% of pretreatment value 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 mg kg -1 VLB and returned to pretreatment level within 24 h. Reduction in oxygenation of muscle and subcutis was much smaller and returned to pretreatment value faster as in tumors. With cisplatin (4 mg kg -1) and bleomicyn (1 mg kg -1) the reduction was less than 15%, but increases in combined therapy to 70%. Similar reduction was observed also with electric pulses alone (eight pulses, 1300 V cm -1, 100 μs, 1 Hz) with fast recovery of 8 h. After electrochemotherapy the recovery was slower and occurs only after 48 h. This study demonstrates that EPR oximetry is a sensitive method for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation after different treatments, which may have implications in controlling side effects of therapy and in the planning of combined treatments.

  6. In Vivo EPR For Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Burke, Greg; Coey, M.; Demidenko, Eugene; Dong, Ruhong; Grinberg, Oleg; Hilton, James; Iwasaki, Akinori; Lesniewski, Piotr; Kmiec, Maciej; Lo, Kai-Ming; Nicolalde, R. Javier; Ruuge, Andres; Sakata, Yasuko; Sucheta, Artur; Walczak, Tadeusz; Williams, Benjamin B.; Mitchell, Chad; Romanyukha, Alex; Schauer, David A.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of terrorism, accident, or war, populations potentially can be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation that could cause direct clinical effects within days or weeks. There is a critical need to determine the magnitude of the exposure to individuals so that those with significant risk have appropriate procedures initiated immediately, while those without a significant probability of acute effects can be reassured and removed from the need for further consideration in the medical/emergency system. In many of the plausible scenarios there is an urgent need to make the determination very soon after the event and while the subject is still present. In vivo EPR measurements of radiation-induced changes in the enamel of teeth is a method, perhaps the only such method, which can differentiate among doses sufficiently for classifying individuals into categories for treatment with sufficient accuracy to facilitate decisions on medical treatment. In its current state, the in vivo EPR dosimeter can provide estimates of absorbed dose with an error approximately ± 50 cGy over the range of interest for acute biological effects of radiation, assuming repeated measurements of the tooth in the mouth of the subject. The time required for acquisition, the lower limit, and the precision are expected to improve, with improvements in the resonator and the algorithm for acquiring and calculating the dose. The magnet system that is currently used, while potentially deployable, is somewhat large and heavy, requiring that it be mounted on a small truck or trailer. Several smaller magnets, including an intraoral magnet are under development, which would extend the ease of use of this technique. PMID:18591988

  7. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food label, pay close ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food label, pay close ...

  8. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations.

    PubMed

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids' EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics' efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method. PMID:24968092

  9. Neuropsychologic effects of saturation diving.

    PubMed

    Vaernes, R J; Kløve, H; Ellertsen, B

    1989-05-01

    Neuropsychologic status of saturation divers was assessed before and after 300-500 msw dives (deep saturation diving--DSD group) and before and after 3.5 yr of ordinary saturation diving (saturation diving--SD group). Average baseline results showed the divers to be slightly superior to nondiving controls. Mild-to-moderate neuropsychologic changes (greater than 10% impairment) were found in measures of tremor, spatial memory, vigilance, and automatic reactivity in 20% of the divers after deep dives (DSD group). One year postdive no recovery was observed except for a vigilance test. In the SD group, 20% of the divers showed greater than 10% impairment after 3.5 yr of ordinary saturation diving. Significant reduction in autonomic reactivity was also found and there was a relationship between low autonomic reactivity before saturation diving and number of greater than 10% impairments. For the whole group (DSD + SD divers), negative correlations were found between saturation experience and results on memory and complex visuomotor tests. Years of diving from first to last examination was positively correlated with number of greater than 10% impairments and with reduction in autonomic reactivity. No similar correlations were found to dive variables after about 3 yr of air diving. The mild-to-moderate changes seen in some divers, therefore, seem to be the effects of saturation diving. Since one deep dive may cause an effect similar to the effect of 3.5 yr of ordinary saturation diving, there is reason to believe that repeated deep diving may lead to more pronounced neuropsychologic impairment.

  10. Characterizing multiple metal ion binding sites within a ribozyme by cadmium-induced EPR silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Natalia; Kraut, Stefanie; Jäschke, Andres; Schiemann, Olav

    2007-01-01

    In ribozyme catalysis, metal ions are generally known to make structural and∕or mechanistic contributions. The catalytic activity of a previously described Diels-Alderase ribozyme was found to depend on the concentration of divalent metal ions, and crystallographic data revealed multiple binding sites. Here, we elucidate the interactions of this ribozyme with divalent metal ions in solution using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese ion titrations revealed five high-affinity Mn2+ binding sites with an upper Kd of 0.6±0.2 μM. In order to characterize each binding site individually, EPR-silent Cd2+ ions were used to saturate the other binding sites. This cadmium-induced EPR silencing showed that the Mn2+ binding sites possess different affinities. In addition, these binding sites could be assigned to three different types, including innersphere, outersphere, and a Mn2+ dimer. Based on simulations, the Mn2+-Mn2+ distance within the dimer was found to be ∼6 Å, which is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The EPR-spectroscopic characterization reveals no structural changes upon addition of a Diels-Alder product, supporting the concept of a preorganized catalytic pocket in the Diels-Alder ribozyme and the structural role of these ions. PMID:19404418

  11. EPR Investigation of Gamma-Irradiated Rapana Thomasiana (Gastropoda, Muricidae) Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Seletchi, Emilia Dana; Duliu, Octavian G.; Georgescu, Rodica

    2007-04-23

    The shell of Rapana Thomasiana snail, a carnivorous gastropod collected from the coasts of the Black Sea (Romania) was investigated by using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The samples in powder form were irradiated with a 60Co gamma-ray source at ambient temperature in the dose range between 1.06 and 11.3 kGy. The measurements showed that the EPR signal intensity enhanced following saturation exponential with the absorbed dose. The estimated EPR parameters: g1 = 1.9976, g2 = 2.0006, g3 = 2.0015, g4 = 2.0030 and g5 = 2.0043 revealed a complex spectrum consisting of CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-} and CO{sub 3}{sup -} species. A very weak signal at g6 = 2.0057 was associated to SO{sub 2}{sup -} electron center. All EPR signals of gamma-irradiated samples decreased with various rate with the of 100 deg. C isothermal annealing time.

  12. EFFECT OF CADMIUM(II) ON FREE RADICALS IN DOPA-MELANIN TESTED BY EPR SPECTROSCOPY.

    PubMed

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Chodurek, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy may be applied to examine interactions of melanin with metal ions and drugs. In this work EPR method was used to examination of changes in free radical system of DOPA-melanin--the model eumelanin after complexing with diamagnetic cadmium(II) ions. Cadmium(II) may affect free radicals in melanin and drugs binding by this polymer, so the knowledge of modification of properties and free radical concentration in melanin is important to pharmacy. The effect of cadmium(II) in different concentrations on free radicals in DOPA-melanin was determined. EPR spectra of DOPA-melanin, and DOPA-melanin complexes with cadmium(II) were measured by an X-band (9.3 GHz) EPR spectrometer produced by Radiopan (Poznań, Poland) and the Rapid Scan Unit from Jagmar (Krak6w, Poland). The DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) to metal ions molar ratios in the reaction mixtures were 2:1, 1:1, and 1: 2. High concentrations of o-semiquinone (g ~2.0040) free radicals (~10(21)-10(22) spin/g) characterize DOPA-melanin and its complexes with cadmium(II). Formation of melanin complexes with cadmium(II) increase free radical concentration in DOPA-melanin. The highest free radical concentration was obtained for DOPA-melanin-cadmium(II) (1:1) complexes. Broad EPR lines with linewidths: 0.37-0.73 mT, were measured. Linewidths increase after binding of cadmium(II) to melanin. Changes of integral intensities and linewidths with increasing microwave power indicate the homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, independently on the metal ion concentration. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested samples, their EPR lines saturated at low microwave powers. Cadmium(II) causes fastening of spin-lattice relaxation processes in DOPA-melanin. The EPR results bring to light the effect of cadmium(II) on free radicals in melanin, and probably as the consequence on drug binding to eumelanin.

  13. EprS, an autotransporter serine protease, plays an important role in various pathogenic phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kida, Y; Taira, J; Kuwano, K

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses an arsenal of both cell-associated (flagella, pili, alginate, etc.) and extracellular (exotoxin A, proteases, type III secretion effectors, etc.) virulence factors. Among them, secreted proteases that damage host tissues are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. We previously reported that EprS, an autotransporter protease of P. aeruginosa, induces host inflammatory responses through protease-activated receptors. However, little is known about the role of EprS as a virulence factor of P. aeruginosa. In this study, to investigate whether EprS participates in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa, we characterized various pathogenic phenotypes of the wild-type PAO1 strain and its eprS-disrupted mutant. The growth assays demonstrated that the growth of the eprS mutant was somewhat lower than that of the wild-type strain in a minimal medium containing BSA as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Thus, these results indicate that eprS would have a role in the growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of limited nutrients, such as a medium containing proteinaceous materials as a sole nutrient source. Furthermore, disruption of eprS resulted in a decreased production of elastase, pigments, autoinducers and surfactants, and a reduction of swimming and swarming motilities. In addition, the eprS mutant exhibited a reduction in the ability to associate with A549 cells and an attenuation of virulence in leucopenic mice as compared with the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggest that EprS exerts pleiotropic effects on various pathogenic phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26678838

  14. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  15. Biophysical EPR Studies Applied to Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Indra D; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are very important in controlling bioenergetics, functional activity, and initializing signal pathways in a wide variety of complicated biological systems. They also represent approximately 50% of the potential drug targets. EPR spectroscopy is a very popular and powerful biophysical tool that is used to study the structural and dynamic properties of membrane proteins. In this article, a basic overview of the most commonly used EPR techniques and examples of recent applications to answer pertinent structural and dynamic related questions on membrane protein systems will be presented. PMID:26855825

  16. Examination by EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in melanins isolated from A-375 cells exposed on valproic acid and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Chodurek, Ewa; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Drug binding by melanin biopolymers influence the effectiveness of the chemotherapy, radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Free radicals of melanins take part in formation of their complex with drugs. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of the two compounds: valproic acid (VPA) and cisplatin (CPT) on free radicals properties of melanin isolated from A-375 melanoma cells. Free radicals were examined by an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were measured for the model synthetic eumelanin - DOPA-melanin, the melanin isolated from the control A-375 cells and these cells treated by VPA, CPT and both VPA and CPT. For all the examined samples broad EPR lines (deltaBpp: 0.48-0.68 mT) with g-factors of 2.0045-2.0060 characteristic for o-semiquinone free radicals were observed. Free radicals concentrations (N) in the tested samples, g-factors, amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I) and linewidths (deltaBpp) of the EPR spectra, were analyzed. The EPR lines were homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of the EPR spectra indicated that slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested melanin samples. The relatively slowest spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT. The changes of the EPR spectra with increasing microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW were evaluated. Free radicals concentrations in the melanin from A-375 cells were higher than in the synthetic DOPA-melanin. The strong increase of free radicals concentration in the melanin from A-375 cells was observed after their treating by VPA. CPT also caused the increase of free radicals concentrations in the examined natural melanin. The free radicals concentration in melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT was slightly higher than those in melanin from the control cells.

  17. Detection of free radicals formed by in vitro metabolism of fluoride using EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    In many parts of the globe, where water contains large amount of fluoride, fluorosis is a serious public health problem. It is accompanied by many changes, not only in the bones, but practically in all organs of the body. Since it was discovered that oxidation stress, together with the peroxidation of lipids which accompanies it, results in many diseases, research has been carried out on this aspect of fluorosis. The findings, however, are incomplete and divergent. The aim of our study was to determine the presence of free radicals in hepatocytes exposed to fluoride in concentrations which do not lead to changes in the concentrations of calcium and magnesium ions. Free radical properties of hepatocytes incubated with fluoride were studied by an X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Hepatocytes are paramagnetic and broad unsymmetrical EPR spectra were obtained for them. Oxygen free radicals with g-factor of 2.0032 exist in hepatocytes. The effect of fluoride concentration and the time of incubation on free radicals amount in cells were examined. The amount of free radicals in hepatocytes increases with the increase of fluoride concentration for all the incubation times (10, 30, and 60 min). The amount of free radicals in hepatocytes decreases with the increase of time of incubation for all the used fluoride concentrations (0.002, 0.082, and 0.164 mmol/l). EPR spectra of the studied cells are homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of EPR lines indicates that slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in the studied cells. Strong dipolar interactions responsible for the broadening (ΔB(pp): 1.45-1.87 mT) of the EPR spectra exist in the hepatocytes.

  18. Preparation of EPR/silica filler by a co-irradiation method forming PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Dang, Shuaiying; Huang, Zhijuan; Xu, Yongshen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to prepare ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR)/silica filler by co-irradiation method forming polypropylene (PP)/EPR/silica nanocomposites. The grafting of maleic anhydride (MAH) on EPR was first studied by co-irradiation in the micro-suspension without any chemical initiator, and the effects of MAH concentration and the total co-irradiation dose on the graft degree of MAH were investigated. Then PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites were successfully prepared by blending of PP matrix and EPR/silica filler, which was obtained by co-irradiation using a mixture of EPR/MAH microsuspension in xylene and tetraethoxysilane/KH560 sol in formic acid. FTIR and SEM results showed that the reactions between MAH on EPR chains and KH560 surrounding silica particles were adopted to form the EPR/silica filler with strong bonding and well silica dispersion. Mechanical properties of PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with different silica contents and the comparisons with PP, PP/EPR and PP/silica films were studied. The rigid silica particles were trapped in EPR shell and well dispersed in PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with good compatibility and strong interfacial adhesion, achieving overall improvements in stiffness, strength and toughness compared with pure PP.

  19. Advanced tool kits for EPR security.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B

    2000-11-01

    Responding to the challenge for efficient and high quality health care, the shared care paradigm must be established in health. In that context, information systems such as electronic patient records (EPR) have to meet this paradigm supporting communication and interoperation between the health care establishments (HCE) and health professionals (HP) involved. Due to the sensitivity of personal medical information, this co-operation must be provided in a trustworthy way. To enable different views of HCE and HP ranging from management, doctors, nurses up to systems administrators and IT professionals, a set of models for analysis, design and implementation of secure distributed EPR has been developed and introduced. The approach is based on the popular UML methodology and the component paradigm for open, interoperable systems. Easy to use tool kits deal with both application security services and communication security services but also with the security infrastructure needed. Regarding the requirements for distributed multi-user EPRs, modelling and implementation of policy agreements, authorisation and access control are especially considered. Current developments for a security infrastructure in health care based on cryptographic algorithms as health professional cards (HPC), security services employing digital signatures, and health-related TTP services are discussed. CEN and ISO initiatives for health informatics standards in the context of secure and communicable EPR are especially mentioned. PMID:11154968

  20. Teaching the EPR Paradox at High School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pospiech, Gesche

    1999-01-01

    Argues the importance of students at university and in the final years of high school gaining an appreciation of the principles of quantum mechanics. Presents the EPR gedanken experiment (thought experiment) as a method of teaching the principles of quantum mechanics. (Author/CCM)

  1. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  2. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  3. Clinical EPR: Unique Opportunities and Some Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Hartford, Alan C.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice; Comi, Richard J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swarts, Steven G.; Flood, Ann B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been well established as a viable technique for measurement of free radicals and oxygen in biological systems, from in vitro cellular systems to in vivo small animal models of disease. However, the use of EPR in human subjects in the clinical setting, although attractive for a variety of important applications such as oxygen measurement, is challenged with several factors including the need for instrumentation customized for human subjects, probe and regulatory constraints. This paper describes the rationale and development of the first clinical EPR systems for two important clinical applications, namely, measurement of tissue oxygen (oximetry), and radiation dose (dosimetry) in humans. The clinical spectrometers operate at 1.2 GHz frequency and use surface loop resonators capable of providing topical measurements up to 1 cm depth in tissues. Tissue pO2 measurements can be carried out noninvasively and repeatedly after placement of an oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic material (currently India ink) at the site of interest. Our EPR dosimetry system is capable of measuring radiation-induced free radicals in the tooth of irradiated human subjects to determine the exposure dose. These developments offer potential opportunities for clinical dosimetry and oximetry, which include guiding therapy for individual patients with tumors or vascular disease, by monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Further work is in progress to translate this unique technology to routine clinical practice. PMID:24439333

  4. Alanine radicals, part 3: properties of the components contributing to the EPR spectrum of X-irradiated alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Heydari, Mojgan Z; Sagstuen, Einar; Hole, Eli O

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid l-alpha-alanine has attracted considerable interest for use in radiation dosimetry and has been formally accepted as a secondary standard for high-dose and transfer dosimetry. Recent results have shown that the alanine EPR spectrum consists of contributions from three different radicals. A set of benchmark spectra describing the essential spectral features of these three radical components was used for reconstructions of the experimental spectra. In the present work, these basis spectra have been used to investigate the differential effects of variations in radiation doses and microwave power, as well as the dependence upon temperature annealing and UV illumination. The results presented here, based solely on relatively low-energy (60-80 keV) X rays, indicate that the three components behave very similarly with respect to radiation dose at room temperature. However, with respect to the thermal annealing/fading behavior and microwave power saturation properties, the three species behave significantly differently. It is concluded that even if it is now realized that three different radicals contribute to the composite EPR alanine spectrum, this has a minor impact on the established protocols for present-day applications (high-dose) of EPR/alanine dosimetry. However, some care should be exercised when e.g. constructing calibration curves, since fading and power saturation behavior may vary over the dose range in question. New results from UV-illumination experiments suggest a possible procedure for experimental spectral separation of the EPR signals due to the three radicals.

  5. The EUVE Electronic Proposal Review (EPR) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullison, J.; Boyd, W.; Stroozas, B. A.; Malina, R. F.

    1999-12-01

    The Electronic Proposal Review (EPR) system created by the University of California, Berkeley has been used for the last three Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) observing cycles. This process, including the EUVE Electronic Proposal Submission (EPS) system and semi-automated processes for the proposal review, has proven to be an effective and preferred means of serving our users' needs. This paper discusses the various elements of EUVE's EPR system as well as the benefits and insights gained from its creation and usage. Via creating and using EPR, the EUVE staff has optimized the administration of the proposal review process and has gained insights relevant to the program's management and application design. EUVE staff has benefitted from EPR over the past three cycles, as the applications have been used to process 142 different proposals. The system has not only helped to cut Time Allocation Committee spending in half, standardize Guest Observer proposal submission (i.e. eliminate proposer errors), reduce mailing, minimize clerical work, and streamline committee reporting, it has also proved to be a preferable means of accessing proposals for science planners and data processors who occasionally need an instant means of double checking proposal specifications. Though participants are generally satisfied with the process, the EUVE management staff continues to work, for example, to find ways to insure that the electronic selection continues to involve meaningful avenues of communication where person-to-person contact is not possible or neceessary. Design of EPR is an evolutionary process with potential future improvements including increased automation for the post-submission processes and greater application portability. This work was funded under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC5-138.

  6. Synergistic effect of nanoclay and EPR-g-MA on the properties of nylon6/EPR blends.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Sumana; Das, Tanya; Das, C K; Khatua, B B

    2009-05-01

    The effect of EPR-g-MA, nanoclay and a combination of the two on phase morphology and properties of (70/30 w/w) nylon6/EPR blends prepared by melt processing technique has been studied. We found that the number average domain diameter (D(n)) of the dispersed EPR phase in the blend decreased in presence of EPR-g-MA, and clay. This observation indicated that nanoclay could be used as an effective compatibilizer in nylon6/EPR blend. X-ray diffraction study and TEM analysis of the blend/clay nanocomposites revealed the delaminated clay morphology and preferential location of the exfoliated clay platelets in nylon6 phase. Thus, selective dispersion of the clay platelets with delaminated morphology in the matrix phase acted as the barrier and thereby prevented the coalescence of dispersed EPR domains during melt processing. However, addition of nanoclay in the blend did not improve the impact property of the blend. Interestingly, the impact strength of the nylon6/EPR/EPR-g-MA/clay blend was much higher than the nylon6/EPR/EPR-g-MA and nylon6/EPR/clay blends at certain compositions with comparable D(n) values. This could be explained by assuming the presence of delaminated clay platelets at the interface, which were stiffer than the polymers. Hence, the bending energy of the interfaces was high.

  7. EPR-based material modelling of soils considering volume changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Javadi, Akbar A.; Alani, Amir M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), taking into account its volumetric behaviour. EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial test are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well known conventional material models. In particular, the capability of the developed EPR models in predicting volume change behaviour of soils is illustrated. It is also shown that the developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis. Two geotechnical examples are presented to verify the developed EPR-based FE model (EPR-FEM). The results of the EPR-FEM are compared with those of a standard FEM where conventional constitutive models are used to describe the material behaviour. The results show that EPR-FEM can be successfully employed to analyse geotechnical engineering problems. The advantages of the proposed EPR models are highlighted.

  8. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-23

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  9. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100° C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  10. Multisite EPR Oximetry from Multiple Quadrature Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, R.; Som, S.; Johnson, D.H.; Zweier, J.L.; Kuppusamy, P.; Potter, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Multisite continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry using multiple quadrature field modulation harmonics is presented. First, a recently developed digital receiver is used to extract multiple harmonics of field modulated projection data. Second, a forward model is presented that relates the projection data to unknown parameters, including linewidth at each site. Third, a maximum likelihood estimator of unknown parameters is reported using an iterative algorithm capable of jointly processing multiple quadrature harmonics. The data modeling and processing are applicable for parametric lineshapes under nonsaturating conditions. Joint processing of multiple harmonics leads to 2-3 fold acceleration of EPR data acquisition. For demonstration in two spatial dimensions, both simulations and phantom studies on an L-band system are reported. PMID:22154283

  11. EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Azarian, G.; Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J.; Stoudt, R.H.

    2004-07-01

    Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

  12. Seventy Years of the EPR Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2006-11-01

    In spite of the fact that statistical predictions of quantum theory (QT) can only be tested if large amount of data is available a claim has been made that QT provides the most complete description of an individual physical system. Einstein's opposition to this claim and the paradox he presented in the article written together with Podolsky and Rosen in 1935 inspired generations of physicists in their quest for better understanding of QT. Seventy years after EPR article it is clear that without deep understanding of the character and limitations of QT one may not hope to find a meaningful unified theory of all physical interactions, manipulate qubits or construct a quantum computer.. In this paper we present shortly the EPR paper, the discussion, which followed it and Bell inequalities (BI). To avoid various paradoxes we advocate purely statistical contextual interpretation (PSC) of QT. According to PSC a state vector is not an attribute of a single electron, photon, trapped ion or quantum dot. A value of an observable assigned to a physical system has only a meaning in a context of a particular physical experiment PSC does not provide any mental space-time picture of sub phenomena. The EPR paradox is avoided because the reduction of the state vector in the measurement process is a passage from a description of the whole ensemble of the experimental results to a particular sub-ensemble of these results. We show that the violation of BI is neither a proof of the completeness of QT nor of its non-locality. Therefore we rephrase the EPR question and ask whether QT is "predictably "complete or in other words does it provide the complete description of experimental data. To test the "predictable completeness" it is not necessary to perform additional experiments it is sufficient to analyze more in detail the existing experimental data by using various non-parametric purity tests and other specific statistical tools invented to study the fine structure the time-series.

  13. W-band frequency-swept EPR.

    PubMed

    Hyde, James S; Strangeway, Robert A; Camenisch, Theodore G; Ratke, Joseph J; Froncisz, Wojciech

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a novel experiment on nitroxide radical spin labels using a multiarm EPR W-band bridge with a loop-gap resonator (LGR). We demonstrate EPR spectroscopy of spin labels by linear sweep of the microwave frequency across the spectrum. The high bandwidth of the LGR, about 1 GHz between 3 dB points of the microwave resonance, makes this new experiment possible. A frequency-tunable yttrium iron garnet (YIG) oscillator provides sweep rates as high as 1.8x10(5) GHz/s, which corresponds to 6.3 kT/s in magnetic field-sweep units over a 44 MHz range. Two experimental domains were identified. In the first, linear frequency sweep rates were relatively slow, and pure absorption and pure dispersion spectra were obtained. This appears to be a practical mode of operation at the present level of technological development. The main advantage is the elimination of sinusoidal magnetic field modulation. In the second mode, the frequency is swept rapidly across a portion of the spectrum, and then the frequency sweep is stopped for a readout period; FID signals from a swept line oscillate at a frequency that is the difference between the spectral position of the line in frequency units and the readout position. If there is more than one line, oscillations are superimposed. The sweep rates using the YIG oscillator were too slow, and the portion of the spectrum too narrow to achieve the full EPR equivalent of Fourier transform (FT) NMR. The paper discusses technical advances required to reach this goal. The hypothesis that trapezoidal frequency sweep is an enabling technology for FT EPR is supported by this study.

  14. Self-testing through EPR-steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šupić, Ivan; Hoban, Matty J.

    2016-07-01

    The verification of quantum devices is an important aspect of quantum information, especially with the emergence of more advanced experimental implementations of quantum computation and secure communication. Within this, the theory of device-independent robust self-testing via Bell tests has reached a level of maturity now that many quantum states and measurements can be verified without direct access to the quantum systems: interaction with the devices is solely classical. However, the requirements for this robust level of verification are daunting and require high levels of experimental accuracy. In this paper we discuss the possibility of self-testing where we only have direct access to one part of the quantum device. This motivates the study of self-testing via EPR-steering, an intermediate form of entanglement verification between full state tomography and Bell tests. Quantum non-locality implies EPR-steering so results in the former can apply in the latter, but we ask what advantages may be gleaned from the latter over the former given that one can do partial state tomography? We show that in the case of self-testing a maximally entangled two-qubit state, or ebit, EPR-steering allows for simpler analysis and better error tolerance than in the case of full device-independence. On the other hand, this improvement is only a constant improvement and (up to constants) is the best one can hope for. Finally, we indicate that the main advantage in self-testing based on EPR-steering could be in the case of self-testing multi-partite quantum states and measurements. For example, it may be easier to establish a tensor product structure for a particular party’s Hilbert space even if we do not have access to their part of the global quantum system.

  15. A multifrequency EPR approach to travertine characterisation.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, F; Montegrossi, G; Pardi, L A; Minissale, A; Paladini, M; Romanelli, M

    2005-11-01

    The understanding of processes that give rise to travertine deposits is important. This is so because of its widespread use as decorative material, but more so in environmental studies due to the significance, by proxy, of travertine in climatology. In this paper, a multifrequency EPR spectroscopy study of the behaviour of an ubiquitary vicariant of Ca in calcite, Mn(II), is presented. EPR spectra were obtained from a natural sample at 9.5 (X-band), 95, 190, and 285GHz, and interpreted through numerical simulation. An analysis of the distribution of the zero-field splitting interaction revealed the source of some unexpected spectral features in the width of the lines in the X-band. By contrast, the homogeneous broadening plays only a minor role. Moreover, field-dependent anisotropies of the Zeeman and hyperfine tensors were observed at higher frequency. On the basis of results garnered in this study, the ZFS interaction of Mn(II) has been ascribed to the microstructural anomalies of the Mn(II) distribution in calcite. This may be considered as the fingerprint of the physical-chemical conditions at the time of travertine deposition. As a consequence, X-band EPR spectroscopy represents a specific tool to investigate the genesis, and to check the homogeneity of Mn(II) distribution in travertines as well as in other calcite-based materials. PMID:16105744

  16. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, J.; Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2016-02-01

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  17. Study of the stability of EPR signals after irradiation of fingernail samples.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ricardo A; Trompier, François; Romanyukha, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the electron paramagnetic resonance in fingernails can be used for radiation dosimetry purposes. Use of fingernails as an emergency dosimeter has benefits of easy, noninvasive sampling and fast dose measurements (∼10 min) potentially in field conditions and almost immediately after an exposure event. This study represents the next step in the development of EPR fingernail dosimetry; e.g., evaluation of the stability of the radiation-induced signal (RIS) at different storage and irradiation conditions. RIS fading during storage in both stressed (untreated) and unstressed (soaked in water) samples (n = 20) was studied at two temperature conditions: freezing (temp ≈ -20°C) and room temperature (20-24°C). Fingernail samples with the same clipping size and number and irradiated to 15 and 20 Gy were measured for over 200 d. Those irradiated to 100 and 200 Gy were measured for 114 d. The other group of samples irradiated to 1, 3, 8, and 20 Gy was followed for 25 mo of storage time. This study demonstrated that all samples that were kept at low freezing temperatures showed a stable RIS with no significant fading. All samples that were kept at room temperatures showed an initial fading of the signal with a slow rise of the EPR signal after irradiation with time to a saturation level. Obtained results allow making recommendations on the appropriate storage conditions of fingernails for EPR dosimetry use. PMID:22951476

  18. Bifunctional Spin Labeling of Muscle Proteins: Accurate Rotational Dynamics, Orientation, and Distance by EPR.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Binder, Benjamin P; McCaffrey, Jesse E; Svensson, Bengt; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    While EPR allows for the characterization of protein structure and function due to its exquisite sensitivity to spin label dynamics, orientation, and distance, these measurements are often limited in sensitivity due to the use of labels that are attached via flexible monofunctional bonds, incurring additional disorder and nanosecond dynamics. In this chapter, we present methods for using a bifunctional spin label (BSL) to measure muscle protein structure and dynamics. We demonstrate that bifunctional attachment eliminates nanosecond internal rotation of the spin label, thereby allowing the accurate measurement of protein backbone rotational dynamics, including microsecond-to-millisecond motions by saturation transfer EPR. BSL also allows for accurate determination of helix orientation and disorder in mechanically and magnetically aligned systems, due to the label's stereospecific attachment. Similarly, labeling with a pair of BSL greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of distance measurements measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER). Finally, when BSL is applied to a protein with high helical content in an assembly with high orientational order (e.g., muscle fiber or membrane), two-probe DEER experiments can be combined with single-probe EPR experiments on an oriented sample in a process we call BEER, which has the potential for ab initio high-resolution structure determination. PMID:26477249

  19. Bismuth germanate as a perspective material for dielectric resonators in EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail Y.; Nadolinny, Vladimir A.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Grishin, Yuriy A.; Fedin, Matvey V.; Veber, Sergey L.

    2016-10-01

    High purity bismuth germanate (Bi4(GeO4)3, BGO) is proposed and implemented as an alternative material for dielectric EPR resonators. A significant improvement of the absolute sensitivity can be readily achieved by substituting the alumina insert (ring) by BGO-made one in commercially available X-band EPR probeheads. Four BGO dielectric inserts of 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm inner diameter (ID) were made for comparison with standard 5 mm inner diameter alumina insert. All inserts were introduced into commercial Bruker EPR resonator ER 4118X-MD-5W1, and their performance was investigated. The Q-values of empty resonators, B1 saturation curves and continuous wave EPR spectra of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) were measured and analyzed in a temperature range 6-300 K. BGO-made resonators were found superior in several important aspects. The background signals arising from BGO are much weaker compared to those of alumina at B = 0-0.6 T and T = 6-300 K; this is especially useful for measuring weak signals in the half-field region, as well as those near the central field. Moreover, mechanical properties of BGO allow easy fabrication of dielectric bodies having various shapes and sizes; in particular, small BGO resonators (e.g. ID = 2 or 3 mm) strongly enhance sensitivity for small samples due to increase of the filling factor. All these advantages have been also inspected in the pulse mode, proving that higher B1 fields and better filling factors can be achieved, contributing to the overall enhancement of the performance.

  20. EPR spin labeling measurements of thylakoid membrane fluidity during barley leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Jajić, Ivan; Wiśniewska-Becker, Anna; Sarna, Tadeusz; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2014-07-15

    Physical properties of thylakoid membranes isolated from barley were investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin labeling technique. EPR spectra of stearic acid spin labels 5-SASL and 16-SASL were measured as a function of temperature in secondary barley leaves during natural and dark-induced senescence. Oxygen transport parameter was determined from the power saturation curves of the spin labels obtained in the presence and absence of molecular oxygen at 25°C. Parameters of EPR spectra of both spin labels showed an increase in the thylakoid membrane fluidity during senescence, in the headgroup area of the membrane, as well as in its interior. The oxygen transport parameter also increased with age of barley, indicating easier diffusion of oxygen within the membrane and its higher fluidity. The data are consistent with age-related changes of the spin label parameters obtained directly by EPR spectroscopy. Similar outcome was also observed when senescence was induced in mature secondary barley leaves by dark incubation. Such leaves showed higher membrane fluidity in comparison with leaves of the same age, grown under light conditions. Changes in the membrane fluidity of barley secondary leaves were compared with changes in the levels of carotenoids (car) and proteins, which are known to modify membrane fluidity. Determination of total car and proteins showed linear decrease in their level with senescence. The results indicate that thylakoid membrane fluidity of barley leaves increases with senescence; the changes are accompanied with a decrease in the content of car and proteins, which could be a contributing factor. PMID:24974331

  1. Bismuth germanate as a perspective material for dielectric resonators in EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail Y; Nadolinny, Vladimir A; Bagryanskaya, Elena G; Grishin, Yuriy A; Fedin, Matvey V; Veber, Sergey L

    2016-10-01

    High purity bismuth germanate (Bi4(GeO4)3, BGO) is proposed and implemented as an alternative material for dielectric EPR resonators. A significant improvement of the absolute sensitivity can be readily achieved by substituting the alumina insert (ring) by BGO-made one in commercially available X-band EPR probeheads. Four BGO dielectric inserts of 2, 3, 4 and 5mm inner diameter (ID) were made for comparison with standard 5mm inner diameter alumina insert. All inserts were introduced into commercial Bruker EPR resonator ER 4118X-MD-5W1, and their performance was investigated. The Q-values of empty resonators, B1 saturation curves and continuous wave EPR spectra of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) were measured and analyzed in a temperature range 6-300K. BGO-made resonators were found superior in several important aspects. The background signals arising from BGO are much weaker compared to those of alumina at B=0-0.6T and T=6-300K; this is especially useful for measuring weak signals in the half-field region, as well as those near the central field. Moreover, mechanical properties of BGO allow easy fabrication of dielectric bodies having various shapes and sizes; in particular, small BGO resonators (e.g. ID=2 or 3mm) strongly enhance sensitivity for small samples due to increase of the filling factor. All these advantages have been also inspected in the pulse mode, proving that higher B1 fields and better filling factors can be achieved, contributing to the overall enhancement of the performance. PMID:27569694

  2. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  3. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  4. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In this study, noninvasive 9 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9 GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9 GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2 mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe3+, and Mn2+ complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1 h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds.

  5. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-15

    In this study, noninvasive 9GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe(3+), and Mn(2+) complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds.

  6. EPR: what has it taught us

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    This symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is a fitting place to review what that work and its sequels have taught us. Prima facie, the EPR paper appears to have been exceedingly counter-productive for the following reasons: (1) The work was quickly rebutted by Bohr, and this rebuttal was apparently accepted by most workers in the field. (2) Scientists who adopted the position advocated by Bohr have produced, in the intervening fifty years, a marvelous body of useful theory, whereas those following the course suggested by EPR have produced nothing of any certified practical value. (3) It has been shown by Bell that the conclusion reached by EPR is incompatible with their assumptions. Chemists and physicists have recently begun to examine the behavior of quantum mechanical systems that are very small, yet large enough to influence their environment in ways that appreciably modify their own behavior, vis-a-vis the behavior they would have if isolated. Because these systems are neither small enough to be treated as isolated (or as residing in a classically described environment) between preparation and detection, nor large enough to be treated classically, they do not conform to the format demanded by the Copenhagen interpretation. Indeed, the behavior of these systems depends on ontological considerations that were irrelevant in the situations covered by the Copenhagen interpretation, and that were systematically ignored in that interpretation. Scientists now face the task of enlarging the scope of quantum theory to cover these new situations, and comparing the empirical consequences of various ontological assumptions. 17 refs.

  7. Case Studies in e-RPL and e-PR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roslyn; Miller, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The use of ePortfolios for recognition of prior learning (e-RPL) and for professional recognition (e-PR) is slowly gaining in popularity in the VET sector however their use is sporadic across educational sectors, disciplines, educational institutions and professions. Added to this is an array of purposes and types of e-RPL and e-PR models and…

  8. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-15

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of Q{sub sA}{sup 2}, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  9. EPR investigation of some gamma-irradiated excipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, Katerina; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2012-09-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on some excipients: lactose, microcrystalline cellulose (avicel), starch, dioxosilane (aerosil), talc and magnesium stearate before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation, all samples are EPR silent except talc. After gamma-irradiation, they show complex spectra except magnesium stearate, which is EPR silent. Studies show the influence of gamma-irradiation on EPR spectra and stability of gamma-induced radicals. Analysis of the EPR spectrum of gamma-irradiated talc shows that this material is radiation insensitive. Only lactose forms stable-free radicals upon gamma sterilization and can be used for identification of radiation processing for a long time period thereafter.

  10. Microwave Saturation of Complex EPR Spectra and Free Radicals of Burnt Skin Treated with Apitherapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The effect of microwave power on the complex electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the burn matrix after the therapy with propolis was examined. The spectra were measured with microwaves in the range of 2.2–79 mW. Three groups of free radicals were found in the damaged skin samples. Their spectral lines evolve differently with the microwave power. In order to detect these free radical groups, the lineshape of the spectra was numerically analysed. The spectra were a superposition of three component lines. The best fit was obtained for the deconvolution of the experimental spectra into one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. The microwave power changes also the lineshape of the spectra of thermally injured skin treated with the conventional agent—silver sulphadiazine. The spectral changes were different for propolis and for silver sulphadiazine. The number of individual groups of free radicals in the wound bed after implementation of these two substances is not equal. It may be explained by a higher activity of propolis than of silver sulphadiazine as therapeutic agents. PMID:23781263

  11. Microwave Saturation of Complex EPR Spectra and Free Radicals of Burnt Skin Treated with Apitherapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The effect of microwave power on the complex electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the burn matrix after the therapy with propolis was examined. The spectra were measured with microwaves in the range of 2.2-79 mW. Three groups of free radicals were found in the damaged skin samples. Their spectral lines evolve differently with the microwave power. In order to detect these free radical groups, the lineshape of the spectra was numerically analysed. The spectra were a superposition of three component lines. The best fit was obtained for the deconvolution of the experimental spectra into one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. The microwave power changes also the lineshape of the spectra of thermally injured skin treated with the conventional agent-silver sulphadiazine. The spectral changes were different for propolis and for silver sulphadiazine. The number of individual groups of free radicals in the wound bed after implementation of these two substances is not equal. It may be explained by a higher activity of propolis than of silver sulphadiazine as therapeutic agents.

  12. Distinctive EPR signals provide an understanding of the affinity of bis-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonato) copper(II) complexes for hydrophobic environments.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Maria; Leite, Andreia; Silva, André M N; Moniz, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Amorim, M João; Queirós, Carla; Cunha-Silva, Luís; Gameiro, Paula; Burgess, John

    2014-07-01

    In this work we report the synthesis and characterization of a set of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone copper(ii) complexes with variable lipophilicity. EPR spectroscopy was used to characterize the structure of copper(ii) complexes in solution, and as a tool to gain insight into solvent interactions. EPR spectra of solutions of the [CuL2] complexes recorded in different solvents reveal the presence of two copper species whose ratio depends on the nature of the solvent. Investigation of EPR spectra in the pure solvents methanol, dimethylsulfoxide, dichloromethane and their 50% (v/v) mixtures with toluene allowed the characterization of two types of copper signals (gzz = 2.30 and gzz = 2.26) whose spin-Hamiltonian parameters are consistent with solvated and non-solvated square-planar copper(ii) complexes. Regarding the potential biological application of ligands and complexes and to get insight into the partition properties in water-membrane interfaces, EPR spectra were also obtained in water-saturated octanol, an aqueous solution buffered at pH = 7.4 and liposome suspensions, for three compounds representative of different hydro-lipophilic balances. Analysis of the EPR spectra obtained in liposomes allowed establishment of the location of the complexes in the water and lipid phases. In view of the results of this work we put forward the use of EPR spectroscopy to assess the affinity of copper(ii) complexes for a hydrophobic environment and also to obtain indirect information about the lipophilicity of the ligands and similar EPR silent complexes.

  13. EPR and fluorescence depolarization studies on bovine cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Stone, D B; Mendelson, R A; Botts, J; Cheung, P H

    1981-09-01

    To test for possible differences in local conformation and S1 flexibility, bovine cardiac and rabbit skeletal myosins were labeled with a fluorophore (1,5-IAEDANS) and a spin label having iodoacetamide reactivity. The marked activation of the Ca2+-ATPase (6- to 8-fold) and inhibition of the K+ (EDTA)-ATPase (80-90%) by both labels indicated specific labeling of the fast-reacting thiols (SH1) of both myosins. Fluorescence depolarization studies of 1,5-IAEDANS-labeled cardiac myosin indicated that, like skeletal myosin, the SI moieties of cardiac myosin exhibit considerable segmental flexibility with respect to the rod portion of the molecule. This indicates that segmental flexibility may be a property of all myosins. Cardiac and skeletal myosins immobilized spin labels to approximately the same extent, indicating a similarity in steric restraints around the SH1 thiol of the two myosins. The magnitude of the changes in spin label mobility accompanying binding of MgADP and hydrolysis of MgATP was reduced in cardiac myosin relative to skeletal myosin. This suggests that the lower catalytic center activity of cardiac myosin is associated with more restricted conformational changes accompanying formation of M.ADP and M.ADP.Pi. From measurements of spin label mobility, the affinity of cardiac and skeletal myosin for ADP were similar: Kd (ADP) = 7 microM, n = 1.6. The EPR spectrum of spin labels attached to cardiac and skeletal myosin showed similar saturation effects upon actin binding indicating immobilization of myosin heads occurs with both proteins.

  14. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  15. EPR study of Gallium atoms in benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.A.; Joly, H.A.; Mile, B.; Sutcliffe, R. )

    1991-09-05

    An EPR study of a Ga atom matrix isolated in benzene at 77 K has revealed the presence of a paramagnetic species with the magnetic parameters {alpha}{sub zz}(69) = 256 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(69) = 270 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(69) = 284 MHz, {alpha}{sub zz}(71) = 325 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(71) = 343 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(71) = 361 Mhz, g{sub zz} = 1.9970, g{approximately}{sub xx} = 1.9750, and g{sub yy} = 1.9350. These parameters are consistent with a trapped atom or a weak Ga-benzene complex that has had the degeneracy of the Ga p orbitals lifted by interaction with the benzene matrix. This contrasts with Al in benzene which gives a mononuclear monoligand complex, Al(C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), with quite strong bonding between the metal atom and the ligand.

  16. EPR paradox, quantum nonlocality and physical reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Eighty years ago Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen demonstrated that instantaneous reduction of wave function, believed to describe completely a pair of entangled physical systems, led to EPR paradox. The paradox disappears in statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) according to which a wave function describes only an ensemble of identically prepared physical systems. QM predicts strong correlations between outcomes of measurements performed on different members of EPR pairs in far-away locations. Searching for an intuitive explanation of these correlations John Bell analysed so called local realistic hidden variable models and proved that correlations consistent with these models satisfy Bell inequalities which are violated by some predictions of QM and by experimental data. Several different local models were constructed and inequalities proven. Some eminent physicists concluded that Nature is definitely nonlocal and that it is acting according to a law of nonlocal randomness. According to these law perfectly random, but strongly correlated events, can be produced at the same time in far away locations and a local and causal explanation of their occurrence cannot be given. We strongly disagree with this conclusion and we prove the contrary by analysing in detail some influential finite sample proofs of Bell and CHSH inequalities and so called Quantum Randi Challenges. We also show how one can win so called Bell's game without violating locality of Nature. Nonlocal randomness is inconsistent with local quantum field theory, with standard model in elementary particle physics and with causal laws and adaptive dynamics prevailing in the surrounding us world. The experimental violation of Bell-type inequalities does not prove the nonlocality of Nature but it only confirms a contextual character of quantum observables and gives a strong argument against counterfactual definiteness and against a point of view according to which experimental outcomes are produced

  17. FID detection of EPR and ENDOR spectra at high microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, H.; Akimoto, I.; Milikisyants, S.; Gast, P.; Groenen, E. J. J.; Schmidt, J.

    2009-11-01

    High-frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy allows FID detection of EPR spectra owing to the short dead time that can be achieved. This FID detection is particularly attractive for EPR and ENDOR spectroscopy of paramagnetic species that exhibit inhomogeneously broadened EPR lines and short dephasing times. Experiments are reported for the metalloprotein azurin at 275 GHz.

  18. Macromolecular therapeutics in cancer treatment: the EPR effect and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi

    2012-12-10

    In this review, I have discussed various issues of the cancer drug targeting primarily related to the EPR (enhanced permeability and retention) effect, which utilized nanomedicine or macromolecular drugs. The content goes back to the development of the first polymer-protein conjugate anticancer agent SMANCS and development of the arterial infusion in Lipiodol formulation into the tumor feeding artery (hepatic artery for hepatoma). The brief account on the EPR effect and its definition, factors involved, heterogeneity, and various methods of augmentation of the EPR effect, which showed remarkably improved clinical outcomes are also discussed. Various obstacles involved in drug developments and commercialization are also discussed through my personal experience and recollections.

  19. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  20. EPR detection of foods preserved with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlinska, G.; Michalik, J.

    1998-06-01

    The applicability of the epr technique for the detection of dried vegetables, mushrooms, some spices, flavour additives and some condiments preserved with ionizing radiation is discussed. The epr signals recorded after exposure to gamma rays and to beams of 10 MeV electrons from linac are stable, intense and specific enough as compared with those observed with nonirradiated samples and could be used for the detection of irradiation. However, stability of radiation induced epr signals produced in these foods depends on storage condition. No differences in shapes (spectral parameters) and intensities of the epr spectra recorded with samples exposed to the same doses of gamma rays ( 60Co) and 10 MeV electrons were observed

  1. Time-resolved EPR spectroscopy in a Unix environment.

    PubMed

    Lacoff, N M; Franke, J E; Warden, J T

    1990-02-01

    A computer-aided time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer implemented under version 2.9 BSD Unix was developed by interfacing a Varian E-9 EPR spectrometer and a Biomation 805 waveform recorder to a PDP-11/23A minicomputer having MINC A/D and D/A capabilities. Special problems with real-time data acquisition in a multiuser, multitasking Unix environment, addressing of computer main memory for the control of hardware devices, and limitation of computer main memory were resolved, and their solutions are presented. The time-resolved EPR system and the data acquisition and analysis programs, written entirely in C, are described. Furthermore, the benefits of utilizing the Unix operating system and the C language are discussed, and system performance is illustrated with time-resolved EPR spectra of the reaction center cation in photosystem 1 of green plant photosynthesis.

  2. Software for evaluation of EPR-dosimetry performance.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Timofeev, Yu S; Ivanov, D V

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with tooth enamel is a method extensively used for retrospective external dosimetry. Different research groups apply different equipment, sample preparation procedures and spectrum processing algorithms for EPR dosimetry. A uniform algorithm for description and comparison of performances was designed and implemented in a new computer code. The aim of the paper is to introduce the new software 'EPR-dosimetry performance'. The computer code is a user-friendly tool for providing a full description of method-specific capabilities of EPR tooth dosimetry, from metrological characteristics to practical limitations in applications. The software designed for scientists and engineers has several applications, including support of method calibration by evaluation of calibration parameters, evaluation of critical value and detection limit for registration of radiation-induced signal amplitude, estimation of critical value and detection limit for dose evaluation, estimation of minimal detectable value for anthropogenic dose assessment and description of method uncertainty.

  3. Study of metalloproteins using continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

    PubMed

    Gambarelli, Serge; Maurel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is an invaluable tool when studying systems with paramagnetic centers. It is a sensitive spectroscopic method, which can be used with dilute samples in aqueous buffer solutions. Here, we describe the basic procedure for recording an X-band EPR spectrum of a metalloprotein sample at low temperature. We also discuss basic optimization techniques to provide spectra with a high signal to noise ratio and minimum distortion.

  4. Use of aspartame-based sweetener tablets in emergency dosimetry using EPR.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, A; Salama, E

    2010-06-01

    Accident dosimetry aims to evaluate the unplanned radiation doses delivered to individuals through one of the objects exist in the area of the accident. The gamma dose response of free radicals generated in irradiated aspartame tablets and its usability for emergency dosimetry was studied. EPR spectra of unirradiated and irradiated aspartame-based sweetener were recorded. Two signals arise after irradiating, S(1) at g (S(1)) = 2.00229 +/- 0.00097 and S(2) at g (S(2)) = 2.00262 +/- 0.00088. Some EPR parameters were studied for radiation-induced radicals in aspartame sweeteners tablets, such as the microwave saturation behaviour, the effect of magnetic field modulation amplitude on the peak-to-peak height and peak-to-peak line width for both of S(1) and S(2). Responses of S(1) and S(2) to different radiation doses were studied and resulted in linear relationships, radicals persistence curves were plotted over a 49-d storage period. It was found that Aspartame sweeteners tablets are useful in the range from 0.96 to 39.96 Gy. Radiation-induced radicals possess reasonable stability.

  5. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  6. EPR study on non- and gamma-irradiated herbal pills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    The results of EPR studies on herbal pills of marigold, hawthorn, yarrow, common balm, tutsan, nettle and thyme before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak singlet EPR line with a g-factor of 2.0048±0.0005. After irradiation herbal pills could be separated in two groups according to their EPR spectra. Radiation-induced free radicals in pills of marigold, yarrow, nettle, tutsan and thyme could be attributed mainly to saccharide excipients. Tablets of hawthorn and common balm show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, superimposed on partly resolved carbohydrate spectrum, due to the active part (herb) and inulin, which is present in the pills as an excipient. Fading study of the radiation-induced EPR signals confirms that sugar radicals are more stable than cellulose species. The reported results show that the presence of characteristic EPR spectra of herbal pills due to excipients or active part can be used as unambiguous proof of radiation processing within 35 or more days after irradiation.

  7. EPR of Mononuclear Non-Heme Iron Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    Flexible geometry of three- to six-protein side-chain ligands to non-heme iron in proteins is the basis for widely diverse reactivites ranging from iron transport to redox chemistry. The gap between fixed states determined by x-ray analysis can be filled by spectroscopic study of trapped intermediates. EPR is a versatile and relatively quick approach to defining intermediate states in terms of the geometry and electronic structures of iron. A number of examples in which the iron chemistry of non-heme proteins is understood through x-ray structures at subbond length resolution, refined calculations, and spectroscopy exist now. Some examples in which EPR has provided unique insight are summarized in Table 1. Assignment and quantitative evaluation of the EPR resonances in ferric, non-heme iron sites is the focus of the first section of this review. An earlier chapter in this series provides more background on the theory specific to EPR of S = 5/2 metal ions [1]. Besides EPR spectra of ferric mononuclear sites, EPR of ferrous iron coupled to a spin 1/2 radical, as it pertains to the categories mononuclear and non-heme, will also be covered, in the second half of this chapter. Examples include the quinone-ferrous interactions in photosynthetic reaction centers and nitric oxide complexes with non-heme ferrous iron. Other recent reviews of the biochemistry and spectroscopy of non-heme iron proteins provide additional background [2-6]. PMID:20428459

  8. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  9. EFFECT OF MICROWAVE POWER ON SHAPE OF EPR SPECTRA--APPLICATION TO EXAMINATION OF COMPLEX FREE RADICAL SYSTEM IN THERMALLY STERILIZED ACIDUM BORICUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pieprzyca, Małgorzata; Pilawa, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Complex free radical system in thermally sterilized acidum boricum (AB) was studied. Acidum boricum was sterilized at temperatures and times given by pharmaceutical norms: 160 degrees C and 120 min, 170 degrees C and 60 min and 180 degrees C and 30 min. The advanced spectroscopic tests were performed. The EPR spectra of free radicals were measured as the first derivatives with microwaves of 9.3 GHz frequency and magnetic modulation of 100 kHz. The Polish X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer of Radiopan (Poznań) was used. EPR lines were not observed for the nonheated AB. The broad EPR asymmetric lines were obtained for all the heated AB samples. The influence of microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW on the shape of EPR spectra of the heated drug samples was tested. The following asymmetry parameters: A1/A2, A1-A2, B1/B2, and B1-B2, were analyzed. The changes of these parameters with microwave power were observed. The strong dependence of shape and its parameters on microwave power proved the complex character of free radical system in thermally sterilized AB. Changes of microwave power during the detection of EPR spectra indicated complex character of free radicals in AB sterilized in hot air under all the tested conditions. Thermolysis, interactions between free radicals and interactions of free radicals with oxygen may be responsible for the complex free radicals system in thermally treated AB. Usefulness of continuous microwave saturation of EPR lines and shape analysis to examine free radicals in thermally sterilized drugs was confirmed. PMID:27180421

  10. EFFECT OF MICROWAVE POWER ON SHAPE OF EPR SPECTRA--APPLICATION TO EXAMINATION OF COMPLEX FREE RADICAL SYSTEM IN THERMALLY STERILIZED ACIDUM BORICUM.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paweł; Pieprzyca, Małgorzata; Pilawa, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Complex free radical system in thermally sterilized acidum boricum (AB) was studied. Acidum boricum was sterilized at temperatures and times given by pharmaceutical norms: 160 degrees C and 120 min, 170 degrees C and 60 min and 180 degrees C and 30 min. The advanced spectroscopic tests were performed. The EPR spectra of free radicals were measured as the first derivatives with microwaves of 9.3 GHz frequency and magnetic modulation of 100 kHz. The Polish X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer of Radiopan (Poznań) was used. EPR lines were not observed for the nonheated AB. The broad EPR asymmetric lines were obtained for all the heated AB samples. The influence of microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW on the shape of EPR spectra of the heated drug samples was tested. The following asymmetry parameters: A1/A2, A1-A2, B1/B2, and B1-B2, were analyzed. The changes of these parameters with microwave power were observed. The strong dependence of shape and its parameters on microwave power proved the complex character of free radical system in thermally sterilized AB. Changes of microwave power during the detection of EPR spectra indicated complex character of free radicals in AB sterilized in hot air under all the tested conditions. Thermolysis, interactions between free radicals and interactions of free radicals with oxygen may be responsible for the complex free radicals system in thermally treated AB. Usefulness of continuous microwave saturation of EPR lines and shape analysis to examine free radicals in thermally sterilized drugs was confirmed.

  11. Pulsed EPR for studying silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, J.; Wasowicz, T.; Sadlo, J.; Reijerse, E. J.; Kevan, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cationic silver clusters of different nuclearity have been produced by radiolysis of zeolite A and SAPO molecular sieves containing Ag + as exchangeable cations. The pulsed EPR spectroscopy has been applied for studying the local environment of silver cluster in order to understand the mechanism of cluster formation and stabilization. The electron spin echo modulation (ESEM) results on Ag 6n+ cluster in dehydration zeolite A indicate that the hexameric silver is stabilized only in sodalite cages which are surrounded by α-cages containing no water molecules. Trimeric silver clusters formed in hydrated A zeolites strongly interact with water, thus the paramagnetic center can be considered as a cluster-water adduct. In SAPO-molecular sieves, silver clusters are formed only in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules. From ESEM it is determined that Ag 4n+ in SAPO-42 is stabilized in α-cages, where it is directly coordinated by two methanol molecules. Dimeric silver, Ag 2+ in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 is located in 6-ring channels and interacts with three CH 3OH molecules, each in different 10-ring or 12-ring channels. The differences of Ag 2+ stability in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 are also discussed.

  12. Asymmetric EPR entanglement in continuous variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Katherine; Janousek, Jiri; Armstrong, Seiji; Morizur, Jean-François; Lam, Ping Koy; Bachor, Hans-Albert

    2014-11-01

    Continuous variable entanglement can be produced in nonlinear systems or via the interference of squeezed states. In many optical systems such as parametric down conversion, the production of two perfectly symmetric subsystems is usually assumed when demonstrating the existence of entanglement. This symmetry simplifies the description of entanglement. However, asymmetry in entanglement may arise naturally in a real experiment, or be intentionally introduced in a given quantum information protocol. These asymmetries can emerge from having the output beams experience different losses and environmental contamination, or from the availability of non-identical input quantum states in quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we present a visualization of entanglement using quadrature amplitude plots of the twin beams. We quantitatively discuss the strength of asymmetric entanglement using EPR and inseparability criteria and theoretically show that the optimal beamsplitter ratio for entanglement is dependent on the asymmetries and may not be 50 : 50. To support this theory, we present experimental results showing one particular asymmetric entanglement where a 78 : 22 beamsplitter is optimal for observing entanglement.

  13. LET effects following neutron irradiation of lithium formate EPR dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Eirik; Waldeland, Einar; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar

    2006-03-13

    Lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters were irradiated using 60Co gamma-rays or fast neutrons to doses ranging from 5 to 20 Gy and investigated by EPR spectroscopy. Using a polynomial fitting procedure in order to accurately analyze peak-to-peak line widths of first derivative EPR spectra, dosimeters irradiated with neutrons had on average 4.4+/-0.9% broader EPR resonance lines than gamma-irradiated dosimeters. The increase in line width was slightly asymmetrical. Computer simulated first derivative polycrystalline EPR spectra of a *CO2- radical gave very good reconstructions of experimental spectra of irradiated dosimeters. The spectrum simulations could then be used as a tool to investigate the line broadening observed following neutron irradiation. It was shown that an increase in the simulated Lorentzian line width could explain both the observed line broadening and the asymmetrical effect. The ratio of the peak-to-peak amplitude of first derivative EPR spectra obtained at two different microwave powers (20 and 0.5 mW) was 7.8+/-1.2% higher for dosimeters irradiated with neutrons. The dependence of the spectrum amplitude on the microwave power was extensively investigated by fitting observations to an analytical non-linear model incorporating, among others, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times as fitting parameters. Neutron irradiation resulted in a reduction in T(2) in comparison with gamma-irradiation, while a smaller difference in T1 was found. The effects observed indicate increased local radical density following irradiation using high linear energy transfer (LET) neutrons as compared to low LET gamma-irradiation. A fingerprint of the LET may thus be found either by an analysis of the line width or of the dependence of the spectrum amplitude on the microwave power. Lithium formate is therefore a promising material for EPR dosimetry of high LET radiation.

  14. High-Frequency EPR and ENDOR Spectroscopy on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Pavel G.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-01-01

    is observed. Finally, it is shown that an almost complete dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 67Zn nuclear spins in the core of ZnO QDs and of the 1H nuclear spins in the Zn(OH)2 capping layer can be obtained. This DNP is achieved by saturating the EPR transition of SDs present in the QDs with resonant high-frequency microwaves at low temperatures. This nuclear polarization manifests itself as a hole and an antihole in the EPR absorption line of the SD in the QDs and a shift of the hole (antihole). The enhancement of the nuclear polarization opens the possibility to study semiconductor nanostructures with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. PMID:20936163

  15. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  16. Retrospective dosimetry using EPR and TL techniques: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    Methods of retrospective dosimetry, including luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), rely on measurement of accident dose absorbed by naturally occurring materials - ceramics in the case of both thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and organic materials and bio- minerals in the case of EPR. Each of these methods relies on measurement of radiation defects resulting from accidental exposure. Since defects also result from natural sources of radiation over the lifetime of a sample, analysis is usually restricted to materials for which the natural dose may be determined and subtracted from the measured cumulative dose. Luminescence dating techniques rely heavily on an accurate assessment of cumulative dose from natural radiation sources, and dating research has provided us with the bulk of our knowledge in this area. Virtually all of the work on natural dose determination can be directly applied to retrospective techniques. With EPR techniques the cumulative dose from diagnostic x- rays is also of importance.

  17. EPR Correlations, Bell Inequalities and Common Cause Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer-Szabó, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    Standard common causal explanations of the EPR situation assume a so-called joint common cause system that is a common cause for all correlations. However, the assumption of a joint common cause system together with some other physically motivated assumptions concerning locality and no-conspiracy results in various Bell inequalities. Since Bell inequalities are violated for appropriate measurement settings, a local, non-conspiratorial joint common causal explanation of the EPR situation is ruled out. But why do we assume that a common causal explanation of a set of correlation consists in finding a joint common cause system for all correlations and not just in finding separate common cause systems for the different correlations? What are the perspectives of a local, non-conspiratorial separate common causal explanation for the EPR scenario? And finally, how do Bell inequalities relate to the weaker assumption of separate common cause systems?

  18. Strontium sulfate as an EPR dosimeter for radiation technology application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, M. A. H.; Abdel-Fattah, A. A.; Sherif, M. M.; Soliman, Y. S.; Mansour, A.

    2015-01-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of γ-radiation induced defects in strontium sulfate rod dosimeter are investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique focusing on the low dose range of 1-100 Gy. Significant EPR signals of spectroscopic splitting factor (g) 2.01075, 2.04225, 2.03166, 2.00774 and 1.9219086 are observed in the rod upon γ-irradiation. The intensity of the signals increases linearly with increasing absorbed doses up to 100 Gy. The EPR response of irradiated dosimeter exhibits good stability over three months of storage. In addition, the response during irradiation is independent on both relative humidity (from 0% to 65%) and temperature (from 10 °C to 35 °C). The prepared rods are nearly water equivalent in the range of 0.4-5 MeV and the overall uncertainty (2σ) of dose monitoring is approximately 4.26%.

  19. Identification and dosimetry of irradiated walnuts (Juglans regia) using EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, A.; Salama, E.; Sami, A.; Mansour, A.; El-Sayed, M.

    2012-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is an easy, fast, and reliable tool for identification of irradiated food. Untreated nuts may encounter hazards of carrying several pathogens or microbial contamination; walnuts are of specific importance due to their nutritional and medicinal values, and hence walnut processing via gamma irradiation is a necessary step. EPR was employed for the identification and dosimetry of Cs-137 gamma-irradiated walnuts (shells and kernels). Several important parameters were studied, such as spectral features, microwave power dependence of signal intensities, and short- and long-term time dependences. Responses of walnut shells and kernels to different radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were investigated. Results confirmed that EPR is a suitable tool for the identification and dosimetry of irradiated walnuts using either their shells or only kernels.

  20. Free radicals and antioxidants at a glance using EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The delicate balance between the advantageous and detrimental effects of free radicals is one of the important aspects of human (patho)physiology. The controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has an essential role in the regulation of various signaling switches. On the other hand, imbalanced generation of radicals is highly correlated with the pathogenesis of many diseases which require the application of selected antioxidants to regain the homeostasis. In the era of growing interest for redox processes, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is arguably the best-suited technique for such research due to its ability to provide a unique insight into the world of free radicals and antioxidants. Herein, I present the principles of EPR spectroscopy and the applications of this method in assessing: (i) the oxidative status of biological systems, using endogenous long-lived free radicals (ascorbyl radical (Asc(•)), tocopheroxyl radical (TO(•)), melanin) as markers; (ii) the production of short-lived radicals (hydroxyl radical (OH(•)), superoxide radical anion (O(2)(•-)), sulfur- and carbon-centered radicals), which are implicated in both, oxidative stress and redox signaling; (iii) the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO(•)); (iv) the antioxidative properties of various drugs, compounds, and natural products; (v) other redox-relevant parameter. Besides giving a comprehensive survey of up-to-date literature, I also provide illustrative examples in sufficient detail to provide a means to exploit the potential of EPR in biochemical/physiological/medical research. The emphasis is on the features and characteristics (both positive and negative) relevant for EPR application in clinical sciences. My aim is to encourage fellow colleagues interested in free radicals and antioxidants to expand their base knowledge or methods used in their laboratories with data acquired by EPR or some of the EPR techniques outlined in this review, in order to

  1. EPR studies of gamma-irradiated taurine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Karabulut, B.; Tapramaz, R.; Köksal, F.

    2000-04-01

    An EPR study of gamma-irradiated taurine [C 2H 7NO 3S] single crystal was carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra were recorded in the three at mutually perpendicular planes. There are two magnetically distinct sites in monoclinic lattice. The principle values of g and hyperfine constants for both sites were calculated. The results have indicated the presence of 32ṠO -2 and 33ṠO -2 radicals. The hyperfine values of 33ṠO -2 radical were used to obtain O-S-O bond angle for both sites.

  2. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  3. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform. PMID:26120897

  4. A hand-held EPR scanner for transcutaneous oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Helen; Ahmad, Rizwan; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous (skin) oxygenation is an important prognostic factor for the treatment of chronic wounds, skin cancer, diabetes side effects, and limb amputation. Currently, there are no reliable methods for measuring this parameter. Oximetry, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, is emerging as a potential tool for clinical oximetry, including cutaneous applications. The problem with EPR oximetry, however, is that the conventional EPR design requires the use of a large magnet that can generate homogeneous field across the sample, making it unattractive for clinical practice. We present a novel approach that makes use of a miniature permanent magnet, combined with a small microwave resonator, to enable the acquisition of EPR signals from paramagnetic species placed on the skin. The instrumentation consists of a hand-held, modular, cylindrical probehead with overall dimensions of 36-mm diameter and 24-mm height, with 150-g weight. The probehead includes a Halbach array of 16 pieces (4×4×8 mm3) of Sm-Co permanent magnet and a loop-gap resonator (2.24 GHz). Preliminary measurements using a Hahn-echo pulse sequence (800 echos in 20 ms) showed a signalto- noise ratio of ~70 compared to ~435 in a homogenous magnet under identical settings. Further work is in progress to improve the performance of the probehead and to optimize the hand-held system for clinical use

  5. Accurate Extraction of Nanometer Distances in Multimers by Pulse EPR

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Silvia; Ackermann, Katrin; Pliotas, Christos; Huang, Hexian; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is gaining increasing importance in structural biology. The PELDOR (pulsed electron–electron double resonance) method allows extracting distance information on the nanometer scale. Here, we demonstrate the efficient extraction of distances from multimeric systems such as membrane‐embedded ion channels where data analysis is commonly hindered by multi‐spin effects. PMID:26865468

  6. Development of a Hybrid EPR/NMR Coimaging System

    PubMed Central

    Samouilov, Alexandre; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique that enables spatial mapping of free radicals or other paramagnetic compounds; however, it does not in itself provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. A hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument was constructed that utilizes the complementary capabilities of both techniques, superimposing EPR and proton-MR images to provide the distribution of paramagnetic species in the body. A common magnet and field gradient system is utilized along with a dual EPR and proton-NMR resonator assembly, enabling coimaging without the need to move the sample. EPRI is performed at ~1.2 GHz/~40 mT and proton MRI is performed at 16.18 MHz/~380 mT; hence the method is suitable for whole-body coimaging of living mice. The gradient system used is calibrated and controlled in such a manner that the spatial geometry of the two acquired images is matched, enabling their superposition without additional postprocessing or marker registration. The performance of the system was tested in a series of phantoms and in vivo applications by mapping the location of a paramagnetic probe in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice. This hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument enables imaging of paramagnetic molecules along with their anatomic localization in the body. PMID:17659621

  7. Development of a hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging system.

    PubMed

    Samouilov, Alexandre; Caia, George L; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Zweier, Jay L

    2007-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique that enables spatial mapping of free radicals or other paramagnetic compounds; however, it does not in itself provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. A hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument was constructed that utilizes the complementary capabilities of both techniques, superimposing EPR and proton-MR images to provide the distribution of paramagnetic species in the body. A common magnet and field gradient system is utilized along with a dual EPR and proton-NMR resonator assembly, enabling coimaging without the need to move the sample. EPRI is performed at approximately 1.2 GHz/ approximately 40 mT and proton MRI is performed at 16.18 MHz/ approximately 380 mT; hence the method is suitable for whole-body coimaging of living mice. The gradient system used is calibrated and controlled in such a manner that the spatial geometry of the two acquired images is matched, enabling their superposition without additional postprocessing or marker registration. The performance of the system was tested in a series of phantoms and in vivo applications by mapping the location of a paramagnetic probe in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice. This hybrid EPR/NMR coimaging instrument enables imaging of paramagnetic molecules along with their anatomic localization in the body. PMID:17659621

  8. Nonlinear Simulation of the Tooth Enamel Spectrum for EPR Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Dubovsky, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Software was developed where initial EPR spectra of tooth enamel were deconvoluted based on nonlinear simulation, line shapes and signal amplitudes in the model initial spectrum were calculated, the regression coefficient was evaluated, and individual spectra were summed. Software validation demonstrated that doses calculated using it agreed excellently with the applied radiation doses and the doses reconstructed by the method of additive doses.

  9. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  10. EPR/PTFE dosimetry for test reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vehar, D.W.; Griffin, P.J.; Quirk, T.J.

    2011-07-01

    The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with materials such as alanine is well established as a technique for measurement of ionizing radiation absorbed dose in photon and electron fields such as Co-60, high-energy bremsstrahlung and electron-beam fields [1]. In fact, EPR/Alanine dosimetry has become a routine transfer standard for national standards bodies such as NIST and NPL. In 1992 the Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) at Sandia National Laboratories implemented EPR/Alanine capabilities for use in routine and calibration activities at its Co-60 and pulsed-power facilities. At that time it also investigated the usefulness of the system for measurement of absorbed dose in the mixed neutron/photon environments of reactors such as the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and the Annular Core Research Reactor used for hardness testing of electronics. The RML concluded that the neutron response of alanine was a sufficiently high fraction of the overall dosimeter response that the resulting uncertainties in the photon dose would be unacceptably large for silicon-device testing. However, it also suggested that non-hydrogenous materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) would exhibit smaller neutron response and might be useful in mixed environments. Preliminary research with PTFE in photon environments indicated considerable promise, but further development was not pursued at that time. Because of renewed interest in absorbed dose measurements that could better define the individual contributions of photon and neutron components to the overall dose delivered to a test object, the RML has re-initiated the development of an EPR/PTFE dosimetry system. This effort consists of three stages: 1) Identification of PTFE materials that may be suitable for dosimetry applications. It was speculated that the inconsistency of EPR signatures in the earlier samples may have been due to variability in PTFE manufacturing processes. 2) Characterization of dosimetry in

  11. Correcting for accidental correlations in saturated avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Grieve, J A; Chandrasekara, R; Tang, Z; Cheng, C; Ling, A

    2016-02-22

    In this paper we present a general method for estimating rates of accidental coincidence between a pair of single photon detectors operated within their saturation regimes. By folding the effects of recovery time of both detectors and the detection circuit into an "effective duty cycle" we are able to accomodate complex recovery behaviour at high event rates. As an example, we provide a detailed high-level model for the behaviour of passively quenched avalanche photodiodes, and demonstrate effective background subtraction at rates commonly associated with detector saturation. We show that by post-processing using the updated model, we observe an improvement in polarization correlation visibility from 88.7% to 96.9% in our experimental dataset. This technique will be useful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio in applications which depend on coincidence measurements, especially in situations where rapid changes in flux may cause detector saturation. PMID:26907016

  12. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A. Compton); "Reading Recovery in Arizona--A…

  13. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure. PMID:24311579

  14. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kristin A; Black, Paul J; Mercer, Kermit R; Garman, Elspeth F; Owen, Robin L; Snell, Edward H; Bernhard, William A

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV-visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV-visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5-0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  15. RosettaEPR: Rotamer Library for Spin Label Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Nathan S.; Stein, Richard A.; Koteiche, Hanane A.; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    An increasingly used parameter in structural biology is the measurement of distances between spin labels bound to a protein. One limitation to these measurements is the unknown position of the spin label relative to the protein backbone. To overcome this drawback, we introduce a rotamer library of the methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL) into the protein modeling program Rosetta. Spin label rotamers were derived from conformations observed in crystal structures of spin labeled T4 lysozyme and previously published molecular dynamics simulations. Rosetta’s ability to accurately recover spin label conformations and EPR measured distance distributions was evaluated against 19 experimentally determined MTSSL labeled structures of T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein LeuT and 73 distance distributions from T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein MsbA. For a site in the core of T4 lysozyme, the correct spin label conformation (Χ1 and Χ2) is recovered in 99.8% of trials. In surface positions 53% of the trajectories agree with crystallized conformations in Χ1 and Χ2. This level of recovery is on par with Rosetta performance for the 20 natural amino acids. In addition, Rosetta predicts the distance between two spin labels with a mean error of 4.4 Å. The width of the experimental distance distribution, which reflects the flexibility of the two spin labels, is predicted with a mean error of 1.3 Å. RosettaEPR makes full-atom spin label modeling available to a wide scientific community in conjunction with the powerful suite of modeling methods within Rosetta. PMID:24039810

  16. Identification and dose assessment of irradiated cumin by EPR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, A A

    2002-03-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to accurately distinguish irradiated from unirradiated cumin and assess the absorbed dose to radiation-processed cumin is examined. The results were successful for identifying both irradiated and unirradiated cumin. Additive reirradiation of the cumin produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. Third-degree polynomial and exponential functions were used to fit the EPR signal/dose curves. It was found that the 3rd degree polynomial function provides satisfactory results without correction for decay of free radicals. The exponential fit to the data cannot be used without correction of decay of free radicals. The stability of the radiation-induced EPR signal of irradiated cumin was studied over a storage period of 6 months. The additive reirradiation of some samples was carried out at different storage times (10, 20 and 30 days) after initial irradiation.

  17. Kinetic measurements using EPR imaging with a modulated field gradient.

    PubMed

    Herrling, Thomas; Fuchs, Jürgen; Groth, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    EPR imaging with modulated field gradient was applied for the investigation of fast diffusion processes. Three different imaging methods are possible: spectral-temporal, spatio-temporal, and spectral-spatial imaging. The time resolution is on the order of seconds and the spatial resolution is in the micrometer region. The efficiency of this imaging technique is demonstrated for the penetration of the spin probe Tempol in the skin of hairless mice biopsies. The skin is normally protected against the penetration of water soluble substances by the horny layer, a resistive thin lipophilic layer. Overcoming this horny layer for water soluble ingredients is one of the main practical problems for the topical application of pharmaceutics which could be investigated by EPR imaging. Different images represent the penetration behavior of the water soluble Tempol in the skin after treatment with the penetration enhancer DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) and after removing the horny layer.

  18. Kinetic Measurements Using EPR Imaging with a Modulated Field Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Thomas; Fuchs, Jürgen; Groth, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    EPR imaging with modulated field gradient was applied for the investigation of fast diffusion processes. Three different imaging methods are possible: spectral-temporal, spatio-temporal, and spectral-spatial imaging. The time resolution is on the order of seconds and the spatial resolution is in the micrometer region. The efficiency of this imaging technique is demonstrated for the penetration of the spin probe Tempol in the skin of hairless mice biopsies. The skin is normally protected against the penetration of water soluble substances by the horny layer, a resistive thin lipophilic layer. Overcoming this horny layer for water soluble ingredients is one of the main practical problems for the topical application of pharmaceutics which could be investigated by EPR imaging. Different images represent the penetration behavior of the water soluble Tempol in the skin after treatment with the penetration enhancer DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) and after removing the horny layer.

  19. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  20. An Introduction to the Epr-Chameleon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Imafuku, Kentaro; Regoli, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    On September 27 (2001), as a side activity to the "Japan-Italy Joint workshop on: Quantum open systems and quantum measurement", the first public demonstration of the dynamical EPR-chameleon experiment was performed at Waseda University in order to give an experimental answer to a long standing question in the foundations of quantum theory: do there exist classical macroscopic systems which, by local independent choices, produce sequences of data which reproduce the singlet correlations, hence violating Bell's inequality? The EPR-chameleon experiment gives an affirmative answer to this question by concretely producing an example of such systems in the form of three personal computers which realize a local deterministic dynamical evolution whose mathematical structure is very simple and transparent. In the experiment performed on September 27 the local dynamics used was not a reversible one because the interaction with the degrees of freedom of the apparatus was integrated out giving rise to an effective Markovian dynamics which, although mapping probability measures into probability measures, did not preserve the ±1-values of the spin (or polarization) observables. This feature was criticized by some of the partecipants and the following two questions arose: i) is it possible to prove that the Markovian evolution, used in the experiment, is indeed the reduced evolution of a bona fide reversible evolution? ii) if the answer to question (i) is affirmative, is it possible to reproduce the EPR correlations by simply considering empirical averages of ±1-values, as one does in usual EPR type experiments? An affirmative answer to these questions was given in the paper [AcImRe01] and it is briefly reviewed in what follows.

  1. EPR study of spermine interaction with multilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, F; Wisniewska, A; Stevanato, R

    1995-11-22

    The interaction of spermine with egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine liposomes was investigated. The EPR spin labeling technique evidenced that spermine induces modifications of some membrane functions of biological interest like water permeability and is a possible modulator of diffusion processes for charged and polar molecules. The association constant for a hypothesized complex between spermine and the phosphate group of phosphatidylcholine was evaluated by enzymatic methods.

  2. X-band EPR of color centers in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petasis, Doros; Gallagher, Joseph; Donnelly, Neil; Whitmore, Paul; Wilson, Mark

    2001-05-01

    Color centers are lattice defects that absorb visible light. The formation of color centers in flawless precious gems decreases their intrinsic and aesthetic value. Such color centers can be produced after exposure of these gems under intense light for prolonged periods of time. We are reporting electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements on the formation of color centers in a variety of mineral samples used for cutting precious gems. These samples were investigated in their natural state and after exposure under a xenon arc lamp for a two-week period. The xenon arc source, filtered through window glass, provides a simulated solar spectrum cutting off at around 320nm in the UV. X-band (9 GHz) EPR spectra were obtained on a Bruker ESP 300 spectrometer with an Oxford instruments ESR 900 liquid-helium cryostat. Detailed measurements at room temperature and at 20K indicate that some minerals (celestite, fluorite, barite, and inesite) are susceptible to creation of color centers with complex EPR spectra.

  3. Trityl-based EPR probe with enhanced sensitivity to oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Eubank, Timothy D.; Marsh, Clay B.; Zweier, Jay L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2009-01-01

    An asymmetric derivative of triarylmethyl radical, TAM-H, containing one aldehyde and two carboxyl groups was synthesized. The electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR, spectrum of TAM-H is characterized by a doublet of narrow lines with linewidth of 105 mG in anoxic conditions and hyperfine interaction constant 245 mG. The partial overlap of the components of the doublet results in enhanced sensitivity of the spectral amplitudes ratio to oxygen compared with oxygen-induced linewidth broadening of a single line. Application of the TAM-H probe allows for EPR measurements in an extended range of oxygen pressures from atmospheric to 1 mmHg whereas the EPR spectrum linewidth of the popular TAM-based oxygen sensor, Oxo63, is practically insensitive to oxygen partial pressures below 20 mmHg. Enhanced sensitivity of TAM-H probe relative to Oxo63 was demonstrated in detection of oxygen consumption by Met-1 cancer cells. The TAM-H probe allowed prolonged measurements of oxygen depletion during the hypoxia stage and down to true anoxia (≤ 1.5 mmHg). PMID:19523513

  4. Implementing Diffie-Hellman key exchange using quantum EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sayonnha; Parakh, Abhishek

    2015-05-01

    This paper implements the concepts of perfect forward secrecy and the Diffie-Hellman key exchange using EPR pairs to establish and share a secret key between two non-authenticated parties and transfer messages between them without the risk of compromise. Current implementations of quantum cryptography are based on the BB84 protocol, which is susceptible to siphoning attacks on the multiple photons emitted by practical laser sources. This makes BB84-based quantum cryptography protocol unsuitable for network computing environments. Diffie-Hellman does not require the two parties to be mutually authenticated to each other, yet it can provide a basis for a number of authenticated protocols, most notably the concept of perfect forward secrecy. The work proposed in this paper provides a new direction in utilizing quantum EPR pairs in quantum key exchange. Although, classical cryptography boasts of efficient and robust protocols like the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, in the current times, with the advent of quantum computing they are very much vulnerable to eavesdropping and cryptanalytic attacks. Using quantum cryptographic principles, however, these classical encryption algorithms show more promise and a more robust and secure structure for applications. The unique properties of quantum EPR pairs also, on the other hand, go a long way in removing attacks like eavesdropping by their inherent nature of one particle of the pair losing its state if a measurement occurs on the other. The concept of perfect forward secrecy is revisited in this paper to attribute tighter security to the proposed protocol.

  5. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  6. Peptide-Membrane Interactions by Spin-Labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Tatyana I; Smirnov, Alex I

    2015-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described.

  7. In vivo EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Zweier, J L; Kuppusamy, P

    1994-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure free radicals; however, it has not been possible to measure important biologic radicals in situ because conventional spectrometer designs are not suitable for the performance of measurements on large aqueous structures such as whole organs or tissues. We describe the design, construction, and application of instrumentation developed in an effort to obtain optimum performance in measuring free radicals in intact biologic organs or tissues. This spectrometer consists of a 1- to 2-GHz microwave bridge with the source locked to the resonant frequency of a specially designed recessed gap, loop-gap resonator. The principles of resonator design and construction are analyzed and described. Using this spectrometer radical concentrations as low as 0.4 microM in aqueous solutions could be measured. Studies of isolated beating hearts involving simultaneous real time measurements of free radicals and cardiac contractile function are performed. This in vivo EPR technique is applied to study the kinetics of free radical uptake and metabolism in normally perfused and globally ischemic hearts. In addition, it is demonstrated that this technique can be used to noninvasively measure tissue oxygen consumption. Thus, low frequency EPR spectroscopy offers great promise in the study of in vivo free radical generation and the effects of this radical generation on whole biologic tissues. PMID:7705304

  8. Thermally stimulated luminescence and EPR studies on topaz.

    PubMed

    Souza, Divanizia N; de Lima, José Fernandes; Valerio, Mário Ernesto G; Caldas, Linda V E

    2006-08-01

    In the present work, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra and thermoluminescence (TL) emission of colourless natural topaz from Santo Antônio do Jacinto, Brazil, was studied as a function of thermal treatment and gamma irradiation dose, focussing on the use of this material as a radiation dosimeter. EPR measurements on "as-received" samples at room temperature provided signals in the region of about 500 at 5,000 G. The signal located around g approximately equal to 2, frequently attributed to (AlO(4))(0), increased with additional gamma dose and disappeared after thermal treatment at 500 degrees C for 1h. Irradiation after thermal treatment recovered this signal. The decay promoted by isochronal thermal treatment showed the (AlO(4))(0) defects to be directly related to the TL glows peaks. The variation of EPR spectrum with annealing temperature prior to irradiation showed that the variation of TL sensitivity is a consequence of the variation of the (AlO(4))(0) population.

  9. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report covers progress made in the first yearly quarter of a two year investigation using novel, very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (VHF EPR) spectroscopy techniques and instrumentation (one of only two W-band spectrometers in existence) developed earlier by these authors, to conduct further qualitative and quantitative studies of heteroatomic organic molecules in coal with particular emphasis on sulfur. Previous W-band (96 GHz) work is being extended to studies of new model compounds as well as coal and desulfurized coal samples. Typically, the model compounds under investigation and their analogues are found in coals as stable free radicals which give rise to an EPR signal. The preparation of radicals from compounds having widely varying structures and physical properties in a stable environment has long been a very difficult task. To address this problem, the refinement of several new and very useful methods of preparing of these stable free radicals in various glasses, at catalytic surfaces, and in solution, are presented in this first report. Free radical generation was accomplished by both UV photolysis as well as chemical oxidation/reduction techniques. By these methods, over 25 new compounds, often commercially derived from coal extracts, have been prepared and studied by conventional X-band EPR (9 GHz). Several representative W-band spectra are also presented.

  10. Tetrabromidocuprates(II)—Synthesis, Structure and EPR

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, André; Winter, Alette; Kelling, Alexandra; Schilde, Uwe; Strauch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Metal-containing ionic liquids (ILs) are of interest for a variety of technical applications, e.g., particle synthesis and materials with magnetic or thermochromic properties. In this paper we report the synthesis of, and two structures for, some new tetrabromidocuprates(II) with several “onium” cations in comparison to the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses. The sterically demanding cations were used to separate the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR measurements. The EPR hyperfine structure in the spectra of these new compounds is not resolved, due to the line broadening resulting from magnetic exchange between the still-incomplete separated paramagnetic Cu(II) centres. For the majority of compounds, the principal g values (g‖ and g⊥) of the tensors could be determined and information on the structural changes in the [CuBr4]2− anions can be obtained. The complexes have high potential, e.g., as ionic liquids, as precursors for the synthesis of copper bromide particles, as catalytically active or paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:27104522

  11. EPR investigation of some traditional oriental irradiated spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Georgescu, Rodica; Ali, Shaban Ibrahim

    2007-06-01

    The 9.50 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and 60Co γ-ray irradiated cardamom ( Elettaria cardamomum L. Maton, Zingiberaceae), ginger (( Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), and saffron ( Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) have been investigated at room temperature. All unirradiated spices presented a weak resonance line with g-factors around free-electron ones. After γ-ray irradiation at an absorbed dose of up to 11.3 kGy, the presence of EPR spectra whose amplitude increase monotonously with the absorbed dose has been noticed with all spices. A 100 °C isothermal annealing of 11.3 kGy irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components that compose initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after 83 days storage at room temperature but after 340 days storage at ambient conditions only irradiated ginger displays a weak signal that differs from those of unirradiated sample. All these factors could be taken into account in establishing at which extent the EPR is suitable to evidence any irradiation treatment applied to these spices.

  12. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  13. Photodynamic action of C-phycocyanins obtained from marine and fresh water cyanobacterial cultures: a comparative study using EPR spin trapping technique.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bibbin Tom; Patel, Anamika; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpita Kumar; Murugesan, Ramachandran

    2006-08-01

    C-phycocyanins, major biliproteins of blue green algae (cyanobacteria), widely used as colourants in food and cosmetics are known for their antioxidant as well as therapeutic potential. Recent claims indicating phycobiliproteins exert stronger photodynamic action on tumor cells than clinically approved hematoporphyrin derivatives motivate us to investigate the photodynamic action of two newly isolated C-phycocyanins from Phormidium [PHR] and Lyngbya [LY] spp, respectively in comparison with known C-phycocyanin from Spirulina sp. [SPI]. Photolysis of air saturated solutions of PHR, LY and SPI in the presence of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidinol (TEMPL) generated three line EPR spectrum characteristic of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl (TEMPOL). The increase in intensity of the EPR spectrum with time of irradiation and decrease in intensity, in the presence of 1O2 quencher DABCO confirm the formation of 1O2. Photoirradiation in the presence of spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) generated EPR signal characteristic of O2(-) adduct. Efficiency of 1O2 generation is of the order LY > PHR> SPI. The yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is found to be 1O2>O2(-) indicating type II mechanism to be the prominent pathway for photosensitation by phycocyanins.

  14. Light-induced EPR study of charge transfer in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Krinichnyi, V. I.; Yudanova, E. I.; Denisov, N. N.

    2009-07-28

    The first results of the light-induced EPR study of magnetic, relaxation, and dynamic parameters of charge carriers background photoinduced by optical photons (1.7-3.4 eV) in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunctions are described. All magnetic resonance parameters for positively charged polaron and negatively charged fullerene ion-radical in radical pairs photoinduced in the composite were determined separately by the steady-state microwave saturation method. Paramagnetic susceptibility of charge carriers reflects their activation dynamics and exchange interaction. A decay of long-living radical pairs depends on the spatial distance between photoinduced charge carriers. The one-dimensional polaron diffusion along the polymer chain and fullerene rotation near the main molecular axis was shown to follow activation Elliot hopping model and to be governed by photon energy. The difference in activation energies of the charge carriers' dynamics and in their dependence on the exciting photon energy proves their noninteracting character in the polymer/fullerene composite. Main magnetic, relaxation and dynamics parameters of charge carriers are governed by the photon energy band due to inhomogeneity of distribution of polymer and fullerene domains in the composite.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  16. Effect of aging on EPR cable electrical performance during LOCA simulations. [Ethylene propylene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    When exposed to a LOCA environment, some ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable materials experience substantial moisture absorption and dimensional changes. These phenomena may contribute to mechanical damage of the cable insulation resulting in electrical degradation. Recent experiments illustrate that the extent of moisture absorption and dimensional changes during an accident simulation are dependent on the EPR product, the accelerated age, and the aging technique employed to achieve that age. Results for several commercial EPR materials are summarized.

  17. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Lu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials.

  18. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Brine saturation technique for extracting light filth from ground cinnamon: intralaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C C

    1985-01-01

    An intralaboratory study was performed using the new brine saturation technique for isolating light filth from ground cinnamon. Recoveries of light filth averaged greater than or equal to 96.5%. The excellent recovery plus improvements in safety and simplicity give this new technique considerable advantage over the present official method. PMID:4086431

  20. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  1. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics.

  2. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Yang, H R; Cui, Y D; Chen, G W; Yang, Y; Wu, X Q; Yao, X K; Han, D D; Han, X X; Zeng, C; Guo, J; Li, W L; Cheng, G; Tong, L M

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light-matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light-graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  3. An EPR study of native radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in sudoite (di-trioctahedral Al-Mg chlorite) from the alteration halo related to unconformity-type uranium deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morichon, Élisa; Allard, Thierry; Beaufort, Daniel; Quirt, David

    2010-03-01

    Natural radiation-induced defects were identified in specimens of sudoite (Al-Mg di-trioctahedral chlorite) related to unconformity-type uranium deposits at the base of the Athabasca Group (Saskatchewan, Canada), using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X- and Q-band frequencies. X-band spectra indicate the presence of a main native defect, named the As-center, whose EPR signal is dominated by an axially distorted spectrum with apparent principal components as follows: g // = 2,051 and g ⊥ = 2,005, and a secondary defect with apparent component g = 2,025. The study of oriented specimens shows that the main defect has its g // component perpendicular to the ( ab) plane of sudoite. The As-center corresponds to an electron hole located on oxygen atoms of the structure and is likely associated with Si, according to the lack of hyperfine structure. The As-center in sudoite has EPR parameters similar to the A-center in kaolinite and dickite, and the Ai-center in illite. The saturation behavior of EPR spectra as a function of power demonstrates that native defects of sudoite are different from those known in other clays, such as kaolinite, dickite or smectite, but are similar to those of illite. The isochronal annealing data suggest that the main defect in sudoite is stable to more than 300°C. The corresponding defects characterized in sudoite may have the potential for tracing past radionuclide migration around unconformity-type uranium deposits.

  4. Triplet State Epr: AN Application to Three Iron - Flavoproteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Randy Claude

    This thesis is a comprehensive development of triplet spin Hamiltonians and the application of that formalism to the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of three iron-sulfur flavoproteins. These spectra developed only after the enzymes had been reduced with their substrates; the signals did not appear upon titration with other reducing agents such as dithionite. As a complement to that work, part of the thesis project included the further development of the multifrequency facilities at the University of Michigan. A new tunable 15 GHz EPR cavity for a P band spectrometer, a new 3 GHz cavity and a redesigned automatic frequency control unit (AFC) for an S band spectrometer contributed to the improvement and extension of the EPR capabilities. The data obtained from these spectrometers indicated that there was a spin-spin interaction due to two spin 1/2 systems, a singly reduced flavin and singly reduced {4Fe -4S} cluster, in a triplet state. Computer simulations confirmed that the interactions in trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMAD), from a bacterium W3Al, and TMAD and dimethyamine dehydrogenase (DMAD) from a bacterium Hyphomicrobium X, are indeed spin-coupled triplet interactions. In addition, the computer simulations indicated that there was a distribution of zero field splittings among the various enzyme molecules constituting the samples, probably due to a variation in g anisotropy of the {4Fe-4S} center. However, these simulations represented only a phenomenological description. A plausible model for the spin-spin interaction, in terms of anisotropic exchange and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, indicated that the structures of the paramagnetic sites among all three enzymes were very similar. The model limited the edge-edge interaction distance between reduced flavin and reduced {4Fe-4S} cluster to somewhere between 3 and 5 (ANGSTROM).

  5. EPR, charge transport, and spin dynamics in doped polyanilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon'kin, A. L.; Shtyrlin, V. G.; Garipov, R. R.; Aganov, A. V.; Zakharov, A. V.; Krinichnyi, V. I.; Adams, P. N.; Monkman, A. P.

    2002-08-01

    Charge transport and magnetic properties of films of polyaniline (PAN) doped with 10-camphorsulfonic acid and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPSA) have been studied by conductivity, magnetic-susceptibility superconducting quantum interference device measurements, and 3-cm and 8-mm electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at doping levels (x) from 0.3 to 0.9 over a temperature range from 15 to 300 K. The temperature dependences of conductivities were explained in terms of the advanced multiphase heterogeneous granular metallic (HGM) model with percolation including disordered metallic (DM) and nonmetallic (NM) phases. The anomalous conductivity change in the PAN-AMPSAx system at T>240 K was accounted quantitatively for a solid-phase equilibrium with the occurrence of the disordered anion phase from the metallic islands. A means for analysis of the EPR line shape in conducting media has been developed and, with this, conductivity and microwave dielectric constants were estimated and two EPR signals, R1 and R2, were detected in both systems. It was shown that R1 signal belongs to pinned radicals of isolated polymer chains, whereas R2 is the weight-averaged signal, resulting from three types of paramagnetic centers, localized and mobile spins in the NM and DM phases, which interact via exchange. From the temperature and frequency dependences of the R2 linewidth the spin-diffusion parameters for the NM phase in both systems were determined. It was found that the HGM model allows good explanation of both charge transport and spin diffusion in the doped polyaniline films.

  6. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  7. Mn distribution in natural sphalerites: a micronalytical and EPR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Benedetto, F.; Bernardini, G. P.; Cipriani, C.; Plant, D.; Romanelli, M.; Vaughan, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) has been successfully applied to determine the local coordination and distribution of transition metal cations in sulphides and sulphosalts (Di Benedetto et al., 2002). Due to its enhanced sensitivity and element-specificity it is one of the best tools to monitor Mn(II) behaviour down to very low concentrations. In order to reach a fuller understanding of the spectroscopic results, a microanalytical study has also been undertaken by means of Electron Microprobe Analysis. Operating conditions were chosen to achieve the lowest possible detection limits, taking into account that Mn can replace Zn in the sphalerite lattice both as a minor and trace element, and that EPR can detect Mn(II) below the ppm range. Six natural samples from the Museo di Storia Naturale, Università di Firenze, were selected to have pure single crystals and avoid magnetically active phases associated with the sphalerite. The Mn concentration determined ranges between 30 and 14300 ppm and Mn content varies considerably within the same sample, leading to differences up to the 50% as compared to the mean value. X-ray images confirm Mn to be distributed with an unusual pattern, unrelated to the other common Zn-replacing cations, Fe and Cd, present in the samples. Powder EPR spectra reveal at least three different Mn(II) signals: two sextets, overlapping in all samples containing Mn as trace element, and a single line, present only in the more concentrated samples. While the latter have been attributed to an inhomogeneous Mn distribution, due to an enhanced Mn-Mn superexchange interaction, the difference between the two sextets, observed by means of EEPR investigations in a synthetic sphalerite (Di Benedetto et al., 2002), appears unrelated to the Mn concentration and may be attributed to small differences in the local coordination of Mn(II) ions. This, in turn, may be explained by the segregation of small amounts of Mn into polytypic domains, features which

  8. EPR investigation of libration motion of spin labeled hemerythrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, Istvan Mihaly; Mot, Augustin; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Damian, Grigore

    2014-09-01

    Reported here are room-temperature continuous wave X-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of the non-heme di-iron protein hemerythrin (Hr), spin labeled at position 51C in different viscous media, illustrating the mobility and oligomeric recombination tendency of the Phascolopsis gouldii Hr. The mobility of a spin labeled Hr depends on the local viscosity and its connectivity to the nature of the molecular environment (glycerol, PEG4000 and BSA). This provides the basis for a tool useful in directly monitoring Hr in ex vivo samples upon injection within the bloodstream of test animals, for blood substitute research.

  9. Geochemical constraints on the source of EPR MORBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical variations of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) have long been attributed to the presence of compositionally distinct crustal and mantle components in their sources. The oxygen isotope composition of MORBs was proposed to be a valuable tracer of subducted crustal materials [1] since 18O/16O ratios are strongly fractioned during low-temperature water-rock interactions (e.g. seafloor alteration). Here, we present a study of combined oxygen isotopes, radiogenic isotopes, and trace elements on volcanic lavas sampled at both ridge axes and off-axis seamounts in the northern East Pacific Rise (EPR; 5-15°N). The chemical composition of these lavas ranges from normal-MORB to enriched-MORB, and the newly analyzed 18O/16O ratios of hand-picked fresh glasses from these 53 lavas were measured using laser-fluorination technique, with a typical precision of ±0.08‰ (1σ). Our results show that the δ18OSMOW values of EPR glasses span ~0.64‰ (from 5.08‰ to 5.72‰), with an average value of 5.53(±0.12, 1σ) ‰, which is comparable to results from previous survey of global MORBs (5.52±0.11‰) [1]. Two andesitic glasses show unusually lower δ18O values (5.08‰ and 5.27‰, respectively) and exhibit excess Cl addition ([Cl]>3000ppm), probably indicating an assimilation of seawater-derived component (e.g., saline brines or altered oceanic crust). Previous studies [2, 3, 4, 5] have shown the correlated variations of trace element ratios (e.g. La/Sm, and K2O/TiO2 element ratios) and radiogenic isotope compositions (e.g. 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, Pb isotope ratios), suggesting the presence of at least two components in the source of EPR MORBs, an enriched component and depleted component. Our results show that δ18O values of these glasses lack statistically-significant correlations with other geochemical indicies in the same sample, suggesting that (1) the source of EPR MORBs has a uniform oxygen isotope composition, (2) the enriched components in the sources

  10. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-12-31

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments.

  11. Use of Rapid-Scan EPR to Improve Detection Sensitivity for Spin-Trapped Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Deborah G.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Tseitlin, Mark; Symmes, Breanna; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2013-01-01

    The short lifetime of superoxide and the low rates of formation expected in vivo make detection by standard continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) challenging. The new rapid-scan EPR method offers improved sensitivity for these types of samples. In rapid-scan EPR, the magnetic field is scanned through resonance in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times, and data are processed to obtain the absorption spectrum. To validate the application of rapid-scan EPR to spin trapping, superoxide was generated by the reaction of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with rates of 0.1–6.0 μM/min and trapped with 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (BMPO). Spin trapping with BMPO to form the BMPO-OOH adduct converts the very short-lived superoxide radical into a more stable spin adduct. There is good agreement between the hyperfine splitting parameters obtained for BMPO-OOH by CW and rapid-scan EPR. For the same signal acquisition time, the signal/noise ratio is >40 times higher for rapid-scan than for CW EPR. Rapid-scan EPR can detect superoxide produced by Enterococcus faecalis at rates that are too low for detection by CW EPR. PMID:23870255

  12. EPR Studies of Gating Mechanisms in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels open and close in response to diverse stimuli, and the molecular events underlying these processes are extensively modulated by ligands of both endogenous and exogenous origin. In the past decade, high-resolution structures of several channel types have been solved, providing unprecedented details of the molecular architecture of these membrane proteins. Intrinsic conformational flexibility of ion channels critically governs their functions. However, the dynamics underlying gating mechanisms and modulations are obscured in the information from crystal structures. While nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic methods allow direct measurements of protein dynamics, they are limited by the large size of these membrane protein assemblies in detergent micelles or lipid membranes. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has emerged as a key biophysical tool to characterize structural dynamics of ion channels and to determine stimulus-driven conformational transition between functional states in a physiological environment. This review will provide an overview of the recent advances in the field of voltage- and ligand-gated channels and highlight some of the challenges and controversies surrounding the structural information available. It will discuss general methods used in site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy and illustrate how findings from these studies have narrowed the gap between high-resolution structures and gating mechanisms in membranes, and have thereby helped reconcile seemingly disparate models of ion channel function. PMID:25950970

  13. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  14. Double-stacked dielectric resonator for sensitive EPR measurements.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, M; Sienkiewicz, A; Scholes, C P

    1997-01-01

    A new approximate method for predicting the resonant frequencies and for solving the field distribution problem of a cylindrical dielectric resonator (DR) is developed. The model proposed in this paper bridges the gap between rigorous and accurate finite-element or Green function-based numerical methods on the one hand and on the other hand, simple approximate solutions in which the field distribution can be described analytically, but the resulting frequency is accurate within a few percent only. In the method described here, the approximate solution for the microwave field distribution is modified by substituting different values of the radial separation constants inside and outside of the diskshaped DR. The model is generalized for the double-stacked DR structure and enables one to introduce corrections that take into account the presence of the shielding walls and of the cylindrical sample hole. Good agreement is found between experimental and calculated results for both the single and double-stacked structures that are designed around commercially available X-band DRs (9-10 GHz). For the resonant frequency of the lowest transverse-electric TEzero1 delta mode that is commonly used for EPR measurements, the accuracy of the method is better than 1%. Experimentally measured resonator filling factors are also in good agreement with those theoretically estimated. Both the theory and the experimental results suggest that the double-stacked DR structure with finite spacing between the ceramic cylinders is the most suitable for EPR measurements of long lossy samples.

  15. EPR retrospective dosimetry with fingernails: report on first application cases.

    PubMed

    Trompier, Francois; Queinnec, François; Bey, Eric; De Revel, Thierry; Lataillade, Jean Jacques; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    For localized irradiation to hands, in case of sources accidentally handled, it is very difficult to estimate the dose distribution by calculation. Doses may reach several tens of grays, and the dose distribution is usually very heterogeneous. Until recently, doses in such situations could be estimated only by analysis of bone biopsies using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This technique was used previously on surgical wastes or after amputation of a finger. In this case, the dose information was available in one or a few locations on the hand only, due to the limited number of biopsy fragments usually collected. The idea to measure free radicals (FRs) induced by radiation in nails to estimate a dose is not new, but up to now, no application cases were reported. As a matter of fact, the EPR analysis of nails is complex due to the presence of intrinsic signals and parasitic signals induced by the mechanical stress (when nails are collected), which overlaps the radio-induced components. In addition, the radio-induced FRs identified up to now are unstable and very sensitive to humidity. In these conditions, it was difficult to foresee any application for dosimetry with fingernails. Recently, stable radio-induced FRs in nails has been identified and an associated protocol for dose assessment developed. This protocol has been applied by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire on fingernail samples from victims of three different radiological accidents that occurred between 2008 and 2012 in different places.

  16. Alcoholic extraction enables EPR analysis to characterize radiation-induced cellulosic signals in spices.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Sanyal, Bhaskar; Akram, Kashif; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-11-19

    Different spices such as turmeric, oregano, and cinnamon were γ-irradiated at 1 and 10 kGy. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the nonirradiated samples were characterized by a single central signal (g = 2.006), the intensity of which was significantly enhanced upon irradiation. The EPR spectra of the irradiated spice samples were characterized by an additional triplet signal at g = 2.006 with a hyperfine coupling constant of 3 mT, associated with the cellulose radical. EPR analysis on various sample pretreatments in the irradiated spice samples demonstrated that the spectral features of the cellulose radical varied on the basis of the pretreatment protocol. Alcoholic extraction pretreatment produced considerable improvements of the EPR signals of the irradiated spice samples relative to the conventional oven and freeze-drying techniques. The alcoholic extraction process is therefore proposed as the most suitable sample pretreatment for unambiguous detection of irradiated spices by EPR spectroscopy.

  17. Cd 2+ effect on free radicals in Cladosporium cladosporioides-melanin tested by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszczyk, Magdalena; Buszman, Ewa; Pilawa, Barbara; Witoszyńska, Teresa; Wilczok, Tadeusz

    2004-08-01

    Changes in free radicals system of Cladosporium cladosporioides-melanin and model DOPA-melanin caused by diamagnetic Cd 2+ ions were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR line of eumelanin was mainly found in the spectrum of Cl.cl.-melanin. Cd 2+ ions increased o-semiquinone free radicals concentration in both natural and synthetic melanins. Cd 2+ broadened EPR lines of Cl.cl.-melanin in mycelium and the ions fastened spin-lattice relaxation processes. The narrower EPR lines and slower spin-lattice relaxation were obtained for DOPA-melanin-Cd 2+ complexes than for DOPA-melanin. Pheomelanin additionally existing in Cl.cl. samples was responsible for differences between the EPR data for Cl.cl. melanin and DOPA-melanin.

  18. The effect of dose and water treatment on EPR signals in irradiated fingernails.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, A; Ciesielski, B; Prawdzik-Dampc, A

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise retrospective dosimetry is crucial in making decisions about medical procedures and safety measures in radiation accidents. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has a potential as one of available biodosimetry methods for use in victims of such incidents. In this study, authors present the findings on EPR dosimetry in fingernails. Authors describe changes of EPR signals in unirradiated and irradiated nails in time after cutting and the effect of water on the mechanically induced and radiation-induced EPR signals measured ex vivo in the fingernails. The effect of dose on amplitude of the EPR signal was measured in nails that were soaked for 10 min in water after their irradiation. The obtained dose-response curves, which reflect changes in concentration of the radiation-induced RIS5 radicals, reach their maximum for doses of 40-60 Gy.

  19. Recovery Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in 1935, programs offering opportunity for recovery from alcoholism and other addictions have undergone vast changes. The Internet has created nearly limitless opportunities for recovering people and those seeking recovery to find both meetings and places where they can gather virtually and discuss…

  20. Structural dynamics of the myosin relay helix by time-resolved EPR and FRET

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Roman V.; Negrashov, Igor V.; Tkachev, Yaroslav V.; Blakely, Sarah E.; Titus, Margaret A.; Thomas, David D.; Nesmelov, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    We have used two complementary time-resolved spectroscopic techniques, dipolar electron–electron resonance and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine conformational changes in a single structural element of the myosin motor domain, the relay helix, before and after the recovery stroke. Two double-Cys mutants were labeled with optical probes or spin labels, and interprobe distances were determined. Both methods resolved two distinct structural states of myosin, corresponding to straight and bent conformations of the relay helix. The bent state was occupied only upon nucleotide addition, indicating that relay helix, like the entire myosin head, bends in the recovery stroke. However, saturation of myosin with nucleotide, producing a single biochemical state, did not produce a single structural state. Both straight and bent structural states of the relay helix were occupied when either ATP (ADP.BeFx) or ADP.Pi (ADP.AlF4) analogs were bound at the active site. A greater population was found in the bent structural state when the posthydrolysis analog ADP.AlF4 was bound. We conclude that the bending of the relay helix in the recovery stroke does not require ATP hydrolysis but is favored by it. A narrower interprobe distance distribution shows ordering of the relay helix, despite its bending, during the recovery stroke, providing further insight into the dynamics of this energy-transducing structural transition. PMID:19966224

  1. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  2. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A. M. H. de; Schmidt, J. E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-03-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe3O4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one.

  3. The view from the trenches: part 2-technical considerations for EPR screening.

    PubMed

    Nicolalde, Roberto J; Gougelet, Robert M; Rea, Michael; Williams, Benjamin B; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M; Lesniewski, Piotr N; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    There is growing awareness of the need for methodologies that can be used retrospectively to provide the biodosimetry needed to carry out screening and triage immediately after an event in which large numbers of people have potentially received clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation. The general approach to developing such methodologies has been a technology centric one, often ignoring the system integrations considerations that are key to their effective use. In this study an integrative approach for the evaluation and development of a physical biodosimetry technology was applied based on in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry. The EPR measurements are based on physical changes in tissues whose magnitudes are not affected by the factors that can confound biologically-based assessments. In this study the use of a pilot simulation exercise to evaluate an experimental EPR system and gather stakeholders' feedback early on in the development process is described. The exercise involved: ten non-irradiated participants, representatives from a local fire department; Department of Homeland Security certified exercise evaluators, EPR experts, physicians; and a human factors engineer. Stakeholders were in agreement that the EPR technology in its current state of development could be deployed for the screening of mass casualties. Furthermore, stakeholders' recommendations will be prioritized and incorporated in future developments of the EPR technique. While the results of this exercise were aimed specifically at providing feedback for the development of EPR dosimetry for screening mass casualties, the methods and lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other biodosimetric methods. PMID:20065674

  4. The view from the trenches: part 2-technical considerations for EPR screening.

    PubMed

    Nicolalde, Roberto J; Gougelet, Robert M; Rea, Michael; Williams, Benjamin B; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M; Lesniewski, Piotr N; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    There is growing awareness of the need for methodologies that can be used retrospectively to provide the biodosimetry needed to carry out screening and triage immediately after an event in which large numbers of people have potentially received clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation. The general approach to developing such methodologies has been a technology centric one, often ignoring the system integrations considerations that are key to their effective use. In this study an integrative approach for the evaluation and development of a physical biodosimetry technology was applied based on in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry. The EPR measurements are based on physical changes in tissues whose magnitudes are not affected by the factors that can confound biologically-based assessments. In this study the use of a pilot simulation exercise to evaluate an experimental EPR system and gather stakeholders' feedback early on in the development process is described. The exercise involved: ten non-irradiated participants, representatives from a local fire department; Department of Homeland Security certified exercise evaluators, EPR experts, physicians; and a human factors engineer. Stakeholders were in agreement that the EPR technology in its current state of development could be deployed for the screening of mass casualties. Furthermore, stakeholders' recommendations will be prioritized and incorporated in future developments of the EPR technique. While the results of this exercise were aimed specifically at providing feedback for the development of EPR dosimetry for screening mass casualties, the methods and lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other biodosimetric methods.

  5. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power. PMID:26507308

  6. Prediction of nitroxide spin label EPR spectra from MD trajectories: application to myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kuprusevicius, Egidijus; White, Gaye; Oganesyan, Vasily S

    2011-01-01

    We report the prediction of motional EPR spectra of the metalloprotein sperm whale myoglobin spin labelled with nitroxide directly from Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations at the atomistic scale. We show that an accurate simulation of EPR spectra can be achieved from a single MD trajectory which is in excellent agreement with experiment. Simulations have been carried out using a general method reported previously by us for the simulation of EPR spectra form single dynamical trajectories. Our calculations demonstrate the complex nature of the dynamics of a spin label which is a superposition of the fast librational motions around dihedral states, of slow conformational flips among different rotameric states and of the slow rotational diffusion of the protein itself. The MD-EPR methodology reported does not require any additional stochastic modelling using adjustable parameters and opens, for the first time, the prospect of the simulation of EPR spectra entirely from single MD trajectories. Such a technique not only simplifies the interpretation and analysis of EPR spectra but also opens the possibility, for example, of "computer engineering" of spin-labelled proteins with the desired properties prior to actual EPR experiment. PMID:21322490

  7. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  8. EPR pairing dynamics in Hubbard model with resonant U

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the collision between two fermions in Hubbard model with on-site interaction strength U. The exact solution shows that the scattering matrix for two-wavepacket collision is separable into two independent parts, operating on spatial and spin degrees of freedom, respectively. The S-matrix for spin configuration is equivalent to that of Heisenberg-type pulsed interaction with the strength depending on U and relative group velocity vr. This can be applied to create distant EPR pair, through a collision process for two fermions with opposite spins in the case of |vr/U| = 1, without the need for temporal control and measurement process. Multiple collision process for many particles is also discussed. PMID:26728282

  9. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    PubMed

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence. PMID:26382506

  10. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    PubMed

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  11. Saturating the holographic entropy bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2010-10-15

    The covariant entropy bound states that the entropy, S, of matter on a light sheet cannot exceed a quarter of its initial area, A, in Planck units. The gravitational entropy of black holes saturates this inequality. The entropy of matter systems, however, falls short of saturating the bound in known examples. This puzzling gap has led to speculation that a much stronger bound, S < or approx. A{sup 3/4}, may hold true. In this note, we exhibit light sheets whose entropy exceeds A{sup 3/4} by arbitrarily large factors. In open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes, such light sheets contain the entropy visible in the sky; in the limit of early curvature domination, the covariant bound can be saturated but not violated. As a corollary, we find that the maximum observable matter and radiation entropy in universes with positive (negative) cosmological constant is of order {Lambda}{sup -1} ({Lambda}{sup -2}), and not |{Lambda}|{sup -3/4} as had hitherto been believed. Our results strengthen the evidence for the covariant entropy bound, while showing that the stronger bound S < or approx. A{sup 3/4} is not universally valid. We conjecture that the stronger bound does hold for static, weakly gravitating systems.

  12. EPR retrospective dosimetry with fingernails: report on first application cases.

    PubMed

    Trompier, Francois; Queinnec, François; Bey, Eric; De Revel, Thierry; Lataillade, Jean Jacques; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    For localized irradiation to hands, in case of sources accidentally handled, it is very difficult to estimate the dose distribution by calculation. Doses may reach several tens of grays, and the dose distribution is usually very heterogeneous. Until recently, doses in such situations could be estimated only by analysis of bone biopsies using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This technique was used previously on surgical wastes or after amputation of a finger. In this case, the dose information was available in one or a few locations on the hand only, due to the limited number of biopsy fragments usually collected. The idea to measure free radicals (FRs) induced by radiation in nails to estimate a dose is not new, but up to now, no application cases were reported. As a matter of fact, the EPR analysis of nails is complex due to the presence of intrinsic signals and parasitic signals induced by the mechanical stress (when nails are collected), which overlaps the radio-induced components. In addition, the radio-induced FRs identified up to now are unstable and very sensitive to humidity. In these conditions, it was difficult to foresee any application for dosimetry with fingernails. Recently, stable radio-induced FRs in nails has been identified and an associated protocol for dose assessment developed. This protocol has been applied by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire on fingernail samples from victims of three different radiological accidents that occurred between 2008 and 2012 in different places. PMID:24776914

  13. EPR of CH3 Radicals in SIO2 Clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Yurij; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Benetis, Nikolas Ploutarch

    2016-06-01

    EPR lineshape simulations of CH3/SiO2 clathrates reveal the motional conditions of the CH3 radical up to the unusual regime of its stability, the high temperature diffusional regime. This was obvious by the isotropic magnetic interaction at the highest experimental temperatures over 140 K. Special motional and thermodynamics conditions for methyl radical may however prevail for the CH3/SiO2 clathrates system due to the limited space of the host voids, compared to solid gas isolation. The lowest temperature in the experiment was 4.1 K, while the highest one was 300 K. The EPR parameters of the radical revealed non-monotonic temperature dependence. The extremely wide temperature range of the radical stability may be attributed to the solidity of the clathrate voids and the small diameter of their channels that do not allow molecular collisions between the radical species. At the lowest sample temperatures, a portion of the radicals stopped to rotate thus indicating their attachment to specific matrix sites with large radical-host interaction. The unusual increase of the width of the CH3/SiO2 clathrate spectra with the temperature at high sample temperatures indicates resemblance to the spin-rotation interaction relaxation mechanism known only in the case of small species in non-viscous fluids, and is contrasted to the normal difussional decrease of the width in the CH3 hosted in a series of solid. The effect was explained by adopting extremely frequent radical collisions with the clathrate void walls leading to repeated angular momentum alterations, a kind of "reorientation". Yu. A. D. acknowledges support by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR), research project 16-02-00127a.

  14. Saturation diving; physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Brubakk, Alf O; Ross, John A S; Thom, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    In saturation diving, divers stay under pressure until most of their tissues are saturated with breathing gas. Divers spend a long time in isolation exposed to increased partial pressure of oxygen, potentially toxic gases, bacteria, and bubble formation during decompression combined with shift work and long periods of relative inactivity. Hyperoxia may lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cell structures, causing damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Vascular gas-bubble formation and hyperoxia may lead to dysfunction of the endothelium. The antioxidant status of the diver is an important mechanism in the protection against injury and is influenced both by diet and genetic factors. The factors mentioned above may lead to production of heat shock proteins (HSP) that also may have a negative effect on endothelial function. On the other hand, there is a great deal of evidence that HSPs may also have a "conditioning" effect, thus protecting against injury. As people age, their ability to produce antioxidants decreases. We do not currently know the capacity for antioxidant defense, but it is reasonable to assume that it has a limit. Many studies have linked ROS to disease states such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and atherosclerosis as well as to old age. However, ROS are also involved in a number of protective mechanisms, for instance immune defense, antibacterial action, vascular tone, and signal transduction. Low-grade oxidative stress can increase antioxidant production. While under pressure, divers change depth frequently. After such changes and at the end of the dive, divers must follow procedures to decompress safely. Decompression sickness (DCS) used to be one of the major causes of injury in saturation diving. Improved decompression procedures have significantly reduced the number of reported incidents; however, data indicate considerable underreporting of injuries

  15. Saturation diving; physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Brubakk, Alf O; Ross, John A S; Thom, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    In saturation diving, divers stay under pressure until most of their tissues are saturated with breathing gas. Divers spend a long time in isolation exposed to increased partial pressure of oxygen, potentially toxic gases, bacteria, and bubble formation during decompression combined with shift work and long periods of relative inactivity. Hyperoxia may lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cell structures, causing damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Vascular gas-bubble formation and hyperoxia may lead to dysfunction of the endothelium. The antioxidant status of the diver is an important mechanism in the protection against injury and is influenced both by diet and genetic factors. The factors mentioned above may lead to production of heat shock proteins (HSP) that also may have a negative effect on endothelial function. On the other hand, there is a great deal of evidence that HSPs may also have a "conditioning" effect, thus protecting against injury. As people age, their ability to produce antioxidants decreases. We do not currently know the capacity for antioxidant defense, but it is reasonable to assume that it has a limit. Many studies have linked ROS to disease states such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and atherosclerosis as well as to old age. However, ROS are also involved in a number of protective mechanisms, for instance immune defense, antibacterial action, vascular tone, and signal transduction. Low-grade oxidative stress can increase antioxidant production. While under pressure, divers change depth frequently. After such changes and at the end of the dive, divers must follow procedures to decompress safely. Decompression sickness (DCS) used to be one of the major causes of injury in saturation diving. Improved decompression procedures have significantly reduced the number of reported incidents; however, data indicate considerable underreporting of injuries

  16. EPR as an analytical tool in assessing the mineral nutrients and irradiated food products-vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Gopal, N. O.

    2008-12-01

    EPR spectral investigations of some commonly available vegetables in south India, which are of global importance like Daucus carota (carrot), Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (cluster beans), Coccinia indica (little gourd) and Beta vulgaris (beet root) have been carried out. In all the vegetable samples a free radical corresponding to cellulose radical is observed. Almost all the samples under investigation exhibit Mn ions in different oxidation states. The temperature variation EPR studies are done and are discussed in view of the paramagnetic oxidation states. The radiation-induced defects have also been assessed by using the EPR spectra of such irradiated food products.

  17. EPR spin trapping and DFT studies on structure of active antioxidants in biogycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Ćwieląg-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam

    2010-09-01

    Spin trapping EPR spectroscopy and DFT methods were used to investigate the structure of antioxidants present in bioglycerols [glycerol fractions (GF) derived from biodiesel production]. For this purpose the reactions of GF components and their pure reference chemicals with PBN and H 2O 2 were examined via EPR measurements. The EPR parameters of formed PBN spin adducts indicated the α-tocopherol origin of the trapped radicals. The comparative analysis of experimental and theoretically calculated hyperfine constants for the spin adducts strongly suggests the carbon-centered nature of the radicals generated and trapped by PBN in the bioglycerol systems.

  18. Microwave (EPR) measurements of the penetration depth measurements of high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalal, N. S.; Rakvin, B.; Mahl, T. A.; Bhalla, A. S.; Sheng, Z. Z.

    1991-01-01

    The use is discussed of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a quick and easily accessible method for measuring the London penetration depth, lambda for the high T sub c superconductors. The method uses the broadening of the EPR signal, due to the emergence of the magnetic flux lattice, of a free radical adsorbed on the surface of the sample. The second moment, of the EPR signal below T sub c is fitted to the Brandt equation for a simple triangular lattice. The precision of this method compares quite favorably with those of the more standard methods such as micro sup(+)SR, neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility.

  19. EPR dosimetric properties of 2-methylalanine pellet for radiation processing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Y. S.; Ali, Laila I.; Moustafa, H.; Tadros, Soad M.

    2014-09-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of γ-radiation induced free radicals in 2-methylalanine (2MA) pellet dosimeter are investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the high-dose range of 1-100 kGy. The EPR spectrum of γ-irradiated 2MA exhibits an isotropic EPR signal with seven lines. The dosimeter response is humidity independent in the range of 33-76% relative humidity. The manufactured dosimeter is typically adipose tissue equivalent in the energy level of 0.1-15 MeV. The overall uncertainty (2σ) of the dosimeter is less than 6.9%.

  20. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  1. Optimal strategies for tests of EPR-Steering with no detection loophole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David A.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown in earlier works that the vertices of Platonic solids are good measurement choices for tests of EPR-Steering. Such measurements are regularly spaced, and measurement diversity is a good feature for making EPR-Steering inequalities easier to violate with entangled states. However, such measurements are provably suboptimal. By scrutinising not only the average results, but also the measurement statistics of cheating strategies in a Local Hidden State model, we outline a method for devising optimal strategies for EPR-Steering tests with no detection loophole.

  2. Spin dynamics effects in submillimeter EPR spectroscopy of impurity thulium ions in synthetic forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovarov, N. K.; Tarasov, V. F.; Zharikov, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    The specific features of the EPR spectra of Tm3+ impurity ions in synthetic forsterite have been studied by continuous-wave EPR spectroscopy in the frequency range of 270-310 GHz at a temperature of 4.2 K in weak magnetic fields. Narrow resonance signals unrelated to the modulation of the resonance conditions of EPR under the modulation of the external magnetic field have been discovered in measurements at frequencies corresponding to the zero field splitting between the ground and first excited singlet electron states of Tm3+ ions in zero magnetic field. The origin of these narrow lines is discussed.

  3. The effect of saturation path on three-phase relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation and fluid flow prediction of many petroleum-enhanced oil recovery methods as well as environmental processes such as carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage or underground water resources remediation requires accurate modeling and determination of relative permeability under different saturation histories. Based on this critical need, several three-phase relative permeability models were developed to predict relative permeability; however, for practical purposes most of them require a variety of parameters introducing undesired complexity to the models. In this work, we attempt to find out if there is a simpler way to express this functionality. To do so, we experimentally measure three-phase, water/oil/gas, relative permeability in a 1 m long water-wet sand pack, under several saturation flow paths to cover the entire three-phase saturation space. We obtain the in situ saturations along the sand pack using a CT scanner and then determine the relative permeabilities of liquid phases directly from the measured in situ saturations using an unsteady state method. The measured data show that at a specific saturation, the oil relative permeability varies significantly (up to two orders of magnitude), depending on the path through saturation space. The three-phase relative permeability data are modeled using standard relative permeability models, Corey-type, and Saturation Weighted Interpolation (SWI). Our measured data suggest that three-phase oil relative permeability in water-wet media is only a function of its own saturation if the residual oil saturation is treated as a function of two saturations. We determine that residual saturation is the key parameter in modeling three-phase relative permeability (effect of saturation history).

  4. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  5. Impact of the track density versus linear density trade-off on the read channel: TCPR4 versus EPR4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayiner, Necip

    1995-12-01

    The areal density on a magnetic recording medium can be increased by increasing the linear bit density, or by increasing the track density, or, more commonly, by a combination of both. Equalizing the signal to a higher order partial response polynomial (i.e. EPR4), and employing a trellis code in conjunction with a PR4 channel (i.e. TCPR4) are among the techniques to achieve this goal by providing performance gains over a PR4 system. In this study, the potential increases in linear and track densities that could be afforded by EPR4 and TCPR4 are investigated by simulating a read channel model which incorporates the effects of non-ideal timing recovery, A/D conversion, and finite register-lengths, using spinstand data. In order to quantify the effects of the increased track density, intertrack interference (ITI) is taken into account in evaluating the performance, by defining the interference as a function of the track misregistration. The trade-offs concerning the equalizer loss due to a higher linear bit density and the SNR loss due to a narrower track, as a function of PW50/T, are addressed. The measure of performance used captures the coding gain, the rate loss due to coding, the loss of the equalizer, and the degradation due to ITI. Assuming similar hardware complexity for the detectors, the two alternatives are compared in terms of the areal density increase they provide over a range of user bit densities that are of current practical interest.

  6. EPR spectroscopy of protein microcrystals oriented in a liquid crystalline polymer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Jorge; Figueirinhas, João Luis; Santos, Celina; Godinho, Maria Helena

    2004-10-01

    Correlation of the g-tensor of a paramagnetic active center of a protein with its structure provides a unique experimental information on the electronic structure of the metal site. To address this problem, we made solid films containing metalloprotein ( Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3) microcrystals. The microcrystals in a liquid crystalline polymer medium (water/hydroxypropylcellulose) were partially aligned by a shear flow. A strong orientation effect of the metalloprotein was observed by EPR spectroscopy and polarizing optical microscopy. The EPR spectra of partially oriented samples were simulated, allowing for molecular orientation distribution function determination. The observed effect results in enhanced sensitivity and resolution of the EPR spectra and provides a new approach towards the correlation of spectroscopic data, obtained by EPR or some other technique, with the three-dimensional structure of a protein or a model compound.

  7. The strength of EPR and ENDOR techniques in revealing structure-function relationships in metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Vinck, Evi

    2007-09-01

    Recent technological and methodological advances have strongly increased the potential of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques to characterize the structure and dynamics of metalloproteins. These developments include the introduction of powerful pulsed EPR/ENDOR methodologies and the development of spectrometers operating at very high microwave frequencies and high magnetic fields. This overview focuses on how valuable information about metalloprotein structure-function relations can be obtained using a combination of EPR and ENDOR techniques. After an overview of the historical development and a limited theoretical description of some of the key EPR and ENDOR techniques, their potential will be highlighted using selected examples of applications to iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and copper-containing proteins. We will end with an outlook of future developments.

  8. EPR investigations of silicon carbide nanoparticles functionalized by acid doped polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karray, Fekri; Kassiba, Abdelhadi

    2012-06-01

    Nanocomposites (SiC-PANI) based on silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC) encapsulated in conducting polyaniline (PANI) are synthesized by direct polymerization of PANI on the nanoparticle surfaces. The conductivity of PANI and the nanocomposites was modulated by several doping levels of camphor sulfonic acid (CSA). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations were carried out on representative SiC-PANI samples over the temperature range [100-300 K]. The features of the EPR spectra were analyzed taking into account the paramagnetic species such as polarons with spin S=1/2 involved in two main environments realized in the composites as well as their thermal activation. A critical temperature range 200-225 K was revealed through crossover changes in the thermal behavior of the EPR spectral parameters. Insights on the electronic transport properties and their thermal evolutions were inferred from polarons species probed by EPR and the electrical conductivity in doped nanocomposites.

  9. Wormhole and entanglement (non-)detection in the ER=EPR correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Pollack, Jason; Remmen, Grant N.

    2015-11-01

    The recently proposed ER=EPR correspondence postulates the existence of wormholes (Einstein-Rosen bridges) between entangled states (such as EPR pairs). Entanglement is famously known to be unobservable in quantum mechanics, in that there exists no observable (or, equivalently, projector) that can accurately pick out whether a generic state is entangled. Many features of the geometry of spacetime, however, are observables, so one might worry that the presence or absence of a wormhole could identify an entangled state in ER=EPR, violating quantum mechanics, specifically, the property of state-independence of observables. In this note, we establish that this cannot occur: there is no measurement in general relativity that unambiguously detects the presence of a generic wormhole geometry. This statement is the ER=EPR dual of the undetectability of entanglement.

  10. Simulating POVMs on EPR pairs with 5.7 bits of expected communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méthot, A. A.

    2004-06-01

    We present a classical protocol for simulating correlations obtained by bipartite POVMs on an EPR pair. The protocol uses shared random variables (also known as local hidden variables) augmented by 5.7 bits of expected communication.

  11. A view of EPR non-locality problems based on Aron's stochastic foundation of relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Jens

    1990-12-01

    It is argued that the problem of causal anomalies that still may exist in Vigier's explanation of superluminal EPR type correlations may be removed in the framework of Aron's stochastic foundation of relativity.

  12. EPR characterization of molecular targets for NO · in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissani, A.; Henry, Y. A.

    1997-02-01

    First some elementary properties of nitric oxide NO · are presented: NO · is synthesized in mammalian cells from L-arginine, the reaction being catalyzed by the enzyme NO-synthase. The EPR spectroscopy of NO-complexes is shown; the formation of paramagnetic complexes with some metalloproteins including haemoglobin enables the EPR detection of such complexes. EPR-detectable targets for NO · in mammalian cells are then (rapidly) described, including first their detection (after induction of NO-synthases) through interaction of NO · with specific metalloenzymes, then NO · localization, the fact that the induction of NO-synthases in a generator cell such as a macrophage gives the same metabolic effects in target cells, and finally the implication of NO · in pathological states, where the inducible L-arginine-NO pathway plays an important role. It is concluded that EPR spectroscopy enables the unambiguous detection of such specific molecular targets for NO ·; in mammalian cells.

  13. Einstein locality, EPR locality, and the significance for science of the nonlocal character of quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    The immense difference between Einstein locality and EPR locality is discussed. The latter provides a basis for establishing the nonlocal character of quantum theory, whereas the former does not. A model representing Heisenberg's idea of physical reality is introduced. It is nondeterministic and holistic: the objects, measuring devices, and their environment are treated as an inseparable entity, with, however, macroscopically localizable attributes. The EPR principle that no disturbance can propagate faster than light is imposed without assuming any structure incompatible with orthodox quantum thinking. This locality requirement renders the model incompatible with rudimentary predictions of quantum theory. A more general proof not depending on any model is also given. A recent argument that purports to show that quantum theory is compatible with EPR locality is examined. It illustrates the importance of the crucial one-world assumption. The significance for science of the failure of EPR locality is discussed.

  14. Skew Projection of Echo-Detected EPR Spectra for Increased Sensitivity and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Michael K.; Krzyaniak, Matthew D.; Cruce, Alex A.; Weber, Ralph T.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of EPR spectra during pulsed EPR experiments is commonly accomplished by recording the integral of the electron spin echo as the applied magnetic field is stepped through the spectrum. This approach to echo-detected EPR spectral measurement (ED-EPR) limits sensitivity and spectral resolution and can cause gross distortions in the resulting spectra because some of the information present in the electron spin echo is discarded in such measurements. However, Fourier Transformation of echo shapes measured at a series of magnetic field values followed by skew projection onto either a magnetic field or resonance frequency axis can increase both spectral resolution and sensitivity without the need to trade one against the other. Examples of skew-projected spectra with single crystals, glasses and powders show resolution improvements as large as a factor of seven with sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of five. PMID:23644351

  15. Application of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and imaging in drug delivery research - chances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Sabine; Metz, Hendrik; Mäder, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study chemical species with unpaired electrons. Since its discovery in 1944, it has been widely used in a number of research fields such as physics, chemistry, biology and material and food science. This review is focused on its application in drug delivery research. EPR permits the direct measurement of microviscosity and micropolarity inside drug delivery systems (DDS), the detection of microacidity, phase transitions and the characterization of colloidal drug carriers. Additional information about the spatial distribution can be obtained by EPR imaging. The chances and also the challenges of in vitro and in vivo EPR spectroscopy and imaging in the field of drug delivery are discussed.

  16. Searching for biosignatures using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Sam; Bargar, John R; Nealson, Kenneth H; Flood, Beverly E; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Raub, Timothy D; Tebo, Bradley M; Villalobos, Mario

    2011-10-01

    Manganese oxide (Mn oxide) minerals from bacterial sources produce electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral signatures that are mostly distinct from those of synthetic simulants and abiogenic mineral Mn oxides. Biogenic Mn oxides exhibit only narrow EPR spectral linewidths (∼500 G), whereas abiogenic Mn oxides produce spectral linewidths that are 2-6 times broader and range from 1200 to 3000 G. This distinction is consistent with X-ray structural observations that biogenic Mn oxides have abundant layer site vacancies and edge terminations and are mostly of single ionic species [i.e., Mn(IV)], all of which favor narrow EPR linewidths. In contrast, abiogenic Mn oxides have fewer lattice vacancies, larger particle sizes, and mixed ionic species [Mn(III) and Mn(IV)], which lead to the broader linewidths. These properties could be utilized in the search for extraterrestrial physicochemical biosignatures, for example, on Mars missions that include a miniature version of an EPR spectrometer.

  17. Sequential CW-EPR image acquisition with 760-MHz surface coil array.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Ayano; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a surface coil array that consists of two inductively coupled surface-coil resonators, for use in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging at 760 MHz. To make sequential EPR image acquisition possible, we decoupled the surface coils using PIN-diode switches, to enable the shifting of the resonators resonance frequency by more than 200 MHz. To assess the effectiveness of the surface coil array in CW-EPR imaging, two-dimensional images of a solution of nitroxyl radicals were measured with the developed coil array. Compared to equivalent single coil acquired images, we found the visualized area to be extended approximately 2-fold when using the surface coil array. The ability to visualize larger regions of interest through the use of a surface coil array, may offer great potential in future EPR imaging studies. PMID:21320789

  18. Nitrite binding to globins: linkage isomerism, EPR silence and reductive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Cioloboc, Daniela; Bischin, Cristina; Scurtu, Florina; Cooper, Chris E

    2014-11-15

    The nitrite adducts of globins can potentially bind via O- or N- linkage to the heme iron. We have used EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) and DFT (density functional theory) to explore these binding modes to myoglobin and hemoglobin. We demonstrate that the nitrite adducts of both globins have detectable EPR signals; we provide an explanation for the difficulty in detecting these EPR features, based on uniaxial state considerations. The EPR and DFT data show that both nitrite linkage isomers can be present at the same time and that the two isomers are readily interconvertible in solution. The millisecond-scale process of nitrite reduction by Hb is investigated in search of the elusive Fe(II)-nitrite adduct.

  19. Transport de paires EPR dans des structures mesoscopiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Emilie

    Dans cette these, nous nous sommes particulierement interesses a la propagation de paires EPR1 delocalisees et localisees, et a l'influence d'un supraconducteur sur le transport de ces paires. Apres une introduction de cette etude, ainsi que du cadre scientifique qu'est l'informatique quantique dans lequel elle s'inscrit, nous allons dans le chapitre 1 faire un rappel sur le systeme constitue de deux points quantiques normaux entoures de deux fils supraconducteurs. Cela nous permettra d'introduire une methode de calcul qui sera reutilisee par la suite, et de trouver egalement le courant Josephson produit par ce systeme transforme en SQUID-dc par l'ajout d'une jonction auxiliaire. Le SQUID permet de mesurer l'etat de spin (singulet ou triplet), et peut etre forme a partir d'autres systemes que nous etudierons ensuite. Dans le chapitre 2, nous rappellerons l'etude detaillee d'un intricateur d'Andreev faite par un groupe de Bale. La matrice T, permettant d'obtenir le courant dans les cas ou les electrons sont separes spatialement ou non, sera etudiee en detail afin d'en faire usage au chapitre suivant. Le chapitre 3 est consacre a l'etude de l'influence du bruit sur le fonctionnement de l'intricateur d'Andreev. Ce bruit modifie la forme du courant jusqu'a aboutir a d'autres conditions de fonctionnement de l'intricateur. En effet, le bruit present sur les points quantiques peut perturber le transport des paires EPR par l'intermediaire des degres de liberte. Nous montrerons que, du fait de l'"intrication" entre la charge de la paire et le bruit, la paire est detruite pour des temps longs. Cependant, le resultat le plus important sera que le bruit perturbe plus le transport des paires delocalisees, qui implique une resonance de Breit-Wigner a deux particules. Le transport parasite n'implique pour sa part qu'une resonance de Breit-Wigner a une particule. Dans le chapitre 4, nous reviendrons au systeme constitue de deux points quantiques entoures de deux fils

  20. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  1. The EPR detection of foods preserved with the use of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlińska, G.; Michalik, J.; Dziedzic-Gocławska, A.; Ostrowski, K.

    1995-02-01

    Solid constituents extracted from irradiated foods have been examined by the epr (esr) spectroscopy. It has been proved that some epr active species produced by radiation in foods are specific and stable enough to be used for the detection of irradiation treatment. The most promising results have been obtained with bones extracted from frozen raw meat (beef, pork, poultry and fish), with seeds of fruits (dates and figs), with dried mushrooms, gelatin and macaroni.

  2. Preparation and applicability of fresh fruit samples for the identification of radiation treatment by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2009-03-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on fresh fruits (whole pulp of pears, apples, peaches, apricots, avocado, kiwi and mango) before and after gamma-irradiation are reported using two drying procedures before EPR investigation. In order to remove water from non-irradiated and irradiated samples of the first batch, the pulp of fresh fruits is pressed, and the solid residue is washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. The fruits of the second batch are pressed and dried in a standard laboratory oven at 40 °C. The results obtained with both drying procedures are compared. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0048±0.0005 before irradiation. Irradiation gives rise to typical "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum featuring one intensive line with g=2.0048±0.0005 and two very weak satellite lines situated 3 mT at left and right of the central line. Only mango samples show a singlet line after irradiation. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signal is studied for a period of 50 days after irradiation. When the irradiated fruit samples are stored in their natural state and dried just before each EPR measurement, the satellite lines are measurable for less than 17 days of storage. Irradiated fruit samples, when stored dried, lose for 50 days ca. 40% of their radiation-induced radicals if treated with alcohol or ca. 70% if dried in an oven. The reported results unambiguously show that the presence of the satellite lines in the EPR spectra could be used for identification of radiation processing of fresh fruits, thus extending the validity of European Protocol EN 1787 (2000). Foodstuffs—Detection of Irradiated Food Containing Cellulose by EPR Spectroscopy. European Committee for Standardisation. Brussels for dry herbs.

  3. Normal jugular bulb oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Chieregato, A; Calzolari, F; Trasforini, G; Targa, L; Latronico, N

    2003-01-01

    Background: Normal values of the jugular bulb oxygen saturation were obtained in 1942 and in 1963. Correct catheter positioning was not confirmed radiologically. Objectives: To replicate the measurements during angiographic catheterisation of the jugular bulb. Methods: Oxygen saturation in the jugular bulb (SjO2), inferior petrosal sinus (SipsO2), and internal jugular vein was bilaterally measured in 12 patients with Cushing's syndrome undergoing selective bilateral catheterisation of the inferior petrosal sinus. In addition, data from the two old series were reanalysed for comparison. Results: SjO2 values (44.7%) were significantly lower than in the two old series, particularly concerning the normal lower limit (54.6% and 55.0% respectively). Comparative analysis suggests that contamination with the extracerebral blood of the facial veins and inferior petrosal sinuses was responsible for falsely high SjO2 values in the two old series. Conclusions: The normal lower SjO2 limit is lower than previously recognised. This may have practical implications for treating severe head trauma patients. PMID:12754351

  4. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; Francois, Pascal; Lourenco, Valerie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10x10 cm{sup 2} square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40x5 cm{sup 2} defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Method: Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS

  5. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  6. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.; Ho, K.

    1993-05-01

    One important goal of this project is the development of methods to analyze the Very High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (VHF EPR) spectra from Illinois coals in order to determine the concentration of organic sulfur in them. We have begun that development work, utilizing a two-species, axially symmetric model for the simulation of VHF EPR coal spectra. Such a model provides quantitative information on the concentration of sulfur species that can be directly related to the organic sulfur content as measured by more conventional chemical methods. The computer modeling technique which we are developing makes use of a multi-dimensional simplex strategy for optimization. Utilizing our newly developed method, we have analyzed the VHF EPR spectra from several sub-bituminous coals containing organic sulfur in the range from 2% to 12%. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between VHF EPR results and chemical analyses. In addition to providing information on the concentration of organic sulfur present in coal, the analysis of VHF EPR spectra also provides detailed spectral parameters. These parameters are related to the molecular structures giving rise to the EPR signals.

  7. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancheva, Veselka; Sagstuen, Einar; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2006-02-01

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated L- α-alanine ( L- α-alanine-d 4) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17 kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard L- α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated L- α-alanine (CD 3CD(NH 2)COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R 1=CH 3C •(H)COOH and R 2=H 3N +-C •(CH 3)COO -, was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d 4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard L- α-alanine.

  8. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  9. Probing Microenvironment in Ionic Liquids by Time-Resolved EPR of Photoexcited Triplets.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M Yu; Veber, S L; Prikhod'ko, S A; Adonin, N Yu; Bagryanskaya, E G; Fedin, M V

    2015-10-22

    Unusual physicochemical properties of ionic liquids (ILs) open vistas for a variety of new applications. Herewith, we investigate the influence of microviscosity and nanostructuring of ILs on spin dynamics of the dissolved photoexcited molecules. We use two most common ILs [Bmim]PF6 and [Bmim]BF4 (with its close analogue [C10mim]BF4) as solvents and photoexcited Zn tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) as a probe. Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TR EPR) is employed to investigate spectra and kinetics of spin-polarized triplet ZnTPP in the temperature range 100-270 K. TR EPR data clearly indicate the presence of two microenvironments of ZnTPP in frozen ILs at 100-200 K, being manifested in different spectral shapes and different spin relaxation rates. For one of these microenvironments TR EPR data is quite similar to those obtained in common frozen organic solvents (toluene, glycerol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone). However, the second one favors the remarkably slow relaxation of spin polarization, being much longer than in the case of common solvents. Additional experiments using continuous wave EPR and stable nitroxide as a probe confirmed the formation of heterogeneities upon freezing of ILs and complemented TR EPR results. Thus, TR EPR of photoexcited triplets can be effectively used for probing heterogeneities and nanostructuring in frozen ILs. In addition, the increase of polarization lifetime in frozen ILs is an interesting finding that might allow investigation of short-lived intermediates inaccessible otherwise. PMID:26421723

  10. EPR and IR spectral investigations on some leafy vegetables of Indian origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Gopal, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    EPR spectral investigations have been carried out on four edible leafy vegetables of India, which are used as dietary component in day to day life. In Rumex vesicarius leaf sample, EPR spectral investigations at different temperatures indicate the presence of anti-ferromagnetically coupled Mn(IV)-Mn(IV) complexes. EPR spectra of Trigonella foenum graecum show the presence of Mn ions in multivalent state and Fe 3+ ions in rhombic symmetry. EPR spectra of Basella rubra indicate the presence of Mn(IV)-O-Mn(IV) type complexes. The EPR spectra of Basella rubra have been studied at different temperatures. It is found that the spin population for the resonance signal at g = 2.06 obeys the Boltzmann distribution law. The EPR spectra of Moringa oliefera leaves show the presence of Mn 2+ ions. Radiation induced changes in free radical of this sample have also been studied. The FT-IR spectra of Basella rubra and Moringa oliefera leaves show the evidences for the protein matrix bands and those corresponding to carboxylic C dbnd O bonds.

  11. Spontaneous Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery from extinction is one of the most basic phenomena of Pavlovian conditioning. Although it can be studied by using a variety of designs, some procedures are better than others for identifying the involvement of underlying learning processes. A wide range of different learning mechanisms has been suggested as being engaged by…

  12. Perception of saturation in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Florian; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2016-03-01

    We measured how well perception of color saturation in natural scenes can be predicted by different measures that are available in the literature. We presented 80 color images of natural scenes or their gray-scale counterparts to our observers, who were asked to choose the pixel from each image that appeared to be the most saturated. We compared our observers' choices to the predictions of seven popular saturation measures. For the color images, all of the measures predicted perception of saturation quite well, with CIECAM02 performing best. Differences between the measures were small but systematic. When gray-scale images were viewed, observers still chose pixels whose counterparts in the color images were saturated above average. This indicates that image structure and prior knowledge can be relevant to perception of saturation. Nevertheless, our results also show that saturation in natural scenes can be specified quite well without taking these factors into account. PMID:26974924

  13. NMR and SIP properties of partially saturated porous silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, E.; Klitzsch, N.; Mohnke, O.; Clauser, C.

    2009-04-01

    The signal responses of both, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are sensitive to the inner surfaces of the water filled porous media. Therefore both methods are well suited to noninvasively determine hydrological relevant parameters such as the pore radii distributions or hydraulic permeability of fully and partially saturated rocks and soils. NMR exploits the relaxation of the magnetization of fluids in the pore space of porous medium. In SIP the frequency dependence of the complex resistivity is determined, which mainly arises from the polarization of charges at the fluid matrix interface. In this work we study the dependence of NMR and SIP signals on the inner structure of fully and partially saturated artificial porous silica glasses (VitraPOR). The samples are characterized by an accurately defined pore space with well known pore radii distributions and surface properties. The mean pore sizes of the investigated samples range from 1.0µm to 250µm. Laboratory NMR saturation recovery (T1) and CPMG (T2) measurements have been carried out using a 3.91 MHz NMR spectrometer. SIP measurements were conducted in an extended frequency range from 1mHz - 1MHz using four point and two point configurations for low and high frequencies ranges, respectively. A homogeneous partial saturation down to 1 vol. % has been realized by applying a uniform negative pressure gradient to the samples at each desaturation step. Additionally the corresponding pf curves have been recorded and evaluated. On the basis of the results from these experiments and corresponding numerical pore scale simulations of NMR relaxation (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; see also Mohnke et al SSS23) and SIP (see also Volkmann et al MPRG7) we aim at an interpretation scheme for combined NMR and SIP measurements in order to assess structure, state and thus transport properties of fully and partially saturated soils.

  14. A Parametric Approach to Spectral-Spatial EPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Som, Subhojit; Potter, Lee C.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2007-01-01

    Continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for in vivo mapping of spin distribution and spectral shape requires rapid data acquisition. A spectral-spatial imaging technique is presented that provides an order of magnitude reduction in acquisition time, compared to iterative tomographic reprojection. The proposed approach assumes that spectral shapes in the sample are well-approximated by members from a parametric family of functions. A model is developed for the spectra measured with magnetic field modulation. Parameters defining the spin distribution and spectral shapes are then determined directly from the measurements using maximum a posteriori probability estimation. The approach does not suffer approximation error from limited sweep width of the main magnetic field and explicitly incorporates the variability in signal-to-noise ratio versus strength of magnetic field gradient. The processing technique is experimentally demonstrated on a one- dimensional phantom containing a nitroxide spin label with constant g-factor. Using an L-band EPR spectrometer, spectral shapes and spin distribution are accurately recovered from two projections and a spectral window which is comparable to the maximum linewidth of the sample. PMID:17276111

  15. Separation and Enrichment of the Active Component of Carbon Based Paramagnetic Materials for Use in EPR Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. J.; Miyake, M.; James, P. E.; Swartz, H. M.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon based paramagnetic materials are frequently used for EPR oximetry, especiallyin vivo,but the EPR spectra of these materials often have more than one paramagnetic center and/or relatively low signal intensity. To determine whether the multi-components of carbon based materials could be separated and enriched in the active component, we used density gradient centrifugation to separate the materials into several fractions. We studied two types of coals, gloxy and Pocahontas, and found these materials to have large density distribution. The separated density fractions had very different EPR spectra and intensities. The active component from the coal material had a more homogeneous EPR signal and significantly increased EPR signal intensity, whereas for India ink, only slight changes were observed. This result can be very useful in the development of better probes for EPR oximetry.

  16. Separation and enrichment of the active component of carbon based paramagnetic materials for use in EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, K J; Miyake, M; James, P E; Swartz, H M

    1998-08-01

    Carbon based paramagnetic materials are frequently used for EPR oximetry, especially in vivo, but the EPR spectra of these materials often have more than one paramagnetic center and/or relatively low signal intensity. To determine whether the multi-components of carbon based materials could be separated and enriched in the active component, we used density gradient centrifugation to separate the materials into several fractions. We studied two types of coals, gloxy and Pocahontas, and found these materials to have large density distribution. The separated density fractions had very different EPR spectra and intensities. The active component from the coal material had a more homogeneous EPR signal and significantly increased EPR signal intensity, whereas for India ink, only slight changes were observed. This result can be very useful in the development of better probes for EPR oximetry.

  17. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine.

  18. The origin of the split S3 EPR signal in Ca(2+)-depleted photosystem II: histidine versus tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Boussac, A; Rutherford, A W

    1992-08-25

    The radical formed as the formal S3 charge storage state in Ca(2+)-depleted photosystem II and detected as a split EPR signal was previously assigned to an oxidized histidine radical on the basis of its UV spectrum. In a recent paper [Hallahan, B. J., Nugent, J. H. A., Warden, J. T., & Evans, M. C. W. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4562-4573], this assignment was challenged, and it was suggested that the signal arises instead from the well-known tyrosine radical Tyrz., the electron carrier between the photooxidized chlorophyll and the Mn cluster. Here, we provide evidence that the measurements of the Tyr., on which the new interpretation was based, are artifactual due to the use of saturating microwave powers. Other than a relaxation-enhancement effect, the formation of the split S3 signal is accompanied by no change in the Tyr. signal. Although essentially unrelated to the origin of the S3 radical, several other experimental and interpretational problems in the work of Hallahan et al. (1992) are pointed out and rationalized. For example, the inability of Hallahan et al. (1992) to observe the split S3 signal in samples containing DCMU or without a chelator, in contrast to our observations, is attributed to a number of technical problems including the incomplete inhibition of the enzyme. We thus conclude that the assignment of the split S3 signal as His., although not proven, remains the most reasonable on the basis of current data.

  19. Electronically Tunable Surface-Coil-Type Resonator for L-Band EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Walczak, Tadeusz; Swartz, Harold M.

    2000-01-01

    The automatic frequency control (AFC) circuit in conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers automatically tunes the microwave source to the resonance frequency of the resonator. The circuit works satisfactorily for samples stable enough that the geometric relations in the resonance structure do not change in a significant way. When EPR signals are measured during in vivo experiments with small rodents, however, the distance between the signal source and the surface-coil detector can change rapidly. When a conventional AFC circuit keeps the oscillator tuned to the resonator under those conditions, the resultant frequency change may exceed ±5 MHz and markedly shift the position of the EPR signal. Such a shift results in unacceptable effects on the spectra, especially when the experimenter is dealing with narrow EPR lines. The animal movement also causes a mismatching of the resonator and the 50-ohm transmission line. Direct results of this mismatching are increased noise; shifts in the position of the baseline; and a high probability of overdriving the signal preamplifier with consequent loss of the EPR signal. We therefore designed, built, and tested a new surface-coil resonator using varactor diodes for tuning the resonance frequency to the fixed frequency oscillator and for capacitive matching of the resonator to the 50-ohm transmission line. The performance of the automatic matching system was tested in vivo by measuring EPR spectra of lithium phthalocyanine implanted in rats. Stability and sensitivity of the spectrometer were evaluated by measuring EPR spectra with and without the use of the automatic matching system. The overall experimental performance of the spectrometer was found to significantly improve during in vivo experiments using the automatic matching system. Excellent matching between the 50-ohm transmission line and the resonator was maintained under all experimental circumstances that were tested. This should allow us now to

  20. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: solving a lineshape paradox.

    PubMed

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4x10(19) spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S=1/2, and centres with S=0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S=1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and (13)C nuclei indicates that IOM* centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H approximately 1.5+/-0.5x10(-2) of the order of values existing in interstellar medium.

  1. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: Solving a lineshape paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4 × 10 19 spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S = 1/2, and centres with S = 0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S = 1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and 13C nuclei indicates that IOM rad centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H ≈ 1.5 ± 0.5 × 10 -2 of the order of values existing in interstellar medium.

  2. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Comberiati, Joseph R.; Locke, Charles D.; Kamath, Krishna I.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  3. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    DOEpatents

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  4. EPR detection of cellular and mitochondrial superoxide using cyclic hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Kirilyuk, Igor A; Voinov, Maxim; Grigor'ev, Igor A

    2011-04-01

    Superoxide (O₂ⁱ⁻) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, but detection of the O(2)(•-) radicals in biological systems is limited due to inefficiency of O₂ⁱ⁻ spin trapping and lack of site-specific information. This work studied production of extracellular, intracellular and mitochondrial O₂ⁱ⁻ in neutrophils, cultured endothelial cells and isolated mitochondria using a new set of cationic, anionic and neutral hydroxylamine spin probes with various lipophilicity and cell permeability. Cyclic hydroxylamines rapidly react with O₂ⁱ⁻, producing stable nitroxides and allowing site-specific cO₂ⁱ⁻ detection in intracellular, extracellular and mitochondrial compartments. Negatively charged 1-hydroxy-4-phosphono-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (PP-H) and positively charged 1-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-yl-trimethylammonium (CAT1-H) detected only extramitochondrial O₂ⁱ⁻. Inhibition of EPR signal by SOD2 over-expression showed that mitochondria targeted mitoTEMPO-H detected intramitochondrial O₂ⁱ⁻ both in isolated mitochondria and intact cells. Both 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CP-H) and 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CM-H) detected an increase in cytoplasm O₂ⁱ⁻ stimulated by PMA, but only CM-H and mitoTEMPO-H showed an increase in rotenone-induced mitochondrial O₂ⁱ⁻. These data show that a new set of hydroxylamine spin probes provide unique information about site-specific production of the O₂ⁱ⁻ radical in extracellular or intracellular compartments, cytoplasm or mitochondria.

  5. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  6. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  7. Microwave and optical saturable absorption in graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhao, Chujun; Lu, Shunbin; Chen, Yu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2012-10-01

    We report on the first experiments on saturable absorption in graphene at microwave frequency band. Almost independent of the incident frequency, microwave absorbance of graphene always decreases with increasing the power and reaches at a constant level for power larger than 80 µW, evidencing the microwave saturable absorption property of graphene. Optical saturable absorption of the same graphene sample was also experimentally confirmed by an open-aperture Z-scan technique by one laser at telecommunication band and another pico-second laser at 1053 nm, respectively. Herein, we are able to conclude that graphene is indeed a broadband saturable absorber that can operate at both microwave and optical band.

  8. Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James A.

    1998-06-23

    The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

  9. A comparative EPR, infrared and Raman study of natural and deproteinated tooth enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fattibene, P; Carosi, A; De Coste, V; Sacchetti, A; Nucara, A; Postorino, P; Dore, P

    2005-03-21

    The aim of the present work was to investigate how the native signal observed in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of tooth enamel and dentin is associated with the organic content of the two tissues. This was achieved by comparing the EPR native signal and the optical bands (Raman and infrared, IR) associated with organic components of tooth enamel and dentin, in natural and deproteinated samples. The main results were: (a) in natural samples, the organic optical bands are more intense in dentin than in enamel, in contrast with the EPR native signal which shows similar intensity in the two tissues; (b) after deproteination, the optical organic bands are completely suppressed in both dentin and enamel, while the EPR native signal is eliminated only in dentin. It is suggested that the IR and Raman organic bands are originated in the bulk of the organic matrix, while the paramagnetic centres associated with the EPR native signal are located in the organic-mineral interface.

  10. A comparative EPR, infrared and Raman study of natural and deproteinated tooth enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattibene, P.; Carosi, A.; DeCoste, V.; Sacchetti, A.; Nucara, A.; Postorino, P.; Dore, P.

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate how the native signal observed in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of tooth enamel and dentin is associated with the organic content of the two tissues. This was achieved by comparing the EPR native signal and the optical bands (Raman and infrared, IR) associated with organic components of tooth enamel and dentin, in natural and deproteinated samples. The main results were: (a) in natural samples, the organic optical bands are more intense in dentin than in enamel, in contrast with the EPR native signal which shows similar intensity in the two tissues; (b) after deproteination, the optical organic bands are completely suppressed in both dentin and enamel, while the EPR native signal is eliminated only in dentin. It is suggested that the IR and Raman organic bands are originated in the bulk of the organic matrix, while the paramagnetic centres associated with the EPR native signal are located in the organic-mineral interface.

  11. Site Directed Spin Labeling and EPR Spectroscopic Studies of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sandip; Chatterjee, Soumili; Chakrapani, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel gating is a stimulus-driven orchestration of protein motions that leads to transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Fundamental to these transitions is the intrinsic flexibility of the protein, which is critically modulated by membrane lipid-composition. To better understand the structural basis of channel function, it is necessary to study protein dynamics in a physiological membrane environment. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is an important tool to characterize conformational transitions between functional states. In comparison to NMR and X-ray crystallography, the information obtained from EPR is intrinsically of lower resolution. However, unlike in other techniques, in EPR there is no upper-limit to the molecular weight of the protein, the sample requirements are significantly lower, and more importantly the protein is not constrained by the crystal lattice forces. Therefore, EPR is uniquely suited for studying large protein complexes and proteins in reconstituted systems. In this article, we will discuss general protocols for site-directed spin labeling and membrane reconstitution using a prokaryotic proton-gated pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) as an example. A combination of steady-state Continuous Wave (CW) and Pulsed (Double Electron Electron Resonance-DEER) EPR approaches will be described that will enable a complete quantitative characterization of channel dynamics. PMID:27403967

  12. Radiation sensitivity and EPR dosimetric potential of gallic acid and its esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuner, Hasan; Oktay Bal, M.; Polat, Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    In the preset work the radiation sensitivities of Gallic Acid anhydrous and monohydrate, Octyl, Lauryl, and Ethyl Gallate (GA, GAm, OG, LG, and EG) were investigated in the intermediate (0.5-20 kGy) and low radiation (<10 Gy) dose range using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While OG, LG, and EG are presented a singlet EPR spectra, their radiation sensitivity found to be very different in the intermediate dose range. At low radiation dose range (<10 Gy) only LG is found to be present a signal that easily distinguished from the noise signals. The intermediate and low dose range radiation sensitivities are compared using well known EPR dosimeter alanine. The radiation yields (G) of the interested material were found to be 1.34×10-2, 1.48×10-2, 4.14×10-2, and 6.03×10-2, 9.44×10-2 for EG, GA, GAm, OG, and LG, respectively at the intermediate dose range. It is found that the simple EPR spectra and the noticeable EPR signal of LG make it a promising dosimetric material to be used below 10 Gy of radiation dose.

  13. Photoionization of phenothiazine: EPR detection of reactions of the polarized solvated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Turro, N.J.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Willigen, H. van

    1995-12-13

    Photoionization of phenothiazine (PTH) and reactions of the solvated electron with some electron acceptors were studied with steady state and time-resolved EPR and transient optical absorption techniques. Time-resolved EPR spectra from the phenothiazine cation radical (PTH{sup .+}) and hydrated electron (e{sub aq}{sup -}) formed in sodium 1-dodecylsulfate (SDS) micellar solution were observed in emission. By contrast, PTH{sup .+} formed by photoionization of PTH in alcohols gives absorptive EPR signals. The spin polarization carried by the hydrated electron in SDS solutions can be transferred effectively to a stable nitroxyl free radical 3-carboxy-2,2,5, 5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxyl (N{sup .-}) present in the bulk aqueous phase. EPR and flash photolysis measurements show that this electron spin polarization transfer process proceeds with a rate which is approximately five times faster than the chemical reaction between e{sub aq}{sup -} and N{sup .-}. The marked difference in rates is attributed to differences in spin-statistical factors and difference in reaction radii for spin exchange compared to reaction. In alcohol solutions of PTH and a nitroxyl stable radical (2,2,6, 6-tetramethylpyperidin-1-oxyl, TEMPO), excitation of PTH also results in emissive polarization of the EPR spectrum of the stable radical. 46 refs., 12 figs.

  14. New Developed Cylindrical TM010 Mode EPR Cavity for X-Band In Vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Junwang, Guo; Qingquan, Yuan; Jianbo, Cong; Lei, Ma; Guofu, Dong; Guoshan, Yang; Ke, Wu

    2014-01-01

    EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity’s cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry. PMID:25222483

  15. High-Pressure EPR and Site-Directed Spin Labeling for Mapping Molecular Flexibility in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Michael T; Yang, Zhongyu; Altenbach, Christian; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is a powerful probe of protein conformational flexibility. Pressurization reveals regions of elevated compressibility, and thus flexibility, within individual conformational states, but also shifts conformational equilibria such that "invisible" excited states become accessible for spectroscopic characterization. The central aim of this chapter is to describe recently developed instrumentation and methodologies that enable high-pressure site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) experiments on proteins and to demonstrate the information content of these experiments by highlighting specific recent applications. A brief introduction to the thermodynamics of proteins under pressure is presented first, followed by a discussion of the principles underlying SDSL-EPR detection of pressure effects in proteins, and the suitability of SDSL-EPR for this purpose in terms of timescale and ability to characterize conformational heterogeneity. Instrumentation and practical considerations for variable-pressure continuous wave EPR and pressure-resolved double electron-electron resonance (PR DEER) experiments are reviewed, and finally illustrations of data analysis using recent applications are presented. Although high-pressure SDSL-EPR is in its infancy, the recent applications presented highlight the considerable potential of the method to (1) identify compressible (flexible) regions in a folded protein; (2) determine thermodynamic parameters that relate conformational states in equilibrium; (3) populate and characterize excited states of proteins undetected at atmospheric pressure; (4) reveal the structural heterogeneity of conformational ensembles and provide distance constraints on the global structure of pressure-populated states with PR DEER.

  16. Sterically shielded spin labels for in-cell EPR spectroscopy: analysis of stability in reducing environment.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, A P; Krstic, I; Kunjir, N C; Hänsel, R; Prisner, T F; Sigurdsson, S Th

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful and widely used technique for studying structure and dynamics of biomolecules under bio-orthogonal conditions. In-cell EPR is an emerging area in this field; however, it is hampered by the reducing environment present in cells, which reduces most nitroxide spin labels to their corresponding diamagnetic N-hydroxyl derivatives. To determine which radicals are best suited for in-cell EPR studies, we systematically studied the effects of substitution on radical stability using five different classes of radicals, specifically piperidine-, imidazolidine-, pyrrolidine-, and isoindoline-based nitroxides as well as the Finland trityl radical. Thermodynamic parameters of nitroxide reduction were determined by cyclic voltammetry; the rate of reduction in the presence of ascorbate, cellular extracts, and after injection into oocytes was measured by continuous-wave EPR spectroscopy. Our study revealed that tetraethyl-substituted nitroxides are good candidates for in-cell EPR studies, in particular pyrrolidine derivatives, which are slightly more stable than the trityl radical. PMID:25348344

  17. Determination of methemoglobin in human blood after ionising radiation by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polakovs, M.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Pavlenko, A.; Aboltins, A.

    2015-03-01

    In the present work presents results of investigations of radiation influence on blood of patients examined by radio-isotopes diagnosis (Tc99m), blood of Chernobyl clean-up workers and human blood irradiated by LINAC using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The EPR spectroscopy reveals information on electronic states of transition metal ions, particularly Fe3+ in different spin states. It is shown that EPR spectra of blood of patients before examination has signal from metal-protein transferrin (g=4.3) and after administration of radioisotope proves signal of Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in the high spin state (g=6.0). The EPR spectra of Chernobyl liquidator display number of signals including low and high state of ion Fe3+ (g = 2.0 and g=6.0), and transferrin (g=4.3). The EPR spectra of irradiated human blood by LINAC (linear accelerator) have only signal Fe3+ (methemaglobin) in low-spin state with g = 2.0.

  18. Structural Characterization of Membrane-Curving Proteins: Site-Directed Spin Labeling, EPR, and Computational Refinement.

    PubMed

    Ambroso, Mark R; Haworth, Ian S; Langen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and other membrane remodeling processes require the coordinated generation of different membrane shapes. Proteins capable of manipulating lipid bilayers mediate these events using mechanisms that are not fully understood. Progress is limited by the small number of structures solved for proteins bound to different membrane shapes and tools capable of resolving such information. However, recent studies have shown site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to be capable of obtaining high-resolution structural information for proteins bound to different membrane shapes. This technique can be applied to proteins with no known structure or proteins with structures known in solution. By refining the data obtained by EPR with computational modeling, 3D structures or structural models of membrane-bound proteins can be generated. In this chapter, we highlight the basic considerations and steps required to investigate the structures of membrane-bound proteins using SDSL, EPR, and computational refinement. PMID:26477254

  19. Saccharides as Prospective Immobilizers of Nucleic Acids for Room-Temperature Structural EPR Studies.

    PubMed

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Tormyshev, Victor M; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedin, Matvey V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for structural studies of biomolecules and their complexes. This method, whose applicability has been recently extended to room temperatures, requires immobilization of the studied biosystem to prevent averaging of dipolar couplings; at the same time, the modification of native conformations by immobilization must be avoided. In this work, we provide first demonstration of room-temperature EPR distance measurements in nucleic acids using saccharides trehalose, sucrose, and glucose as immobilizing media. We propose an approach that keeps structural conformation and unity of immobilized double-stranded DNA. Remarkably, room-temperature electron spin dephasing time of triarylmethyl-labeled DNA in trehalose is noticeably longer compared to previously used immobilizers, thus providing a broader range of available distances. Therefore, saccharides, and especially trehalose, can be efficiently used as immobilizers of nucleic acids, mimicking native conditions and allowing wide range of structural EPR studies at room temperatures. PMID:27320083

  20. An automated system for the measurement of alanine/EPR dosimeters

    PubMed

    Sharpe; Sephton

    2000-05-01

    NPL for several years has offered mailed reference dosimetry services based on alanine/EPR dosimeters, both at industrial and therapy dose levels. Compared to other methods of reference dosimetry, operator involvement in alanine/EPR has been found to be relatively high, and contributes significantly to the overall economics of the process. Commercially available sample changers are not suitable for high accuracy applications, and it has proved necessary to develop a dedicated automation system to handle NPL alanine dosimeter pellets. In this paper we describe an automatic sample changer for placing and retrieving alanine pellets into and out of the cavity of a standard research grade EPR spectrometer. Up to 32 pellets can be held in each removable sample tray. The sample changer software has been interfaced into the spectrometer control software to enable complete automation of the measurement process, including the optimization of spectrometer settings and rotation of the sample within the cavity.

  1. Navigating Membrane Protein Structure, Dynamics, and Energy Landscapes Using Spin Labeling and EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Claxton, Derek P; Kazmier, Kelli; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2015-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the functional mechanism of a protein entails the characterization of its energy landscape. Achieving this ambitious goal requires the integration of multiple approaches including determination of high-resolution crystal structures, uncovering conformational sampling under distinct biochemical conditions, characterizing the kinetics and thermodynamics of transitions between functional intermediates using spectroscopic techniques, and interpreting and harmonizing the data into novel computational models. With increasing sophistication in solution-based and ensemble-oriented biophysical approaches such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, atomic resolution structural information can be directly linked to conformational sampling in solution. Here, we detail how recent methodological and technological advances in EPR spectroscopy have contributed to the elucidation of membrane protein mechanisms. Furthermore, we aim to assist investigators interested in pursuing EPR studies by providing an introduction to the technique, a primer on experimental design, and a description of the practical considerations of the method toward generating high quality data.

  2. Comparisons of EPR imaging and T1-weighted MRI for efficient imaging of nitroxyl contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Narazaki, Michiko; Ikehira, Hiroo; Anzai, Kazunori; Ikota, Nobuo

    2007-07-01

    The resolution and signal to noise ratio of EPR imaging and T(1)-weighted MRI were compared using an identical phantom. Several solutions of nitroxyl contrast agents with different EPR spectral shapes were tested. The feasibility of T(1)-weighted MRI to detect nitroxyl contrast agents was described. T(1)-weighted MRI can detect nitroxyl contrast agents with a complicated EPR spectrum easier and quicker; however, T(1)-weighted MRI has less quantitative ability especially for lipophilic nitroxyl contrast agents, because T(1)-relaxivity, i.e. accessibility to water, is affected by the hydrophilic/hydrophobic micro-environment of a nitroxyl contrast agent. The less quantitative ability of T(1)-weighted MRI may not be a disadvantage of redox imaging, which obtains reduction rate of a nitroxyl contrast. Therefore, T(1)-weighted MRI has a great advantage to check the pharmacokinetics of newly modified and/or designed nitroxyl contrast agents. PMID:17433743

  3. Copper ESEEM and HYSCORE through ultra-wideband chirp EPR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Doll, Andrin; Pribitzer, Stephan; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2015-07-28

    The main limitation of pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is its narrow excitation bandwidth. Ultra-wideband (UWB) excitation with frequency-swept chirp pulses over several hundreds of megahertz overcomes this drawback. This allows to excite electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) from paramagnetic copper centers in crystals, whereas up to now, only ESEEM of ligand nuclei like protons or nitrogens at lower frequencies could be detected. ESEEM spectra are recorded as two-dimensional correlation experiments, since the full digitization of the electron spin echo provides an additional Fourier transform EPR dimension. Thus, UWB hyperfine-sublevel correlation experiments generate a novel three-dimensional EPR-correlated nuclear modulation spectrum.

  4. "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study"--response to a comment.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Wibke; Buback, Michael

    2012-08-14

    We have presented an EPR-based approach for deducing the RAFT equilibrium constant, K(eq), of a dithiobenzoate-mediated system [Meiser, W. and Buback M. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1490]. Our value is by four orders of magnitude below K(eq) from ab initio calculations for the identical monomer-free system. Junkers et al. [Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1891] claim that our EPR approach would be model dependent and our data could be equally well fitted by assuming slow addition of radicals to the RAFT agent and slow fragmentation of the so-obtained intermediate radical as well as high cross-termination rate. By identification of all side products, our EPR-based method is shown to be model independent and to provide reliable K(eq) values, which demonstrate the validity of the intermediate radical termination model.

  5. Interpreting HSE Contents of Planetary Basalts: The Importance of Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2000-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements provide important constraints on planetary differentiation due to their siderophile behavior. Their interpretation in terms of planetary differentiation models has so far overlooked the importance of sulfide saturation and under-saturation.

  6. Diode laser saturation spectroscopy of NH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Saturation of molecular transitions using a tuneable diode laser was demonstrated for the first time using a standing-wave cavity configuration with an f/8 beam focussed at the sample. Observed saturation effects in NH3 transitions near 888/cm include sub-Doppler (Lamb-dip) resonances at line center.

  7. Seismic determination of saturation in fractured reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.L.; Wiggins, M.L.; Gupta, A.

    2002-01-01

    Detecting the saturation of a fractured reservoir using shear waves is possible when the fractures have a geometry that induces a component of movement perpendicular to the fractures. When such geometry is present, vertically traveling shear waves can be used to examine the saturation of the fractured reservoir. Tilted, corrugated, and saw-tooth fracture models are potential examples.

  8. Solvent effect on librational dynamics of spin-labelled haemoglobin by ED- and CW-EPR.

    PubMed

    Scarpelli, Francesco; Bartucci, Rosa; Sportelli, Luigi; Guzzi, Rita

    2011-03-01

    Two-pulse, echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (ED-EPR) spectra and continuous-wave EPR (CW-EPR) spectra were used to investigate the solvent effect on the librational motion of human haemoglobin spin-labelled on cysteine β93 with the nitroxide derivative of maleimide, 6-MSL. Protein samples fully hydrated in phosphate buffer solution (PBS), in a 60% v/v glycerol/water mixture and in the lyophilized form were measured at cryogenic temperature in the frozen state. The protein librational motion was characterized by the amplitude-correlation time product, <α²>τ(c), deduced from the ED-EPR spectra. The librational amplitude, <α²>τ(c), was determined independently, from the motionally averaged hyperfine splitting in the CW-EPR spectra, and the librational correlation time, τ(c), was derived from the combination of the pulsed and conventional EPR data. Rapid librational motion of small amplitude was detected in all samples. In each case, the librational dynamics was restricted up to 180 K, beyond which it increased steeply for the hydrated protein in PBS and in the presence of glycerol. In contrast, in the dehydrated protein, the librational dynamics was hindered and less dependent on temperature up to ~240 K. In all samples, <α²> deviated from small values only for T > 200 K, where a rapid increase of <α²> was evident for the hydrated samples, whereas limited temperature variation was shown in the lyophilized samples. The librational correlation time was in the sub-nanosecond regime and weakly dependent on temperature. The results evidence that solvent favours protein dynamics.

  9. EPR oxygen images predict tumor control by a 50 percent tumor control radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Elas, Martyna; Magwood, Jessica M.; Butler, Brandi; Li, Chanel; Wardak, Rona; Barth, Eugene D.; Epel, Boris; Rubinstein, Samuel; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials to ameliorate hypoxia as a strategy to relieve the radiation resistance it causes have prompted a need to assay the precise extent and location of hypoxia in tumors. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance oxygen imaging (EPR O2 imaging) provides a non-invasive means to address this need. To obtain a preclinical proof of principle that EPR O2 images could predict radiation control, we treated mouse tumors at or near doses required to achieve 50 percent control (TCD50). Mice with FSa fibrosarcoma or MCa4 carcinoma were subjected to EPR O2 imaging and immediately radiated to a TCD50 or TCD50 ±10 Gy.. Statistical analysis was permitted by collection of ~ 1300 tumor pO2 image voxels, including the fraction of tumor voxels with pO2 less than 10 mm Hg (HF10). Tumors were followed for 90 days (FSa) or 120 days (MCa4) to determine local control or failure. HF10 obtained from EPR images showed statistically significant differences between tumors that were controlled by the TCD50 and those that were not controlled for both FSa and MCa4. Kaplan-Meier analysis of both types of tumors showed ~90% of mildly hypoxic tumors were controlled (HF10<10%), and only 37% (FSA) and 23% (MCa4) tumors controlled if hypoxic. EPR pO2 image voxel distributions in these ~0.5 ml tumors provide a prediction of radiation curability independent of radiation dose. These data confirm the significance of EPR pO2 hypoxic fractions. The ~90% control of low HF10 tumors argue that ½ ml subvolumes of tumors may be more sensitive to radiation and may need less radiation for high tumor control rates. PMID:23861469

  10. High-field EPR study of carotenoid and chlorophyll cation radicals in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmi, K. V.; Reifler, M. J.; Brudvig, G. W.; Poluektov, O. G.; Wagner, A. M.; Thurnuaer, M. C.; Chemistry; Yale Univ.

    2000-11-16

    In photosystem II (PS II), chlorophyll, {beta}-carotene, and cytochrome b{sub 559} are alternate electron donors that may be involved in a photoprotection mechanism. The present study describes the use of high-field EPR spectroscopy to characterize the low-temperature photooxidation of Chl{sub z} and Car cofactors in PS II. The EPR signals of the individual species, previously not resolved at X-band frequency (9 GHz), are resolved at higher D-band frequency (130 GHz) in deuterated Synechococcus lividus PS II. Deuteration of PS II results in significant narrowing of the EPR lines, yielding well-resolved EPR spectra of the Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals at 130 GHz. The g tensors of the individual species were determined by EPR spectral simulations. The g tensor determined for the Car{sup +} radical (g{sub xx} = 2.00335, g{sub yy} = 2.00251, g{sub zz} = 2.00227) is similar to that previously observed for a canthaxanthin cation radical but with a slightly rhombic tensor. The Chl{sub z}{sup +} g tensor (g{sub xx} = 2.00312, g{sub yy} = 2.00263, g{sub zz} = 2.00202) is similar to that of a chlorophyll a cation radical. This study shows that both the carotenoid and chlorophyll radicals are generated in PS II by illumination at temperatures from 6 to 190 K and that there is no interconversion of Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals upon dark annealing at temperatures up to 160 K. This study also establishes the feasibility of using deuteration and high-field EPR to resolve previously unresolvable cofactor signals in PS II.

  11. Analysis of the spatial distribution of free radicals in ammonium tartrate by pulse EPR techniques.

    PubMed

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Barbon, Antonio; Brustolon, Marina

    2009-03-01

    Using pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) on a series of l(+)-ammonium tartrate (AT) dosimeters exposed to radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET), we assessed the ability of pulse EPR spectroscopy to discriminate the quality of various radiation beams such as (60)Co gamma-ray photons, protons and thermal neutrons at various doses by analyzing the local radical distributions produced by the different beams. We performed two types of pulse EPR investigations: two-pulse electron spin echo decay obtained by varying the microwave power, and a double electron-electron resonance (DEER) study. Both methods provide information about the dipolar interactions among the free radicals and about their spatial distributions. The first method provided information on the instantaneous diffusion and hence the microscopic concentration of the radicals that is compared with the macroscopic one obtained by CW-EPR. The DEER spectra yielded the distributions of distances between pairs of radicals two to five crystal cells apart produced by the same radiation event, a result reported here for the first time. The inter-radical distributions given by the DEER results have been simulated by modeling the radical distributions according to the details of the matter-radiation interactions for the various beams. The results of both types of pulse experiments are strongly dependent on the radiation quality. This was also observed for samples giving indistinguishable CW-EPR spectral profiles. We conclude that the pulse EPR measurements can be valuable tools for distinguishing the LET of the radiation beams, an important parameter for radiobiological considerations. PMID:19267562

  12. 75 FR 16203 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on EPR; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on EPR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on the U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) will hold a meeting on April 20-21, 2010, at 11545 Rockville Pike, T2-...

  13. Patterning via optical saturable transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Precious

    For the past 40 years, optical lithography has been the patterning workhorse for the semiconductor industry. However, as integrated circuits have become more and more complex, and as device geometries shrink, more innovative methods are required to meet these needs. In the far-field, the smallest feature that can be generated with light is limited to approximately half the wavelength. This, so called far-field diffraction limit or the Abbe limit (after Prof. Ernst Abbe who first recognized this), effectively prevents the use of long-wavelength photons >300nm from patterning nanostructures <100nm. Even with a 193nm laser source and extremely complicated processing, patterns below ˜20nm are incredibly challenging to create. Sources with even shorter wavelengths can potentially be used. However, these tend be much more expensive and of much lower brightness, which in turn limits their patterning speed. Multi-photon reactions have been proposed to overcome the diffraction limit. However, these require very large intensities for modest gain in resolution. Moreover, the large intensities make it difficult to parallelize, thus limiting the patterning speed. In this dissertation, a novel nanopatterning technique using wavelength-selective small molecules that undergo single-photon reactions, enabling rapid top-down nanopatterning over large areas at low-light intensities, thereby allowing for the circumvention of the far-field diffraction barrier is developed and experimentally verified. This approach, which I refer to as Patterning via Optical Saturable Transitions (POST) has the potential for massive parallelism, enabling the creation of nanostructures and devices at a speed far surpassing what is currently possible with conventional optical lithographic techniques. The fundamental understanding of this technique goes beyond optical lithography in the semiconductor industry and is applicable to any area that requires the rapid patterning of large-area two or three

  14. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents: a prospective look at a retrospective method

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Chumak, V.; Shalom, S.

    1996-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel is a relatively new technique for retrospective dosimetry that in the past two years has seen increasing effort towards its development and evaluation. Efforts have centered on determining the accuracy which may be achieved with current measurement techniques as well as the minimum doses detectable. The study was focused on evaluating some factors which influence the accuracy of EPR dosimetry of enamel. Reported are studies on sample intercomparisions, instrumental considerations, and effects of dental x-rays, environmental sunlight and ultraviolet radiation.

  15. Application of jade samples for high-dose dosimetry using the EPR technique.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Melo, Adeilson P; Ferraz, Gilberto M; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    The dosimeter characteristics of jade samples were studied for application in high-dose dosimetry. Jade is the common denomination of two silicates: jadeite and actinolite. The EPR spectra of different jade samples were obtained after irradiation with absorbed doses of 100 Gy up to 20 kGy. The jade samples present signals that increase with the absorbed dose (g-factors around 2.00); they can be attributed to electron centers. The EPR spectra obtained for the USA jade samples and their main dosimetric properties as reproducibility, calibration curves and energy dependence were investigated.

  16. FTIR and EPR spectroscopic investigation of calcium-silicate glasses with iron and dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eniu, D.; Gruian, C.; Vanea, E.; Patcas, L.; Simon, V.

    2015-03-01

    The sol-gel derived 50SiO2ṡ30CaOṡ10Fe2O3ṡ10Dy2O3 system was subjected to heat treatments at 500, 800 and 1200 °C in order to obtain crystalline phases of interest for biomedical applications. The structural changes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both FTIR and EPR results support the development of wollastonite, hematite and magnetite crystalline phases desirable for samples bioactivity and heating possibility for hyperthermia treatment. Dysprosium addition was considered for subsequent radioactivation of the samples that could extend their application to thermoradiotherapy.

  17. EPR study of VO2+ doped glycine zinc sulphate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakaran, R.; Subramanian, P.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals Of GZS:VO2+ were grown by slow evaporation of solvent at room temperature. The EPR study was carried out at room temperature. Single crystal rotations in each of the three mutually orthogonal planes indicate single site occupation of VO2+ in the lattice. g and A tensors were calculated from the recorded EPR spectra. The principal values of g and A indicates existence of rhombic symmetry around the VO2+ ion. From the direction cosines of the g and A tensors, the locations of VO2+ in the lattice have been identified as substitutional site.

  18. EPR, mass, IR, electronic, and magnetic studies on copper(II) complexes of semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes having the general composition Cu(L) 2X 2 [where L = isopropyl methyl ketone semicarbazone (LLA), isopropyl methyl ketone thiosemicarbazone (LLB), 4-aminoacetophenone semicarbazone (LLC), and 4-aminoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (LLD) and X = Cl -, 1/2SO 42-] have been synthesized. All the Cu(II) complexes reported here have been characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic moment susceptibility, EI mass, 1H NMR, IR, EPR, and electronic spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have magnetic moments corresponding to one unpaired electrons. The possible geometries of the complexes were assigned on the basis of EPR, electronic, and infrared spectral studies.

  19. Pulsed EPR Distance Measurements in Soluble Proteins by Site-directed Spin-labeling (SDSL)

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Blackburn, Mandy E.; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in structural biology centers on recent improvements in distance measurements using the double electron-electron resonance (DEER) technique. This unit focuses on EPR-based distance measurements by site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) of engineered cysteine residues in soluble proteins, with HIV-1 protease used as a model. To elucidate conformational changes in proteins, experimental protocols were optimized and existing data analysis programs were employed to derive distance distribution profiles. Experimental considerations, sample preparation and error analysis for artifact suppression are also outlined here. PMID:24510645

  20. A secure and efficient password-based user authentication scheme using smart cards for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Lin, Tsung-Hung; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    The integrated EPR information system supports convenient and rapid e-medicine services. A secure and efficient authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system provides safeguarding patients' electronic patient records (EPRs) and helps health care workers and medical personnel to rapidly making correct clinical decisions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed an efficient password-based user authentication scheme using smart cards for the integrated EPR information system, and claimed that the proposed scheme could resist various malicious attacks. However, their scheme is still vulnerable to lost smart card and stolen verifier attacks. This investigation discusses these weaknesses and proposes a secure and efficient authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system as alternative. Compared with related approaches, the proposed scheme not only retains a lower computational cost and does not require verifier tables for storing users' secrets, but also solves the security problems in previous schemes and withstands possible attacks.

  1. A secure and efficient password-based user authentication scheme using smart cards for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Lin, Tsung-Hung; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-06-01

    The integrated EPR information system supports convenient and rapid e-medicine services. A secure and efficient authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system provides safeguarding patients' electronic patient records (EPRs) and helps health care workers and medical personnel to rapidly making correct clinical decisions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed an efficient password-based user authentication scheme using smart cards for the integrated EPR information system, and claimed that the proposed scheme could resist various malicious attacks. However, their scheme is still vulnerable to lost smart card and stolen verifier attacks. This investigation discusses these weaknesses and proposes a secure and efficient authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system as alternative. Compared with related approaches, the proposed scheme not only retains a lower computational cost and does not require verifier tables for storing users' secrets, but also solves the security problems in previous schemes and withstands possible attacks. PMID:23553734

  2. Saturated anionic phospholipids enhance transdermal transport by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arindam; Zhao, Ya-Li; Hui, Sek Wen

    2002-10-01

    Anionic phospholipids, but not cationic or neutral phospholipids, were found to enhance the transdermal transport of molecules by electroporation. When added as liposomes to the milieus of water-soluble molecules to be delivered through the epidermis of porcine skin by electroporation, these phospholipids enhance, by one to two orders of magnitude, the transdermal flux. Encapsulation of molecules in liposomes is not necessary. Dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS), phosphatidylserine from bovine brain (brain-PS), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) were used to test factors affecting the potency of anionic lipid transport enhancers. DMPS with saturated acyl chains was found to be a much more potent transport enhancer than those with unsaturated acyl chains (DOPS and DOPG). There was no headgroup preference. Saturated DMPS was also more effective in delaying resistance recovery after pulsing, and with a greater affinity in the epidermis after pulsing. Using fluorescent carboxyl fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Dextrans as test water-soluble molecules for transport, and rhodamine-labeled phospholipids to track anionic phospholipids, we found, by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, that transport of water-soluble molecules was localized in local transport spots or regions (LTRs) created by the electroporation pulses. Anionic phospholipids, especially DMPS, were located at the center of the LTRs and spanned the entire thickness of the stratum corneum (SC). The degree of saturation of anionic phospholipids made no difference in the densities of LTRs created. We deduce that, after being driven into the epidermis by negative electric pulses, saturated anionic phospholipids mix and are retained better by the SC lipids. Anionic lipids prefer loose layers or vesicular rather than multilamellar forms, thereby prolonging the structural recovery of SC lipids to the native multilamellar form. In the

  3. EPR spectrum of the Y@C82 metallofullerene isolated in solid argon matrix: hyperfine structure from EPR spectroscopy and relativistic DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya; Akimov, Alexander V; Belov, Vasilii A; Tyurin, Daniil A; Bubnov, Vyacheslav P; Kareev, Ivan E; Yagubskii, Eduard B

    2010-08-21

    The EPR spectrum of the Y@C(82) molecules isolated in solid argon matrix was recorded for the first time at a temperature of 5 K. The isotropic hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) A(iso) = 0.12 +/- 0.02 mT on the nucleus (89)Y as derived from the EPR spectrum is found in more than two times greater than that obtained in previous EPR measurements in liquid solutions. Comparison of the measured hfcc on a metal atom with that predicted by density-functional theory calculations (PBE/L22) indicate that relativistic method provides good agreement between experiment in solid argon and theory. Analysis of the DFT calculated dipole-dipole hf-interaction tensor and electron spin distribution in the endometallofullerenes with encaged group 3 metal atoms Sc, Y and La has been performed. It shows that spin density on the scandium atom represents the Sc d(yz) orbital lying in the symmetry plane of the C(2v) fullerene isomer and interacting with two carbon atoms located in the para-position on the fullerene hexagon. In contrast, the configuration of electron spin density on the heavier atoms, Y and La, is associated with the hybridized orbital formed by interaction of the metal d(yz) and p(y) electronic orbitals.

  4. Saturation and beaming in astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, C.; Ross, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A 'four-stream' model system of equations that are closely analogous to the equations of radiative transfer in a maser spectral line and are amenable to numerical solution are constructed. This model is used to investigate radiative transfer in asymmetric maser clouds. Competition between different beams of radiation for available pump photons is important in both unsaturated and saturated masers. Consequently, the radiation from a typical cloud will be highly beamed, even if the maser is saturated, because the shape of a typical cloud is not symmetric. In addition, it is shown that analysis of maser emission lines formed in expanding envelopes does not reveal the degree of saturation of the maser.

  5. Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator

    DOEpatents

    Ruch, Jeffrey F.; Urban, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

  6. Reading Recovery. [Fact Sheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    This set of 10 fact sheets (each 2 to 4 pages long) addresses aspects of Reading Recovery, a program that helps children to be proficient readers and writers by the end of the first grade. It discusses the basic facts of Reading Recovery; Reading Recovery for Spanish literacy; Reading Recovery lessons; Reading Recovery professional development;…

  7. Radiation Dosimetry of Dental Enamel Using X-Band and Q-Band EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Tania; Romanyukha, Alex; Pass, Barry; Misra, Prabhakar

    2010-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of tooth enamel can be used for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid, minimally invasive technique for obtaining a sample of dental enamel small enough to not disturb the structure and functionality of a tooth and to improve the sensitivity of the spectral signals using X-band (9.4 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz) EPR spectroscopy. EPR measurements in X-band were performed on 100 mg isotropic powdered enamel samples and Q-band measurements done on 4 mg (1x1x3 mm) enamel biopsy samples. All samples were obtained from discarded teeth collected during normal dental treatment. In order to study the variation of the Radiation-Induced Signal (RIS) at different orientations in the applied magnetic field samples were placed in the resonance cavity for Q-band EPR. In X-band spectra, the RIS is distinct from the ``native'' radiation-independent signal only for doses > 0.5Gy. Q-band, however, resolves the RIS and ``native'' signals and improves sensitivity by a factor of 20 enabling measurements in 2-4 mg tooth enamel samples. )

  8. A New Q-Band EPR Probe for Quantitative Studies of Even Electron Metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petasis, D. T.; Hendrich, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    Existing Q-band (35 GHz) EPR spectrometers employ cylindrical cavities for more intense microwave magnetic fields B1, but are so constructed that only one orientation between the external field B and B1is allowed, namely the B ⊥ B1orientation, thus limiting the use of the spectrometer to measurements on Kramers spin systems (odd electron systems). We have designed and built a Q-band microwave probe to detect EPR signals in even electron systems, which operates in the range 2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K for studies of metalloprotein samples. The cylindrical microwave cavity operates in the TE011mode with cylindrical wall coupling to the waveguide, thus allowing all orientations of the external magnetic field B relative to the microwave field B1. Such orientations allow observation of EPR transitions in non-Kramers ions (even electron) which are either forbidden or significantly weaker for B ⊥ B1. Rotation of the external magnetic field also permits easy differentiation between spin systems from even and odd electron oxidation states. The cavity consists of a metallic helix and thin metallic end walls mounted on epoxy supports, which allows efficient penetration of the modulation field. The first quantitative EPR measurements from a metalloprotein (Hemerythrin) at 35 GHz with B1‖ B are presented.

  9. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed Central

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes. PMID:26389123

  10. Simple group password-based authenticated key agreements for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The security and privacy are important issues for electronic patient records (EPRs). The goal of EPRs is sharing the patients' medical histories such as the diagnosis records, reports and diagnosis image files among hospitals by the Internet. So the security issue for the integrated EPR information system is essential. That is, to ensure the information during transmission through by the Internet is secure and private. The group password-based authenticated key agreement (GPAKE) allows a group of users like doctors, nurses and patients to establish a common session key by using password authentication. Then the group of users can securely communicate by using this session key. Many approaches about GAPKE employ the public key infrastructure (PKI) in order to have higher security. However, it not only increases users' overheads and requires keeping an extra equipment for storing long-term secret keys, but also requires maintaining the public key system. This investigation presents a simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) protocol for the integrated EPR information system. The proposed SGPAKE protocol does not require using the server or users' public keys. Each user only remembers his weak password shared with a trusted server, and then can obtain a common session key. Then all users can securely communicate by using this session key. The proposed SGPAKE protocol not only provides users with convince, but also has higher security.

  11. EPR investigation of iron in size segregated atmospheric aerosols collected at Dunkerque, Northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, Frédéric; Zhilinskaya, Elena A.; Courcot, Dominique; Aboukaı̈s, Antoine; Puskaric, Emile

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to study atmospheric aerosols at Dunkerque, a French sea-side city located on the southern coast of the North Sea. Particles were collected in June-July 2001 and January-February 2002 periods using global filtration and cascade impaction. EPR spectra obtained for these particles were attributed to Fe 3+ ions, mainly in the form of hematite ( α-Fe 2O 3) in interaction with other paramagnetic species (Fe 3+, Mn 2+, Cu 2+, etc.). From the EPR spectra intensities measured at 77 and 293 K, Fe 3+ ions were evidenced in the form of clusters and agglomerated species. Fe 3+ agglomerated species were observed mainly for winds blowing from the industrial park. Cascade impactor samples study evidenced that clusters are rather detected in the small size particles whereas agglomerated Fe 3+ ions species are rather present in the large ones. The small size particles are richer in iron than the large ones, thus such particles play an important role in the value of EPR parameters.

  12. Increasing sensitivity of pulse EPR experiments using echo train detection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentink-Vigier, F.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Kaminker, I.; Tarle, V.; Goldfarb, D.

    2013-11-01

    Modern pulse EPR experiments are routinely used to study the structural features of paramagnetic centers. They are usually performed at low temperatures, where relaxation times are long and polarization is high, to achieve a sufficient Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR). However, when working with samples whose amount and/or concentration are limited, sensitivity becomes an issue and therefore measurements may require a significant accumulation time, up to 12 h or more. As the detection scheme of practically all pulse EPR sequences is based on the integration of a spin echo - either primary, stimulated or refocused - a considerable increase in SNR can be obtained by replacing the single echo detection scheme by a train of echoes. All these echoes, generated by Carr-Purcell type sequences, are integrated and summed together to improve the SNR. This scheme is commonly used in NMR and here we demonstrate its applicability to a number of frequently used pulse EPR experiments: Echo-Detected EPR, Davies and Mims ENDOR (Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance), DEER (Electron-Electron Double Resonance|) and EDNMR (Electron-Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR)-Detected NMR), which were combined with a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) type detection scheme at W-band. By collecting the transient signal and integrating a number of refocused echoes, this detection scheme yielded a 1.6-5 folds SNR improvement, depending on the paramagnetic center and the pulse sequence applied. This improvement is achieved while keeping the experimental time constant and it does not introduce signal distortion.

  13. EPR study of light illumination effects on radicals in gamma-irradiated ?-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, B.; Schultka, K.; Penkowski, M.; Sagstuen, E.

    2004-05-01

    Exposure of γ-irradiated L-alanine samples to sunlight and to light from a regular, fluorescent lamp resulted in significant changes in their EPR resonance patterns, both to spectral shapes and intensities. The experimental EPR spectra were numerically decomposed into three components reflecting contributions of three different radicals (R1-R3) generated by ionizing radiation in alanine. The light exposure caused a decay of the measured EPR signal intensity. For similar light intensities and exposure times the decay was much more pronounced in samples illuminated by sunlight than in samples illuminated by the fluorescent lamp. In both cases light-induced decay of R1 radicals was observed. Sunlight illumination resulted in a moderate decay of R2 radicals and in a doubling of the R3 radical population. On the other hand, fluorescent light caused a significant increase of R2 radicals and did not change the amount of R3 radicals. A quantitative analysis of the variations of the three radical contributions to the total EPR spectra upon fluorescent light exposure suggests a net R1→R2 free radical transformation. These effects of light on the alanine dosimetric signal should be taken into account in dosimetry protocols, assuring protection of alanine dosimeters from extended exposure to light.

  14. EPR policies for electronics in developing Asia: an adapted phase-in approach.

    PubMed

    Akenji, Lewis; Hotta, Yasuhiko; Bengtsson, Magnus; Hayashi, Shiko

    2011-09-01

    The amount of e-waste is growing rapidly in developing countries, and the health and environmental problems resulting from poor management of this waste have become a concern for policy makers. In response to these challenges, a number of Asian developing countries have been inspired by policy developments in OECD countries, and have drafted legislations based on the principle of extended producer responsibility (EPR). However, the experiences from developed countries show that a successful implementation of EPR policies requires adequate institutions and sufficient administrative capacity. Even advanced countries are thus facing difficulties. This paper concludes from existing literature and from the authors' own observations that there seems to be a mismatch between the typical policy responses to e-waste problems in developing Asia and the capacity for successful implementation of such policies. It also notes that the e-waste situation in developing Asian countries is further complicated by a number of additional factors, such as difficulties in identifying producers, import of used electronic products and e-waste (sometimes illegal), and the existence of a strong informal waste sector. Given these challenges, the authors conclude that comprehensive EPR policy schemes of the kind that have been implemented in some advanced countries are not likely to be effective. The paper therefore proposes an alternative phase-in approach whereby developing Asian countries are able to move gradually towards EPR systems. It argues that this approach would be more feasible, and discusses what could be the key building blocks of each implementation stage. PMID:21730041

  15. Recognising Workplace Learning: The Emerging Practices of e-RPL and e-PR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roslyn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of e-portfolios in recognition of prior learning (RPL) processes in workplace and professional practice contexts has attracted little attention in the literature due to its emergent nature. This study seeks to explore the growing incidence of e-portfolio-based RPL (e-RPL) and professional recognition (e-PR) processes in Australia…

  16. EPR Studies of Spin-Spin Exchange Processes: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Michael P.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical background, experimental procedures, and analysis of experimental results are provided for an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths. Source of line broadening observed in a spin-spin exchange process between radicals formed in aqueous solutions of potassium peroxylamine…

  17. Tight binding study of transition ions in silicon and E.P.R. spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecheur, P.; Toussaint, G.

    1983-02-01

    A tight binding scheme is used to study the electronic structure of transition ions in silicon. Self consistency and spin polarization are introduced in a simple way. Results are obtained for interstitial and substitutional Cr, Mn and Fe impurities. They are compared to E.P.R. experiments and cluster Xα results.

  18. Interaction of formin FH2 with skeletal muscle actin. EPR and DSC studies.

    PubMed

    Kupi, Tünde; Gróf, Pál; Nyitrai, Miklós; Belágyi, József

    2013-10-01

    Formins are highly conserved proteins that are essential in the formation and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The formin homology 2 (FH2) domain is responsible for actin binding and acts as an important nucleating factor in eukaryotic cells. In this work EPR and DSC were used to investigate the properties of the mDia1-FH2 formin fragment and its interaction with actin. MDia1-FH2 was labeled with a maleimide spin probe (MSL). EPR results suggested that the MSL was attached to a single SH group in the FH2. In DSC and temperature-dependent EPR experiments we observed that mDia1-FH2 has a flexible structure and observed a major temperature-induced conformational change at 41 °C. The results also confirmed the previous observation obtained by fluorescence methods that formin binding can destabilize the structure of actin filaments. In the EPR experiments the intermolecular connection between the monomers of formin dimers proved to be flexible. Considering the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular roles of formins this internal flexibility of the dimers is probably important for manifestation of their biological functions.

  19. An EPR, ENDOR and EIE study of gamma-irradiated poly (lactide-co-glycolide) polymers.

    PubMed

    Bushell, James A; Claybourn, Mike; Murphy, Damien M; Williams, Helen E

    2006-10-01

    Gamma radiation of poly (lactide-co-glycolide) raw polymers and processed microspheres under vacuum and at 77 K results in the formation of a series of free radicals. The resulting powder electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum contains a distribution of several different radicals, depending on the annealing temperature, and is therefore difficult to interpret. By utilising the selectivity of the electron nuclear DOuble resonance (ENDOR) and associated ENDOR induced EPR (EIE) techniques, a more direct approach for the deconvolution of the EPR spectrum can be achieved. Using this approach, the radiolytically induced CH3 *CHC(O)R- chain scission radical was identified at 120 K by simulation of the EIE spectrum. At elevated temperatures (250 K), this radical decays considerably and the more stable radicals -O*CHC(O)-, CH3 *C(OR)C(O)- and CH3 *C(OH)C(O)- predominate. This work demonstrates the utility of the EIE approach to supplement and aid the interpretation of powder EPR spectra of radicals in a polymer matrix. PMID:16847997

  20. EPR and UV spectroscopic study of table sugar as a high-dose dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Gancheva, V.; Georgieva, E.

    2002-10-01

    The possibilities for the estimation of the absorbed dose for high-energy radiation with a new self-calibrated dosimeter containing table sugar as a radiation-sensitive material and Mn 2+/MgO as an internal standard by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is reported. The dose response of this dosimeter is represented as the ratio between the EPR signal intensities of sugar and Mn 2+ versus absorbed dose. Because the EPR spectra of both substances are simultaneously recorded, the influence of some related instrumental setting parameters were investigated. UV spectral studies on water solutions of irradiated solid sugar were also performed. In all solutions of irradiated sugar samples a band at 267 nm was recorded as linearly increasing intensity with the absorbed dose. The minimum detectable dose using the UV spectrum of water solutions of irradiated sugar is 100 Gy. Combination of EPR and UV spectral data is possible to use for independent internal or international calibration and control of dose estimations.

  1. Simple group password-based authenticated key agreements for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The security and privacy are important issues for electronic patient records (EPRs). The goal of EPRs is sharing the patients' medical histories such as the diagnosis records, reports and diagnosis image files among hospitals by the Internet. So the security issue for the integrated EPR information system is essential. That is, to ensure the information during transmission through by the Internet is secure and private. The group password-based authenticated key agreement (GPAKE) allows a group of users like doctors, nurses and patients to establish a common session key by using password authentication. Then the group of users can securely communicate by using this session key. Many approaches about GAPKE employ the public key infrastructure (PKI) in order to have higher security. However, it not only increases users' overheads and requires keeping an extra equipment for storing long-term secret keys, but also requires maintaining the public key system. This investigation presents a simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) protocol for the integrated EPR information system. The proposed SGPAKE protocol does not require using the server or users' public keys. Each user only remembers his weak password shared with a trusted server, and then can obtain a common session key. Then all users can securely communicate by using this session key. The proposed SGPAKE protocol not only provides users with convince, but also has higher security. PMID:23328913

  2. The evaluation of new and isotopically labeled isoindoline nitroxides and an azaphenalene nitroxide for EPR oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadeem; Blinco, James P.; Bottle, Steven E.; Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Swartz, Harold M.; Micallef, Aaron S.

    2011-01-01

    Isoindoline nitroxides are potentially useful probes for viable biological systems, exhibiting low cytotoxicity, moderate rates of biological reduction and favorable Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) characteristics. We have evaluated the anionic (5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl; CTMIO), cationic (5-(N,N,N-trimethylammonio)-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl iodide, QATMIO) and neutral (1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl; TMIO) nitroxides and their isotopically labeled analogues (2H12- and/or 2H12-15N-labeled) as potential EPR oximetry probes. An active ester analogue of CTMIO, designed to localize intracellularly, and the azaphenalene nitroxide 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-2,3-dihydro-2-azaphenalen-2-yloxyl (TMAO) were also studied. While the EPR spectra of the unlabeled nitroxides exhibit high sensitivity to O2 concentration, deuteration resulted in a loss of superhyperfine features and a subsequent reduction in O2 sensitivity. Labeling the nitroxides with 15N increased the signal intensity and this may be useful in decreasing the detection limits for in vivo measurements. The active ester nitroxide showed approximately 6% intracellular localization and low cytotoxicity. The EPR spectra of TMAO nitroxide indicated an increased rigidity in the nitroxide ring, due to dibenzo-annulation. PMID:21665499

  3. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  4. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent. PMID:23832070

  5. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes.

  6. Higher oxidation states of prostaglandin H synthase. EPR study of a transient tyrosyl radical in the enzyme during the peroxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Karthein, R; Dietz, R; Nastainczyk, W; Ruf, H H

    1988-01-15

    Purified prostaglandin H synthase (EC 1.14.99.1), reconstituted with hemin, was reacted with substrates of the cyclooxygenase and peroxidase reaction. The resulting EPR spectra were measured below 90 K. Arachidonic acid, added under anaerobic conditions, did not change the EPR spectrum of the native enzyme due to high-spin ferric heme. Arachidonic acid with O2, as well as prostaglandin G2 or H2O2, decreased the spectrum of the native enzyme and concomitantly a doublet signal at g = 2.005 was formed with maximal intensity of 0.35 spins/enzyme and a half-life of less than 20 s at -12 degrees C. From the conditions for the formation and the effect of inhibitors, this doublet signal was assigned to an enzyme intermediate of the peroxidase reaction, namely a higher oxidation state. The doublet signal with characteristic hyperfine structure was nearly identical to the signal of the tyrosyl radical in ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1). Hence the signal of prostaglandin H synthase was assigned to a tyrosyl radical. Electronic spectra as well as decreased power saturation of the tyrosyl radical signal indicated heme in its ferryl state which coupled to the tyrosyl radical weakly. [FeIVO(protoporphyrin IX)]...Tyr+. was suggested as the structure of this two-electron oxidized state of the enzyme. A hypothetical role for the tyrosyl radical could be the abstraction of a hydrogen at C-13 of arachidonic acid which is assumed to be the initial step of the cyclooxygenase reaction.

  7. Ultrafast saturation of resonant optical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-12-01

    A generalized formulation is presented for determining the saturation thresholds for optical processes excited by ultrafast pulses based on the pulse area of the excitation pulse. It is demonstrated that the threshold of driving-pulse intensity for absorption and fluorescence saturation in a two-level system is inversely proportional to the square of the duration of the excitation pulse. These results are obtained from both a simplified analytical solution assuming a Gaussian excitation pulse shape and a detailed numerical calculation based on density-matrix equations. The calculation is generalized further to obtain the saturation condition for a two-photon Raman process by defining a two-photon pulse area both analytically and numerically. These results not only provide predictive capabilities for determining thresholds of signal saturation using ultrashort durations with arbitrary pulse shapes and durations but also open up possibilities for predetermining the threshold intensities of various resonant nonlinear processes.

  8. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  9. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  10. Methodology for increased precision in saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance studies of rotational dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Thomas, D D

    1986-01-01

    Microsecond rotational motions of nitroxide spin labels are measured primarily with saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR). In the present study we have used model system experiments to quantitatively evaluate different ST-EPR spectral parameters, both in-phase and out-of-phase, with an emphasis on techniques for suppressing the interference from weakly immobilized probes. Analyses of both systematic and random errors show that maximum sensitivity to small changes in correlation time and minimum ambiguity of interpretation are best achieved by combining measurements of both spectral line-shape, i.e., the ratio of line-heights, and spectral intensity, i.e., the absolute amplitude of either a position within a spectrum or a spectral integral. Errors in the measurement of correlation times for the two types of parameters tend to be complementary. Integrated intensity parameters are particularly useful in measuring microsecond probe motions in the presence of weakly immobilized components. We confirm that integrated intensity parameters are sometimes effective in rejecting signals from weakly immobilized probes, but the effectiveness of this rejection is more limited than previously supposed and depends on the type of parameter being measured. We describe procedures for evaluating and minimizing errors due to weakly immobilized probes, emphasizing the advantages of a new kind of intensity parameter obtained from integrated in-phase spectra. We provide detailed descriptions of experimental procedures, along with calibration plots of the most useful spectral parameters vs. rotational correlation time, which should make it possible for workers in other laboratories, using different instruments and sample geometries, to reproduce spectra quantitatively and to make accurate correlation time measurements. PMID:3013330

  11. Absolute flux density calibrations: Receiver saturation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Ohlson, J. E.; Seidel, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of receiver saturation was examined for a total power radiometer which uses an ambient load for calibration. Extension to other calibration schemes is indicated. The analysis shows that a monotonic receiver saturation characteristic could cause either positive or negative measurement errors, with polarity depending upon operating conditions. A realistic model of the receiver was made by using a linear-cubic voltage transfer characteristic. The evaluation of measurement error for this model provided a means for correcting radio source measurements.

  12. EPR Methods for Biological Cu(II): L-Band CW and NARS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian; Kowalski, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Copper has many roles in biology that involve the change of coordination sphere and/or oxidation state of the copper ion. Consequently, the study of copper in heterogeneous environments is an important area in biophysics. EPR is a primary technique for the investigation of paramagnetic copper, which is usually the isolated Cu(II) ion, but sometimes as Cu(II) in different oxidation states of multi-transition ion clusters. The gross geometry of the coordination environment of Cu(II) can often be determined from a simple inspection of the EPR spectrum, recorded in the traditional X-band frequency range (9 – 10 GHz). Identification and quantitation of the coordinating ligand atoms, however, is not so straightforward. In particular, analysis of the superhyperfine structure on the EPR spectrum, to determine the number of coordinated nitrogen atoms, is fraught with difficulty at X-band, despite the observation that the overwhelming number of EPR studies of Cu(II) in the literature have been carried out at X-band. Greater reliability has been demonstrated at S-band (3 – 4 GHz), using the low-field parallel (gz) features. However, analysis relies on clear identification of the outermost superhyperfine line, which has the lowest intensity of all the spectral features. Computer simulations have subsequently indicated that the much more intense perpendicular region of the spectrum can be reliably interpreted at L-band (2 GHz). The present work describes the development of L-band EPR of Cu(II) into a routine method, that is applicable to biological samples. PMID:26478491

  13. EPR Methods for Biological Cu(II): L-Band CW and NARS.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian; Kowalski, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Copper has many roles in biology that involve the change of coordination sphere and/or oxidation state of the copper ion. Consequently, the study of copper in heterogeneous environments is an important area in biophysics. EPR is a primary technique for the investigation of paramagnetic copper, which is usually the isolated Cu(II) ion, but sometimes as Cu(II) in different oxidation states of multitransition ion clusters. The gross geometry of the coordination environment of Cu(II) can often be determined from a simple inspection of the EPR spectrum, recorded in the traditional X-band frequency range (9-10 GHz). Identification and quantitation of the coordinating ligand atoms, however, is not so straightforward. In particular, analysis of the superhyperfine structure on the EPR spectrum, to determine the number of coordinated nitrogen atoms, is fraught with difficulty at X-band, despite the observation that the overwhelming number of EPR studies of Cu(II) in the literature have been carried out at X-band. Greater reliability has been demonstrated at S-band (3-4 GHz), using the low-field parallel (gz) features. However, analysis relies on clear identification of the outermost superhyperfine line, which has the lowest intensity of all the spectral features. Computer simulations have subsequently indicated that the much more intense perpendicular region of the spectrum can be reliably interpreted at L-band (2 GHz). The present work describes the development of L-band EPR of Cu(II) into a routine method that is applicable to biological samples.

  14. Characterizing EPR-Mediated Passive Drug Targeting using Contrast-Enhanced Functional Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Theek, Benjamin; Gremse, Felix; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Fokong, Stanley; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Deckers, Roel; Storm, Gert; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    The Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect is extensively used in drug delivery research. Taking into account that EPR is a highly variable phenomenon, we have here set out to evaluate if contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound (ceUS) imaging can be employed to characterize EPR-mediated passive drug targeting to tumors. Using standard fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and two different protocols for hybrid computed tomography-fluorescence molecular tomography (CT-FMT), the tumor accumulation of a ~10 nm-sized near-infrared-fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) was evaluated in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. In the same set of animals, two different ceUS techniques (2D MIOT and 3D B-mode imaging) were employed to assess tumor vascularization. Subsequently, the degree of tumor vascularization was correlated with the degree of EPR-mediated drug targeting. Depending on the optical imaging protocol used, the tumor accumulation of the polymeric drug carrier ranged from 5-12% of the injected dose. The degree of tumor vascularization, determined using ceUS, varied from 4-11%. For both hybrid CT-FMT protocols, a good correlation between the degree of tumor vascularization and the degree of tumor accumulation was observed, with in the case of reconstructed CT-FMT, correlation coefficients of ~0.8 and p-values of <0.02. These findings indicate that ceUS can be used to characterize and predict EPR, and potentially also to pre-selecting patients likely to respond to passively tumor-targeted nanomedicine treatments. PMID:24631862

  15. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  16. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and colloid

  17. Brine saturation technique for extraction of light filth from rubbed and ground sage: intralaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C C

    1981-05-01

    An intralaboratory study was made of a new and widely applicable technique for isolating light filth from rubbed and ground sage. The technique eliminated the hazardous, costly, and lengthy pretreatment and isolation procedures of the current methodology and resulted in considerably better recoveries. Overall recovery of all filth elements introduced as spikes was 99.3% on the first trapping. The basic principle of the procedure is product saturation with brine, followed by trapping of the filth elements from tap water with oliver oil. PMID:7240080

  18. Theoretical analysis of saturable absorbtion in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Skidin, A; Shtyrina, O V; Yarutkina, I A; Fedoruk, M P

    2016-07-25

    We propose a general analytical method for estimation of the saturable absorber output energy as a function of the input energy. The method is based on a representation of the saturable absorber output energy as a series of powers of the recovery time. We also derive a simplified expression of the saturable absorber output energy that gives a good approximation for large input energies. The analytical results are verified by the numerical simulation. The results have been applied to the particular cases of an input function that include the Gaussian input pulse and the hyperbolic secant input pulse. We show that the analytical results can improve the prediction of the output energy in the fiber lasers. PMID:27464194

  19. Wave Attenuation in Partially Saturated Porous Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chuan-Sheng

    1992-01-01

    This thesis consists of three independent papers. Paper 1 studies effects of pulsating gas pockets on wave propagation in partially saturated porous solids containing both liquid and gas phases. On the basis of Biot theory, an analytic solution for the White model for study of the effects of saturation history on wave attenuation is derived. One of the most significant findings of this work is that when the average spacing among the neighboring gas pockets is of the order of the boundary-layer thickness associated with the slow compressional (or P2) wave, the attenuation of the compressional (or P) wave due to local fluid flow reaches its maximum. Results of Paper 1 bear direct applications to seismic and logging responses of partially saturated rocks in prospecting for petroleum, and monitoring of oil and natural gas reservoirs. Paper 2 presents the results of the experimental studies of the effects of partial liquid/gas saturation on extensional wave attenuation in Berea sandstones. Two experimental methods are used; one is the resonant-bar method and the other the forced-deformation method. It is found that the wave attenuation depends on sample-saturation history (drainage or imbibition), as well as boundary-flow conditions, and the degree of saturation. The attenuation caused by "flowable" liquid is sensitive only in the region of low degree of gas saturation. An open-pore boundary tends to induce higher attenuation. The results obtained by the forced-deformation method show that the magnitude of the attenuation decreases substantially with decreasing frequency to the extent that no attenuation peak was apparent at frequencies below 100 Hz. Paper 3 analyzes extensional wave propagation in a porous fluid-saturated hollow-cylinder of infinite extent. Analytic solutions of complex Young's modulus for the long wavelength limit was obtained for a hollow -cylinder with open-pore inner surface. A simplified formula for estimating the frequency at which the

  20. Host-lattice systematics of EPR spectra of Mn2+-doped isomorphic metal hexakisantipyrine perchlorate and EPR of Cu2+ in copper pentakisantipyrine perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.; Kahrizi, Mojtaba

    1985-08-01

    X-band EPR measurements on Mn2+-doped single crystals of isomorphous metal hexakisantipyrine perchlorate (metal=Ca, Cd, Mg, Co, and Pb) have been performed. For the case of calcium and cadmium metal hosts, the measurements were made from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature, while for the remaining metal hosts the measurements were made only at room temperature. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are rigorously evaluated using a least-squares fitting computer technique, especially adapted to electron-nuclear spin coupled systems. As for the systematics of the spin Hamiltonian parameters, at room temperature the variation of the zero field splitting parameters b02 and b04 is found to be approximately linear in the host metal ion radius. In order to estimate the Cu2+-Mn2+ exchange interaction, 5%-50% of Ca2+ ions in Mn2+-doped calcium hexakisantipyrine perchlorate were substituted for by Cu2+, and the EPR spectra were recorded from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. However, even at liquid helium temperature, the presence of the paramagnetic ion Cu2+ in this host caused no significant change of the g value for Mn2+ as compared with that in the pure diamagnetic host indicating negligible Cu2+-Mn2+ exhange constant. EPR measurements on Cu2+ in copper pentakisantipyrine perchlorate were also made at room, liquid nitrogen, and liquid helium temperatures and the principal values and direction cosines of the principal axes of the g and A tensors were estimated, using a rigorous least-squares fitting procedure.

  1. Optimal weighted suprathreshold stochastic resonance with multigroup saturating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liyan; Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2016-09-01

    Suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) describes a noise-enhanced effect that occurs, not in a single element, but rather in an array of nonlinear elements when the signal is no longer subthreshold. Within the context of SSR, we investigate the optimization problem of signal recovery through an array of saturating sensors where the response of each element can be optimally weighted prior to summation, with a performance measure of mean square error (MSE). We consider groups of sensors. Individual sensors within each group have identical parameters, but each group has distinct parameters. We find that optimally weighting the sensor responses provides a lower MSE in comparison with the unweighted case for weak and moderate noise intensities. Moreover, as the slope parameter of the nonlinear sensors increases, the MSE superiority of the optimally weighted array shows a peak, and then tends to a fixed value. These results indicate that SSR with optimal weights, as a general mechanism of enhancement by noise, is of potential interest to signal recovery.

  2. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The "standard" and "quick look" Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  3. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The `standard' and `quick look' Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  4. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  5. Effects of acupuncture and heating on blood volume and oxygen saturation of human Achilles tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hideyuki; Takakura, Nobuari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture (dry needling) and heating (application of hot pack) treatments on the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the human Achilles tendon in vivo. Nine healthy males participated in this study. During the treatments (acupuncture and heating; both 10 min) and recovery period (30 min), the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the Achilles tendon were measured using red laser lights. During needle insertion, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon increased significantly from the pre-treatment level and these values remained high throughout the 30-min recovery period. During heating treatment, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon also increased significantly. Although the increased blood volume was not maintained after removal of the hot pack, the oxygen saturation remained significantly elevated throughout the 30-min recovery period. These results suggested that acupuncture and heating treatments enhanced the blood flow in the tendon. The long-lasting increase, especially with acupuncture treatment, in the blood supply to the tendon implies that these treatments may have therapeutic effects on injured tendons.

  6. A Eukaryotic Sensor for Membrane Lipid Saturation.

    PubMed

    Covino, Roberto; Ballweg, Stephanie; Stordeur, Claudius; Michaelis, Jonas B; Puth, Kristina; Wernig, Florian; Bahrami, Amir; Ernst, Andreas M; Hummer, Gerhard; Ernst, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Maintaining a fluid bilayer is essential for cell signaling and survival. Lipid saturation is a key factor determining lipid packing and membrane fluidity, and it must be tightly controlled to guarantee organelle function and identity. A dedicated eukaryotic mechanism of lipid saturation sensing, however, remains elusive. Here we show that Mga2, a transcription factor conserved among fungi, acts as a lipid-packing sensor in the ER membrane to control the production of unsaturated fatty acids. Systematic mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a pivotal role of the oligomeric transmembrane helix (TMH) of Mga2 for intra-membrane sensing, and they show that the lipid environment controls the proteolytic activation of Mga2 by stabilizing alternative rotational orientations of the TMH region. This work establishes a eukaryotic strategy of lipid saturation sensing that differs significantly from the analogous bacterial mechanism relying on hydrophobic thickness. PMID:27320200

  7. Dilatant hardening of fluid-saturated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y.; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pore fluid in rock affects both the elastic and inelastic deformation processes, yet laboratory testing is typically performed on dry material even though in situ the rock is often saturated. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained, undrained, and unjacketed response. Confined compression experiments, both conventional triaxial and plane strain, were performed on water-saturated Berea sandstone to investigate poroelastic and inelastic behavior. Measured drained response was used to calibrate an elasto-plastic constitutive model that predicts undrained inelastic deformation. The experimental data show good agreement with the model: dilatant hardening in undrained triaxial and plane strain compression tests under constant mean stress was predicted and observed.

  8. Economical analysis of saturation mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Reetz, Manfred T; Nov, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Saturation mutagenesis is a powerful technique for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and genomes. In spite of its numerous applications, creating high-quality saturation mutagenesis libraries remains a challenge, as various experimental parameters influence in a complex manner the resulting diversity. We explore from the economical perspective various aspects of saturation mutagenesis library preparation: We introduce a cheaper and faster control for assessing library quality based on liquid media; analyze the role of primer purity and supplier in libraries with and without redundancy; compare library quality, yield, randomization efficiency, and annealing bias using traditional and emergent randomization schemes based on mixtures of mutagenic primers; and establish a methodology for choosing the most cost-effective randomization scheme given the screening costs and other experimental parameters. We show that by carefully considering these parameters, laboratory expenses can be significantly reduced. PMID:26190439

  9. Economical analysis of saturation mutagenesis experiments

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G.; Reetz, Manfred T.; Nov, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Saturation mutagenesis is a powerful technique for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and genomes. In spite of its numerous applications, creating high-quality saturation mutagenesis libraries remains a challenge, as various experimental parameters influence in a complex manner the resulting diversity. We explore from the economical perspective various aspects of saturation mutagenesis library preparation: We introduce a cheaper and faster control for assessing library quality based on liquid media; analyze the role of primer purity and supplier in libraries with and without redundancy; compare library quality, yield, randomization efficiency, and annealing bias using traditional and emergent randomization schemes based on mixtures of mutagenic primers; and establish a methodology for choosing the most cost-effective randomization scheme given the screening costs and other experimental parameters. We show that by carefully considering these parameters, laboratory expenses can be significantly reduced. PMID:26190439

  10. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  11. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    SciTech Connect

    A. Wolfsberg; P. Reimus

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS M&O 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  12. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  13. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small. PMID:27415380

  14. Oxygen Saturation Targeting and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A; Morley, Colin J

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen saturation targeting is widely used in neonatal intensive care, but the optimal target range in very preterm infants has been uncertain and is the subject of recent debate and research. This review briefly discusses the technology of oxygen monitoring and the role of oxygen toxicity in preterm infants. The background to the recent trials of oxygen saturation targeting in acute and continuing care of very preterm infants is reviewed, and the findings and implications of the recent trials, particularly with respect to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are discussed.

  15. Saturation current in solar cells - An analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, N. M.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the saturation current in solar cells indicates that the factor A in the Shockley equation is material independent and has a constant value of 2.95 x 10 to the 5th A per sq cm of the cell. The saturation current, I(0), and a fundamental solid state parameter, the 0 K Debye temperature, are explicitly correlated on the basis of the work of Ravindra and Srivastava (1979). It is shown that dLnI(0)/dT increases with the energy gap at 0 K.

  16. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-27

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. We employed pump detuning in order to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. In an amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. Finally, this detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  17. Vhf EPR quantitation and speciation of organic sulfur in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.I.

    1994-06-01

    The existence of free electrons in coals` natural site offers a great attraction for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) analysis to aid in the study of the structure and composition of coal. This direct and non-destructive approach to coal analysis has been hindered by the problem of resolution using the conventional 9.5 GHz EPR spectrometers. In the past few years, we have developed techniques including W-band Very High Frequency EPR spectroscopy as a means of determining the quantity and structure of organic sulfur in native and desulfurized coals. The state of the art 95 GHz (W-band) EPR spectrometer which we have constructed shows a well resolved spectrum including the interaction between unpaired electrons and the heteroatom like sulfur. The spectra also provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding different sulfur species. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Kentucky, we are also analyzing the result of desulfurization techniques on the presence of various sulfur species in coal. In the past, we have tried to synthesize various model compounds comparing their W-band spectra with other models, the predictions of theoretical models, and with the W-band spectra of coal specimens. In this quarter, we have been concentrating our efforts on developing a new standard protocol in handling and preparing the coal samples for EPR measurements to provide a quantitative comparison between the EPR spectra of coal in the natural state and desulfurized. Ten coal samples, both native and desulfurized, have been provided to us. These samples have been run in both laboratories. The simulation of coal EPR spectra has been carried out using several mathematical models. EPR results now are being compared with XANES data.

  18. EPR spectra of bulk textured samples of the YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Calamiotou, M.; Guskos, N.; Leventouri, T. ); Paraskevas, S.M. ); Hascicek, Y.S. )

    1991-08-20

    In this paper EPR and specific conductivity measurements are presented for a series of bulk partially oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} samples. The intensities of the EPR signals from the samples as pellets are several times lower than the corresponding ones from the samples in powder form. This difference is intensity is attributed to the skin effect.

  19. Single crystal EPR measurements of the Fe8 and Mn_12 molecular magnetic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achey, Randall; Dalal, Naresh; Maccagnano, Sara; Negusse, Ezana; Lussier, Alex; Hill, Stephen

    2001-03-01

    We report high sensitivity, high field/frequency (up to 9 tesla/210 GHz) EPR measurements for oriented single crystals of the Fe8 and Mn_12 molecular magnetic clusters. Extrapolating the frequency dependence of transitions to zero-field allows us to directly, and accurately (to within 0.5%), determine the zero-field splittings, which are in reasonable agreement with other studies. Subsequent analysis of EPR spectra for field parallel and perpendicular to the easy axis enables us to independently deduce g-values and the spin Hamiltonian parameters up to fourth order. Analysis of individual resonances, which we can assign to known transitions, reveals a pronounced MS dependence of the resonance line widths. Furthermore, the line positions exhibit complex (again MS dependent) temperature dependences which cannot be reconciled with the standard spin Hamiltonian.

  20. Radical scavenging of white tea and its flavonoid constituents by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Azman, Nurul A M; Peiró, Sara; Fajarí, Lluís; Julià, Luis; Almajano, Maria Pilar

    2014-06-25

    White tea (WT) presents high levels of catechins, which are known to reduce oxidative stress. WT is the least processed tea, unfermented and prepared only from very young tea leaves. The subject of this paper is the use of the spin trap method and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as the analytical tool to measure, for the first time, the radical scavenging activity of WT and its major catechin components, epicatechin (EC), epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin (EGC), and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), against the methoxy radical, using ferulic acid as antioxidant pattern. The antioxidant activity has been measured by the decrease of the intensity of the spectral bands of the adduct DMPO-OCH3 in the EPR with the amount of antioxidant in the reactive mixture. Tea leaves and buds were extracted with waterless methanol. It has been proved that tea compounds with more antiradical activity against methoxy radical are those with the gallate group, EGCG and ECG. PMID:24885813

  1. AC susceptibility and EPR investigations of superspin dynamics in magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alex D.

    In this investigation we use two complementary techniques to distinguish between superparamagnetic blocking (SPB) and superspin-glass (SSG) freezing phenomena in magnetite nanoparticles. While these manifestations of the superspin dynamics are fundamentally different, they have similar "signatures", especially in dc-magnetization experiments. Even if ac-susceptibility measurements are employed, careful use of mathematical models to analyze the data are needed to uncover which type of phenomena (SPB or SSG freezing) occurs within the material. Yet, by utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) on a 10 nm Fe3O4 nano-powder as well as on a ferrofluid (based on the same nanoparticle ensemble) we found a very distinct difference in the absorption spectra between the two samples, which indicates markedly different EPR signatures from SPB and SSG freezing behaviors.

  2. Analysis of Two-Player Quantum Games in an EPR Setting Using Clifford's Geometric Algebra

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, James M.; Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The framework for playing quantum games in an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) type setting is investigated using the mathematical formalism of geometric algebra (GA). The main advantage of this framework is that the players' strategy sets remain identical to the ones in the classical mixed-strategy version of the game, and hence the quantum game becomes a proper extension of the classical game, avoiding a criticism of other quantum game frameworks. We produce a general solution for two-player games, and as examples, we analyze the games of Prisoners' Dilemma and Stag Hunt in the EPR setting. The use of GA allows a quantum-mechanical analysis without the use of complex numbers or the Dirac Bra-ket notation, and hence is more accessible to the non-physicist. PMID:22279525

  3. Identification and dose assessment of irradiated cardamom and cloves by EPR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshir, W. B.

    2014-03-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to accurately distinguish irradiated from unirradiated cardamom and cloves and assesses the absorbed dose to radiation processed cardamom and cloves are examined. The results were successful for identifying both irradiated and unirradiated cardamom and cloves. Additive reirradiation of cardamom and cloves produces reproducible dose-response functions, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. Third degree polynomial function was used to fit the EPR signal/dose curves. It was found that this 3rd degree polynomial function provides satisfactory results without correction of decay for free radicals. The stability of the radiation induced EPR signal of irradiated cardamom and cloves were studied over a storage period of almost 8 months.

  4. EPR study of phenolic radical stabilization by grafting on SiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiota, Stathi; Louloudi, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid [SiO 2-GA] material has been synthesized by grafting Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) on SiO 2 via formation of amide bonds between amine groups on aminopropyl-silica and the carboxyl group of GA. The spatial fixation of GA prevents polymerization effects. EPR spectroscopy shows that GA radicals on [SiO 2-GA] show remarkable stability, comparable to that previously observed only for radicals in biological matrices on in soil organic matter. EPR reveals a bundle-like organization of the GA molecules on [SiO 2-GA] material. The relation of these factors to the enhanced radical stability is discussed.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure and EPR spectra of cis-dioxo-molybdenum(V) with catechol ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoming; Liu, Shuncheng; Mao, Xian; Bu, Xianhe

    2001-05-01

    The cis-dioxo-molybdenum(V) complex anion [Mo (V)O 2(C 6H 4O 2) 2] 3- was obtained by the reaction of tetra-butyl ammonium β-octamolybdate with catechol and ethylenediamine in the mixed solvent of CH 3OH and CH 3CN, and characterized by IR, NM, UV, EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction with its discrete (NH 2CH 2CH 2NH 3) + cations. The determination of single crystal X-ray analysis revealed that the metal center exhibits distorted octahedral co-ordination with cis dioxo catechol. The result of essentially the same of EPR spectra shown by the complex and flavoenzyme suggests that the title complex anion and flavoenzyme have related structure feature.

  6. EPR Study of Vanadium Ion in Zinc-Boro-Vanadate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Renuka, C.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes EPR studies on x V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(40-x)ZnO-60B{sub 2}O{sub 3}(where x 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol %) glass system. These studies indicate a strong compositional dependent trend and existence of characteristic boro-vanadate groups in these glasses. The EPR spectra show a distinct hyperfine structure of {sup 51}V. Spectral analysis shows that the vanadium is present in the glass as vanadyl ion [VO]{sup 2+} at tetragonally distorted octahedral site. The decrease of A{sub ||} and A{sub perpendicular} with increase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentration suggests an increase in the covalence between the central atom and the surrounding oxygen ligands.

  7. Flexibility of the alpha-spectrin N-terminus by EPR and fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, L; Fung, L W; Menhart, N

    2000-01-01

    The structure and flexibility of the biologically important alpha-spectrin amino terminal region was examined by the use of fluorescence and EPR spectroscopy. The region studied has been previously demonstrated to be essential for the alpha-spectrin:beta-spectrin association of the tetramerization site. Appropriate spectroscopic probe moieties were coupled to this region in a recombinant fragment of human erythroid alpha-spectrin. There was good agreement between the EPR and fluorescence techniques in most of this region. Mobility determinations indicated that a portion of the region was relatively immobilized. This is significant, since although predictive methods have indicated that this region should be alpha-helical, previous experimental evidence obtained on smaller synthetic peptides had indicated that this region was disordered. Observed rigidity appears to be incompatible with such a disordered state, and has important ramifications for the flexibility of this molecule that is so integral to its role in stabilizing erythrocyte membranes. PMID:10866978

  8. Analysis of two-player quantum games in an EPR setting using Clifford's geometric algebra.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James M; Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The framework for playing quantum games in an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) type setting is investigated using the mathematical formalism of geometric algebra (GA). The main advantage of this framework is that the players' strategy sets remain identical to the ones in the classical mixed-strategy version of the game, and hence the quantum game becomes a proper extension of the classical game, avoiding a criticism of other quantum game frameworks. We produce a general solution for two-player games, and as examples, we analyze the games of Prisoners' Dilemma and Stag Hunt in the EPR setting. The use of GA allows a quantum-mechanical analysis without the use of complex numbers or the Dirac Bra-ket notation, and hence is more accessible to the non-physicist.

  9. EPR study of gamma irradiated DL-methionine sulfone single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Bünyamin; Yıldırım, İlkay

    2015-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of gamma irradiated dl-2-amino-4-(Methylsulfonyl) butyric acid (dl-methionine sulfone, hereafter dl-ABA) single crystals and powder was performed at room temperature. It has been found that this compound indicates the existence of C. O2- and N. H2 radicals after γ-irradiation. While g and hyperfine splitting values for the N. H2 radical were observed, for the C. O2- radical, only the g factor was measured. The EPR spectra have shown that N. H2 radical has two groups each having two distinct sites and C. O2- radical has one site. The principal g and hyperfine values for all sites were analyzed.

  10. Special aspects of the temperature dependence of EPR absorption of chemically carbonized polyvinylidene fluoride derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivulin, V. E.; Pesin, L. A.; Ivanov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependences of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption of two samples of chemically carbonized derivatives of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) synthesized under different conditions have been measured in the range of 100-300 K. It has been found that the temperature dependence of the integrated intensity of the EPR signal of both samples is nonmonotonic and does not obey the classical Curie dependence characteristic of free radicals. An analytical expression that is consistent with experimental data and suggests the presence of an activation component of paramagnetism in the test samples has been obtained. The presence of a term independent of temperature in this equation also indicates the paramagnetic contribution of free electrons. The magnitude of the activation energy of the singlet-triplet transitions has been evaluated: δ = 0.067 eV. The HYSCORE spectra of chemically carbonized PVDF derivatives have been obtained for the first time.

  11. Frequency domain Fourier transform THz-EPR on single molecule magnets using coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Alexander; Behrends, Jan; Lips, Klaus; Bittl, Robert; Holldack, Karsten

    2009-08-21

    Frequency domain Fourier transform THz electron paramagnetic resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR) based on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is presented as a novel tool to ascertain very large zero field splittings in transition metal ion complexes. A description of the FD-FT THz-EPR at the BESSY II storage ring providing CSR in a frequency range from 5 cm(-1) up to 40 cm(-1) at external magnetic fields from -10 T to +10 T is given together with first measurements on the single molecule magnet Mn(12)Ac where we studied DeltaM(S) = +/-1 spin transition energies as a function of the external magnetic field and temperature.

  12. Atomic Hydrogen as High-Precision Field Standard for High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan; Ozarowski, Andrew; Britt, R. David; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We introduce atomic hydrogen trapped in an octaisobutylsilsesquioxane nanocage (H@iBuT8) as a new molecular high-precision magnetic field standard for high-field EPR spectroscopy of organic radicals and other systems with signals around g = 2. Its solid-state EPR spectrum consists of two narrow lines separated by about 51 mT and centered at g ≈ 2. The isotropic g factor is 2.00294(3) and essentially temperature independent. The isotopic 1H hyperfine coupling constant is 1416.8(2) MHz below 70 K and decreases slightly with increasing temperature to 1413.7(1) MHz at room temperature. The spectrum of the standard does not overlap with those of most organic radicals, and it can be easily prepared and is stable at room temperature. PMID:20813570

  13. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  14. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. PMID:26801204

  15. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies.

  16. Influence of heating time and pressure treatment of potato starch on the generation of radicals: EPR studies.

    PubMed

    Krupska, Aldona; Więckowski, Andrzej B; Słomińska, Lucyna; Jarosławski, Leszek; Zielonka, Roman

    2012-06-01

    The influence of heating time and pressurizing time under pressure of 1 GPa on radicals generation in potato starch polymer was investigated by EPR. Potato starch was heated at two temperatures: 413 ± 2 K (140 °C) and 473 ± 2 K (200 °C) for 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, 270 and 300 min and subdued to pressurizing under pressure of 1 ± 0.002 GPa for 6, 60, 300 and 1440 min. In starch heated at 413 K (140 °C) a decrease in the relative intensity of the EPR signal as a function of the pressurizing time can be observed, whereas in starch heated at 473 K (200 °C) such a decrease is not observed. The EPR spectra analysis indicates that they are powder spectra due to the paramagnetic centers leading to Lorentzian line shapes with weak spectroscopic splitting factor g anisotropies and linewidth anisotropies. We have shown that pressurization of starch causes a decrease in the number of radicals in a temperature range in which the polymer is not yet disintegrated. The results of the EPR investigations indicate the existence of a carbon radical center situated at the carbon C1 of the glucose ring. In the EPR spectra of the samples heated with no oxygen access, the hyperfine structure is poorly visible. In the registered EPR spectra of the samples heated with oxygen access, the hyperfine structure is not observed. PMID:24750603

  17. Single loop multi-gap resonator for whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz.

    PubMed

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Caia, George L; Zweier, Jay L

    2007-09-01

    For whole body EPR imaging of small animals, typically low frequencies of 250-750 MHz have been used due to the microwave losses at higher frequencies and the challenges in designing suitable resonators to accommodate these large lossy samples. However, low microwave frequency limits the obtainable sensitivity. L-band frequencies can provide higher sensitivity, and have been commonly used for localized in vivo EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, it would be highly desirable to develop an L-band microwave resonator suitable for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of small animals such as living mice. A 1.2 GHz 16-gap resonator with inner diameter of 42 mm and 48 mm length was designed and constructed for whole body EPR imaging of small animals. The resonator has good field homogeneity and stability to animal-induced motional noise. Resonator stability was achieved with electrical and mechanical design utilizing a fixed position double coupling loop of novel geometry, thus minimizing the number of moving parts. Using this resonator, high quality EPR images of lossy phantoms and living mice were obtained. This design provides good sensitivity, ease of sample access, excellent stability and uniform B(1) field homogeneity for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz. PMID:17625940

  18. SINGLE LOOP - MULTI GAP RESONATOR FOR WHOLE BODY EPR IMAGING OF MICE AT 1.2 GHZ

    PubMed Central

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Caia, George L.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    For whole body EPR imaging of small animals, typically low frequencies of 250–750 MHz have been used due to the microwave losses at higher frequencies and the challenges in designing suitable resonators to accommodate these large lossy samples. However, low microwave frequency limits the obtainable sensitivity. L-band frequencies can provide higher sensitivity, and have been commonly used for localized in vivo EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, it would be highly desirable to develop an L-band microwave resonator suitable for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of small animals such as living mice. A 1.2 GHz 16 gap resonator with inner diameter of 43 mm and 48 mm length was designed and constructed for whole body EPR imaging of small animals. The resonator has good field homogeneity and stability to animal induced motional noise. Resonator stability was achieved with electrical and mechanical design utilizing a fixed position double coupling loop of novel geometry, thus minimizing the number of moving parts. Using this resonator, high quality EPR images of lossy phantoms and living mice were obtained. This design provides good sensitivity, ease of sample access, excellent stability and uniform B1 field homogeneity for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz. PMID:17625940

  19. Single loop multi-gap resonator for whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Caia, George L.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2007-09-01

    For whole body EPR imaging of small animals, typically low frequencies of 250-750 MHz have been used due to the microwave losses at higher frequencies and the challenges in designing suitable resonators to accommodate these large lossy samples. However, low microwave frequency limits the obtainable sensitivity. L-band frequencies can provide higher sensitivity, and have been commonly used for localized in vivo EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, it would be highly desirable to develop an L-band microwave resonator suitable for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of small animals such as living mice. A 1.2 GHz 16-gap resonator with inner diameter of 42 mm and 48 mm length was designed and constructed for whole body EPR imaging of small animals. The resonator has good field homogeneity and stability to animal-induced motional noise. Resonator stability was achieved with electrical and mechanical design utilizing a fixed position double coupling loop of novel geometry, thus minimizing the number of moving parts. Using this resonator, high quality EPR images of lossy phantoms and living mice were obtained. This design provides good sensitivity, ease of sample access, excellent stability and uniform B1 field homogeneity for in vivo whole body EPR imaging of mice at 1.2 GHz.

  20. Chemical reactivity of a metallofullerene. EPR study of diphenylmethano-La @ C{sub 82} radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Maruyama, Yusei; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nagase, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Kazunori; Funasaka, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Takeshi

    1995-09-20

    We have synthesized the first methanofullerene derivatives of La@C{sub 82} and shown that the metallofullerene can be functionalized while retaining its unique electronic properties. We describe the first C-C bond formation on La@C{sub 82} and characterization of the products by EPR. We are currently applying the technology to produce water-soluble metallofullerenes. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. EPR study of monomeric and dimeric vanadyl ions in SbVO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Typek, J.; Guskos, N.; Buchowski, D.; Wabia, M.; Filipek, E.

    A new compound, SbVO5 , formed in the V-Sb-O system, has been synthesized and investigated using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. SbVO5 has been prepared by two methods: by heating equimolar mixtures of V2O5 and alpha-Sb2O4 in air and by oxidation of the known phase (SbVO4.5) of rutile type obtained in pure argon at temperatures between 550 degreesC and 650 degreesC. At room temperature only a weak EPR signal from the powder sample of SbVO5 was detected corroborating the absence of bulk V(IV) ions in the structure. Comparison with the CuSO4 reference sample revealed that only 0.02% vanadium ions are EPR active. Intense EPR spectra obtained in the low temperature range, below 100 K, showed a well resolved hyperfine structure typical of isolated vanadium ions in axial symmetry, present as VO2+ species, and a broad line attributed to V4+-O-V5+ bonds. The hyperfine structure lines could be analyzed by an axial spin Hamiltonian with g parallel to =1.9311, g perpendicular to =1.9425 and A parallel to =181x10(-4) cm(-1) , A perpendicular to =54x10(-4) cm(-1) . The spectrum recorded at the lowest obtainable temperature T=3.65 K contains yet another component which is typical of a triplet state indicating the presence of two interacting VO2+ nuclei with spin 1/2 giving a singlet S=0 and a triplet S=1 state. The appearance of a low-field line (Bsimilar to1600 Gs at gapproximate to4) is another diagnostic for the presence of dimeric species and is attributed to the forbidden DeltaM(S) =+/-2 transition.

  2. Ionizable Nitroxides for Studying Local Electrostatic Properties of Lipid Bilayers and Protein Systems by EPR

    PubMed Central

    Voinov, Maxim A.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions are known to play one of the major roles in the myriad of biochemical and biophysical processes. In this Chapter we describe biophysical methods to probe local electrostatic potentials of proteins and lipid bilayer systems that is based on an observation of reversible protonation of nitroxides by EPR. Two types of the electrostatic probes are discussed. The first one includes methanethiosulfonate derivatives of protonatable nitroxides that could be used for highly specific covalent modification of the cysteine’s sulfhydryl groups. Such spin labels are very similar in magnetic parameters and chemical properties to conventional MTSL making them suitable for studying local electrostatic properties of protein-lipid interfaces. The second type of EPR probes is designed as spin-labeled phospholipids having a protonatable nitroxide tethered to the polar head group. The probes of both types report on their ionization state through changes in magnetic parameters and a degree of rotational averaging, thus, allowing one to determine the electrostatic contribution to the interfacial pKa of the nitroxide, and, therefore, determining the local electrostatic potential. Due to their small molecular volume these probes cause a minimal perturbation to the protein or lipid system while covalent attachment secure the position of the reporter nitroxides. Experimental procedures to characterize and calibrate these probes by EPR and also the methods to analyze the EPR spectra by least-squares simulations are also outlined. The ionizable nitroxide labels and the nitroxide-labeled phospholipids described so far cover an exceptionally wide pH range from ca. 2.5 to 7.0 pH units making them suitable to study a broad range of biophysical phenomena especially at the negatively charged lipid bilayer surfaces. The rationale for selecting proper electrostatically neutral interface for calibrating such probes and example of studying surface potential of lipid bilayer is

  3. Highly Active Titanocene Catalysts for Epoxide Hydrosilylation: Synthesis, Theory, Kinetics, EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Dina Schwarz G; Zimmer, Katharina; Klare, Sven; Meyer, Andreas; Rojo-Wiechel, Elena; Bauer, Mirko; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Flowers, Robert A; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    A catalytic system for titanocene-catalyzed epoxide hydrosilylation is described. It features a straightforward preparation of titanocene hydrides that leads to a reaction with low catalyst loading, high yields, and high selectivity of radical reduction. The mechanism was studied by a suite of methods, including kinetic studies, EPR spectroscopy, and computational methods. An unusual resting state leads to the observation of an inverse rate order with respect to the epoxide.

  4. Highly Active Titanocene Catalysts for Epoxide Hydrosilylation: Synthesis, Theory, Kinetics, EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Dina Schwarz G; Zimmer, Katharina; Klare, Sven; Meyer, Andreas; Rojo-Wiechel, Elena; Bauer, Mirko; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Schiemann, Olav; Flowers, Robert A; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    A catalytic system for titanocene-catalyzed epoxide hydrosilylation is described. It features a straightforward preparation of titanocene hydrides that leads to a reaction with low catalyst loading, high yields, and high selectivity of radical reduction. The mechanism was studied by a suite of methods, including kinetic studies, EPR spectroscopy, and computational methods. An unusual resting state leads to the observation of an inverse rate order with respect to the epoxide. PMID:27125466

  5. EPR study of gamma-irradiated 2-Bromo-4'-methoxyacetophenone single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugur Tasdemir, Halil; Türkkan, Ercan; Sayin, Ulku; Ozmen, Ayhan

    2016-03-01

    The gamma-irradiated single crystals of 2-Bromo-4‧-methoxyaceto-phenone (2B4MA) were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Density-functional theory calculations were employed to investigate and identify the radicals that have been assumed to be formed upon irradiation of 2B4MA single crystals. The EPR spectra of 2B4MA were recorded at different orientations in the magnetic field at room temperature. Taking into account the chemical structure and experimental spectra of irradiated single crystal of 2B4MA, it was assumed that at least two different radicals were produced in the sample. Following this assumption, six possible radicals were modeled and EPR parameters were calculated by using the DFT, B3LYP/6-311+G(d), for the modeled radicals individually. The calculated hyperfine coupling constants and g-tensors were used as initial values for simulation studies. The three crystallographic axes on the simulated spectra were well matched with experimental spectra for the two modeled radicals. Thus, we identified the R1 type radical and R4 type radical as paramagnetic species produced in gamma-irradiated 2B4MA.

  6. Single crystal EPR determination of the quantum energy level structure for Fe8 molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccagnano, S.; Hill, S.; Negusse, E.; Lussier, A.; Mola, M. M.; Achey, R.; Dalal, N. S.

    2001-05-01

    Using a high sensitivity resonance cavity technique,^1 we are able to obtain high field/frequency (up to 9 tesla/210 GHz) EPR spectra for oriented single crystals of [Fe_8O_2(OH)_12(tacn)_6]Br_8.9H_2O (or Fe8 for short). Extrapolating the frequency dependence of transitions to zero-field (for any orientation of the field) allows us to directly, and accurately (to within 0.5 percent), determine the first five zero-field splittings, which are in reasonable agreement with recent inelastic neutron studies.^2 The dependence of these splittings on the applied field strength, and its orientation with respect to the crystal, enables us to identify (to within 1^o) the easy, intermediate and hard magnetic axes. Subsequent analysis of EPR spectra for field parallel to the easy axis yields a value of for gz which is appreciably different from the value assumed in a recent high field EPR study by Barra et al.^3 ^1 M.M. Mola, S. Hill, P. Goy, and M. Gross, Rev. Sci. Inst. 71, 186 (2000). ^2 R. Caciuffo, G. Amoretti, R. Sessoli, A. Caneschi, and D. Gatteschi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4744 (1998). ^3 A. L. Barra, D. Gatteschi, and R. Sessoli, cond?mat/0002386 (Feb, 2000).

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C. |

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  8. EPR study of the formation of radicals in PP with antioxidants irradiated with gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P.; Albano, C.; Perera, R.

    2007-12-01

    The behavior of different compounds of polypropylene (PP) with stabilizers such as buthyl-hydroxy-toluene (BHT), Chimassorb 944 (Hals) (CHIM), and a copolymer of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) was studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). A characteristic spectra for pure PP irradiated in air was obtained for all the samples just after being irradiated [M. Dole, The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Vol. 2, Academic Press, 1973]. A change in the lineshape of the spectra from a pure PP's EPR signal to that of nitroxyl radical as a function of time was observed. The total free radical concentration (TFRC) decayed until approximately 800 h in the PP-HALS and until around 2000 h in all other cases, when the TFRC began to increase in all the cases, except in that of PP-BHT. In this last case, the EPR signal was not detectable after 4000 h. The BHT and the SBS diluted the free radical concentrations, being them smaller when they are present. The behavior observed in all the samples is consistent with the formation of nitroxyl radicals by gamma rays.

  9. EPR investigation of gamma irradiated single crystal guaifenesin: A combined experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasdemir, Halil Ugur; Sayin, Ulku; Türkkan, Ercan; Ozmen, Ayhan

    2016-04-01

    Gamma irradiated single crystal of Guaifenesin (Glyceryl Guaiacolate), an important expectorant drug, were investigated with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy between 123 and 333 K temperature at different orientations in the magnetic field. Considering the chemical structure and the experimental spectra of the gamma irradiated single crystal of guaifenesin sample, we assumed that alkoxy or alkyl-type paramagnetic species may be produced by irradiation. Depending on this assumption, eight possible alkoxy and alkyl-type radicals were modeled and EPR parameters of these modeled radicals were calculated using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)-level of density functional theory (DFT). Theoretically calculated values of alkyl-type modeled radical(R3) are in good agreement with experimentally determined EPR parameters of single crystal. Furthermore, simulation spectra which are obtained by using the theoretical initial values are well matched with the experimental spectra. It was determined that a stable Cα •H2αCβHβCγH2γ (R3) alkyl radical was produced in the host crystal as a result of gamma irradiation.

  10. Entanglement conservation, ER=EPR, and a new classical area theorem for wormholes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Remmen, Grant N.; Bao, Ning; Pollack, Jason

    2016-07-11

    We consider the question of entanglement conservation in the context of the ER=EPR correspondence equating quantum entanglement with wormholes. In quantum mechanics, the entanglement between a system and its complement is conserved under unitary operations that act independently on each; ER=EPR suggests that an analogous statement should hold for wormholes. We accordingly prove a new area theorem in general relativity: for a collection of dynamical wormholes and black holes in a spacetime satisfying the null curvature condition, the maximin area for a subset of the horizons (giving the largest area attained by the minimal cross section of the multi-wormhole throatmore » separating the subset from its complement) is invariant under classical time evolution along the outermost apparent horizons. The evolution can be completely general, including horizon mergers and the addition of classical matter satisfying the null energy condition. In conclusion, this theorem is the gravitational dual of entanglement conservation and thus constitutes an explicit characterization of the ER=EPR duality in the classical limit.« less

  11. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  12. Analysis of Influenza A Virus NS1 Dimer Interfaces in Solution by Pulse EPR Distance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed electron–electron double resonance (PELDOR) is an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy technique for nanometer distance measurements between paramagnetic centers such as radicals. PELDOR has been recognized as a valuable tool to approach structural questions in biological systems. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the value of distance measurements for differentiating competing structural models on the dimerization of the effector domain (ED) of the non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of the influenza A virus. Our results show NS1 to be well amenable to nanometer distance measurements by EPR, yielding high quality data. In combination with mutants perturbing protein dimerization and in silico prediction based on crystal structures, we can exclude one of two potential dimerization interfaces. Furthermore, our results lead to a viable hypothesis of a NS1 ED:ED interface which is flexible through rotation around the vector interconnecting the two native cysteines. These results prove the high value of pulse EPR as a complementary method for structural biology. PMID:25148246

  13. Entanglement conservation, ER=EPR, and a new classical area theorem for wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmen, Grant N.; Bao, Ning; Pollack, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We consider the question of entanglement conservation in the context of the ER=EPR correspondence equating quantum entanglement with wormholes. In quantum mechanics, the entanglement between a system and its complement is conserved under unitary operations that act independently on each; ER=EPR suggests that an analogous statement should hold for wormholes. We accordingly prove a new area theorem in general relativity: for a collection of dynamical wormholes and black holes in a spacetime satisfying the null curvature condition, the maximin area for a subset of the horizons (giving the largest area attained by the minimal cross section of the multi-wormhole throat separating the subset from its complement) is invariant under classical time evolution along the outermost apparent horizons. The evolution can be completely general, including horizon mergers and the addition of classical matter satisfying the null energy condition. This theorem is the gravitational dual of entanglement conservation and thus constitutes an explicit characterization of the ER=EPR duality in the classical limit.

  14. EPR Distance Measurements in Native Proteins with Genetically Encoded Spin Labels.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Moritz J; Fedoseev, Artem; Bücker, Dennis; Borbas, Julia; Peter, Christine; Drescher, Malte; Summerer, Daniel

    2015-12-18

    The genetic encoding of nitroxide amino acids in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) distance measurements enables precise structural studies of native proteins, i.e. without the need for mutations to create unique reactive sites for chemical labeling and thus with minimal structural perturbation. We here report on in vitro DEER measurements in native E. coli thioredoxin (TRX) that establish the nitroxide amino acid SLK-1 as a spectroscopic probe that reports distances and conformational flexibilities in the enzyme with nonmutated catalytic centers that are not accessible by the use of the traditional methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL). We generated a rotamer library for SLK-1 that in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation enables predictions of distance distributions between two SLK-1 labels incorporated into a target protein. Toward a routine use of SLK-1 for EPR distance measurements in proteins and the advancement of the approach to intracellular environments, we study the stability of SLK-1 in E. coli cultures and lysates and establish guidelines for protein expression and purification that offer maximal nitroxide stability. These advancements and insights provide new perspectives for facile structural studies of native, endogenous proteins by EPR distance measurements.

  15. Size Dependent Kinetics of Gold Nanorods in EPR Mediated Tumor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiao; Wang, Zhantong; Sun, Xiaolian; Song, Jibin; Jacobson, Orit; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNR) have been intensively used in nanomedicine for cancer diagnostics and therapy, due to their excellent plasmonic photothermal properties. Tuning the size and aspect ratio of AuNR tailors the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the NIR spectrum at which biological tissues are transparent, thus enables specific and effective treatment. The AuNR extravasates into tumor interstitium through enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Efficient AuNR based cancer therapy requires efficient AuNR tumor delivery. However, the size of AuNR can dramatically affect its blood circulation and tumor accumulation. Here we proposed for the first time a systematic framework to investigate the size-dependent kinetics of AuNRs during EPR mediated tumor delivery. By using 64Cu-labeled AuNRs with positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic modeling, the in vivo uptake and kinetics of 64Cu-AuNR during its blood circulation, tumor accumulation and elimination were studied both in vitro and in vivo. The results of different sized AuNRs were compared and the optimum size of AuNR was suggested for EPR mediated tumor delivery. Our study provides a better understanding of the in vivo behavior of AuNR, which can help future design of nanomaterials for cancer imaging and therapy.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Oxygenation Measured by EPR Oximetry Using a Highly Sensitive Polymer-Encapsulated Paramagnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hou, H; Khan, N; Nagane, M; Gohain, S; Chen, E Y; Jarvis, L A; Schaner, P E; Williams, B B; Flood, A B; Swartz, H M; Kuppusamy, P

    2016-01-01

    We have incorporated LiNc-BuO, an oxygen-sensing paramagnetic material, in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is an oxygen-permeable, biocompatible, and stable polymer. We fabricated implantable and retrievable oxygen-sensing chips (40 % LiNc-BuO in PDMS) using a 20-G Teflon tubing to mold the chips into variable shapes and sizes for in vivo studies in rats. In vitro EPR measurements were used to test the chip's oxygen response. Oxygen induced linear and reproducible line broadening with increasing partial pressure (pO2). The oxygen response was similar to that of bare (unencapsulated) crystals and did not change significantly on sterilization by autoclaving. The chips were implanted in rat femoris muscle and EPR oximetry was performed repeatedly (weekly) for 12 weeks post-implantation. The measurements showed good reliability and reproducibility over the period of testing. These results demonstrated that the new formulation of OxyChip with 40 % LiNc-BuO will enable the applicability of EPR oximetry for long-term measurement of oxygen concentration in tissues and has the potential for clinical applications. PMID:27526163

  17. Non-invasive determination of the irradiation dose in fingers using low-frequency EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Crokart, N.; Trompier, F.; Beghein, N.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2004-07-01

    Several reports in the literature have described the effects of radiation in workers who exposed their fingers to intense radioactive sources. The radiation injuries occurring after local exposure to a high dose (20 to 100 Gy) could lead to the need for amputation. Follow-up of victims needs to be more rational with a precise knowledge of the irradiated area that risks tissue degradation and necrosis. It has been described previously that X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy could be used to assess the dose in irradiated amputated fingers. Here, we propose the use of low-frequency EPR spectroscopy to evaluate non-invasively the absorbed dose. Low-frequency microwaves are indeed less absorbed by water and penetrate more deeply into living material (~10 mm in tissues using 1 GHz spectrometers). This work presents preliminary results obtained with baboon and human fingers compared with human dry phalanxes placed inside a surface-coil resonator. The EPR signal increased linearly with the dose. The ratio of the slopes of the dry bone to whole finger linear regression lines was around 5. The detection limit achievable with the present spectrometer and resonator is around 60 Gy, which is well within the range of accidentally exposed fingers. It is likely that the detection limit could be improved in the future, thanks to further technical spectrometer and resonator developments as well as to appropriate spectrum deconvolution into native and dosimetric signals.

  18. Moving difference (MDIFF) non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR of copper(II).

    PubMed

    Hyde, James S; Bennett, Brian; Kittell, Aaron W; Kowalski, Jason M; Sidabras, Jason W

    2013-11-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR spectroscopy has been introduced for application to nitroxide-labeled biological samples (Kittell et al., 2011). Displays are pure absorption, and are built up by acquiring data in spectral segments that are concatenated. In this paper we extend the method to frozen solutions of copper-imidazole, a square planar copper complex with four in-plane nitrogen ligands. Pure absorption spectra are created from concatenation of 170 5-gauss segments spanning 850 G at 1.9 GHz. These spectra, however, are not directly useful since nitrogen superhyperfine couplings are barely visible. Application of the moving difference (MDIFF) algorithm to the digitized NARS pure absorption spectrum is used to produce spectra that are analogous to the first harmonic EPR. The signal intensity is about four times higher than when using conventional 100 kHz field modulation, depending on line shape. MDIFF not only filters the spectrum, but also the noise, resulting in further improvement of the SNR for the same signal acquisition time. The MDIFF amplitude can be optimized retrospectively, different spectral regions can be examined at different amplitudes, and an amplitude can be used that is substantially greater than the upper limit of the field modulation amplitude of a conventional EPR spectrometer, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio of broad lines.

  19. Assessment of quality of quartz crystals by EPR and γ-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, K.; Stegger, P.; Lehmann, G.; Schneider, J. R.

    1986-03-01

    Natural amethysts from amygdoidal cavities and from fissures as well as synthetic iron-doped quartz crystals of different origins were studied by EPR and γ-ray diffraction. Anisotropic broadening proportional to the slopes of the transitions consistent with a distribution of orientations, most likely due to a mosaic structure, was observed in the EPR spectra of Fe 3+. This broadening was considerably smaller or completely absent in natural amethysts from fissures as well as in a synthetic crystal grown from NH 4F solution. From this broadening average distributions of orientations could be evaluated for substitutional Fe 3+ in good overall agreement with those obtained for the whole crystals by γ-ray diffraction. Thus Fe 3+ is a good probe for the overall quality of the crystals, but the γ-ray diffraction experiments clearly show predominance of a few orientations rather than a random distribution. In the quartz samples of high perfection a hyperfine splitting from an alkali nucleus could be resolved in the EPR spectra of substitutional Fe 3+ at low temperatures and a contribution of vibrations to the minimum linewidths was also observed.

  20. Semiquinone and ascorbyl radicals in the gut fluids of caterpillars measured with EPR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, R V; Poopat, U; Spencer, B

    2003-01-01

    The biological activity of phenolic compounds ingested by caterpillars is commonly believed to result from their oxidation, although the products of oxidation have been well-characterized in only a few cases. The initial oxidation products of phenols (semiquinone or phenoxyl radicals) can be measured with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. In this study semiquinone radicals formed from tannic acid and gallic acid in the gut fluids of two species of caterpillars were measured. In Orgyia leucostigma, in which ingested phenols are not oxidized, semiquinone radicals were absent or at very low intensities. By contrast, in Malacosoma disstria, in which ingested phenols are oxidized, high semiquinone radical intensities were measured. In the absence of detectable levels of semiquinone radicals, ascorbyl radicals were detected in the EPR spectra instead. High molar ratios of ascorbate to phenols in an artificial diet produced ascorbyl radicals in the midgut fluids of both species, while diets containing low molar ratios produced semiquinone radicals. Similar results were obtained in M. disstria fed the leaves of red oak or sugar maple. The results of this study provide further evidence that ascorbate is an essential antioxidant that prevents the oxidation of phenols in the gut fluids of caterpillars, and demonstrate that EPR spectrometry is a valuable method for determining the degree of oxidative activation of phenols ingested by herbivorous insects. PMID:12459207

  1. EPR and impedance spectroscopic investigations on lithium bismuth borate glasses containing nickel and vanadium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Khasa, Satish; Hooda, Ashima; Dahiya, Manjeet S.; Agarwal, Ashish; Chand, Prem

    2016-03-01

    Glasses having composition 7NiO • 23Li2O • 20Bi2O3 • 50B2O3, 7V2O5 • 23Li2O • 20Bi2O3 • 50B2O3 and x(2NiO • V2O5) • (30 - x)Li2O • 50B2O3 • 20Bi2O3 (with x = 0, 2, 5, 7 & 10 mol%) prepared through melt-quench route are explored by analyzing density, impedance spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). It is found that both density and molar volume increase with an increase in substitution of 2NiO • V2O5 in the base glass matrix. Different dielectric parameters viz. dielectric loss (ε), electrical modulus (M), loss tangent (tanδ) etc. are evaluated and their variations with frequency and temperature are analyzed which reveals that these glasses exhibit a non-Debye relaxation behavior. A phenomenal description of the capacitive behavior is obtained by considering the circuitry as a parallel combination of bulk resistance (Rb) and constant phase element (CPE). The conduction mechanism is found to follow Quantum Mechanical Tunneling (QMT) model. Spin Hamiltonian Parameters (SHPs) and covalency rates are calculated from the EPR spectra of vanadyl ion. The observed EPR spectra confirmed that V4 + ion exists as vanadyl ion in the octahedral coordination with tetragonal compression.

  2. Size Dependent Kinetics of Gold Nanorods in EPR Mediated Tumor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiao; Wang, Zhantong; Sun, Xiaolian; Song, Jibin; Jacobson, Orit; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNR) have been intensively used in nanomedicine for cancer diagnostics and therapy, due to their excellent plasmonic photothermal properties. Tuning the size and aspect ratio of AuNR tailors the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the NIR spectrum at which biological tissues are transparent, thus enables specific and effective treatment. The AuNR extravasates into tumor interstitium through enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Efficient AuNR based cancer therapy requires efficient AuNR tumor delivery. However, the size of AuNR can dramatically affect its blood circulation and tumor accumulation. Here we proposed for the first time a systematic framework to investigate the size-dependent kinetics of AuNRs during EPR mediated tumor delivery. By using 64Cu-labeled AuNRs with positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic modeling, the in vivo uptake and kinetics of 64Cu-AuNR during its blood circulation, tumor accumulation and elimination were studied both in vitro and in vivo. The results of different sized AuNRs were compared and the optimum size of AuNR was suggested for EPR mediated tumor delivery. Our study provides a better understanding of the in vivo behavior of AuNR, which can help future design of nanomaterials for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27698939

  3. Cr3+-Doped Yb3Ga5O12 Nanophosphor: Synthesis, Optical, EPR, Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Sivaramaiah, G.; Rao, J. L.; Singh, N.; Pathak, M. S.; Jirimali, H. D.; Singh, Pramod K.; Srivastava, Anoop K.; Dhoble, S. J.; Mohapatra, M.

    2016-08-01

    Gallium garnets of lanthanides are multifunctional materials especially known for their complicated structure and magnetic properties. In addition, with a suitable transition metal dopant ion, these matrices have been proved to be excellent materials for lasers. In particular, gallium garnet of ytterbium (Yb3Ga5O12) is known to possess excellent properties with regards to these applications. In this connection, Yb3Ga5O12 doped with Cr3+ nanophosphors were synthesized by a solution combustion route. The synthesized material was characterized by powder x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy for phase purity and homogenous morphology. In order to ascertain the oxidation state of the doped ion, diffuse reflectance (DRF), photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments were performed on the sample. The DRF and PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent Cr ion in the matrix. The EPR spectra exhibited two resonance signals with effective g values at g ≈ 7.6 and 4. The EPR data corroborated the DRF and PL results, suggesting the stabilisation of Cr3+ in the matrix at octahedral-type geometries.

  4. Intracellular targeting delivery of liposomal drugs to solid tumors based on EPR effects.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-03-18

    The success of an effective drug delivery system using liposomes for solid tumor targeting based on EPR effects is highly dependent on both size ranging from 100-200 nm in diameter and prolonged circulation half-life in the blood. A major development was the synthesis of PEG-liposomes with a prolonged circulation time in the blood. Active targeting of immunoliposomes to the solid tumor tissue can be achieved by the Fab' fragment which is better than whole IgG in terms of designing PEG-immunoliposomes with prolonged circulation. For intracellular targeting delivery to solid tumors based on EPR effects, transferrin-PEG-liposomes can stay in blood circulation for a long time and extravasate into the extravascular of tumor tissue by the EPR effect as PEG-liposomes. The extravasated transferrin-PEG-liposomes can maintain anti cancer drugs in interstitial space for a longer period, and deliver them into the cytoplasm of tumor cells via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Transferrin-PEG-liposomes improve the safety and efficacy of anti cancer drug by both passive targeting by prolonged circulation and active targeting by transferrin.

  5. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.

    1991-12-31

    This report covers progress made in the first yearly quarter of a two year investigation using novel, very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (VHF EPR) spectroscopy techniques and instrumentation (one of only two W-band spectrometers in existence) developed earlier by these authors, to conduct further qualitative and quantitative studies of heteroatomic organic molecules in coal with particular emphasis on sulfur. Previous W-band (96 GHz) work is being extended to studies of new model compounds as well as coal and desulfurized coal samples. Typically, the model compounds under investigation and their analogues are found in coals as stable free radicals which give rise to an EPR signal. The preparation of radicals from compounds having widely varying structures and physical properties in a stable environment has long been a very difficult task. To address this problem, the refinement of several new and very useful methods of preparing of these stable free radicals in various glasses, at catalytic surfaces, and in solution, are presented in this first report. Free radical generation was accomplished by both UV photolysis as well as chemical oxidation/reduction techniques. By these methods, over 25 new compounds, often commercially derived from coal extracts, have been prepared and studied by conventional X-band EPR (9 GHz). Several representative W-band spectra are also presented.

  6. Gamma irradiation effects and EPR investigation on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres containing bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Montanari, L; Cilurzo, F; Conti, B; Genta, I; Groppo, A; Valvo, L; Faucitano, A; Buttafava, A

    2002-06-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the stability of microspheres made of a polylactide-co-glycolide 50:50 copolymer (PLGA) and loaded with 40% bupivacaine (BU) were studied. The radiolysis mechanisms of BU and BU-loaded microspheres were investigated by using electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. Microspheres were prepared by means of a spray drying method. Gamma Irradiation was carried out in the open, at the dose of 25 kGy, by using a 60Co source. The stability of BU-loaded microspheres was evaluated over a 1-year period on the basis of drug content and dissolution profile. Non-irradiated microspheres were stable over the whole period under consideration. Immediately after irradiation the amount of BU released after 24 h from irradiated microspheres increased from 17 to 25%; in the following 3 months of storage it increased to about 35%, and then it kept constant for 1 year. Radicals generated by BU irradiation were identified by EPR analysis; the sensitivity to gamma radiation of BU was about four times lower than that of PLGA. Furthermore, the EPR spectra of loaded microspheres showed that the relative abundance of BU radicals plus PLGA radicals was proportionate to the electronic fractions of the components; this implies that no spin transfer BU/PLGA had occurred during gamma irradiation. PMID:12088056

  7. A more secure anonymous user authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fengtong

    2014-05-01

    Secure and efficient user mutual authentication is an essential task for integrated electronic patient record (EPR) information system. Recently, several authentication schemes have been proposed to meet this requirement. In a recent paper, Lee et al. proposed an efficient and secure password-based authentication scheme used smart cards for the integrated EPR information system. This scheme is believed to have many abilities to resist a range of network attacks. Especially, they claimed that their scheme could resist lost smart card attack. However, we reanalyze the security of Lee et al.'s scheme, and show that it fails to protect off-line password guessing attack if the secret information stored in the smart card is compromised. This also renders that their scheme is insecure against user impersonation attacks. Then, we propose a new user authentication scheme for integrated EPR information systems based on the quadratic residues. The new scheme not only resists a range of network attacks but also provides user anonymity. We show that our proposed scheme can provide stronger security. PMID:24760224

  8. Simulation of multi-frequency EPR spectra for a distribution of the zero-field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarkh, Mykhailo; Groenen, Edgar J. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a numerical procedure called 'grid-of-errors' to extract the distribution of magnetic interactions from continuous-wave electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple microwave frequencies. The approach is based on the analysis of the lineshape of the spectra and explicitly worked out for high-spin systems for which the lineshape is determined by a distribution of the zero-field splitting. Initial principal values of the zero-field splitting tensor are obtained from the EPR spectrum at a microwave frequency in the high-field limit, and the initial distribution is taken Gaussian. Subsequently, the grid-of-errors procedure optimizes this distribution, without any restriction to its shape, taking into account spectra at various microwave frequencies. The numerical procedure is illustrated for the Fe(III)-EDTA complex. An optimized distribution of the zero-field splitting is obtained, which provides a proper description of the EPR spectra at 9.5, 34, 94, and 275 GHz. The proposed approach can be used as well for distributions of magnetic interactions other than the zero-field splitting.

  9. EPR studies of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. Evidence for a diiron carboxylate center.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Deborah A; Voevodskaya, Nina; Stenmark, Pål; Gräslund, Astrid; Nordlund, Pär

    2002-11-15

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a ubiquinol oxidase found in the mitochondrial respiratory chain of plants as well as some fungi and protists. It has been predicted to contain a coupled diiron center on the basis of a conserved sequence motif consisting of the proposed iron ligands, four glutamate and two histidine residues. However, this prediction has not been experimentally verified. Here we report the high level expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana alternative oxidase AOX1a as a maltose-binding protein fusion in Escherichia coli. Reduction and reoxidation of a sample of isolated E. coli membranes containing the alternative oxidase generated an EPR signal characteristic of a mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) binuclear iron center. The high anisotropy of the signal, the low value of the g-average tensor, and a small exchange coupling (-J) suggest that the iron center is hydroxo-bridged. A reduced membrane preparation yielded a parallel mode EPR signal with a g-value of about 15. In AOX containing a mutation of a putative glutamate ligand of the diiron center (E222A or E273A) the EPR signals are absent. These data provide evidence for an antiferromagnetic-coupled binuclear iron center, and together with the conserved sequence motif, identify the alternative oxidase as belonging to the growing family of diiron carboxylate proteins. The alternative oxidase is the first integral membrane protein in this family, and adds a new catalytic activity (ubiquinol oxidation) to this group of enzymatically diverse proteins.

  10. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Angelo; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante; Mangiacotti, Michele; Marchesani, Giuliana; Plescia, Elena

    2011-12-01

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy.We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO2-, CO33-, SO2- and SO3- radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters.

  11. US EPR Tests Performed to confirm the Mechanical and Hydraulic Design of the Vessel Internals

    SciTech Connect

    Dolleans, Philippe; Chambrin, Jean-Luc; Muller, Thierry

    2006-07-01

    The EPR is an Evolutionary high-Power Reactor which is based on the best French and German experience of the past twenty years in plant design construction and operation. In the present detailed engineering phase of the plant under construction in Finland (Okiluoto 3) or scheduled in France (Flamanville 3), a few actions are still ongoing mainly to complement equipment validation files. Design and validation of the main EPR components were performed within Framatome ANP's engineering teams and its two Technical Centers located in France and Germany, which develop state of the art methods in the field of thermo hydraulic testing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel internals are mainly derived from components already implemented on presently operating plants, but they differ in some features from the design used in French N4 or German Konvoi. The aim of this paper is to present the tests performed to confirm the hydraulic and mechanical design of the EPR vessel internals. - Four different mock-ups are presented to illustrate these tests: - JULIETTE for the reactor pressure vessel lower internals; - ROMEO for the reactor pressure vessel upper internals; - MAGALY for the design of the skeleton-type control rod guide assembly; - HYDRAVIB for the vibratory response of the reactor pressure vessel lowers internals. (authors)

  12. EPR and impedance spectroscopic investigations on lithium bismuth borate glasses containing nickel and vanadium ions.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Khasa, Satish; Hooda, Ashima; Dahiya, Manjeet S; Agarwal, Ashish; Chand, Prem

    2016-03-15

    Glasses having composition 7NiO∙23Li2O∙20Bi2O3∙50B2O3, 7V2O5∙23Li2O∙20Bi2O3∙50B2O3 and x(2NiO∙V2O5)∙(30-x)Li2O∙50B2O3∙20Bi2O3 (with x=0, 2, 5, 7 & 10 mol%) prepared through melt-quench route are explored by analyzing density, impedance spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). It is found that both density and molar volume increase with an increase in substitution of 2NiO∙V2O5 in the base glass matrix. Different dielectric parameters viz. dielectric loss (ε), electrical modulus (M), loss tangent (tanδ) etc. are evaluated and their variations with frequency and temperature are analyzed which reveals that these glasses exhibit a non-Debye relaxation behavior. A phenomenal description of the capacitive behavior is obtained by considering the circuitry as a parallel combination of bulk resistance (Rb) and constant phase element (CPE). The conduction mechanism is found to follow Quantum Mechanical Tunneling (QMT) model. Spin Hamiltonian Parameters (SHPs) and covalency rates are calculated from the EPR spectra of vanadyl ion. The observed EPR spectra confirmed that V(4+) ion exists as vanadyl ion in the octahedral coordination with tetragonal compression.

  13. EPR study of Cu(2+) ion doped orotato(nicotinamid)cobalt(II) single crystal.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, I; Karabulut, B; Büyükgüngör, O

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the Cu(2+) ion doped orotato(nicotinamid)cobalt(II) complex by using EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The single crystal is triclinic with the space group P1‾. The unit cell dimensions of the crystal are a=7.2785(4)Å, b=10.2349(5)Å, c=12.7372(6)Å, α=69.297(4)°, β=74.791(4)° and γ=76.995(4)°, with Z=2. We analyzed the EPR spectra of both single crystal and powder of the complex at room temperature. EPR analysis indicates the presence of only one Cu(2+) site. We obtained the spin Hamiltonian parameters from the single crystal data for the complex. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are gx=2.032, gy=2.116, gz=2.319, Ax=28G, Ay=66G, Az=126G. These data indicate that the symmetry of paramagnetic center is rhombic. We constructed the ground state wave function of the Cu(2+) ion.

  14. Accelerated cable life testing of EPR-insulated medium voltage distribution cables

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.D. ); Bernstein, B.S. ); Smith, J.T. III ); Thue, W.A. , Stuart, FL ); Groeger, J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents results aimed at developing a reliable accelerated aging tank test for EPR-insulated cables. Aging was performed at 2 to 4 times rated voltage on load cycling to temperatures of 45 C, 60 C, 75 C, and 90 C at the conductor with water in the conductor strands and outside the cable. Results show that cable failure is more rapid at the highest electrical stress and lowest conductor load cycle temperature. Cables aged at higher temperatures and various levels of electrical stress rarely failed and retained in excess of 40% of their original breakdown strength after 1,500+ days of aging. Aging performed at 90 C load cycle temperature and 4 times rated voltage with air on the outside and water at the conductor of the cable showed more rapid loss of life than with water outside. Results indicate the optimum aging conditions for EPR-insulated cables in the accelerated cable life test (ACLT) differ significantly from those previously observed for XLPE-insulated cables, and that the appropriate test methodology for EPR-insulated cables requires additional study.

  15. Fullerene Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of background solution chemistry and residence time within the soil column on the transport of aqu/C60 through saturated ultrapure quartz sand columns. Aqu/C60 breakthrough curves were obtained under different pore water velocities, solution pHs, and i...

  16. Saturated Vapour Pressure and Refrigeration - Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The first part of a two-part article describes an experimental approach that can be used in teaching the concept of saturated vapour pressure. This leads to a discussion of refrigeration cycles in the second part of the article. (JR)

  17. Hydrotreating catalysts for diesel aromatics saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.H.; Stanislaus, A.; Hannerup, P.N. )

    1993-06-01

    The aromatics content of diesel feedstocks can vary widely. Straight-run stocks typically contain 20 to 40 vol% aromatics and cracked stocks 40 to 70 vol%. Thus, requirements for aromatics saturation range from moderate to severe depending on refinery location and feedstock availability. Existing middle distillate hydrotreaters designed to reduce sulfur levels can reduce aromatics content only marginally. Considerable attention has, in recent years, been paid to new catalysts and processes for aromatics saturation. The catalyst systems investigated are: (1)Conventional hydrotreating catalysts in single-stage operation; (2)Pt/alumina in two-stage operation; and (3)Sulfur-tolerant noble-metal catalyst in two-stage operation. Which of these systems should be used for a given service depends on many factors, but generally, the NiMo + NiW system is preferred at moderate levels of saturation, while for deep aromatics saturation the system using a sulfur-tolerant noble-metal catalyst is preferred. A comparison of the conditions necessary to obtain given aromatic specifications is made for all four systems. The feedstocks and their properties are summarized in a table. The paper discusses the four catalyst systems mentioned above and operating conditions.

  18. Quasielastic (e,e') sum rule saturation

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Chinn; A. Picklesimer; Wally Van Orden

    1989-09-01

    A microscopic Green's function doorway formalism is used to study Coulomb sum rule saturation in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering as a function of momentum transfer. Form factor, kinematical restriction, and final-state interaction effects on the approach to saturation are examined in detail, as are the roles of nonhermiticity, energy dependence, and the analytic behavior of the final-state interactions. The implications of relativistic kinematics and dynamics for the approach to saturation at not-too-high values of the momentum transfer are assessed. Because the pair production of relativistic treatments destroys the asymptotic nature of the nonrelativistic Coulomb sum rule, the degree to which a regime of validity can be expected for this sum rule, and its location, is considered. The breakdown of the sum rule as the momentum transfer increases is also examined. Similar theoretical studies of an analogous nonrelativistic transverse sum in its saturation region are developed as well. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental data for {sup 40}Ca both directly and using a variety of theoretical prescriptions and limits. Neutron knockout contributions and associated uncertainties due to ambiguity in the free neutron form factors are examined.

  19. Multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Stratonnikov, Aleksander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2008-06-01

    The system of multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation is an instrument that can record both spectral and spatial information about a sample. In this project, the spectral imaging technique is used for monitoring of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in human tissues. This system can be used for monitoring spatial distribution of oxygen saturation in photodynamic therapy, surgery or sports medicine. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range is an effective and extensively used technique for the non-invasive study and characterization of various biological tissues. In this article, a short review of modeling techniques being currently in use for diffuse reflection from semi-infinite turbid media is presented. A simple and practical model for use with a real-time imaging system is proposed. This model is based on linear approximation of the dependence of the diffuse reflectance coefficient on relation between absorbance and reduced scattering coefficient. This dependence was obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon propagation in turbid media. Spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin differ mostly in the red area (520 - 600 nm) and have several characteristic points there. Thus four band-pass filters were used for multi-spectral imaging. After having measured the reflectance, the data obtained are used for fitting the concentration of oxygenated and free hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

  20. A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam

    2008-07-08

    This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

  1. Surface Reservoir Characterization and Stratigraphic Studies Using Rock Magnetism and EPR in Venezuela: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana, M.; Diaz, M.; Costanzo-Alvarez, V.

    2007-05-01

    During the last years, the Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Laboratory at the Simon Bolivar University has incorporated studies of rock magnetism and non conventional techniques in geophysics (as Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance or EPR) to solve diverse problems at the Venezuelan oil industry. Particularly, surface reservoir characterization and EPR-Magnetostratigraphic studies have been performed. At some Venezuelan oil fields (Guafita, La Victoria and Furrial) rock magnetic properties studies (e.g. Magnetic Susceptibility (MS)), extractable organic matter (EOM) and organic matter free radical concentration (OMFRC obtained via EPR) analysis have been applied trying to identified, at shallow levels, the "oil magnetic signature" of subjacent reservoirs. The results obtained in non consolidated samples from the first 1500 m of producers and non producers wells, show the existence of MS, EOM and OMFRC anomalies at shallow levels that are associated with an underlying reservoir and/or oil migration. Authigenic spherical aggregates of submicronic FE-rich magnetic crystals, observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), are responsible for the detected MS anomalies. These studies allowed to establish a set of criteria (i.e. EPR, EOM and SEM) in order to link, with a minimum uncertainty, near-surface MS anomalies with the underlying reservoir. We have also explored the application of EPR, combined with petrographic, MS analysis, Qn and S-ratios, to characterize stratigraphic facies and identifying depositional environments at various sections in southwestern Venezuela. The different paramagnetic species that have been identified (e.g. manganese, free radicals and different Fe forms) together with the rock magnetic parameters, seem to give valuable information regarding the lithological characteristics of the studied sections. According to our results, as manganese content is related with the redox conditions, it can be used as a paleoenvironmental change index in

  2. Chemical Variations Along the EPR Identify Melt Flow and Influence Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachi-Kocher, A.; Mallick, S.; Langmuir, C. E.; Salters, V. J.

    2008-12-01

    We have analyzed at high "density" samples from the EPR between 8-18N for trace elements and isotopes. At the EPR we observe a systematic variation in the chemical composition of the basalts related to ridge discontinuities, both fracture zones and overlapping spreading centers. At migrating ridges such as the EPR leading (LE) and trailing edges (TE) of ridge segments have been identified. LEs have thicker crust suggesting a larger accumulation of melt. The low degree melts generated of-axis on the TE of the ridge segment can find a shorter route to the ridge by crossing the transform fault plane. The LE therefore has additional low-degree melts which are missing at the TE. The area on the EPR we covered contains four fracture zones (Siqueros, Clipperton, Orozco and 18N) as well as three overlapping spreading centers. We observe discontinuities in the chemical composition of the basalts at all seven ridge discontinuity. The changes in the trace element ratios like Ce/Yb, Ba/La, Sm/Nd at six of the seven discontinuities are consistent with the LE receiving a larger amount of low degree melt, as predicted by the geophysical model. The Clipperton Fracture zone is the only discontinuity that has chemical variations that are the reverse of what is expected based on the model. A second aspect of the chemistry is the consistent offset in Hf and Nd isotopic composition at ridge discontinuities. These variations can be explained if the sources of the EPR basalts has two lithologies with different solidi, whereby the lithology with the lower solidus also has a less radiogenic Nd and Hf isotopic composition. This material will melt earlier and will be concentrated in the low degree melts. Crossing the transform fault plane of these low degree melts could explain the observed isotopic variations. This supports the Carbotte et al. model for the explanation of the crustal thickness variations. And again the only exception is the variation across the Clipperton Fracture Zone

  3. Toward a full understanding of the EPR effect in primary and metastatic tumors as well as issues related to its heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-30

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect of solid tumors as seen with nanomedicines and macromolecular drugs is well known. However, many researchers appear to lack a full understanding of this effect. The effect varies depending on a patient's pathological and physiological characteristics and clinical condition. When a patient's systolic blood pressure is low side of about 90mmHg instead of 120-130mmHg, the hydrodynamic force pushing blood from the luminal side of a vessel into tumor tissue becomes significantly low, which results in a low EPR. Also, a vascular embolism in a tumor may impede blood flow and the EPR. Here, I describe the background of the EPR effect, heterogeneity of this effect, physiological and pathological factors affecting the effect, the EPR effect in metastatic tumors, artifacts of the EPR effect with micellar and liposomal drugs, problems of macromolecular drug stability and drug release, and access to target sites.

  4. Cotransport of viruses and clay particles in water saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Syngouna, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦΧ174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles hindered the transport of the two viruses considered in this work. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and glass beads were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦΧ174, and the capillary potential energy ofKGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water filmis the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of magnitude greater than the DLVO energy potential. Figure 1Schematic illustration of the various concentrations involved in the cotransport experiments for: (a) saturated and (b) unsaturated porous media.

  5. Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing

    SciTech Connect

    P. W. Reimus; M. J. Umari

    2003-12-23

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that have been conducted to test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters that are used in the development of parameter distributions for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in the revisions to the SZ flow model report (BSC 2003 [ 162649]), the SZ transport model report (BSC 2003 [ 162419]), the SZ colloid transport report (BSC 2003 [162729]), and the SZ transport model abstraction report (BSC 2003 [1648701]). Specifically, this scientific analysis report provides the following information that contributes to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as a barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvium Testing Complex (ATC), which is located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and

  6. The reaction of [Fe(pic)3] with hydrogen peroxide: a UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic study (Hpic = picolinic acid).

    PubMed

    Jain, Sneh L; Bhattacharyya, Pravat

    2005-08-21

    The Gif family of catalysts, based on an iron salt and O2 or H2O2 in pyridine, allows the oxygenation of cyclic saturated hydrocarbons to ketones and alcohols under mild conditions. The reaction between [Fe(pic)3] and hydrogen peroxide in pyridine under GoAgg(III)(Fe(III)/Hpic catalyst) conditions was investigated by UV-visible spectrophotometry. Reactions were monitored at 430 and 520 nm over periods ranging from a few minutes to several hours at 20 degrees C. A number of kinetically stable intermediates were detected, and their relevance to the processes involved in the assembly of the active GoAgg(III) catalyst was determined by measuring the kinetics in the presence and absence of cyclohexane. EPR measurements at 110 K using hydrogen peroxide and t-BuOOH as oxidants were used to further probe these intermediates. Our results indicate that in wet pyridine [Fe(pic)3] undergoes reversible dissociation of one picolinate ligand, establishing an equilibrium with [Fe(pic)2(py)(OH)]. Addition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide rapidly generates the high-spin complex [Fe(pic)2(py)(eta1-OOH)] from the labilised hydroxy species. Subsequently the hydroperoxy species undergoes homolysis of the Fe-O bond, generating HOO. and [Fe(pic)2(py)2], the active oxygenation catalyst.

  7. Magnetic-field-induced orientation of photosynthetic reaction centers as revealed by time-resolved W-band EPR of spin-correlated radical pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, T.; Bechtold, M.; Heinen, U.; Link, G.; Poluektov, O.; Utschig, L.; Tang, J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Kothe, G.

    1999-12-09

    The spin-polarized W-band EPR spectra of the secondary radical pair in plant photosystem 1 indicate a magnetic-field-induced orientation of the photosynthetic reaction centers in the field of the EPR spectrometer. This orientation arises due to the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the reaction center protein. Analysis of the angular-dependent EPR spectra on the basis of the spin-correlated radical pair concept provides new information on the cofactor arrangement in plant photosystem 1.

  8. Controls on Highly Siderophile Element Concentrations in Martian Basalt: Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the platinum group elements) in shergottites exhibit a wide range from very high, similar to the terrestrial mantle, to very low, similar to sulfide saturated mid ocean ridge basalt (e.g., [1]). This large range has been difficult to explain without good constraints on sulfide saturation or under-saturation [2]. A new model for prediction of sulfide saturation places new constraints on this problem [3]. Shergottite data: For primitive shergottites, pressure and temperature estimates are between 1.2-1.5 GPa, and 1350-1470 C [4]. The range of oxygen fugacities is from FMQ-2 to IW, where the amount of Fe2O3 is low and thus does not have a significant effect on the S saturation values. Finally, the bulk compositions of shergottites have been reported in many recent studies (e.g., [5]). All of this information will be used to test whether shergottites are sulfide saturated [3]. Modeling values and results: The database for HSE partition coefficients has been growing with many new data for silicates and oxides [6-8] to complement a large sulfide database [9- 11]. Combining these data with simple batch melting models allows HSE contents of mantle melts to be estimated for sulfide-bearing vs. sulfide-free mantle. Combining such models with fractional crystallization modeling (e.g., [12]) allows HSE contents of more evolved liquids to be modeled. Most primitive shergottites have high HSE contents (and low S contents) that can be explained by sulfide under-saturated melting of the mantle. An exception is Dhofar 019 which has high S contents and very low HSE contents suggesting sulfide saturation. Most evolved basaltic shergottites have lower S contents than saturation, and intermediate HSE contents that can be explained by olivine, pyroxene, and chromite fractionation. An exception is EET A79001 lithology B, which has very low HSE contents and S contents higher than sulfide saturation values . evidence for sulfide saturation

  9. EPR study of free radicals in cotton fiber for its potential use as a fortuitous dosimeter in radiological accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudprasert, W.; Insuan, P.; Khamkhrongmee, S.

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied to characterize radiation-induced free radicals in the cotton fiber in order to determine the possibility for using cotton as a fortuitous dosimeter in accidental exposures to radiation. Cotton fabrics were irradiated at 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 10, 50 and 500 Gy using a 137Cs gamma source. The irradiated samples were then stored in the dark under controlled environmental conditions for 1, 15, 35 and 60 days. The EPR spectra were observed in samples using a Bruker EMX X-band spectrometer equipped with a TE102 rectangular cavity. The EPR signal intensities of irradiated samples were determined from peak-to-peak amplitudes of EPR spectra and compared to those of unirradiated samples. The following optimum parameters were used: 100 kHz modulation frequency, 9.84 GHz microwave frequency, 1.8 mT modulation amplitude, 1.0 mW microwave power, 655 ms time constant, 41 ms conversion time and 41.98 s sweep time. The EPR spectra of unirradiated samples showed a singlet line with g = 2.006 due to pre-existing stable organic radicals in the cotton fibers, whereas those of irradiated samples showed the same pattern with different signal intensities according to the doses. Irradiation increased the signal intensity in a dose dependent manner. The signal intensity exhibited an exponential decay with storage time from 1 to 60 days. Obviously, the degree of fading of EPR intensity did not depend on the absorbed dose from 0.1 - 50 Gy. The maximum fading was about 60% at 60 days of storage for irradiated samples at all doses. However, this post-irradiation signal appeared to be detectable for up to 60 days. The EPR study results indicated the potential of using cotton as a fortuitous dosimeter in radiological accidents.

  10. VHF EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    A direct and non-destructive technique called very High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (VHF EPR) utilizing instrumentation and application techniques developed in this laboratory, is proving to be a practical and sensitive analytical method for the organic sulfur in coal. Research during this past year (1992--1993) was very successful in terms of obtaining spectrochemical information on organic sulfur in coal both quantitatively (amount of organic sulfur) and qualitatively (form and distribution of organic sulfur). Starting in this funding year, the authors have begun to develop and use a two-species model (non-exchanging and axially symmetric) for the simulation of VHF EPR coal spectra. Such a model provides quantitative information on the total concentration of sulfur species that can be directly related to the organic sulfur content as measured by conventional chemical methods. Utilizing the newly developed method, they have analyzed the VHF EPR spectra from some sub-bituminous coals containing organic sulfur in the range from 2% to 12% and a number of maceral blends. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between VHF EPR results and chemical analyses. In addition, the modelling of VHF EPR spectra of coal provides detailed spectral parameters. These parameters can be related to the molecular structures of the paramagnetic species giving rise to the EPR signals, as demonstrated by our study of the model compounds. The foundation of VHF EPR analysis of aromatic sulfur radicals has been firmly established based on careful investigations of the molecular and electronic structures of the thiophenic model compounds. The results validate the theoretical soundness of the method and carry important practical implications.

  11. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  12. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  13. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  14. Saturated Activity: Very Close, Detached Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.

    It is proposed to obtain EUVE spectra of 4 close, synchronized, late-type binary stars with orbital/rotational periods shorter than 1.2 day, to study stellar coronal activity at very high, saturated levels. Among stars of spectral types between late-F to mid-K, only components of very close binary systems (and very rare young stars) can have such short rotational periods. Together with the EGO-1 and EGO-2 results for DH Leo and TZ CrB obtained by others, the spectra will be utilized in a comprehensive discussion of the saturated stellar activity, in relation to and in contrast with, the previously obtained by us spectra of the single, rapidly-rotating young star, AB Dor (P=0.51 day, EGO-1) and of two contact binary systems, 44i Boo (P=0.27 day) and VW Cep (P=0.28 day, EGO-2).

  15. Saturation effects in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Shen, Guoqing; Ball, David A.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) could provide a more useful tool for intracellular studies and biological sample characterization if measurement times could be reduced. While an increase in laser power can enable an autocorrelation function (ACF) with adequate signal-to-noise to be acquired within a shorter measurement time, excitation saturation then leads to distortion of the ACF and systematic errors in the measurement results. An empirical method for achieving reduced systematic errors by employing a fitting function with an additional adjustable parameter has been previously introduced for two-photon FCS. Here we provide a unified physical explanation of excitation saturation effects for the three cases of continuous-wave, pulsed one-photon excitation, and two-photon excitation FCS. When the time between laser pulses is longer than the fluorescence lifetime, the signal rate at which excitation saturation occurs is lower for pulsed excitation than for cw excitation, and due to the disparate timescales of the photophysical processes following excitation, it is lower still for two-photon excitation. We use a single-molecule description of FCS to obtain improved analytical ACF fitting functions for the three cases. The fitting functions more accurately account for saturation effects than those previously employed without the need for an additional empirical parameter. Use of these fitting functions removes systematic errors and enables measurements to be acquired more quickly by use of higher laser powers. Increase of background, triplet photophysics, and the cases of scanning FCS and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy are also discussed. Experimental results acquired with a custom built apparatus are presented.

  16. Micromechanics of saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateau, Xavier; Dormieux, Luc

    2002-07-01

    The homogenization method is used to determine the formulation of the behaviour of both saturated and unsaturated porous media. This approach makes it possible to assess the validity of the effective stress concept as a function of the properties of the porous media at the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the influence of the morphologies of the solid and fluid phases on the macroscopic behaviour is studied. The strain induced by drying is examined as a function of the morphological properties.

  17. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF ESSENTIALLY SATURATED PEAT

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R

    2008-02-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory measured the hydraulic conductivity of peat samples using method ASTM D4511-00. Four samples of peat were packed into 73mm diameter plastic tubes and saturated from the bottom up with water. The columns were packed with Premier ProMoss III TBK peat to a dry density of approximately 0.16 gm/cc (10 lb/ft3). One column was packed using oven dried peat and the other 3 were packed using as delivered peat. The oven dried sample was the most difficult to saturate. All of the peat samples expanded during saturation resulting in a sample length (L) that was longer than when the sample was initially packed. Table 1 contains information related to the column packing. After saturation the hydraulic conductivity test was conducted using the apparatus shown in Figure 1. Three of the samples were tested at 2 different flow conductions, 1 high and 1 low. Table 2 and Figure 2 contain the results of the hydraulic conductivity testing. Each test was run for a minimum of 40 minutes to allow the test conditions to stabilize. The hydraulic conductivity at the end of each test is reported as the hydraulic conductivity for that test. The hydraulic conductivity of the 4 peat samples is 0.0052 {+-} 0.0009 cm/sec. This result compares well with the hydraulic conductivity measured in the pilot scale peat bed after approximately 2 months of operation. The similarity in results between the dry pack sample and moist pack samples shows the moisture content at the time of packing had a minimal effect on the hydraulic conductivity. Additionally, similarity between the results shows the test is reproducible. The hydraulic conductivity results are similar to those reported by other tests of peat samples reported in the literature.

  18. THE SATURATION LIMIT OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2009-05-01

    Simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a homogeneous shearing box have shown that the asymptotic strength of the magnetic field declines steeply with increasing resolution. Here I model the MRI-driven dynamo as a large-scale dynamo driven by the vertical magnetic helicity flux. This growth is balanced by large-scale mixing driven by a secondary instability. The saturated magnetic energy density depends almost linearly on the vertical height of the typical eddies. The MRI can drive eddies with arbitrarily large vertical wavenumber, so the eddy thickness is either set by diffusive effects, by the magnetic tension of a large-scale vertical field component, or by magnetic buoyancy effects. In homogeneous, zero magnetic flux simulations, only the first effect applies and the saturated limit of the dynamo is determined by explicit or numerical diffusion. The exact result depends on the numerical details, but is consistent with previous work, including the claim that the saturated field energy scales as the gas pressure to the one quarter power (which we interpret as an artifact of numerical dissipation). The magnetic energy density in a homogeneous shearing box will tend to zero as the resolution of the simulation increases, but this has no consequences for the dynamo or for angular momentum transport in real accretion disks. The claim that the saturated state depends on the magnetic Prandtl number may also be an artifact of simulations in which microphysical transport coefficients set the MRI eddy thickness. Finally, the efficiency of the MRI dynamo is a function of the ratio of the Alfven velocity to the product of the pressure scale height and the local shear. As this approaches unity from below, the dynamo reaches maximum efficiency. Farther from the disk midplane, the Parker instability will dominate the local dynamics and the dynamo process.

  19. Induction of phase II enzymes and hsp70 genes by copper sulfate through the electrophile-responsive element (EpRE): insights obtained from a transgenic zebrafish model carrying an orthologous EpRE sequence of mammalian origin.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Nornberg, Bruna Félix da Silva; Geracitano, Laura A; Barros, Daniela Martí; Monserrat, José Maria; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2010-09-01

    We have evaluated the homology of the electrophile-responsive element (EpRE) core sequence, a binding site for the Nrf2 transcription factor, in the proximal promoters of the mouse and zebrafish glutathione-S-transferase (gst), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (gclc) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes. The EpRE sites identified for both species in the three analyzed genes showed a high similarity with the putative EpRE core sequence. We also produced a transgenic zebrafish model carrying a transgene comprised of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene under transcriptional control of a mouse EpRE sequence. This transgenic model was exposed to copper sulfate, and the reporter gene was significantly activated. The endogenous gst, gclc and hsp70 zebrafish genes were analyzed in the EpRE-Luc transgenic zebrafish and showed an expression pattern similar to that of the reporter transgene used. Our results demonstrate that EpRE is conserved between mouse and zebrafish for detoxification-related genes and that the development of genetically modified models using this responsive element to drive the expression of reporter genes can be an important tool in understanding the action mechanism of aquatic pollutants. PMID:19116768

  20. Occupational differences between conventional and saturation divers.

    PubMed

    Biersner, R J; Hall, D A; Linaweaver, P G

    1976-01-01

    Diving experiences of 53 Divers First Class attending the U.S. Navy Saturation Diver Training Program were compared to 155 Divers First Class performing routine operational dives. The two groups were matched for years of diving experience, total number of dives, and total number of SCUBA dives. The Diving Experience Questionnaire (DEQ), which consisted of 43 items dealing with specific diving conditions and activites, was used to document the diving backgrounds of the two groups. Five of the 43 items were found to significantly and uniquely differentiate between the two groups. Those attending the Saturation Diving Program a) made more dives between 46-61 m (151-200 ft), b) had more experience with semiclosed-circuit SCUBA, c) attended more deep-diving training courses, d) made fewer dives in water warmer than 70 degrees F, and e) had fewer specialized qualifications outside deep diving. The multiple regression analysis which differentiated between the two groups resulted in an R of 0.48. These five items indicate that volunteering for saturation diving is consistent or congruent with past deep-diving experience, while remaining in conventional diving is congruent with previous shallow-water experience. These results indicate that the DEQ may be a highly useful method of differentiating between experienced divers.

  1. Multipactor saturation in parallel-plate waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Sorolla, E.; Mattes, M.

    2012-07-15

    The saturation stage of a multipactor discharge is considered of interest, since it can guide towards a criterion to assess the multipactor onset. The electron cloud under multipactor regime within a parallel-plate waveguide is modeled by a thin continuous distribution of charge and the equations of motion are calculated taking into account the space charge effects. The saturation is identified by the interaction of the electron cloud with its image charge. The stability of the electron population growth is analyzed and two mechanisms of saturation to explain the steady-state multipactor for voltages near above the threshold onset are identified. The impact energy in the collision against the metal plates decreases during the electron population growth due to the attraction of the electron sheet on the image through the initial plate. When this growth remains stable till the impact energy reaches the first cross-over point, the electron surface density tends to a constant value. When the stability is broken before reaching the first cross-over point the surface charge density oscillates chaotically bounded within a certain range. In this case, an expression to calculate the maximum electron surface charge density is found whose predictions agree with the simulations when the voltage is not too high.

  2. Enhanced oil recovery update

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V

    1989-03-01

    Technology continues to grow in the realm of enhanced oil recovery. Since 1950 several processes have proven economic for oil recovery. Others are still in their infancy and must be custom designed for each reservoir. This paper gives a general overview of these processes. The author focuses on the latest technology and the outlook for enhanced oil recovery operations.

  3. What Is "No Recovery?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Thanatologists, as Balk recently commented (Balk, 2004), have been saying that there is no recovery from bereavement, or that we should not speak of bereavement as leading to a recovery. The term recovery has a high level of plasticity and can be shaped to fit diverse meanings, including contradictory meanings. We will sort our way through some of…

  4. Youth in Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Miranda, John; Williams, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Young people are entering long-term recovery probably in greater numbers than ever before. A key word here is "probably" because we know precious little about the phenomenon of young people who recover from alcohol and drug addition. This article is a preliminary exploration of youth in recovery. It reviews several types of recovery support…

  5. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  6. SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, N; Roberts, K; Stabile, F; Mongillo, N; Decker, RD; Wilson, LD; Husain, Z; Contessa, J; Carlson, DJ; Williams, BB; Flood, AB; Swartz, HM

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical intervention following a major, unplanned radiation event can elevate the human whole body exposure LD50 from 3 to 7 Gy. On a large scale, intervention cannot be achieved effectively without accurate and efficient triage. Current methods of retrospective biodosimetry are restricted in capability and applicability; published human data is limited. We aim to further develop, validate, and optimize an automated field-deployable in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument that can fill this need. Methods: Ionizing radiation creates highly-stable, carbonate-based free radicals within tooth enamel. Using a process similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR directly measures the presence of radiation-induced free radicals. We performed baseline EPR measurements on one of the upper central incisors of total body irradiation (TBI) and head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy patients before their first treatment. Additional measurements were performed between subsequent fractions to examine the EPR response with increasing radiation dose. Independent dosimetry measurements were performed with optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and diodes to more accurately establish the relationship between EPR signal and delivered radiation dose. Results: 36 EPR measurements were performed over the course of four months on two TBI and four H & N radiotherapy patients. We observe a linear increase in EPR signal with increasing dose across the entirety of the tested range. A linear least squares-weighted fit of delivered dose versus measured signal amplitude yields an adjusted R-square of 0.966. The standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP) is 1.77 Gy. For doses up to 7 Gy, the range most relevant to triage, we calculate an SEIP of 1.29 Gy. Conclusion: EPR spectroscopy provides a promising method of retrospective, non-invasive, in vivo biodosimetry. Our preliminary data show an excellent correlation between predicted signal amplitude and delivered

  7. Stability analysis for delta operator systems subject to state saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjiu; Geng, Qing; Xia, Yuanqing; Li, Li

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of stability analysis for linear delta operator systems subject to state saturation. Both full state saturation and partial state saturation are investigated for the delta operator systems. Two equivalent necessary and sufficient conditions are identified such that the system with full state saturation is globally asymptotically stable. Based on the sufficient conditions, an iterative algorithm is proposed for testing global asymptotic stability of the system with full state saturation. A new globally asymptotically stable condition is also proposed for the partial state saturation system. Two numerical examples on a ball and beam model are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. EPR studies of free radicals decay and survival in gamma irradiated aminoglycoside antibiotics: sisomicin, tobramycin and paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Pilawa, Barbara; Koprowski, Robert; Wróbel, Zygmunt; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Swakoń, Jan; Olko, Paweł

    2012-02-14

    Radiation sterilization technology is more actively used now that any time because of its many advantages. Gamma radiation has high penetrating power, relatively low chemical reactivity and causes small temperature rise. But on the other hand radiosterilization can lead to radiolytic products appearing, in example free radicals. Free radicals in radiative sterilized sisomicin, tobramycin and paromomycin were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Dose of gamma irradiation of 25kGy was used. Concentrations and properties of free radicals in irradiated antibiotics were studied. EPR spectra were recorded for samples stored in air and argon. For gamma irradiated antibiotics strong EPR lines were recorded. One- and two-exponential functions were fitted to experimental points during testing and researching of time influence of the antibiotics storage to studied parameters of EPR lines. Our study of free radicals in radiosterilized antibiotics indicates the need for characterization of medicinal substances prior to sterilization process using EPR values. We propose the concentration of free radicals and other spectroscopic parameters as useful factors to select the optimal type of sterilization for the individual drug. The important parameters are i.a. the τ time constants and K constants of exponential functions. Time constants τ give us information about the speed of free radicals concentration decrease in radiated medicinal substances. The constant K(0) shows the free radicals concentration in irradiated medicament after long time of storage.

  9. Correcting for Incomplete Saturation and Off-Resonance Effects in Multiple-Site Saturation-Transfer Kinetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-09-01

    The effects of incomplete saturation and off-resonance irradiation on nuclear magnetic resonance saturation-transfer measurements of three-site chemical-exchange rates are discussed. A new method that uses double-saturation measurements is compared with two published methods, one that uses single-saturation measurements and one that uses a single-saturation measurement and a double-saturation measurement. Several formulas are compared for measuring the exchange rate constant kDE for exchange from a detected spin D to an exchanging spin E in the presence of exchange from spin D to a competing spin C. For each method, formulas are derived with corrections for incomplete saturation or off-resonance effects, with both corrections, and with neither correction. Exact formulas are available for three exchanging sites with incomplete saturation if there are no off-resonance effects. Off-resonance corrections are imperfect even with complete saturation.

  10. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Daniel

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  11. Copper binding to bilirubin as determined by FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Wu, J.; Soloway, R.D.; Li, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, D.; Shen, G.

    1996-07-01

    Copper is known to form complexes with bilirubin (H2BR). Such complexes have received increased attention due to their clinical significance as free-radical scavengers. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of Cu(2+) BR complexes to ascertain the nature of the binding between Cu(2+) and BR. Several physical measurements of the salts were made, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The complexes were prepared by dissolving protonated BR in NaOH, and adding different ratios of aqueous CuCl2. At ratios of Cu(2+):H2BR of 1:1 and 2:1, soluble complexes were formed. In solution EPR spectra demonstrated nine hyperfine peaks, which from the splitting, is indicative of Cu(2+) coordinated to four nitrogen atoms coming from two molecules of BR. The solid obtained from the solutions demonstrated predominant infrared absorptions at 1574cm({minus}1) and 1403cm({minus}1) (assigned previously as COO- vibrations, asymmetric and symmetric), whereas the 1710cm({minus}1) vibration appears only as a shoulder (assigned previously as the free COOH vibration) indicative that most of the COO groups have reacted with sodium, thus accounting for the aqueous solubility. The NH stretching vibration in the pyrrole group of H2BR has disappeared and is replaced with the OH stretching vibration in H2O. At higher ratios of 3:1 and 5:1 (Cu2+H2BR), black precipitates are formed, which produce no EPR signals. Furthermore, the NH vibration disappears as in the soluble solution complexes. It can be concluded that the insoluble salts (higher Cu2+:H2BR ratios) are mixed complexes containing the Cu nitrogen chelate and Cu salts involving the COOH groups. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  12. SPIDYAN, a MATLAB library for simulating pulse EPR experiments with arbitrary waveform excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Frequency-swept chirp pulses, created with arbitrary waveform generators (AWGs), can achieve inversion over a range of several hundreds of MHz. Such passage pulses provide defined flip angles and increase sensitivity. The fact that spectra are not excited at once, but single transitions are passed one after another, can cause new effects in established pulse EPR sequences. We developed a MATLAB library for simulation of pulse EPR, which is especially suited for modeling spin dynamics in ultra-wideband (UWB) EPR experiments, but can also be used for other experiments and NMR. At present the command line controlled SPin DYnamics ANalysis (SPIDYAN) package supports one-spin and two-spin systems with arbitrary spin quantum numbers. By providing the program with appropriate spin operators and Hamiltonian matrices any spin system is accessible, with limits set only by available memory and computation time. Any pulse sequence using rectangular and linearly or variable-rate frequency-swept chirp pulses, including phase cycling can be quickly created. To keep track of spin evolution the user can choose from a vast variety of detection operators, including transition selective operators. If relaxation effects can be neglected, the program solves the Liouville-von Neumann equation and propagates spin density matrices. In the other cases SPIDYAN uses the quantum mechanical master equation and Liouvillians for propagation. In order to consider the resonator response function, which on the scale of UWB excitation limits bandwidth, the program includes a simple RLC circuit model. Another subroutine can compute waveforms that, for a given resonator, maintain a constant critical adiabaticity factor over the excitation band. Computational efficiency is enhanced by precomputing propagator lookup tables for the whole set of AWG output levels. The features of the software library are discussed and demonstrated with spin-echo and population transfer simulations.

  13. Biologic dosimetry for nuclear environments by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. Conference paper

    SciTech Connect

    McCreery, M.J.; Swenberg, C.E.; Basso, M.J.; Conklin, J.J.; Hsieh, J.

    1982-06-18

    A number of stable and unstable free radicals are produced by exposure of calcified tissues to ionizing radiation. Identification of the exact molecular nature of these radicals and their kinetic annealing properties awaits further investigation. However, the high stability and the dose-response characteristics of the signal at g = 2.0023 make it very promising for use in biologic dosimetry. A 10-25 mg sample of enamel is enough to determine absorbed dose from 10-10 to the 7th power rads of gamma, X-ray, and accelerated electron exposures. This sample, which is no more than a chip from the ridge of a human tooth, does not expose the living portion of the tooth and so is relatively noninvasive. Investigations to establish a standard method for this procedure and to evaluate neutron dose is in progress. Although the procedures outlined here are relatively noninvasive, this technique affords other approaches that are even less invasive. Unlike optical methods, the sample for EPR analysis does not have to be transparent. It is not even necessary to suspend the sample as a fine powder. As long as the bone or tooth sample is within the dimensional limits of the tuned EPR cavity, it can be analyzed intact. This fact makes in vivo analysis feasible. We are currently making attempts to enlarge the EPR cavity with modification of the corresponding electronic components so that a finger can be analyzed. If this approach is successful, the expedient evaluation of large numbers of casualties might be possible by a method that is noninvasive and nondestructive.

  14. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-05-21

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the (1)H NMR spectrum of H2O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10-20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ϵ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum.

  15. SPIDYAN, a MATLAB library for simulating pulse EPR experiments with arbitrary waveform excitation.

    PubMed

    Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Frequency-swept chirp pulses, created with arbitrary waveform generators (AWGs), can achieve inversion over a range of several hundreds of MHz. Such passage pulses provide defined flip angles and increase sensitivity. The fact that spectra are not excited at once, but single transitions are passed one after another, can cause new effects in established pulse EPR sequences. We developed a MATLAB library for simulation of pulse EPR, which is especially suited for modeling spin dynamics in ultra-wideband (UWB) EPR experiments, but can also be used for other experiments and NMR. At present the command line controlled SPin DYnamics ANalysis (SPIDYAN) package supports one-spin and two-spin systems with arbitrary spin quantum numbers. By providing the program with appropriate spin operators and Hamiltonian matrices any spin system is accessible, with limits set only by available memory and computation time. Any pulse sequence using rectangular and linearly or variable-rate frequency-swept chirp pulses, including phase cycling can be quickly created. To keep track of spin evolution the user can choose from a vast variety of detection operators, including transition selective operators. If relaxation effects can be neglected, the program solves the Liouville-von Neumann equation and propagates spin density matrices. In the other cases SPIDYAN uses the quantum mechanical master equation and Liouvillians for propagation. In order to consider the resonator response function, which on the scale of UWB excitation limits bandwidth, the program includes a simple RLC circuit model. Another subroutine can compute waveforms that, for a given resonator, maintain a constant critical adiabaticity factor over the excitation band. Computational efficiency is enhanced by precomputing propagator lookup tables for the whole set of AWG output levels. The features of the software library are discussed and demonstrated with spin-echo and population transfer simulations.

  16. On the zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations and on the interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beauregard, O. Costa

    1988-09-01

    Being formalized inside the S-matrix scheme, the zigzagging causility model of EPR correlations has full Lorentz and CPT invariance. EPR correlations, proper or reversed, and Wheeler's smoky dragon metaphor are respectively pictured in spacetime or in the momentum-energy space, as V-shaped, A-shaped, or C-shaped ABC zigzags, with a summation at B over virtual states |B>

  17. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  18. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Céline M; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  19. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O.; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the 1H NMR spectrum of H2O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10-20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ɛ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum.

  20. Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy of 33S-Labeled Molybdenum Cofactor in Catalytically Active Bioengineered Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eric L.; Belaidi, Abdel Ali; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Davis, Amanda C.; Krämer, Tobias; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Neese, Frank; Schwarz, Günter; Enemark, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum enzymes contain at least one pyranopterin dithiolate (molybdopterin, MPT) moiety that coordinates Mo through two dithiolate (dithiolene) sulfur atoms. For sulfite oxidase (SO), hyperfine interactions (hfi) and nuclear quadrupole interactions (nqi) of magnetic nuclei (I ≠ 0) near the Mo(V) (d1) center have been measured using high-resolution pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods and interpreted with the help of the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These have provided important insights about the active site structure and the reaction mechanism of the enzyme. However, it has not been possible to use EPR to probe the dithiolene sulfurs directly since naturally abundant 32S has no nuclear spin (I = 0). Here we describe direct incorporation of 33S (I = 3/2), the only stable magnetic sulfur isotope, into MPT using controlled in vitro synthesis with purified proteins. The electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra from 33S-labeled MPT in this catalytically active SO variant are dominated by the ‘inter-doublet’ transition arising from the strong nuclear quadrupole interaction, as also occurs for the 33S-labeled exchangeable equatorial sulfite ligand [Klein, E. L., et al., Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 1408 – 1418]. The estimated experimental hfi and nqi parameters for 33S (aiso = 3 MHz and e2Qq/h = 25 MHz) are in good agreement with those predicted by DFT. In addition, the DFT calculations show that the two 33S atoms are indistinguishable by EPR and reveal a strong intermixing between their out-of-plane pz orbitals and the dxy orbital of Mo(V). PMID:24387640

  1. Mapping Local Protein Electrostatics by EPR of pH-Sensitive Thiol-Specific Nitroxide† ¶

    PubMed Central

    Voinov, Maxim A.; Ruuge, Andres; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Grigor’ev, Igor A.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2013-01-01

    A first thiol-specific pH-sensitive nitroxide spin label of the imidazolidine series -methanethiosulfonic acid S-(1-oxyl-2,2,3,5,5-pentamethylimidazolidin-4-ylmethyl) ester (IMTSL) - has been synthesized and characterized. X- (9 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) EPR spectral parameters of the new spin label in its free form and covalently attached to an amino acid cysteine and a tripeptide glutathione were studied as a function of pH and solvent polarity. pKa value of protonatable tertiary amino group of the spin label was found to be unaffected by other ionizable groups present in side chains of unstructured small peptides. The W-band EPR spectra were shown to allow for pKa determination from precise g-factor measurements. Is has been demonstrated that high accuracy of pKa determination for pH-sensitive nitroxides could be achieved regardless the frequency of measurements or the regime of spin exchange: fast at X-band and slow at W-band. IMTSL was found to react specifically with a model protein - iso-1-cytochrome c from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae - giving EPR spectra very similar to those of the most commonly employed cysteine-specific label MTSL. CD data indicated no perturbations to the overall protein structure upon IMTSL labeling. It was found that for IMTSL, giso correlates linearly with Aiso but the slopes are different for the neutral and charged forms of the nitroxide. This finding was attributed to the solvent effects on the spin density at the oxygen atom of the N–O group and on the excitation energy of the oxygen lone-pair orbital. PMID:18426227

  2. Miasmatic calories and saturating fats: fear of contamination in anorexia.

    PubMed

    Warin, Megan

    2003-03-01

    This paper draws on ethnographic material to challenge the taken-for-granted relationship between anorexia and fear of fat. While popular understandings assume anorexia to be an extension of everyday dietary guidelines and a fear of weight gain from foods high in fats and calories, I argue that it is fear of contamination rather than fear of fat per se that is at issue. Through a critique and extension of Mary Douglas' structuralist typology and Julia Kristeva's embodied theory of abjection, I demonstrate that it is the qualities of certain foods, and in particular their amorphous natures, that render them contaminating. Saturating fats and invisible calories are considered dangerous by people with anorexia because they have the ability to move, seep, and infiltrate the body through the interplay of senses. Foods that transgress conceptual and bodily boundaries are thus to be avoided at all costs, for they have the potential to defile and pollute. In light of the low recovery rates for those with anorexia within Australia (and internationally), the findings of this paper have significant implications for the understanding and treatment of this disorder.

  3. Chemical process to separate iron oxides particles in pottery sample for EPR dating.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Farias, T M B; Gennari, R F; Ferraz, G M; Kunzli, R; Chubaci, J F D

    2008-12-15

    Ancient potteries usually are made of the local clay material, which contains relatively high concentration of iron. The powdered samples are usually quite black, due to magnetite, and, although they can be used for thermoluminescene (TL) dating, it is easiest to obtain better TL reading when clearest natural or pre-treated sample is used. For electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the huge signal due to iron spin-spin interaction, promotes an intense interference overlapping any other signal in this range. Sample dating is obtained by dividing the radiation dose, determined by the concentration of paramagnetic species generated by irradiation, by the natural dose so as a consequence, EPR dating cannot be used, since iron signal do not depend on radiation dose. In some cases, the density separation method using hydrated solution of sodium polytungstate [Na6(H2W12O40).H2O] becomes useful. However, the sodium polytungstate is very expensive in Brazil; hence an alternative method for eliminating this interference is proposed. A chemical process to eliminate about 90% of magnetite was developed. A sample of powdered ancient pottery was treated in a mixture (3:1:1) of HCl, HNO(3) and H(2)O(2) for 4h. After that, it was washed several times in distilled water to remove all acid matrixes. The original black sample becomes somewhat clearer. The resulting material was analyzed by plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), with the result that the iron content is reduced by a factor of about 9. In EPR measurements a non-treated natural ceramic sample shows a broad spin-spin interaction signal, the chemically treated sample presents a narrow signal in g=2.00 region, possibly due to a radical of (SiO(3))(3-), mixed with signal of remaining iron [M. Ikeya, New Applications of Electron Spin Resonance, World Scientific, Singapore, 1993, p. 285]. This signal increases in intensity under gamma-irradiation. However, still due to iron influence, the additive method yielded too

  4. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in solid Polyethylene by NMR and EPR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    2000-06-12

    The authors have shown that the hydroperoxide species in {gamma}-irradiated {sup 13}C-polyethylene can be directly observed by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. The experiment was performed without the need for special sample preparation such as chemical derivatization or dissolution. Annealing experiments were employed to study the thermal decomposition of the hydroperoxide species and to measure an activation energy of 98 kJ/mol. EPR spectroscopy suggests that residual polyenyl and alkylperoxy radicals are predominantly trapped in interracial or crystalline regions, while the peroxy radicals observed after UV-photolysis of hydroperoxides are in amorphous regions.

  5. Splitting spacetime and cloning qubits: linking no-go theorems across the ER=EPR duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Pollack, Jason; Remmen, Grant N.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the no-cloning theorem in quantum mechanics through the lens of the proposed ER=EPR (Einstein-Rosen = Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen) duality between entanglement and wormholes. In particular, we find that the no-cloning theorem is dual on the gravity side to the no-go theorem for topology change, violating the axioms of which allows for wormhole stabilization and causality violation. Such a duality between important no-go theorems elucidates the proposed connection between spacetime geometry and quantum entanglement.

  6. Pentachlorooxotechnetate(VI) anion, (TcOCl/sub 5/): an EPR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirmse, R.; Stach, J.; Abram, U.

    1985-07-03

    The anion pentachlorooxotechnetate(VI), TcOCl/sub 5//sup -/, has been prepared by reduction of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ with HCl in concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and investigated by means of the EPR technique. The axial symmetric spectrum suggests an in-plane ..pi..-type ground state of the MO of the unpaired electron. The Tc-Cl/sub eq/ bonding properties have been discussed in terms of MO theory, and a comparison has been given to the bonding properties in likely complexes of neighboring elements of Tc.

  7. Nursing documentation with NANDA and NIC in a comprehensive HIS/EPR system.

    PubMed

    Flø, Kåre

    2006-01-01

    DIPS nursing documentation system facilitates that nurses can write several types of notes into the EPR. Within these notes the nurses can register NANDA diagnoses and NIC interventions with nursing activities. To choose NANDA and NIC the nurse can use a search engine, or she can choose a relevant Care plan guideline and pick the suggested diagnoses and interventions from there. Diagnoses and interventions with nursing activities registered are presented in a Care plan. When a nurse writes a note for a patient she will always be presented the Care plan and she can easy evaluate and update the Care plan.

  8. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course.

  9. Identification of periplasmic nitrate reductase Mo(V) EPR signals in intact cells of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sears, H J; Bennett, B; Spiro, S; Thomson, A J; Richardson, D J

    1995-08-15

    EPR spectroscopy has been successfully used to detect signals due to molybdenum (V) and ferric iron in intact cells of aerobically grown Paracoccus denitrificans. The signals are ascribed to the catalytic molybdenum centre and to the haem iron of the periplasmic nitrate reductase. These signals are absent from a mutant strain deficient in this enzyme. The Mo(V) signal is due to the High-g Split species which has been well characterized in the purified enzyme. This confirms that the High-g Split is the physiologically relevant signal of a number observed in the previous work on the purified enzyme. PMID:7646461

  10. EPR of Gd3+ ion in mixed CeO2-Y2O3 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, L. K.; Kurkin, I. N.; Rakhmatullin, R. M.; Böttcher, R.; Pöppl, A.; Sen, S.

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports on the results of EPR studies of mixed CeO2-Y2O3 crystals (including nanosized crystals) doped by gadolinium ions. It is revealed that the width of the line corresponding to the allowed transition 1/2 ↔ -1/2 between the Kramers-conjugated states |±1/2> of the Gd3+ ion decreases with a decrease in the powder size from macrosizes to nanosizes. The observed dependence can be due to the increase in the unit cell size during grinding of the samples.

  11. EPR and optical absorption study of Cu2+ doped lithium sulphate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheela, K. Juliet; Krishnan, S. Radha; Shanmugam, V. M.; Subramanian, P.

    2016-05-01

    EPR study of Cu2+ doped NLO active Lithium Sulphate monohydrate (Li2SO4.H2O) single crystals were grown successfully by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The principal values of g and A tensors indicate existence of orthorhombic symmetry around the Cu2+ ion. From the direction cosines of g and A tensors, the locations of Cu2+ in the lattice have been identified as interstitial site. Optical absorption confirms the rhombic symmetry and ground state wave function of the Cu2+ ion in a lattice as dx2-y2.

  12. An in situ electrochemical cell for Q- and W-band EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Paul R.; Collison, David; Daff, Simon; Austin, Nicola; Edge, Ruth; Flynn, Brian W.; Jack, Lorna; Leroux, Fanny; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Murray, Alan F.; Sells, Daniel; Stevenson, Tom; Wolowska, Joanna; Yellowlees, Lesley J.

    2011-12-01

    A simple design for an in situ, three-electrode spectroelectrochemical cell is reported that can be used in commercial Q- and W-band (ca. 34 and 94 GHz, respectively) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers, using standard sample tubing (1.0 and 0.5 mm inner diameter, respectively) and within variable temperature cryostat systems. The use of the cell is demonstrated by the in situ generation of organic free radicals (quinones and diimines) in fluid and frozen media, transition metal ion radical anions, and on the enzyme nitric oxide synthase reductase domain (NOSrd), in which a pair of flavin radicals are generated.

  13. Bidirectional teleportation of a pure EPR state by using GHZ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, Shima; Houshmand, Monireh

    2016-02-01

    In the present paper, a novel bidirectional quantum teleportation protocol is proposed. By using entanglement swapping technique, two GHZ states are shared as a quantum channel between Alice and Bob as legitimate users. In this scheme, based on controlled-not operation, single-qubit measurement, and appropriate unitary operations, two users can simultaneously transmit a pure EPR state to each other, While, in the previous protocols, the users can just teleport a single-qubit state to each other via more than four-qubit state. Therefore, the proposed scheme is economical compared with previous protocols.

  14. Multifrequency cw-EPR and DFT Studies of an Apparent Compressed Octahedral Cu(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nikita; Orio, Maylis; Gennari, Marcello; Wills, Christopher; Molton, Florian; Philouze, Christian; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Blackman, Allan G; Duboc, Carole

    2016-02-15

    The syntheses and single-crystal X-ray structures of the mononuclear complexes [Cu(bmet)](ClO4)2·H2O, [Cu(bmet)]Br2·2MeCN, and [Zn(bmet)](ClO4)2·H2O (bmet = N,N'-bis(2,2'-bipyridin-6-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine) are described. All three complexes feature a central metal ion bound to all six N atoms of the bmet ligand, which displays a meridional-facial-facial-meridional (mffm) configuration. The three complexes show one N-M-N axis to be significantly shorter than the others in agreement with an apparent compressed octahedral geometry. The X-ray structures of a single crystal of [Cu(bmet)](ClO4)2·0.375H2O resolved from data recorded at different temperatures display no remarkable structural modifications. However, they all display both as a powder and, in solution, an axial g1 > g2 ≳ g3 > g(e) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) pattern at low temperature, which is indicative of tetragonally elongated octahedra, while at room temperature the Q-band EPR spectra display a more rhombic g1 ≳ g2 > g3 > g(e) pattern. The fully density functional theory optimized structure of the Cu(II) complexes displays significant structural modifications only along one N(imine)-M-N(amine) axis resulting in an elongated octahedral structure. Furthermore, the EPR parameters predicted from this structure are comparable to those determined experimentally from the axial EPR signal recorded at low temperature, consistent with the unpaired electron residing mainly in the {3d(x(2)-y(2))} orbital. The structural and electronic properties of [Cu(bmet)](2+) are different from those in other previously described dynamic Jahn-Teller systems. We propose that these data can be rationalized by a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect perturbed by the strain of the hexadentate bmet ligand.

  15. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd[sup 3+] + L(ligand), [RuL[sub 5]H[sub 2]O][sup 2+], laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO)[sub 6] + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd[sup 3+] ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]-2,2'-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  16. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd{sup 3+} + L(ligand), [RuL{sub 5}H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+}, laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO){sub 6} + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd{sup 3+} ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO){sub 6}-2,2`-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  17. EPR Oximetry for Investigation of Hyperbaric O2 Pre-treatment for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Hou, Huagang; Coombs, Rachel; Swartz, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have reported benefits associated with the application of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO) delivered immediately prior to radiation therapy. While these studies provide evidence that pre-treatment with HBO may be beneficial, no measurements of intratumoral pO2 were carried out and they do not directly link the apparent benefits to decreased hypoxic fractions at the time of radiation therapy. While there is empirical evidence and some theoretical basis for HBO to enhance radiation therapy, without direct and repeated measurements of its effects on pO2, it is unlikely that the use of HBO can be understood and optimized for clinical applications. In vivo EPR oximetry is a technique uniquely capable of providing repeated direct measurements of pO2 through a non-invasive procedure in both animal models and human patients. In order to evaluate the ability of pretreatment with HBO to elevate tumor pO2, a novel small animal hyperbaric chamber system was constructed that allows simultaneous in vivo EPR oximetry. This chamber can be placed within the EPR magnet and is equipped with a variety of ports for multiplace gas delivery, thermoregulation, delivery of anesthesia, physiologic monitoring, and EPR detection. Initial measurements were performed in a subcutaneous RIF-1 tumor model in C3H/HeJ mice. The mean baseline pO2 value was 6.0 ± 1.2 mmHg (N = 7) and responses to two atmospheres absolute pressure HBO varied considerably across subjects, within tumors, and over time. When an increase in pO2 was observed, the effect was transient in all but one case, with durations lasting from 5 min to over 20 min, and returned to baseline levels during HBO administration. These results indicate that without direct measurements of pO2 in the tissue of interest, it is likely to be difficult to know the effects of HBO on actual tissue pO2. PMID:27526165

  18. A Multiparty Controlled Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication and Authentication Protocol Based on EPR Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yan; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Yan, Li-Li; Sheng, Zhi-Wei

    2013-06-01

    A multiparty controlled bidirectional quantum secure direct communication and authentication protocol is proposed based on EPR pair and entanglement swapping. The legitimate identities of communicating parties are encoded to Bell states which act as a detection sequence. Secret messages are transmitted by using the classical XOR operation, which serves as a one-time-pad. No photon with secret information transmits in the quantum channel. Compared with the protocols proposed by Wang et al. [Acta Phys. Sin. 56 (2007) 673; Opt. Commun. 266 (2006) 732], the protocol in this study implements bidirectional communication and authentication, which defends most attacks including the ‘man-in-the-middle’ attack efficiently.

  19. The orientation of membrane bound radicals: an EPR investigation of magnetically ordered spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Dismukes, G C; Sauer, K

    1978-12-01

    The orientation of membrane-bound radicals in spinach chloroplasts is examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of chloroplasts oriented by magnetic fields. Several of the membrane-bound radicals which possess g-tensor anisotropy display EPR signals with a marked dependence on the orientation of the membranes relative to the applied EPR field. The fraction of oxidized and reduced plastocyanin, P-700, iron-sulfur proteins A and B, and the X center, an early acceptor of Photosystem I, can be controlled by the light intensity during steady-state illumination and can be trapped by cooling. The X center can be photoreduced and trapped in the absence of strong reductants and high pH, conditions previously found necessary for its detection. These results confirm its role as an early electron acceptor in P-700 photo-oxidation. X is oriented with its smallest principal g-tensor axis (gx) predominantly parallel to the normal to the thylakoid membrane, the same orientation as was found for an early electron acceptor based on time-resolved electron spin polarization studies. We propose that the X center is the first example of a high potential iron-sulfur protein which functions in electron transfer in its 'superreduced' state. We present evidence which suggests that iron-sulfur proteins A and B are 4Fe-4S clusters in an 8Fe-8S protein. Center B is oriented with gy predominantly normal to the membrane plane. The spectra of center A and plastocyanin do not show significant changes with sample orientation. In the case of plastocyanin, this may indicate a lack of molecular orientation. The absence of an orientation effect for reduced center A is reconcilable with a 4Fe-4S geometry, provided that the electron obtained upon reduction can be shared between any pair of Fe atoms in the center. Orientation of the 'Rieske' iron-sulfur protein is also observed. It has axial symmetry with g parallel close to the plane of the membrane. A model is proposed for the

  20. Emerging Issues in Pediatric Asthma: Gaps in EPR-3 Guidelines for Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    There are many complexities to the treatment of infants and children with recurrent wheezing and asthma. NHLBI’s Expert Panel Report-3 (EPR3), published in 2007, provides guidance to clinicians who care for infants and children with asthma. Since that time, many important clinical trials have further informed the evidence base available to clinicians. In this manuscript, new approaches to long-term therapy, intermittent fixed-dose and dynamic dose therapies, and emerging therapies for asthma are reviewed. Further, additional gaps in guideline-base care and areas for future research are discussed. PMID:25269401

  1. Fault-tolerant controlled deterministic secure quantum communication using EPR states against collective noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Yang, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes two new fault-tolerant controlled deterministic secure quantum communication (CDSQC) protocols based only on Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entangled states. The proposed protocols are designed to be robust against the collective-dephasing noise and the collective-rotation noise, respectively. Compared to the existing fault-tolerant controlled quantum communication protocols, the proposed protocols not only can do without a quantum channel between the receiver and the controller as the state-of-the-art protocols do, but also have the advantage that the number of quantum particles required in the CDSQC protocols is reduced owing to the use of the simplest entangled states.

  2. Source Variations Along the EPR Identify Melt flow and Influence Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salters, V. J.; Mallick, S. J.; Sachi-Kocher, A.

    2009-05-01

    Understanding the melting processes and the relation between the source variations and the melting process is crucial in understanding the sub-ridge processes. We have analyzed at high "density" samples from the EPR between 8-18N for trace elements and isotopes. At the EPR we observe a systematic variation in the chemical composition of the basalts related to ridge discontinuities, both at fracture zones and at overlapping spreading centers. The variations in the chemistry are of two types: 1. There is a discontinuity in composition across a fracture zone or overlapper. This discrete jump in composition can be identified in both the trace element ratios as well as the isotopic compositions. 2. The chemical variations in each individual ridge segment indicates two component mixing. However, the two components differ from segment to segment. The first type of variation can be explained by low degrees melts traveling across the ridge continuity. At migrating ridges such as the EPR leading (LE) and trailing edges (TE) of ridge segments have been identified. LEs have thicker crust suggesting a larger accumulation of melt. The low degree melts generated of-axis on the TE of the ridge segment can find a shorter route to the ridge by crossing the transform fault plane. The LE therefore has additional low-degree melts which are missing at the TE. The area on the EPR we covered contains four fracture zones (Siqueros, Clipperton, Orozco and 18N) as well as three overlapping spreading centers. We observe discontinuities in the chemical composition of the basalts at all eight ridge discontinuity. The changes in the trace element ratios like Ce/Yb, Ba/La, Sm/Nd at six of the seven discontinuities are consistent with the LE receiving a larger amount of low degree melt, as predicted by the geophysical model. The Clipperton Fracture zone is the only discontinuity that has chemical variations that are the reverse of what is expected based on the model. Secondly, and perhaps most

  3. The direct and inverse problems of an air-saturated porous cylinder submitted to acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Ogam, Erick; Depollier, Claude; Fellah, Z E A

    2010-09-01

    Gas-saturated porous skeleton materials such as geomaterials, polymeric and metallic foams, or biomaterials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, from structural materials to energy technologies. Most polymeric foams are used for noise control applications and knowledge of the manner in which the energy of sound waves is dissipated with respect to the intrinsic acoustic properties is important for the design of sound packages. Foams are often employed in the audible, low frequency range where modeling and measurement techniques for the recovery of physical parameters responsible for energy loss are still few. Accurate acoustic methods of characterization of porous media are based on the measurement of the transmitted and/or reflected acoustic waves by platelike specimens at ultrasonic frequencies. In this study we develop an acoustic method for the recovery of the material parameters of a rigid-frame, air-saturated polymeric foam cylinder. A dispersion relation for sound wave propagation in the porous medium is derived from the propagation equations and a model solution is sought based on plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions. The explicit analytical solution equation of the scattered field shows that it is also dependent on the intrinsic acoustic parameters of the porous cylinder, namely, porosity, tortuosity, and flow resistivity (permeability). The inverse problem of the recovery of the flow resistivity and porosity is solved by seeking the minima of the objective functions consisting of the sum of squared residuals of the differences between the experimental and theoretical scattered field data. PMID:20887001

  4. Physiological meaning of cerebral oxygen saturation for piglet with hypoxia-ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Haishu; Huang, Lan; Jen, Chungchien; Hwang, Betau; Lee, Zhiguang; Teng, Yichao; Zheng, Meizhi

    2005-01-01

    The physiological meaning of cerebral oxygen saturation absolute values and the oxygen metabolism of piglet with hypoxia-ischemia (HIE) were researched. The subjects were two piglets. During the total experiment of hypoxia then recovery, the regional cerebral tissue oxygen (rScO2), pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) were detected non-invasively and the jugular oxygen saturation (SjO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were given invasively. The results show that because SjO2 was equal to or larger than rScO2 and SaO2 > ScO2, rScO2 cannot be determined by the weighted sum of SjO2 and SaO2 which had been presented in some papers. According to above-mentioned analysis, the ecchymoma and pathological changes of the vessels due to HIE may be another contribution of rScO2. SjO2 was correlated with SaO2 (R=0.996 and 0.962 for two piglets) and the values of (SaO2-SjO2) are close to constants (29.3+/-8% and 30.3+/-8%).It means that because the subjects were under anesthesia, the oxygen consumption of cerebral tissue kept constants.

  5. Saturation dynamics and working limits of saturated absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sadiek, Ibrahim; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2016-08-17

    Cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) in the linear absorption regime is a well-established method for sensitive trace gas detection, but only a few studies have addressed quantitative measurements in the presence of a saturated sample. In fact, saturation is usually avoided in order to escape from the required complex modeling of the saturation process that depends on the characteristics of the absorbing species, its interaction with the surrounding gas as well as on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the cavity excitation. Conversely, the novel saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy approach (SCAR/Sat-CRDS) takes advantage of sample saturation in order to allow one to extract both the gas absorption and the empty cavity loss rates from a single ringdown event. Using a new continuous-wave infrared CRD spectrometer equipped with a tunable narrow-bandwidth high-power OPO laser system and a 18 bit digitizer, the transient dynamics of absorption saturation and the working limits of the Sat-CRDS approach in terms of its ability to extract reliable trace gas concentrations have been experimentally studied in this work. Using a strong methane transition as a test case, the excitation power P0 and saturation power PS have been systematically varied to explore a wide range of saturation regimes. At pressures 5 μbar < p < 2 mbar, the saturation intensity revealed a nearly linear pressure dependence showing that non-collisional processes contribute to the overall relaxation. A ratio of P0/PS ≈ 15 turned out to be optimal with working limits of 5 < P0/PS < 300. Moreover, the ratio of the absorption and empty cavity loss rates, γg/γc, has been varied to test the dynamic range of the method. At γg > γc, a pronounced coupling between the two parameters has been observed. Finally, a standard error analysis was performed revealing that the Sat-CRDS approach holds its advantages over conventional CRDS implementations in particular when the attainable

  6. Analysis of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a spin-labeled integral membrane protein, band 3, in terms of the uniaxial rotational diffusion model.

    PubMed Central

    Hustedt, E J; Beth, A H

    1995-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed for the calculation of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR) spectra of a nitroxide spin-label assuming uniaxial rotational diffusion, a model that is frequently used to describe the global rotational dynamics of large integral membrane proteins. One algorithm explicitly includes terms describing Zeeman overmodulation effects, whereas the second more rapid algorithm treats these effects approximately using modified electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times. Simulations are presented to demonstrate the sensitivity of X-band ST-EPR spectra to the rate of uniaxial rotational diffusion and the orientation of the nitroxide probe with respect to the diffusion axis. Results obtained by using the algorithms presented, which are based on the transition-rate formalism, are in close agreement with those obtained by using an eigenfunction expansion approach. The effects of various approximations used in the simulation algorithms are considered in detail. Optimizing the transition-rate formalism to model uniaxial rotational diffusion results in over an order of magnitude reduction in computation time while allowing treatment of nonaxial A- and g-tensors. The algorithms presented here are used to perform nonlinear least-squares analyses of ST-EPR spectra of the anion exchange protein of the human erythrocyte membrane, band 3, which has been affinity spin-labeled with a recently developed dihydrostilbene disulfonate derivative, [15N,2H13]-SL-H2DADS-MAL. These results suggest that all copies of band 3 present in intact erythrocytes undergo rotational diffusion about the membrane normal axis at a rate consistent with a band 3 dimer. PMID:8534811

  7. [New Method of Measuring Arterial Oxygen Saturation].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Bao, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Lin, Ling; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Chun-jie

    2016-01-01

    The traditional method of measuring arterial oxygen saturation is that R value, the ratio of alternating component of the logarithmic photoplethysmography, is firstly computed and then the linear regression model is established by experiment. The R value computation is a dimension reduction process based on Lambert-beer law, which aims at eliminating the influence of optical path and minimizing the impact of individual differences. When taking scattering into consideration, the dimension reduction process loses information, introduces the system error and limits the precision of measurement. In order to reduce the measurement error resulting from the scattering effects, this paper presents a new method that the peak and valley values of dual-wavelength logarithmic photoplethysmography waves are used as the independent variables to develop a linear regression model to predict the arterial oxygen saturation. During the experiment, the in-vivo measurements were carried out on 23 healthy volunteer and 133 samples of photoplethysmography waves and the reference value of oxygen saturation were recorded. To compare the predictive performance between the new method and the R value method, 90 samples were randomly selected as modeling sets and the remaining 43 samples were used as prediction sets. Random selection of modeling sets and prediction are executed 10 times. The average related coefficients of the prediction sets of the new method and the R value method are 0.890 6 and 0.846 8, and the average root mean square errors are 0.889 6% and 1.037 3% respectively. Results indicate that the performance of the new method is better than the one of the R value method, and the predictivemodel based on 4 parameters can improve the stability and accuracy of measurement. And the new method has guiding significance to the measurement of human body's blood physiological information based on limited wavelength spectrum data. PMID:27228767

  8. Microbial enhanced oil recovery and compositions therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bryant, Rebecca S.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for microbial enhanced oil recovery, wherein a combination of microorganisms is empirically formulated based on survivability under reservoir conditions and oil recovery efficiency, such that injection of the microbial combination may be made, in the presence of essentially only nutrient solution, directly into an injection well of an oil bearing reservoir having oil present at waterflood residual oil saturation concentration. The microbial combination is capable of displacing residual oil from reservoir rock, which oil may be recovered by waterflooding without causing plugging of the reservoir rock. Further, the microorganisms are capable of being transported through the pores of the reservoir rock between said injection well and associated production wells, during waterflooding, which results in a larger area of the reservoir being covered by the oil-mobilizing microorganisms.

  9. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  10. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  11. Current saturation in submillimeter wave varactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollberg, Erik L.; Tolmunen, T. J.; Frerking, Margaret A.; East, Jack R.

    1992-01-01

    In semiconductor devices the speed of electrons cannot exceed certain limits. This phenomenon will affect varactor multipliers as well as other high frequency devices where the RF current through the active part of the device is primarily displacement current. Hence, 'saturation' of the varactor output power is expected at some point. This phenomenon is discussed in some detail and shown to severely deteriorate the multiplier performance at higher frequencies. Single barrier varactors should have an advantage over GaAs Schottky diode varactors because they can be fabricated on InAs and stacked in a series array, allowing for lower current densities and higher power handling.

  12. An ice-water saturation adjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A reasonably accurate and noniterative saturation adjustment scheme is proposed to calculate: (1) the amount of condensation and/or deposition necessary to remove any supersaturated vapor, or (2) the amount of evaporation and/or sublimation necessary to remove any subsaturation in the presence of cloud droplets and/or cloud ice. This proposed scheme can be implemented for a nonhydrostatic cloud model. The derivation of the scheme, an evaluation of its performance, and tests for sensitivity to variations in a few key parameters are presented.

  13. Saturation point structure of marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Betts, Alan K.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the microstructure of a Pacific stratocumulus capped boundary layer is presented. A complex structure of three branches, identified using conserved variable diagrams, is found to correspond well to a conceptual model for the unstable, radiatively cooled cloud topped boundary layer. A simple conditional sampling method was used to identify saturation point pairs for ascending and descending branches of the internal boundary layer circulation. Results indicate a primary circulation scale of 5 km and provide a reasonable cloud top entrainment rate of 1 cm/s.

  14. A Hash Based Remote User Authentication and Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme for the Integrated EPR Information System.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Wang, Chun-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    To protect patient privacy and ensure authorized access to remote medical services, many remote user authentication schemes for the integrated electronic patient record (EPR) information system have been proposed in the literature. In a recent paper, Das proposed a hash based remote user authentication scheme using passwords and smart cards for the integrated EPR information system, and claimed that the proposed scheme could resist various passive and active attacks. However, in this paper, we found that Das's authentication scheme is still vulnerable to modification and user duplication attacks. Thereafter we propose a secure and efficient authentication scheme for the integrated EPR information system based on lightweight hash function and bitwise exclusive-or (XOR) operations. The security proof and performance analysis show our new scheme is well-suited to adoption in remote medical healthcare services.

  15. Theoretical studies of the local structure and EPR parameters for Cu2+ centers in disodium malonate trihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao-Ying, Li; Ying, Huang; Xue-Mei, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors gxx, gyy, gzz and hyperfine structure constants Axx, Ayy, Azz) of the two Cu2+ centers in disodium malonate trihydrate (DSMT) single crystal are theoretically interpreted using the high order perturbation formulas of these parameters for a 3d9 ions in rhombically elongated octahedra. In the calculation, the rhombic crystal-field parameters are determined from the superposition model and the admixture of d-orbitals in the ground state wave function are taking account, the results show that although the admixture of the | d z 2 > state to the ground state wave function is small, it should not be neglected in calculations of the EPR parameters. The theoretical EPR parameters show good agreement with the observed values. The results are discussed.

  16. EPR and LC-MS studies on the mechanism of industrial dye decolorization by versatile peroxidase from Bjerkandera adusta.

    PubMed

    Baratto, Maria Camilla; Juarez-Moreno, Karla; Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms of industrial dye transformation by versatile peroxidase were elucidated. Purified versatile peroxidase from Bjerkandera adusta was able to decolorize different classes of dyes including azo and phthalocyanines, but unable to transform any of the anthraquinones tested. Kinetic constants for selected dyes were determined and the transformation products were analyzed by EPR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The EPR and MS analyses of the enzymatic decolorization products showed the cleavage of the azo bond in azo dyes and the total disruption of the phthalocyaninic ring in phthalocyanine dyes. The EPR analysis on two copper-containing dyes, reactive violet 5 (azo) and reactive blue 72 (phthalocyanine), showed that the transformation can or not break the metal-ion coordination bond according the dye nature. The role of the catalytic Trp172 in the dye transformation by a long-range electron transfer pathway was confirmed and the oxidation mechanisms are proposed and discussed. PMID:25567062

  17. High-pressure low-temperature locknut cell for both EPR and NMR studies to 10 kilobars and 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shantanu; Srinivasan, R.

    1983-11-01

    A locked high-pressure cell with working pressure range up to 10 kbars suitable for low-temperature studies to 77 K has been described. It can be used for both EPR and NMR studies of single crystals (and other solid samples). The high-pressure seal and all other aspects of the cell remain the same for either application. Only a change of the bottom plug is required for a switch from a nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) to an electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) experiment. Details of the procedure for the calibration of pressure inside the cell at various temperatures are discussed. The performance of the cell in EPR (Cr3+ion) and NMR (27Al nucleus) studies is reported.

  18. Theoretical investigations of the optical and EPR spectra for trivalent cerium and ytterbium ions in orthorhombic YF3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2016-09-01

    The optical spectra and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors and hyperfine structure constants A) for trivalent cerium and ytterbium ions in YF3 crystal with orthorhombic structure are investigated together by the complete diagonalization (of energy matrix) method (CDM). The obtained results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental ones. More importantly, two magnetically nonequivalent centers in YF3 crystal observed in EPR experiments are confirmed and ascribed to their specific positions in a unit cell by our calculations based on superposition model (SPM) analysis. Such identification of local sites with different magnetic properties would help us to understand not only the EPR spectra and magnetic susceptibility of other lanthanide ions doped in crystals with the same structure as YF3 but also the energy transfer scheme between two lanthanide ions occupying such two sites. All results are discussed carefully.

  19. TIME-LAPSE MODELING AND INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2004-11-19

    In the fourth quarter of this DOE NETL project, they have developed an algorithm for generating time-lapse seismic anomalies from changes in fluid properties over time. This forward-modeling algorithm constitutes the first step in the inversion procedure of Phase III of the project. Examples were generated illustrating the flexibility of this approach. Additional activities in this reporting period included a trip by the Principal Investigator to the 7th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies (GHGT-7) in Vancouver, Canada, September 5-9, 2004. In the next quarter, they will work on the second step of the inversion procedure, namely, the inversion of the seismic time-lapse anomalies to obtain changes in fluid properties, and will continue investigating alternative methods for calculating properties of oil/brine/CO{sub 2} and brine/CO{sub 2} systems.

  20. Separation and isolation of saturated and unsaturated 5-n-alk(en)ylresorcinols from rye bran.

    PubMed

    Patzke, Hannes; Schulze-Kaysers, Nadine; Schieber, Andreas

    2016-03-18

    Alkylresorcinols (AR) are a class of phenolic lipids which are found in a number of plants and microorganisms and which are associated with various biological activities. In view of the very limited availability of reference compounds, we developed a process for the isolation of AR from rye bran. For this purpose, a crude extract was subjected to deep bed filtration at -80 °C, whereby the crystallized saturated AR were separated from the unsaturated homologues. Highly purified, individual compounds were subsequently isolated by semi-preparative HPLC. In contrast to previously published approaches, the method reported here is relatively easy to perform and allows the recovery of saturated and unsaturated AR of high purity. Furthermore, it is superior to argentation chromatography because it does not necessitate the removal of silver ions for subsequent bioassays.