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Sample records for scaffold degradation elevates

  1. Polymer scaffold degradation control via chemical control

    SciTech Connect

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Dirk, Shawn; Cicotte, Kirsten

    2016-01-05

    A variety of polymers and copolymers suitable for use as biologically compatible constructs and, as a non-limiting specific example, in the formation of degradable tissue scaffolds as well methods for synthesizing these polymers and copolymers are described. The polymers and copolymers have degradation rates that are substantially faster than those of previously described polymers suitable for the same uses. Copolymers having a synthesis route which enables one to fine tune the degradation rate by selecting the specific stoichiometry of the monomers in the resulting copolymer are also described. The disclosure also provides a novel synthesis route for maleoyl chloride which yields monomers suitable for use in the copolymer synthesis methods described herein.

  2. Electrospinning of photocrosslinked and degradable fibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrea R; Ifkovits, Jamie L; Baker, Brendon M; Brey, Darren M; Mauck, Robert L; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-12-15

    Electrospun fibrous scaffolds are being developed for the engineering of numerous tissues. Advantages of electrospun scaffolds include the similarity in fiber diameter to elements of the native extracellular matrix and the ability to align fibers within the scaffold to control and direct cellular interactions and matrix deposition. To further expand the range of properties available in fibrous scaffolds, we developed a process to electrospin photocrosslinkable macromers from a library of multifunctional poly(beta-amino ester)s. In this study, we utilized one macromer (A6) from this library for initial examination of fibrous scaffold formation. A carrier polymer [poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)] was used for fiber formation because of limitations in electrospinning A6 alone. Various ratios of A6 and PEO were successfully electrospun and influenced the scaffold fiber diameter and appearance. When electrospun with a photoinitiator and exposed to light, the macromers crosslinked rapidly to high double bond conversions and fibrous scaffolds displayed higher elastic moduli compared to uncrosslinked scaffolds. When these fibers were deposited onto a rotating mandrel and crosslinked, organized fibrous scaffolds were obtained, which possessed higher moduli (approximately 4-fold) in the fiber direction than perpendicular to the fiber direction, as well as higher moduli (approximately 12-fold) than that of nonaligned crosslinked scaffolds. With exposure to water, a significant mass loss and a decrease in mechanical properties were observed, correlating to a rapid initial loss of PEO which reached an equilibrium after 7 days. Overall, these results present a process that allows for formation of fibrous scaffolds from a wide variety of possible photocrosslinkable macromers, increasing the diversity and range of properties achievable in fibrous scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  3. Scaffold degradation during bone tissue reconstruction in Macaca nemestrina mandible

    PubMed Central

    Bachtiar, Endang W.; Amir, Lisa Rinanda; Suhardi, Pradono; Abas, Basril

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the degradation of three scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) with 70∶30 ratio, HA/TCP with 50∶50 ratio, and HA/TCP/chitosan scaffold as analyzed by the RNA expression of matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2), interleukin 13 (IL13), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) genes. Methods The three tested scaffolds and dental pulp stromal cells (DPSCs) were transplanted into the mandibular bone defect of six young male Macaca nemestrina. Defect on the left mandible served as the experimental group and the right mandible served as control group (split mouth design). The biopsies were retrieved at 0, 2, and 4 weeks after cell-scaffold transplantation. The expression of MMP2, IL13, and TRAP was analyzed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results The inflammatory cells were still detected in areas where active bone and blood vessel formation occurred. The remnants of scaffold biomaterials were rarely seen. The expression of MMP2, IL13, and TRAP was observed in all samples. Their expressions were increased at week 4 and the decrease of TRAP gene expression in the experimental group was found higher than the control group. TRAP gene in the HA/TCP/chitosan group was found to be the highest at week 2 and lowest at week 4. Conclusions Degradation of the scaffold did not induce higher inflammatory response compared to the control yet it induced more osteoclast activity. PMID:28386463

  4. In vitro degradation and mechanical properties of PLA-PCL copolymer unit cell scaffolds generated by two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Felfel, R M; Poocza, Leander; Gimeno-Fabra, Miquel; Milde, Tobias; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Ahmed, Ifty; Scotchford, Colin; Sottile, Virginie; Grant, David M; Liefeith, Klaus

    2016-02-02

    The manufacture of 3D scaffolds with specific controlled porous architecture, defined microstructure and an adjustable degradation profile was achieved using two-photon polymerization (TPP) with a size of 2  ×  4  ×  2 mm(3). Scaffolds made from poly(D,L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) copolymer with varying lactic acid (LA) and ɛ -caprolactone (CL) ratios (LC16:4, 18:2 and 9:1) were generated via ring-opening-polymerization and photoactivation. The reactivity was quantified using photo-DSC, yielding a double bond conversion ranging from 70% to 90%. The pore sizes for all LC scaffolds were see 300 μm and throat sizes varied from 152 to 177 μm. In vitro degradation was conducted at different temperatures; 37, 50 and 65 °C. Change in compressive properties immersed at 37 °C over time was also measured. Variations in thermal, degradation and mechanical properties of the LC scaffolds were related to the LA/CL ratio. Scaffold LC16:4 showed significantly lower glass transition temperature (T g) (4.8 °C) in comparison with the LC 18:2 and 9:1 (see 32 °C). Rates of mass loss for the LC16:4 scaffolds at all temperatures were significantly lower than that for LC18:2 and 9:1. The degradation activation energies for scaffold materials ranged from 82.7 to 94.9 kJ mol(-1). A prediction for degradation time was applied through a correlation between long-term degradation studies at 37 °C and short-term studies at elevated temperatures (50 and 65 °C) using the half-life of mass loss (Time (M1/2)) parameter. However, the initial compressive moduli for LC18:2 and 9:1 scaffolds were 7 to 14 times higher than LC16:4 (see 0.27) which was suggested to be due to its higher CL content (20%). All scaffolds showed a gradual loss in their compressive strength and modulus over time as a result of progressive mass loss over time. The manufacturing process utilized and the scaffolds produced have potential for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

  5. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  6. Biocompatibility and degradation of tendon-derived scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix has often been used as a biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. Its function, once implanted can be crucial to determining whether a tissue engineered construct will be successful, both in terms of how the material breaks down, and how the body reacts to the material’s presence in the first place. Collagen is one of the primary components of extracellular matrix and has been used for a number of biomedical applications. Scaffolds comprised of highly aligned collagen fibrils can be fabricated directly from decellularized tendon using a slicing, stacking, and rolling technique, to create two- and three-dimensional constructs. Here, the degradation characteristics of the material are evaluated in vitro, showing that chemical crosslinking can reduce degradation while maintaining fiber structure. In vivo, non-crosslinked and crosslinked samples are implanted, and their biological response and degradation evaluated through histological sectioning, trichrome staining, and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages. Non-crosslinked samples are rapidly degraded and lose fiber morphology while crosslinked samples retain both macroscopic structure as well as fiber orientation. The cellular response of both materials is also investigated. The in vivo response demonstrates that the decellularized tendon material is biocompatible, biodegradable and can be crosslinked to maintain surface features for extended periods of time in vivo. This study provides material characteristics for the use of decellularized tendon as biomaterial for tissue engineering. PMID:26816651

  7. In vitro degradation of porous PLLA/pearl powder composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y S; Huang, Q L; Kienzle, A; Müller, W E G; Feng, Q L

    2014-05-01

    The in vitro degradation behavior of poly-L-lactide (PLLA), PLLA/aragonite pearl powder and PLLA/vaterite pearl powder scaffolds was investigated. The scaffolds were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) up to 200 days. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to observe any degradation of the scaffolds. Degradation behaviors such as changes in pH, porosity, bulk density, water absorption, weight loss and mechanical properties were discussed. The results show that a gradual increase of the pH in composite scaffolds can decrease the rate of hydrolysis of PLLA. PLLA/vaterite and PLLA/aragonite scaffolds have a similar degradation behavior but a slower rate of degradation than PLLA.

  8. Evaluating Changes in Structure and Cytotoxicity During In Vitro Degradation of Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Martha O.; Piard, Charlotte M.; Melchiorri, Anthony; Dreher, Maureen L.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the structural, mechanical, and cytocompatibility changes of three-dimensional (3D) printed porous polymer scaffolds during degradation. Three porous scaffold designs were fabricated from a poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) resin. PPF is a hydrolytically degradable polymer that has been well characterized for applications in bone tissue engineering. Over a 224 day period, scaffolds were hydrolytically degraded and changes in scaffold parameters, such as porosity and pore size, were measured nondestructively using micro-computed tomography. In addition, changes in scaffold mechanical properties were also measured during degradation. Scaffold degradation was verified through decreasing pH and increasing mass loss as well as the formation of micropores and surface channels. Current methods to evaluate polymer cytotoxicity have been well established; however, the ability to evaluate toxicity of an absorbable polymer as it degrades has not been well explored. This study, therefore, also proposes a novel method to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the absorbable scaffolds using a combination of degradation extract, phosphate-buffered saline, and cell culture media. Fibroblasts were incubated with this combination media, and cytotoxicity was evaluated using XTT assay and fluorescence imaging. Cell culture testing demonstrated that the 3D-printed scaffold extracts did not induce significant cell death. In addition, results showed that over a 224 day time period, porous PPF scaffolds provided mechanical stability while degrading. Overall, these results show that degradable, 3D-printed PPF scaffolds are suitable for bone tissue engineering through the use of a novel toxicity during degradation assay. PMID:25627168

  9. Degradation behavior and compatibility of micro, nanoHA/chitosan scaffolds with interconnected spherical macropores.

    PubMed

    Ruixin, Li; Cheng, Xu; Yingjie, Liu; Hao, Li; Caihong, Shi; Weihua, Su; Weining, An; Yinghai, Yuan; Xiaoli, Qin; Yunqiang, Xu; Xizheng, Zhang; Hui, Li

    2017-03-30

    Hydroxyapatite/Chitosan (HA/CS) composite have significant application in biomedical especially for bone replacement. Inorganic particle shape and size of composite affect the scaffold mechanical property, biological property, and degradation. The aim of this study was to fabricate HA/CS scaffold with good pore connectivity and analyze their biological, degradation properties. Microhydroxyapatite/chitosan(mHA/CS) and nanohydroxyapatite/chitosan (nHA/CS) composite scaffolds with interconnected spherical pore architectures were fabricated. Composite scaffolds structure parameters were analyzed using micro CT. Cell proliferation and morphology were tested and compared between two scaffolds using mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. To research the composite degradation in lysozyme PBS solution, degradation rate and reducing sugar content were tested, and scaffolds morphology were observed by SEM. The results showed that microHA and nanoHA were fabricated by being calcined and synthesis methods, and their infrared spectra are very similar. EDAX composition analysis demonstrated that both of microHA and nanoHA were calcium deficiency HA. Micro-CT results demonstrated the scaffolds had interconnected spherical pores, and the structure parameters were similar. Cell viabilities were significant increased with cultured time, but there were no significant difference between microHA/CS and nanoHA/CS scaffolds. Scaffold structure was gradually destroyed and inorganic composition HA particles are more prominent with degradation time.

  10. Degradability, bioactivity, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds of lithium-containing mesoporous bioglass and mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yanrong; Guo, Lieping; Shen, Hongxing; An, Xiaofei; Jiang, Hong; Ji, Fang; Niu, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds of lithium (Li)-containing mesoporous bioglass and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL) copolymer were fabricated in this study. The results showed that the water absorption and degradability of Li-containing mesoporous bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-MBPC) scaffolds were obviously higher than Li-containing bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-BPC) scaffolds. Moreover, the apatite-formation ability of l-MBPC scaffolds was markedly enhanced as compared with l-BPC scaffolds, indicating that l-MBPC scaffolds containing mesoporous bioglass exhibited good bioactivity. The cell experimental results showed that cell attachment, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on l-MBPC scaffolds were remarkably improved as compared to l-BPC scaffolds. In animal experiments, the histological elevation results revealed that l-MBPC scaffolds significantly promoted new bone formation, indicating good osteogenesis. l-MBPC scaffolds with improved properties would be an excellent candidate for bone tissue repair. PMID:26150718

  11. Degradability, bioactivity, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds of lithium-containing mesoporous bioglass and mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL copolymer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanrong; Guo, Lieping; Shen, Hongxing; An, Xiaofei; Jiang, Hong; Ji, Fang; Niu, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds of lithium (Li)-containing mesoporous bioglass and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL) copolymer were fabricated in this study. The results showed that the water absorption and degradability of Li-containing mesoporous bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-MBPC) scaffolds were obviously higher than Li-containing bioglass/mPEG-PLGA-b-PLL composite (l-BPC) scaffolds. Moreover, the apatite-formation ability of l-MBPC scaffolds was markedly enhanced as compared with l-BPC scaffolds, indicating that l-MBPC scaffolds containing mesoporous bioglass exhibited good bioactivity. The cell experimental results showed that cell attachment, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on l-MBPC scaffolds were remarkably improved as compared to l-BPC scaffolds. In animal experiments, the histological elevation results revealed that l-MBPC scaffolds significantly promoted new bone formation, indicating good osteogenesis. l-MBPC scaffolds with improved properties would be an excellent candidate for bone tissue repair.

  12. Synchrotron-Based in Situ Characterization of the Scaffold Mass Loss from Erosion Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bawolin, Nahshon K.; Chen, Xiongbaio

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss behavior of degradable tissue scaffolds is critical to their lifespan and other degradation-related properties including mechanical strength and mass transport characteristics. This paper presents a novel method based on synchrotron imaging to characterize the scaffold mass loss from erosion degradation in situ, or without the need of extracting scaffolds once implanted. Specifically, the surface-eroding degradation of scaffolds in a degrading medium was monitored in situ by synchrotron-based imaging; and the time-dependent geometry of scaffolds captured by images was then employed to estimate their mass loss with time, based on the mathematical model that was adopted from the literature of surface erosion with the experimentally-identified model parameters. Acceptable agreement between experimental results and model predictions was observed for scaffolds in a cylindrical shape, made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL). This study illustrates that geometry evaluation by synchrotron-based imaging is an effective means to in situ characterize the scaffold mass loss as well as possibly other degradation-related properties. PMID:27399789

  13. Fabrication, characterization, and in vitro degradation of composite scaffolds based on PHBV and bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Du, Ruilin; Chang, Jiang

    2005-10-01

    Composite scaffolds of polyhydroxybutyrate-polyhydroxyvalerate (PHBV) with sol-gel-derived bioactive glass (BG, 58S) are fabricated by compression molding, thermal processing, and salt particulate leaching method. Structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds are determined. The bioactivity of the composites is evaluated by soaking the scaffolds in a simulated body fluid (SBF), and the formation of the apatite layer on the scaffolds is determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results show that the PHBV/BG composites are bioactive as they induce the formation of apatite on the composite scaffolds after soaking in SBF for 3 days. In addition, the measurements of the water contact angles suggest that incorporation of BG into PHBV can improve the hydrophilicity of the composites and the enhancement is dependent on the BG content. Furthermore, the degradation assessment of the scaffolds is performed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution at 37 C. Weight loss and water absorption of the scaffolds, pH of the incubation media, and molecular weight measurements of the PHBV in the scaffolds are used to monitor the degradation of the scaffolds during a nine-week incubation in PBS. It has been found that the incorporation of bioactive glass into the PHBV delayed the degradation of PHBV in the composite scaffolds for the period investigated. The present results show not only a useful method to prepare composite scaffolds with improved properties but also a way of adjusting the in vitro degradation behavior of composite scaffolds by tailoring the content of bioactive glass.

  14. Superior Tissue Evolution in Slow-Degrading Scaffolds for Valvular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Marieke M C P; Soekhradj-Soechit, R Sarita; van Geemen, Daphne; Cox, Martijn; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T; Driessen-Mol, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are widely used to fabricate porous scaffolds for the regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. To ensure mechanical integrity, a balance between the rate of scaffold absorption and tissue formation is of high importance. A higher rate of tissue formation is expected in fast-degrading materials than in slow-degrading materials. This could be a result of synthetic cells, which aim to compensate for the fast loss of mechanical integrity of the scaffold by deposition of collagen fibers. Here, we studied the effect of fast-degrading polyglycolic acid scaffolds coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA-P4HB) and slow-degrading poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on amount of tissue, composition, and mechanical characteristics in time, and compared these engineered values with values for native human heart valves. Electrospun PGA-P4HB and PCL scaffolds were either kept unseeded in culture or were seeded with human vascular-derived cells. Tissue formation, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, remaining scaffold weight, tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, and mechanical properties were analyzed every week up to 6 weeks. Mass of unseeded PCL scaffolds remained stable during culture, whereas PGA-P4HB scaffolds degraded rapidly. When seeded with cells, both scaffold types demonstrated increasing amounts of tissue with time, which was more pronounced for PGA-P4HB-based tissues during the first 2 weeks; however, PCL-based tissues resulted in the highest amount of tissue after 6 weeks. This study is the first to provide insight into the tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, therewith allowing for a fair comparison between engineered tissues cultured on scaffolds as well as between native heart valve tissues. Although the absolute amount of ECM components differed between the engineered tissues, the ratio between ECM components was similar after 6 weeks. PCL-based tissues maintained their shape, whereas the PGA-P4HB-based tissues deformed during culture. After 6 weeks

  15. Degradation behaviors of geometric cues and mechanical properties in a 3D scaffold for tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wong, Yoke San; Fuh, Jerry Ying Hsi

    2017-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) scaffold fabricated via electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jetting) and thermally uniaxial stretching, has been developed for tendon tissue regeneration in our previous study. In this study, more in-depth biological test showed that the aligned cell morphology guided by the anisotropic geometries of the 3D tendon scaffolds, leading to up-regulated tendious gene expression including collagen type I, decorin, tenascin-C, and biglycan, as compared to the electrospun scaffolds. Given the importance of geometric cues to the biological function of the scaffolds, the degradation behaviors of the 3D scaffolds were investigated. Results from accelerated hydrolysis showed that the E-jetted portion followed bulk-controlled erosion, while the unaixially stretched portion followed surface-controlled erosion. The 3D tendon scaffold exhibited consistency between the weight loss and the decline of mechanical properties, which indicated by a 65% decrease in mass with a corresponding 56% loss in ultimate tensile strength after degradation. This study not only reveals that the anisotropic geometries of 3D tendon scaffold could affect cell morphology and lead to desired gene expression toward tendon tissue but also gives an insight into how the degradation impacts geometric cues and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated scaffold. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1138-1149, 2017.

  16. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging for noninvasive trafficking of scaffold degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Hee; Lee, Jeong Heon; Hyun, Hoon; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Park, Gwangli; Robichaud, Kyle; Lunsford, Elaine; Lee, Sang Jin; Khang, Gilson; Choi, Hak Soo

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds could revolutionize tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; however, in vivo matrix degradation and tissue ingrowth processes are not fully understood. Currently a large number of samples and animals are required to track biodegradation of implanted scaffolds, and such nonconsecutive single-time-point information from various batches result in inaccurate conclusions. To overcome this limitation, we developed functional biodegradable scaffolds by employing invisible near-infrared fluorescence and followed their degradation behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Using optical fluorescence imaging, the degradation could be quantified in real-time, while tissue ingrowth was tracked by measuring vascularization using magnetic resonance imaging in the same animal over a month. Moreover, we optimized the in vitro process of enzyme-based biodegradation to predict implanted scaffold behaviors in vivo, which was closely related to the site of inoculation. This combined multimodal imaging will benefit tissue engineers by saving time, reducing animal numbers, and offering more accurate conclusions.

  17. Composite hydrogel scaffolds with controlled pore opening via biodegradable hydrogel porogen degradation.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Ashley M; Milbrandt, Todd A; Puleo, David A; Hilt, J Zach

    2014-02-01

    Poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) biodegradable hydrogel systems have garnered much attention in recent years due to their appealing properties for biomedical applications. These hydrogel systems exhibit properties similar to natural soft tissue, degrade in aqueous environments, and have easily tunable properties that have been well studied and understood. In most cases, tissue engineering scaffolds must possess a three-dimensional interconnected porous network for tissue ingrowth and construct vascularization. Here, PBAE properties were explored and systems were selected to serve as both the pore-forming agent and the outer matrix of a scaffold that exhibits controlled pore opening upon degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a biodegradable hydrogel porogen system entrapped in a degradable hydrogel outer matrix. Scaffolds were prepared, and the degradation, compressive moduli, and porosity were analyzed. An added advantage of a degradable porogen is the potential for controlled drug release, and a model protein was released from the porogen particles to demonstrate this application. Finally, pluripotent cells seeded onto predegraded scaffolds were viable during the first 24 h of exposure, and furthermore, cell tracking confirmed the presence of cells within the pores of the scaffold. Overall, these present studies demonstrate the possibility of using these biodegradable hydrogel porogen-matrix systems as tissue engineering scaffolding materials.

  18. Physiologically relevant oxidative degradation of oligo(proline) cross-linked polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shann S; Koblin, Rachel L; Zachman, Angela L; Perrien, Daniel S; Hofmeister, Lucas H; Giorgio, Todd D; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2011-12-12

    Chronic inflammation-mediated oxidative stress is a common mechanism of implant rejection and failure. Therefore, polymer scaffolds that can degrade slowly in response to this environment may provide a viable platform for implant site-specific, sustained release of immunomodulatory agents over a long time period. In this work, proline oligomers of varying lengths (P(n)) were synthesized and exposed to oxidative environments, and their accelerated degradation under oxidative conditions was verified via high performance liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography. Next, diblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) were carboxylated to form 100 kDa terpolymers of 4%PEG-86%PCL-10%cPCL (cPCL = poly(carboxyl-ε-caprolactone); i% indicates molar ratio). The polymers were then cross-linked with biaminated PEG-P(n)-PEG chains, where P(n) indicates the length of the proline oligomer flanked by PEG chains. Salt-leaching of the polymeric matrices created scaffolds of macroporous and microporous architecture, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The degradation of scaffolds was accelerated under oxidative conditions, as evidenced by mass loss and differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Immortalized murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages were then seeded on the scaffolds and activated through the addition of γ-interferon and lipopolysaccharide throughout the 9-day study period. This treatment promoted the release of H(2)O(2) by the macrophages and the degradation of proline-containing scaffolds compared to the control scaffolds. The accelerated degradation was evidenced by increased scaffold porosity, as visualized through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography imaging. The current study provides insight into the development of scaffolds that respond to oxidative environments through gradual degradation for the controlled release of therapeutics targeted to diseases that feature chronic

  19. Characterizing the Degradation of Alginate Hydrogel for Use in Multilumen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Dena; Koffler, Jacob; Lynam, Daniel A; Tuszynski, Mark H; Sakamoto, Jeffrey S

    2015-10-21

    Alginate was studied as a degradable nerve guidance scaffold material in vitro and in vivo. In vitro degradation rates were determined using rheology to measure the change in shear modulus vs time. The shear modulus decreased from 155 kPa to 5 kPa within 2 days; however, alginate samples maintained their superficial geometry for over 28 days. The degradation behavior was supported by materials characterization data showing alginate consisted of high internal surface area (400 m(2) /g), which likely facilitated the release of cross-linking cations resulting in the rapid decrease in shear modulus. To assess the degradation rate in vivo, multilumen scaffolds were fabricated using a fiber templating technique. The scaffolds were implanted in a 2 mm-long T3 full transection rodent spinal cord lesion model for 14 days. Although there was some evidence of axon guidance, in general, alginate scaffolds degraded before axons could grow over the 2 mm-long lesion. Enabling alginate-based scaffolds for nerve repair will likely require approaches to slow its degradation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. An animal experimental study of porous magnesium scaffold degradation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.J.; Yang, Z.Y.; Tan, L.L.; Li, H.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to observe the biodegradable and osteogenic properties of magnesium scaffolding under in vivo conditions. Twelve 6-month-old male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. The chosen operation site was the femoral condyle on the right side. The experimental group was implanted with porous magnesium scaffolds, while the control group was implanted with hydroxyapatite scaffolds. X-ray and blood tests, which included serum magnesium, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine (CREA), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were performed serially at 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and 1, 2, and 3 months. All rabbits were killed 3 months postoperatively, and the heart, kidney, spleen, and liver were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The bone samples were subjected to microcomputed tomography scanning (micro-CT) and hard tissue biopsy. SPSS 13.0 (USA) was used for data analysis, and values of P<0.05 were considered to be significant. Bubbles appeared in the X-ray of the experimental group after 2 weeks, whereas there was no gas in the control group. There were no statistical differences for the serum magnesium concentrations, ALT, BUN, and CREA between the two groups (P>0.05). All HE-stained slices were normal, which suggested good biocompatibility of the scaffold. Micro-CT showed that magnesium scaffolds degraded mainly from the outside to inside, and new bone was ingrown following the degradation of magnesium scaffolds. The hydroxyapatite scaffold was not degraded and had fewer osteoblasts scattered on its surface. There was a significant difference in the new bone formation and scaffold bioabsorption between the two groups (9.29±1.27 vs 1.40±0.49 and 7.80±0.50 vs 0.00±0.00 mm3, respectively; P<0.05). The magnesium scaffold performed well in degradation and osteogenesis, and is a promising material for orthopedics. PMID:25098717

  1. Degradability, cytocompatibility, and osteogenesis of porous scaffolds of nanobredigite and PCL–PEG–PCL composite

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jun; Fan, Donghui; Zhao, Lingming; Yu, Baoqin; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie; Shin, Jung-Woog

    2016-01-01

    Biocomposite scaffolds were fabricated by incorporation of nanobredigite (n-BD) into the polymer of poly(ε-caprolactone)–poly(ethyleneglycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL–PEG–PCL). The results revealed that the addition of n-BD into PCL–PEG–PCL significantly improved water absorption, compressive strength, and degradability of the scaffolds of n-BD/PCL–PEG–PCL composite (n-BPC) compared with PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds alone. In addition, the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of MG63 cells cultured on n-BPC scaffolds were obviously higher than that cultured on PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds. Moreover, the results of the histological evaluation from the animal model revealed that the n-BPC scaffolds significantly improved new bone formation compared with the PCL–PEG–PCL scaffolds, indicating good osteogenesis. The n-BPC scaffolds with good biocompatibility could stimulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone tissue regeneration and would be an excellent candidate for bone defect repair. PMID:27555774

  2. In vivo degradation of 14C-labeled porcine dermis biologic scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lisa E.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Johnson, Scott A.; Londono, Ricardo; Medberry, Christopher J.; Daly, Kerry A.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2017-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials are used for repair and reconstruction of injured or missing tissues. Such materials are often composed of allogeneic or xenogeneic extracellular matrix (ECM) manufactured by decellularization of source tissue, such as dermis. Dermal ECM (D-ECM) has been observed to degrade and remodel in vivo more slowly than other biologic scaffold materials, such as small intestinal submucosa (SIS-ECM). Histologic examination is a common method for evaluating material degradation, but it lacks sensitivity and is subject to observer bias. Utilization of 14C-proline labeled ECM is a quantitative alternative for measuring degradation of ECM scaffolds. Using both methods, the amount of degradation of D-ECM and SIS-ECM was determined at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-implantation in a rodent model. Results utilizing 14C liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analysis showed distinct differences in degradation at the three time points. D-ECM material in situ stayed the same at 76% remaining from 2 to 4 weeks post-implantation, and then decreased to 44% remaining at 24 weeks. In the same time period, implanted SIS-ECM material decreased from 72% to 13% to 0%. Visual examination of device degradation by histology overestimated degradation at 2 weeks and underestimated device degradation at 24 weeks, compared to the 14C method. PMID:24997479

  3. Investigation of polymeric scaffold degradation for drug delivery and neovascularization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Alibouzar, Mitra; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhang, Lijie G.; Sarkar, Kausik; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Degradable polymer-based prosthetics for the treatment of osseous tissue defects, maxillo-/cranio-facial trauma and brain injury face two common clinical obstacles impeding efficient tissue engraftment i.e., controlled material release and neovascularization. Ascertaining the time scales of polymer degradation for controlled delivery of drugs and nutrients is critical to treatment efficacy and strategy. We incorporated multiple experimental methodologies to understand the driving forces of transport mechanisms in polyvinyl alcohol-based (PVA) 3D-printed scaffolds of different porosity. Scaffold degradation was monitored various pulsatile flow conditions using MEMS-based pressure catheters and an ultrasonic flow rate sensor. Ultrasonic properties (bulk attenuation and sound velocity) were measured to monitor the degradation process in a static, alkaline medium. Viscosity and the absorption spectra variations with PVA-solute concentrations were measured using a rheometer and a spectrophotometer, respectively. A simple mathematical model based on Fick's law of diffusion provides the fundamental description of solute transport from the scaffold matrices. However, macroscopic material release could become anomalous or non-Fickian in complex polymeric scaffold matrices. Supported by the GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering and NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2EB020549-01.

  4. Degradation and biocompatibility of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Li, Yubao; Zou, Qin

    2009-04-01

    Porous scaffold containing 30 wt% nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and 70 wt% polyurethane (PU) from castor oil was prepared by a foaming method and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that n-HA particles disperse homogeneously in the PU matrix. The porous scaffold has not only macropores of 100-800 μm in size but also a lot of micropores on the walls of macropores. The porosity and compressive strength of scaffold are 80% and 271 kPa, respectively. After soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), hydrolysis and deposition partly occur on the scaffold. The biological evaluation in vitro and in vivo shows that the n-HA/PU scaffold is non-cytotoxic and degradable. The porous structure provides a good microenvironment for cell adherence, growth and proliferation. The n-HA/PU composite scaffold can be satisfied with the basic requirement for tissue engineering, and has the potential to be applied in repair and substitute of human menisci of the knee-joint and articular cartilage.

  5. Remote Determination of Time-Dependent Stiffness of Surface-Degrading-Polymer Scaffolds Via Synchrotron-Based Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bawolin, N K; Chen, X B

    2017-04-01

    Surface-degrading polymers have been widely used to fabricate scaffolds with the mechanical properties appropriate for tissue regeneration/repair. During their surface degradation, the material properties of polymers remain approximately unchanged, but the scaffold geometry and thus mechanical properties vary with time. This paper presents a novel method to determine the time-dependent mechanical properties, particularly stiffness, of scaffolds from the geometric changes captured by synchrotron-based imaging, with the help of finite element analysis (FEA). Three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffolds were fabricated from surface-degrading polymers, and during their degradation, the tissue scaffolds were imaged via the synchrotron-based imaging to characterize their changing geometry. On this basis, the stiffness behavior of scaffolds was estimated from the FEA, and the results obtained were compared to the direct measurements of scaffold stiffness from the load-displacement material testing. The comparison illustrates that the Young's moduli estimated from the FEA and characterized geometry are in agreement with the ones of direct measurements. The developed method of estimating the mechanical behavior was also demonstrated effective with a nondegrading scaffold that displays the nonlinear stress-strain behavior. The in vivo monitoring of Young's modulus by morphology characterization also suggests the feasibility of characterizing experimentally the difference between in vivo and in vitro surface degradation of tissue engineering constructs.

  6. Partially degradable film/fabric composites: textile scaffolds for liver cell culture.

    PubMed

    Karamuk, E; Mayer, J; Wintermantel, E; Akaike, T

    1999-09-01

    In this study, a composite scaffold combining textile superstructures and biomimetic glycopolymers is introduced, which may allow engineering of organotypic liver tissue in vitro. Woven poly(ethylene therephtalat) (PET) fabrics were coated on one side with a thin biodegradable polymer film (poly[D-L-lactic-co-glycolic acid] PLGA), in order to obtain a polar structure. The composite structure ensured the stability of the membrane during in vitro degradation, independently of mesh size. Matrix porosity increased when a polymer blend matrix was used. For hepatocyte culturing studies, the scaffolds were additionally coated with an artificial glycopolymer (poly[N-p-vinylbenzyl-D-lactoamide], PVLA) in order to improve cell attachment. It was observed that formation of aggregates depends on the scaffold geometry as well as on the pretreatment and medium conditions. After 4 days in culture, the pores of the fabric were filled with aggregates illustrating the possibility of immobilizing hepatocyte aggregates in well-defined spatial configurations on textile structures.

  7. Synthesis and fabrication of a degradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J.; Garty, Shai; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (poly-NIPAM) hydrogels with controlled molecular weight of the parent polymer and its degradation products were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization in the presence of a polycaprolactone-based di-chlorinated macroinitiator and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The phase transition temperature, swelling, hydrolytic degradability, and mechanical properties at 25 and 37°C were explored. A cytocompatibility study showed good NIH3T3 cell response over 5 days culture on the surface of the hydrogels, demonstrated by a consistent increase in cell proliferation detected by an Alamar Blue assay. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazo-lium bromide] results suggested that the hydrogels and their degradation products in the concentration range of 1–25 mg/ mL were not cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. A sphere-templating technique was utilized to fabricate biodegradable polyNIPAM scaffolds with monodisperse, pore size. Scaffolds with pore diameter of 48 ± 6 μm were loaded with A-10 smooth muscle cells and then warmed to 37°C entrapping cells in pores approximately 40 μm in diameter, a size we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Due to their degradable nature, tunable molecular weight, highly interconnected morphology, thermally controlled monodisperse pore size, and temperature-induced volume expansion–contraction, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed in this work will be valuable in tissue engineering. PMID:22961921

  8. Co-culturing monocytes with smooth muscle cells improves cell distribution within a degradable polyurethane scaffold and reduces inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    McBane, Joanne E; Cai, Kuihua; Labow, Rosalind S; Santerre, J Paul

    2012-02-01

    Activated monocytes can promote inflammation or wound repair, depending on the nature of the implant environment. Recent work showed that a degradable, polar-hydrophobic-ionic polyurethane (D-PHI) induced an anti-inflammatory monocyte phenotype. In the current study it is hypothesized that wound-healing phenotype monocytes (activated by D-PHI material chemistry) will promote human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) to attach and migrate into porous D-PHI scaffolds. hVSMC migration is necessary for hVSMC population of the scaffold and tissue formation to occur, and then, once tissue formation is complete, the monocyte should promote contractile phenotype markers in the hVSMC. hVSMC were cultured for up to 28 days with or without monocytes and analyzed for cell viability, attachment (DNA) and migration. Lysates were analyzed for the hVSMC contractile phenotype markers calponin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) as well as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA; pro-migration marker) using immunoblotting analysis. Histological staining showed that hVSMC alone remained around the perimeter of the scaffold, whereas co-culture samples had co-localization of monocytes with hVSMC in the pores, a more even cell distribution throughout the scaffold and increased total cell attachment (P<0.05). Co-culture samples had higher cell numbers and more DNA than the addition of both single cell cultures. The water-soluble tetrazolium-1 data suggested that cells were not dying over the 28 day culture period. Calponin, also linked to cell motility, was maintained up to 28 days in the co-culture and hVSMC alone, whereas α-SMA disappeared after 7 days. Co-cultures on D-PHI showed that monocytes were activated to a wound-healing phenotype (low TNF-α, elevated IL-10), while promoting uPA expression. In summary, this study showed that, by co-culturing monocytes with hVSMC, the latter showed increased total cell attachment and infiltration into the D-PHI scaffold compared with hVSMC alone

  9. Culture & differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into osteoblast on degradable biomedical composite scaffold: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Krishan G.; Mohanty, Sujata; Ray, Alok R.; Malhotra, Rajesh; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    degradable 3D composite may have great potential to be used as scaffold in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26831424

  10. Degradable polyester scaffolds with controlled surface chemistry combining minimal protein adsorption with specific bioactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafahrend, Dirk; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Beer, Meike V.; Gasteier, Peter; Möller, Martin; Boehm, Gabriele; Dalton, Paul D.; Groll, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering place high demands on materials and exceed the passive biocompatibility requirements previously considered acceptable for biomedical implants. Together with degradability, the activation of specific cell-material interactions and a three-dimensional environment that mimics the extracellular matrix are core challenges and prerequisites for the organization of living cells to functional tissue. Moreover, although bioactive signalling combined with minimization of non-specific protein adsorption is an advanced modification technique for flat surfaces, it is usually not accomplished for three-dimensional fibrous scaffolds used in tissue engineering. Here, we present a one-step preparation of fully synthetic, bioactive and degradable extracellular matrix-mimetic scaffolds by electrospinning, using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) as the matrix polymer. Addition of a functional, amphiphilic macromolecule based on star-shaped poly(ethylene oxide) transforms current biomedically used degradable polyesters into hydrophilic fibres, which causes the suppression of non-specific protein adsorption on the fibres’ surface. The subsequent covalent attachment of cell-adhesion-mediating peptides to the hydrophilic fibres promotes specific bioactivation and enables adhesion of cells through exclusive recognition of the immobilized binding motifs. This approach permits synthetic materials to directly control cell behaviour, for example, resembling the binding of cells to fibronectin immobilized on collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.

  11. A Biosynthetic Scaffold that Facilitates Chondrocyte-Mediated Degradation and Promotes Articular Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar., Balaji V.; Dailing, Eric A.; Brock, J. Logan; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Randolph, Mark A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge to repair because of its limited self-healing capacity. Interest has grown in the delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects, and combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and allow cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold often does not match the rate of matrix production by chondrocytes, which can limit functional tissue regeneration. Here, we designed a hybrid biosynthetic system consisting of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) endcapped with thiols and crosslinked by norbornene-functionalized gelatin via a thiol-ene photopolymerization. The protein crosslinker was selected to facilitate chondrocyte-mediated scaffold remodeling and matrix deposition. Gelatin was functionalized with norbornene to varying degrees (~4–17 norbornenes/gelatin), and the shear modulus of the resulting hydrogels was characterized (<0.1–0.5 kPa). Degradation of the crosslinked PEG-gelatin hydrogels by chondrocyte-secreted enzymes was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Finally, chondrocytes encapsulated in these biosynthetic scaffolds showed significantly increased glycosaminoglycan deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a distributed matrix. These results indicate the potential of a hybrid PEG-gelatin hydrogel to permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling and promote articular cartilage matrix production. Tunable scaffolds that can easily permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:26900597

  12. Investigating the morphological, mechanical and degradation properties of scaffolds comprising collagen, gelatin and elastin for use in soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Grover, Chloe N; Cameron, Ruth E; Best, Serena M

    2012-06-01

    Collagen-based scaffolds can be used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of soft tissues and provide support during tissue regeneration. To better match the native ECM composition and mechanical properties as well as tailor the degradation resistance and available cell binding motifs, other proteins or different collagen types may be added. The present study has explored the use of components such as gelatin or elastin and investigated their effect on the bulk physical properties of the resulting scaffolds compared to those made from pure collagen type I. The effect of altering the composition and crosslinking was evaluated in terms of the scaffold structure, mechanical properties, swelling, degradation and cell attachment. Results demonstrate that scaffolds based on gelatin had reduced tensile stiffness and degradation time compared with collagen. The addition of elastin reduced the overall strength and stiffness of the scaffolds, with electron microscopy results suggesting that insoluble elastin interacts best with collagen and soluble elastin interacts best with gelatin. Carbodiimide crosslinking was essential for structural stability, strength and degradation resistance for scaffolds of all compositions. In addition, preliminary cell adhesion studies showed these highly porous structures (pore size 130-160 μm) to be able to support HT1080 cell infiltration and growth. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of gelatin in place of collagen, with additions of elastin, can tailor the physical properties of scaffolds and could be a design strategy for reducing the overall material costs.

  13. In-vitro degradation characteristics of poly(e-caprolactone)/poly(glycolic acid) scaffolds fabricated via solid-state cryomilling.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V; Warzywoda, Juliusz

    2015-10-01

    Poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL)/poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffolds were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling along with compression molding and porogen leaching techniques. Four types of scaffolds were produced using four distinct cryomilling times. These scaffolds were evaluated for their in-vitro degradation behavior hydrolytically in phosphate buffer saline (PBS). The degradation profiles were investigated over a period of 60 days. The percentage of weight loss, percentage of water absorption, morphology, compressive, thermal, and material properties were studied as a function of degradation time. Weight loss and water absorption demonstrated a high correlation, which showed an increasing behavior with increase in cryomilling time and degradation time. Morphology of the scaffolds analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed micro-cracks on the surface of the cylindrical struts due to hydrolytic attack and dissolution of hydrophilic PGA. Changes in compressive modulus and crystallinity over the degradation period and material properties were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC and XRD results indicated that hydrolytic attack had taken place during degradation, resulting in moments of increased and decreased percent crystallinity. This study successfully brought forth the differences in resultant properties of the PCL/PGA scaffolds as a function of degradation time.

  14. Nanocomposite scaffolds with tunable mechanical and degradation capabilities: co-delivery of bioactive agents for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Juan P; Roether, Judith; Hoppe, Alexander; Pishbin, Fatemeh; Haro Durand, Luis; Gorustovich, Alejandro; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lucangioli, Silvia; Mouriño, Viviana

    2016-10-21

    Novel multifunctional nanocomposite scaffolds made of nanobioactive glass and alginate crosslinked with therapeutic ions such as calcium and copper were developed for delivering therapeutic agents, in a highly controlled and sustainable manner, for bone tissue engineering. Alendronate, a well-known antiresorptive agent, was formulated into microspheres under optimized conditions and effectively loaded within the novel multifunctional scaffolds with a high encapsulation percentage. The size of the cation used for the alginate crosslinking impacted directly on porosity and viscoelastic properties, and thus, on the degradation rate and the release profile of copper, calcium and alendronate. According to this, even though highly porous structures were created with suitable pore sizes for cell ingrowth and vascularization in both cases, copper-crosslinked scaffolds showed higher values of porosity, elastic modulus, degradation rate and the amount of copper and alendronate released, when compared with calcium-crosslinked scaffolds. In addition, in all cases, the scaffolds showed bioactivity and mechanical properties close to the endogenous trabecular bone tissue in terms of viscoelasticity. Furthermore, the scaffolds showed osteogenic and angiogenic properties on bone and endothelial cells, respectively, and the extracts of the biomaterials used promoted the formation of blood vessels in an ex vivo model. These new bioactive nanocomposite scaffolds represent an exciting new class of therapeutic cell delivery carrier with tunable mechanical and degradation properties; potentially useful in the controlled and sustainable delivery of therapeutic agents with active roles in bone formation and angiogenesis, as well as in the support of cell proliferation and osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Examinations of a new long-term degradable electrospun polycaprolactone scaffold in three rat abdominal wall models.

    PubMed

    Jangö, Hanna; Gräs, Søren; Christensen, Lise; Lose, Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    Alternative approaches to reinforce native tissue in reconstructive surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are warranted. Tissue engineering combines the use of a scaffold with the regenerative potential of stem cells and is a promising new concept in urogynecology. Our objective was to evaluate whether a newly developed long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold could provide biomechanical reinforcement and function as a scaffold for autologous muscle fiber fragments. We performed a study with three different rat abdominal wall models where the scaffold with or without muscle fiber fragments was placed (1) subcutaneously (minimal load), (2) in a partial defect (partial load), and (3) in a full-thickness defect (heavy load). After 8 weeks, no animals had developed hernia, and the scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement, even in the models where it was subjected to heavy load. The scaffold was not yet degraded but showed increased thickness in all groups. Histologically, we found a massive foreign body response with numerous large giant cells intermingled with the fibers of the scaffold. Cells from added muscle fiber fragments could not be traced by PKH26 fluorescence or desmin staining. Taken together, the long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement by inducing a marked foreign-body response and attracting numerous inflammatory cells to form a strong neo-tissue construct. However, cells from the muscle fiber fragments did not survive in this milieu. Properties of the new neo-tissue construct must be evaluated at the time of full degradation of the scaffold before its possible clinical value in pelvic organ prolapse surgery can be evaluated.

  16. In vitro and in vivo degradation of poly(L: -lactide-co-glycolide) films and scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pamula, Elzbieta; Menaszek, Elzbieta

    2008-05-01

    Poly(L: -lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was synthesized using a biocompatible initiator, zirconium acetylacetonate. In vitro and in vivo degradation properties of PLGA films (produced by solvent casting, 180 microm thick) and PLGA scaffolds (produced by an innovated solvent casting and particulate leaching, 3 mm thick) were evaluated. The samples were either submitted for degradation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 degrees C for 30 weeks, or implanted into rat skeletal muscles for 1, 4, 12, 22 and 30 weeks. The degradation was monitored by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, weight loss, and molecular weight changes (in vitro), and by microscopic observations of the materials' morphology after histological staining with May-Grunwald-Giemsa (in vivo). The results show that the films in both conditions degraded much faster than the scaffolds. The scaffolds were dimensionally stable for 23 weeks, while the films lost their integrity after 7 weeks in vitro. The films' degradation was heterogenous--degradation in their central parts was faster than in the surface and subsurface regions due to the increased concentration of the acidic degradation products inside. In the scaffolds, having much thinner pore walls, heterogenous degradation due to the autocatalytic effect was not observed.

  17. Degradable, thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-based scaffolds with controlled porosity for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J; Ratner, Buddy D

    2010-10-11

    We have developed a thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-based scaffold with degradability and controlled porosity. Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) hydrogels were synthesized by photocopolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The hydrogels' phase transition temperature, swelling, and viscoelastic properties, as well as hydrolytic degradability at 25 and 37 °C, were explored. A sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with controllable pore size and a highly interconnected porous structure. The scaffold pore diameter change as a function of temperature was evaluated and, as expected, pores decreased in diameter when the temperature was raised to 37 °C. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test results suggested neither the scaffolds nor their degradation products were cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. Scaffolds with 55 ± 5 μm pore diameter were loaded with NIH3T3 cells and then were warmed to 37 °C entrapping cells in pores approximately 39 μm in diameter, a size range we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Cells showed uniform infiltration and an elongated morphology after 7 days of culture. Due to the controlled monodisperse pore diameter, highly interconnected architecture, fully degradable chemistry and thermoresponsive properties, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed here are attractive for applications in tissue engineering.

  18. A Degradable, Thermo-sensitive Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-Based Scaffold with Controlled Porosity for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Long, Thomas J.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-based scaffold with degradability and controlled porosity. Biodegradable poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) hydrogels were synthesized by photo-copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane and polycaprolactone dimethacrylate. The hydrogels’ phase transition temperature, swelling and viscoelastic properties, as well as hydrolytic degradability at 25 and 37°C, were explored. A sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with controllable pore size and a highly interconnected porous structure. The scaffold pore diameter change as a function of temperature was evaluated and, as expected, pores decreased in diameter when the temperature was raised to 37°C. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test results suggested neither the scaffolds nor their degradation products were cytotoxic to NIH3T3 cells. Scaffolds with 55±5 μm pore diameter were loaded with NIH3T3 cells and then were warmed to 37°C entrapping cells in pores approximately 39 μm in diameter, a size range we have found to be optimal for angiogenesis and biointegration. Cells showed uniform infiltration and an elongated morphology after 7 days of culture. Due to the controlled monodisperse pore diameter, highly interconnected architecture, fully degradable chemistry and thermoresponsive properties, the polyNIPAM-based scaffolds developed here are attractive for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:20836521

  19. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3.

  20. Factors Controlling Elevated Temperature Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    For 5 years, the cooperative agreement NCC3-763 has focused on the development and understanding of Sic-based composites. Most of the work was performed in the area of SiC fiber-reinforced composites for UEET and NGLT and in collaboration with Goodrich Corporation under a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement. A smaller amount of work was performed on C fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites for NGLT. Major accomplishments during this agreement included: Improvements to the interphase used in melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites which increases the life under stressed-oxidation at intermediate temperatures referred to as "outside-debonding". This concept is currently in the patent process and received a Space Act Award. Mechanistic-based models of intermediate temperature degradation for MI SiC/SiC Quantification and relatively robust relationships for matrix crack evolution under stress in SiC/SiC composites which serve as the basis for stress-strain and elevated temperature life models The furthering of acoustic emission as a useful tool in composite damage evolution and the extension of the technique to other composite systems Development of hybrid C-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites Numerous presentations at conferences, industry partners, and government centers and publications in recognized proceedings and journals. Other recognition of the author's accomplishments by NASA with a TGIR award (2004), NASA's Medal for Public Service (2004), and The American Ceramic Society s Richard M. Fulrath Award (2005). The following will briefly describe the work of the past five years in the three areas of interest: SiC/SiC composite development, mechanistic understanding and modeling of SiC/SiC composites, and environmental durability of C/SiC composites. More detail can be found in the publications cited at the end of this report.

  1. Sequential identification of a degradable phosphate glass scaffold for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rishma; Ready, Derren; Knowles, Jonathan C; Hunt, Nigel P; Lewis, Mark P

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering has the potential to overcome limitations associated with current management of skeletal muscle defects. This study aimed to sequentially identify a degradable phosphate glass scaffold for the restoration of muscle defects. A series of glass compositions were investigated for the potential to promote bacterial growth. Thereafter, the response of human craniofacial muscle-derived cells was determined. Glass compositions containing Fe4- and 5 mol% did not promote greater Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis growth compared to the control (p > 0.05). Following confirmation of myogenicity, further studies assessed the biocompatibility of glasses containing Fe5 mol%. Cells seeded on collagen-coated disks demonstrated comparable cellular metabolic activity to control. Upregulation of genes encoding for myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) confirmed myofibre formation and there was expression of developmental MYH genes. The use of 3-D aligned fibre scaffolds supported unidirectional cell alignment and upregulation of MRF and developmental MYH genes. Compared to the 2-D disks, there was also expression of MYH2 and MYH7 genes, indicating further myofibre maturation on the 3-D scaffolds and confirming the importance of key biophysical cues.

  2. Biocompatibility, degradability, bioactivity and osteogenesis of mesoporous/macroporous scaffolds of mesoporous diopside/poly(l-lactide) composite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhulin; Ji, Jiajin; Tang, Songchao; Qian, Jun; Yan, Yonggang; Yu, Baoqing; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive mesoporous diopside (m-DP) and poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) composite scaffolds with mesoporous/macroporous structure were prepared by the solution-casting and particulate-leaching method. The results demonstrated that the degradability and bioactivity of the mesoporous/macroporous scaffolds were significantly improved by incorporating m-DP into PLLA, and that the improvement was m-DP content-dependent. In addition, the scaffolds containing m-DP showed the ability to neutralize acidic degradation products and prevent the pH from dropping in the solution during the soaking period. Moreover, the scaffolds containing m-DP enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were also m-DP content-dependent. Furthermore, the histological and immunohistochemical analysis results showed that the scaffolds with m-DP significantly promoted new bone formation and improved the materials degraded in vivo, indicating good biocompatibility. The results suggested that the mesoporous/macroporous scaffolds of the m-DP/PLLA composite with osteogenesis had a potential for bone regeneration. PMID:26378120

  3. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process.

  4. Rapid fabrication of poly(DL-lactide) nanofiber scaffolds with tunable degradation for tissue engineering applications by air-brushing

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Adam M; Kim, Jeffrey; Hotaling, Nathan; Seppala, Jonathan E; Kofinas, Peter; Tutak, Wojtek

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanofiber based materials have been widely investigated for use as tissue engineering scaffolds. While promising, these materials are typically fabricated through techniques that require significant time or cost. Here we report a rapid and cost effective air-brushing method for fabricating nanofiber scaffolds using a simple handheld apparatus, compressed air, and a polymer solution. Air-brushing also facilities control over the scaffold degradation rate without adversely impacting architecture. This was accomplished through a one step blending process of high (Mw ≈ 100 000 g mol−1) and low (Mw ≈ 25 000 g mol−1) molecular weight poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) polymers at various ratios (100:0, 70:30 and 50:50). Through this approach, we were able to control fiber scaffold degradation rate while maintaining similar fiber morphology, scaffold porosity, and bulk mechanical properties across all of the tested compositions. The impact of altered degradation rates was biologically evaluated in human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) cultures for up to 16 days and demonstrated degradation rate dependence of both total DNA concentration and gene regulation. PMID:27121660

  5. Tailoring the degradation kinetics of poly(ester-carbonate urethane)urea thermoplastic elastomers for tissue engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Pelinescu, Anca L.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds are of increasing interest for applications in soft tissue repair and regeneration, particularly in mechanically active settings. The rate at which such a scaffold should degrade for optimal outcomes, however, is not generally known and the ability to select from similar scaffolds that vary in degradation behavior to allow such optimization is limited. Our objective was to synthesize a family of biodegradable polyurethane elastomers where partial substitution of polyester segments with polycarbonate segments in the polymer backbone would lead to slower degradation behavior. Specifically, we synthesized poly(ester carbonate)urethane ureas (PECUUs) using a blended soft segment of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(1,6-hexamethylene carbonate) (PHC), a 1,4-diisocyanatobutane hard segment and chain extension with putrescine. Soft segment PCL/PHC molar ratios of 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 0/100 were investigated. Polymer tensile strengths varied from 14-34 MPa with breaking strains of 660-875%, initial moduli of 8-24 MPa and 100% recovery after 10% strain. Increased PHC content was associated with softer, more distensible films. Scaffolds produced by salt leaching supported smooth muscle cell adhesion and growth in vitro. PECUU in aqueous buffer in vitro and subcutaneous implants in rats of PECUU scaffolds showed degradation slower than comparable poly(ester urethane)urea and faster than poly(carbonate urethane)urea. These slower degrading thermoplastic polyurethanes provide opportunities to investigate the role of relative degradation rates for mechanically supportive scaffolds in a variety of soft tissue repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:20188411

  6. Hybrid macroporous gelatin/bioactive-glass/nanosilver scaffolds with controlled degradation behavior and antimicrobial activity for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yazdimamaghani, M; Vashaee, D; Assefa, S; Walker, K J; Madihally, S V; Köhler, G A; Tayebi, L

    2014-06-01

    A new composition of gelatin/bioactive-glass/silver nanoparticle was synthesized and employed to prepare antibacterial macroporous scaffolds with potential applications in bone tissue engineering. A set of macroporous nanocomposite scaffolds were developed from an aqueous solution of gelatin by freeze-drying and crosslinking using genipin at ambient temperature. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in situ in gelatin solution by heat treatment reduction as a simple and "green" method in which gelatin acted as a natural reducing and stabilizing agent. The effect of the incorporation of the bioactive-glass and the silver nanoparticle concentration on the physicochemical properties of the scaffolds, such as the gel fraction, porosity, in vitro enzyme degradation, morphology, and swelling behavior was studied. Furthermore, the in vitro viability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and the antibacterial activity against gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus were tested on the scaffolds. It was found that upon the addition of silver nanoparticles the porosity, pore size, swelling, and antibacterial properties were enhanced. The silver nanoparticles increased the in vitro enzyme degradation in samples without bioactive-glass; however, the degradation was remarkably reduced by addition of bioactive-glass. In addition, formation of apatite particles, the main inorganic constituent of the bone, on the surface of the bioactive-glass containing scaffolds were confirmed after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The viability of hMSC on the scaffold suggested that gelatin/bioactive-glass/nanosilver scaffolds can be used as an antibacterial scaffolds.

  7. Bone regeneration using cell-mediated responsive degradable PEG-based scaffolds incorporating with rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Jing; Hou, Juan; Guo, Han; Liu, Changsheng

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of large osseous defects remains a challenging clinical problem in orthopedic surgery. Particularly, strategies to control the appropriate degradation rate adapting to the tissue reconstruction are of essential for tissue regeneration. Here we report on a strategy to achieve adaptive degradation rate using cell-secreted protease as a switch. Disulfide-containing PEG-based scaffolds have been synthesized, and demonstrated to be responsive to the cell-secreted redox microenvironment. Thus, the cell-triggered degradation and liberation of growth factor are achieved. The osteoinductive growth factor, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), is incorporated into the scaffold for bioactivity promotion. Degradations under the stimuli of reduced glutathione (GSH) at intracellular and extracellular concentrations was studied with the results of duration time ranging from 0.5 h to 22 days regulated by both concentrations of redox medium and polymer precursors. The rhBMP-2 loaded scaffolds evidently induced the ectopic bone formation in the mouse thigh muscles. In addition, we further investigated the in vivo effects of rhBMP-2-loaded scaffolds in a rabbit radius critical defect by radiography, three dimensional micro-computed tomographic (μCT) and synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) imaging, histological analysis, and biomechanical measurement. Scaffolds underwent gradual resorption and replacement by new bone and induced reunion of bone marrow cavity at 12 weeks, much better than the effect of self-repairing group. The results indicated that both osteoinduction and appropriate degradation played a crucial role in accelerating and promoting bone augmentation, as well as effective proangiogenesis. Such a strategy appears promising as 3D temporal scaffolds for potential orthopedic applications.

  8. Effect of Chemical and Physical Properties on the In Vitro Degradation of 3D Printed High Resolution Poly(propylene fumarate) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jason M; Bodamer, Emily; Krebs, Olivia; Luo, Yuanyuan; Kleinfehn, Alex; Becker, Matthew L; Dean, David

    2017-04-10

    Two distinct molecular masses of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) are combined with an additive manufacturing process to fabricate highly complex scaffolds possessing controlled chemical properties and porous architecture. Scaffolds were manufactured with two polymer molecular masses and two architecture styles. Degradation was assessed in an accelerated in vitro environment. The purpose of the degradation study is not to model or mimic in vivo degradation, but to efficiently compare the effect of modulating scaffold properties. This is the first study addressing degradation of chain-growth synthesized PPF, a process that allows for considerably more control over molecular mass distribution. It demonstrates that, with greater process control, not only is scaffold fabrication reproducible, but the mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be tailored by altering the physical properties of the scaffold. This is a clear step forward in using PPF to address unmet medical needs while meeting regulatory demands and ultimately obtaining clinical relevancy.

  9. Degradation and osteogenic potential of a novel poly(lactic acid)/nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Wang, Hui-Ren; Li, Xi-Lei; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Fan, Zhong-Yong; Li, Su-Ming; Dong, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the biological performance of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) composite scaffolds by using in vitro degradation and an in vivo model of heterotopic bone formation. Nano-sized β-TCP (nβ-TCP) was prepared with a wet grinding method from micro-sized β-TCP (mβ-TCP), and composite scaffolds containing 0, 10, 30, or 50 wt% nβ-TCP or 30 wt% mβ-TCP were generated using a freeze-drying method. Degradation was assessed by monitoring changes in microstructure, pH, weight, and compressive strength over a 26-week period of hydrolysis. Composite scaffolds were processed into blocks, and implanted into muscular pockets of rabbits after loading with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). New bone formation was evaluated based on histological and immunohistochemical analysis 2, 4, and 8 weeks after implantation. The in vitro results indicated that the buffering effect of nβ-TCP was stronger than mβ-TCP, which was positively correlated with the content of nβ-TCP. The in vivo findings demonstrated that nβ-TCP enhanced the osteoconductivity of the scaffolds. Although composite scaffolds containing 30% nβ-TCP exhibited similar osteoconductivity to 50% nβ-TCP, they had better mechanical properties than the 50% nβ-TCP scaffolds. This study supports the potential application of a composite scaffold containing 30% nβ-TCP as a promising scaffold for bone regeneration.

  10. Chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microsphere-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro degradation and in vivo bone regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Deng, Meng; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Kofron, Michelle D; Doty, Stephen B; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-09-01

    Natural polymer chitosan and synthetic polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. We have previously reported the fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a novel chitosan/PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffold for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, the in vitro degradation characteristics of the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and the in vivo bone formation capacity of the chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model were investigated. The chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed slower degradation than the PLAGA scaffold in vitro. Although chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed a gradual decrease in compressive properties during the 12-week degradation period, the compressive strength and compressive modulus remained in the range of human trabecular bone. Chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds were able to guide bone formation in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated that successful bridging of the critical-sized defect on the sides both adjacent to and away from the radius occurred using chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds. Immobilization of heparin and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold surface promoted early bone formation as evidenced by complete bridging of the defect along the radius and significantly enhanced mechanical properties when compared to the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold. Furthermore, histological analysis suggested that chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds supported normal bone formation via intramembranous formation.

  11. A study on the effect of degradation media on the physical and mechanical properties of porous PLGA 85/15 scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Perron, Josee K; Naguib, Hani E; Daka, Joseph; Chawla, Attar; Wilkins, Ruth

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of PLGA 85/15 scaffold on the cell growth and viability of a cell line, and the degradation of the scaffold in different media. The cell line used was human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). Three different media were considered: distilled water, a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and HL-60 cell line. Porous PLGA 85/15 scaffolds were prepared with an optimized gas foaming/salt leaching technique using a NaCl/polymer mass ratio of five, a saturation pressure of 5.52 MPa and a saturation time of 12 h. The cell growth and viability were not impaired by the presence of the scaffold. The mass change of the scaffold due to degradation over the period was varied only by 4% across all three media. The average macropore size and molecular weight decreased as the degradation time increased in each medium. The scaffolds maintained mechanical and structural integrity throughout the study in all three media over the degradation period studied, and the change of Young's modulus of the scaffold under wet condition was not significant. Overall, PBS solution most strongly affected physical and mechanical properties, followed by dH(2)O and HL-60 cells. The distinct variations of the scaffold's properties using different media, demonstrated the importance of carefully selecting the medium to perform in vitro studies. The medium must replicate the actual environment where the scaffold would be used, to represent accurately the changes in properties that the scaffold would be undergoing.

  12. Resilin-PEG Hybrid Hydrogels Yield Degradable Elastomeric Scaffolds with Heterogeneous Microstructure.

    PubMed

    McGann, Christopher L; Akins, Robert E; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogels derived from resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have shown outstanding mechanical resilience and cytocompatibility; expanding the versatility of RLP-based materials via conjugation with other polypeptides and polymers would offer great promise in the design of a range of materials. Here, we present an investigation of the biochemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels composed of a recombinant RLP and a multiarm PEG macromer. These hybrid hydrogels can be rapidly cross-linked through a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues on the RLP and vinyl sulfone groups on the multiarm PEG. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastomeric hydrogels with mechanical resilience comparable to aortic elastin; hydrogel stiffness was easily modulated through the cross-linking ratio. Macromolecular phase separation of the RLP-PEG hydrogels offers the unique advantage of imparting a heterogeneous microstructure, which can be used to localize cells, through simple mixing and cross-linking. Assessment of degradation of the RLP by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) illustrated the specific proteolysis of the polypeptide in both its soluble form and when cross-linked into hydrogels. Finally, the successful encapsulation and viable three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) demonstrated the cytocompatibility of the RLP-PEG gels. Overall, the cytocompatibility, elastomeric mechanical properties, microheterogeneity, and degradability of the RLP-PEG hybrid hydrogels offer a suite of promising properties for the development of cell-instructive, structured tissue engineering scaffolds.

  13. Metabolomics reveals elevated macromolecular degradation in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Ciancio, S G; Shibly, O; Xu, T; Devizio, W; Trivedi, H M; Guo, L; Jönsson, T J

    2011-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by tissue destruction. In the diseased oral environment, saliva has primarily been considered to act as a protectant by lubricating the tissue, mineralizing the bones, neutralizing the pH, and combating microbes. To understand the metabolic role that saliva plays in the diseased state, we performed untargeted metabolomic profiling of saliva from healthy and periodontitic individuals. Several classes of biochemicals, including dipeptide, amino acid, carbohydrate, lipids, and nucleotide metabolites, were altered, consistent with increased macromolecular degradation of proteins, triacylglycerol, glycerolphospholipids, polysaccharides, and polynucleotides in the individuals with periodontal disease. These changes partially reflected the enhanced host-bacterial interactions in the diseased state as supported by increased levels of bacterially modified amino acids and creatine metabolite. More importantly, the increased lipase, protease, and glycosidase activities associated with periodontitis generated a more favorable energy environment for oral bacteria, potentially exacerbating the disease state.

  14. Mechanical, permeability, and degradation properties of 3D designed poly(1,8 octanediol-co-citrate) scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Hollister, Scott J

    2010-04-01

    Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) is a synthetic biodegradable elastomer that can be processed into three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for tissue engineering. We investigated the effect of designed porosity on the mechanical properties, permeability, and degradation profiles of the POC scaffolds. For mechanical properties, scaffold compressive data were fitted to a one-dimensional (1D) nonlinear elastic model, and solid tensile data were fitted to a Neohookean incompressible nonlinear elastic model. Chondrocytes were seeded on scaffolds to assess the biocompatibility of POC. Increased porosity was associated with increased degradation rate, increased permeability, and decreased mechanical stiffness, which also became less nonlinear. Scaffold characterization in this article will provide design guidance for POC scaffolds to meet the mechanical and biological parameters needed for engineering soft tissues such as cartilage.

  15. Mechanical, Permeability, and Degradation Properties of 3D Designed Poly(1,8 Octanediol-co-Citrate)(POC) Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Claire G.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) is a synthetic biodegradable elastomer that can be processed into 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering. We investigated the effect of designed porosity on the mechanical properties, permeability and degradation profiles of the POC scaffolds. For mechanical properties, scaffold compressive data was fit to a 1D nonlinear elastic model and solid tensile data was fit to a Neohookean incompressible nonlinear elastic model. Chondrocytes were seeded on scaffolds to assess the biocompatibility of POC. Increased porosity was associated with increased degradation rate, increased permeability, and decreased mechanical stiffness which also became less nonlinear. Scaffold characterization in this paper will provide design guidance for POC scaffolds to meet the mechanical and biological parameters needed for engineering soft tissues such as cartilage. PMID:20091910

  16. Long-term in vitro degradation of PDLLA/bioglass bone scaffolds in acellular simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Blaker, J J; Nazhat, S N; Maquet, V; Boccaccini, A R

    2011-02-01

    The long-term (600days) in vitro degradation of highly porous poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA)/Bioglass-filled composite foams developed for bone tissue engineering scaffolds has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Foams of ∼93% porosity were produced by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The degradation profile for foams of neat PDLLA and the influence of Bioglass addition were comprehensively assessed in terms of changes in dimensional stability, pore morphology, weight loss, molecular weight and mechanical properties (dry and wet states). It is shown that the degradation process proceeded in several stages: (a) a quasi-stable stage, where water absorption and plasticization occurred together with weight loss due to Bioglass particle loss and dissolution, resulting in decreased wet mechanical properties; (b) a stage showing a slight increase in the wet mechanical properties and a moderate decrease in dimensions, with the properties remaining moderately constant until the onset of significant weight loss, whilst molecular weight continued to decrease; (c) an end stage of massive weight loss, disruption of the pore structure and the formation of blisters and embrittlement of the scaffold (evident on handling). The findings from this long-term in vitro degradation investigation underpin studies that have been and continue to be performed on highly porous poly(α-hydroxyesters) scaffolds filled with bioactive glasses for bone tissue engineering applications.

  17. Optimization of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and its delivery through a modified degradable fibrin scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Abhay Smashikant

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a degradable fibrin wound dressing that can deliver an optimized dose of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This aim led to three distinct phases of study. In the first phase, a structurally modified fibrin degradable scaffold was developed and tested in a rabbit ear ulcer model. A significant increase in the angiogenic and fibroblastic response with a corresponding decrease in healing time was seen in the modified fibrin-treated ulcers as compared with untreated ulcers and ulcers treated with non-modified fibrin systems. In the second phase of the study, a biochemical factor, FGF-1, was added to this scaffold. An optimal dose of 8 mug of FGF-1 was determined to be required to initiate a desired wound-healing response in a rabbit ear ulcer model, based on an enhanced angiogenic and fibroblastic response and an increased epithelialization rate. The objective of the last phase was to investigate the efficacy of a modified scaffold as a vehicle for FGF-1. In vivo testing was conducted in a full-thickness defect model in a rabbit. Improvements were seen in the angiogenic and fibroblastic responses in the FGF-1/modified fibrin treatment group and, hence, FGF-1/modified fibrin was the preferred treatment. In conclusion, the modified fibrin/FGF-1 matrix served as a suitable vehicle for the growth factor, providing a desired healing response and a desirable release rate and, thus, was determined to be an effective scaffold.

  18. Mathematical modeling of degradation for bulk-erosive polymers: applications in tissue engineering scaffolds and drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2011-03-01

    The degradation of polymeric biomaterials, which are widely exploited in tissue engineering and drug delivery systems, has drawn significant attention in recent years. This paper aims to develop a mathematical model that combines stochastic hydrolysis and mass transport to simulate the polymeric degradation and erosion process. The hydrolysis reaction is modeled in a discrete fashion by a fundamental stochastic process and an additional autocatalytic effect induced by the local carboxylic acid concentration in terms of the continuous diffusion equation. Illustrative examples of microparticles and tissue scaffolds demonstrate the applicability of the model. It is found that diffusive transport plays a critical role in determining the degradation pathway, whilst autocatalysis makes the degradation size dependent. The modeling results show good agreement with experimental data in the literature, in which the hydrolysis rate, polymer architecture and matrix size actually work together to determine the characteristics of the degradation and erosion processes of bulk-erosive polymer devices. The proposed degradation model exhibits great potential for the design optimization of drug carriers and tissue scaffolds.

  19. Degradability, biocompatibility, and osteogenesis of biocomposite scaffolds containing nano magnesium phosphate and wheat protein both in vitro and in vivo for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Zhou, Panyu; Wang, Fei; Qiu, Chao; Wang, Panfeng; Zhang, Yuntong; Zhao, Liming; Xu, Shuogui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bioactive scaffold of nano magnesium phosphate (nMP)/wheat protein (WP) composite (MWC) was fabricated. The results revealed that the MWC scaffolds had interconnected not only macropores (sized 400–600 μm) but also micropores (sized 10–20 μm) on the walls of macropores. The MWC scaffolds containing 40 w% nMP had an appropriate degradability in phosphate-buffered saline and produced a weak alkaline microenvironment. In cell culture experiments, the results revealed that the MWC scaffolds significantly promoted the MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth into the scaffolds. The results of synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography and analysis of the histological sections of the in vivo implantation revealed that the MWC scaffolds evidently improved the new bone formation and bone defects repair as compared with WP scaffolds. Moreover, it was found that newly formed bone tissue continued to increase with the gradual reduction of materials residual in the MWC scaffolds. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical analysis further offered the evidence of the stimulatory effects of MWC scaffolds on osteogenic-related cell differentiation and new bone regeneration. The results indicated that MWC scaffolds with good biocompability and degradability could promote osteogenesis in vivo, which would have potential for bone tissue repair. PMID:27555766

  20. Robust formulation for the design of tissue engineering scaffolds: A comprehensive study on structural anisotropy, viscoelasticity and degradation of 3D scaffolds fabricated with customized desktop robot based rapid prototyping (DRBRP) system.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Enamul

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the scaffolds' structural anisotropy (i.e. the effect of loading direction), viscoelasticity (i.e. the effect of cross head speed or strain rate), and the influence of simulated physiological environment (PBS solution at 37°C) on the mechanical properties. Besides, the in vitro degradation study has also been performed that evaluates the effect of variation in material and lay-down pattern on the scaffolds' degradation kinetics in terms of mass loss, and change in morphological and mechanical properties. Porous three dimensional (3D) scaffolds of polycarprolactone (PCL) and polycarprolactone-polyethylene glycol (PCL-PEG) were developed by laying down the microfilaments directionally layer-by-layer using an in-house built computer-controlled extrusion and deposition process, called desktop robot based rapid prototyping (DRBRP) system. The loading direction, strain rate and physiological environment directly influenced the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. In vitro degradation study demonstrated that both PCL and PCL-PEG scaffolds realized homogeneous hydrolytic degradation via surface erosion resulting in a consistent and predictable mass loss. The linear mass loss caused uniform and linear increase in porosity that accordingly led to the decrease in mechanical properties. The synthetic polymer had the potential to modulate hydrophilicity and/or degradability and consequently, the biomechanical properties of the scaffolds by varying the polymer constituents.

  1. Nanohydroxyapatite Effect on the Degradation, Osteoconduction and Mechanical Properties of Polymeric Bone Tissue Engineered Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Shima; Nayyer, Leila; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Statistical reports show that every year around the world approximately 15 million bone fractures occur; of which up to 10% fail to heal completely and hence lead to complications of non-union healing. In the past, autografts or allografts were used as the “gold standard” of treating such defects. However, due to various limitations and risks associated with these sources of bone grafts, other avenues have been extensively investigated through which bone tissue engineering; in particular engineering of synthetic bone graft substitutes, has been recognised as a promising alternative to the traditional methods. METHODS A selective literature search was performed. RESULTS Bone tissue engineering offers unlimited supply, eliminated risk of disease transmission and relatively low cost. It could also lead to patient specific design and manufacture of implants, prosthesis and bone related devices. A potentially promising building block for a suitable scaffold is synthetic nanohydroxyapatite incorporated into synthetic polymers. Incorporation of nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers has shown promising bioactivity, osteoconductivity, mechanical properties and degradation profile compared to other techniques previously considered. CONCLUSION Scientific research, through extensive physiochemical characterisation, in vitro and in vivo assessment has brought together the optimum characteristics of nanohydroxyapatite and various types of synthetic polymers in order to develop nanocomposites of suitable nature for bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present article is to review and update various aspects involved in incorporation of synthetic nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers, in terms of their potentials to promote bone growth and regeneration in vitro, in vivo and consequently in clinical applications. PMID:28217213

  2. Effect of the preparation methods on architecture, crystallinity, hydrolytic degradation, bioactivity, and biocompatibility of PCL/bioglass composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Michal; Pawlik, Justyna; Menaszek, Elzbieta; Stodolak-Zych, Ewa; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    In this study, two different composition gel derived silica-rich (S2) or calcium-rich (A2) bioactive glasses (SBG) from a basic CaO-P2 O5 -SiO2 system were incorporated into poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) matrix to obtain novel bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. The composites were fabricated in the form of highly porous 3D scaffolds using following preparation methods: solvent casting particulate leaching (SCPL), solid-liquid phase separation, phase inversion (PI). Scaffolds containing 21% vol. of each bioactive glass were characterized for architecture, crystallinity, hydrolytic degradation, surface bioactivity, and cellular response. Results indicated that the use of different preparation methods leads to obtain highly porous (60-90%) materials with differentiated morphology: pore shape, size, and distributions. Thermal analysis (DSC) showed that the preparation method of materials and addition of bioactive glass particles into polymer matrix induced the changes of PCL crystallinity. Composites obtained by SCPL and PI method containing A2 SBG rapidly formed a hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate surface layer after incubation in SBF. Bioactive glasses used as filler in composite scaffolds could neutralize the released acidic by-products of the polymer degradation. Preliminary in vitro biological studies of the composites in contact with osteoblastic cells showed good biocompatibility of the obtained materials. Addition of bioactive glass into the PCL matrix promotes mineralization estimated on the basis of the ALP activity. These results suggest that through a process of selection appropriate methods of preparation and bioglass composition it is possible to design and obtain porous materials with suitable properties for regeneration of bone tissue.

  3. Preparation, in vitro degradability, cytotoxicity, and in vivo biocompatibility of porous hydroxyapatite whisker-reinforced poly(L-lactide) biocomposite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lu; Yu, Haiyang; Yang, Weizhong; Zhu, Zhuoli; Yue, Li

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable and bioactive scaffolds with interconnected macroporous structures, suitable biodegradability, adequate mechanical property, and excellent biocompatibility have drawn increasing attention in bone tissue engineering. Hence, in this work, porous hydroxyapatite whisker-reinforced poly(L-lactide) (HA-w/PLLA) composite scaffolds with different ratios of HA and PLLA were successfully developed through compression molding and particle leaching. The microstructure, in vitro mineralization, cytocompatibility, hemocompatibility, and in vivo biocompatibility of the porous HA-w/PLLA were investigated for the first time. The SEM results revealed that these HA-w/PLLA scaffolds possessed interconnected pore structures. Compared with porous HA powder-reinforced PLLA (HA-p/PLLA) scaffolds, HA-w/PLLA scaffolds exhibited better mechanical property and in vitro bioactivity, as more formation of bone-like apatite layers were induced on these scaffolds after mineralization in SBF. Importantly, in vitro cytotoxicity displayed that porous HA-w/PLLA scaffold with HA/PLLA ratio of 1:1 (HA-w1/PLLA1) produced no deleterious effect on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), and cells performed elevated cell proliferation, indicating a good cytocompatibility. Simultaneously, well-behaved hemocompatibility and favorable in vivo biocompatibility determined from acute toxicity test and histological evaluation were also found in the porous HA-w1/PLLA1 scaffold. These findings may provide new prospects for utilizing the porous HA whisker-based biodegradable scaffolds in bone repair, replacement, and augmentation applications.

  4. [Degradable performance and bio-mineralization function of PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffold in vitro and in vivo].

    PubMed

    Ge, Jianhua; Wang, Yingjun; Min, Shaoxiong

    2010-10-01

    The degradable performance and bio-mineralization function of PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo were systematically studied. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that there was the deposition of bone-like carbonate hydroxyapatite on the surface of scaffolds. We found that the weight of scaffolds did not always decrease with the prolongation of time in vitro. At the same time, we found that after the PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds were embedded in skulls of rhesus monkeys, the new bone area reached 75% at the 12th week. Histological observation showed that the new bones were rebuilt and knitted bones were formed at the 12th week. These findings meant that the PLA-PEG-PLA/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds were potential in clinical use.

  5. Improvement in degradability of 58s glass scaffolds by ZnO and β-TCP modification.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Cijun; Cao, Yiyuan; Dan, Gao; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Wu, Ping

    2016-09-02

    58s bioactive glass shows great potential for bone defects repair. However, at early repairing stage, the degradation rate of 58s glass is too fast due to the fast ion-exchange. At later repairing stage, the degradation rate of 58s glass is too slow due to the high dense mineral layer. In this work, Zinc oxide (ZnO) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were introduced into 58s glass bone scaffolds to improve the degradability. The results showed that ZnO could decrease the degradation rate and promote the stability of 58s glass at early repairing stage. Moreover, the presence of β-TCP appeared to increase the degradation rate at a later stage of repairing. Furthermore, in vitro biocompatibility study, carried out using human osteoblast-like cells (MG63), demonstrated that ZnO and β-TCP enhanced cell attachment and proliferation. The study provided a reference for further research in bone tissue engineering.

  6. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds’ in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1–6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  7. In Vitro Studies on the Degradability, Bioactivity, and Cell Differentiation of PRP/AZ31B Mg Alloys Composite Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jian; Xu, Hongwei; Li, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, more and more methods have been developed to improve the bioactivity of the biodegradable materials in bone tissue regeneration. In present study, we used rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) to evaluate the outcomes of Mg alloys (AZ31B, Magnesium, and Aluminum) and Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/Mg alloys on rMSCs biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation. Water absorption experiments indicated that both bare AZ31B and PRP/AZ31B were capable of absorbing large amounts of water. But the water absorption ratio for PRP/AZ31B was significantly higher than that for bare AZ31B. The degradability experiments implied that both samples degraded at same speed. rMSCs on the surface of AZ31B distributed more and better than those on the AZ31B scaffold. In ALP activity experiment, the activity of rMSCs on the PRP/AZ31B was markedly higher than that on the AZ31B scaffolds on the 7th day and 14th day. qRT-PCR also showed that OPN and OCN were expressed in both samples. OPN and OCN expression in PRP/AZ31B sample were higher than those in bare AZ31B samples. In summary, the in vitro study implied that AZ31B combined with PRP could remarkably improve cell seeding, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. PMID:28337451

  8. A novel porous Fe/Fe-W alloy scaffold with a double-layer structured skeleton: Preparation, in vitro degradability and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; He, Feng-Li; Li, Da-Wei; Liu, Ya-Li; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-06-01

    A novel porous Fe/Fe-W alloy scaffold with a double-layer structured skeleton was prepared for the first time by electrodeposition. The microstructure of the scaffold was analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and mercury porosimetry. Mechanical property, in vitro degradability and biocompatibility were tested by tensile test, immersion and a cytotoxicity test. The results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a cellular structure that is similar to that of cancellous bone and had a considerably large specific surface area. The skeleton of the scaffolds showed a double-layer structure that was composed of a hollow Fe skeleton wrapped in a thin layer of Fe-W alloy. The tensile strength and the apparent density are close to that of cancellous bone. It was also found that the different surface microstructures showed different effects on in vitro degradability and biocompatibility. In the immersion test, the corrosion rate decreased gradually as the immersion time increased. In the cytotoxicity test, the extraction medium of the pure Fe scaffold showed the lowest cell viability, followed by that of 1.5FeW as a close second. The extraction media of FeW, Fe1.5W and Fe2W were similar, and their cell viability was far above that of the Fe and 1.5FeW scaffolds. The structural style of the scaffolds presented in this paper is potentially useful and applicable to developing degradable scaffolds with a tailored corrosion rate.

  9. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials.

  10. Mechanical properties and in vitro evaluation of bioactivity and degradation of dexamethasone-releasing poly-D-L-lactide/nano-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Tang, Chak Yin; Tsui, Chi Pong; Chen, Da Zhu

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate drug-release nano-composite scaffolds and perform in vitro evaluation of their mechanical properties, bioactivity, biodegradability and drug release behaviors. Porous drug-release poly-d-l-lactide (PDLLA) composite scaffolds filled with different amounts of nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) were prepared by a technique combining polymer coagulation, cold compression moulding, salt leaching and drug coating. Apatite detected on the scaffolds after exposure to a simulated body fluid showed improvement in bioactivity and the apatite formation ability through the addition of the nano-HAp content in the composites. Nano-HAp incorporation and apatite formation made a positive impact on the mechanical properties of the scaffolds; however, plasticization and degradation of PDLLA had a negative impact. The pH-compensation effect of the composite scaffolds can reduce the risk of chronic inflammation complications. The fabrication method in this study can produce scaffolds with controllable structure, appropriate mechanical properties and degradation rates for cancellous bone repair applications.

  11. Significant degradability enhancement in multilayer coating of polycaprolactone-bioactive glass/gelatin-bioactive glass on magnesium scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is a promising candidate to be used in medical products especially as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The main challenge for using Mg in biomedical applications is its high degradation rate in the body. For this reason, in this study, a multilayer polymeric layer composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gel) reinforced with bioactive glass (BaG) particles has been applied on the surface of Mg scaffolds. The materials characteristics of uncoated Mg scaffold, Mg scaffold coated only with PCL-BaG and Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG have been analyzed and compared in detail. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized for microstructural studies. In vitro bioactivity and biodegradation evaluations were carried out by submerging the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pre-determined time points. The results demonstrated that Mg scaffold coated with PCL-BaG and Gel-BaG exhibited significant improvement in biodegradability.

  12. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. II. In vitro and in vivo biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Bal, B Sonny; Bonewald, Lynda F; Kuroki, Keiichi; Brown, Roger F

    2010-10-01

    In Part I, the in vitro degradation of bioactivAR52115e glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of human trabecular bone, but with three different compositions, was investigated as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. This work is an extension of Part I, to investigate the effect of the glass composition on the in vitro response of osteogenic MLO-A5 cells to these scaffolds, and on the ability of the scaffolds to support tissue infiltration in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. The results of assays for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity showed that the slower degrading silicate 13-93 and borosilicate 13-93B1 scaffolds were far better than the borate 13-93B3 scaffolds in supporting cell proliferation and function. However, all three groups of scaffolds showed the ability to support tissue infiltration in vivo after implantation for 6 weeks. The results indicate that the required bioactivity and degradation rate may be achieved by substituting an appropriate amount of SiO2 in 13-93 glass with B2O3, and that these trabecular glass scaffolds could serve as substrates for the repair and regeneration of contained bone defects.

  13. Composite scaffolds of dicalcium phosphate anhydrate /multi-(amino acid) copolymer: in vitro degradability and osteoblast biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qianqian; Ye, Jun; Xu, Qian; Mo, Anchun; Gong, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate in vitro degradability and osteoblast biocompatibility of dicalcium phosphate anhydrate/multi-(amino acid) (DCPA/MAA) composites prepared by in situ polymerization method. The results revealed that the composites could be slowly degraded in PBS solution, with weight loss of 9.5 ± 0.2 wt.% compared with 12.2 ± 0.2 wt.% of MAA copolymer after eight weeks, and the changes of pH value were in the range of 7.18-7.4 and stabilized at 7.24. In addition, the compressive strength of the composite decreased from 98 to 62 MPa while that of MAA copolymer from 117 to 86 MPa. Furthermore, with non-toxicity demonstrated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, the addition of DCPA to the MAA copolymer evidenced an enhancement of osteoblast differentiation and attachment compared with pure MAA materials regarding to alkaline phosphatase activity as well as initial cell adhesion. The results indicated that the DCPA/MAA scaffolds with good osteoblast biocompatibility, degradability, and sufficient strength had promising potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Physico-chemical properties and degradability of non-woven hyaluronan benzylic esters as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Milella, E; Brescia, E; Massaro, C; Ramires, P A; Miglietta, M R; Fiori, V; Aversa, P

    2002-02-01

    The development of biocompatible materials which can be processed into three-dimensional scaffolds and the design of appropriate configurations in order to enable the cellular infiltration and proliferation is a major issue in the tissue engineering. The hyaluronan total benzyl ester (Hyaff 11) has been found to be suitable substrate to grow a variety of cell types. Since structural, physical, chemical and biological data can help for tailoring appropriate scaffold for tissue engineering, information on chemicophysical properties on degradability of hyaluronan total benzyl ester non-woven has been obtained. The thermal analysis, the evaluation of the surface chemical composition, the morphology, the mechanical behaviour and the swelling tests were carried out on these materials. The hyaluronan total benzyl ester non-woven showed a thermal stability up to 220 degrees C and the surface composition differed from that of the bulk for C-O and C-C contribution. No contaminant were detected. The non-woven swelled in culture medium. Moreover the mechanical tests showed that when submitted to a press treatment, the samples have best mechanical properties. The pressed Hyaff 11 non-woven undergoes degradation when exposed to DMEM. The frying and breaking of the fibres, a decrease of the mechanical properties and a molecular weight loss have been observed. First, the ester bond of the Hyaff 11 non-woven is hydrolysed and the benzylic alcohol is released and the low molecular weight values indicate that a cleavage of the polymer is promoted by the components of the culture medium. After 11 days, some fragments, constituted by hyaluronic acid with a molecular weight of 23,000 Da became soluble in the medium. No oligomer was detected.

  15. The scaffold protein Atg11 recruits fission machinery to drive selective mitochondria degradation by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Kai; Wang, Ke; Liu, Xu; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2013-07-15

    As the cellular power plant, mitochondria play a significant role in homeostasis. To maintain the proper quality and quantity of mitochondria requires both mitochondrial degradation and division. A selective type of autophagy, mitophagy, drives the degradation of excess or damaged mitochondria, whereas division is controlled by a specific fission complex; however, the relationship between these two processes, especially the role of mitochondrial fission during mitophagy, remains unclear. In this study, we report that mitochondrial fission is important for the progression of mitophagy. When mitophagy is induced, the fission complex is recruited to the degrading mitochondria through an interaction between Atg11 and Dnm1; interfering with this interaction severely blocks mitophagy. These data establish a paradigm for selective organelle degradation.

  16. Redox-responsive degradable PEG cryogels as potential cell scaffolds in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dispinar, Tugba; Van Camp, Wim; De Cock, Liesbeth J; De Geest, Bruno G; Du Prez, Filip E

    2012-03-01

    A Michael addition strategy involving the reaction between a maleimide double bond and amine groups is investigated for the synthesis of cryogels at subzero temperature. Low-molecular-weight PEG-based building blocks with amine end groups and disulfide-containing building blocks with maleimide end groups are combined to synthesize redox-responsive PEG cryogels. The cryogels exhibit an interconnected macroporous morphology, a high compressive modulus and gelation yields of around 95%. While the cryogels are stable under physiological conditions, complete dissolution of the cryogels into water-soluble products is obtained in the presence of a reducing agent (glutathione) in the medium. Cell seeding experiments and toxicologic analysis demonstrate their potential as scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  17. Phenanthrene-triggered Chlorosis is caused by elevated Chlorophyll degradation and leaf moisture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Li, Jinfeng; Gu, Ruochen; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-01-01

    Leaf is an important organ in responding to environmental stresses. To date, chlorophyll metabolism under polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) stress is still unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the chlorophyll metabolism of wheat seedling leaves in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. In this study, the hydroponic experiment was employed, and the wheat seedlings were exposed to phenanthrene to observe the response at day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. Over the exposure time, wheat leaf color turns light. With the accumulation of phenanthrene, the concentrations of glutamate, 5-aminolevulinic acid, uroporphyrinogen III, protoporphyrin IX, Mg-protoporphyrin IX and protochlorophyllide increase while the concentrations of porphobilinogen and Chlorophyll b decrease. Also chlorophyll a content rises initially and then declines. Uroporphyrinogen III synthase and chlorophyllase are activated and porphobilinogen deaminase activity declines in the treatments. Both chlorophyll synthesis and degradation are enhanced, but the degradation rate is faster. Phenanthrene accumulation has significant and positive effects on increase of glutamate, 5-aminolevulinic acid, uroporphyrinogen III, protoporphyrin IX, Mg-protoporphyrin IX and protochlorophyllide concentrations. There is a negative correlation between phenanthrene accumulation and total chlorophyll. Additionally, the leaf moisture increases. Therefore, it is concluded that wheat leaf chlorosis results from a combination of accelerated chlorophyll degradation and elevated leaf moisture under phenanthrene exposure. Our results are helpful not only for better understanding the toxicity of PAHs to plants and crop PAH-adaptive mechanism in the environment, but also for potentially employing the changes of the chlorophyll-synthesizing precursors and enzyme activities in plant leaves as indicators of plant response to PAH pollution.

  18. Stability of the Endosomal Scaffold Protein LAMTOR3 Depends on Heterodimer Assembly and Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Mariana E. G.; Stasyk, Taras; Taub, Nicole; Ebner, Hannes L.; Fürst, Beatrix; Filipek, Przemyslaw; Weys, Sabine R.; Hess, Michael W.; Lindner, Herbert; Kremser, Leopold; Huber, Lukas A.

    2013-01-01

    LAMTOR3 (MP1) and LAMTOR2 (p14) form a heterodimer as part of the larger Ragulator complex that is required for MAPK and mTOR1 signaling from late endosomes/lysosomes. Here, we show that loss of LAMTOR2 (p14) results in an unstable cytosolic monomeric pool of LAMTOR3 (MP1). Monomeric cytoplasmic LAMTOR3 is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent but lysosome-independent manner. Mutational analyses indicated that the turnover of the protein is dependent on ubiquitination of several lysine residues. Similarly, other Ragulator subunits, LAMTOR1 (p18), LAMTOR4 (c7orf59), and LAMTOR5 (HBXIP), are degraded as well upon the loss of LAMTOR2. Thus the assembly of the Ragulator complex is monitored by cellular quality control systems, most likely to prevent aberrant signaling at the convergence of mTOR and MAPK caused by a defective Ragulator complex. PMID:23653355

  19. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro enzymatic degradation of chitosan-gelatine hydrogel scaffolds as potential biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja

    2012-07-01

    The crosslinking of chitosan (CHT) and gelatin (GEL) accomplished with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) was investigated and optimized in relation to hydrogels stability by varying the CHT/GEL mass ratio and the EDC/NHS molar ratio at different and constant EDC concentrations. Hydrogels were also fabricated in the presence of α-tocopherol to assess the release mechanism of a lipophilic drug from a highly-hydrophilic CHT/GEL hydrogel network. Alterations in the physico-chemical properties of hydrogels were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their biostability was studied within a simulated body-fluid solution (PBS of pH 7.4) at 37 °C for 24 h by evaluating the degree of swelling, followed by topography and morphology characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis confirmed the formation of a modulated hydrogels porosity using different freezing temperatures prior to lyophilization. The in vitro degradation behaviors of the hydrogels were investigated for up to 5 weeks using collagenase, lysozyme, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase by monitoring the weight-losses of hydrogels and their degradation products, being identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as well as the pH monitoring of degraded solutions. It was observed that an inner morphological hydrogel structure influences their swelling and degradation behavior, which is additionally reduced by in-gel-embedded α-tocopherol because of hydrophobic interactions with their constituents, and hindering the effect on collagenase activity.

  20. Bioresorbable Ca-phosphate-polymer/metal and Fe-Ag nanocomposites for macro-porous scaffolds with tunable degradation and drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, I.; Swain, S. K.; Sharipova, A.; Gutmanas, E. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Bioresorbable implants are increasingly gaining popularity as an attractive alternative to traditional permanent bone healing devices. The advantage of bioresorbable implantable devices is that they slowly degrade over time and disappear once their "mission" is accomplished. Thus, no foreign material is left behind that can cause adverse effects on the host, such as long term local or systemic immune response and stress-shielding related bone atrophy. Resorbable materials considered for surgical implant applications include degradable polymers, Ca phosphate ceramics (CaP) and corrodible metals. Degradable polymers, such as polycaprolactone and lactic acid are weak, lack osteoconductivity and degrade to acidic products that can cause late inflammation. Resorbable CaP ceramics (e.g., β-TCP) are attractive materials for bone regeneration bear close resemblance to the bone mineral, however they are intrinsically brittle and thus unsuitable for use in load-bearing sites. Moreover, introducing high porosity required to encourage better cellular ingrowth into bone regeneration scaffolds is detrimental to the mechanical strength of the material. In present work we review and discuss our results on development of strong bioresorbable Ca-phosphate-polymer/metal nanonocomposites and highly porous scaffolds from them. By introduction of nanoscale ductile polymer or metal phase into CaP ceramic an attempt was made to mimic structure of natural bone, where nanocrystallites of CaP ceramic are bonded by thin collagen layers. Recent results on development of high strength scaffolds from Fe-Ag nanocomposites are also reported. High energy milling of powders followed by cold sintering—high pressure consolidation at ambient temperature in combination with modified porogen leaching method was employed for processing. The developed nanocomposites and scaffolds exhibited high mechanical strength coupled with measurable ductility, gradual lost weight and strength during immersion in

  1. Translating textiles to tissue engineering: Creation and evaluation of microporous, biocompatible, degradable scaffolds using industry relevant manufacturing approaches and human adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haslauer, Carla M; Avery, Matthew R; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric scaffolds have emerged as a means of generating three-dimensional tissues, such as for the treatment of bone injuries and nonunions. In this study, a fibrous scaffold was designed using the biocompatible, degradable polymer poly-lactic acid in combination with a water dispersible sacrificial polymer, EastONE. Fibers were generated via industry relevant, facile scale-up melt-spinning techniques with an islands-in-the-sea geometry. Following removal of EastONE, a highly porous fiber remained possessing 12 longitudinal channels and pores throughout all internal and external fiber walls. Weight loss and surface area characterization confirmed the generation of highly porous fibers as observed via focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. Porous fibers were then knit into a three-dimensional scaffold and seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). Confocal microscopy images confirmed hASC attachment to the fiber walls and proliferation throughout the knit structure. Quantification of cell-mediated calcium accretion following culture in osteogenic differentiation medium confirmed hASC differentiation throughout the porous constructs. These results suggest incorporation of a sacrificial polymer within islands-in-the-sea fibers generates a highly porous scaffold capable of supporting stem cell viability and differentiation with the potential to generate large three-dimensional constructs for bone regeneration and/or other tissue engineering applications.

  2. Degradation kinetics of the main carbohydrates in birch wood during hot water extraction in a batch reactor at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borrega, Marc; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-11-01

    Hot water extraction of wood at elevated temperatures may be a suitable method to produce hemicellulose-lean pulps and to recover xylan-derived products from the water extract. In this study, water extractions of birch wood were conducted at temperatures between 180 and 240 °C in a batch reactor. Xylan was extensively removed, whereas cellulose was partly degraded only at temperatures above 180 °C. Under severe extraction conditions, acetic acid content in the water extract was higher than the corresponding amount of acetyl groups in wood. In addition to oligo- and monosaccharides, considerable amounts of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were recovered from the extracts. After reaching a maximum, the furfural yield remained constant with increasing extraction time. This maximum slightly decreased with increasing extraction temperature, suggesting the preferential formation of secondary degradation products from xylose. Kinetic models fitting experimental data are proposed to explain degradation and conversion reactions of xylan and glucan.

  3. Angiogenesis and healing with non-shrinking, fast degradeable PLGA/CaP scaffolds in critical-sized defects in the rabbit femur with or without osteogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Endres, S; Hiebl, B; Hägele, J; Beltzer, C; Fuhrmann, R; Jäger, V; Almeida, M; Costa, E; Santos, C; Traupe, H; Jung, E M; Prantl, L; Jung, F; Wilke, A; Franke, R-P

    2011-01-01

    Cost effective and safely to apply tissue engineered constructs of big volume bone transplants for the reconstruction of critical sized defects (CSD) are still not available. Key problems with synthetic scaffold materials are shrinkage and fast degradation of the scaffolds, a lack of blood supply and nutrition in the central scaffold volume and the absent or the scarce development of bone tissue along the scaffold to bridge the bone defect. The use of composite scaffolds made of biopolymers like polylactidglycolid acid (PLGA) coated and loaded with calcium phosphates (CaP) revealed promising therapeutical options for the regeneration of critical sized bone defects. In this study interconnectively macroporous PLGA scaffolds loaded with microporous and coated with nanoporous calcium phosphates were either seeded in fixed bed bioreactors with allogenic osteogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells and implanted or implanted unseeded into critical sized femoral bone defects. As CSD a 12 mm long segment of the chinchilla femur was excised where the proximal and distal parts of the femur were fixed and stabilized by the use of an eight-hole linear reconstruction plate and secured with three bicortical screws (2.7 mm diameter) on every side of the osteotomy. Aim of the study was if we could find a way to load and coat PLGA scaffolds with CaP so that shrinkage of scaffolds could be avoided, which would favour angiogenesis, blood supply and nutrition in the construct and thus avoid central necroses regularly observed so far in transplants not vascularized and which would be inhabited by cells of he bone lineage forming new bone and healing the defect. Four weeks, at least, a notable shrinkage of the scaffolds was avoided and scaffolds were practically not degraded. Both scaffolds, loaded and loaded and coated, revealed blood vessels in all parts of the implants after 4 weeks. Only in scaffolds seeded with allogenic mesenchymal stem cells the development of bridging bone

  4. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  5. Degradation of B7 threaded fasteners in borated-water solutions at elevated temperatures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The enclosed test program was initiated principally because of NRC IE bulletin No. 82-02, which reported severe degradation of Grade B7 fasteners in the reactor coolant pressure boundary due to boric acid attack. Two phases of tests were run at 550/sup 0/F in boric acid solution. A third phase test is planned, and the results will be issued as a supplement to this publication.

  6. The effect of elevated intraocular oxygen on organelle degradation in the embryonic chicken lens.

    PubMed

    Bassnett, Steven; McNulty, Richard

    2003-12-01

    In the vertebrate lens, nuclei and other cytoplasmic organelles are degraded in fiber cells situated in the center of the tissue. This is believed to ensure the transparency of the tissue. The mechanism that triggers this process is unknown. We hypothesized that standing gradients of oxygen generated within the tissue may serve as a spatial cue for organelle degradation. To examine this possibility, we incubated fertilized chicken eggs under hyperoxic (50% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hyperoxic treatment was initiated on the seventh day of embryonic development (E7), five days before organelle degradation normally commences in the lens core. Hyperoxia was maintained until E17. Under normoxic conditions, the partial pressure of oxygen (P(O)) within the vitreous compartment was low. Direct measurement of P(O) using an optode oxygen sensor indicated values of 1.3 kPa and 0.4 kPa for the mid- and anterior vitreous, respectively. Similarly, treatment with pimonidazole, a bio-reductive hypoxia marker, led to the formation of immuno-positive protein adducts within the lens, suggesting that the embryonic lens is chronically hypoxic in situ. Following hyperoxic treatment, vitreous P(O) significantly increased, although pimonidazole staining in the lens was not markedly affected. Confocal microscopy of slices prepared from hyperoxic lenses revealed a significant increase in the size of the lens relative to age-matched normoxic controls. By E13, an organelle-free zone (OFZ) was present in the center of normoxic and hyperoxic lenses. However, in hyperoxic lenses, the OFZ was consistently smaller, and the distance from the lens surface to the border of the OFZ significantly larger, than in normoxic controls. These observations suggest that hyperoxia delays organelle breakdown and are consistent with a model in which hypoxia in the deep cortical layers of the normal lens serves as a trigger for the organelle loss process.

  7. Degradation by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A of plant material grown under elevated CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Ball, A S

    1991-11-15

    The biodegradability of plant material derived from wheat grown under different concentrations of atmospheric CO2 was investigated using the lignocarbohydrate solubilising actinomycete, Streptomyces viridosporus. Growth of S. viridosporus and solubilisation of lignocarbohydrate were highest when wheat grown at ambient CO2 concentrations (350 ppm) was used as C-source. Growth of S. viridosporus and solubilisation were reduced when the plant material was derived from wheat grown at 645 ppm CO2. The results suggest that modifications in plant structure occur when wheat is grown under conditions of elevated atmospheric CO2 which make it more resistant to microbial digestion.

  8. Metabolic effects of elevated temperature on organic acid degradation in ripening Vitis vinifera fruit.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, C; Sadras, V O; Hancock, R D; Soole, K L; Ford, C M

    2014-11-01

    Berries of the cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera are notably responsive to temperature, which can influence fruit quality and hence the future compatibility of varieties with their current growing regions. Organic acids represent a key component of fruit organoleptic quality and their content is significantly influenced by temperature. The objectives of this study were to (i) manipulate thermal regimes to realistically capture warming-driven reduction of malate content in Shiraz berries, and (ii) investigate the mechanisms behind temperature-sensitive malate loss and the potential downstream effects on berry metabolism. In the field we compared untreated controls at ambient temperature with longer and milder warming (2-4 °C differential for three weeks; Experiment 1) or shorter and more severe warming (4-6 °C differential for 11 days; Experiment 2). We complemented field trials with control (25/15 °C) and elevated (35/20 °C) day/night temperature controlled-environment trials using potted vines (Experiment 3). Elevating maximum temperatures (4-10 °C above controls) during pre-véraison stages led to higher malate content, particularly with warmer nights. Heating at véraison and ripening stages reduced malate content, consistent with effects typically seen in warm vintages. However, when minimum temperatures were also raised by 4-6 °C, malate content was not reduced, suggesting that the regulation of malate metabolism differs during the day and night. Increased NAD-dependent malic enzyme activity and decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate kinase activities, as well as the accumulation of various amino acids and γ-aminobutyric acid, suggest enhanced anaplerotic capacity of the TCA cycle and a need for coping with decreased cytosolic pH in heated fruit.

  9. Metabolic effects of elevated temperature on organic acid degradation in ripening Vitis vinifera fruit

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, C.; Sadras, V. O.; Hancock, R. D.; Soole, K. L.; Ford, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Berries of the cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera are notably responsive to temperature, which can influence fruit quality and hence the future compatibility of varieties with their current growing regions. Organic acids represent a key component of fruit organoleptic quality and their content is significantly influenced by temperature. The objectives of this study were to (i) manipulate thermal regimes to realistically capture warming-driven reduction of malate content in Shiraz berries, and (ii) investigate the mechanisms behind temperature-sensitive malate loss and the potential downstream effects on berry metabolism. In the field we compared untreated controls at ambient temperature with longer and milder warming (2–4 °C differential for three weeks; Experiment 1) or shorter and more severe warming (4–6 °C differential for 11 days; Experiment 2). We complemented field trials with control (25/15 °C) and elevated (35/20 °C) day/night temperature controlled-environment trials using potted vines (Experiment 3). Elevating maximum temperatures (4–10 °C above controls) during pre-véraison stages led to higher malate content, particularly with warmer nights. Heating at véraison and ripening stages reduced malate content, consistent with effects typically seen in warm vintages. However, when minimum temperatures were also raised by 4–6 °C, malate content was not reduced, suggesting that the regulation of malate metabolism differs during the day and night. Increased NAD-dependent malic enzyme activity and decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate kinase activities, as well as the accumulation of various amino acids and γ-aminobutyric acid, suggest enhanced anaplerotic capacity of the TCA cycle and a need for coping with decreased cytosolic pH in heated fruit. PMID:25180109

  10. Echogenicity as a surrogate for bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold degradation: analysis at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12- 18, 24-, 30-, 36- and 42-month follow-up in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos M; Ishibashi, Yuki; Eggermont, Jeroen; Nakatani, Shimpei; Cho, Yun Kyeong; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C; Sheehy, Alexander; Lane, Jennifer; Kamberi, Marika; Rapoza, Richard; Perkins, Laura; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study is to validate intravascular quantitative echogenicity as a surrogate for molecular weight assessment of poly-l-lactide-acid (PLLA) bioresorbable scaffold (Absorb BVS, Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California). We analyzed at 9 time points (from 1- to 42-month follow-up) a population of 40 pigs that received 97 Absorb scaffolds. The treated regions were analyzed by echogenicity using adventitia as reference, and were categorized as more (hyperechogenic or upperechogenic) or less bright (hypoechogenic) than the reference. The volumes of echogenicity categories were correlated with the measurements of molecular weight (Mw) by gel permeation chromatography. Scaffold struts appeared as high echogenic structures. The quantification of grey level intensity in the scaffold-vessel compartment had strong correlation with the scaffold Mw: hyperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.75; P < 0.01), upperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.63; P < 0.01) and hyper + upperechogenicity (correlation coefficient = 0.78; P < 0.01). In the linear regression, the R(2) for high echogenicity and Mw was 0.57 for the combination of hyper and upper echogenicity. IVUS high intensity grey level quantification is correlated to Absorb BVS residual molecular weight and can be used as a surrogate for the monitoring of the degradation of semi-crystalline polymers scaffolds.

  11. Bone regeneration in a massive rat femur defect through endochondral ossification achieved with chondrogenically differentiated MSCs in a degradable scaffold.

    PubMed

    Harada, Noriko; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Sato, Kenji; Abe, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Katsuyuki; Sakai, Yuhiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Matsushita, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of proliferating and differentiating into several lineages. In regenerative medicine, their potential as a resource for tissue-replacement therapy is receiving much attention. However, transplanting MSCs to repair larger bone defects in animal models has so far proved disappointing. Here we report on the healing of both critical-sized (5 mm) and massive (15 mm) full-thickness femur defects in rats by implanting a uniquely fabricated PLGA scaffold seeded with MSCs pre-differentiated in vitro into cartilage-forming chondrocytes (MSC-DCs). This strategy closely mimics endochondral ossification, the process by which long bones develop in nature. It is thought that because the transplanted MSC-DCs induced natural bone formation, the defect size was not critical to the outcome. Crucially, after 8 weeks the mean biomechanical strength of femora with the massive 15 mm implant reached 75% that of a normal rat femur, while in the case of 5 mm implants there was no significant difference. Successful healing was also highly reproducible, with bone union occurring in all treated animals examined radiologically 8 or 16 weeks after surgery.

  12. Elevated expression of periostin in human osteoarthritic cartilage and its potential role in matrix degradation via matrix metalloproteinase-13

    PubMed Central

    Attur, Mukundan; Yang, Qing; Shimada, Kohei; Tachida, Yuki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Mignatti, Paolo; Statman, Lauren; Palmer, Glyn; Kirsch, Thorsten; Beier, Frank; Abramson, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of periostin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). In OA, dysregulated gene expression and phenotypic changes in articular chondrocytes culminate in progressive loss of cartilage from the joint surface. The molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. We examined periostin expression by immunohistochemical analysis of lesional and nonlesional cartilage from human and rodent OA knee cartilage. In addition, we used small interfering (si)RNA and adenovirus transduction of chondrocytes to knock down and up-regulate periostin levels, respectively, and analyzed its effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, a disintegrin and MMP with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4, and type II collagen expression. We found high periostin levels in human and rodent OA cartilage. Periostin increased MMP-13 expression dose [1–10 µg/ml (EC50 0.5–1 μg/ml)] and time (24–72 h) dependently, significantly enhanced expression of ADAMTS4 mRNA, and promoted cartilage degeneration through collagen and proteoglycan degradation. Periostin induction of MMP-13 expression was inhibited by CCT031374 hydrobromide, an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In addition, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous periostin blocked constitutive MMP-13 expression. These findings implicate periostin as a catabolic protein that promotes cartilage degeneration in OA by up-regulating MMP-13 through canonical Wnt signaling.—Attur, M., Yang, Q., Shimada, K., Tachida, Y., Nagase, H., Mignatti, P., Statman, L., Palmer, G., Kirsch, T., Beier, F., Abramson, A. B. Elevated expression of periostin in human osteoarthritic cartilage and its potential role in matrix degradation via matrix metalloproteinase-13. PMID:26092928

  13. Degradation studies of 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane-extended poly (1, 4-butylene succinate) - bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue repair applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kulwinder; Singh, K. J.; Anand, Vikas

    2016-05-01

    Bio composite scaffolds prepared from polymer and bio glass provide necessary sites for bone tissue regeneration. In the presented work, bioactive glass scaffolds have been prepared from 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane-extended poly (1, 4-butylene succinate) with different amount of bioactive glass powder by solvent casting method. Prepared scaffolds have been characterized by XRD, FTIR and FESEM techniques. Effect of content of bioactive glass on biodegradability has been investigated in detail.

  14. Biocompatibility and Structural Features of Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nasonova, M V; Glushkova, T V; Borisov, V V; Velikanova, E A; Burago, A Yu; Kudryavtseva, Yu A

    2015-11-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of scaffolds of different composition on the basis of biodegradable polymers fabricated by casting and electrospinning methods. For production of polyhydroxyalkanoate-based scaffolds by electrospinning method, the optimal concentration of the polymer was 8-10%. Fiber diameter and properties of the scaffold produced by electrospinning method depended on polymer composition. Addition of polycaprolactone increased elasticity of the scaffolds. Bio- and hemocompatibility of the scaffolds largely depended on the composition formulation and method of scaffold fabrication. Polylactide introduced into the composition of polyhydroxybutyrate-oxyvalerate scaffolds accelerated degradation and increased adhesive properties of the scaffolds.

  15. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  16. Methanethiol degradation in anaerobic bioreactors at elevated pH (8): reactor performance and microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, Robin C; de Bok, Frank A M; Bonilla-Salinas, Monica; van Doesburg, Wim; Lomans, Bart P; Lens, Piet N L; Stams, Alfons J M; Janssen, Albert J H

    2008-12-01

    The degradation of methanethiol (MT) at 30 degrees C under saline-alkaline (pH 8-10, 0.5M Na(+)) conditions was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with estuarine sediment from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands). At a sodium concentration of 0.5M and a pH between 8 and 9 complete MT degradation to sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide was possible at a maximum loading rate of 22mmolMTL(-1)day(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 6h. The presence of yeast extract (100mg/L) in the medium was essential for complete MT degradation. 16S rRNA based DGGE and sequence analysis revealed that species related to the genera Methanolobus and Methanosarcina dominated the archaeal community in the reactor sludge. Their relative abundance fluctuated in time, possibly as a result of the changing operational conditions in the reactor. The most dominant MT-degrading archaeon was enriched from the reactor and obtained in pure culture. This strain WR1, which was most closely related to Methanolobus taylorii, degraded MT, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), methanol and trimethylamine. Its optimal growth conditions were 0.2M NaCl, 30 degrees C and pH 8.4. In batch and reactor experiments operated at pH 10, MT was not degraded.

  17. The use of UAV to document sloping landscapes to produce digital elevation models to examine environmental degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Agapiou, A.; Papadavid, G.; Christoforou, M.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over the study area of Pissouri in Cyprus to document the sloping landscapes of the area. The study area has been affected by overgrazing, which has led to shifts in the vegetation patterns and changing microtopography of the soil. The UAV images were used to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) to examine the changes in microtopography. Next to that orthophotos were used to detect changes in vegetation patterns. The combined data of the digital elevation models and the orthophotos will be used to detect the occurrence of catastrophic shifts and mechanisms for desertification in the study area due to overgrazing. This study is part of the "CASCADE- Catastrophic shifts in dryland" project.

  18. Evaluation of biodegradable elastic scaffolds made of anionic polyurethane for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chao; Hung, Kun-Che; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane (PU) was synthesized by a water-based process. The process rendered homogenous PU nanoparticles (NPs). Spongy PU scaffolds in large dimensions were obtained by freeze-drying the PU NP dispersion. The spongy scaffolds were characterized in terms of the porous structure, wettability, mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and degradation products. The capacity as cartilage tissue engineering scaffolds was evaluated by growing chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the scaffolds. Scaffolds made from the PU dispersion had excellent hydrophilicity, porosity, and water absorption. Examination by micro-computed tomography confirmed that PU scaffolds had good pore interconnectivity. The degradation rate of the scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline was much faster than that in papain solution or in deionized water at 37°C. The biodegradable PU appeared to be degraded via the cleavage of ester linkage The intrinsic elastic property of PU and the gyroid-shape porous structure of the scaffolds may have accounted for the outstanding strain recovery (87%) and elongation behavior (257%) of the PU scaffolds, compared to conventional poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) scaffolds. Chondrocytes were effectively seeded in PU scaffolds without pre-wetting. They grew better and secreted more glycosaminoglycan in PU scaffolds vs. PLA scaffolds. Human MSCs showed greater chondrogenic gene expression in PU scaffolds than in PLA scaffolds after induction. Based on the favorable hydrophilicity, elasticity, and regeneration capacities, the novel biodegradable PU scaffolds may be superior to the conventional biodegradable scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering applications.

  19. Hybrid Macro-Porous Titanium Ornamented by Degradable 3D Gel/nHA Micro-Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bo; Ma, Pei; Chen, Jun; Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Li, Bo; Li, Qiang; Huang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Guixing; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Porous titanium is a kind of promising material for bone substitution, while its bio-inert property results in demand of modifications to improve the osteointegration capacity. In this study, gelatin (Gel) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to construct 3D micro-scaffolds in the pores of porous titanium in the ratios of Gel:nHA = 1:0, Gel:nHA = 1:1, and Gel:nHA = 1:3, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation, and gene and protein expression levels of osteogenic markers were evaluated in MC3T3-E1 cells, followed by bone regeneration assessment in a rabbit radius defect model. All hybrid scaffolds with different composition ratio were found to have significant promotional effects in cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, in which the group with Gel:nHA = 1:1 showed the best performance in vitro, as well as the most bone regeneration volume in vivo. This 3D micro-scaffolds modification may be an innovative method for porous titanium ornamentation and shows potential application values in clinic. PMID:27092492

  20. Evident elevation of atmospheric monoterpenes due to degradation-induced species changes in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Mu, Yujing; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-15

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from plants have substantial effects on atmospheric chemistry/physics and feedbacks on ecosystem function. The on-going climate change and anthropogenic disturbance have been confirmed to cause the evident degradation of grassland with shift of plant community, and hence BVOCs emissions were suspected to be altered due to the different BOVCs emission potentials of different species. In this study, we investigated BVOCs concentration above ground surface during growing season in a degraded semi-arid grassland (41°2' N-45°6' N, 113°5'-117°8') in Inner Mongolia. The observed monoterpenes' concentrations varied from 0.10 to 215.78 μg m(-3) (34.88 ± 9.73 μg m(-3) in average) across 41 sites. Compared to non-degraded grassland, concentrations of monoterpenes were about 180 times higher at the sites dominated by subshrub--Artemisia frigida, a preponderant species under drought stress and over-grazing. The biomass of A. frigida explained 51.39% of the variation of monoterpenes' concentrations. α-pinene, β-pinene and γ-terpinene dominated in the 10 determined monoterpenes, accounting for 37.72 ± 2.98%, 14.65 ± 2.55% and 10.50 ± 2.37% of the total monoterpenes concentration, respectively. Low isoprene concentrations (≤ 3.25 μg m(-3)) were found and sedge biomass contributed about 51.76% to their spatial variation. α-pinene and isoprene emissions at noon were as high as 515.53 ± 88.34 μg m(-2)h(-1) and 7606.19 ± 1073.94 μg m(-2) h(-1) in A. frigida- and sedge-dominated areas where their biomass were 236.90 g m(-2) and 72.37 g m(-2), respectively. Our results suggested that the expansion of A. frigida and sedge caused by over-grazing and climatic stresses may increase local ambient BVOCs concentration in grassland.

  1. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  2. Porous Biodegradable Metals for Hard Tissue Scaffolds: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yusop, A. H.; Bakir, A. A.; Shaharom, N. A.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.; Hermawan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds have been utilized in tissue regeneration to facilitate the formation and maturation of new tissues or organs where a balance between temporary mechanical support and mass transport (degradation and cell growth) is ideally achieved. Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and porous structure. Metals that can degrade in physiological environment, namely, biodegradable metals, are proposed as potential materials for hard tissue scaffolding where biodegradable polymers are often considered as having poor mechanical properties. Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored degradation behaviour. The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be easily applied to metals. With further optimization in topologically ordered porosity design exploiting material property and fabrication technique, porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. PMID:22919393

  3. Synthetic, biological and composite scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Jennifer; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen; Zheng, Minghao

    2011-03-01

    The reconstruction of abdominal wall defects remains a huge surgical challenge. Tension-free repair is proven to be superior to suture repair in abdominal wall reconstruction. Scaffolds are essential for tension-free repair. They are used to bridge a defect or reinforce the abdominal wall. A huge variety of scaffolds are now commercially available. Most of the synthetic scaffolds are composed of polypropylene. They provide strong tissue reinforcement, but cause a foreign body reaction, which can result in serious complications. Absorbable synthetic scaffolds, such as Dexon™ (polyglycolic acid) and Vicryl™ (polyglactin 910), are not suitable for abdominal wall reconstruction as they usually require subsequent surgeries to repair recurrent hernias. Composite scaffolds combine the strength of nonabsorbable synthetic scaffolds with the antiadhesive properties of the absorbable scaffold, but require long-term follow-up. Biological scaffolds, such as Permacol™, Surgisis(®) and Alloderm(®), are derived from acellular mammalian tissues. Non-cross-linked biological scaffolds show excellent biocompatibility and degrade slowly over time. However, remnant DNA has been found in several products and the degradation leads to recurrence. Randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up studies are lacking for all of the available scaffolds, particularly those derived from animal tissue. This article provides an overview of the different types of scaffolds available, and presents the key clinical studies of the commercially available synthetic, composite and biological scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

  4. A Process to Make Collagen Scaffolds with an Artificial Circulatory System Using Rapid Prototyping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    can overcome the diffusion constraints of the foam - 187 structured scaffolds. 3D Printing has been used to prepare poly( glycolic -co-lactic) acid...therefore an attractive scaffold material. Current collagen scaffolds are foams which limit the mass transport of oxygen and nutrients deep into the scaffold...degradation and eventually produce a completely natural tissue. Most scaffolds used for tissue engineering are open-cell foam structures which have resulted in

  5. Microstructure design of biodegradable scaffold and its effect on tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2011-08-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds play a critical role in therapeutic tissue engineering, in which the matrix degradation and tissue ingrowth are of particular importance for determining the ongoing performance of tissue-scaffold system during regenerative process. This paper aims to explore the mechanobiological process within biodegradable scaffolds, where the representative volume element (RVE) is extracted from periodic scaffold micro-architectures as a base-cell design model. The degradation of scaffold matrix is modeled in terms of a stochastic hydrolysis process enhanced by diffusion-controlled autocatalysis; and the tissue ingrowth is modeled through the mechano-regulatory theory. By using the finite element based homogenization technique and topology optimization approach, the effective properties of various periodic scaffold structures are obtained. To explore the effect of scaffold design on the mechanobiological evolutions of tissue-scaffold systems, different scaffold architectures are considered for polymer degradation and tissue regeneration. It is found that the different tissues can grow into the degraded voids inside the polymer matrix. It is demonstrated that the design of scaffold architecture has a considerable impact on the tissue regeneration outcome, which exhibits the importance of implementing different criteria in scaffold micro-structural design, before being fabricated via rapid prototyping technique, e.g. solid free-form fabrication (SFF). This study models such an interactive process of scaffold degradation and tissue growth, thereby providing some new insights into design of biodegradable scaffold micro-architecture for tissue engineering.

  6. Fabrication of polymeric scaffolds with a controlled distribution of pores.

    PubMed

    Capes, J S; Ando, H Y; Cameron, R E

    2005-12-01

    The design of tissue engineering scaffolds must take into account many factors including successful vascularisation and the growth of cells. Research has looked at refining scaffold architecture to promote more directed growth of tissues through well-defined anisotropy in the pore structure. In many cases it is also desirable to incorporate therapeutic ingredients, such as growth factors, into the scaffold so that their release occurs as the scaffold degrades. Therefore, scaffold fabrication techniques must be found to precisely control, not only the overall porosity of scaffolds, but also the pore size, shape and spatial distribution. This work describes the use of a regularly shaped porogen, sugar spheres, to manufacture polymeric scaffolds. Results show that pre-assembling the spheres created scaffolds with a constant porosity of 60%, but with varying pores sizes from 200-800 microm, leading to a variation in the surface area and likely degradation rate of the scaffolds. Employing different polymer impregnation techniques tailored the number of pores present with a diameter of less than 100 microm to suit different functions, and altering the packing structure of the sugar spheres created scaffolds with novel layered porosity. Replacing sugar spheres with sugar strands formed scaffolds with pores aligned in one direction.

  7. Elevating your elevator talk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  8. Polyamines cause elevation of steroid 5α-reductase mRNA levels by suppressing mRNA degradation in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kyoji; Lee, Mi-Sook; Her, Song; Nishibori, Naoyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Polyamines are widely distributed in living organisms, and considered to play a potential role in various cellular processes. The effects of polyamines on gene expression as well as cell proliferation have been suggested to be closely associated with the physiological and pathological functions. However, it seems necessary to investigate their potential roles in the regulation of cellular metabolism and functions. Previously, glial cells have been suggested to be involved in the protection and preservation of neuronal functions, probably through the production of neurotrophic factors in the brain. On the other hand, neuroactive 5α-reduced steroids promote glial cell differentiation, resulting in enhancement of their ability to produce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Based on these findings, polyamines are assumed to stimulate the expression of the gene encoding steroid 5α-reductase (5α-R), which can induce the production of neuroactive 5α-reduced steroids in glial cells. The effects of polyamines on 5α-R mRNA levels in C6 glioma cells were examined as a model experiment. In consequence, spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD), but not putrescine (PUT), have been shown to elevate 5α-R mRNA levels without activating the 5α-R promoter. Furthermore, SPM increased 5α-R mRNA levels under the conditions in which the mRNA biosynthesis was inhibited. Therefore, it can be speculated that polyamines increase 5α-R mRNA levels as a consequence of suppressing the degradation of mRNA.

  9. Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Diopside Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Wu, Ping; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    A synergetic effect between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene on diopside (Di) scaffolds was demonstrated. 3D network architecture in the matrix was formed through the 1D CNTs inlaid among the 2D graphene platelets (GNPs). The mechanical properties of the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds were significantly improved compared with the CNTs/Di scaffolds and GNPs/Di scaffolds. In addition, the scaffolds exhibited excellent apatite-forming ability, a modest degradation rate, and stable mechanical properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, cell culturing tests indicated that the scaffolds supported the cells attachment and proliferation. Taken together, the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds offered great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27144173

  10. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  11. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  12. The Nanogel-Based Scaffold in Endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirieh, Sanam

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a degradable nanogel-based scaffold with antibacterial content. Methods: This nanogel design consisted of the cross-linker, polyethyleneglycol (PEG 4600) with 3-dimensional network. This polymer degrades over time ( 30 days), delivering a controlled release of antibiotic. Amoxicillin was added to the scaffold with 25 wt% (n=26). Nanogel-scaffold only and amoxicillin only were used as controls. Agar diffusion test against E. faecalis was performed at eight time intervals (days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 30). One-Way ANOVA was used to compare the antibacterial properties of experimental groups at the eight different times. Results: The antibacterial properties for experimental plates, at the different times, were not significantly different (F=.624, p=.74). Based on the profile, the scaffold-only group showed a smaller inhibition zone compared to the two other groups. The antibacterial profiles for the experimental group and the antibiotic-only group were similar. Conclusion: This particular scaffold presented antibacterial properties. Findings suggest that nanogel-modified scaffolds may have potential use for drug-delivery in endodontics..

  13. Multifunctional Thin Film Biomatrice Biosensor in a Degradable Scaffold Containing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2) for Controlled Release in Skeletal Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Harvey; Lomax, Linda

    2001-03-01

    Bone morphonogenetic proteins (BMP-2) have been under investigation for three decades. Deminerialized bone and extracts of deminerialized bone are o steoinductive with a temporal sequence of bone induction. Native and recombi nant BMP's have shown the ability, thru growth and differentiative factors t o induce de novo bone formation both invitro and invivo. Their principle fun ction is to induce transformation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts. Native and recombinant BMP's, when purified and used without carrier disp erse after implantation and exert no effect on bone induction. The delivery system provides the missing component to successsfully applying osteogenic p roteins for clinical need. Biological and physio-chemical properties are str ictly adhered tofor a successful delivery system. The BMP delivery system ca rrier for osteo inductive payload provided; 1)non tumorgenic genecity, 2) no n immunogenecity, 3) water insoluble, 4) biosorbability with predictable enz ymatic degradation, and 5) an optimized surface for compatibility, cell migr ation and attachment with a negative surface change that encouraged target c ell attachment. Being a controlled Release System, it binded the proteins wi th predictible BMP released kinetics. Porosity with interconnecting voids pr otected the BMP from noon specific proteolysis and promoted rapid vascular a nd mesenchymal invasion. Far wide ranging clinical applications of mechanica l and biofunctional requirements were met with the BMP delivery system. Cohe sion and malleability were reqiured forcontour augmentation, and reconstruct ion of the discontinuity defects, prevented dislocation and retained the sha pe and bone replaced the system. Biological systems have elastic activity associated with them. The activi ty was current associated with a time dependant biological/biochemical react ion (enzymic activity). Bioelectric phoenomena associated with charged molec ules in a biologic structure caused

  14. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M; Rainbow, Roshni S; Preda, Rucsanda C; Kaplan, David L; Zeng, Li

    2013-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how the scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here we have compared the responses of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. The silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and the response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study we conclude that selecting the proper scaffold material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair, and that silk and collagen are better scaffolds in terms of supporting the stability of three-dimensional cartilage under inflammatory conditions.

  15. Reinforcing Silk Scaffolds with Silk Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Gil, Eun Seok; Kluge, Jonathan; Numata, Keiji; Wang, Lijing; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Silk fibroin is a useful protein polymer for biomaterials and tissue engineering. In this work, porogen leached scaffolds prepared from aqueous and HFIP silk solutions were reinforced through the addition of silk particles. This led to about 40 times increase in the specific compressive modulus and the yield strength of HFIP-based scaffolds. This increase in mechanical properties resulted from the high interfacial cohesion between the silk matrix and the reinforcing silk particles, due to partial solubility of the silk particles in HFIP. The porosity of scaffolds was reduced from ≈90% (control) to ≈75% for the HFIP systems containing 200% particle reinforcement, while maintaining pore interconnectivity. The presence of the particles slowed the enzymatic degradation of silk scaffolds. PMID:20166230

  16. Biodegradable Fibrous Scaffolds with Diverse Properties by Electrospinning Candidates from a Combinatorial Macromer Library

    PubMed Central

    Metter, Robert B.; Ifkovits, Jamie L.; Hou, Kevin; Vincent, Ludovic; Hsu, Benjamin; Wang, Louis; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2009-01-01

    The properties of electrospun fibrous scaffolds, including degradation, mechanics and cellular interactions, are important for their use in tissue engineering applications. Although some diversity has been obtained previously in fibrous scaffolds, optimization of scaffold properties relies on iterative techniques in both polymer synthesis and processing. Here, we electrospun candidates from a combinatorial library of biodegradable and photopolymerizable poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) to show that the diversity in properties found in this library is retained when processed into fibrous scaffolds. Specifically, three PBAE macromers were electrospun into scaffolds and possessed similar initial mechanical properties, but exhibited mass loss ranging from rapid (complete degradation within ∼2 weeks) to moderate (complete degradation within ∼ 3 months) to slow (only partial degradation after 3 months). These trends in mechanics and degradation mimicked what was previously observed in the bulk polymers. Although cellular adhesion was dependent on the polymer composition in films, adhesion to scaffolds that were electrospun with gelatin was similar on all formulations and controls. To further illustrate the diverse properties that are attainable in these systems, the fastest and slowest degrading polymers were electrospun together into one scaffold, but as distinct fiber populations. This dual-polymer scaffold exhibited behavior in mass loss and mechanics with time that fell between the single-polymer scaffolds. In general, this work indicates that combinatorial libraries may be an important source of information and specific polymer compositions for the fabrication of electrospun fibrous scaffolds with tunable properties. PMID:19853066

  17. Controlling protein release from scaffolds using polymer blends and composites.

    PubMed

    Ginty, Patrick J; Barry, John J A; White, Lisa J; Howdle, Steve M; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of three protein loaded polymer blend and composite materials that modify the release kinetics of the protein from poly(dl-lactic acid) (P(dl)LA) scaffolds. P(dl)LA has been combined with either poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(caprolactone) (PCL) microparticles or calcium alginate fibres using supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) processing to form single and dual protein release scaffolds. P(dl)LA was blended with the hydrophilic polymer PEG using scCO(2) to increase the water uptake of the resultant scaffold and modify the release kinetics of an encapsulated protein. This was demonstrated by the more rapid release of the protein when compared to the release rate from P(dl)LA only scaffolds. For the P(dl)LA/alginate scaffolds, the protein loaded alginate fibres were processed into porous protein loaded P(dl)LA scaffolds using scCO(2) to produce dual release kinetics from the scaffolds. Protein release from the hydrophilic alginate fibres was more rapid in the initial stages, complementing the slower release from the slower degrading P(dl)LA scaffolds. In contrast, when protein loaded PCL particles were loaded into P(dl)LA scaffolds, the rate of protein release was retarded from the slow degrading PCL phase.

  18. Active scaffolds for on-demand drug and cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuanhe; Kim, Jaeyun; Cezar, Christine A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Kangwon; Bouhadir, Kamal; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Porous biomaterials have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. The release of biological agents from conventional porous scaffolds is typically governed by molecular diffusion, material degradation, and cell migration, which do not allow for dynamic external regulation. We present a new active porous scaffold that can be remotely controlled by a magnetic field to deliver various biological agents on demand. The active porous scaffold, in the form of a macroporous ferrogel, gives a large deformation and volume change of over 70% under a moderate magnetic field. The deformation and volume variation allows a new mechanism to trigger and enhance the release of various drugs including mitoxantrone, plasmid DNA, and a chemokine from the scaffold. The porous scaffold can also act as a depot of various cells, whose release can be controlled by external magnetic fields. PMID:21149682

  19. Microstructure and characteristic properties of gelatin/chitosan scaffold prepared by a combined freeze-drying/leaching method.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Abbasi, F; Khoshfetrat, A B; Ghaleh, H

    2013-10-01

    A combined freeze-drying and particulate leaching method for scaffold synthesis showed an improvement in the horizontal microstructure of the gelatin/chitosan scaffolds. Type and concentration of the cross-linking agent, freezing temperature, concentration of the polymeric solution and gelatin/chitosan weight ratio were the variables affecting the scaffold properties. Assessment of the tensile properties of the scaffolds revealed that for a scaffold with 50% chitosan, glutaraldehyde, as a cross-linking agent, created much tighter polymeric network compared to N,N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide (EDC). However, in the case of gelatin scaffolds, EDC was identified as the stronger cross-linker. Compressive behavior of the scaffolds satisfied formulations obtained from the theoretical modeling of the low-density, elastomeric foams. The investigation of the scaffold degradation indicated that the increase in the mechanical strength of the scaffolds would not always reduce their degradation rate.

  20. Biomimetic magnetic silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Declercq, Heidi A; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Dubruel, Peter; Cornelissen, Maria; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rivas, Jose; Padeletti, Giuseppina; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds integrating magnetic materials and featuring magnetic gradients were prepared for potential utility in magnetic-field assisted tissue engineering. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were introduced into SFP scaffolds via dip-coating methods, resulting in magnetic SFP scaffolds with different strengths of magnetization. Magnetic SFP scaffolds showed excellent hyperthermia properties achieving temperature increases up to 8 °C in about 100 s. The scaffolds were not toxic to osteogenic cells and improved cell adhesion and proliferation. These findings suggest that tailored magnetized silk-based biomaterials can be engineered with interesting features for biomaterials and tissue-engineering applications.

  1. A review: fabrication of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Janik, H; Marzec, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is the fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds that can be used for the reconstruction and regeneration of damaged or deformed tissues and organs. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to create either fibrous or porous scaffolds from polymers, metals, composite materials and ceramics. However, the most promising materials are biodegradable polymers due to their comprehensive mechanical properties, ability to control the rate of degradation and similarities to natural tissue structures. Polyurethanes (PUs) are attractive candidates for scaffold fabrication, since they are biocompatible, and have excellent mechanical properties and mechanical flexibility. PU can be applied to various methods of porous scaffold fabrication, among which are solvent casting/particulate leaching, thermally induced phase separation, gas foaming, emulsion freeze-drying and melt moulding. Scaffold properties obtained by these techniques, including pore size, interconnectivity and total porosity, all depend on the thermal processing parameters, and the porogen agent and solvents used. In this review, various polyurethane systems for scaffolds are discussed, as well as methods of fabrication, including the latest developments, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Optimization of Polymer-ECM Composite Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering: Effect of Cells and Culture Conditions on Polymeric Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ritu; Guvendiren, Murat; Freeman, Onyi; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2017-01-11

    The design of composite tissue scaffolds containing an extracellular matrix (ECM) and synthetic polymer fibers is a new approach to create bioactive scaffolds that can enhance cell function. Currently, studies investigating the effects of ECM-deposition and decellularization on polymer degradation are still lacking, as are data on optimizing the stability of the ECM-containing composite scaffolds during prolonged cell culture. In this study, we develop fibrous scaffolds using three polymer compositions, representing slow (E0000), medium (E0500), and fast (E1000) degrading materials, to investigate the stability, degradation, and mechanics of the scaffolds during ECM deposition and decellularization, and during the complete cellularization-decell-recell cycle. We report data on percent molecular weight (% Mw) retention of polymeric fiber mats, changes in scaffold stiffness, ECM deposition, and the presence of fibronectin after decellularization. We concluded that the fast degrading E1000 (Mw retention ≤ 50% after 28 days) was not sufficiently stable to allow scaffold handling after 28 days in culture, while the slow degradation of E0000 (Mw retention ≥ 80% in 28 days) did not allow deposited ECM to replace the polymer support. The scaffolds made from medium degrading E0500 (Mw retention about 60% at 28 days) allowed the gradual replacement of the polymer network with cell-derived ECM while maintaining the polymer network support. Thus, polymers with an intermediate rate of degradation, maintaining good scaffold handling properties after 28 days in culture, seem best suited for creating ECM-polymer composite scaffolds.

  3. Optimization of Polymer-ECM Composite Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering: Effect of Cells and Culture Conditions on Polymeric Nanofiber Mats

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ritu; Guvendiren, Murat; Freeman, Onyi; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The design of composite tissue scaffolds containing an extracellular matrix (ECM) and synthetic polymer fibers is a new approach to create bioactive scaffolds that can enhance cell function. Currently, studies investigating the effects of ECM-deposition and decellularization on polymer degradation are still lacking, as are data on optimizing the stability of the ECM-containing composite scaffolds during prolonged cell culture. In this study, we develop fibrous scaffolds using three polymer compositions, representing slow (E0000), medium (E0500), and fast (E1000) degrading materials, to investigate the stability, degradation, and mechanics of the scaffolds during ECM deposition and decellularization, and during the complete cellularization-decell-recell cycle. We report data on percent molecular weight (% Mw) retention of polymeric fiber mats, changes in scaffold stiffness, ECM deposition, and the presence of fibronectin after decellularization. We concluded that the fast degrading E1000 (Mw retention ≤ 50% after 28 days) was not sufficiently stable to allow scaffold handling after 28 days in culture, while the slow degradation of E0000 (Mw retention ≥ 80% in 28 days) did not allow deposited ECM to replace the polymer support. The scaffolds made from medium degrading E0500 (Mw retention about 60% at 28 days) allowed the gradual replacement of the polymer network with cell-derived ECM while maintaining the polymer network support. Thus, polymers with an intermediate rate of degradation, maintaining good scaffold handling properties after 28 days in culture, seem best suited for creating ECM-polymer composite scaffolds. PMID:28085047

  4. ASTM international workshop on standards and measurements for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A

    2015-07-01

    The "Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds" was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN, and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active "guide" documents for educational purposes, but few standard "test methods" or "practices." Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition, and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Workshop participants emphasized the need to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization. Finally, participants noted that standards would be more broadly accepted if their impact in the TEMPs community could be quantified. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus is turning to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs.

  5. Microporous Dermal-Like Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Accelerated Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Thomas, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3–4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration. PMID:24568584

  6. Microporous dermal-like electrospun scaffolds promote accelerated skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bonvallet, Paul P; Culpepper, Bonnie K; Bain, Jennifer L; Schultz, Matthew J; Thomas, Steven J; Bellis, Susan L

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3-4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration.

  7. Degradation behavior at elevated temperature of LaNisub5-xSnsubxHsubz for x between 0.20 and 0.25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Lindensmith, C. A.; Luo, S.; Flanagan, T. B.; Vogt, T.

    2000-01-01

    Systematic studies of the hydriding behavior of LaNi(sub 5-x)Sn(sub x)H(sub z) alloys with tin contents in the range between 0.20 and 0.25 have revealed changes in the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) isotherms measured after heating the hydrides above 450 K. These changes are indications of degradation processes and increased disorder within the alloy structure.

  8. Porous magnesium-based scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Razavi, Mehdi; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Moharamzadeh, Keyvan; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Tayebi, Lobat

    2017-02-01

    Significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to the development of scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although at present most of the studies are focused on non-load bearing scaffolds, many scaffolds have also been investigated for hard tissue repair. In particular, metallic scaffolds are being studied for hard tissue engineering due to their suitable mechanical properties. Several biocompatible metallic materials such as stainless steels, cobalt alloys, titanium alloys, tantalum, nitinol and magnesium alloys have been commonly employed as implants in orthopedic and dental treatments. They are often used to replace and regenerate the damaged bones or to provide structural support for healing bone defects. Among the common metallic biomaterials, magnesium (Mg) and a number of its alloys are effective because of their mechanical properties close to those of human bone, their natural ionic content that may have important functional roles in physiological systems, and their in vivo biodegradation characteristics in body fluids. Due to such collective properties, Mg based alloys can be employed as biocompatible, bioactive, and biodegradable scaffolds for load-bearing applications. Recently, porous Mg and Mg alloys have been specially suggested as metallic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. With further optimization of the fabrication techniques, porous Mg is expected to make a promising hard substitute scaffold. The present review covers research conducted on the fabrication techniques, surface modifications, properties and biological characteristics of Mg alloys based scaffolds. Furthermore, the potential applications, challenges and future trends of such degradable metallic scaffolds are discussed in detail.

  9. Novel biodegradable porous scaffold applied to skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Chou, Yi-Ting; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Zhao-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hong; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing is an important lifesaving issue for massive lesions. A novel porous scaffold with collagen, hyaluronic acid and gelatin was developed for skin wound repair. The swelling ratio of this developed scaffold was assayed by water absorption capacity and showed a value of over 20 g water/g dried scaffold. The scaffold was then degraded in time- and dose-dependent manners by three enzymes: lysozyme, hyaluronidase and collagenase I. The average pore diameter of the scaffold was 132.5±8.4 µm measured from SEM images. With human skin cells growing for 7 days, the SEM images showed surface fractures on the scaffold due to enzymatic digestion, indicating the biodegradable properties of this scaffold. To simulate skin distribution, the human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the porous scaffold and the cross-section immunofluorescent staining demonstrated normal human skin layer distributions. The collagen amount was also quantified after skin cells seeding and presented an amount 50% higher than those seeded on culture wells. The in vivo histological results showed that the scaffold ameliorated wound healing, including decreasing neutrophil infiltrates and thickening newly generated skin compared to the group without treatments.

  10. Microporous Nanofibrous Fibrin-based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Linnes, Michael L.; Rajachar, Rupak M.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2008-01-01

    The fibrotic response of the body to synthetic polymers limits their success in tissue engineering and other applications. Though porous polymers have demonstrated improved healing, difficulty in controlling their pore sizes and pore interconnections has clouded the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, a novel method to fabricate natural polymer/calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size, pore interconnection, and calcium phosphate deposition was developed. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds were fabricated using sphere-templating methods. Composite scaffolds were created by solution deposition of calcium phosphate on fibrin surfaces or by direct incorporation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). The SEM results showed that fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure. Osteoblast-like cells, obtained from murine calvaria, attached, spread and showed a polygonal morphology on the surface of the biomaterial. Multiple cell layers and fibrillar matrix deposition were observed. Moreover, cells seeded on mineralized fibrin scaffolds exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity as well as osteoblast marker gene expression compared to fibrin scaffolds and nHA incorporated fibrin scaffolds (0.25 g and 0.5 g). All types of scaffolds were degraded both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these scaffolds promoted bone formation in a mouse calvarial defect model and the bone formation was enhanced by addition of rhBMP-2. PMID:18640716

  11. Electrospun Silk Biomaterial Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Reagan, Michaela R; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique that enables the development of nanofiber-based biomaterial scaffolds. Scaffolds can be generated that are useful for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine since they mimic the nanoscale properties of certain fibrous components of the native extracellular matrix in tissues. Silk is a natural protein with excellent biocompatibility, remarkable mechanical properties as well as tailorable degradability. Integrating these protein polymer advantages with electrospinning results in scaffolds with combined biochemical, topographical and mechanical cues with versatility for a range of biomaterial, cell and tissue studies and applications. This review covers research related to electrospinning of silk, including process parameters, post treatment of the spun fibers, functionalization of nanofibers, and the potential applications for these material systems in regenerative medicine. Research challenges and future trends are also discussed. PMID:19643154

  12. Nano/macro porous bioactive glass scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaojie

    Bioactive glass (BG) and ceramics have been widely studied and developed as implants to replace hard tissues of the musculo-skeletal system, such as bones and teeth. Recently, instead of using bulk materials, which usually do not degrade rapidly enough and may remain in the human body for a long time, the idea of bioscaffold for tissue regeneration has generated much interest. An ideal bioscaffold is a porous material that would not only provide a three-dimensional structure for the regeneration of natural tissue, but also degrade gradually and, eventually be replaced by the natural tissue completely. Among various material choices the nano-macro dual porous BG appears as the most promising candidate for bioscaffold applications. Here macropores facilitate tissue growth while nanopores control degradation and enhance cell response. The surface area, which controls the degradation of scaffold can also be tuned by changing the nanopore size. However, fabrication of such 3D structure with desirable nano and macro pores has remained challenging. In this dissertation, sol-gel process combined with spinodal decomposition or polymer sponge replication method has been developed to fabricate the nano-macro porous BG scaffolds. Macropores up to 100microm are created by freezing polymer induced spinodal structure through sol-gel transition, while larger macropores (>200um) of predetermined size are obtained by the polymer sponge replication technique. The size of nanopores, which are inherent to the sol-gel method of glass fabrication, has been tailored using several approaches: Before gel point, small nanopores are generated using acid catalyst that leads to weakly-branched polymer-like network. On the other hand, larger nanopores are created with the base-catalyzed gel with highly-branched cluster-like structure. After the gel point, the nanostructure can be further modified by manipulating the sintering temperature and/or the ammonia concentration used in the solvent

  13. Novel Polymeric Scaffolds Using Protein Microbubbles as Porogen and Growth Factor Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)–eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1–loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1–specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor–eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold. PMID:19327002

  14. Novel polymeric scaffolds using protein microbubbles as porogen and growth factor carriers.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian; Tang, Liping

    2010-02-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1-loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1-specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor-eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold.

  15. Dual-source dual-power electrospinning and characteristics of multifunctional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    Electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds are attractive due to their distinctive advantages over other types of scaffolds. As both osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity play crucial roles in bone tissue engineering, scaffolds possessing both properties are desirable. In this investigation, novel bicomponent scaffolds were constructed via dual-source dual-power electrospinning (DSDPES). One scaffold component was emulsion electrospun poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) nanofibers containing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2), and the other scaffold component was electrospun calcium phosphate (Ca-P) particle/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocomposite fibers. The mass ratio of rhBMP-2/PDLLA fibers to Ca-P/PLGA fibers in bicomponent scaffolds could be controlled in the DSDPES process by adjusting the number of syringes used to supply solutions for electrospinning. Through process optimization, both types of fibers could be evenly distributed in bicomponent scaffolds. The structure and properties of each type of fibers in the scaffolds were studied. The morphological and structural properties and wettability of scaffolds were assessed. The effects of emulsion composition for rhBMP-2/PDLLA fibers and mass ratio of fibrous components in bicomponent scaffolds on in vitro release of rhBMP-2 from scaffolds were investigated. In vitro degradation of scaffolds was also studied by monitoring their morphological changes, weight losses and decreases in average molecular weight of fiber matrix polymers.

  16. Maltodextrin enhances biofilm elimination by electrochemical scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Sujala T.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical scaffolds (e-scaffolds) continuously generate low concentrations of H2O2 suitable for damaging wound biofilms without damaging host tissue. Nevertheless, retarded diffusion combined with H2O2 degradation can limit the efficacy of this potentially important clinical tool. H2O2 diffusion into biofilms and bacterial cells can be increased by damaging the biofilm structure or by activating membrane transportation channels by exposure to hyperosmotic agents. We hypothesized that e-scaffolds would be more effective against Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in the presence of a hyperosmotic agent. E-scaffolds polarized at −600 mVAg/AgCl were overlaid onto preformed biofilms in media containing various maltodextrin concentrations. E-scaffold alone decreased A. baumannii and S. aureus biofilm cell densities by (3.92 ± 0.15) log and (2.31 ± 0.12) log, respectively. Compared to untreated biofilms, the efficacy of the e-scaffold increased to a maximum (8.27 ± 0.05) log reduction in A. baumannii and (4.71 ± 0.12) log reduction in S. aureus biofilm cell densities upon 10 mM and 30 mM maltodextrin addition, respectively. Overall ~55% decrease in relative biofilm surface coverage was achieved for both species. We conclude that combined treatment with electrochemically generated H2O2 from an e-scaffold and maltodextrin is more effective in decreasing viable biofilm cell density. PMID:27782161

  17. Engineering functionally graded tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leong, K F; Chua, C K; Sudarmadji, N; Yeong, W Y

    2008-04-01

    Tissue Engineering (TE) aims to create biological substitutes to repair or replace failing organs or tissues due to trauma or ageing. One of the more promising approaches in TE is to grow cells on biodegradable scaffolds, which act as temporary supports for the cells to attach, proliferate and differentiate; after which the scaffold will degrade, leaving behind a healthy regenerated tissue. Tissues in nature, including human tissues, exhibit gradients across a spatial volume, in which each identifiable layer has specific functions to perform so that the whole tissue/organ can behave normally. Such a gradient is termed a functional gradient. A good TE scaffold should mimic such a gradient, which fulfils the biological and mechanical requirements of the target tissue. Thus, the design and fabrication process of such scaffolds become more complex and the introduction of computer-aided tools will lend themselves well to ease these challenges. This paper reviews the needs and characterization of these functional gradients and the computer-aided systems used to ease the complexity of the scaffold design stage. These include the fabrication techniques capable of building functionally graded scaffolds (FGS) using both conventional and rapid prototyping (RP) techniques. They are able to fabricate both continuous and discrete types of FGS. The challenge in fabricating continuous FGS using RP techniques lies in the development of suitable computer aided systems to facilitate continuous FGS design. What have been missing are the appropriate models that relate the scaffold gradient, e.g. pore size, porosity or material gradient, to the biological and mechanical requirements for the regeneration of the target tissue. The establishment of these relationships will provide the foundation to develop better computer-aided systems to help design a suitable customized FGS.

  18. Maltodextrin enhances biofilm elimination by electrochemical scaffold.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-10-26

    Electrochemical scaffolds (e-scaffolds) continuously generate low concentrations of H2O2 suitable for damaging wound biofilms without damaging host tissue. Nevertheless, retarded diffusion combined with H2O2 degradation can limit the efficacy of this potentially important clinical tool. H2O2 diffusion into biofilms and bacterial cells can be increased by damaging the biofilm structure or by activating membrane transportation channels by exposure to hyperosmotic agents. We hypothesized that e-scaffolds would be more effective against Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in the presence of a hyperosmotic agent. E-scaffolds polarized at -600 mVAg/AgCl were overlaid onto preformed biofilms in media containing various maltodextrin concentrations. E-scaffold alone decreased A. baumannii and S. aureus biofilm cell densities by (3.92 ± 0.15) log and (2.31 ± 0.12) log, respectively. Compared to untreated biofilms, the efficacy of the e-scaffold increased to a maximum (8.27 ± 0.05) log reduction in A. baumannii and (4.71 ± 0.12) log reduction in S. aureus biofilm cell densities upon 10 mM and 30 mM maltodextrin addition, respectively. Overall ~55% decrease in relative biofilm surface coverage was achieved for both species. We conclude that combined treatment with electrochemically generated H2O2 from an e-scaffold and maltodextrin is more effective in decreasing viable biofilm cell density.

  19. Microtubular architecture of biodegradable polymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ma, P X; Zhang, R

    2001-09-15

    It is a relatively new approach to generate tissues with mammalian cells and scaffolds (temporary synthetic extracellular matrices). Many tissues, such as nerve, muscle, tendon, ligament, blood vessel, bone, and teeth, have tubular or fibrous bundle architectures and anisotropic properties. In this work, we have designed and fabricated highly porous scaffolds from biodegradable polymers with a novel phase-separation technique to generate controllable parallel array of microtubular architecture. Porosity as high as 97% has been achieved. The porosity, diameter of the microtubules, the tubular morphology, and their orientation are controlled by the polymer concentration, solvent system, and temperature gradient. The mechanical properties of these scaffolds are anisotropic. Osteoprogenitor cells are seeded in these three-dimensional scaffolds and cultured in vitro. The cell distribution and the neo-tissue organization are guided by the microtubular architecture. The fabrication technique can be applied to a variety of polymers, therefore the degradation rate and cell--matrix interactions can be controlled by the chemical composition of the polymers and the incorporation of bioactive moieties. These microtubular scaffolds may be used to engineer a variety of tissues with anisotropic architecture and properties.

  20. Preparation and chemical and biological characterization of a pectin/chitosan polyelectrolyte complex scaffold for possible bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, P; Ferreira, P; de Sousa, H C; Batista, P; Rodrigues, M A; Correia, I J; Gil, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this work, porous scaffolds obtained from the freeze-drying of pectin/chitosan polyelectrolyte complexes were prepared and characterized by FTIR, SEM and weight loss studies. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the prepared scaffolds was evaluated in vitro, using human osteoblast cells. The results obtained showed that cells adhered to scaffolds and proliferated. The study also confirmed that the degradation by-products of pectin/chitosan scaffold are noncytotoxic.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H.; Mirastschijski, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-α (p < 0.005) and accomplished by MMPs (p < 0.005). Levels of the collagenases MMP-8 and MMP-13 were insignificant and neither MMP-2 nor MMP-14 were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-α increased secretion of MMP-1 (p < 0.01) but had no impact on MMP-1 quantities in the tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed similar tissue MMP-1 expression with or without TNF-α with epidermis being the major source of MMP-1. Increased tissue-derived collagenolytic activity with TNF-α exposure was blocked by neutralizing MMP-1 monoclonal antibody and was not due to down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. TNF-α increased production (p < 0.01), tissue levels (p < 0.005) and catalytic activity of the endogenous MMP-1 activator MMP-3. Type I collagen degradation correlated with MMP-3 tissue levels (rs = 0.68, p < 0.05) and was attenuated with selective MMP-3 inhibitor. Type I collagen formation was down-regulated in cultured compared with native skin explants but was not reduced further by TNF-α. TNF-α had no significant effect on epidermal apoptosis. Our data indicate that TNF-α augments collagenolytic activity of MMP-1, possibly through up-regulation of MMP-3 leading to gradual loss of type I collagen in human skin. PMID:25457675

  2. Development of Composite Porous Scaffolds Based on Collagen and Biodegradable Poly(ester urethane)urea

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianjun; Stankus, John J.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective in this work was to develop a flexible, biodegradable scaffold for cell transplantation that would incorporate a synthetic component for strength and flexibility and type I collagen for enzymatic lability and cytocompatibility. A biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea was synthesized from poly(caprolactone), 1,4-diisocyanatobutane, and putrescine. Using a thermally induced phase separation process, porous scaffolds were created from a mixture containing this polyurethane and 0%, 10%, 20%, or 30% type I collagen. The resulting scaffolds were found to have open, interconnected pores (from 7 to >100 um) and porosities from 58% to 86% depending on the polyurethane/collagen ratio. The scaffolds were also flexible with breaking strains of 82–443% and tensile strengths of 0.97–4.11 MPa depending on preparation conditions. Scaffold degradation was significantly increased when collagenase was introduced into an incubating buffer in a manner that was dependent on the mass fraction of collagen present in the scaffold. Mass losses could be varied from 15% to 59% over 8 weeks. When culturing umbilical artery smooth muscle cells on these scaffolds higher cell numbers were observed over a 4-week culture period in scaffolds containing collagen. In summary, a strong and flexible scaffold system has been developed that can degrade by both hydrolysis and collagenase degradation pathways, as well as support cell growth. This scaffold possesses properties that would make it attractive for future use in soft tissue applications where such mechanical and biological features would be advantageous. PMID:16826792

  3. Design of a multiphase osteochondral scaffold. II. Fabrication of a mineralized collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Harley, Brendan A; Lynn, Andrew K; Wissner-Gross, Zachary; Bonfield, William; Yannas, Ioannis V; Gibson, Lorna J

    2010-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of papers describing the design and development of an osteochondral scaffold using collagen-glycosaminoglycan and calcium phosphate technologies engineered for the regenerative repair of articular cartilage defects. The previous paper described a technology (concurrent mapping) for systematic variation and control of the chemical composition of triple coprecipitated collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and calcium phosphate (CGCaP) nanocomposites without using titrants. This paper describes (1) fabricating porous, three-dimensional scaffolds from the CGCaP suspensions, (2) characterizing the microstructure and mechanical properties of such scaffolds, and (3) modifying the calcium phosphate mineral phase. The methods build on the previously demonstrated ability to vary the composition of a CGCaP suspension (calcium phosphate mass fraction between 0 and 80 wt %) and enable the production of scaffolds whose pore architecture (mean pore size: 50-1000 microm), CaP phase chemistry (brushite, octacalcium phosphate, apatite) and crosslinking density (therefore mechanical properties and degradation rate) can be independently controlled. The scaffolds described in this paper combine the desirable biochemical properties and pore architecture of porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with the strength and direct bone-bonding properties of calcium phosphate biomaterials in a manner that can be tailored to meet the demands of a range of applications in orthopedics and regenerative medicine.

  4. Cell growth and function on calcium phosphate reinforced chitosan scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-03-01

    Macroporous chitosan scaffolds reinforced by calcium phosphate powders such as hydroxyapatite (HA) or calcium phosphate invert glass were fabricated using a thermally induced phase separation technique. Human osteoblast-like MG63 cells were cultured on the composite scaffolds for up to 11 days, and the cell growth and function were analyzed. The cell growth is much faster on the chitosan/HA scaffolds incorporated with the glass (CHG) than on the chitosan/HA scaffold without the glass (CH). The total protein content of cells were quantified and increased over time on both composites (CH, CHG) but was significantly higher on CHG after 7 days of culture. The cells on CHG also expressed significantly higher amount of alkaline phosphatase at days 7 and 11 and osteocalcin at day 7 than those on CH. The results suggested that the addition of glass in chitosan/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds might enhance the proliferation and osteoblastic phenotype expression of MG63 cells. However, the chitosan-matrix scaffolds did not show higher phenotype expression of MG63 cells, in comparison with the TCPS plate, probably due to the degradation of chitosan and release of acidic byproducts. Larger amount of soluble calcium phosphate invert glasses should be added into the scaffolds to prevent chitosan from fast degradation that may affect the differentiation of osteoblast cells.

  5. Integrated Bi-Layered Scaffold for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Florczyk, Stephen J.; Bryers, James D.; Zhang, Miqin

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering poses the challenge of combining both cartilage and bone tissue engineering fundamentals. In this study, a sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate an integrated bi-layered scaffold based on degradable poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel. One layer of the integrated scaffold was designed with a single defined, monodispersed pore size of 38 μm and pore surfaces coated with hydroxyapatite particles to promote regrowth of subchondral bone while the second layer had 200 μm pores with surfaces decorated with hyaluronan for articular cartilage regeneration. Mechanical properties of the construct as well as cyto-compatibility of the scaffold and its degradation products were elucidated. To examine the potential of the biphasic scaffold for regeneration of osteochondral tissue the designated cartilage and bone layers of the integrated bi-layered scaffold were seeded with chondrocytes differentiated from human mesenchymal stem cells and primary human mesenchymal stem cells, respectively. Both types of cells were co-cultured within the scaffold in standard medium without soluble growth/differentiation factors over four weeks. The ability of the integrated bi-layered scaffold to support simultaneous matrix deposition and adequate cell growth of two distinct cell lineages in each layer during four weeks of co-culture in vitro in the absence of soluble growth factors was demonstrated. PMID:23225568

  6. Application of K/Sr co-doped calcium polyphosphate bioceramic as scaffolds for bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huixu; Wang, Qianbin; Ye, Qingsong; Wan, Changxiu; Li, Longjiang

    2012-04-01

    Ion doping is one of the most important methods to modify the properties of bioceramics for better biodegrade abilities, biomechanical properties, and biocompatibilities. This paper presents a novel ion doping method applied in calcium polyphosphate (CPP)-based bioceramic scaffolds substituted by potassium and strontium ions (K/Sr) to form (K/Sr-CPP) scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. The microstructure and crystallization of the scaffolds were detected by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compressive strength and degradation tests were assessed to evaluate the mechanical and chemical stabilities of K/Sr-CPP in vitro. The cell biocompatibility was measured with respect to the cytotoxicity of the extractions of scaffolds. Muscle pouches and bone implantation were performed to evaluate the biodegradability and osteoconductivity of the scaffolds. The results indicated that the obtained K/Sr-CPP scaffolds had a single beta-CPP phase. The unit cell volume and average grain size increased but the crystallization decreased after the ions were doped into the CPP structure. The K/Sr-CPP scaffolds yielded a higher compressive strength and a better degradation property than the pure CPP scaffold. The MTT assay and in vivo results reveal that the K/Sr-CPP scaffolds exhibited a better cell biocompatibility and a tissue biocompatibility than CPP and hydroxyapatite scaffolds. This study proves the potential applications of K/Sr-CPP scaffolds in bone repair.

  7. 3. General view of elevators no. 2 and no. 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of elevators no. 2 and no. 3 in background right, showing relation to associated Washburn Crosby Milling complex in foreground (left to right: utility building, A mill (with scaffolding), wheat house, Humboldt mill; elevator no. 1 in rear with gold medal flour sign), facing southeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  8. Oxygen diffusion in marine-derived tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, E; Belova, I V; Murch, G E; Boccaccini, A R; Fiedler, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the effective diffusivity in new bioactive glass (BG) based tissue engineering scaffolds. High diffusivities facilitate the supply of oxygen and nutrients to grown tissue as well as the rapid disposal of toxic waste products. The present study addresses required novel types of bone tissue engineering BG scaffolds that are derived from natural marine sponges. Using the foam replication method, the scaffold geometry is defined by the porous structure of Spongia Agaricina and Spongia Lamella. These sponges present the advantage of attaining scaffolds with higher mechanical properties (2-4 MPa) due to a decrease in porosity (68-76%). The effective diffusivities of these structures are compared with that of conventional scaffolds based on polyurethane (PU) foam templates, characterised by high porosity (>90%) and lower mechanical properties (>0.05 MPa). Both the spatial and directional variations of diffusivity are investigated. Furthermore, the effect of scaffold decomposition due to immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the diffusivity is addressed. Scaffolds based on natural marine sponges are characterised by lower oxygen diffusivity due to their lower porosity compared with the PU replica foams, which should enable the best oxygen supply to newly formed bone according the numerical results. The oxygen diffusivity of these new BG scaffolds increases over time as a consequence of the degradation in SBF.

  9. The effect of hyaluronic acid on biofunctionality of gelatin-collagen intestine tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shabafrooz, Vahid; Mozafari, Masoud; Köhler, Gerwald A; Assefa, Senait; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-09-01

    The creation of engineered intestinal tissue has recently stimulated new endeavors with the ultimate goal of intestinal replacement for massive resections of bowel. In this context, we investigated the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the physicochemical characteristics of gelatin-collagen scaffolds and its cytocompatibilty to the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line in vitro. Gelatin/collagen hybrid scaffolds with different concentrations of HA were prepared by solvent casting and freeze-drying techniques and subsequent chemical crosslinking by genipin. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro tests were carried out in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution to study the swelling ratio and the biostability of the scaffolds. It was found that the porous structure of the scaffolds could be tailored by further addition of HA. Moreover, both the swelling ratio and the degradation rate of the scaffold increased by addition of HA. A resazurin-based cell viability assay was employed to determine the viability and estimate the number of scaffold-adherent Caco-2 cells. The assay indicated that the scaffolds were all cytocompatible. We concluded that addition of less than 15% HA to scaffolds with a composition of 9:1 gelatin:collagen results only in incremental improvement in the structural characteristics and cytocompatibility of the gelatin-collagen scaffolds. However, the scaffolds with 25% HA exhibited remarkable enhancement in physicochemical characteristics of the scaffolds including cell viability, growth, and attachment as well as their physical structure.

  10. Development of porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramay, Hassna Rehman

    In bone tissue engineering, biodegradable scaffolds are used as a temporary biological and mechanical support for new tissue growth. A scaffold must have good biocompatibility, controllable degradation rate, and enough mechanical strength to support bone cell attachment, differentiation, and proliferation as it gradually degrades and finally is completely replaced by new bone tissues. Biological studies and clinical practices have established that a three-dimensional interconnected porous structure is necessary to allow cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and to provide pathways for biofluids. However, the mechanical strength of a material generally decreases as increasing porosity. The conflicting interests between biological and mechanical requirements thus pose a challenge in developing porous scaffolds for load-bearing bone tissue engineering. Two types of ceramic scaffolds, (1) Hydroxaypatite and (2) Hydroxaypatite/tricalcium phosphate, are prepared in this study utilizing a novel technique that combines the gel casting and polymer sponge methods. This technique provides better control over material microstructure and can produce scaffolds with enhanced mechanical toughness and strength. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds prepared by this technique have an open, uniform and interconnected porous structure (˜porosity = 76%) with compressive modulus of 7 GPa, comparable to that of cortical bone, and compressive strength of 5 MPa, comparable to that of cancellous bone. The second type of ceramic scaffold is a biphasic nano composite with tricalcium phosphate as the main matrix reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-fibers. The porous scaffold attained a compressive strength of 9.6 MPa (˜porosity = 73%), comparable to the high-end value of cancellous bone. The toughness of the scaffold increased from 1.00 to 1.72 kN/m (˜porosity = 73%), as the addition of HA nano-fibers increased up to 5 wt.%. Polymer scaffolds are prepared using a solid

  11. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M; Morrison, Wayne A; Dusting, Gregory J; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Lim, Shiang Y; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo.

  12. Exact approaches for scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents new structural and algorithmic results around the scaffolding problem, which occurs prominently in next generation sequencing. The problem can be formalized as an optimization problem on a special graph, the "scaffold graph". We prove that the problem is polynomial if this graph is a tree by providing a dynamic programming algorithm for this case. This algorithm serves as a basis to deduce an exact algorithm for general graphs using a tree decomposition of the input. We explore other structural parameters, proving a linear-size problem kernel with respect to the size of a feedback-edge set on a restricted version of Scaffolding. Finally, we examine some parameters of scaffold graphs, which are based on real-world genomes, revealing that the feedback edge set is significantly smaller than the input size. PMID:26451725

  13. Scaffold: Quantum Programming Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    it in pointer and addressing errors. • C2QG: A key feature of Scaffold is a Classical code to Quantum Gates sequence (C2QG) mod- ule. C2QG modules...Scaffold: Quantum Programming Language Ali Javadi Abhari, Arvin Faruque, Mohammad Javad Dousti, Lukas Svec, Oana Catu, Amlan Chakrabati, Chen-Fu...endorsements, either expressed or implied, of IARPA, DoI/NBC, or the U.S. Government. 1 Introduction Quantum computing is of significant research

  14. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid mesh coated with fibrin or collagen and biological adhesive substance as a prefabricated, degradable, biocompatible, and functional scaffold for regeneration of the urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Salem, Salah Abood; Hwei, Ng Min; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Ho, Christopher C K; Sagap, Ismail; Singh, Rajesh; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Md Zainuddin, Zulkifili; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2013-08-01

    The chief obstacle for reconstructing the bladder is the absence of a biomaterial, either permanent or biodegradable, that will function as a suitable scaffold for the natural process of regeneration. In this study, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) plus collagen or fibrin was evaluated for its suitability as a scaffold for urinary bladder construct. Human adipose-derived stem cells (HADSCs) were cultured, followed by incubation in smooth muscle cells differentiation media. Differentiated HADSCs were then seeded onto PLGA mesh supported with collagen or fibrin. Evaluation of cell-seeded PLGA composite immersed in culture medium was performed under a light and scanning microscope. To determine if the composite is compatible with the urodynamic properties of urinary bladder, porosity and leaking test was performed. The PLGA samples were subjected to tensile testing was pulled until PLGA fibers break. The results showed that the PLGA composite is biocompatible to differentiated HADSCs. PLGA-collagen mesh appeared to be optimal as a cell carrier while the three-layered PLGA-fibrin composite is better in relation to its leaking/ porosity property. A biomechanical test was also performed for three-layered PLGA with biological adhesive and three-layered PLGA alone. The tensile stress at failure was 30.82 ± 3.80 (MPa) and 34.36 ± 2.57 (MPa), respectively. Maximum tensile strain at failure was 19.42 ± 2.24 (mm) and 23.06 ± 2.47 (mm), respectively. Young's modulus was 0.035 ± 0.0083 and 0.043 ± 0.012, respectively. The maximum load at break was 58.55 ± 7.90 (N) and 65.29 ± 4.89 (N), respectively. In conclusion, PLGA-Fibrin fulfils the criteria as a scaffold for urinary bladder reconstruction.

  15. Development of model hydroxyapatite bone scaffolds with multiscale porosity for potential load bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne

    2005-11-01

    Model hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffolds consisting of a latticed pattern of rods were fabricated by a solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technique based on the robotic deposition of colloidal pastes. An optimal HA paste formulation for this method was developed. Local porosity, i.e. microporosity (1--30 mum) and sintering porosity (less than 1 mum), were produced by including polymer microsphere porogens in the HA pastes and by controlling the sintering of the scaffolds. Scaffolds with and without local porosity were evaluated with and without in vitro accelerated degradation. Percent weight loss of the scaffolds and calcium and phosphorus concentrations in solution increased with degradation time. After degradation, compressive strength and modulus decreased significantly for scaffolds with local porosity, but did not change significantly for scaffolds without local porosity. The compressive strength and modulus of scaffolds without local porosity were comparable to human cortical bone and were significantly greater than the scaffolds with local porosity. Micropores in HA disks caused surface pits that increased the surface roughness as compared to non-microporous HA disks. Mouse mesenchymal stem cells extended their cell processes into these microporous pits on HA disks in vitro. ALP expression was prolonged, cell attachment strength increased, and ECM production appeared greater on microporous HA disks compared to non-microporous HA disks and tissue culture treated polystyrene controls. Scaffolds with and without microporosity were implanted in goats bones. Microporous scaffolds with rhBMP-2 increased the percent of the scaffold filled with bone tissue compared to microporous scaffolds without rhBMP-2. Lamellar bone inside scaffolds was aligned near the rods junctions whereas lamellar bone was aligned in a more random configuration away from the rod junctions. Microporous scaffolds stained darkly with toluidine blue beneath areas of contact with new bone. This

  16. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of electro-spun biodegradable polymer scaffolds: Experimental characterisation and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Georges; Omar, Rodaina; Krynauw, Hugo; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Franz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Electro-spun biodegradable polymer fibrous structures exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties dependent on the degree of fibre alignment. Degradation and mechanical anisotropy need to be captured in a constitutive formulation when computational modelling is used in the development and design optimisation of such scaffolds. Biodegradable polyester-urethane scaffolds were electro-spun and underwent uniaxial tensile testing in and transverse to the direction of predominant fibre alignment before and after in vitro degradation of up to 28 days. A microstructurally-based transversely isotropic hyperelastic continuum constitutive formulation was developed and its parameters were identified from the experimental stress-strain data of the scaffolds at various stages of degradation. During scaffold degradation, maximum stress and strain in circumferential direction decreased from 1.02 ± 0.23 MPa to 0.38 ± 0.004 MPa and from 46 ± 11 % to 12 ± 2 %, respectively. In longitudinal direction, maximum stress and strain decreased from 0.071 ± 0.016 MPa to 0.010 ± 0.007 MPa and from 69 ± 24 % to 8 ± 2 %, respectively. The constitutive parameters were identified for both directions of the non-degraded and degraded scaffold for strain range varying between 0% and 16% with coefficients of determination r(2)>0.871. The six-parameter constitutive formulation proved versatile enough to capture the varying non-linear transversely isotropic behaviour of the fibrous scaffold throughout various stages of degradation.

  17. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered.

  18. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  19. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  20. In vivo monitoring of structural and mechanical changes of tissue scaffolds by multi-modality imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Ye, Sang-Ho; Jiang, Hong Bin; Dutta, Debaditya; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Wagner, William R.; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Degradable tissue scaffolds are implanted to serve a mechanical role while healing processes occur and putatively assume the physiological load as the scaffold degrades. Mechanical failure during this period can be unpredictable as monitoring of structural degradation and mechanical strength changes at the implant site is not readily achieved in vivo, and non-invasively. To address this need, a multi-modality approach using ultrasound shear wave imaging (USWI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for both mechanical and structural assessment in vivo was demonstrated with degradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and polydioxanone (PDO) scaffolds. The fibrous scaffolds were fabricated with wet electrospinning, dyed with indocyanine green (ICG) for optical contrast in PAI, and implanted in the abdominal wall of 36 rats. The scaffolds were monitored monthly using USWI and PAI and were extracted at 0, 4, 8 and 12 wk for mechanical and histological assessment. The change in shear modulus of the constructs in vivo obtained by USWI correlated with the change in average Young's modulus of the constructs ex vivo obtained by compression measurements. The PEUU and PDO scaffolds exhibited distinctly different degradation rates and average PAI signal intensity. The distribution of PAI signal intensity also corresponded well to the remaining scaffolds as seen in explant histology. This evidence using a small animal abdominal wall repair model demonstrates that multi-modality imaging of USWI and PAI may allow tissue engineers to noninvasively evaluate concurrent mechanical stiffness and structural changes of tissue constructs in vivo for a variety of applications. PMID:24951048

  1. ELEVATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Frederick, H.S.; Kinsella, M.A.

    1959-02-24

    An elevator is described, which is arranged for movement both in a horizontal and in a vertical direction so that the elevating mechanism may be employed for servicing equipment at separated points in a plant. In accordance with the present invention, the main elevator chassis is suspended from a monorail. The chassis, in turn supports a vertically moveable carriage, a sub- carriage vertically moveable on the carriage, and a turntable carried by the sub- carriage and moveable through an arc of 90 with the equipment attached thereto. In addition, the chassis supports all the means required to elevate or rotate the equipment.

  2. Triggerable Degradation of Polyurethanes for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cancan; Huang, Yihui; Wu, Jinglei; Tang, Liping; Hong, Yi

    2015-09-16

    Tissue engineered and bioactive scaffolds with different degradation rates are required for the regeneration of diverse tissues/organs. To optimize tissue regeneration in different tissues, it is desirable that the degradation rate of scaffolds can be manipulated to comply with various stages of tissue regeneration. Unfortunately, the degradation of most degradable polymers relies solely on passive controlled degradation mechanisms. To overcome this challenge, we report a new family of reduction-sensitive biodegradable elastomeric polyurethanes containing various amounts of disulfide bonds (PU-SS), in which degradation can be initiated and accelerated with the supplement of a biological product: antioxidant-glutathione (GSH). The polyurethanes can be processed into films and electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Synthesized materials exhibited robust mechanical properties and high elasticity. Accelerated degradation of the materials was observed in the presence of GSH, and the rate of such degradation depends on the amount of disulfide present in the polymer backbone. The polymers and their degradation products exhibited no apparent cell toxicity while the electrospun scaffolds supported fibroblast growth in vitro. The in vivo subcutaneous implantation model showed that the polymers prompt minimal inflammatory responses, and as anticipated, the polymer with the higher disulfide bond amount had faster degradation in vivo. This new family of polyurethanes offers tremendous potential for directed scaffold degradation to promote maximal tissue regeneration.

  3. Porous Collagen Scaffold Reinforced with Surfaced Activated PLLA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cancan; Lu, Wei; Bian, Shaoquan; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-01-01

    Porous collagen scaffold is integrated with surface activated PLLA nanoparticles fabricated by lyophilizing and crosslinking via EDC treatment. In order to prepare surface-modified PLLA nanoparticles, PLLA was firstly grafted with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) through surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid. Nanoparticles of average diameter 316 nm and zeta potential −39.88 mV were obtained from the such-treated PLLA by dialysis method. Porous collagen scaffold were fabricated by mixing PLLA nanoparticles with collagen solution, freeze drying, and crosslinking with EDC. SEM observation revealed that nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed in collagen matrix, forming interconnected porous structure with pore size ranging from 150 to 200 μm, irrespective of the amount of nanoparticles. The porosity of the scaffolds kept almost unchanged with the increment of the nanoparticles, whereas the mechanical property was obviously improved, and the degradation was effectively retarded. In vitro L929 mouse fibroblast cells seeding and culture studies revealed that cells infiltrated into the scaffolds and were distributed homogeneously. Compared with the pure collagen sponge, the number of cells in hybrid scaffolds greatly increased with the increment of incorporated nanoparticles. These results manifested that the surface-activated PLLA nanoparticles effectively reinforced the porous collagen scaffold and promoted the cells penetrating into the scaffold, and proliferation. PMID:22448137

  4. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli.

  5. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  6. In vitro evaluation of alginate/halloysite nanotube composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; Dai, Libing; Shi, Huizhe; Xiong, Sheng; Zhou, Changren

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a series of alginate/halloysite nanotube (HNTs) composite scaffolds were prepared by solution-mixing and freeze-drying method. HNTs are incorporated into alginate to improve both the mechanical and cell-attachment properties of the scaffolds. The interfacial interactions between alginate and HNTs were confirmed by the atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and FTIR spectroscopy. The mechanical, morphological, and physico-chemical properties of the composite scaffolds were investigated. The composite scaffolds exhibit significant enhancement in compressive strength and compressive modulus compared with pure alginate scaffold both in dry and wet states. A well-interconnected porous structure with size in the range of 100-200μm and over 96% porosity is found in the composite scaffolds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) result shows that HNTs are uniformly dispersed and partly oriented in the composite scaffolds. The incorporation of HNTs leads to increase in the scaffold density and decrease in the water swelling ratio of alginate. HNTs improve the stability of alginate scaffolds against enzymatic degradation in PBS solution. Thermogravimetrica analysis (TGA) shows that HNTs can improve the thermal stability of the alginate. The mouse fibroblast cells display better attachment to the alginate/HNT composite than those to the pure alginate, suggesting the good cytocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. Alginate/HNT composite scaffolds exhibit great potential for applications in tissue engineering.

  7. Clinoptilolite/PCL-PEG-PCL composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Pazarçeviren, Engin; Erdemli, Özge; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize highly porous clinoptilolite/poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) composite scaffolds. Scaffolds with different clinoptilolite contents (10% and 20%) were fabricated with reproducible solvent-free powder compression/particulate leaching technique. The scaffolds had interconnective porosity in the range of 55-76%. Clinoptilolite/poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds showed negligible degradation within eight weeks and displayed less water uptake and higher bioactivity than poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds. The presence of clinoptilolite improved the mechanical properties. Highest compressive strength (5.6 MPa) and modulus (114.84 MPa) were reached with scaffold group containing 20% clinoptilolite. In vitro protein adsorption capacity of the scaffolds was also higher for clinoptilolite/poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds. These scaffolds had 0.95 mg protein/g scaffold adsorption capacity and also higher osteoinductivity in terms of enhanced ALP, OSP activities and intracellular calcium deposition. Stoichiometric apatite deposition (Ca/P=1.686) was observed during cellular proliferation analysis with human fetal osteoblasts cells. Thus, it can be suggested that clinoptilolite/poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) composite scaffolds could be promising carriers for enhancement of bone regeneration in bone tissue engineering applications.

  8. Chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianshuo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Chen, Yong; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    A novel composite scaffold based on chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite (CS-COL/OMMT) was prepared to improve swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio, biomineralization and mechanical properties for use in tissue engineering applications. In order to expend the basal spacing, montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and was characterized by XRD, TGA and FTIR. The results indicated that the anionic surfactants entered into interlayer of MMT and the basal spacing of MMT was expanded to 3.85 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio and mechanical properties of composite scaffolds were also studied. The results demonstrated that the scaffold decreased swelling ratio, degradation ratio and improved mechanical and biomineralization properties because of OMMT.

  9. Biomolecule Gradient in Micropatterned Nanofibrous Scaffold for Spatiotemporal Release

    PubMed Central

    Bonani, Walter; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Tan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Controlled molecule release from scaffolds can dramatically increase the scaffold ability of directing tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to the regeneration is precise regulation over release direction and kinetics of multiple molecules (small genes, peptides, or larger proteins). To this end, we developed gradient micropatterns of electrospun nanofibers along the scaffold thickness through programming the deposition of heterogeneous nanofibers of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA). Confocal images of the scaffolds containing fluorophore-impregnated nanofibers demonstrated close matching of actual and designed gradient fiber patterns; thermal analyses further showed their matching in the composition. Using acid-terminated PLGA (PLGAac) and ester-terminated PLGA (PLGAes) to impregnate molecules in the PCL-PLGA scaffolds, we demonstrated for the first time their differences in nanofiber degeneration and molecular weight change during degradation. PLGAac nanofibers were more stable with gradual and steady increase in the fiber diameter during degradation, resulting in more spatially confined molecule delivery from PCL-PLGA scaffolds. Thus, patterns of PCL-PLGAac nanofibers were used to design versatile controlled delivery scaffolds. To test the hypothesis that molecule-impregnated PLGAac in the gradient-patterned PCL-PLGAac scaffolds can program various modalities of molecule release, model molecules, including small fluorophores and larger proteins, were respectively used for time-lapse release studies. Gradient-patterns were used as building blocks in the scaffolds to program simultaneous release of one or multiple proteins to one side or, respectively, to the opposite sides of scaffolds for up to 50 days. Results showed that the separation efficiency of molecule delivery from all the scaffolds with a thickness of 200 μm achieved >88% for proteins and >82% for small molecules. In addition to versatile

  10. In vitro assessment of three-dimensionally plotted nagelschmidtite bioceramic scaffolds with varied macropore morphologies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2014-01-01

    It is known that porous scaffolds play an important role in bone/periodontal tissue engineering. A new nagelschmidtite (NAGEL, Ca7Si2P2O16) ceramic has recently been prepared which shows excellent apatite mineralization ability and osteo-/cementostimulation properties in vitro. However, up to now porous NAGEL scaffolds have not been developed yet. There has been no systematic study of the effect of macropore morphology of bioceramic scaffolds on their physico-chemical and biological properties. The aim of this study was to prepare NAGEL scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. We applied a modified three-dimensional (3-D) plotting method to prepare highly controllable NAGEL scaffolds and investigated the effect of macropore morphology on the physico-chemical and biological properties. The results showed that the macropore size and morphology of 3-D plotted NAGEL scaffolds could be effectively controlled. Compared with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds NAGEL scaffolds possess a significantly enhanced compressive strength, a higher modulus and better degradability. Nagel scaffolds with a square pore morphology presented a higher compressive strength, a higher modulus and greater weight loss rate than those with triangular and parallelogram pore morphologies. In addition, all of the NAGEL scaffolds with the three macropore morphologies supported the attachment and proliferation of MC3T3 cells. The proliferation of MC3T3 cells on NAGEL scaffolds with triangular and parallelogram structures was higher than that on β-TCP scaffolds with the same pore structure. Cells on all three groups of NAGEL scaffolds revealed higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared with cells on β-TCP scaffolds, and among the three NAGEL scaffolds groups those with a parallelogram pore structure showed the highest ALP activity. Furthermore, the angiogenic cell experiments showed that the ionic products from NAGEL scaffolds promoted tube formation, expression of pro

  11. Biodegradability and biocompatibility study of poly(chitosan-g-lactic acid) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Cui, Huifei

    2012-03-14

    A biodegradable, biocompatible poly(chitosan-g-lactic acid) (PCLA) scaffold was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The PCLA scaffold was obtained by grafting lactic acid (LA) onto the amino groups on chitosan (CS) without a catalyst. The PCLA scaffolds were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biodegradabilty was determined by mass loss in vitro, and degradation in vivo as a function of feed ratio of LA/CS. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) culture experiments and histological examination were performed to evaluate the PCLA scaffolds' biocompatibility. The results indicated that PCLA was promising for tissue engineering application.

  12. Nanocomposite scaffold with enhanced stability by hydrogen bonds between collagen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Fan, Xialian; Tang, Keyong; Zheng, Xuejing; Liu, Jie; Wang, Baoshi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffolds, as potential substrates for skin tissue engineering, were fabricated by freeze drying the mixture of type I collagen extracted from porcine skin and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. This procedure was performed without any cross-linker or toxic reagents to generate porosity in the scaffold. Both morphology and thermal stability of the nanocomposite scaffold were examined. The swelling behavior, mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation of the composite scaffolds were carefully investigated. Our results revealed that collagen, PVP and TiO2 are bonded together by four main hydrogen bonds, which is an essential action for the formation of nanocomposite scaffold. Using Coasts-Redfern model, we were able to calculate the thermal degradation apparent activation energy and demonstrated that the thermal stability of nanocomposites is dependent on amount of PVP incorporated. Furthermore, SEM images showed that the collagen fibers are wrapped and stabilized on scaffolds by PVP molecules, which improve the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The UTS of PVP-contained scaffold is four times higher than that of scaffold without PVP, whereas ultimate percentage of elongation (UPE) is decreased, and PVP can enhance the degradation resistance.

  13. Development of Novel Biocomposite Scaffold of Chitosan-Gelatin/Nanohydroxyapatite for Potential Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Yang; Liu, Ouyang; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Feng, Xiao-bo; Shao, Zeng-wu; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shu-Hua; Hong, Ji-bo

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional chitosan-gelatin/nanohydroxyapatite (ChG/nHaP) scaffold was successfully fabricated and characterized in terms of swelling, degradation, cell proliferation, cell attachment, and mineralization characterizations. The ChG/nHaP scaffold was fabricated with a mean pore size of 100-180 μm. Our results showed that the physicochemical and biological properties of the scaffolds were affected by the presence of HaP. The swelling and degradation characteristics of the ChG scaffold were remarkably decreased by the addition of HaP. On the other hand, the presence of HaP remarkably improved the MC3T3-E1 cell attachment and cell growth in the scaffold membrane. The biocompatible nature of the ChG/nHaP scaffold leads to the development of finely scaled mineral deposits on the scaffold membrane. Thus, HaP played an important role in improving the biological performance of the scaffold. Therefore, the ChG/nHaP scaffold could be applied as a suitable material for bone tissue engineering applications.

  14. Effect of silanization on chitosan porous scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Guicai; Zhang, Luzhong; Wang, Caiping; Zhao, Xueying; Zhu, Changlai; Zheng, Yanhong; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Yahong; Yang, Yumin

    2014-01-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTE) silanization treatment for modification and biocompatibility of lyophilized chitosan porous scaffolds. The process is beneficial for biomaterial development due to its low toxicity and simplicity. The silanization treatment with low APTE concentration showed no significant influence on the morphology of chitosan scaffolds, while a skin-like surface was observed for the silanized scaffolds treated with high APTE concentration. The porosity and surface amino densities were increased after silanization whereas the swelling ratio was reduced, and the degradation ratio in PBS and anti-acid degradation properties of the silanized chitosan scaffolds were significantly improved. The in vitro Schwann cells culture demonstrated that the silanized scaffolds with 8% APTE could obviously facilitate the attachment and proliferation of Schwann cells, indicating great potential for the application in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhen; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    Porous scaffolds fabricated from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers play vital roles in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Among various scaffold matrix materials, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) is a very popular and an important biodegradable polyester owing to its tunable degradation rates, good mechanical properties and processibility, etc. This review highlights the progress on PLGA scaffolds. In the latest decade, some facile fabrication approaches at room temperature were put forward; more appropriate pore structures were designed and achieved; the mechanical properties were investigated both for dry and wet scaffolds; a long time biodegradation of the PLGA scaffold was observed and a three-stage model was established; even the effects of pore size and porosity on in vitro biodegradation were revealed; the PLGA scaffolds have also been implanted into animals, and some tissues have been regenerated in vivo after loading cells including stem cells. PMID:23741612

  16. L_RNA_scaffolder: scaffolding genomes with transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of large mate-pair libraries is necessary for de novo genome assembly but the procedure is complex and time-consuming. Furthermore, in some complex genomes, it is hard to increase the N50 length even with large mate-pair libraries, which leads to low transcript coverage. Thus, it is necessary to develop other simple scaffolding approaches, to at least solve the elongation of transcribed fragments. Results We describe L_RNA_scaffolder, a novel genome scaffolding method that uses long transcriptome reads to order, orient and combine genomic fragments into larger sequences. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, the zebrafish genome was scaffolded. With expanded human transcriptome data, the N50 of human genome was doubled and L_RNA_scaffolder out-performed most scaffolding results by existing scaffolders which employ mate-pair libraries. In these two examples, the transcript coverage was almost complete, especially for long transcripts. We applied L_RNA_scaffolder to the highly polymorphic pearl oyster draft genome and the gene model length significantly increased. Conclusions The simplicity and high-throughput of RNA-seq data makes this approach suitable for genome scaffolding. L_RNA_scaffolder is available at http://www.fishbrowser.org/software/L_RNA_scaffolder. PMID:24010822

  17. Bone tissue engineering scaffolding: computer-aided scaffolding techniques.

    PubMed

    Thavornyutikarn, Boonlom; Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai; Thouas, George A; Chen, Qizhi

    Tissue engineering is essentially a technique for imitating nature. Natural tissues consist of three components: cells, signalling systems (e.g. growth factors) and extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM forms a scaffold for its cells. Hence, the engineered tissue construct is an artificial scaffold populated with living cells and signalling molecules. A huge effort has been invested in bone tissue engineering, in which a highly porous scaffold plays a critical role in guiding bone and vascular tissue growth and regeneration in three dimensions. In the last two decades, numerous scaffolding techniques have been developed to fabricate highly interconnective, porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. This review provides an update on the progress of foaming technology of biomaterials, with a special attention being focused on computer-aided manufacturing (Andrade et al. 2002) techniques. This article starts with a brief introduction of tissue engineering (Bone tissue engineering and scaffolds) and scaffolding materials (Biomaterials used in bone tissue engineering). After a brief reviews on conventional scaffolding techniques (Conventional scaffolding techniques), a number of CAM techniques are reviewed in great detail. For each technique, the structure and mechanical integrity of fabricated scaffolds are discussed in detail. Finally, the advantaged and disadvantage of these techniques are compared (Comparison of scaffolding techniques) and summarised (Summary).

  18. Preparation, physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of PBLG/PLGA/bioglass composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ning; Qian, Junmin; Wang, Jinlei; Ji, Chuanlei; Xu, Weijun; Wang, Hongjie

    2017-02-01

    In this study, novel poly(γ-benzyl l-glutamate)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/bioglass (PBLG/PLGA/BG) composite scaffolds with different weight ratios were fabricated using a negative NaCl-templating method. The morphology, compression modulus and degradation kinetics of the scaffolds were characterized. The results showed that the PBLG/PLGA/BG composite scaffolds with a weight ratio of 5:5:1, namely PBLG5PLGA5BG composite scaffolds, displayed a pore size range of 50-500μm, high compressive modulus (566.6±8.8kPa), suitable glass transition temperature (46.8±0.2°C) and low degradation rate (>8weeks). The in vitro biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated with MC3T3-E1 cells by live-dead staining, MTT and ALP activity assays. The obtained results indicated that the PBLG5PLGA5BG composite scaffolds were more conducive to the adhesion, proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells than PBLG and PBLG/PLGA composite scaffolds. The in vivo biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated in both SD rat subcutaneous model and rabbit tibia defect model. The results of H&E, Masson's trichrome and CD34 staining assays demonstrated that the PBLG5PLGA5BG composite scaffolds allowed the ingrowth of tissue and microvessels more effectively than PBLG/PLGA composite scaffolds. The results of digital radiography confirmed that the PBLG5PLGA5BG composite scaffolds significantly improved in vivo osteogenesis. Collectively, the PBLG5PLGA5BG composite scaffolds could be a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Electrospun biodegradable calcium containing poly(ester-urethane)urea: synthesis, fabrication, in vitro degradation, and biocompatibility evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Priya A; Ramesh, P

    2013-07-01

    In this work an in vitro degradable poly(ester-urethane)urea (PEUU) was synthesized using polycaprolactone diol, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and calcium salt of p-aminobenzoic acid. The synthesized polymer was characterized by (1) H-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy and viscosity studies. Scaffolds having random micro fibrous structures were fabricated from PEUU by electrospinning process. The thermal properties of the scaffold were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis. The mechanical property evaluation showed that the scaffold possess sufficiently high tensile strength of 16 MPa. The in vitro degradation studies of the electrospun scaffold were carried out in phosphate buffer saline for 6 months. The average mass loss of the scaffold after 6 months of hydrolytic degradation was 25%. FTIR spectroscopy study confirmed the degradation of the PEUU from decrease in intensity of 1400 cm(-1) peak corresponding to ionic carboxylate group. Presence of amine group and calcium ions in the degradation medium further confirmed the degradation of the hard segment in the hydrolytic medium. The mechanical property evaluation of the scaffold indicated a gradual decrease in tensile strength and modulus whereas percentage elongation of the scaffold increases with time of in vitro degradation. The morphological evaluation of the scaffold after degradation by SEM shows evidence of broken fibers and pores in the scaffold. Preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both the material and the degradation products were noncytotoxic in nature and the material showed good proliferation to L-929 cells.

  20. Semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) gelatin nanofiber scaffolds for oral mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aduba, Donald C; Hammer, Jeremy A; Yuan, Quan; Yeudall, W Andrew; Bowlin, Gary L; Yang, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The oral mucosa is a promising absorption site for drug administration because it is permeable, highly vascularized and allows for ease of administration. Nanofiber scaffolds for local or systemic drug delivery through the oral mucosa, however, have not been fully explored. In this work, we fabricated electrospun gelatin nanofiber scaffolds for oral mucosal drug delivery. To improve structural stability of the electrospun gelatin scaffolds and allow non-invasive incorporation of therapeutics into the scaffold, we employed photo-reactive polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA575, 575 gmol(-1)) as a cross-linker to stabilize the scaffold by forming semi-interpenetrating network gelatin nanofiber scaffolds (sIPN NSs), during which cross-linker concentration was varied (1×, 2×, 4× and 8×). The results showed that electrospun gelatin nanofiber scaffolds after being cross-linked with PEG-DA575 (i.e. sIPN NS1×, 2×, 4× and 8×) retained fiber morphology and possessed improved structural stability. A series of structural parameters and properties of the cross-linked electrospun gelatin scaffolds were systematically characterized in terms of morphology, fiber diameter, mechanical properties, porosity, swelling and degradation. Mucin absorption onto sIPN NS4× was also confirmed, indicating this scaffold possessed greatest mucoadhesion properties among those tested. Slow release of nystatin, an anti-fungal reagent, from the sIPN gelatin nanofiber scaffold was demonstrated.

  1. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Pramanik, Krishna; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S) in the size range of 20–30 nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30 wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40 wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to obtain interconnected porous 3D microstructure with improved mechanical strength. The prepared scaffolds exhibited >80% porosity with a mean pore size range between 100 and 300 microns. Scaffold containing 30 wt% bioglass (GCB 30) showed a maximum compressive strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 MPa. Swelling and degradation studies showed that the scaffold had excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. GCB 30 scaffold was shown to be noncytotoxic and supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as indicated by MTT assay and RUNX-2 expression. Higher cellular activity was observed in GCB 30 scaffold as compared to GCB 0 scaffold suggesting the fact that 58S bioglass nanoparticles addition into the scaffold promoted better cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, the study showed that the developed composite scaffolds are potential candidates for regenerating damaged bone tissue. PMID:26884764

  2. Scaffolding Reading Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Ashraf Atta Mohamed Safein

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates whether English language teachers use scaffolding strategies for developing their students' reading comprehension skills or just for assessing their comprehension. It also tries to demonstrate whether teachers are aware of these strategies or they use them as a matter of habit. A questionnaire as well as structured…

  3. Indirect additive manufacturing as an elegant tool for the production of self-supporting low density gelatin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Van Hoorick, Jasper; Declercq, Heidi; De Muynck, Amelie; Houben, Annemie; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cornelissen, Ria; Van Erps, Jürgen; Thienpont, Hugo; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra

    2015-10-01

    The present work describes for the first time the production of self-supporting low gelatin density (<10 w/v%) porous scaffolds using methacrylamide-modified gelatin as an extracellular matrix mimicking component. As porous scaffolds starting from low gelatin concentrations cannot be realized with the conventional additive manufacturing techniques in the abscence of additives, we applied an indirect fused deposition modelling approach. To realize this, we have printed a sacrificial polyester scaffold which supported the hydrogel material during UV crosslinking, thereby preventing hydrogel structure collapse. After complete curing, the polyester scaffold was selectively dissolved leaving behind a porous, interconnective low density gelatin scaffold. Scaffold structural analysis indicated the success of the selected indirect additive manufacturing approach. Physico-chemical testing revealed scaffold properties (mechanical, degradation, swelling) to depend on the applied gelatin concentration and methacrylamide content. Preliminary biocompatibility studies revealed the cell-interactive and biocompatible properties of the materials developed.

  4. Vaporizable Scaffolds for Fabricating Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Yen, Shiao-pin; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating thermoelectric modules with vacuum gaps separating the thermoelectric legs has been conceived, and the feasibility of some essential parts of the process has been demonstrated. The vacuum gaps are needed to electrically insulate the legs from each other. The process involves the use of scaffolding in the form of sheets of a polymer to temporarily separate the legs by the desired distance, which is typically about 0.5 mm. During a bonding subprocess that would take place in a partial vacuum at an elevated temperature, the polymer would be vaporized, thereby creating the vacuum gaps.

  5. Regenerated cellulose scaffolds: Preparation, characterization and toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Júnior, Adalberto M; Braido, Guilherme; Saska, Sybele; Barud, Hernane S; Franchi, Leonardo P; Assunção, Rosana M N; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Capote, Ticiana S O; Messaddeq, Younès; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2016-01-20

    Regenerated cellulose scaffolds (RCS) may be used as alloplastic materials for tissue repair. In this work, the RCS were obtained by viscose process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG). In vitro enzymatic degradation assay and toxicological assays were also evaluated. The physicochemical characterizations revealed the formation of a porous material with distinct thermal profile and crystallinity compared to pristine cellulose pulp. Enzymatic degradation assay revealed that lysozyme showed a mildest catalytic action when compared to cellulase, Tricoderma reesei (Tr). Nevertheless, both enzymes were efficient for degrading the RCS. RCS did not show cytotoxicity, mutagenic or genotoxic effects. The systematically characterization of this work suggests that RCS presented distinct features that make it a viable material for future studies related to the development of scaffolds for biological applications.

  6. Effects of designed PLLA and 50:50PLGA scaffold architectures on bone formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Eiji; Liao, Elly E.; Hu, Wei-Wen; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable porous scaffolds have been investigated as an alternative approach to current metal, ceramic, and polymer bone graft substitutes for lost or damaged bone tissues. Although there have been many studies investigating the effects of scaffold architecture on bone formation, many of these scaffolds were fabricated using conventional methods, such as salt leaching and phase separation, and were constructed without designed architecture. To study the effects of both designed architecture and material on bone formation, we designed and fabricated three types of porous scaffold architecture from two biodegradable materials, poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and 50:50Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) using image based design and indirect solid freeform fabrication techniques, seeded them with bone morphogenic protein-7 transduced human gingival fibroblasts and implanted them subcutaneously into mice for 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-computed tomography data confirmed that the fabricated porous scaffolds replicated the designed architectures. Histological analysis revealed that the 50:50PLGA scaffolds degraded and did not maintain their architecture after 4 weeks. The PLLA scaffolds maintained their architecture at both time points and showed improved bone ingrowth which followed the internal architecture of the scaffolds. Mechanical properties of both PLLA and 50:50PLGA scaffolds decreased, but PLLA scaffolds maintained greater mechanical properties than 50:50PLGA after implantation. The increase of mineralized tissue helped to support mechanical properties of bone tissue and scaffold constructs from 4 to 8 weeks. The results indicated the importance of choice of scaffold materials and computationally designed scaffolds to control tissue formation and mechanical properties for desired bone tissue regeneration. PMID:22162220

  7. Computational modelling of local calcium ions release from calcium phosphate-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Varun; Guyot, Yann; Kerckhofs, Greet; Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet

    2017-04-01

    A variety of natural or synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP)-based scaffolds are currently produced for dental and orthopaedic applications. These scaffolds have been shown to stimulate bone formation due to their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. The release of the [Formula: see text] ions from these scaffolds is of great interest in light of the aforementioned properties. It can depend on a number of biophysicochemical phenomena such as dissolution, diffusion and degradation, which in turn depend on specific scaffold characteristics such as composition and morphology. Achieving an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying on traditional experimental work alone. Mathematical modelling can complement experimentation. In this study, the in vitro dissolution behaviour of four CaP-based scaffold types was investigated experimentally. Subsequently, a mechanistic finite element method model based on biophysicochemical phenomena and specific scaffold characteristics was developed to predict the experimentally observed behaviour. Before the model could be used for local [Formula: see text] ions release predictions, certain parameters such as dissolution constant ([Formula: see text]) and degradation constant ([Formula: see text]) for each type of scaffold were determined by calibrating the model to the in vitro dissolution data. The resulting model showed to yield release characteristics in satisfactory agreement with those observed experimentally. This suggests that the mathematical model can be used to investigate the local [Formula: see text] ions release from CaP-based scaffolds.

  8. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Repair of Injured Skeletal Muscle With a Shape-memory Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Cao, Lan; Shansky, Janet; Wang, Zheng; Mooney, David; Vandenburgh, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Repair of injured skeletal muscle by cell therapies has been limited by poor survival of injected cells. Use of a carrier scaffold delivering cells locally, may enhance in vivo cell survival, and promote skeletal muscle regeneration. Biomaterial scaffolds are often implanted into muscle tissue through invasive surgeries, which can result in trauma that delays healing. Minimally invasive approaches to scaffold implantation are thought to minimize these adverse effects. This hypothesis was addressed in the context of a severe mouse skeletal muscle injury model. A degradable, shape-memory alginate scaffold that was highly porous and compressible was delivered by minimally invasive surgical techniques to injured tibialis anterior muscle. The scaffold controlled was quickly rehydrated in situ with autologous myoblasts and growth factors (either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) alone or IGF-1 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). The implanted scaffolds delivering myoblasts and IGF-1 significantly reduced scar formation, enhanced cell engraftment, and improved muscle contractile function. The addition of VEGF to the scaffold further improved functional recovery likely through increased angiogenesis. Thus, the delivery of myoblasts and dual local release of VEGF and IGF-1 from degradable scaffolds implanted through a minimally invasive procedure effectively promoted the functional regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:24769909

  9. Evidence of Innervation following Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Mediated Remodeling of Muscular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Brown, Bryan N.; Beattie, Allison J.; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring porcine derived extracellular matrix (ECM) has successfully been used as a biologic scaffold material for site-specific reconstruction of a wide variety of tissues. The site-specific remodeling process includes rapid degradation of the scaffold with concomitant recruitment of mononuclear cells, endothelial cells, and bone marrow derived cells, and can lead to formation of functional skeletal and smooth muscle tissue. However, the temporal and spatial patterns of innervation of the remodeling scaffold material in muscular tissues are not well understood. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the presence of nervous tissue in a rat model of abdominal wall reconstruction and a canine model of esophageal reconstruction in which ECM scaffolds were used as inductive scaffolds. Evidence of mature nerve, immature nerve, and Schwann cells was found within the remodeled ECM at 28 days in the rat body wall model, and at 91 days post surgery in a canine model of esophageal repair. Additionally, a microscopic and morphologic study that investigated the response of primary cultured neurons seeded upon an ECM scaffold showed that neuronal survival and outgrowth was supported by the ECM substrate. Finally, matricryptic peptides resulting from rapid degradation of the ECM scaffold induced migration of terminal Schwann cells in a concentration dependent fashion in vitro. The findings of this study suggest that the reconstruction of tissues in which innervation is an important functional component is possible with use of biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix. PMID:19701935

  10. Cellulose acetate based 3-dimensional electrospun scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Atila, Deniz; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-11-20

    Skin defects that are not able to regenerate by themselves are among the major problems faced. Tissue engineering approach holds promise for treating such defects. Development of tissue-mimicking-scaffolds that can promote healing process receives an increasing interest in recent years. In this study, 3-dimensional electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) pullulan (PULL) scaffolds were developed for the first time. PULL was intentionally used to obtain 3D structures with adjustable height. It was removed from the electrospun mesh to increase the porosity and biostability. Different ratios of the polymers were electrospun and analyzed with respect to degradation, porosity, and mechanical properties. It has been observed that fiber diameter, thickness and porosity of scaffolds increased with increased PULL content, on the other hand this resulted with higher degradation of scaffolds. Mechanical strength of scaffolds was improved after PULL removal suggesting their suitability as cell carriers. Cell culture studies were performed with the selected scaffold group (CA/PULL: 50/50) using mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929). In vitro cell culture tests showed that cells adhered, proliferated and populated CA/PULL (50/50) scaffolds showing that they are cytocompatible. Results suggest that uncrosslinked CA/PULL (50/50) electrospun scaffolds hold potential for skin tissue engineering applications.

  11. Poly(ε-caprolactone)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with porous crater-like structures for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Patrick T.J.; Murdock, Kyle; Alexander, Grant C.; Salaam, Amanee D.; Ng, Joshua I.; Lim, Dong-Jin; Dean, Derrick; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning has been widely used to fabricate scaffolds imitating the structure of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, conventional electrospinning produces tightly compacted nanofiber layers with only small superficial pores and a lack of bioactivity, which limit the usefulness of electrospinning in biomedical applications. Thus, a porous poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffold with crater-like structures was developed. Porous crater-like structures were created on the scaffold by a gas foaming/salt leaching process; this unique fiber structure had more large pore areas and higher porosity than the conventional electrospun fiber network. Various ratios of PCL/gelatin (concentration ratios: 100/0, 75/25, and 50/50) composite electrospun scaffolds with and without crater-like structures were characterized by their microstructures, surface chemistry, degradation, mechanical properties, and ability to facilitate cell growth and infiltration. The combination of PCL and gelatin endowed the scaffold with both structural stability of PCL and bioactivity of gelatin. All ratios of scaffolds with crater-like structures showed fairly similar surface chemistry, degradation rates, and mechanical properties to equivalent scaffolds without crater-like structures; however, craterized scaffolds displayed higher human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation and infiltration throughout the scaffolds after 7-day culture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that PCL/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with crater-like structures can provide a structurally and biochemically improved three-dimensional ECM-mimicking microenvironment. PMID:26567028

  12. Poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with porous crater-like structures for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Patrick T J; Murdock, Kyle; Alexander, Grant C; Salaam, Amanee D; Ng, Joshua I; Lim, Dong-Jin; Dean, Derrick; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2016-04-01

    Electrospinning has been widely used to fabricate scaffolds imitating the structure of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, conventional electrospinning produces tightly compacted nanofiber layers with only small superficial pores and a lack of bioactivity, which limit the usefulness of electrospinning in biomedical applications. Thus, a porous poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/gelatin composite electrospun scaffold with crater-like structures was developed. Porous crater-like structures were created on the scaffold by a gas foaming/salt leaching process; this unique fiber structure had more large pore areas and higher porosity than the conventional electrospun fiber network. Various ratios of PCL/gelatin (concentration ratios: 100/0, 75/25, and 50/50) composite electrospun scaffolds with and without crater-like structures were characterized by their microstructures, surface chemistry, degradation, mechanical properties, and ability to facilitate cell growth and infiltration. The combination of PCL and gelatin endowed the scaffold with both structural stability of PCL and bioactivity of gelatin. All ratios of scaffolds with crater-like structures showed fairly similar surface chemistry, degradation rates, and mechanical properties to equivalent scaffolds without crater-like structures; however, craterized scaffolds displayed higher human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation and infiltration throughout the scaffolds after 7-day culture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that PCL/gelatin composite electrospun scaffolds with crater-like structures can provide a structurally and biochemically improved three-dimensional ECM-mimicking microenvironment.

  13. Fabrication and modeling of dynamic multipolymer nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brendon M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Burdick, Jason A; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2009-10-01

    Aligned nanofibrous scaffolds hold tremendous potential for the engineering of dense connective tissues. These biomimetic micropatterns direct organized cell-mediated matrix deposition and can be tuned to possess nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. For these scaffolds to function in vivo, however, they must either recapitulate the full dynamic mechanical range of the native tissue upon implantation or must foster cell infiltration and matrix deposition so as to enable construct maturation to meet these criteria. In our recent studies, we noted that cell infiltration into dense aligned structures is limited but could be expedited via the inclusion of a distinct rapidly eroding sacrificial component. In the present study, we sought to further the fabrication of dynamic nanofibrous constructs by combining multiple-fiber populations, each with distinct mechanical characteristics, into a single composite nanofibrous scaffold. Toward this goal, we developed a novel method for the generation of aligned electrospun composites containing rapidly eroding (PEO), moderately degradable (PLGA and PCL/PLGA), and slowly degrading (PCL) fiber populations. We evaluated the mechanical properties of these composites upon formation and with degradation in a physiologic environment. Furthermore, we employed a hyperelastic constrained-mixture model to capture the nonlinear and time-dependent properties of these scaffolds when formed as single-fiber populations or in multipolymer composites. After validating this model, we demonstrated that by carefully selecting fiber populations with differing mechanical properties and altering the relative fraction of each, a wide range of mechanical properties (and degradation characteristics) can be achieved. This advance allows for the rational design of nanofibrous scaffolds to match native tissue properties and will significantly enhance our ability to fabricate replacements for load-bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system.

  14. FABRICATION AND MODELING OF DYNAMIC MULTI-POLYMER NANOFIBROUS SCAFFOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Aligned nanofibrous scaffolds hold tremendous potential for the engineering of dense connective tissues. These biomimetic micro-patterns direct organized, cell-mediated matrix deposition, and can be tuned to possess nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. For these scaffolds to function in vivo, however, they must either recapitulate the full dynamic mechanical range of the native tissue upon implantation, or must foster cell infiltration and matrix deposition so as to enable construct maturation to meet these criteria. In our recent studies, we noted that cell infiltration into dense aligned structures is limited, but could be expedited via the inclusion of a distinct, rapidly eroding sacrificial component. In the present study, we sought to further the fabrication of dynamic nanofibrous constructs by combining multiple fiber populations, each with distinct mechanical characteristics, into a single composite nanofibrous scaffold. Towards this goal, we developed a novel method for the generation of aligned electrospun composites containing rapidly eroding (PEO), moderately degradable (PLGA and PCL/PLGA), and slowly degrading (PCL) fiber populations. We evaluated the mechanical properties of these composites upon formation and with degradation in a physiologic environment. Further, we employed a hyperelastic constrained mixture model to capture the nonlinear and time-dependent properties of these scaffolds when formed as single-fiber populations or in multi-polymer composites. After validating this model, we demonstrated that by carefully selecting fiber populations with differing mechanical properties, and altering the relative fraction of each, a wide range of mechanical properties (and degradation characteristics) can be achieved. This advance allows for the rational design of nanofibrous scaffolds to match native tissue properties, and will significantly enhance our ability to fabricate replacements for load bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system

  15. Preparation and characterization of aligned porous PCL/zein scaffolds as drug delivery systems via improved unidirectional freeze-drying method.

    PubMed

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-11-01

    A novel type of drug-delivery scaffold based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein blends was prepared by improved unidirectional freeze-drying. Scaffolds with tube-like pore structure and high porosity, up to 89%, were obtained by adjusting the concentration of the PCL and zein solutions. Characters of the prepared scaffolds, such as microstructural, porosity, and compressive strength, were evaluated. The hydrophilicity and the degradability of the composite films were investigated in contact with phosphate buffer saline (PBS). It was found that the presence of zein accelerates the degradation rate of the scaffolds in the period time of investigation (28days). The results showed an acceptable way for controlling the in vitro degradation behavior of PCL composite scaffolds by adapting the concentration of zein. In vitro protein release and degradation results revealed that the absolute weight loss of the PCL/zein scaffolds exhibited an increasing trend by increasing the amount of zein concentration in the scaffolds. The drug delivery capability of the scaffolds was tested using tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). Sustained release of the drug was obtained, and it was found that the proportion of zein in the scaffold had a great impact on the drug release kinetics. The results demonstrated the potential of the PCL/zein biocomposite scaffolds as a suitable candidate in tissue engineering strategies for bone defect treatment.

  16. Scaffolding Student Participation in Mathematical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moschkovich, Judit N.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding can be used to describe various types of adult guidance, in multiple settings, across different time scales. This article clarifies what we mean by scaffolding, considering several questions specifically for scaffolding in mathematics: What theoretical assumptions are framing scaffolding? What is being scaffolded? At…

  17. Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Atheroregression: Understanding of Transient Scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    N. Kharlamov, M.D., Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical and biological features of the bioresorbable scaffolds in interventional cardiology highlighting scientific achievements and challenges of the transient scaffolding with Absorb BVS. Special attention is granted to the vascular biology pathways which, involved in the resorption of scaffold, artery remodeling and mechanisms of Glagovian atheroregression setting the stage for subsequent clinical applications. Twenty five years ago Glagov described the phenomenon of limited external elastic membrane enlargement in response to an increase in plaque burden. We believe this threshold becomes the target for development of strategies that reverse atherosclerosis, and particularly transient scaffolding has a potential to be a tool to ultimately conquer atherosclerosis. PMID:26818488

  18. Biocompatibility and bone-repairing effects: comparison between porous poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid and nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chen; Qian, Xiaodan; Tang, Zihua; Hu, Qinghong; Chen, Jiarong; Gao, Changyou; Tang, Ruikang; Tong, Xiangmin; Wang, Jinfu

    2014-06-01

    Copolymer composite scaffolds and bioceramic/polymer composite scaffolds are two representative forms of composite scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering. Studies to compare biocompatibility and bone-repairing effects between these two scaffolds are significant for selecting or improving the scaffold for clinical application. We prepared two porous scaffolds comprising poly-lactic-acid/poly-glycolic-acid (PLGA) and poly-lactic-acid/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP/PLA) respectively, and examined their biocompatibility with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through evaluating adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potentials of hMSCs in the scaffold. Then, the PLGA scaffold with hMSCs (PM construct) and the nHAP/PLA scaffold with hMSCs (HPM construct) were transplanted into the rat calvarial defect areas to compare their effects on the bone reconstruction. The results showed that the nHAP/PLA scaffold was in favor of adhesion, matrix deposition and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. For in vivo transplantation, both HPM and PM constructs led to mineralization and osteogenesis in the defect area of rat. However, the area grafted with PM construct showed a better formation of mature bone than that with HPM construct. In addition, the evaluation of in vitro and in vivo degradation indicated that the degradation rate of nHAP/PLA scaffold was much lower than that of PLGA scaffold. It is inferred that the lower degradation of nHAP/PLA scaffold should result in its inferior bone reconstruction in rat calvaria. Therefore, the preparation of an ideal composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering should be taken into account of the balance between its biocompatibility, degradation rate, osteoconductivity and mechanical property.

  19. Hybrid scaffold bearing polymer-siloxane Schiff base linkage for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bindu P; Gangadharan, Dhanya; Mohan, Neethu; Sumathi, Babitha; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds that can provide the requisite biological cues for the fast regeneration of bone are highly relevant to the advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In the present article, we report the fabrication of a chitosan-gelatin-siloxane scaffold bearing interpolymer-siloxane Schiff base linkage, through a single-step dialdehyde cross-linking and freeze-drying method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as the siloxane precursor. Swelling of the scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline indicates enhancement with increase in siloxane concentration, whereas compressive moduli of the wet scaffolds reveal inverse dependence, owing to the presence of siloxane, rich in silanol groups. It is suggested that through the strategy of dialdehyde cross-linking, a limiting siloxane loading of 20 wt.% into a chitosan -gelatin matrix should be considered ideal for bone tissue engineering, because the scaffold made with 30 wt.% siloxane loading degrades by 48 wt.%, in 21 days. The hybrid scaffolds bearing Schiff base linkage between the polymer and siloxane, unlike the stable linkages in earlier reports, are expected to give a faster release of siloxanes and enhancement in osteogenesis. This is verified by the in vitro evaluation of the hybrid scaffolds using rabbit adipose mesenchymal stem cells, which revealed osteogenic cell-clusters on a polymer-siloxane scaffold, enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone-specific genes, whereas the control scaffold without siloxane supported more of cell-proliferation than differentiation. A siloxane concentration dependent enhancement in osteogenic differentiation is also observed.

  20. Novel hydroxyapatite/carboxymethylchitosan composite scaffolds prepared through an innovative "autocatalytic" electroless coprecipitation route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J M; Costa, S A; Leonor, I B; Malafaya, P B; Mano, J F; Reis, R L

    2009-02-01

    A developmental composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and carboxymethylchitosan (CMC) was obtained using a coprecipitation method, which is based on the "autocatalytic" electroless deposition route. The results revealed that the pores of the scaffold were regular, interconnected, and possess a size in the range of 20-500 microm. Furthermore, the Fourier transform infra-red spectrum of the composite scaffolds exhibited all the characteristic peaks of apatite, and the appearance of typical bands from CMC, thus showing that coprecipitation of both organic and inorganic phases was effective. The X-ray diffraction pattern of composite scaffolds demonstrated that calcium-phosphates consisted of crystalline HA. From microcomputed tomography analysis, it was possible to determine that composite scaffolds possess a 58.9% +/- 6% of porosity. The 2D morphometric analysis demonstrated that on average the scaffolds consisted of 24% HA and 76% CMC. The mechanical properties were assessed using compressive tests, both in dry and wet states. Additionally, in vitro tests were carried out to evaluate the water-uptake capability, weight loss, and bioactive behavior of the composite scaffolds. The novel hydroxyapatite/carboxymethylchitosan composite scaffolds showed promise whenever degradability and bioactivity are simultaneously desired, as in the case of bone tissue-engineering scaffolding applications.

  1. Rheological, biocompatibility and osteogenesis assessment of fish collagen scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elango, Jeevithan; Zhang, Jingyi; Bao, Bin; Palaniyandi, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Shujun; Wenhui, Wu; Robinson, Jeya Shakila

    2016-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to find an alternative to mammalian collagen with better osteogenesis ability. Three types of collagen scaffolds - collagen, collagen-chitosan (CCH), and collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) - were prepared from the cartilage of Blue shark and investigated for their physico-functional and mechanical properties in relation to biocompatibility and osteogenesis. CCH scaffold was superior with pH 4.5-4.9 and viscosity 9.7-10.9cP. Notably, addition of chitosan and HA (hydroxyapatite) improved the stiffness (11-23MPa) and degradation rate but lowered the water binding capacity and porosity of the scaffold. Interestingly, CCH scaffolds remained for 3days before complete in-vitro biodegradation. The decreased amount of viable T-cells and higher level of FAS/APO-1 were substantiated the biocompatibility properties of prepared collagen scaffolds. Osteogenesis study revealed that the addition of CH and HA in both fish and mammalian collagen scaffolds could efficiently promote osteoblast cell formation. The ALP activity was significantly high in CHA scaffold-treated osteoblast cells, which suggests an enhanced bone-healing process. Therefore, the present study concludes that the composite scaffolds prepared from fish collagen with higher stiffness, lower biodegradation rate, better biocompatible, and osteogenesis properties were suitable biomaterial for a bone tissue engineering application as an alternative to mammalian collagen scaffolds.

  2. Nanofibrous Silver-Coated Polymeric Scaffolds with Tunable Electrical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Memic, Adnan; Aldhahri, Musab; Tamayol, Ali; Mostafalu, Pooria; Abdel-wahab, Mohamed Shaaban; Samandari, Mohamadmahdi; Moghaddam, Kamyar Mollazadeh; Annabi, Nasim; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Electrospun micro- and nanofibrous poly(glycerol sebacate)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PGS-PCL) substrates have been extensively used as scaffolds for engineered tissues due to their desirable mechanical properties and their tunable degradability. In this study, we fabricated micro/nanofibrous scaffolds from a PGS-PCL composite using a standard electrospinning approach and then coated them with silver (Ag) using a custom radio frequency (RF) sputtering method. The Ag coating formed an electrically conductive layer around the fibers and decreased the pore size. The thickness of the Ag coating could be controlled, thereby tailoring the conductivity of the substrate. The flexible, stretchable patches formed excellent conformal contact with surrounding tissues and possessed excellent pattern-substrate fidelity. In vitro studies confirmed the platform’s biocompatibility and biodegradability. Finally, the potential controlled release of the Ag coating from the composite fibrous scaffolds could be beneficial for many clinical applications. PMID:28336896

  3. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  4. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  5. Nanoclay-Enriched Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) Electrospun Scaffolds for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Karaca, Elif; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Patel, Alpesh; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tissue engineering aims at repairing and regenerating damaged tissues using biological tissue substitutes. One approach to achieve this aim is to develop osteoconductive scaffolds that facilitate the formation of functional bone tissue. We have fabricated nanoclay-enriched electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A range of electrospun scaffolds is fabricated by varying the nanoclay concentrations within the PCL scaffolds. The addition of nanoclay decreases fiber diameter and increases surface roughness of electrospun fibers. The enrichment of PCL scaffold with nanoclay promotes in vitro biomineralization when subjected to simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating bioactive characteristics of the hybrid scaffolds. The degradation rate of PCL increases due to the addition of nanoclay. In addition, a significant increase in crystallization temperature of PCL is also observed due to enhanced surface interactions between PCL and nanoclay. The effect of nanoclay on the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers is also evaluated. The feasibility of using nanoclay-enriched PCL scaffolds for tissue engineering applications is investigated in vitro using hMSCs. The nanoclay-enriched electrospun PCL scaffolds support hMSCs adhesion and proliferation. The addition of nanoclay significantly enhances osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on the electrospun scaffolds as evident by an increase in alkaline phosphates activity of hMSCs and higher deposition of mineralized extracellular matrix compared to PCL scaffolds. Given its unique bioactive characteristics, nanoclay-enriched PCL fibrous scaffold may be used for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. PMID:24842693

  6. Enzymatic mineralization of silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Declercq, Heidi A; Gheysens, Tom; Dendooven, Jolien; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cornelissen, Ria; Dubruel, Peter; Kaplan, David L

    2014-07-01

    The present study focuses on the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mediated formation of apatitic minerals on porous silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds. Porous SFP scaffolds impregnated with different concentrations of ALP are homogeneously mineralized under physiological conditions. The mineral structure is apatite while the structures differ as a function of the ALP concentration. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, and colonization of osteogenic MC3T3 cells improve on the mineralized SFP scaffolds. These findings suggest a simple process to generate mineralized scaffolds that can be used to enhanced bone tissue engineering-related utility.

  7. [Advances in the research of natural polymeric materials and their derivatives in the manufacture of scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wang, Hong; Leng, Chongyan; Wang, Kuan; Xie, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Natural polymeric materials and their derivatives are organic macromolecular compounds which exist in plants, animals, and micro-organisms. They have been widely used in the preparation of scaffolds for skin tissue engineering recently because of their good histocompatibility and degradability, and low immunogenicity. With the improvement of the preparation technics, composite materials are more commonly used to make scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering. This article summarizes the classification and research status of the commonly used natural polymer materials, their derivatives, and composite scaffold materials, as well as makes a prospect of the research trends of dermal scaffold in the future.

  8. A novel alkali metals/strontium co-substituted calcium polyphosphate scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Qiguang; Wan, Changxiu; Shi, Tong; Markel, David; Blaiser, Ralph; Ren, Weiping

    2011-08-01

    Our purpose of this study is to develop potassium or sodium/strontium co-substituted calcium polyphosphate (K/Sr-CPP or Na/Sr-CPP) bioceramics in application of bone repairing scaffold. The incorporation of K, Na, and Sr into CPP substrate via a calcining-sintering process was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In vitro degradation study of co-substituted CPP indicated the incorporation of alkali metal elements promoted the degradability of CPP, and the scanning electron microscope showed the apatite-like minerals were precipitated on the surface of co-substituted CPP. The compress resistant strength of co-substituted CPP was elevated by dopants. The MTT assay and confocal laser-scanning microscope on osteoblasts culturing with co-substituted CPP showed no cytotoxicity. The cell proliferation on co-substituted CPP was even better than others. Thus, this co-substituted CPP bioceramics might have potential of applications in orthopedic field.

  9. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Cinthya, Kuriakose; Jayakrishnan, A; Anilkumar, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture.

  10. Boron nitride nanotubes included thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds show improved properties.

    PubMed

    Şen, Özlem; Culha, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are increasingly investigated for their medical and biomedical applications due to their unique properties such as resistance to oxidation, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. BNNTs can be used to enhance mechanical strength of biomedical structures such as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the use of BNNTs and hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) to improve the properties of gelatin-glucose scaffolds prepared with electrospinning technique. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells are used for the toxicity assessment and cell seeding studies. It is found that the addition of BNNTs into the scaffold does not influence cell viability, decreases the scaffold degradation rate, and improves cell attachment and proliferation compared to only-gelatin scaffold.

  11. Evaluation of a thermoresponsive polycaprolactone scaffold for in vitro three-dimensional stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hruschka, Veronika; Saeed, Aram; Slezak, Paul; Cheikh Al Ghanami, Racha; Feichtinger, Georg Alexander; Alexander, Cameron; Redl, Heinz; Shakesheff, Kevin; Wolbank, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) strategies aim at imitating the natural process of regeneration by using bioresorbable scaffolds that support cellular attachment, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Based on the idea of combining a fully degradable polymer [poly(ɛ-caprolactone)] with a thermoresponsive polymer (polyethylene glycol methacrylate), a scaffold was developed, which liquefies below 20°C and solidifies at 37°C. In this study, this scaffold was evaluated for its ability to support C2C12 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to generate an expandable three-dimensional (3D) construct for soft or bone TE. As a first step, biomaterial seeding was optimized and cellular attachment, survival, distribution, and persistence within the 3D material were characterized. C2C12 cells were differentiated toward the osteogenic as well as myogenic lineage, while ASCs were cultured in control, adipogenic, or osteogenic differentiation media. Differentiation was examined using quantitative real-time PCR for the expression of osteogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic markers and by enzyme activity and immunoassays. Both cell types attached and were found evenly distributed within the material. C2C12 cells and ASCs demonstrated the potential to differentiate in all tested lineages under 2D conditions. Under 3D osteogenic conditions for C2C12 cells, only osteocalcin expression (fold induction: 16.3±0.2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (p<0.001) were increased compared with the control C2C12 cells. Three-dimensional osteogenic differentiation of ASC was limited and donor dependent. Only one donor showed an increase in the osteogenic markers osteocalcin (p=0.027) and osteopontin (p=0.038). In contrast, differentiation toward the myogenic or adipogenic lineage showed expression of specific markers in 3D, at least at the level of the 2D culture. In 3D culture, strong induction of myogenin (p<0.001) as well as myoD (p<0.001) was found in C2C12 cells. The

  12. Potential of a PLA-PEO-PLA-based scaffold for skin tissue engineering: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Garric, Xavier; Guillaume, Olivier; Dabboue, Hinda; Vert, Michel; Molès, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vitro behaviour of porous degradable scaffolds of the PLA-PEO-PLA-type designed prior to in vivo evaluation for skin tissue engineering. Two tri-block co-polymers were synthesized from PEO and DL-lactide and their degradation was studied under conditions that mimic a cutaneous wound environment. 3-D porous scaffolds with interconnected pores were fabricated using the salt leaching method and characterized by ESEM and Hg porosimetry. The degrading action of gamma sterilization was studied on the co-polymers. The less degraded one was selected to make porous scaffolds on which human dermal fibroblasts and human epidermal keratinocytes were cultured. The capacity of such scaffolds to act as a dermal equivalent was also considered. Colonization by human dermal fibroblasts was shown after hematoxylin staining and the production of major proteins normally found in the extracellular matrix was assessed by Western blotting of protein extracts. Finally, a skin substitute was generated by seeding human keratinocytes on the dermal equivalent and a new epidermis was characterized by using immuno-histological staining. Results show that gamma sterilization and that degradation under conditions that mimic skin wound healing were acceptable. The fact that fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix and that keratinocytes generated an epidermal barrier argues in favour of the interest of this type of porous scaffold for skin reconstruction.

  13. Fabrication of biodegradable textile scaffold based on hydrophobized hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Zapotocky, Vojtech; Pospisilova, Martina; Janouchova, Katerina; Svadlak, Daniel; Batova, Jana; Sogorkova, Jana; Cepa, Martin; Betak, Jiri; Stepankova, Veronika; Sulakova, Romana; Kulhanek, Jaromir; Pitucha, Tomas; Vranova, Jana; Duffy, Garry; Velebny, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report on the preparation of a novel biodegradable textile scaffold made of palmitoyl-hyaluronan (palHA). Monofilament fibres of palHA with a diameter of 120μm were prepared by wet spinning. The wet-spun fibres were subsequently processed into a warp-knitted textile. To find a compromise between swelling in water and degradability of the final textile scaffold, a series of palHA derivatives with different degrees of substitution of the palmitoyl chain was synthesized. Freeze-drying not only provided shape fixation, but also speeded up scaffold degradation in vitro. Fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin and collagen IV were physically adsorbed on the textile surface to enhance cell adhesion on the material. The highest amount of adsorbed cell-adhesive proteins was achieved with fibronectin (89%), followed by fibrinogen (81%). Finally, textiles modified with fibronectin or fibrinogen both supported the adhesion and proliferation of normal human fibroblasts in vitro, proving to be a useful cellular scaffold for tissue engineering.

  14. The History of GalaFLEX P4HB Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon F.; Martin, David P.; Moses, Arikha C.

    2016-01-01

    The GalaFLEX Scaffold (Galatea Surgical, Inc., Lexington, MA) for plastic and reconstructive surgery belongs to a new generation of products for soft tissue reinforcement made from poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB). Other members of this new family of products include MonoMax Suture (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) for soft tissue approximation, BioFiber Scaffold (Tornier, Inc., Edina, MN) for tendon repair, and Phasix Mesh (C.R. Bard, Inc., Murray Hill, NJ) for hernia repair. Each of these fully resorbable products provides prolonged strength retention, typically 50% to 70% strength retention at 12 weeks, and facilitates remodeling in vivo to provide a strong, lasting repair. P4HB belongs to a naturally occurring class of biopolymers and fibers made from it are uniquely strong, flexible, and biocompatible. GalaFLEX Scaffold is comprised of high-strength, resorbable P4HB monofilament fibers. It is a knitted macroporous scaffold intended to elevate, reinforce, and repair soft tissue. The scaffold acts as a lattice for new tissue growth, which is rapidly vascularized and becomes fully integrated with adjacent tissue as the fibers resorb. In this review, we describe the development of P4HB, its production, properties, safety, and biocompatibility of devices made from P4HB. Early clinical results and current clinical applications of products made from P4HB are also discussed. The results of post-market clinical studies evaluating the GalaFLEX Scaffold in rhytidectomy and cosmetic breast surgery demonstrate that the scaffold can reinforce lifted soft tissue, resulting in persistent surgical results in the face and neck at one year, and provide lower pole stability after breast lift at one year. PMID:27697885

  15. Porous magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds for enhanced bone regeneration following tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer; Ray, Herbert; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of implant-supported dental prostheses require bone grafting to enhance bone quantity and quality prior to implant placement. We have developed a metallic magnesium particle/PLGA composite scaffold to overcome the limitations of currently used dental bone grafting materials. This is the first report of porous metallic magnesium/PLGA scaffolds synthesized using a solvent casting, salt leaching method. We found that incorporation of varying amounts of magnesium into the PLGA scaffolds increased the compressive strength and modulus, as well as provided a porous structure suitable for cell infiltration, as measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Additionally, combining basic-degrading magnesium with acidic-degrading PLGA led to an overall pH buffering effect and long-term release of magnesium over the course of a 10-week degradation assay, as measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Using an indirect proliferation assay adapted from ISO 10993:5, it was found that extracts of medium from degrading magnesium/PLGA scaffolds increased bone marrow stromal cell proliferation in vitro, a phenomenon observed by other groups investigating magnesium's impact on cells. Finally, magnesium/PLGA scaffold biocompatibility was assessed in a canine socket preservation model. Micro-computed tomography and histological analysis showed the magnesium/PLGA scaffolds to be safer and more effective at preserving bone height than empty controls. Three-dimensional magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds show promise for dental socket preservation and also, potentially, orthopedic bone regeneration. These scaffolds could decrease inflammation observed with clinically used PLGA devices, as well as enhance osteogenesis, as observed with previously studied magnesium devices.

  16. Scaffolding Experiences in Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper discusses the importance of scaffolding and other techniques in teaching reading. It details numerous ways to employ scaffolding, such as the following: a teacher may read aloud new passages while students follow along; a teacher may print new words on the chalkboard before students read a passage which uses the words; and teachers may…

  17. Preparation and characterization of poly (hydroxy butyrate)/chitosan blend scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Saeed; Khorasani, Saied Nouri; Ebrahimi, Somayeh; Khalili, Shahla; Fekrat, Farnoosh; Sadeghi, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poly (hydroxy butyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer with good mechanical properties. This polymer could be a promising material for scaffolds if some features improve. Materials and Methods: In the present work, new PHB/chitosan blend scaffolds were prepared as a three-dimensional substrate in cartilage tissue engineering. Chitosan in different weight percent was added to PHB and solved in trifluoroacetic acid. Statistical Taguchi method was employed in the design of experiments. Results: The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy test revealed that the crystallization of PHB in these blends is suppressed with increasing the amount of chitosan. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a thin and rough top layer with a nodular structure, supported with a porous sub-layer in the surface of the scaffolds. In vitro degradation rate of the scaffolds was higher than pure PHB scaffolds. Maximum degradation rate has been seen for the scaffold with 90% wt. NaCl and 40% wt. chitosan. Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that these newly developed PHB/chitosan blend scaffolds may serve as a three-dimensional substrate in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28028517

  18. Laser fabrication of three-dimensional CAD scaffolds from photosensitive gelatin for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Deiwick, Andrea; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Möller, Lena; Dräger, Gerald; Chichkov, Boris

    2011-04-11

    In the present work, 3D CAD scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were developed starting from methacrylamide-modified gelatin (GelMOD) using two-photon polymerization (2PP). The scaffolds were cross-linked employing the biocompatible photoinitiator Irgacure 2959. Because gelatin is derived from collagen (i.e., the main constituent of the ECM), the developed materials mimic the cellular microenvironment from a chemical point of view. In addition, by applying the 2PP technique, structural properties of the cellular microenvironment can also be mimicked. Furthermore, in vitro degradation assays indicated that the enzymatic degradation capability of gelatin is preserved for the methacrylamide-modified derivative. An in depth morphological analysis of the 2PP-fabricated scaffolds demonstrated that the parameters of the CAD model are reproduced with great precision, including the ridge-like surface topography on the order of 1.5 μm. The developed scaffolds showed an excellent stability in culture medium. In a final part of the present work, the suitability of the developed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications was verified. The results indicated that the applied materials are suitable to support porcine mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and subsequent proliferation. Upon applying osteogenic stimulation, the seeded cells differentiated into the anticipated lineage. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed the induced calcification of the scaffolds. The results clearly indicate that 2PP is capable of manufacturing precisely constructed 3D tissue engineering scaffolds using photosensitive polymers as starting material.

  19. Classification of Scaffold Hopping Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongmao; Tawa, Gregory; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The general goal of drug discovery is to identify novel compounds that are active against a preselected biological target with acceptable pharmacological properties defined by marketed drugs. Scaffold hopping has been widely applied by medicinal chemists to discover equipotent compounds with novel backbones that have improved properties. In this review, scaffold hopping is classified into four major categories, namely heterocycle replacements, ring opening or closure, peptidomimetics, and topology-based hopping. The structural diversity of original and final scaffolds with respect to each category will be reviewed. The advantages and limitations of small, medium, and large-step scaffold hopping will also be discussed. Software that is frequently used to facilitate different kinds of scaffold hopping methods will be summarized. PMID:22056715

  20. Nanostructured scaffolds for neural applications.

    PubMed

    Seidlits, Stephanie K; Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2008-04-01

    This review discusses the design of scaffolds having submicron and nanoscale features for neural-engineering applications. In particular, the goal is to create materials that can interface more intimately with individual neuronal cells, within both living tissues and in culture, by better mimicking the native extracellular environment. Scaffolds with nanoscale features have the potential to improve the specificity and accuracy of materials for a number of neural-engineering applications, ranging from neural probes for Parkinson's patients to guidance scaffolds for axonal regeneration in patients with traumatic nerve injuries. This review will highlight several techniques that are used to create nanostructured scaffolds, such as photolithography to create grooves for neurite guidance, electrospinning of fibrous matrices, self-assembly of 3D scaffolds from designer peptides and fabrication of conductive nanoscale materials. Most importantly, this review focuses on the effects of incorporating nanoscale architectures into these materials on neuronal and glial cell growth and function.

  1. Fabrication of PLGA/MWNTs composite electrospun fibrous scaffolds for improved myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiazhu; Xie, Ya; Zhang, Hongbo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-11-01

    Electrically conducting scaffolds have attracted tremendous attention in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. In this paper, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite fibrous scaffolds were fabricated using the electrospinning technique. The physical properties of the composite fibers were characterized and proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 cells on these scaffolds were examined. It was found that the addition of MWNTs modulated the physical properties of PLGA fibers including morphology, fiber diameter, degradation, tensile strength and electrical conductivity, depending on the amount of MWNTs. These fibrous scaffolds were cytocompatible and supported the proliferation of C2C12 cells. Importantly, C2C12 cells showed more mature myotube formation on PLGA/MWNTs composite fibrous scaffolds compared to PLGA scaffolds. These results indicate that PLGA/MWNTs composite electrospun fibers have great potential in skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  2. Elevation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A. S.; Marshall, G.A.; Carver, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    Elevation changes, as well as horizontal displacements of the Earth's surface, are an expected consequence of dip-slip displacement on earthquake faults. the rock surrounding and overlying the fault is forced to stretch and bend to accommodate fault slip. Slip in the case of the April 25 mainshock is thought to have occurred on a gently inclined plane dipping to the northeast at a small angle (see article on preliminary seismological results in this issue).The associated fault-plane solution implies that rock overlying the fault plane (the hanging-wall block west and south of the epicenter) rose and shifted to the northeast. The map on the next page shows the location of the epicenter and approximate extent of uplift and subsidence derived from estimates of the geometry, location. and slip on the buried fault plane. 

  3. Bambus 2: scaffolding metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Sergey; Treangen, Todd J.; Pop, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Sequencing projects increasingly target samples from non-clonal sources. In particular, metagenomics has enabled scientists to begin to characterize the structure of microbial communities. The software tools developed for assembling and analyzing sequencing data for clonal organisms are, however, unable to adequately process data derived from non-clonal sources. Results: We present a new scaffolder, Bambus 2, to address some of the challenges encountered when analyzing metagenomes. Our approach relies on a combination of a novel method for detecting genomic repeats and algorithms that analyze assembly graphs to identify biologically meaningful genomic variants. We compare our software to current assemblers using simulated and real data. We demonstrate that the repeat detection algorithms have higher sensitivity than current approaches without sacrificing specificity. In metagenomic datasets, the scaffolder avoids false joins between distantly related organisms while obtaining long-range contiguity. Bambus 2 represents a first step toward automated metagenomic assembly. Availability: Bambus 2 is open source and available from http://amos.sf.net. Contact: mpop@umiacs.umd.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21926123

  4. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  5. Control of crosslinking for tailoring collagen-based scaffolds stability and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Davidenko, N.; Schuster, C.F.; Bax, D.V.; Raynal, N.; Farndale, R.W.; Best, S.M.; Cameron, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    We provide evidence to show that the standard reactant concentrations used in tissue engineering to cross-link collagen-based scaffolds are up to 100 times higher than required for mechanical integrity in service, and stability against degradation in an aqueous environment. We demonstrate this with a detailed and systematic study by comparing scaffolds made from (a) collagen from two different suppliers, (b) gelatin (a partially denatured collagen) and (c) 50% collagen–50% gelatin mixtures. The materials were processed, using lyophilisation, to produce homogeneous, highly porous scaffolds with isotropic architectures and pore diameters ranging from 130 to 260 μm. Scaffolds were cross-linked using a carbodiimide treatment, to establish the effect of the variations in crosslinking conditions (down to very low concentrations) on the morphology, swelling, degradation and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Carbodiimide concentration of 11.5 mg/ml was defined as the standard (100%) and was progressively diluted down to 0.1%. It was found that 10-fold reduction in the carbodiimide content led to the significant increase (almost 4-fold) in the amount of free amine groups (primarily on collagen lysine residues) without compromising mechanics and stability in water of all resultant scaffolds. The importance of this finding is that, by reducing cross-linking, the corresponding cell-reactive carboxylate anions (collagen glutamate or aspartate residues) that are essential for integrin-mediated binding remain intact. Indeed, a 10-fold reduction in carbodiimide crosslinking resulted in near native-like cell attachment to collagen scaffolds. We have demonstrated that controlling the degree of cross-linking, and hence retaining native scaffold chemistry, offers a major step forward in the biological performance of collagen- and gelatin-based tissue engineering scaffolds. Statement of Significance This work developed collagen and gelatine-based scaffolds with structural

  6. Biomimetic, Osteoconductive Non-mulberry Silk Fiber Reinforced Tricomposite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prerak; Adhikary, Mimi; M, Joseph Christakiran; Kumar, Manishekhar; Bhardwaj, Nandana; Mandal, Biman B

    2016-11-16

    Composite biomaterials as artificial bone graft materials are pushing the present frontiers of bioengineering. In this study, a biomimetic, osteoconductive tricomposite scaffold made of hydroxyapatite (HA) embedded in non-mulberry Antheraea assama (A. assama) silk fibroin fibers and its fibroin solution is explored for its osteogenic potential. Scaffolds were physico-chemically characterized for morphology, porosity, secondary structure conformation, water retention ability, biodegradability, and mechanical property. The results revealed a ∼5-fold increase in scaffold compressive modulus on addition of HA and silk fibers to liquid silk as compared to pure silk scaffolds while maintaining high scaffold porosity (∼90%) with slower degradation rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed deposition of HA crystals on composite scaffolds. Furthermore, the crystallite size of HA within scaffolds was strongly regulated by the intrinsic physical cues of silk fibroin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies indicated strong interactions between HA and silk fibroin. The fabricated tricomposite scaffolds supported enhanced cellular viability and function (ALP activity) for both MG63 osteosarcoma and human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) as compared to pure silk scaffolds without fiber or HA addition. In addition, higher expression of osteogenic gene markers such as collagen I (Col-I), osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) further substantiated the applicability of HA composite silk scaffolds for bone related applications. Immunostaining studies confirmed localization of Col-I and BSP and were in agreement with real-time gene expression results. These findings demonstrate the osteogenic potential of developed biodegradable tricomposite scaffolds with the added advantage of the affordability of its components as bone graft substitute materials.

  7. Development of chitosan-tripolyphosphate non-woven fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Adhikari, Basudam; Dhara, Santanu

    2012-04-01

    The fibrous scaffolds are promising for tissue engineering applications because of their close structural resemblance with native extracellular matrix. Additionally, the chemical composition of scaffold is also an important consideration as they have significant influences on modulating cell attachment, morphology and function. In this study, chitosan-tripolyphosphate (TPP) non-woven fibrous scaffolds were prepared through wetspinning process. Interestingly, at physiological pH these scaffolds release phosphate ions, which have significant influences on cellular function. For the first time, cell viability in presence of varying concentration of sodium TPP solution was analyzed and correlated with the phosphate release from the scaffolds during 30 days incubation period. In vitro degradation of the chitosan-TPP scaffolds was higher than chitosan scaffolds, which may be due to decrease in crystallinity as a result of instantaneous ionic cross-linking during fiber formation. The scaffolds with highly interconnected porous structure present a remarkable cytocompatibility for cell growing, and show a great potential for tissue engineering applications.

  8. Woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Liu, S; Liu, X; Pei, Y; Bai, S; Zhao, H; Lu, Q; Ma, F; Kaplan, D L; Zhu, H

    2014-02-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) porous regenerated silk scaffolds with outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and low inflammatory reactions have promising application in different tissue regeneration, the mechanical properties of regenerated scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This study presents woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds aimed at dermal tissue engineering. To improve the mechanical properties, silk scaffolds prepared by lyophilization were reinforced with degummed woven silk fabrics. The ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break and suture retention strength of the scaffolds were significantly improved, providing suitable mechanical properties strong enough for clinical applications. The stiffness and degradation behaviors were then further regulated by different after-treatment processes, making the scaffolds more suitable for dermal tissue regeneration. The in vitro cell culture results indicated that these scaffolds maintained their excellent biocompatibility after being reinforced with woven silk fabrics. Without sacrifice of porous structure and biocompatibility, the fabric-reinforced scaffolds with better mechanical properties could facilitate future clinical applications of silk as matrices in skin repair.

  9. Peracetic acid: a practical agent for sterilizing heat-labile polymeric tissue-engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yoganarasimha, Suyog; Trahan, William R; Best, Al M; Bowlin, Gary L; Kitten, Todd O; Moon, Peter C; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy A

    2014-09-01

    Advanced biomaterials and sophisticated processing technologies aim at fabricating tissue-engineering scaffolds that can predictably interact within a biological environment at the cellular level. Sterilization of such scaffolds is at the core of patient safety and is an important regulatory issue that needs to be addressed before clinical translation. In addition, it is crucial that meticulously engineered micro- and nano- structures are preserved after sterilization. Conventional sterilization methods involving heat, steam, and radiation are not compatible with engineered polymeric systems because of scaffold degradation and loss of architecture. Using electrospun scaffolds made from polycaprolactone, a low melting polymer, and employing spores of Bacillus atrophaeus as biological indicators, we compared ethylene oxide, autoclaving and 80% ethanol to a known chemical sterilant, peracetic acid (PAA), for their ability to sterilize as well as their effects on scaffold properties. PAA diluted in 20% ethanol to 1000 ppm or above sterilized electrospun scaffolds in 15 min at room temperature while maintaining nano-architecture and mechanical properties. Scaffolds treated with PAA at 5000 ppm were rendered hydrophilic, with contact angles reduced to 0°. Therefore, PAA can provide economical, rapid, and effective sterilization of heat-sensitive polymeric electrospun scaffolds that are used in tissue engineering.

  10. Mechanical evaluation of gradient electrospun scaffolds with 3D printed ring reinforcements for tracheal defect repair.

    PubMed

    Ott, Lindsey M; Zabel, Taylor A; Walker, Natalie K; Farris, Ashley L; Chakroff, Jason T; Ohst, Devan G; Johnson, Jed K; Gehrke, Steven H; Weatherly, Robert A; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-04-21

    Tracheal stenosis can become a fatal condition, and current treatments include augmentation of the airway with autologous tissue. A tissue-engineered approach would not require a donor source, while providing an implant that meets both surgeons' and patients' needs. A fibrous, polymeric scaffold organized in gradient bilayers of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) with 3D printed structural ring supports, inspired by the native trachea rings, could meet this need. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the tracheal scaffolds with mechanical testing models to determine the design most suitable for maintaining a patent airway. Degradation over 12 weeks revealed that scaffolds with the 3D printed rings had superior properties in tensile and radial compression, with at least a three fold improvement and 8.5-fold improvement, respectively, relative to the other scaffold groups. The ringed scaffolds produced tensile moduli, radial compressive forces, and burst pressures similar to or exceeding physiological forces and native tissue data. Scaffolds with a thicker PCL component had better suture retention and tube flattening recovery properties, with the monolayer of PCL (PCL-only group) exhibiting a 2.3-fold increase in suture retention strength (SRS). Tracheal scaffolds with ring reinforcements have improved mechanical properties, while the fibrous component increased porosity and cell infiltration potential. These scaffolds may be used to treat various trachea defects (patch or circumferential) and have the potential to be employed in other tissue engineering applications.

  11. Freeform extrusion fabrication of titanium fiber reinforced 13-93 bioactive glass scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Albin; Kolan, Krishna C R; Leu, Ming C; Hilmas, Gregory E

    2017-05-01

    Although implants made with bioactive glass have shown promising results for bone repair, their application in repairing load-bearing long bone is limited due to their poor mechanical properties in comparison to human bone. This work investigates the freeform extrusion fabrication of bioactive silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds reinforced with titanium (Ti) fibers. A composite paste prepared with 13-93 glass and Ti fibers (~16µm in diameter and lengths varying from ~200µm to ~2 mm) was extruded through a nozzle to fabricate scaffolds (0-90° filament orientation pattern) on a heated plate. The sintered scaffolds measured pore sizes ranging from 400 to 800µm and a porosity of ~50%. Scaffolds with 0.4vol% Ti fibers measured fracture toughness of ~0.8MPam(1/2) and a flexural strength of ~15MPa. 13-93 glass scaffolds without Ti fibers had a toughness of ~0.5MPam(1/2) and a strength of ~10MPa. The addition of Ti fibers increased the fracture toughness of the scaffolds by ~70% and flexural strength by ~40%. The scaffolds' biocompatibility and their degradation in mechanical properties in vitro were assessed by immersing the scaffolds in a simulated body fluid over a period of one to four weeks.

  12. Development of an Ibuprofen-releasing biodegradable PLA/PGA electrospun scaffold for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cantón, Irene; Mckean, Robert; Charnley, Mirren; Blackwood, Keith A; Fiorica, Calogero; Ryan, Anthony J; MacNeil, Sheila

    2010-02-01

    Our aim was to develop a biodegradable fibrous dressing to act as a tissue guide for in situ wound repair while releasing Ibuprofen to reduce inflammation in wounds and reduce pain for patients on dressing changes. Dissolving the acid form of Ibuprofen (from 1% to 10% by weight) in the same solvent as 75% polylactide, 25% polyglycolide (PLGA) polymers gave uniformly loaded electrospun fibers which gave rapid release of drug within the first 8 h and then slower release over several days. Scaffolds with 10% Ibuprofen degraded within 6 days. The Ibuprofen released from these scaffolds significantly reduced the response of fibroblasts to major pro-inflammatory stimulators. Fibroblast attachment and proliferation on scaffolds was unaffected by the addition of 1-5% Ibuprofen. Scaffolds loaded with 10% Ibuprofen initially showed reduced cell attachment but this was restored by soaking scaffolds in media for 24 h. In summary, addition of Ibuprofen to electrospun biodegradable scaffolds can give acute protection of adjacent cells to inflammation while the scaffolds provide an open 3D fibrous network to which cells can attach and migrate. By 6 days, such scaffolds will have completely dissolved into the wound bed obviating any need for dressing removal.

  13. Using Scaffolds in Problem-Based Hypermedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yuyan; Klein, James D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the use of scaffolds in problem-based hypermedia. Three hundred and twelve undergraduate students enrolled in a computer literacy course worked in project teams to use a hypermedia PBL program focused on designing a personal computer. The PBL program included content scaffolds, metacognitive scaffolds, or no scaffolds.…

  14. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sucking thus creating a "wink" when chewing or sucking. Is Monocular Elevation Deficiency associated with other diseases or developmental problems? There is no known association between Monocular Elevation ...

  15. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  16. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-08

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  17. Ectopic Osteogenesis and Scaffold Biodegradation of Nano-Hydroxyapatite-Chitosan in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    He, Yiqun; Dong, Youhai; Cui, Fuzhai; Chen, Xujun; Lin, Rongqiang

    2015-01-01

    The bone-formation and scaffold-biodegradation processes have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to determine the osteogenic ability of nHA-CS osteo-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) composites and to explore the relationship between bone formation and scaffold biodegradation. The nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites (nHA-CS+cells group) and the nHA-CS scaffolds (nHA-CS group) were implanted into the femoral spatium intermusculare of SD rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation, the rat femurs were scanned using computerized tomography (CT), and the CT values of the implants were measured and comparatively analyzed. The implants were then harvested and subjected to hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome staining, and the percentages of bone area, scaffold area and collagen area were compared between the two groups. The CT values of the implants were higher in the nHA-CS+cells group than the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed that de novo bone and collagen formation in the pores of the scaffolds gradually increased from 2 weeks post-implantation in both groups and that the scaffold gradually degraded as bone formation proceeded. However, more de novo bone and collagen formation and scaffold degradation occurred in the nHA-CS+cells group than in the nHA-CS group at the same time points (P < 0.05). In conclusion, nHA-CS osteo-induced BMSC composites are promising bone tissue engineering substitutes, and osteo-induced BMSCs can significantly enhance the osteogenic ability and play an active role in the degradation of nHA-CS scaffolds on par with bone formation. PMID:26258851

  18. Hybrid scaffolds based on PLGA and silk for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Jang, Ji Eun; Khang, Gilson; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-03-01

    Porous silk scaffolds, which are considered to be natural polymers, cannot be used alone because they have a long degradation rate, which makes it difficult for them to be replaced by the surrounding tissue. Scaffolds composed of synthetic polymers, such as PLGA, have a short degradation rate, lack hydrophilicity and their release of toxic by-products makes them difficult to use. The present investigations aimed to study hybrid scaffolds fabricated from PLGA, silk and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Hap NPs) for optimized bone tissue engineering. The results from variable-pressure field emission scanning electron microscopy (VP-FE-SEM), equipped with EDS, confirmed that the fabricated scaffolds had a porous architecture, and the location of each component present in the scaffolds was examined. Contact angle measurements confirmed that the introduction of silk and HAp NPs helped to change the hydrophobic nature of PLGA to hydrophilic, which is the main constraint for PLGA used as a biomaterial. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed thermal decomposition and different vibrations caused in functional groups of compounds used to fabricate the scaffolds, which reflected improvement in their mechanical properties. After culturing osteoblasts for 1, 7 and 14 days in the presence of scaffolds, their viability was checked by MTT assay. The fluorescent microscopy results revealed that the introduction of silk and HAp NPs had a favourable impact on the infiltration of osteoblasts. In vivo experiments were conducted by implanting scaffolds in rat calvariae for 4 weeks. Histological examinations and micro-CT scans from these experiments revealed beneficial attributes offered by silk fibroin and HAp NPs to PLGA-based scaffolds for bone induction.

  19. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-02-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells.

  20. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  1. Biodegradable fibrous scaffolds with tunable properties formed from photo-cross-linkable poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Devlin, Jeffrey J; Eng, George; Martens, Timothy P; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-09-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the architecture and mechanical properties of scaffolds, particularly with respect to mimicking features of natural tissues, are important for tissue engineering applications. Acrylated poly(glycerol sebacate) (Acr-PGS) is a material that can be cross-linked upon exposure to ultraviolet light, leading to networks with tunable mechanical and degradation properties through simple changes during Acr-PGS synthesis. For example, the number of acrylate functional groups on the macromer dictates the concentration of cross-links formed in the resulting network. Three macromers were synthesized that form networks that vary dramatically with respect to their tensile modulus ( approximately 30 kPa to 6.6 MPa) and degradation behavior ( approximately 20-100% mass loss at 12 weeks) based on the extent of acrylation ( approximately 1-24%). These macromers were processed into biodegradable fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning, with gelatin as a carrier polymer to facilitate fiber formation and cell adhesion. The resulting scaffolds were also diverse with respect to their mechanics (tensile modulus ranging from approximately 60 kPa to 1 MPa) and degradation ( approximately 45-70% mass loss by 12 weeks). Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on all fibrous scaffolds was indistinguishable from those of controls. The scaffolds showed similar diversity when implanted on the surface of hearts in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction and demonstrated a dependence on the scaffold thickness and chemistry in the host response. In summary, these diverse scaffolds with tailorable chemical, structural, mechanical, and degradation properties are potentially useful for the engineering of a wide range of soft tissues.

  2. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  3. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  4. 87. Credit JE. West and south elevations. Notice draft tube ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. Credit JE. West and south elevations. Notice draft tube openings, relief valve outlets above them, and exciter water discharge opening (with scaffolding in front). (JE, v. 27 1911 p. 417). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  5. Stabilized Collagen and Elastin-Based Scaffolds for Mitral Valve Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Christopher; Simionescu, Dan Teodor; Wright, Cristopher; Liao, Jun; Sierad, Leslie Neil; Simionescu, Agneta

    2016-11-01

    There is a significant clinical need for new approaches to treatment of mitral valve disease. The aim of this study was to develop a tissue-engineered mitral valve scaffold possessing appropriate composition and structure to ensure ideal characteristics of mitral valves, such as large orifice, rapid opening and closure, maintenance of mitral annulus-papillary muscle continuity, in vivo biocompatibility and extended durability. An extracellular matrix-based scaffold was generated, based on the native porcine mitral valve as starting material and a technique for porcine cell removal without causing damage to the matrix components. To stabilize these structures and slow down their degradation, acellular scaffolds were treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG), a well-characterized polyphenol with high affinity for collagen and elastin. Biaxial mechanical testing presented similar characteristics for the PGG-treated scaffolds compared to fresh tissues. The extracellular matrix components, crucial for maintaining the valve shape and function, were well preserved in leaflets, and in chordae, as shown by their resistance to collagenase and elastin. When extracted with strong detergents, the PGG-treated scaffolds released a reduced amount of soluble matrix peptides, compared to untreated scaffolds; this correlated with diminished activation of fibroblasts seeded on scaffolds treated with PGG. Cell-seeded scaffolds conditioned for 5 weeks in a valve bioreactor showed good cell viability. Finally, rat subdermal implantation studies showed that PGG-treated mitral valve scaffolds were biocompatible, nonimmunogenic, noninflammatory, and noncalcifying. In conclusion, a biocompatible mitral valve scaffold was developed, which preserved the biochemical composition and structural integrity of the valve, essential for its highly dynamic mechanical demands, and its biologic durability.

  6. Conversion of borate-based glass scaffold to hydroxyapatite in a dilute phosphate solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Pan, Haobo; Fu, Hailuo; Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Huang, Wenhai

    2010-02-01

    Porous scaffolds of a borate-based glass (composition in mol%: 6Na2O, 8K2O, 8MgO, 22CaO, 36B2O3, 18SiO2, 2P2O5), with interconnected porosity of approximately 70% and pores of size 200-500 microm, were prepared by a polymer foam replication technique. The degradation of the scaffolds and conversion to a hydroxyapatite-type material in a 0.02 M K2HPO4 solution (starting pH = 7.0) at 37 degrees C were studied by measuring the weight loss of the scaffolds, as well as the pH and the boron concentration of the solution. X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis showed that a hydroxyapatite-type material was formed on the glass surface within 7 days of immersion in the phosphate solution. Cellular response to the scaffolds was assessed using murine MLO-A5 cells, an osteogenic cell line. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the scaffolds supported cell attachment and proliferation during the 6 day incubation. The results indicate that this borate-based glass could provide a promising degradable scaffold material for bone tissue engineering applications.

  7. Accelerated wound healing by injectable microporous gel scaffolds assembled from annealed building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Donald R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Scumpia, Philip; Di Carlo, Dino; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Injectable hydrogels can provide a scaffold for in situ tissue regrowth and regeneration, however these injected materials require gel degradation prior to tissue reformation limiting their ability to provide physical support. We have created a new class of injectable biomaterial that circumvents this challenge by providing an interconnected microporous network for simultaneous tissue reformation and material degradation. We assemble monodisperse micro-gel building blocks into an interconnected microporous annealed particle (MAP) scaffold. Through microfluidic formation, we tailor the chemical and physical properties of the building blocks, providing downstream control of the physical and chemical properties of the assembled MAP scaffold. In vitro, cells incorporated during MAP scaffold formation proliferated and formed extensive 3D networks within 48 hours. In vivo, the injectable MAP scaffold facilitated cell migration resulting in rapid cutaneous tissue regeneration and tissue structure formation within 5 days. The combination of microporosity and injectability achieved with MAP scaffolds will enable novel routes to tissue regeneration in vivo and tissue creation de novo. PMID:26030305

  8. Collagen scaffolds derived from fresh water fish origin and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Datta, Pallab; Adhikari, Basudam; Dhara, Santanu; Ghosh, Kuntal; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Collagen, a major component of native extracellular matrix, has diverse biomedical applications. However, its application is limited due to lack of cost-effective production and risk of disease transmission from bovine sources currently utilized. This study describes fabrication and characterization of nano/micro fibrous scaffolds utilizing collagen extracted from fresh water fish origin. This is the first time collagen extracted from fresh water fish origin was studied for their biocompatibility and immunogenicity. The nano/micro fibrous collagen scaffolds were fabricated through self-assembly owing to its amphiphilic nature and were subsequently cross-linked. In vitro degradation study revealed higher stability of the cross-linked scaffolds with only ~50% reduction of mass in 30 days, while the uncross-linked one degraded completely in 4 days. Further, minimal inflammatory response was observed when collagen solution was injected in mice with or without adjuvant, without significant dilution of sera. The fish collagen scaffolds exhibited considerable cell viability and were comparable with that of bovine collagen. SEM and fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed significant proliferation rate of cells on the scaffolds and within 5 days the cells were fully confluent. These findings indicated that fish collagen scaffolds derived from fresh water origin were highly biocompatible in nature.

  9. Nanocomposite bone scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johannes; Lu, Lichun; Runge, M Brett; Zeng, Heng; Yaszemski, Michael J; Dadsetan, Mahrokh

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, development of an osteoconductive construct that integrates with host tissue remains a challenge. In this work, the effect of bone-like minerals on maturation of pre-osteoblast cells was investigated using polymer-mineral scaffolds composed of poly(propylene fumarate)-co-poly(caprolactone) (PPF-co-PCL) and nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA). The HA of varying concentrations was added to an injectable formulation of PPF-co-PCL and the change in thermal and mechanical properties of the scaffolds was evaluated. No change in onset of degradation temperature was observed due to the addition of HA, however compressive and tensile moduli of copolymer changed significantly when HA amounts were increased in composite formulation. The change in mechanical properties of copolymer was found to correlate well to HA concentration in the constructs. Electron microscopy revealed mineral nucleation and a change in surface morphology and the presence of calcium and phosphate on surfaces was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. To characterize the effect of mineral on attachment and maturation of pre-osteoblasts, W20-17 cells were seeded on HA/copolymer composites. We demonstrated that cells attached more to the surface of HA containing copolymers and their proliferation rate was significantly increased. Thus, these findings suggest that HA/PPF-co-PCL composite scaffolds are capable of inducing maturation of pre-osteoblasts and have the potential for use as scaffold in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1–14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour. PMID:24501673

  11. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-02-06

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1-14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour.

  12. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeon Kwon, Doo; Seon Kwon, Jin; Hun Park, Seung; Hun Park, Ji; Hee Jang, So; Yun Yin, Xiang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Hee Lee, Jun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold. PMID:26234712

  13. Mineralized poly(lactic acid) scaffolds loading vascular endothelial growth factor and the in vivo performance in rat subcutaneous model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Park, Jeong-Hui; Yun, Ye-Rang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-05-01

    The functionalization of degradable polymeric scaffolds with therapeutic molecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key strategy to gain better regenerative ability of damaged bone tissue by stimulating vascularization and tissue perfusion. Here, we combined VEGF with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) porous scaffold, after modifying the PLA surface with calcium phosphate (CaP) mineral. The mineralized PLA scaffold (mPLA) showed more effective loading capacity of VEGF than the PLA without mineralization as well as profiled sustainable release of VEGF for up to a couple of weeks. The VEGF-loaded mPLA scaffold presented significantly improved proliferation of primary endothelial cells for up to 7 days, with respect to the scaffold without the VEGF loading. The performance of the engineered scaffold was assessed after subcutaneous implantation in rats for 4 weeks. Histological results showed favorable tissue compatibility of both the mPLA scaffolds (with and without VEGF loading), as characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, formation of fibrous capsule, and ingrowth of fibroblasts into the matrices. Immunohistochemical staining of the von Willebrand Factor revealed significantly improved formation of neo-capillaries in the VEGF-loaded mPLA. Based on this study, the strategy of VEGF loading onto mineralized PLA scaffold is considered beneficial for gaining improved vascularization of the polymeric scaffolds, suggesting potential applications for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Low-Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Biomimic Three-Dimensional Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Feng; He, Shu; Song, Yue; Wang, Chun-Mei; Gao, Yi; Li, Jun-Qin; Tang, Peng; Wang, Zheng; Bi, Long; Pei, Guo-Xian

    2016-03-23

    Low-temperature additive manufacturing (AM) holds promise for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds containing bioactive molecules and/or drugs. Due to the strict technical limitations of current approaches, few materials are suitable for printing at low temperature. Here, a low-temperature robocasting method was employed to print biomimic 3D scaffolds for bone regeneration using a routine collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) composite material, which is too viscous to be printed via normal 3D printing methods at low temperature. The CHA scaffolds had excellent 3D structure and maintained most raw material properties after printing. Compared to nonprinted scaffolds, printed scaffolds promoted bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and improved osteogenic outcome in vitro. In a rabbit femoral condyle defect model, the interconnecting pores within the printed scaffolds facilitated cell penetration and mineralization before the scaffolds degraded and enhanced repair, compared to nonprinted CHA scaffolds. Additionally, the optimal printing parameters for 3D CHA scaffolds were investigated; 600-μm-diameter rods were optimal in terms of moderate mechanical strength and better repair outcome in vivo. This low-temperature robocasting method could enable a variety of bioactive molecules to be incorporated into printed CHA materials and provides a method of bioprinting biomaterials without compromising their natural properties.

  15. Direct ink writing of highly porous and strong glass scaffolds for load-bearing bone defects repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2011-10-01

    The quest for synthetic materials to repair load-bearing bone lost because of trauma, cancer, or congenital bone defects requires the development of porous, high-performance scaffolds with exceptional mechanical strength. However, the low mechanical strength of porous bioactive ceramic and glass scaffolds, compared with that of human cortical bone, has limited their use for these applications. In the present work bioactive 6P53B glass scaffolds with superior mechanical strength were fabricated using a direct ink writing technique. The rheological properties of Pluronic® F-127 (referred to hereafter simply as F-127) hydrogel-based inks were optimized for the printing of features as fine as 30 μm and of three-dimensional scaffolds. The mechanical strength and in vitro degradation of the scaffolds were assessed in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The sintered glass scaffolds showed a compressive strength (136 ± 22 MPa) comparable with that of human cortical bone (100-150 MPa), while the porosity (60%) was in the range of that of trabecular bone (50-90%). The strength is ~100-times that of polymer scaffolds and 4-5-times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities. Despite the strength decrease resulting from weight loss during immersion in SBF, the value (77 MPa) is still far above that of trabecular bone after 3 weeks. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for load-bearing bone defect repair and regeneration.

  16. Evaluation of bone matrix gelatin/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Gao, Y; Yan, J; Zhao, X Y; Yang, Y Y; Kong, D M; Zhao, J; Shi, Y X; Li, X L

    2016-07-15

    This study was designed to evaluate bone matrix gelatin (BMG)/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Chondrocytes were isolated from costal cartilage of Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded on BMG/fibrin glue or chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds. After different in vitro culture durations, the scaffolds were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and toluidine blue staining, anti-collagen II and anti-aggrecan immunohistochemistry, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. After 2 weeks of culture, chondrocytes were distributed evenly on the surfaces of both scaffolds. Cell numbers and the presence of extracellular matrix components were markedly increased after 8 weeks of culture, and to a greater extent on the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. The BMG/fibrin glue scaffold showed signs of degradation after 8 weeks. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed higher levels of collagen II and aggrecan using the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. SEM revealed that the majority of cells on the surface of the BMG/fibrin glue scaffold demonstrated a round morphology, while those in the chitosan/gelatin group had a spindle-like shape, with pseudopodia. Chitosan/gelatin scaffolds appear to be superior to BMG/ fibrin glue constructs in supporting chondrocyte attachment, proliferation, and biosynthesis of cartilaginous matrix components.

  17. Extrusion-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds with hydroxyapatite gradients.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Placone, Jesse K; Smith, Brandon T; Fisher, John P; Mikos, Antonios G

    2017-04-01

    The primary focus of this work is to present the current challenges of printing scaffolds with concentration gradients of nanoparticles with an aim to improve the processing of these scaffolds. Furthermore, we address how print fidelity is related to material composition and emphasize the importance of considering this relationship when developing complex scaffolds for bone implants. The ability to create complex tissues is becoming increasingly relevant in the tissue engineering community. For bone tissue engineering applications, this work demonstrates the ability to use extrusion-based printing techniques to control the spatial deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in a 3D composite scaffold. In doing so, we combined the benefits of synthetic, degradable polymers, such as poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), with osteoconductive HA nanoparticles that provide robust compressive mechanical properties. Furthermore, the final 3D printed scaffolds consisted of well-defined layers with interconnected pores, two critical features for a successful bone implant. To demonstrate a controlled gradient of HA, thermogravimetric analysis was carried out to quantify HA on a per-layer basis. Moreover, we non-destructively evaluated the tendency of HA particles to aggregate within PPF using micro-computed tomography (μCT). This work provides insight for proper fabrication and characterization of composite scaffolds containing particle gradients and has broad applicability for future efforts in fabricating complex scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  18. Diagnostics of 3D Scaffolds by the Method of X-Ray Phase Contrast Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'tapova, V. R.; Khlusov, I. A.; Karpov, D. A.; Chen, F.; Baumbach, T.; Pichugin, V. F.

    2014-02-01

    Polymers are one of the most interesting classes of materials for bioengineering due to their high biocompatibility and the possibility of regulating their strength and degradation. In bioengineering, the design of a polymer scaffold determines the functional possibilities of the scaffold and its possible medical applications. Traditionally, the design of polymer scaffolds is analyzed with the help of two-dimensional visualization methods, such as optical and electron microscopy, and computer tomography. However, the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum is only insignificantly absorbed by polymers and soft tissue, which means that it does not support computer tomography with sufficient contrast. The present work investigates visualization with the help of an interferometer based on the Talbot effect for three-dimensional visualization of a polymer scaffold in absorption, phase, and dark-field contrasts. A comparison of images obtained by x-ray visualization with histological sections of the scaffold is made. Phase contrast has made it possible to visualize the polymer structure and growth of soft tissues in the volume of the scaffold. In the future, it will be possible to use phase contrast for three-dimensional visualization of polymer scaffolds and soft tissues in vivo as well as in vitro.

  19. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix™ alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation.

  20. Surface modification of PHBV scaffolds via UV polymerization to improve hydrophilicity.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Ren, Li

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffolds with polyacrylamide was achieved with the aim to improve their hydrophilicity. PHBV scaffolds were prepared using the particle-leaching technique, with a porogen size of 100-200, 200-300, 300-400 and 400-500 mum, respectively. After UV polymerization, the modified PHBV scaffolds had interconnected pores with flaky substances partially filled inside. They had a lower porosity, ranging from 80.3 to 86.6%, and higher density, 0.22-0.25 g/cm(3), than the PHBV scaffolds. Mercury intrusion porosimetry results showed that the pore sizes at the peak volume increased with the increase of porogen sizes for the modified scaffolds. No extensive weight loss of the PHBV was found after 360 days incubation in PBS at 37 degrees C. However, the weight loss of the modified PHBV increased with time before 90 days incubation. After that period, it ranged only between 5 and 7.5%, with the maximum value at 240 days. During 360 days incubation, the pH value of degradation fluid fluctuated between 7.1 and 7.2. Sheep chondrocytes were cultured on the PHBV and modified PHBV scaffolds. Results showed that the modified PHBV scaffolds provided a better surface for chondrocyte adhesion and spread.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell growth on and mechanical properties of fibrin-based biomimetic bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Linsley, Chase S; Wu, Benjamin M; Tawil, Bill

    2016-12-01

    Using the microenvironment of healing bone tissue as inspiration, this study utilized fibrin hydrogels combined with collagen type I and calcium phosphate ceramics to create a biomimetic bone scaffold. The contribution each component had on the growth of mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was assessed, and changes in the scaffold's mechanical properties were measured by indentation testing. The results show cell growth was greatest in scaffolds with lower concentrations of fibrinogen complex and followed a similar trend with the addition of collagen. However, cell growth was greatest in fibrin scaffolds with high concentrations of fibrinogen complex when combined with hydroxyapatite-β-tricalcium phosphate. The fibrin scaffold's stiffness does not significantly change over time, but the addition of collagen to scaffolds with low concentrations of fibrinogen complex had significant increases in stiffness by day 14. These results demonstrate that hMSC do not rapidly degrade fibrin and fibrin-collagen scaffolds in vitro. The data reported here can aid in the design and fabrication of fibrin-based engineered tissues and cell delivery vehicles that promote hMSC growth and viability as well as meet the mechanical requirements of native tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2945-2953, 2016.

  2. Gelatin/Carboxymethyl chitosan based scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tarun; Narayan, Rajan; Maji, Somnath; Behera, Shubhanath; Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Banerjee, Indranil; Pal, Kunal; Giri, Supratim

    2016-12-01

    The present study delineates the preparation, characterization and application of gelatin-carboxymethyl chitosan scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering. The effect of carboxymethyl chitosan and gelatin ratio was evaluated for variations in their physico-chemical-biological characteristics and drug release kinetics. The scaffolds were prepared by freeze drying method and characterized by SEM and FTIR. The study revealed that the scaffolds were highly porous with pore size ranging between 90 and 170μm, had high water uptake (400-1100%) and water retention capacity (>300%). The collagenase mediated degradation of the scaffolds was dependent on the amount of gelatin present in the formulation. A slight yet significant variation in their biological characteristics was also observed. All the formulations supported adhesion, spreading, growth and proliferation of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. The cells seeded on the scaffolds also demonstrated expression of collagen type I, HIF1α and VEGF, providing a clue regarding their growth and proliferation along with potential to support angiogenesis during wound healing. In addition, the scaffolds showed sustained ampicillin and bovine serum albumin release, confirming their suitability as a therapeutic delivery vehicle during wound healing. All together, the results suggest that gelatin-carboxymethyl chitosan based scaffolds could be a suitable matrix for dermal tissue engineering applications.

  3. Biodegradable CSMA/PECA/Graphene Porous Hybrid Scaffold for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Liao, JinFeng; Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Zhang, XiaoNing; Qian, ZhiYong

    2015-05-11

    Owing to the limited repair capacity of articular cartilage, it is essential to develop tissue-engineered cartilage for patients suffering from joint disease and trauma. Herein, we prepared a novel hybrid scaffold composed of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-ε-caprolactone-acryloyl chloride (MPEG-PCL-AC, PECA was used as abbreviation for MPEG-PCL-AC) and graphene oxide (GO) and evaluated its potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. To mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage, the scaffold had an adequate pore size, porosity, swelling ability, compression modulus and conductivity. Cartilage cells contacted with the scaffold remained viable and showed growth potential. Furthermore, CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold was biocompatible and had a favorable degradation rate. In the cartilage tissue repair of rabbit, Micro-CT and histology observation showed the group of CSMA/PECA/GO scaffold with cellular supplementation had better chondrocyte morphology, integration, continuous subchondral bone, and much thicker newly formed cartilage compared with scaffold group and control group. Our results show that the CSMA/PECA/GO hybrid porous scaffold can be applied in articular cartilage tissue engineering and may have great potential to in other types of tissue engineering applications.

  4. Fabrication of gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate scaffolds with unidirectional pores for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Yu; Yang, Chyun-Yu; Lee, Tzer-Min

    2015-03-01

    This study fabricated homogeneous gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate composites via coprecipitation in a gelatin solution. Unidirectional porous scaffolds with an oriented microtubular structure were then manufactured using freeze-drying technology. The resulting structure and pore alignment were determined using scanning electron microscopy. The pore size were in the range of 200-400 μm, which is considered ideal for the engineering of bone tissue. The scaffolds were further characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Hydroxyapatite was the main calcium phosphate compound in the scaffolds, with strontium incorporated into the crystal structure. The porosity of the scaffolds decreased with increasing concentration of calcium-phosphate. The compressive strength in the longitudinal direction was two to threefold higher than that observed in the transverse direction. Our results demonstrate that the composite scaffolds degraded by approximately 20 % after 5 weeks. Additionally, in vitro results reveal that the addition of strontium significantly increased human osteoblastic cells proliferation. Scaffolds containing strontium with a Sr-CaP/(gelatin + Sr-CaP) ratio of 50 % provided the most suitable environment for cell proliferation, particularly under dynamic culture conditions. This study demonstrates the considerable potential of composite scaffolds composed of gelatin-strontium-substituted calcium phosphate for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  5. Development of D-lysine-assisted 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide-initiated cross linking of collagen matrix for design of scaffold.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ganesan; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Mandal, Asit Baran; Sadulla, Sayeed

    2013-04-01

    This work discusses the preparation and characterization of collagen scaffold with presence of D-Lysine (Coll-D-Lys)-assisted 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-initiated cross linking. The mechanical strength, thermal and structural stability, resistance to biodegradation and cell viability of this scaffold was investigated. The results of the Coll-D-Lys-EDC/NHS scaffold also indicate an increase in the tensile strength (T(S)), percentage of elongation (% E), denaturation temperature (T(d)), and decrease the decomposition rate. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analyses revealed a well ordered with properly oriented and well-aligned structure of scaffold. The D-Lys stabilizes the scaffold against degradation by collagenase than L-Lys. The cell assay showed more than 98 ± 2% fibroblast viability (NIH 3T3) after 72 h of culture Coll-D-Lys-scaffold when compared with native Coll and Coll-L-Lys-scaffold. The proteolytic machinery is not well equipped to deal with Coll-D-Lys-scaffold than Coll-L-Lys-scaffold. Incorporating D-Lys in scaffold design has the potential to improve existing collagen stability and create new topologies inaccessible to homochiral molecules. This method may assist in the functionalization of the scaffold for regenerative applications.

  6. A silk fibroin/chitosan scaffold in combination with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to repair cartilage defects in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiang; She, Rongfeng; Huang, Wenliang; Dong, Zhijun; Mo, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were seeded in a three-dimensional scaffold of silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (CS) to repair cartilage defects in the rabbit knee. Totally 54 rabbits were randomly assigned to BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold, SF/CS scaffold and control groups. A cylindrical defect was created at the patellofemoral facet of the right knee of each rabbit and repaired by scaffold respectively. Samples were prepared at 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-surgery for gross observation, hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue staining, type II collagen immunohistochemistry, Wakitani histology. The results showed that differentiated BMSCs proliferated well in the scaffold. In the BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold group, the bone defect was nearly repaired, the scaffold was absorbed and immunohistochemistry was positive. In the SF/CS scaffold alone group, fiber-like tissues were observed, the scaffold was nearly degraded and immunohistochemistry was weakly positive. In the control group, the defect was not well repaired and positive immunoreactions were not detected. Modified Wakitani scores were superior in the BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold group compared with those in other groups at 4, 8 and 12 weeks (P < 0.05). A SF/CS scaffold can serve as carrier for stem cells to repair cartilage defects and may be used for cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. Preparation and characterization of crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds by ice segregation induced self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Suárez, Marina; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Lazzari, Massimo

    2016-05-05

    Chitosan and gelatin are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers which may be used in the preparation of 3D scaffolds with applications in biomedicine. Chitosan/gelatin scaffolds crosslinked with glutaraldehyde were prepared by ice segregation induced self-assembly (ISISA); a unidirectional freezing at -196°C followed freeze-drying to produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. This process may be included within the green chemistry by the preparation of the porous structures without using organic solvents, moreover is a versatile, non-difficult and cheap process. The scaffolds prepared by ISISA were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and their stability was evaluated by degree swelling and degradation tests. The scaffolds present properties as high porosity, high degree swelling and good stability which make them suitable of applications as biomaterials.

  8. [Research progress on application of carbon nanotubes in bone tissue engineering scaffold].

    PubMed

    Yao, Mengzhu; Sheng, Xiaoxia; Lin, Jun; Gao, Jianqing

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess excellent mechanical and electrical properties and demonstrate broad application prospects in medical fields. Carbon nanotubes are composed of inorganic materials, natural biodegradable polymer or synthetic biodegradable polymer. The composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds are constructed by particle-hole method, lyophilization, microsphere aggregation method, electrostatic spinning or three-dimensional printing. Composite scaffolds overcome the shortcomings of single material and have good biocompatibility, osteoconduction and osteoinduction. With the study of surface chemistry, toxicology, and biocompatibility, a degradable "human-friendly" carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue scaffold will be available; and under the drive of new fabrication techniques, the clinical application of carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds will be better developed.

  9. Skeletal muscle regeneration on protein-grafted and microchannel-patterned scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  10. Functionalization of Calcium Sulfate/Bioglass Scaffolds with Zinc Oxide Whisker.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Cijun; Zhou, Jianhua; Gao, Dan; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Peng, Shuping

    2016-03-18

    There are urgent demands for satisfactory antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of bone scaffolds. In this study, zinc oxide whisker (ZnOw) was introduced into calcium sulfate/bioglass scaffolds. Antimicrobial behavior was analyzed using Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The results showed that the scaffolds presented a strong antibacterial activity after introducing ZnOw, due to the antibacterial factors released from the degradation of ZnO. Moreover, ZnOw was also found to have a distinct reinforcing effect on mechanical properties. This was ascribed to whisker pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection, crack branching and other toughening mechanisms. In addition, the cell culture experiments showed that the scaffolds with ZnOw had a good biocompatibility.

  11. Morphology and properties of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds: impact of process variables.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi

    2014-09-01

    Successful engineering of functional biological substitutes requires scaffolds with three-dimensional interconnected porous structure, controllable rate of biodegradation, and ideal mechanical strength. In this study, we report the development and characterization of micro-porous PVA scaffolds fabricated by freeze drying method. The impact of molecular weight of PVA, surfactant concentration, foaming time, and stirring speed on pore characteristics, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, and rate of degradation of the scaffolds was characterized. Results show that a foaming time of 60s, a stirring speed of 1,000 rpm, and a surfactant concentration of 5% yielded scaffolds with rigid structure but with interconnected pores. Study also demonstrated that increased foaming time increased porosity and swelling ratio and reduced the rigidity of the samples.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration on Protein-Grafted and Microchannel-Patterned Scaffold for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration. PMID:24175281

  13. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  14. Effect of glucose content on thermally cross-linked fibrous gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Siimon, Kaido; Reemann, Paula; Põder, Annika; Pook, Martin; Kangur, Triin; Kingo, Külli; Jaks, Viljar; Mäeorg, Uno; Järvekülg, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Thermally cross-linked glucose-containing electrospun gelatin meshes were studied as possible cell substrate materials. FTIR analysis was used to study the effect of glucose on cross-linking reactions. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the extent of cross-linking of fibrous gelatin scaffolds, which in return determines scaffold properties and their usability in tissue engineering applications. Easy to handle fabric-like scaffolds were obtained from blends containing up to 15% glucose. Maximum extent of cross-linking was reached at nearly 20% glucose content. Cross-linking effectively resulted in decreased solubility and increased resistance to enzymatic degradation. Preliminary short-term cell culture experiments indicate that such thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds are suitable for tissue engineering applications.

  15. Tunable tissue scaffolds fabricated by in situ crosslink in phase separation system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xifeng; Chen, Wenjian; Gustafson, Carl T.; Miller, A. Lee; Waletzki, Brian E.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds with intrinsic porous structures are desirable in various tissue regeneration applications. In this study, a unique method that combines thermally induced phase separation with a photocrosslinking process was developed for the fabrication of 3-D crosslinked polymer scaffolds with densely interconnected porous structures. Biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate)-co-poly(L-lactic acid) with crosslinkable fumarate bonds were used as the structural polymer material and a dioxane/water binary system was applied for the phase separation. By altering the polymer composition (9, 5 and 3 wt%), different types of scaffolds with distinct morphology, mechanical strength, degradation rate, cell growth and morphology, and extracellular matrix production were fabricated. These crosslinked 3-D porous scaffolds with tunable strength and biological responses show promise for potential applications in regenerative therapies, including bone and neural tissue engineering. PMID:26989479

  16. Inorganic-organic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brennan Margaret

    Analogous to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural tissues, properties of a tissue engineering scaffold direct cell behavior and thus regenerated tissue properties. These include both physical properties (e.g. morphology and modulus) and chemical properties (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydration and bioactivity). Notably, recent studies suggest that scaffold properties (e.g. modulus) may be as potent as growth factors in terms of directing stem cell fate. Thus, 3D scaffolds possessing specific properties modified for optimal cell regeneration have the potential to regenerate native-like tissues. Photopolymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA)-based hydrogels are frequently used as scaffolds for tissue engineering. They are ideal for controlled studies of cell-material interactions due to their poor protein adsorption in the absence of adhesive ligands thereby making them "biological blank slates". However, their range of physical and chemical properties is limited. Thus, hydrogel scaffolds which maintain the benefits of PEG-DA but possess a broader set of tunable properties would allow the establishment of predictive relationships between scaffold properties, cell behavior and regenerated tissue properties. Towards this goal, this work describes a series of unique hybrid inorganic-organic hydrogel scaffolds prepared using different solvents and also in the form of continuous gradients. Properties relevant to tissue regeneration were investigated including: swelling, morphology, modulus, degradation rates, bioactivity, cytocompatibility, and protein adhesion. These scaffolds were based on the incorporation of hydrophobic, bioactive and osteoinductive methacrylated star polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSstar-MA) ["inorganic component"] into hydrophilic PEG-DA ["organic component"]. The following parameters were varied: molecular weight (Mn) of PEG-DA (Mn = 3k & 6k g/mol) and PDMSstar-MA (Mn = 1.8k, 7k, 14k), ratio of PDMSstar-MA to PEG-DA (0:100 to 20:80), total

  17. Poly(hydroxybutyrate)/cellulose acetate blend nanofiber scaffolds: Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhijiang, Cai; Yi, Xu; Haizheng, Yang; Jia, Jianru; Liu, Yuanpei

    2016-01-01

    Poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/cellulose acetate (CA) blend nanofiber scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning using the blends of chloroform and DMF as solvent. The blend nanofiber scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, contact angle and tensile test. The blend nanofibers exhibited cylindrical, uniform, bead-free and random orientation with the diameter ranged from 80-680 nm. The scaffolds had very well interconnected porous fibrous network structure and large aspect surface areas. It was found that the presence of CA affected the crystallization of PHB due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which restricted the preferential orientation of PHB molecules. The DSC result showed that the PHB and CA were miscible in the blend nanofiber. An increase in the glass transition temperature was observed with increasing CA content. Additionally, the mechanical properties of blend nanofiber scaffolds were largely influenced by the weight ratio of PHB/CA. The tensile strength, yield strength and elongation at break of the blend nanofiber scaffolds increased from 3.3 ± 0.35 MPa, 2.8 ± 0.26 MPa, and 8 ± 0.77% to 5.05 ± 0.52 MPa, 4.6 ± 0.82 MPa, and 17.6 ± 1.24% by increasing PHB content from 60% to 90%, respectively. The water contact angle of blend nanofiber scaffolds decreased about 50% from 112 ± 2.1° to 60 ± 0.75°. The biodegradability was evaluated by in vitro degradation test and the results revealed that the blend nanofiber scaffolds showed much higher degradation rates than the neat PHB. The cytocompatibility of the blend nanofiber scaffolds was preliminarily evaluated by cell adhesion studies. The cells incubated with PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffold for 48 h were capable of forming cell adhesion and proliferation. It showed much better biocompatibility than pure PHB film. Thus, the prepared PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffolds are bioactive and may be more suitable for cell proliferation suggesting that these scaffolds can be used for

  18. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  19. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  20. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks.

  1. A chitosan-hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Diego G; Malmonge, Sônia M; Campos, Doris M; Attik, Nina G; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Gritsch, Kerstin

    2016-11-01

    The current challenge in treating periodontitis is regenerating the periodontium. This motivates tissue-engineering researchers to develop scaffolds as artificial matrices that give mechanical support for osteoblasts, cementoblasts, gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblast cells. In this study, modified hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CS) were employed to create a hybrid CS-HA hydrogel scaffold for periodontal regeneration. CS, HA, and CS-HA scaffolds were obtained by freeze-drying technique, resulting in porous structures suitable for use in tissue engineering. Scaffolds were submitted to gamma and UV-sterilization without significant morphology changes. The ATR-FTIR spectra of CS-HA hydrogels showed peaks at 377 cm(-1) , 1566 cm(-1) , and 1614 cm(-1) , representing secondary amide, primary amine, and carboxyl acid respectively, and it was also observed the emergence of peaks at 886 cm(-1) , which probably represents the Schiff base formed in the case of hybrid CS-HA hydrogels. The scaffolds presented a high rate of PBS uptake, reaching values higher than 95%. Thermal degradation of HA scaffolds was around 225°C and CS was around 285°C. The ATR-FTIR spectra and swelling degree were slightly disturbed mainly after gamma sterilization, but degradation temperature did not change after sterilization. The performance of the CS-HA hydrogel scaffolds for in vitro cell culture was tested using NIH3T3 and MG63 cell lines. The Alamar Blue test showed a significant increase in cellular viability and high CD44 expression, suggesting that the cells migrated more when seeded onto the scaffolds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1691-1702, 2016.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Carboxymethylcellulose-Methacrylate Hydrogel Cell Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Robert; Ribeiro, Andreia; Lombardo, Leonard; Boyer, Richard; Leach, Jennie B.

    2012-01-01

    Many carbohydrates pose advantages for tissue engineering applications due to their hydrophilicity, degradability, and availability of chemical groups for modification. For example, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) is a water-soluble cellulose derivative that is degradable by cellulase. Though this enzyme is not synthesized by mammalian cells, cellulase and the fragments derived from CMC degradation are biocompatible. With this in mind, we created biocompatible, selectively degradable CMC-based hydrogels that are stable in routine culture, but degrade when exposed to exogenous cellulase. Solutions of CMC-methacrylate and polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEG-DM) were co-crosslinked to form stable hydrogels; we found that greater CMC-methacrylate content resulted in increased gel swelling, protein diffusion and rates of degradation by cellulase, as well as decreased gel shear modulus. CMC-methacrylate/PEG-DM gels modified with the adhesive peptide RGD supported fibroblast adhesion and viability. We conclude that hydrogels based on CMC-methacrylate are suitable for bioengineering applications where selective degradability may be favorable, such as cell scaffolds or controlled release devices. PMID:22708058

  3. Polylactic acid fibre-reinforced polycaprolactone scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Taddei, Paola; di Foggia, Michele; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Martini, Desirèe; Fagnano, Concezio; Baldini, Nicola; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2008-09-01

    The employment of composite scaffolds with a well-organized architecture and multi-scale porosity certainly represents a valuable approach for achieving a tissue engineered construct to reproduce the middle and long-term behaviour of hierarchically complex tissues such as spongy bone. In this paper, fibre-reinforced composites scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications is described. These are composed of poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) fibres embedded in a porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone) matrix, and were obtained by synergistic use of phase inversion/particulate leaching technique and filament winding technology. Porosity degree as high as 79.7% was achieved, the bimodal pore size distribution showing peaks at ca 10 and 200 microm diameter, respectively, accounting for 53.7% and 46.3% of the total porosity. In vitro degradation was carried out in PBS and SBF without significant degradation of the scaffold after 35 days, while in NaOH solution, a linear increase of weight lost was observed with preferential degradation of PLLA component. Subsequently, marrow stromal cells (MSC) and human osteoblasts (HOB) reached a plateau at 3 weeks, while at 5 weeks the number of cells was almost the same. Human marrow stromal cell and trabecular osteoblasts rapidly proliferate on the scaffold up to 3 weeks, promoting an oriented migration of bone cells along the fibre arrangement. Moreover, the role of seeded HOB and MSC on composite degradation mechanism was assessed by demonstrating a more relevant contribution to PLLA degradation of MSC when compared to HOB. The novel PCL/PLLA composite scaffolds thus showed promise whenever tuneable porosity, controlled degradability and guided cell-material interaction are simultaneously requested.

  4. Rapid Engineering of Three-Dimensional, Multicellular Tissues With Polymeric Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Jordan, Jacqueline; Fraga, Denise N.

    2007-01-01

    A process has been developed for the rapid tissue engineering of multicellular-tissue-equivalent assemblies by the controlled enzymatic degradation of polymeric beads in a low-fluid-shear bioreactor. In this process, the porous polymeric beads serve as temporary scaffolds to support the assemblies of cells in a tissuelike 3D configuration during the critical initial growth phases of attachment of anchorage-dependent cells, aggregation of the cells, and formation of a 3D extracellular matrix. Once the cells are assembled into a 3D array and enmeshed in a structural supportive 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), the polymeric scaffolds can be degraded in the low-fluid-shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor. The natural 3D tissuelike assembly, devoid of any artificial support structure, is maintained in the low-shear bioreactor environment by the newly formed natural cellular/ECM. The elimination of the artificial scaffold allows normal tissue structure and function.

  5. Microporous nanofibrous fibrin-based scaffolds for craniofacial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osathanon, Thanaphum

    The fibrotic response of the body to synthetic polymers limits their success in tissue engineering and other applications. Though porous polymers have demonstrated improved healing, difficulty in controlling their pore sizes and pore interconnections has clouded the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, a novel method to fabricate natural polymer/calcium phosphate composite scaffolds and immobilized alkaline phosphatase fibrin scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size, pore interconnection has been investigated. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds (FS) were fabricated using sphere-templating method. Calcium phosphate/fibrin composite scaffolds were created by solution deposition of calcium phosphate on fibrin surfaces or by direct incorporation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). The SEM results showed that fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure. Osteoblast-like cells, obtained from murine calvaria, attached, spread and showed a polygonal morphology on the surface of the biomaterial. Multiple cell layers and fibrillar matrix deposition were observed. Moreover, cells seeded on mineralized fibrin scaffolds (MFS) exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity as well as osteoblast marker gene expression compared to FS and nHA incorporated fibrin scaffolds (nHA/FS). These fibrin-based scaffolds were degraded both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these scaffolds promoted bone formation in a mouse calvarial defect model and the bone formation was enhanced by addition of rhBMP-2. The second approach was to immobilize alkaline phosphatase (ALP) on fibrin scaffolds. ALP enzyme was covalently immobilized on the microporous nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds using 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC). The SEM results demonstrated mineral deposition on immobilized ALP fibrin scaffolds (ALP/FS) when incubated in medium supplemented with beta-glycerophosphate, suggesting that the

  6. Scaffold pore space modulation through intelligent design of dissolvable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Michael A K; Wettergreen, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this area of research is to manipulate the pore space of scaffolds through the application of an intelligent design concept on dissolvable microparticles. To accomplish this goal, we developed an efficient and repeatable process for fabrication of microparticles from multiple materials using a combination of rapid prototyping (RP) and soft lithography. Phase changed 3D printing was used to create masters for PDMS molds. A photocrosslinkable polymer was then delivered into these molds to make geometrically complex 3D microparticles. This repeatable process has demonstrated to generate the objects with greater than 95% repeatability with complete pattern transfer. This process was illustrated for three different shapes of various complexities. The shapes were based on the extrusion of 2D shapes. This may allow simplification of the fabrication process in the future combined with a direct transfer of the findings. Altering the shapes of particles used for porous scaffold fabrication will allow for tailoring of the pore shapes, and therefore their biological function within a porous tissue engineering scaffold. Through permeation experiments, we have shown that the pore geometry may alter the permeability coefficient of scaffolds while influencing mechanical properties to a lesser extent. By selecting different porogen shapes, the nutrition transport and scaffold degradation can be significantly influenced with minimal effect on the mechanical integrity of the construct. In addition, the different shapes may allow a control of drug release by modifying their surface-to-volume ratio, which could modulate drug delivery over time. While soft lithography is currently used with photolithography, its high precision is offset by high cost of production. The employment of RP to a specific resolution offers a much less expensive alternative with increased throughput due to the speed of current RP systems.

  7. Surface modification of poly(D,L-lactic acid) scaffolds for orthopedic applications: a biocompatible, nondestructive route via diazonium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubi, Hesameddin; Kinsella, Joseph M; Murshed, Monzur; Cerruti, Marta

    2014-07-09

    Scaffolds made with synthetic polymers such as polyesters are commonly used in bone tissue engineering. However, their hydrophobicity and the lack of specific functionalities make their surface not ideal for cell adhesion and growth. Surface modification of these materials is thus crucial to enhance the scaffold's integration in the body. Different surface modification techniques have been developed to improve scaffold biocompatibility. Here we show that diazonium chemistry can be used to modify the outer and inner surfaces of three-dimensional poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) scaffolds with phosphonate groups, using a simple two-step method. By changing reaction time and impregnation procedure, we were able to tune the concentration of phosphonate groups present on the scaffolds, without degrading the PDLLA matrix. To test the effectiveness of this modification, we immersed the scaffolds in simulated body fluid, and characterized them with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. Our results showed that a layer of hydroxyapatite particles was formed on all scaffolds after 2 and 4 weeks of immersion; however, the precipitation was faster and in larger amounts on the phosphonate-modified than on the bare PDLLA scaffolds. Both osteogenic MC3T3-E1 and chondrogenic ATDC5 cell lines showed increased cell viability/metabolic activity when grown on a phosphonated PDLLA surface in comparison to a control PDLLA surface. Also, more calcium-containing minerals were deposited by cultures grown on phosphonated PDLLA, thus showing the pro-mineralization properties of the proposed modification. This work introduces diazonium chemistry as a simple and biocompatible technique to modify scaffold surfaces, allowing to covalently and homogeneously bind a number of functional groups without degrading the scaffold's polymeric matrix.

  8. In vitro chondrogenesis with lysozyme susceptible bacterial cellulose as a scaffold.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikas; Sun, Lin; Panilaitis, Bruce; Kaplan, David L

    2015-12-01

    A current focus of tissue engineering is the use of adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as an alternative to autologous chondrocytes for cartilage repair. Several natural and synthetic polymers (including cellulose) have been explored as a biomaterial scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. While bacterial cellulose (BC) has been used in tissue engineering, its lack of degradability in vivo and high crystallinity restricts widespread applications in the field. Recently we reported the formation of a novel bacterial cellulose that is lysozyme-susceptible and -degradable in vivo from metabolically engineered Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Here we report the use of this modified bacterial cellulose (MBC) for cartilage tissue engineering using hMSCs. MBC's glucosaminoglycan-like chemistry, combined with in vivo degradability, suggested opportunities to exploit this novel polymer in cartilage tissue engineering. We have observed that, like BC, MBC scaffolds support cell attachment and proliferation. Chondrogenesis of hMSCs in the MBC scaffolds was demonstrated by real-time RT-PCR analysis for cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) markers (collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX9) as well as histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of cartilage-specific ECM markers. Further, the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of hMSCs in MBC showed unique characteristics. For example, after 4 weeks of cultivation, the spatial cell arrangement and collagen type-II and ACAN distribution resembled those in native articular cartilage tissue, suggesting promise for these novel in vivo degradable scaffolds for chondrogenesis.

  9. Development of an electrospun biomimetic polyurea scaffold suitable for vascular grafting.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Krishna; Frid, Maria G; Hunter, Kendall; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R; Park, Daewon

    2017-01-27

    The optimization of biomechanical and biochemical properties of a vascular graft to render properties relevant to physiological environments is a major challenge today. These critical properties of a vascular graft not only regulate its stability and integrity, but also control invasion of cells for scaffold remodeling permitting its integration with native tissue. In this work, we have synthesized a biomimetic scaffold by electrospinning a blend of a polyurea, poly(serinol hexamethylene urea) (PSHU), and, a polyester, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL). Mechanical properties of the scaffold were varied by varying polymer blending ratio and electrospinning flow rate. Mechanical characterization revealed that scaffolds with lower PSHU content relative to PCL content resulted in elasticity close to native mammalian arteries. We also found that increasing electrospinning flow rates also increased the elasticity of the matrix. Optimization of elasticity generated scaffolds that enabled vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) to adhere, grow and maintain a SMC phenotype. The 30/70 scaffold also underwent slower degradation than scaffolds with higher PSHU content, thereby, providing the best option for in vivo remodeling. Further, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGD) covalently conjugated to the polyurea backbone in 30/70 scaffold resulted in significantly increased clotting times. Reducing surface thrombogenicity by the conjugation of RGD is critical to avoiding intimal hyperplasia. Hence, biomechanical and biochemical properties of a vascular graft can be balanced by optimizing synthesis parameters and constituent components. For these reasons, the optimized RGD-conjugated 30/70 scaffold electrospun at 2.5 or 5 mL/h has great potential as a suitable material for vascular grafting applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  10. Hierarchically microporous/macroporous scaffold of magnesium-calcium phosphate for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Jia, Junfeng; Wu, Fan; Wei, Shicheng; Zhou, Huanjun; Zhang, Hongbo; Shin, Jung-Woog; Liu, Changsheng

    2010-02-01

    Hierarchically 3D microporous/macroporous magnesium-calcium phosphate (micro/ma-MCP) scaffolds containing magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate [NH(4)MgPO(4).6H(2)O] and hydroxyapatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)] were fabricated from cement utilizing leaching method in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl) particles and NaCl saturated water solution. NaCl particles produced macroporosity, and NaCl solution acted as both cement liquid and porogens, inducing the formation of microporosity. The micro/ma-MCP scaffolds with porosities varied from 52 to 78% showed well interconnected and open macropores with the sizes of 400-500 microm, and degradation of the scaffolds was significantly enhanced in Tris-HCl solution compared with macroporous MCP (ma-MCP) and corresponding calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds. Cell attachment and proliferation of MG(63) on micro/ma-MCP were significantly better than ma-MCP and CPC scaffolds because of the presence of microporosity, which enhanced the surface area of the scaffolds. Moreover, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the MG(63) cells on micro/ma-MCP was significantly higher than ma-MCP and CPC scaffolds at 7 days, and the MG(63) cells with normal phenotype spread well and formed confluent layers across the macroporous walls of the micro/ma-MCP scaffolds. Histological evaluation confirmed that the micro/ma-MCP scaffolds improved the efficiency of new bone regeneration, and exhibited excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and faster and more effective osteogenesis in vivo.

  11. Biomimetic poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(l-lactic acid) blend scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, Martin; Román, Sabiniano; MacNeil, Sheila; Chen, Biqiong

    2015-05-01

    Large three-dimensional poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)/poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds with similar bulk mechanical properties to native low and high stress adapted adipose tissue were fabricated via a freeze-drying and a subsequent curing process. PGS/PLLA scaffolds containing 73vol.% PGS were prepared using two different organic solvents, resulting in highly interconnected open-pore structures with porosities and pore sizes in the range of 91-92% and 109-141μm, respectively. Scanning electron microscopic analysis indicated that the scaffolds featured different microstructure characteristics, depending on the organic solvent in use. The PGS/PLLA scaffolds had a tensile Young's modulus of 0.030MPa, tensile strength of 0.007MPa, elongation at the maximum stress of 25% and full shape recovery capability upon release of the compressive load. In vitro degradation tests presented mass losses of 11-16% and 54-55% without and with the presence of lipase enzyme in 31days, respectively. In vitro cell tests exhibited clear evidence that the PGS/PLLA scaffolds prepared with 1,4-dioxane as the solvent are suitable for culture of adipose derived stem cells. Compared to pristine PLLA scaffolds prepared with the same procedure, these scaffolds provided favourable porous microstructures, good hydrophilic characteristics, and appropriate mechanical properties for soft tissue applications, as well as enhanced scaffold cell penetration and tissue in-growth characteristics. This work demonstrates that the PGS/PLLA scaffolds have potential for applications in adipose tissue engineering.

  12. Decellularized scaffolds in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yaling; Alkhawaji, Ali; Ding, Yuqiang; Mei, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic organ transplantation remains the ultimate solution for end-stage organ failure. Yet, the clinical application is limited by the shortage of donor organs and the need for lifelong immunosuppression, highlighting the importance of developing effective therapeutic strategies. In the field of regenerative medicine, various regenerative technologies have lately been developed using various biomaterials to address these limitations. Decellularized scaffolds, derived mainly from various non-autologous organs, have been proved a regenerative capability in vivo and in vitro and become an emerging treatment approach. However, this regenerative capability varies between scaffolds as a result of the diversity of anatomical structure and cellular composition of organs used for decellularization. Herein, recent advances in scaffolds based on organ regeneration in vivo and in vitro are highlighted along with aspects where further investigations and analyses are needed. PMID:27486772

  13. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  14. Biologic scaffold for CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanwei; Modo, Michel; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-05-01

    Injury to the CNS typically results in significant morbidity and endogenous repair mechanisms are limited in their ability to restore fully functional CNS tissue. Biologic scaffolds composed of individual purified components have been shown to facilitate functional tissue reconstruction following CNS injury. Extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues retain a number of bioactive molecules and their ability for CNS repair has recently been recognized. In addition, novel biomaterials for dural mater repairs are of clinical interest as the dura provides barrier function and maintains homeostasis to CNS. The present article describes the application of regenerative medicine principles to the CNS tissues and dural mater repair. While many approaches have been exploring the use of cells and/or therapeutic molecules, the strategies described herein focus upon the use of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues that are free of cells and exogenous factors.

  15. Electrospun silk fibroin/poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Lin, Ming; Xie, Qing; Sun, Hao; Huang, Yazhuo; Zhang, DanDan; Yu, Zhang; Bi, Xiaoping; Chen, Junzhao; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wodong; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue engineering has become a promising therapeutic approach for bone regeneration. Nanofibrous scaffolds have attracted great interest mainly due to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) has been successfully used in bone regeneration, but PLCL polymers are inert and lack natural cell recognition sites, and the surface of PLCL scaffold is hydrophobic. Silk fibroin (SF) is a kind of natural polymer with inherent bioactivity, and supports mesenchymal stem cell attachment, osteogenesis, and ECM deposition. Therefore, we fabricated hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds by adding different weight ratios of SF to PLCL in order to find a scaffold with improved properties for bone regeneration. Methods Hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by blending different weight ratios of SF with PLCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were seeded on SF/PLCL nanofibrous scaffolds of various ratios for a systematic evaluation of cell adhesion, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and osteogenic differentiation; the efficacy of the composite of hADSCs and scaffolds in repairing critical-sized calvarial defects in rats was investigated. Results The SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold exhibited favorable tensile strength, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, the SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs by elevating the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes such as BSP, Ocn, Col1A1, and OPN and enhanced ECM mineralization. In vivo assays showed that SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold improved the repair of the critical-sized calvarial defect in rats, resulting in increased bone volume, higher trabecular number, enhanced bone mineral density, and increased new bone areas, compared with the pure PLCL scaffold. Conclusion The SF/PLCL (50/50) nanofibrous scaffold facilitated hADSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in

  16. Developing bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films were fabricated using the method of dissolving and evaporation. PLLA scaffold was prepared by solid-liquid phase separation of polymer solutions and subsequent sublimation of solvent. Bonelike apatite coating was formed on PLLA films, PLLA scaffolds and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffolds in 24 hours through an accelerated biomimetic process. The ion concentrations in the simulated body fluid (SBF) were nearly 5 times of those in human blood plasma. The apatite formed was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The apatite formed in 5SBF was similar in morphology and composition to that formed in the classical biomimetic process employing SBF or 1.5SBF, and similar to that of natural bone. This indicated that the biomimetic apatite coating process could be accelerated by using concentrated simulated body fluid at 37°C. Besides saving time, the accelerated biomimetic process is particularly significant to biodegradable polymers. Some polymers which degrade too fast to be coated with apatite by a classical biomimetic process, for example PGA, could be coated with bone-like apatite in an accelerated biomimetic process. Collagen and apatite were co-precipitated as a composite coating on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in an accelerated biomimetic process. The incubation solution contained collagen (1g/L) and simulated body fluid (SBF) with 5 times inorganic ionic concentrations as human blood plasma. The coating formed on PLLA films and scaffolds after 24 hours incubation was characterized using EDX, XRD, FTIR, and SEM. It was shown that the coating contained carbonated bone-like apatite and collagen, the primary constituents of natural bone. SEM showed a complex composite coating of submicron bone-like apatite particulates combined with collagen fibrils. This work provided an efficient process to obtain

  17. PCL and PCL-gelatin nanofibers as esophageal tissue scaffolds: optimization, characterization and cell-matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2013-09-01

    Nanofiber based scaffolds offer great promise in regeneration of various tissues including esophagus. Diseases of the esophagus such as malignancy and strictures require surgical intervention to repair the affected region using an appropriate substitute. Long gap esophageal atresia poses a clinical challenge to bridge the gap. In this study, nanofibrous scaffolds made of PCL and PCL-gelatin were fabricated through electrospinning. The average diameter of PCL and PCL-gelatin nanofibers were found to be 324 +/- 50 nm and 242 +/- 30 nm respectively. PCL-gelatin nanofibers was characterized using FTIR, DSC, UTM, Goniometer, suture retention strength and in vitro degradation and the results were compared with the PCL nanofibers. PCL nanofiber characterization results showed that it exhibited higher tensile strength, suture retention strength, contact angle and slower degradation when compared with the PCL-gelatin nanofibers. Further, the interaction of human esophageal epithelial cells with PCL and PCL-gelatin nanofibrous scaffold was determined by cell adhesion, proliferation and gene expression studies. Our results demonstrated that the epithelial cells adhered and proliferated well on both PCL and PCL-gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds and also exhibited the characteristic cobblestone morphology. Cell proliferation on PCL-gelatin nanofibrous scaffold was significantly higher than the PCL nanofibrous scaffold (*p <0.05). Therefore, these scaffolds could be explored as potential candidates for regeneration of functional esophagus.

  18. Hyperbranched poly(glycidol)/poly(ethylene oxide) crosslinked hydrogel for tissue engineering scaffold using e-beams.

    PubMed

    Haryanto; Singh, Deepti; Huh, Pil Ho; Kim, Seong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    A microporous hydrogel scaffold was developed from hyperbranched poly(glycidol) (HPG) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) using electron beam (e-beam) induced cross-linking for tissue engineering applications. In this study, HPG was synthesized from glycidol using trimethylol propane as a core initiator and cross-linked hydrogels were made using 0, 10, 20, and 30% HPG with respect to PEO. The effects of %-HPG on the swelling ratio, cross-linking density, mechanical properties, morphology, degradation, and cytotoxicity of the hydrogel scaffolds were then investigated. Increasing the HPG content increased the pore size of the hydrogel scaffold, as well as the porosity, elongation at break, degree of degradation and swelling ratio. In contrast, the presence of HPG decreased the cross-linking density of the hydrogel. There was no significant difference in compressive modulus and tensile strength of all compositions. The pore size of hydrogel scaffolds could be easily tailored by controlling the content of HPG in the polymer blend. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity demonstrated that HPG/PEO hydrogel scaffold has potential for use as a matrix for cellular attachment and proliferation. These results indicate that cross-linked HPG/PEO hydrogel can function as a potential material for tissue engineering scaffolds. Moreover, a facile method to prepare hydrogel microporous scaffolds for tissue engineering by e-beam irradiation was developed.

  19. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  20. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  1. Effect of Low Temperature Ethylene Oxide and Electron Beam Sterilization on the In Vitro and In Vivo Function of Reconstituted Extracellular Matrix-Derived Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Perrone, Gabriel S.; Fleming, Braden C.; Sieker, Jakob T.; Kramer, Joshua; Hawes, Michael L.; Murray, Martha M.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM) -derived scaffolds are commonly utilized in preclinical tissue engineering studies as delivery vehicles for cells and growth factors. Translation into clinical use requires identifying a sterilization method that effectively removes bacteria but doesn’t harm scaffold function. To determine effectiveness of sterilization and impact on ECM scaffold integrity and function low temperature ethylene oxide and 15kGy electron beam irradiation techniques were evaluated. Scaffold sterility was assessed in accordance to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 71. Scaffold matrix degradation was determined in vitro using enzymatic resistance tests and gel electrophoresis. Scaffold mechanics including elastic modulus, yield stress and collapse modulus were tested. Lastly, 14 Yorkshire pigs underwent ACL transection and bio-enhanced ACL repair using sterilized scaffolds. Histologic response of ligament, synovium and lymph nodes was compared at 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Ethylene oxide as well as electron beam irradiation yielded sterile scaffolds. Scaffold resistance to enzymatic digestion and protein integrity slightly decreased after electron beam irradiation while ethylene oxide altered scaffold matrix. Scaffold elastic modulus and yield stress were increased after electron beam treatment, while collapse modulus was increased after ethylene oxide treatment. No significant changes in ACL dimensions, in vivo scaffold resorption rate, or histologic response of synovium, ligament and lymph nodes with either terminal sterilization technique were detectable. In conclusion, this study identifies two methods to terminally sterilize an ECM scaffold. In vitro scaffold properties were slightly changed without significantly influencing the biologic responses of the surrounding tissues in vivo. This is a critical step toward translating new tissue engineering strategies to clinical trials. PMID:26088294

  2. Designing Online Scaffolds for Interactive Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Wu, I-Chia; Jen, Fen-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of online scaffolds in computer simulation to facilitate students' science learning. We first introduced online scaffolds to assist and model students' science learning and to demonstrate how a system embedded with online scaffolds can be designed and implemented to help high school…

  3. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold restenosis: intravascular imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Enrico; Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Caiazzo, Gianluca; Serdoz, Roberta; Foin, Nicolas; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-11-21

    The mechanism of restenosis in bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) may be different from that of metallic stents and it is still poorly investigated. Intravascular imaging techniques are useful tools for corroborating or excluding possible mechanisms of intra-scaffold restenosis. In these novel devices intravascular imaging should be systematically used for a better comprehension of the in-scaffold restenosis mechanism.

  4. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The minimum platform width for any work level shall not be less than 20 inches for mobile scaffolds... occupied. This paragraph does not apply to vertical movements of mobile scaffolds that are designed to move... proper repair. (f) Manually propelled mobile ladder stands and scaffolds shall conform to the...

  5. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The minimum platform width for any work level shall not be less than 20 inches for mobile scaffolds... occupied. This paragraph does not apply to vertical movements of mobile scaffolds that are designed to move... proper repair. (f) Manually propelled mobile ladder stands and scaffolds shall conform to the...

  6. 49 CFR 214.109 - Scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) The minimum platform width for any work level shall not be less than 20 inches for mobile scaffolds... occupied. This paragraph does not apply to vertical movements of mobile scaffolds that are designed to move... proper repair. (f) Manually propelled mobile ladder stands and scaffolds shall conform to the...

  7. RHOBTB3 promotes proteasomal degradation of HIFα through facilitating hydroxylation and suppresses the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen-Song; Liu, Qi; Li, Mengqi; Lin, Shu-Yong; Peng, Yongying; Wu, Di; Li, Terytty Yang; Fu, Qiang; Jia, Weiping; Wang, Xinjun; Ma, Teng; Zong, Yue; Cui, Jiwen; Pu, Chengfei; Lian, Guili; Guo, Huiling; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of adaptive responses to low oxygen, and their α-subunits are rapidly degraded through the ubiquitination-dependent proteasomal pathway after hydroxylation. Aberrant accumulation or activation of HIFs is closely linked to many types of cancer. However, how hydroxylation of HIFα and its delivery to the ubiquitination machinery are regulated remains unclear. Here we show that Rho-related BTB domain-containing protein 3 (RHOBTB3) directly interacts with the hydroxylase PHD2 to promote HIFα hydroxylation. RHOBTB3 also directly interacts with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein, a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, facilitating ubiquitination of HIFα. Remarkably, RHOBTB3 dimerizes with LIMD1, and constructs a RHOBTB3/LIMD1-PHD2-VHL-HIFα complex to effect the maximal degradation of HIFα. Hypoxia reduces the RHOBTB3-centered complex formation, resulting in an accumulation of HIFα. Importantly, the expression level of RHOBTB3 is greatly reduced in human renal carcinomas, and RHOBTB3 deficiency significantly elevates the Warburg effect and accelerates xenograft growth. Our work thus reveals that RHOBTB3 serves as a scaffold to organize a multi-subunit complex that promotes the hydroxylation, ubiquitination and degradation of HIFα.

  8. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Bamboo Fiber/Nano-hydroxyapatite/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) Composite Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuyun; Li, Ye; Xiong, Chengdong; Su, Shengpei; Ding, Haojie

    2017-02-08

    In this study, bamboo fiber was first designed to incorporate into nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) to obtain a new composite scaffold of bamboo fiber/nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co- glycolic) (BF/n-HA/PLGA) by freeze-drying method. The effect of their components and some factors consisting of different freeze temperatures, concentrations, and pore-forming agents on the porous morphology, porosity, and compressive properties of the scaffold were investigated by scanning electron microscope, modified liquid displacement method, and electromechanical universal testing machine. The results indicated that the 5% BF/30% n-HA/PLGA composite scaffold, prepared with 5% (w/v) high concentration and frozen at -20 °C without pore-forming agent, had the best ideal porous structure and porosity as well as compressive properties, which far exceed those of n-HA/PLGA composite scaffold. In addition, the in vitro simulated body fluids soaking and cell culture experiment showed the addition of BF into the scaffold accelerated the BF/n-HA/PLGA composite scaffolds degradation and exhibited good cytocompatibility, including attachment and proliferation. All the results of the study show that BF has improved the properties of n-HA/PLGA composite scaffolds and BF/n-HA/PLGA might have a great potential for bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  10. Resorbable polymeric scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: the influence of their microstructure on the growth of human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells.

    PubMed

    Pamula, Elzbieta; Filová, Elena; Bacáková, Lucie; Lisá, Vera; Adamczyk, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Degradable three-dimensional porous scaffolds applicable as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering were developed by an innovative solvent casting/particulate leaching technique from poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG). Three types of PLG scaffolds were prepared, and these had the same high porosity (83%) but increasing diameter of the pores (180-200 microm, 250-320 microm, and 400-600 microm) and increasing pore interconnectivity. The colonization of the scaffolds with human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells was then studied in vitro in a conventional static cell culture system. The number of cells growing on the scaffolds on days 1 and 7 after seeding was highest in the material with the largest pore diameter, but on day 15, the differences among the scaffolds disappeared. Confocal microscopy revealed that on day 1 after seeding, the cells penetrated to a depth of 490 +/- 100 microm, 720 +/- 170 microm, and 720 +/- 120 microm into the scaffolds of small, medium, and large pore size, respectively. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into newly synthesized DNA and the concentration of vinculin, beta-actin, osteopontin, and osteocalcin in cells on the scaffolds of all pore sizes were similar to the values obtained on standard tissue culture polystyrene, which indicated good biocompatibility of the scaffolds. These results suggest that all scaffolds could serve as good carriers for bone cells, although the quickest colonization with cells was found in the scaffolds with the largest pore diameter from 400 to 600 microm.

  11. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  12. Problem Solving, Scaffolding and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Helping students to construct robust understanding of physics concepts and develop good solving skills is a central goal in many physics classrooms. This thesis examine students' problem solving abilities from different perspectives and explores strategies to scaffold students' learning. In studies involving analogical problem solving…

  13. Strategic Scaffolding for Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Angela; Natarajan, Uma; Willard, Catherine; Kane, Tera; Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Schifter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Though many national and international science organizations stress the importance of integrating scientific inquiry into classroom instruction, this is often difficult for teachers. Moreover, assessing and scaffolding inquiry skills for students can be even more of a challenge. This paper investigated the student performances in an inquiry-based,…

  14. A collagen-poly(lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) hybrid scaffold for bladder tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Micol, Lionel A; Houis, Stephanie; Wurm, Florian M; Hilborn, Jöns; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Scaffold materials should favor cell attachment and proliferation, and provide designable 3D structures with appropriate mechanical strength. Collagen matrices have proven to be beneficial scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, apart from small intestinal submucosa, they offer a limited mechanical strength even if crosslinking can enhance their mechanical properties. A more cell-friendly way to increase material strength is to combine synthetic polymer meshes with plastic compressed collagen gels. This work describes the potential of plastic compressed collagen-poly(lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PLAC) hybrids as scaffolds for bladder tissue regeneration. Human bladder smooth muscle and urothelial cells were cultured on and inside collagen-PLAC hybrids in vitro. Scaffolds were analyzed by electron microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and AlamarBlue assay. Both cell types proliferated in and on the hybrid, forming dense cell layers on top after two weeks. Furthermore, hybrids were implanted subcutaneously in the backs of nude mice. Host cell infiltration, scaffold degradation, and the presence of the seeded bladder cells were analyzed. Hybrids showed a lower inflammatory reaction in vivo than PLAC meshes alone, and first signs of polymer degradation were visible at six months. Collagen-PLAC hybrids have potential for bladder tissue regeneration, as they show efficient cell seeding, proliferation, and good mechanical properties.

  15. Monosaccharide-Responsive Phenylboronate-Polyol Cell Scaffolds for Cell Sheet and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Srivastava, Akshay; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery. PMID:24167587

  16. Magnetic bioinspired hybrid nanostructured collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds supporting cell proliferation and tuning regenerative process.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, Anna; Iafisco, Michele; Sandri, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Cunha, Carla; Sprio, Simone; Savini, Elisa; Uhlarz, Marc; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas

    2014-09-24

    A bioinspired mineralization process was applied to develop biomimetic hybrid scaffolds made of (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+))-doped hydroxyapatite nanocrystals nucleated on self-assembling collagen fibers and endowed with super-paramagnetic properties, minimizing the formation of potentially cytotoxic magnetic phases such as magnetite or other iron oxide phases. Magnetic composites were prepared at different temperatures, and the effect of this parameter on the reaction yield in terms of mineralization degree, morphology, degradation, and magnetization was investigated. The influence of scaffold properties on cells was evaluated by seeding human osteoblast-like cells on magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, and differences in terms of viability, adhesion, and proliferation were studied. The synthesis temperature affects mainly the chemical-physical features of the mineral phase of the composites influencing the degradation, the microstructure, and the magnetization values of the entire scaffold and its biological performance. In vitro investigations indicated the biocompatibility of the materials and that the magnetization of the super-paramagnetic scaffolds, induced applying an external static magnetic field, improved cell proliferation in comparison to the nonmagnetic scaffold.

  17. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  18. A structural model for the flexural mechanics of nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Engelmayr, George C; Sacks, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The development of methods to predict the strength and stiffness of biomaterials used in tissue engineering is critical for load-bearing applications in which the essential functional requirements are primarily mechanical. We previously quantified changes in the effective stiffness (E) of needled nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffolds due to tissue formation and scaffold degradation under three-point bending. Toward predicting these changes, we present a structural model for E of a needled nonwoven scaffold in flexure. The model accounted for the number and orientation of fibers within a representative volume element of the scaffold demarcated by the needling process. The spring-like effective stiffness of the curved fibers was calculated using the sinusoidal fiber shapes. Structural and mechanical properties of PGA and PLLA fibers and PGA, PLLA, and 50:50 PGA/PLLA scaffolds were measured and compared with model predictions. To verify the general predictive capability, the predicted dependence of E on fiber diameter was compared with experimental measurements. Needled nonwoven scaffolds were found to exhibit distinct preferred (PD) and cross-preferred (XD) fiber directions, with an E ratio (PD/XD) of approximately 3:1. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental dependence of E on fiber diameter (R2 = 0.987) suggests that the structural model can be used to design scaffolds with E values more similar to native soft tissues. A comparison with previous results for cell-seeded scaffolds (Engelmayr, G. C., Jr., et al., 2005, Biomaterials, 26(2), pp. 175-187) suggests, for the first time, that the primary mechanical effect of collagen deposition is an increase in the number of fiber-fiber bond points yielding effectively stiffer scaffold fibers. This finding indicated that the effects of tissue deposition on needled nonwoven scaffold mechanics do not follow a rule-of-mixtures behavior. These important results underscore

  19. Improved dimensional stability with bioactive glass fibre skeleton in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) porous scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Uppstu, Peter; Hannula, Markus; Ellä, Ville; Rosling, Ari; Kellomäki, Minna

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering requires highly porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with preferable osteoconductive properties, controlled degradation, and good dimensional stability. In this study, highly porous 3D poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) - bioactive glass (BG) composites (PLGA/BG) were manufactured by combining highly porous 3D fibrous BG mesh skeleton with porous PLGA in a freeze-drying process. The 3D structure of the scaffolds was investigated as well as in vitro hydrolytic degradation for 10weeks. The effect of BG on the dimensional stability, scaffold composition, pore structure, and degradation behaviour of the scaffolds was evaluated. The composites showed superior pore structure as the BG fibres inhibited shrinkage of the scaffolds. The BG was also shown to buffer the acidic degradation products of PLGA. These results demonstrate the potential of these PLGA/BG composites for bone tissue engineering, but the ability of this kind of PLGA/BG composites to promote bone regeneration will be studied in forthcoming in vivo studies.

  20. A novel open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and properties for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Qi; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Jiang, Guo-Feng; Liu, Wei; Qiao, Yu-Qin; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-Long; He, Guo; Liu, Xuan-Yong

    2016-04-01

    The traditional production methods of porous magnesium scaffolds are difficult to accurately control the pore morphologies and simultaneously obtain appropriate mechanical properties. In this work, two open-porous magnesium scaffolds with different pore size but in the nearly same porosity are successfully fabricated with high-purity Mg ingots through the titanium wire space holder (TWSH) method. The porosity and pore size can be easily, precisely and individually controlled, as well as the mechanical properties also can be regulated to be within the range of human cancellous bone by changing the orientation of pores without sacrifice the requisite porous structures. In vitro cell tests indicate that the scaffolds have good cytocompatibility and osteoblastic differentiation properties. In vivo findings demonstrate that both scaffolds exhibit acceptable inflammatory responses and can be almost fully degraded and replaced by newly formed bone. More importantly, under the same porosity, the scaffolds with larger pore size can promote early vascularization and up-regulate collagen type 1 and OPN expression, leading to higher bone mass and more mature bone formation. In conclusion, a new method is introduced to develop an open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and mechanical properties, which has great potential clinical application for bone reconstruction in the future.

  1. Material characterization of microsphere-based scaffolds with encapsulated raw materials.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Mohan, Neethu; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    "Raw materials," or materials capable of serving both as building blocks and as signals, which are often but not always natural materials, are taking center stage in biomaterials for contemporary regenerative medicine. In osteochondral tissue engineering, a field leveraging the underlying bone to facilitate cartilage regeneration, common raw materials include chondroitin sulfate (CS) for cartilage and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) for bone. Building on our previous work with gradient scaffolds based on microspheres, here we delved deeper into the characterization of individual components. In the current study, the release of CS and TCP from poly(D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere-based scaffolds was evaluated over a time period of 4 weeks. Raw material encapsulated groups were compared to 'blank' groups and evaluated for surface topology, molecular weight, and mechanical performance as a function of time. The CS group may have led to increased surface porosity, and the addition of CS improved the mechanical performance of the scaffold. The finding that CS was completely released into the surrounding media by 4 weeks has a significant impact on future in vivo studies, given rapid bioavailability. The addition of TCP seemed to contribute to the rough external appearance of the scaffold. The current study provides an introduction to degradation patterns of homogenous raw material encapsulated scaffolds, providing characterization data to advance the field of microsphere-based scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  2. A novel open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and properties for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-qi; Wahafu, Tuerhongjiang; Jiang, Guo-feng; Liu, Wei; Qiao, Yu-qin; Peng, Xiao-chun; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-long; He, Guo; Liu, Xuan-yong

    2016-01-01

    The traditional production methods of porous magnesium scaffolds are difficult to accurately control the pore morphologies and simultaneously obtain appropriate mechanical properties. In this work, two open-porous magnesium scaffolds with different pore size but in the nearly same porosity are successfully fabricated with high-purity Mg ingots through the titanium wire space holder (TWSH) method. The porosity and pore size can be easily, precisely and individually controlled, as well as the mechanical properties also can be regulated to be within the range of human cancellous bone by changing the orientation of pores without sacrifice the requisite porous structures. In vitro cell tests indicate that the scaffolds have good cytocompatibility and osteoblastic differentiation properties. In vivo findings demonstrate that both scaffolds exhibit acceptable inflammatory responses and can be almost fully degraded and replaced by newly formed bone. More importantly, under the same porosity, the scaffolds with larger pore size can promote early vascularization and up-regulate collagen type 1 and OPN expression, leading to higher bone mass and more mature bone formation. In conclusion, a new method is introduced to develop an open-porous magnesium scaffold with controllable microstructures and mechanical properties, which has great potential clinical application for bone reconstruction in the future. PMID:27071777

  3. Nanohydroxyapatite incorporated electrospun polycaprolactone/polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone blend scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Remya, K R; Joseph, Jasmin; Mani, Susan; John, Annie; Varma, H K; Ramesh, P

    2013-09-01

    The present work is a comparative evaluation of physical and biological properties of electrospun biodegradable fibrous scaffolds based on polycaprolactone (PCL) and its blend with polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone (CEC) with and without nanohydroxyapatite (nHAP) particles. The fiber morphology, porosity, surface wettability, and mechanical properties of electrospun PCL were distinctly influenced by the presence of both copolymer CEC and nHAP. The degradation in hydrolytic media affected both morphological and mechanical properties of the scaffolds and the tensile strength decreased by 58% for PCL, 83% for PCL/CEC, 36% for PCL/nHAP and 75% for PCL/CEC/nHAP in 90 days of PBS ageing. MTT assay using mouse fibroblast L929 cells proved all the scaffolds to be non-cytotoxic. An overall enhanced performance was shown by PCL/CEC/nHAP scaffold in cell viability (LPH) and proliferation (Picogreen). Simultaneously, ELF assay of ALP activity (bone marker) confirmed the presence of osteogenic-induced Rabbit adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) on all the scaffolds. In comparison, the results reveal the potential of the cytocompatible PCL/CEC/nHAP scaffold for the fabrication of living bony constructs for tissue engineering applications.

  4. Porous hydroxyapatite/gelatine scaffolds with ice-designed channel-like porosity for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Landi, Elena; Valentini, Federica; Tampieri, Anna

    2008-11-01

    A cryogenic process, including freeze-casting and drying has been performed to obtain hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds (approx. diameter 10 mm, height 20 mm) with completely lamellar morphology due to preferentially aligned channel-like pores. Changing the process parameters that influence the cold transmission efficiency from the bottom to the top of the poured HA slurry, lamellar ice crystals with different thickness grew throughout the samples. After sintering, scaffolds with porosity features nearly resembling the ice ones were obtained. The interconnection of pores and the ability of the scaffolds to be rapidly penetrated by synthetic body fluid has been proven. Biohybrid HA/gel composites were prepared, infiltrating HA lamellar scaffolds (45-55 vol.% of porosity) with a 10wt.% solution of gelatine. Colouring genipine was used to cross-link gelatine and clearly show the distribution of the protein in the composite. The compressive mechanical properties of lamellar scaffolds improved with the addition of gelatine: the strength increased up to 5-6 times, while the elastic modulus and strain approximately doubled. The effectiveness of the cross-linkage has been preliminarily verified following scaffold degradation in synthetic body fluid.

  5. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Pei; Wei, Pingpin; Li, Pengjian; Gao, Chengde; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-11-15

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m{sup 1/2}) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability.

  6. Optimization, characterization, and efficacy evaluation of 2% chitosan scaffold for tissue engineering and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Priyanka; Tyagi, Priyanka; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a chitosan-based scaffold and carry out a complete comprehensive study encompassing optimization of exact chitosan strength, product characterization, toxicity evaluation, in vitro validation in cell culture experiments, and finally in vivo efficacy in animal excision wound model. Materials and Methods: Developed chitosan scaffolds (CSs) were optimized for tissue engineering and wound healing efficacy by means of microstructure, toxicity, and biocompatibility evaluation. Results: Scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies revealed that porosity of CS decreased with increase in chitosan concentration. Chemical stability and integrity of scaffolds were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared studies. Highest swelling percentage (SP) of 500% was observed in 2%, while lowest (200%) was observed in 1% CS. Reabsorption and noncytotoxic property of optimized scaffold were established by enzymatic degradation and MTT assay. Enzymatic degradation suggested 20–45% of weight loss (WL) within 14 days of incubation. Cytotoxicity analysis showed that scaffolds were noncytotoxic against normal human dermal fibroblast human dermal fibroblast cell lines. Significant cellular adherence over the scaffold surface with normal cellular morphology was confirmed using SEM analysis. In vivo efficacy evaluation was carried out by means of reduction in wound size on Sprague-Dawley rats. Sprague-Dawley rats treated with optimized scaffold showed ~ 100% wound healing in comparison to ~80% healing in betadine-treated animals within 14 days. Histological examination depicted advance re-epithelization with better organization of collagen bundle in wound area treated with 2% CS in comparison to conventional treatment or no treatment. Conclusion: This study, thus, reveals that 2% CSs were found to have a great potential in wound healing. PMID:28216954

  7. Gold and Hydroxyapatite Nano-Composite Scaffolds for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: In Vitro Characterization.

    PubMed

    Smith, S E; White, R A; Grant, D A; Grant, S A

    2016-01-01

    Current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replacement materials often fail due to the lack of biological integration. While many newly developed extracellular matrix based scaffolds show good biocompatibility they often do not entice cellular remodeling and the rebuilding of a functional ligament. We have proposed the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAp) to acellular tissue to enhance cell attachment and proliferation while maintaining an improved degradation resistance and open microstructure. We are the first to investigate the double conjugation of AuNP and nano-HAp onto decellularized tissue to improve the tissue remodeling response. Decellularized porcine diaphragm was crosslinked with two types of nano-HAp and amine-functionalized AuNP with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethlaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) crosslinker. Scaffolds were characterized using electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and fibroblast assays. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with nano-HAp have increased thermal stability at low levels of crosslinking. The open microstructure of the scaffold was not compromised allowing for cell migration while still providing increased degradation resistance. The addition of < 200 nm nano-HAp decreased cell viability compared to scaffolds without nanoparticles, but the addition of AuNP to scaffolds showed enhanced cell viability in the presence of < 200 nm nano-HAp. The addition of < 40 nm nano-HAp showed an increase in cell viability compared to scaffolds crosslinked without nanoparticles. It is concluded that attaching AuNP and < 40nm nano-HAp to extracellular matrices may improve overall properties.

  8. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  9. Disorganized collagen scaffold interferes with fibroblast mediated deposition of organized extracellular matrix in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Sander, Edward A.; Bale, Shyam Sundar; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissue engineering applications require the remodeling of a degradable scaffold either in vitro or in situ. Although inefficient remodeling or failure to fully remodel the temporary matrix can result in a poor clinical outcome, very few investigations have examined in detail, the interaction of regenerative cells with temporary scaffoldings. In a recent series of investigations, randomly oriented collagen gels were directly implanted into human corneal pockets and followed for 24 months. The resulting remodeling response exhibited a high degree of variability which likely reflects differing regenerative/synthetic capacity across patients. Given this variability, we hypothesize that a disorganized, degradable provisional scaffold could be disruptive to a uniform, organized reconstruction of stromal matrix. In this investigation, two established corneal stroma tissue engineering culture systems (collagen scaffold-based and scaffold-free) were compared to determine if the presence of the disorganized collagen gel influenced matrix production and organizational control exerted by primary human corneal fibroblast cells (PHCFCs). PHCFCs were cultured on thin disorganized reconstituted collagen substrate (RCS - 5 donors: average age 34.4) or on a bare polycarbonate membrane (5 donors: average age 32.4-controls). The organization and morphology of the two culture systems were compared over the long-term at 4, 8 and 11/12 weeks. Construct thickness and extracellular matrix organization/alignment was tracked optically with bright field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The details of cell/matrix morphology and cell/matrix interaction were examined with standard transmission, cuprolinic blue and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Both the scaffold-free and the collagen-based scaffold cultures produced organized arrays of collagen fibrils. However, at all time points, the amount of organized cell-derived matrix in the scaffold

  10. Mining for bioactive scaffolds with scaffold networks: improved compound set enrichment from primary screening data.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Ertl, Peter; Renner, Steffen

    2011-07-25

    Identification of meaningful chemical patterns in the increasing amounts of high-throughput-generated bioactivity data available today is an increasingly important challenge for successful drug discovery. Herein, we present the scaffold network as a novel approach for mapping and navigation of chemical and biological space. A scaffold network represents the chemical space of a library of molecules consisting of all molecular scaffolds and smaller "parent" scaffolds generated therefrom by the pruning of rings, effectively leading to a network of common scaffold substructure relationships. This algorithm provides an extension of the scaffold tree algorithm that, instead of a network, generates a tree relationship between a heuristically rule-based selected subset of parent scaffolds. The approach was evaluated for the identification of statistically significantly active scaffolds from primary screening data for which the scaffold tree approach has already been shown to be successful. Because of the exhaustive enumeration of smaller scaffolds and the full enumeration of relationships between them, about twice as many statistically significantly active scaffolds were identified compared to the scaffold-tree-based approach. We suggest visualizing scaffold networks as islands of active scaffolds.

  11. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering from amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jane; Bettinger, Christopher J; Langer, Robert S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency, optimal degradation properties and biocompatibility are critical to the success of tissue engineered devices and drug delivery systems. Most biodegradable polymers suffer from a short half life due to rapid degradation upon implantation, exceedingly high stiffness, and limited ability to functionalize the surface with chemical moieties. This work describes the fabrication of microfluidic networks from poly(ester amide), poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate) (APS), a recently developed biodegradable elastomeric poly(ester amide). Microfluidic scaffolds constructed from APS exhibit a much lower Young's Modulus and a significantly longer degradation half-life than those of previously reported systems. The device is fabricated using a modified replica-molding technique, which is rapid, inexpensive, reproducible, and scalable, making the approach ideal for both rapid prototyping and manufacturing of tissue engineering scaffolds.

  12. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering from amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jane; Bettinger, Christopher J; Langer, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency, optimal degradation properties and biocompatibility are critical to the success of tissue engineered devices and drug delivery systems. Most biodegradable polymers suffer from a short half-life due to rapid degradation upon implantation, exceedingly high stiffness, and limited ability to functionalize the surface with chemical moieties. This work describes the fabrication of microfluidic networks from poly(ester amide), poly(1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-co-polyol sebacate) (APS), a recently developed biodegradable elastomeric polymer. Microfluidic scaffolds constructed from APS exhibit a much lower Young's modulus and a significantly longer degradation half-life than those of previously reported systems. The device is fabricated using a modified replica-molding technique, which is rapid, inexpensive, reproducible and scalable, making the approach ideal for both rapid prototyping and manufacturing of tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:21220957

  13. Relevance of PEG in PLA-based blends for tissue engineering 3D-printed scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Serra, Tiziano; Ortiz-Hernandez, Monica; Engel, Elisabeth; Planell, Josep A; Navarro, Melba

    2014-05-01

    Achieving high quality 3D-printed structures requires establishing the right printing conditions. Finding processing conditions that satisfy both the fabrication process and the final required scaffold properties is crucial. This work stresses the importance of studying the outcome of the plasticizing effect of PEG on PLA-based blends used for the fabrication of 3D-direct-printed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. For this, PLA/PEG blends with 5, 10 and 20% (w/w) of PEG and PLA/PEG/bioactive CaP glass composites were processed in the form of 3D rapid prototyping scaffolds. Surface analysis and differential scanning calorimetry revealed a rearrangement of polymer chains and a topography, wettability and elastic modulus increase of the studied surfaces as PEG was incorporated. Moreover, addition of 10 and 20% PEG led to non-uniform 3D structures with lower mechanical properties. In vitro degradation studies showed that the inclusion of PEG significantly accelerated the degradation rate of the material. Results indicated that the presence of PEG not only improves PLA processing but also leads to relevant surface, geometrical and structural changes including modulation of the degradation rate of PLA-based 3D printed scaffolds.

  14. Effect of adipic dihydrazide modification on the performance of collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Yumei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2010-02-01

    Collagen and hydrazide-functionalized hyaluronic acid derivatives were hybridized by gelating and genipin crosslinking to form composite hydrogel. The study contributed to the understanding of the effects of adipic dihydrazide modification on the physicochemical and biological properties of the collagen/hyaluronic acid scaffold. The investigation included morphology observation, mechanical measurement, swelling evaluation, and collagenase degradation. The results revealed that the stability of composites was increased through adipic dihydrazide modification and genipin crosslinking. The improved biocompatibility and retention of hyaluronic acid made the composite material more favorable to chondrocytes growing, suggesting the prepared scaffold might be high potential for chondrogenesis.

  15. Degradation behavior of poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Krebs, Nicholas; Hart, Alison; Neville, Craig M; Huang, Albert Y; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2009-12-15

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a promising scaffold material for soft tissue engineering applications, is a soft, tough elastomer with excellent biocompatibility. However, the rapid in vivo degradation rate of PGS limits its use as a scaffold material. To determine the impact of crosslink density on degradation rate, a family of PGS materials was synthesized by incrementally increasing the curing time from 42 to 144 h, at 120 degrees C and 10 mTorr vacuum. As expected, PGS became a stiffer, tougher, and stronger elastomer with increasing curing time. PGS disks were subcutaneously implanted into rats and periodically harvested; only mild tissue responses were observed and the biocompatibility remained excellent. Regardless of crosslink density, surface erosion degradation was observed. The sample dimensions linearly decreased with implantation time, and the mass loss rates were constant after 1-week implantation. As surface erosion degradation frequently correlates with enzymatic digestion, parallel in vitro digestion studies were conducted in lipase solutions which hydrolyze ester bonds. Enzymatic digestion played a significant role in degrading PGS, and the mass loss rates were not a function of curing time. Alternative chemistry approaches will be required to decrease the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of the ester bonds in PGS polymers.

  16. Mechanical enhancement of nanofibrous scaffolds through polyelectrolyte complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Cai, Ning; Xu, Weixiu; Xue, Yanan; Wang, Zelong; Dai, Qin; Yu, Faquan

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of mechanical properties is required in applications of tissue-engineered scaffolds. In this study, a polyelectrolyte complexation approach is proposed to improve the mechanical properties of the nanofibrous scaffolds. Through an electrospun chitosan/gelatin (CG) model system, it is demonstrated that the storage modulus of CG nanofiber-based complex membranes is over 103-fold higher than that of neat chitosan or gelatin membranes. Further, an annealing process was found to promote the conjugation of the oppositely charged polymers and thus the tensile modulus of CG membranes is 1.9-fold elevated. When the molar ratio of aminoglucoside units in chitosan to carboxyl units in gelatin is 1:1, the complex nanofiber-based membranes (CG2) display the highest mechanical strength. In addition, the complex membranes reveal an excellent swelling capacity. By comparing the CG membranes electrospun with cast, it is deduced that the complexation is one of the main contributing factors to the improvement in mechanical properties. FTIR and DSC analyses confirm that more molecular interactions took place in the complexation. SEM observation clearly displays the electrospinnability of the complex. Therefore, polyelectrolyte complexation is an effective strategy for enhancing mechanical properties of nanofibrous scaffolds. These mechanically enhanced chitosan/gelatin nanofibrous membranes have wider applications than wound dressing.

  17. Gold nanoparticle-filled biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds induced muscle remodeling: in vitro and in vivo findings.

    PubMed

    Zsedenyi, Adam; Farkas, Balazs; Abdelrasoul, Gaser N; Romano, Ilaria; Gyukity-Sebestyen, Edina; Nagy, Katalin; Harmati, Maria; Dobra, Gabriella; Kormondi, Sandor; Decsi, Gabor; Nemeth, Istvan Balazs; Diaspro, Alberto; Brandi, Fernando; Beke, Szabolcs; Buzas, Krisztina

    2017-03-01

    Therapeutic stem cell transplantation bears the promise of new directions in organ and tissue replacement, but a number of its difficulties and perils are also well known. Our goal was to develop a method of transplantation by which the transplanted cells remain confined to the transplantation site and induce favorable processes. With the help of mask-projection excimer laser stereolithography, 3D hybrid nanoscaffolds were fabricated from biodegradable, photocurable PPF:DEF resin with incorporated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The scaffolds were tested in vitro and in vivo in order to find out about their biocompatibility and fitness for our purposes. In vitro, macrophages and mouse autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) were seeded over the hybrid scaffolds and non-hybrid (with Au NPs) scaffolds for 4days. The hybrid nanocomposite greater stem cell dispension and stem cell adhesion than PPF scaffolds without Au NPs, but such a difference was not seen in the case of macrophages. In vivo, stem cells, scaffoldings and scaffoldings covered in stem cells were transplanted under the back skin of mice. After 14days, blood samples were taken and the affected skin area was excised. Cytokine and chemokine profiling did not indicate elevated immunomediators in the sera of experimental animals. Interestingly, the autologous-stem-cell-seeded hybrid nanocomposite scaffold induced muscle tissue regeneration after experimental wound generation in vivo. We could not observe such stem cell-induced tissue regeneration when no scaffolding was used. We conclude that PPF:DEF resin nanoscaffolds with incorporated gold nanoparticles offer a safe and efficient alternative for the enhancement of local tissue remodeling. The results also support the idea that adipose derived stem cells are an optimal cell type for the purposes of regenerative musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

  18. Balancing mechanical strength with bioactivity in chitosan-calcium phosphate 3D microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: air- vs. freeze-drying processes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; McCanless, J D; Mecwan, M M; Noblett, A P; Haggard, W O; Smith, R A; Bumgardner, J D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential benefit of 3D composite scaffolds composed of chitosan and calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering. Additionally, incorporation of mechanically weak lyophilized microspheres within those air-dried (AD) was considered for enhanced bioactivity. AD microsphere, alone, and air- and freeze-dried microsphere (FDAD) 3D scaffolds were evaluated in vitro using a 28-day osteogenic culture model with the Saos-2 cell line. Mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and lysozyme-driven enzymatic degradation of the scaffolds were also studied. FDAD scaffold showed a higher concentration (p < 0.01) in cells per scaffold mass vs. AD constructs. Collagen was ∼31% greater (p < 0.01) on FDAD compared to AD scaffolds not evident in microscopy of microsphere surfaces. Alternatively, AD scaffolds demonstrated a superior threefold increase in compressive strength over FDAD (12 vs. 4 MPa) with minimal degradation. Inclusion of FD spheres within the FDAD scaffolds allowed increased cellular activity through improved seeding, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production (as collagen), although mechanical strength was sacrificed through introduction of the less stiff, porous FD spheres.

  19. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility in vitro of biphasic calcium phosphate/polyvinyl alcohol scaffolds prepared by freeze-drying method for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Nie, Lei; Chen, Dong; Suo, Jinping; Zou, Peng; Feng, Shuibin; Yang, Qi; Yang, Shuhua; Ye, Shunan

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a well developed porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffold was prepared by emulsion foam freeze-drying method possessed moderate inter-connected pores and porosity. The SEM analysis showed that BCP nano-particles could disperse uniformly in the scaffolds, and the pore size, porosity, and compressive strength could be controlled by the weight ratio of BCP/PVA. The in vitro degradation and cytocompatibility of scaffolds were examined in this study. The degradation analysis showed the prepared scaffolds have a low variation of pH values (approximately 7.18-7.36) in SBF solution, and have the biodegradation rate of BCP/PVA scaffolds decreased with the increase of PVA concentration. Moreover, MTT assay indicated that the BCP/PVA porous scaffold has no negative effects on cells growth and proliferation, and the hBMSCs possessed a favorable spreading morphology on the BCP/PVA scaffold surface. The inter-connected pore structure, mechanical strength, biodegradation rate and cytocompatibility of the prepared BCP/PVA scaffold can meet essential requirements for blame bearing bone tissue engineering and regeneration.

  20. Tailoring chitosan/collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering: Effect of composition and different crosslinking agents on scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Blanco, M D; Davidenko, N; Cameron, R E

    2015-11-05

    Chitosan/collagen (Chit/Col) blends have demonstrated great potential for use in tissue engineering (TE) applications. However, there exists a lack of detailed study on the influence of important design parameters (i.e, component ratio or crosslinking methods) on the essential properties of the scaffolds (morphology, mechanical stiffness, swelling, degradation and cytotoxicity). This work entailed a systematic study of these essential properties of three Chit/Col compositions, covering a wide range of component ratios and using different crosslinking methods. Our results showed the possibility of tailoring these properties by changing component ratios, since different interactions occurred between Chit/Col: samples with Chit-enriched compositions showed a hydrogen-bonding type complex (HC), whereas a self-crosslinking phenomenon was induced in Col-enriched scaffolds. Additionally, material and biological properties of the resultant matrices were further adjusted and tuned by changing crosslinking conditions. In such way, we obtained a wide range of scaffolds whose properties were tailored to meet specific needs of TE applications.

  1. Bone regeneration in rat calvarial defects implanted with fibrous scaffolds composed of a mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yifei; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the capacity of porous scaffolds composed of a single bioactive glass to regenerate bone. In the present study, scaffolds composed of a mixture of two different bioactive glasses (silicate 13-93 and borate 13-93B3) were created and evaluated for their response to osteogenic MLO-A5 cells in vitro and their capacity to regenerate bone in rat calvarial defects in vivo. The scaffolds, which have similar microstructures (porosity=58-67%) and contain 0, 25, 50 and 100 wt.% 13-93B3 glass, were fabricated by thermally bonding randomly oriented short fibers. The silicate 13-93 scaffolds showed a better capacity to support cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity than the scaffolds containing borate 13-93B3 fibers. The amount of new bone formed in the defects implanted with the 13-93 scaffolds at 12 weeks was 31%, compared to values of 25, 17 and 20%, respectively, for the scaffolds containing 25, 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. The amount of new bone formed in the 13-93 scaffolds was significantly higher than in the scaffolds containing 50 and 100% 13-93B3 glass. While the 13-93 fibers were only partially converted to hydroxyapatite at 12 weeks, the 13-93B3 fibers were fully converted and formed a tubular morphology. Scaffolds composed of an optimized mixture of silicate and borate bioactive glasses could provide the requisite architecture to guide bone regeneration combined with a controllable degradation rate that could be beneficial for bone and tissue healing.

  2. In vitro comparative study of two decellularization protocols in search of an optimal myocardial scaffold for recellularization

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Uriarte, Juan J; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Roura, Santiago; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Selection of a biomaterial-based scaffold that mimics native myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture can facilitate functional cell attachment and differentiation. Although decellularized myocardial ECM accomplishes these premises, decellularization processes may variably distort or degrade ECM structure. Materials and methods. Two decellularization protocols (DP) were tested on porcine heart samples (epicardium, mid myocardium and endocardium). One protocol, DP1, was detergent-based (SDS and Triton X-100), followed by DNase I treatment. The other protocol, DP2, was focused in trypsin and acid with Triton X-100 treatments. Decellularized myocardial scaffolds were reseeded by embedding them in RAD16-I peptidic hydrogel with adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs). Results. Both protocols yielded acellular myocardial scaffolds (~82% and ~94% DNA reduction for DP1 and DP2, respectively). Ultramicroscopic assessment of scaffolds was similar for both protocols and showed filamentous ECM with preserved fiber disposition and structure. DP1 resulted in more biodegradable scaffolds (P = 0.04). Atomic force microscopy revealed no substantial ECM stiffness changes post-decellularization compared to native tissue. The Young’s modulus did not differ between heart layers (P = 0.69) or decellularization protocols (P = 0.15). After one week, recellularized DP1 scaffolds contained higher cell density (236 ± 106 and 98 ± 56 cells/mm2 for recellularized DP1 and DP2 scaffolds, respectively; P = 0.04). ATDPCs in both DP1 and DP2 scaffolds expressed the endothelial marker isolectin B4, but only in the DP1 scaffold ATDPCs expressed the cardiac markers GATA4, connexin43 and cardiac troponin T. Conclusions. In our hands, DP1 produced myocardial scaffolds with higher cell repopulation and promotes ATDPCs expression of endothelial and cardiomyogenic markers. PMID:26045895

  3. Guided tissue fabrication from periosteum using preformed biodegradable polymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Thomson, R C; Mikos, A G; Beahm, E; Lemon, J C; Satterfield, W C; Aufdemorte, T B; Miller, M J

    1999-11-01

    A successful tissue engineering method for bone replacement would imitate natural bone graft by providing the essential elements for new bone formation using synthetic scaffolds, osteogenic cell populations, and bone induction factors. This is a study of the suitability of various formulations of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams to provide a tissue conducting scaffold in an ovine model for bone flap fabrication. Three formulations were used of different copolymer ratio and molecular weight. Porous wafers of PLGA were stacked into rectangular chambers (volume 4 cm3) enclosed on five sides. Some chambers also contained autologous morcellized bone graft (MBG). The chambers were inserted with the open face adjacent to the cambium layer of the periosteum in rib beds of seven sheep and harvested after 8 weeks in vivo. Gross and histologic examination of the resulting tissue specimens demonstrated molded units of vascularized tissue generally conforming to the shape of the chambers and firmly attached to the periosteum. Polymer degradation appeared to occur by varying degrees based on polymer formulation. New bone formation was observed only in areas containing MBG. There was no evidence of significant inflammatory reaction or local tissue damage at 8 weeks. We conclude that a PLGA foam scaffold is (1) an efficient conductor of new tissue growth but not osteoinductive, (2) contributes to the shape of molded tissue, and (3) biocompatible when used in this model. Further studies are warranted to develop practical methods to deliver bone induction factors to the system to promote osseous tissue generation throughout the synthetic scaffold.

  4. Development of a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alge, Daniel L.

    The repair of critical-sized cranial bone defects represents an important clinical challenge. The limitations of autografts and alloplastic materials make a bone tissue engineering strategy desirable, but success depends on the development of an appropriate scaffold. Key scaffold properties include biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, sufficient strength to maintain its structure, and resorbability. Furthermore, amenability to rapid prototyping fabrication methods is desirable, as these approaches offer precise control over scaffold architecture and have the potential for customization. While calcium phosphate cements meet many of these criteria due to their composition and their injectability, which can be leveraged for scaffold fabrication via indirect casting, their mechanical properties are a major limitation. Thus, the overall goal of this work was to develop a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for use in cranial bone tissue engineering. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) setting cements are of particular interest because of their excellent resorbability. We demonstrated for the first time that DCPD cement can be prepared from monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/hydroxyapatite (HA) mixtures. However, subsequent characterization revealed that MCPM/HA cements rapidly convert to HA during degradation, which is undesirable and led us to choose a more conventional formulation for scaffold fabrication. In addition, we developed a novel method for calcium phosphate cement reinforcement that is based on infiltrating a pre-set cement structure with a polymer, and then crosslinking the polymer in situ. Unlike prior methods of cement reinforcement, this method can be applied to the reinforcement of 3D scaffolds fabricated by indirect casting. Using our novel method, composites of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) reinforced DCPD were prepared and demonstrated as excellent candidate scaffold materials, as they had increased strength and ductility

  5. Laser solidification of injectable scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, E. N.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Borschenko, I. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Khlebtsov, N. G.; Minaeva, S. A.; Popov, V. K.; Popova, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    A novel laser sintering approach of polymer powder and surgical suture material within the cavities has been developed to fabricate biodegradable intra-cavity scaffolds. In the frameworks of such sintering approach, laser radiation is absorbed by the surface of the sintered materials only and cannot damage the surrounding tissue. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of fabricated solid intra-cavity polymer structures with a minimally invasive endoscopic technique. This novel approach looks very promising for engineering of spinal discs tissues.

  6. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni; Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds' porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  7. Investigation of thermal degradation with extrusion-based dispensing modules for 3D bioprinting technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungseok; Yoo, James J; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-04

    Recently, numerous three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting systems have been introduced for the artificial regeneration of tissues. Among them, the extrusion-based dispensing module is the most widely used because of the processability it gives various biomaterials. The module uses high forces and temperature to dispense materials through a micro-nozzle. Generally, the harsh conditions induce thermal degradation of the material in the dispensing procedure. The thermal degradation affects the properties of the materials, and the change of the properties should be carefully controlled, because it severely affects the regeneration of tissues. Therefore, in this research, the relationship between the dispensing module and the thermal degradation of material was investigated. Extrusion-based dispensing modules can be divided into the syringe type (ST) and filament type (FT) based on working principles. We prepared a poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffold with the two methods at various time points. Then, the characteristics of the printed scaffolds were assessed by measuring molecular weight (M w), glass transition temperature (T g), in vitro degradation, compressive modulus, and cytocompatibility. The results showed that the PLGA scaffold with the FT dispensing module maintained its properties regardless of printing time points. In contrast, severe thermal degradation was observed in the scaffold group prepared by the ST dispensing module. Consequentially, it was obvious that the FT dispensing module was more suitable for producing scaffolds without severe thermal degradation.

  8. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterial-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights into the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterial-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases.

  9. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  10. Functionalized scaffolds to enhance tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baolin; Lei, Bo; Li, Peng; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds play a vital role in regenerative medicine. It not only provides a temporary 3-dimensional support during tissue repair, but also regulates the cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the development and trends of functional scaffolding biomaterials including electrically conducting hydrogels and nanocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glasses (BGs) with various biodegradable polymers. Furthermore, the progress on the fabrication of biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds from conducting polymers and composites of HA and BG via electrospinning, deposition and thermally induced phase separation is discussed. Moreover, bioactive molecules and surface properties of scaffolds are very important during tissue repair. Bioactive molecule-releasing scaffolds and antimicrobial surface coatings for biomedical implants and scaffolds are also reviewed. PMID:25844177

  11. Increasing the pore sizes of bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds comprised of polycaprolactone, collagen I and hydroxyapatite to enhance cell infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Matthew C.; Clem, William C.; Grunda, Jessica M.; Clines, Gregory A.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL), collagen I and nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HA) have previously been shown to support the adhesion, integrin-related signaling and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), suggesting these matrices serve as promising degradable substrates for osteoregeneration. However, the small pore sizes in electrospun scaffolds hinder cell infiltration in vitro and tissue-ingrowth into the scaffold in vivo, limiting their clinical potential. In this study, three separate techniques were evaluated for their capability to increase the pore size of the PCL/col I/nanoHA scaffolds: limited protease digestion, decreasing the fiber packing density during electro-spinning, and inclusion of sacrificial fibers of the water-soluble polymer PEO. The PEO sacrificial fiber approach was found to be the most effective in increasing scaffold pore size. Furthermore, the use of sacrificial fibers promoted increased MSC infiltration into the scaffolds, as well as greater infiltration of endogenous cells within bone upon placement of scaffolds within calvarial organ cultures. These collective findings support the use of sacrificial PEO fibers as a means to increase the porosity of complex, bone-mimicking electrospun scaffolds, thereby enhancing tissue regenerative processes that depend upon cell infiltration, such as vascularization and replacement of the scaffold with native bone tissue. PMID:22014462

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel collagen/cellulose nanocrystals scaffold for achieving the sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Weichang; Lan, Yong; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered dermis is thought to be the best treatment for skin defects; however, slow vascularization of these biomaterial scaffolds limits their clinical application. Exogenous administration of angiogenic growth factors is highly desirable for tissue regeneration. In this study, biodegradable gelatin microspheres (GMs) containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were fabricated and incorporated into a porous collagen/cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) scaffold, as a platform for long-term release and consequent angiogenic boosting. The physicochemical properties of these scaffolds were examined and the in vitro release pattern of bFGF from scaffolds was measured by ELISA. Collagen/CNCs scaffolds with and without bFGF-GMs were incubated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 1 week, results showed that the scaffolds with bFGF-GMs significantly augmented cell proliferation. Then, four different groups of scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley rats to study angiogenesis in vivo via macroscopic observation, and hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. The results suggested that the collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds had a significantly higher number of newly formed and mature blood vessels, and the fastest degradation rate. This study demonstrated that collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds have great potential in skin tissue engineering.

  13. Improving bone repair of femoral and radial defects in rabbit by incorporating PRP into PLGA/CPC composite scaffold with unidirectional pore structure.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Chen, Yan; Li, Jiyan; Lin, Bomiao; Ouyang, Yi; Yu, Bo; Xia, Yuanyou; Yu, Bo; Ye, Jiandong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a platelet-rich plasma poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PRP-PLGA)/calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composite scaffold was prepared by incorporating PRP into PLGA/CPC scaffold with unidirectional pore structure, which was fabricated by the unidirectional freeze casting of CPC slurry and the following infiltration of PLGA. The results from in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation in femoral defects manifested that incorporation of PRP into PLGA/CPC scaffold improved in vitro cell response (cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation), and markedly boosted bone formation, angiogenesis and material degradation. The incorporation of PRP into scaffold showed more outstanding improvement in osteogenesis as the scaffolds were used to repair the segmental radial defects, especially at the early stage. The new bone tissues grew along the unidirectional lamellar pores of scaffold. At 12 weeks postimplantation, the segmental radial defects treated with PRP-PLGA/CPC scaffold had almost recuperated, whereas treated with the scaffold without PRP was far from healed. Taken together, the PRP-PLGA/CPC scaffold with unidirectional pore structure is a promising candidate to repair bone defects at various sites.

  14. Effects of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on compressive mechanical behavior of collagen/β-TCP composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-11-01

    The primary aim of this study is to characterize the effects of cell culture on the compressive mechanical behavior of the collagen/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) composite scaffold. The composite and pure collagen scaffolds were fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation technique and the subsequent freeze-drying method. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were then cultured in these scaffolds up to 28 days. Compression test of the scaffolds with rMSCs were conducted periodically. Biological properties such as cell number, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene expressions of osteogenetic bone markers were evaluated during cell culture. The microstructural changes in the scaffolds during cell culture were also examined using a scanning electron microscope. The compressive elastic modulus was then correlated with those of the biological properties and microstructures to understand the mechanism of variational behavior of the macroscopic elastic property. The composite scaffold exhibited higher ALP activity and more active generation of osteoblastic markers than the collagen scaffold, indicating that β-TCP can activate the differentiation of rMSCs into osteoblasts and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation such as type I collagen and the following mineralization. The variational behavior of the compressive modulus of the composite scaffold was affected by both the material degradation and the proliferation of cells and the ECM formation. In the first stage, the modulus of the composite scaffold tended to increase due to cell proliferation and the following formation of network structure. In the second stage, the modulus tended to decrease because the material degradation such as ductile deformation of collagen and decomposition of β-TCP were more effective on the property than the ECM formation. In the third stage, active calcification by formation and growth of mineralized nodules resulted in the recovery of modulus. It is concluded that the

  15. Integrating novel technologies to fabricate smart scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at restoring or regenerating a damaged tissue by combining cells, derived from a patient biopsy, with a 3D porous matrix functioning as a scaffold. After isolation and eventual in vitro expansion, cells are seeded on the 3D scaffolds and implanted directly or at a later stage in the patient's body. 3D scaffolds need to satisfy a number of requirements: (i) biocompatibility, (ii) biodegradability and/or bioresorbability, (iii) suitable mechanical properties, (iv) adequate physicochemical properties to direct cell-material interactions matching the tissue to be replaced and (v) ease in regaining the original shape of the damaged tissue and the integration with the surrounding environment. Still, it appears to be a challenge to satisfy all the aforementioned requisites with the biomaterials and the scaffold fabrication technologies nowadays available. 3D scaffolds can be fabricated with various techniques, among which rapid prototyping and electrospinning seem to be the most promising. Rapid prototyping technologies allow manufacturing scaffolds with a controlled, completely accessible pore network--determinant for nutrient supply and diffusion--in a CAD/CAM fashion. Electrospinning (ESP) allows mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment of the cells and can provide fibrous scaffolds with instructive surface properties to direct cell faith into the proper lineage. Yet, these fabrication methods have some disadvantages if considered alone. This review aims at summarizing conventional and novel scaffold fabrication techniques and the biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug-delivery applications. A new trend seems to emerge in the field of scaffold design where different scaffolds fabrication technologies and different biomaterials are combined to provide cells with mechanical, physicochemical and biological cues at the macro-, micro- and nano-scale. If merged together, these integrated technologies may lead to the generation

  16. Gelatin-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds with oriented pore channel architecture - From in vitro to in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Thiem, A; Bagheri, M; Große-Siestrup, C; Zehbe, R

    2016-05-01

    A gelatin-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, composite scaffold, featuring a highly oriented pore channel structure, was developed as a template for articular cartilage regeneration. As a design principle the composite scaffold was optimized to contain only medical grade educts and accordingly no chemical cross linking agents or other toxicological relevant substances or methods were used. Scaffolds were synthesized using a freeze structuring method combined with an electrochemical process followed by freeze-drying. Finally, cross linking was performed using dehydrothermal treatment, which was simultaneously used for sterilization purposes. These composite scaffolds were analyzed in regard to structural and biomechanical properties, and to their degradation behavior. Furthermore, cell culture performance was tested using chondrocytes originated from joint articular cartilage tissue from 6 to 10 months old domestic pigs. Finally, the scaffolds were tested for tissue biocompatibility and their ability for tissue integration in a rat model. The scaffolds showed both excellent functional performance and high biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. We expect that these gelatin-PLGA scaffolds can effectively support chondrogenesis in vivo demonstrating great potential for the use in cartilage defect treatment.

  17. Investigation of different cross-linking approaches on 3D gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering application: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Shankar, K Gopal; Gostynska, Natalia; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Sprio, Simone; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2017-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate the physical-chemical and biological features exhibited by porous scaffolds for regeneration of cartilaginous tissues obtained through stabilization of 3D gelatin hydrogels by physical (DHT), chemical (BDDGE) and natural (Genipin) cross-linking approaches. The study aimed at comparatively assessing the porous microstructure and the long-term resistance of the scaffolds upon degradation in wet physiological conditions (37°C, pH=7.4). The degree of cross-linking increases as function of incorporation of cross-linkers which was maximum up to 73% for BDDGE. The infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis confirmed the gelatin structure was preserved during the cross-linking treatments. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were analysed by static and dynamic compression test, which showed different viscoelastic behaviour upon various cross-linking strategies. The biological performance of the scaffolds investigated using human chondrocytes showed good cell adhesion, viability and proliferation, as well as extensive 3D scaffold colonization. Besides, the analysis of gene expression related to the formation of new chondral tissue reported increasing ability with time in the formation of new extra-cellular matrix. In conclusion, out of three different cross-linking methods, the gelatin scaffolds subjected to dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) represented to be the most favourable 3D scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  18. Improved biocomposite development of poly(vinyl alcohol) and hydroxyapatite for tissue engineering scaffold fabrication using selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Chua, Chee Kai; Leong, Kah Fai; Quah, Zai Yan; Chandrasekaran, Margam; Lee, Mun Wai

    2008-03-01

    In scaffold guided tissue engineering (TE), temporary three-dimensional scaffolds are essential to guide and support cell proliferation. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is studied for the development of such scaffolds by eliminating pore spatial control problems faced in conventional scaffolds fabrication methods. SLS offers good user control over the scaffold's microstructures by adjusting its main processing parameters, namely the laser power, scan speed and part bed temperature. This research focuses on the improvements in the fabrication of TE scaffolds using SLS with powder biomaterials, namely hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Grinding of as-received PVA powder to varying particle sizes and two methods of mixing are investigated as the preparation process to determine a better mixing method that would enhance the mixture homogeneity. Suitable sintering conditions for the improved biocomposite are then achieved by varying the important process parameters such as laser power, scan speed and part bed temperature.SLS fabricated samples are characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). FTIR results show that the grinding and sintering processes neither compromise the chemical composition of the PVA nor cause undue degradation. Visual analysis of the grinding, powder mixing and sintering effect are carried out with SEM. The SEM observations show improvements in the sintering effects. The favorable outcome ascertains PVA/HA biocomposite as a suitable material to be processed by SLS for TE scaffolds.

  19. Heparin functionalized polyaspartamide/polyester scaffold for potential blood vessel regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Giovanna; Fiorica, Calogero; Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio; Giammona, Gaetano

    2014-05-01

    An interesting issue in tissue engineering is the development of a biodegradable vascular graft able to substitute a blood vessel and to allow its complete regeneration. Here, we report a new scaffold potentially useful as a synthetic vascular graft, produced through the electrospinning of α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl) (2-aminoethylcarbamate)-D,L-aspartamide-graft-polylactic acid (PHEA-EDA-g-PLA) in the presence of polycaprolactone (PCL). The scaffold degradation profile has been evaluated as well as the possibility to bind heparin to electrospun fibers, being it a known anticoagulant molecule able to bind growth factors. In vitro cell compatibility has been investigated using human vascular endothelial cells (ECV 304) and the ability of heparinized PHEA-EDA-g-PLA/PCL scaffold to retain basic fibroblast growth factor has been evaluated in comparison with not heparinized sample.

  20. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L.; Remzi Becer, C.; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials’ viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:26463421

  1. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  2. Multilayered Electrospun Scaffolds for Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Abby; Hippensteel, Kirk J.; Kishan, Alysha; Garrigues, N. William; Ruch, David S.; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Full-thickness rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in people over the age of 65. High retear rates and poor functional outcomes are common after surgical repair, and currently available extracellular matrix scaffold patches have limited abilities to enhance new tendon formation. In this regard, tissue-engineered scaffolds may provide a means to improve repair of rotator cuff tears. Electrospinning provides a versatile method for creating nanofibrous scaffolds with controlled architectures, but several challenges remain in its application to tissue engineering, such as cell infiltration through the full thickness of the scaffold as well as control of cell growth and differentiation. Previous studies have shown that ligament-derived extracellular matrix may enhance differentiation toward a tendon or ligament phenotype by human adipose stem cells (hASCs). In this study, we investigated the use of tendon-derived extracellular matrix (TDM)-coated electrospun multilayered scaffolds compared to fibronectin (FN) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) coating for use in rotator cuff tendon tissue engineering. Multilayered poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds were prepared by sequentially collecting electrospun layers onto the surface of a grounded saline solution into a single scaffold. Scaffolds were then coated with TDM, FN, or PBS and seeded with hASCs. Scaffolds were maintained without exogenous growth factors for 28 days in culture and evaluated for protein content (by immunofluorescence and biochemical assay), markers of tendon differentiation, and tensile mechanical properties. The collagen content was greatest by day 28 in TDM-scaffolds. Gene expression of type I collagen, decorin, and tenascin C increased over time, with no effect of scaffold coating. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan and dsDNA contents increased over time in culture, but there was no effect of scaffold coating. The Young's modulus did not change over time, but yield strain

  3. Injectable polyurethane composite scaffolds delay wound contraction and support cellular infiltration and remodeling in rat excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Elizabeth J; Hafeman, Andrea E; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Nanney, Lillian B; Guelcher, Scott A

    2012-02-01

    Injectable scaffolds present compelling opportunities for wound repair and regeneration because of their ability to fill irregularly shaped defects and deliver biologics such as growth factors. In this study, we investigated the properties of injectable polyurethane (PUR) biocomposite scaffolds and their application in cutaneous wound repair using a rat excisional model. The scaffolds have a minimal reaction exotherm and clinically relevant working and setting times. Moreover, the biocomposites have mechanical and thermal properties consistent with rubbery elastomers. In the rat excisional wound model, injection of settable biocomposite scaffolds stented the wounds at early time points, resulting in a regenerative rather than a scarring phenotype at later time points. Measurements of wound length and thickness revealed that the treated wounds were less contracted at day 7 compared to blank wounds. Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis showed that the scaffolds were biocompatible and supported tissue ingrowth. Myofibroblast formation and collagen fiber organization provided evidence that the scaffolds have a positive effect on extracellular matrix remodeling by disrupting the formation of an aligned matrix under elevated tension. In summary, we have developed an injectable biodegradable PUR biocomposite scaffold that enhances cutaneous wound healing in a rat model.

  4. Multifunctional chitosan/polyvinyl pyrrolidone/45S5 Bioglass® scaffolds for MC3T3-E1 cell stimulation and drug release.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqing; Li, Wei; Yu, Shanshan; Ma, Liwei; Jin, Dayong; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Novel chitosan-polyvinyl pyrrolidone/45S5 Bioglass® (CS-PVP/BG) scaffolds were prepared via foam replication and chemical cross-linking techniques. The pristine BG, CS-PVP coated BG and genipin cross-linked CS-PVP/BG (G-CS-PVP/BG) scaffolds were synthesized and characterized in terms of chemical composition, physical structure and morphology respectively. Resistance to enzymatic degradation of the scaffold is improved significantly with the use of genipin cross-linked CS-PVP. The bio-effects of scaffolds on MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated by studying cell viability, adhesion and proliferation. The CCK-8 assay shows that cell viability on the resulting G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold is improved obviously after cross-linking of genipin. Cell skeleton images exhibit that well-stretched F-actin bundles are obtained on the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. SEM results present significant improvement on the cell adhesion and proliferation for cells cultured on the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. The drug release performance on the as-synthesized scaffold was studied in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. Vancomycin is found to be released in burst fashion within 24h from the pristine BG scaffold, however, the release period from the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold is enhanced to 7days, indicating improved drug release properties of the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffold. Our results suggest that the G-CS-PVP/BG scaffolds possess promising physicochemical properties, sustained drug release capability and good biocompatibility for MC3T3-E1 cells' proliferation and adhesion, suggesting their potential applications in areas such as MC3T3-E1 cell stimulation and bone tissue engineering.

  5. Hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of electrospun supramolecular biomaterials: In vitro degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, M C P; Sӧntjens, S H M; Cox, M A J; Nandakumar, A; Bosman, A W; Mes, T; Janssen, H M; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T; Driessen-Mol, A

    2015-11-01

    The emerging field of in situ tissue engineering (TE) of load bearing tissues places high demands on the implanted scaffolds, as these scaffolds should provide mechanical stability immediately upon implantation. The new class of synthetic supramolecular biomaterial polymers, which contain non-covalent interactions between the polymer chains, thereby forming complex 3D structures by self assembly. Here, we have aimed to map the degradation characteristics of promising (supramolecular) materials, by using a combination of in vitro tests. The selected biomaterials were all polycaprolactones (PCLs), either conventional and unmodified PCL, or PCL with supramolecular hydrogen bonding moieties (either 2-ureido-[1H]-pyrimidin-4-one or bis-urea units) incorporated into the backbone. As these materials are elastomeric, they are suitable candidates for cardiovascular TE applications. Electrospun scaffold strips of these materials were incubated with solutions containing enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis, or solutions containing oxidative species. At several time points, chemical, morphological, and mechanical properties were investigated. It was demonstrated that conventional and supramolecular PCL-based polymers respond differently to enzyme-accelerated hydrolytic or oxidative degradation, depending on the morphological and chemical composition of the material. Conventional PCL is more prone to hydrolytic enzymatic degradation as compared to the investigated supramolecular materials, while, in contrast, the latter materials are more susceptible to oxidative degradation. Given the observed degradation pathways of the examined materials, we are able to tailor degradation characteristics by combining selected PCL backbones with additional supramolecular moieties. The presented combination of in vitro test methods can be employed to screen, limit, and select biomaterials for pre-clinical in vivo studies targeted to different clinical applications.

  6. Fabrication of poly-DL-lactide/polyethylene glycol scaffolds using the gas foaming technique.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengdong; Annabi, Nasim; Hosseinkhani, Maryam; Sivaloganathan, Sobana; Dehghani, Fariba

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare poly-DL-lactide/polyethylene glycol (PDLLA/PEG) blends to improve medium absorption and cell proliferation in the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of their scaffolds. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as a foaming agent to create porosity in these blends. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the blends were homogeneous mixtures of PDLLA and PEG. The peak shifts at 1092 and 1744 cm(-1) confirmed the presence of molecular interactions between these two compounds. Increasing the PEG weight ratio enhanced the relative crystallinity and hydrophilicity. The PDLLA/PEG blends (especially 80/20 and 70/30 weight ratios) exhibited linear degradation profiles over an incubation time of 8 weeks. The mechanical properties of PDLLA/PEG blends having less than 30 wt.% PEG were suitable for the fabrication of porous scaffolds. Increasing the concentration of PEG to above 50% resulted in blends that were brittle and had low mechanical integrity. Highly porous scaffolds with controllable pore size were produced for 30 wt.% PEG samples using the gas foaming technique at temperatures between 25 and 55 °C and pressures between 60 and 160 bar. The average pore diameters achieved by gas foaming process were between 15 and 150 μm, and had an average porosity of 84%. The medium uptake and degradation rate of fabricated PDLLA/PEG scaffolds were increased compared with neat PDLLA film due to the presence of PEG and porosity. The porous scaffolds also demonstrated a lower modulus of elasticity and a higher elongation at break compared to the non-porous film. The fabricated PDLLA/PEG scaffolds have high potential for various tissue-engineering applications.

  7. Collagen-chitosan scaffold - Lauric acid plasticizer for skin tissue engineering on burn cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Setyadi, Ewing Dian; Rudyardjo, Djony Izak

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of burns in the world is more than 800 cases per one million people each year and this is the second highest cause of death due to trauma after traffic accident. Many studies are turning to skin substitute methods of tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to determine the composition of the collagen, chitosan, and lauric acid scaffold, as well as knowing the results of the characterization of the scaffold. The synthesis of chitosan collagen lauric acid scaffold as a skin tissue was engineered using freeze dried method. Results from making of collagen chitosan lauric acid scaffold was characterized physically, biologically and mechanically by SEM, cytotoxicity, biodegradation, and tensile strength. From the morphology test, the result obtained is that pore diameter size ranges from 94.11 to 140.1 µm for samples A,B,C,D, which are in the range of normal pore size 63-150 µm, while sample E has value below the standard which is about 37.87 to 47.36 µm. From cytotoxicity assay, the result obtained is the percentage value of living cells between 20.11 to 21.51%. This value is below 50% the standard value of living cells. Incompatibility is made possible because of human error mainly the replication of washing process over the standard. Degradation testing obtained values of 19.44% - 40% by weight which are degraded during the 7 days of observation. Tensile test results obtained a range of values of 0.192 - 3.53 MPa. Only sample A (3.53 MPa) and B (1.935 MPa) meet the standard values of skin tissue scaffold that is 1-24 MPa. Based on the results of the characteristics of this study, composite chitosan collagen scaffold with lauric acid plasticizer has a potential candidate for skin tissue engineering for skin burns cases.

  8. D-Dimer elevation and adverse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halaby, Rim; Popma, Christopher J; Cohen, Ander; Chi, Gerald; Zacarkim, Marcelo Rodrigues; Romero, Gonzalo; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Hernandez, Adrian; Mentz, Robert; Harrington, Robert; Lip, Gregory; Peacock, Frank; Welker, James; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Daaboul, Yazan; Korjian, Serge; Gibson, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    D-Dimer is a biomarker of fibrin formation and degradation. While a D-dimer within normal limits is used to rule out the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among patients with a low clinical probability of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the prognostic association of an elevated D-dimer with adverse outcomes has received far less emphasis. An elevated D-dimer is independently associated with an increased risk for incident VTE, recurrent VTE, and mortality. An elevated D-dimer is an independent correlate of increased mortality and subsequent VTE across a broad variety of disease states. Therefore, medically ill subjects in whom the D-dimer is elevated constitute a high risk subgroup in which the prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  9. The potential of encapsulating "raw materials" in 3D osteochondral gradient scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, Banupriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as "raw materials" for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the scaffolds to better retain their 3D structure during culture and provided a buffering effect to the cells in culture. Following seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells, there were several instances where glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagen, or calcium contents were higher with the scaffolds containing raw materials (CS or BG) than with those containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. It was also noteworthy that a combination of both CS and TGF-β3 increased the secretion of collagen type II. Moreover, cells seeded in scaffolds containing opposing gradients of CS/TGF-β3 and BG/BMP-2 produced clear regional variations in the secretion of tissue-specific ECM. The study demonstrated raw materials have the potential to create a favorable microenvironment for cells; they can significantly enhance the synthesis of certain extracellular matrix (ECM) components when compared to expensive growth factors; either alone or in combination with growth factors they can enhance the secretion of tissue specific matrix proteins. Raw materials are promising candidates that can be used to either replace or be used in combination with growth factors. Success with raw materials in lieu of growth factors could have profound implications in terms of lower cost and faster regulatory approval for more rapid translation of

  10. A Transient Cell-Shielding Method for Viable MSC Delivery within Hydrophobic Scaffolds Polymerized In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fast-degrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  11. Indirect three‐dimensional printing: A method for fabricating polyurethane‐urea based cardiac scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hernández‐Córdova, R.; Mathew, D.A.; Balint, R.; Carrillo‐Escalante, H.J.; Cervantes‐Uc, J.M.; Hidalgo‐Bastida, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biomaterial scaffolds are a key part of cardiac tissue engineering therapies. The group has recently synthesized a novel polycaprolactone based polyurethane‐urea copolymer that showed improved mechanical properties compared with its previously published counterparts. The aim of this study was to explore whether indirect three‐dimensional (3D) printing could provide a means to fabricate this novel, biodegradable polymer into a scaffold suitable for cardiac tissue engineering. Indirect 3D printing was carried out through printing water dissolvable poly(vinyl alcohol) porogens in three different sizes based on a wood‐stack model, into which a polyurethane‐urea solution was pressure injected. The porogens were removed, leading to soft polyurethane‐urea scaffolds with regular tubular pores. The scaffolds were characterized for their compressive and tensile mechanical behavior; and their degradation was monitored for 12 months under simulated physiological conditions. Their compatibility with cardiac myocytes and performance in novel cardiac engineering‐related techniques, such as aggregate seeding and bi‐directional perfusion, was also assessed. The scaffolds were found to have mechanical properties similar to cardiac tissue, and good biocompatibility with cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the incorporated cells preserved their phenotype with no signs of de‐differentiation. The constructs worked well in perfusion experiments, showing enhanced seeding efficiency. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1912–1921, 2016. PMID:26991636

  12. Engineering of a polymer layered bio-hybrid heart valve scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, S; Kumary, T V; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Natarajan, T S; Verma, R S

    2015-06-01

    Current treatment strategy for end stage valve disease involves either valvular repair or replacement with homograft/mechanical/bioprosthetic valves. In cases of recurrent stenosis/ regurgitation, valve replacement is preferred choice of treatment over valvular repair. Currently available mechanical valves primarily provide durability whereas bioprosthetic valves have superior tissue compatibility but both lack remodelling and regenerative properties making their utility limited in paediatric patients. With advances in tissue engineering, attempts have been made to fabricate valves with regenerative potential using various polymers, decellularized tissues and hybrid scaffolds. To engineer an ideal heart valve, decellularized bovine pericardium extracellular matrix (DBPECM) is an attractive biocompatible scaffold but has weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation. However, DBPECM can be modified with synthetic polymers to enhance its mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a Bio-Hybrid scaffold with non-cross linked DBPECM in its native structure coated with a layer of Polycaprolactone-Chitosan (PCL-CH) nanofibers that displayed superior mechanical properties. Surface and functional studies demonstrated integration of PCL-CH to the DBPECM with enhanced bio and hemocompatibility. This engineered Bio-Hybrid scaffold exhibited most of the physical, biochemical and functional properties of the native valve that makes it an ideal scaffold for fabrication of cardiac valve with regenerative potential.

  13. In vitro characterization of hepatocyte growth factor release from PHBV/PLGA microsphere scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin Hao; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Tong, Yen Wah

    2009-05-01

    Polymer scaffolds which can support cells to grow as well as deliver growth factors to the cells simultaneously have great potential for the successful regeneration of failed tissues. As popularly used vehicles to deliver anti-cancer drugs and growth factors, microspheres also show many advantages as substrates to guide the growth of cells. Therefore, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using microspheres as ideal scaffolds for liver tissue engineering. To determine the capabilities of previously used microsphere scaffold to deliver growth factors simultaneously, this work investigated a long-term (about three months) release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from microsphere scaffolds fabricated by using two different polymers, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV, 8% PHV), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA, 5050) and a blend of PLGA and PHBV. BSA served as a model for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) since both proteins have similar molecular weights and hydrophilicity. Furthermore, HGF was encapsulated into the PLGA/PHBV composite microsphere with a core-shell structure, and sustained delivery of HGF with maintained bioactivity was achieved for at least 40 days. The moderate degradation rate (about 55% loss of the initial mass) and well-preserved structure after three months of incubation indicated that the PLGA/PHBV composite microspheres would therefore be more suitable than the pure PHBV or PLGA microspheres as a scaffold for engineering liver tissue.

  14. Graphene-based electroresponsive scaffolds as polymeric implants for on-demand drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Servant, Ania; Leon, Veronica; Jasim, Dhifaf; Methven, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Fernandez-Pacheco, Ester Vazquez; Prato, Maurizio; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2014-08-01

    Stimuli-responsive biomaterials have attracted significant attention in the field of polymeric implants designed as active scaffolds for on-demand drug delivery. Conventional porous scaffolds suffer from drawbacks such as molecular diffusion and material degradation, allowing in most cases only a zero-order drug release profile. The possibility of using external stimulation to trigger drug release is particularly enticing. In this paper, the fabrication of previously unreported graphene hydrogel hybrid electro-active scaffolds capable of controlled small molecule release is presented. Pristine ball-milled graphene sheets are incorporated into a three dimensional macroporous hydrogel matrix to obtain hybrid gels with enhanced mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. These electroactive scaffolds demonstrate controlled drug release in a pulsatile fashion upon the ON/OFF application of low electrical voltages, at low graphene concentrations (0.2 mg mL(-1) ) and by maintaining their structural integrity. Moreover, the in vivo performance of these electroactive scaffolds to release drug molecules without any "resistive heating" is demonstrated. In this study, an illustration of how the heat dissipating properties of graphene can provide significant and previously unreported advantages in the design of electroresponsive hydrogels, able to maintain optimal functionality by overcoming adverse effects due to unwanted heating, is offered.

  15. Design and analysis of tissue engineering scaffolds that mimic soft tissue mechanical anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Todd; Sacks, Michael S; Stankus, John; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R

    2006-07-01

    Tissue engineered constructs must exhibit tissue-like functional properties, including mechanical behavior comparable to the native tissues they are intended to replace. Moreover, the ability to reversibly undergo large strains can help to promote and guide tissue growth. Electrospun poly (ester urethane) ureas (ES-PEUU) are elastomeric and allow for the control of fiber diameter, porosity, and degradation rate. ES-PEUU scaffolds can be fabricated to have a well-aligned fiber network, which is important for applications involving mechanically anisotropic soft tissues. We have developed ES-PEUU scaffolds under variable speed conditions and modeled the effects of fiber orientation on the macro-mechanical properties of the scaffold. To illustrate the ability to simulate native tissue mechanical behavior, we demonstrated that the high velocity spun scaffolds exhibited highly anisotropic mechanical properties closely resembling the native pulmonary heart valve leaflet. Moreover, use of the present fiber-level structural constitutive model allows for the determination of electrospinning conditions to tailor ES-PEUU scaffolds for specific soft tissue applications. The results of this study will help to provide the basis for rationally designed mechanically anisotropic soft tissue engineered implants.

  16. Functionalisation and surface modification of electrospun polylactic acid scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoveizi, Elham; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Parivar, Kazem; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tavakol, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Repair or replacement of damaged tissues using tissue engineering technology is considered to be a fine solution for enhanced treatment of different diseases such as skin diseases. Although the nanofibers made of synthetic degradable polymers, such as polylactic acid (PLA), have been widely used in the medical field, they do not favour cellular adhesion and proliferation. To enhance cell adherence on scaffold and improve biocompatibility, the surface of PLA scaffold was modified by gelatin in our experiments. For electrospinning, PLA and gelatin were dissolved in hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) solvent at varying compositions (PLA:gelatin at 3:7 and 7:3). The properties of the blending nanofiber scaffold were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Modified PLA/gelatin 7/3 scaffold is more suitable for fibroblasts attachment and viability than the PLA or gelatin nanofiber alone. Thus fibroblast cultured on PLA/gelatin scaffold could be an alternative way to improve skin wound healing.

  17. Indirect three-dimensional printing: A method for fabricating polyurethane-urea based cardiac scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Córdova, R; Mathew, D A; Balint, R; Carrillo-Escalante, H J; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Hernández-Sánchez, F

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds are a key part of cardiac tissue engineering therapies. The group has recently synthesized a novel polycaprolactone based polyurethane-urea copolymer that showed improved mechanical properties compared with its previously published counterparts. The aim of this study was to explore whether indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing could provide a means to fabricate this novel, biodegradable polymer into a scaffold suitable for cardiac tissue engineering. Indirect 3D printing was carried out through printing water dissolvable poly(vinyl alcohol) porogens in three different sizes based on a wood-stack model, into which a polyurethane-urea solution was pressure injected. The porogens were removed, leading to soft polyurethane-urea scaffolds with regular tubular pores. The scaffolds were characterized for their compressive and tensile mechanical behavior; and their degradation was monitored for 12 months under simulated physiological conditions. Their compatibility with cardiac myocytes and performance in novel cardiac engineering-related techniques, such as aggregate seeding and bi-directional perfusion, was also assessed. The scaffolds were found to have mechanical properties similar to cardiac tissue, and good biocompatibility with cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the incorporated cells preserved their phenotype with no signs of de-differentiation. The constructs worked well in perfusion experiments, showing enhanced seeding efficiency. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1912-1921, 2016.

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of a sustained-release chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Liu, Yingchao; Macedo, Hugo M; Jiang, Lili; Li, Chao; Mei, Guanyu; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-04-01

    Nutrient depletion within three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is one of the major hurdles in the use of this technology to grow cells for applications in tissue engineering. In order to help in addressing it, we herein propose to use the controlled release of encapsulated nutrients within polymer microspheres into chitosan-based 3D scaffolds, wherein the microspheres are embedded. This method has allowed maintaining a stable concentration of nutrients within the scaffolds over the long term. The polymer microspheres were prepared using multiple emulsions (w/o/w), in which bovine serum albumin (BSA) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) were regarded as the protein pattern and the exoperidium material, respectively. These were then mixed with a chitosan solution in order to form the scaffolds by cryo-desiccation. The release of BSA, entrapped within the embedded microspheres, was monitored with time using a BCA kit. The morphology and structure of the PLGA microspheres containing BSA before and after embedding within the scaffold were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). These had a round shape with diameters in the range of 27-55 μm, whereas the chitosan-based scaffolds had a uniform porous structure with the microspheres uniformly dispersed within their 3D structure and without any morphological change. In addition, the porosity, water absorption and degradation rate at 37 °C in an aqueous environment of 1% chitosan-based scaffolds were (92.99±2.51) %, (89.66±0.66) % and (73.77±3.21) %, respectively. The studies of BSA release from the embedded microspheres have shown a sustained and cumulative tendency with little initial burst, with (20.24±0.83) % of the initial amount released after 168 h (an average rate of 0.12%/h). The protein concentration within the chitosan-based scaffolds after 168 h was found to be (11.44±1.81)×10(-2) mg/mL. This novel chitosan-based scaffold embedded with PLGA microspheres has proven to be a promising technique

  19. Characterization of Silk Fibroin/Chitosan 3D Porous Scaffold and In Vitro Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shuguang; Liu, Lei; Shi, Yong; Qiu, Junqi; Fang, Wei; Rong, Mingdeng; Guo, Zehong; Gao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a powerful tool to treat bone defects caused by trauma, infection, tumors and other factors. Both silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (CS) are non-toxic and have good biocompatibility, but are poor biological scaffolds when used alone. In this study, the microscopic structure and related properties of SF/CS composite scaffolds with different component ratios were examined. The scaffold material most suitable for osteoblast growth was determined, and these results offer an experimental basis for the future reconstruction of bone defects. First, via freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking methods, SF/CS composites with different component ratios were prepared and their structure was characterized. Changes in the internal structure of the SF and CS mixture were observed, confirming that the mutual modification between the two components was complete and stable. The internal structure of the composite material was porous and three-dimensional with a porosity above 90%. We next studied the pore size, swelling ratio, water absorption ratio, degradation and in vitro cell proliferation. For the 40% SF-60% CS group, the pore size of the scaffold was suitable for the growth of osteoblasts, and the rate of degradation was steady. This favors the early adhesion, growth and proliferation of MG-63 cells. In addition to good biocompatibility and satisfactory cell affinity, this material promotes the secretion of extracellular matrix materials by osteoblasts. Thus, 40% SF-60% CS is a good material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26083846

  20. Fibrin gel as an injectable biodegradable scaffold and cell carrier for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuting; Meng, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Lee, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing needs for organ transplantation and a universal shortage of donated tissues, tissue engineering emerges as a useful approach to engineer functional tissues. Although different synthetic materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, they have many limitations such as the biocompatibility concerns, the inability to support cell attachment, and undesirable degradation rate. Fibrin gel, a biopolymeric material, provides numerous advantages over synthetic materials in functioning as a tissue engineering scaffold and a cell carrier. Fibrin gel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, promotes cell attachment, and can degrade in a controllable manner. Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network. The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues. Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration. Here, we review the recent advancement in developing fibrin-based biomaterials for the development of injectable tissue engineering scaffold and cell carriers.

  1. Development of a cellularly degradable PEG hydrogel to promote articular cartilage extracellular matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Balaji V.; Brock, J. Logan; Silver, Jason S.; Leight, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Healing articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge because of its limited self-healing capacity. While delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects has received growing interest, combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and promote cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold does not match the rate of production by cells leading to generally low ECM outputs. Here, a PEG norbornene hydrogel was functionalized with thiolated TGF-β1 and crosslinked by an MMP-degradable peptide. Chondrocytes were co-encapsulated with a smaller population of MSCs, with the goal of stimulating matrix production and increasing bulk mechanical properties of the scaffold. Interestingly, the co-encapsulated cells cleaved the MMP-degradable target sequence more readily than either cell population alone. Relative to non-degradable gels, cellularly-degraded materials showed significantly increased GAG and collagen deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a more diffuse matrix. These results indicate the potential of an enzymatically-degradable, peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogel to locally influence and promote cartilage matrix production over a short period. Scaffolds that permit cell-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:25607633

  2. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  3. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Type I Collagen Scaffold in Rat: Improving Visualization of Bladder and Subcutaneous Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Geutjes, Paul; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of implanted scaffolds is important to understand their behavior and role in tissue engineering, in particular to follow their degradation and interaction with host tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited for this goal, but its application is often hampered by the low contrast of scaffolds that are prepared from biomaterials such as type I collagen. The aim of this study was to test iron oxide particles incorporation in improving their MRI contrasts, and to follow their degradation and tissue interactions. Scaffolds with and without iron oxide particles were implanted either subcutaneously or on the bladder of rats. At predetermined time points, in vivo MRI were obtained and tissues were then harvested for histology analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The result showed that the incorporation of iron oxide particles improved MRI contrast of the implants, providing information on their location, shapes, and degradation. Second, the host tissue reaction to the type I collagen implants could be observed in both MRI and histology. Finally, MRI also revealed that the degradation and host tissue reaction of iron particles-loaded scaffolds differed between subcutaneous and bladder implantation, which was substantiated by histology. PMID:24625324

  4. Determination and comparison of specifics of nucleus pulposus cells of human intervertebral disc in alginate and chitosan–gelatin scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Renani, Hamid Bahramian; Ghorbani, Masood; Beni, Batool Hashemibeni; Karimi, Z; Mirhosseini, MM; Zarkesh, H; Kabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain is a major economical and social problem nowadays. Intervertebral disc herniation and central degeneration of disc are two major reasons of low back pain that occur because of structural impairment of disc. The intervertebral disc contains three parts as follows : Annulus fibrosus, transitional region, and nucleus pulposus, which forms the central nucleus of the disc. The reduction of cell count and extracellular matrix, especially in nucleus pulposus, causes disc degeneration. Different scaffolds (natural and synthetic) have been used for tissue repairing and regeneration of the intervertebral disc in tissue engineering. Most scaffolds have biodegradable and biocompatible characteristics and also prepare a fine condition for proliferation and migration of cells. In this study, proliferation of NP cells of human intervertebral disc compromised in Chitosan-gelatin scaffold with alginate scaffold was studied. Materials and Methods: NP cells derived from nucleus pulposus by collagenase enzymatic hydrolysis. They were derived from patients who undergoing open surgery for discectomy in the Isfahan Alzahra hospital. Chitosan was blended with gelatin and glutaraldehyde was used for cross linking the two polymers. Then, alginate scaffold was prepared. Cellular suspension with 1 × 105 transferred to each scaffold and cultured for 21 days. Cell viability and proliferation investigated by trypan blue and (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to assert the porosity and to survey structure of scaffold. Results: MTT assay dem1onstrated that cell viability of third day had significant difference in contrast by first day in both scaffolds. Accordingly, there was a significant decreased in cellular viability from day 3 to 21. Results of the cell count showed a punctual elevation cell numbers for alginate scaffold but there was no similar result for chitosan

  5. Teaching Writing: A Multilayered Participatory Scaffolding Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    This article adds to the research on teachers' writing pedagogy. It reviews and challenges the research literature on scaffolding as an instructional practice and presents a more inclusive framework for analysis. As student participation and voice were absent from much of the literature, a participatory scaffolding framework was developed to…

  6. Bioactive nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M C; Kamocki, K; Yassen, G H; Platt, J A; Vail, M M; Ehrlich, Y; Spolnik, K J; Gregory, R L

    2013-11-01

    Here we report the synthesis, materials characterization, antimicrobial capacity, and cytocompatibility of novel antibiotic-containing scaffolds. Metronidazole (MET) or Ciprofloxacin/(CIP) was mixed with a polydioxanone (PDS)polymer solution at 5 and 25 wt% and processed into fibers. PDS fibers served as a control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), tensile testing, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to assess fiber morphology, chemical structure, mechanical properties, and drug release, respectively. Antimicrobial properties were evaluated against those of Porphyromonas gingivalis/Pg and Enterococcus faecalis/Ef. Cytotoxicity was assessed in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Statistics were performed, and significance was set at the 5% level. SEM imaging revealed a submicron fiber diameter. FTIR confirmed antibiotic incorporation. The tensile values of hydrated 25 wt% CIP scaffold were significantly lower than those of all other groups. Analysis of HPLC data confirmed gradual, sustained drug release from the scaffolds over 48 hrs. CIP-containing scaffolds significantly (p < .00001) inhibited biofilm growth of both bacteria. Conversely, MET-containing scaffolds inhibited only Pg growth. Agar diffusion confirmed the antimicrobial properties against specific bacteria for the antibiotic-containing scaffolds. Only the 25 wt% CIP-containing scaffolds were cytotoxic. Collectively, this study suggests that polymer-based antibiotic-containing electrospun scaffolds could function as a biologically safe antimicrobial drug delivery system for regenerative endodontics.

  7. Information Scaffolding: Application to Technical Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Catherine Claire

    2010-01-01

    Information Scaffolding is a user-centered approach to information design; a method devised to aid "everyday" authors in information composition. Information Scaffolding places a premium on audience-centered documents by emphasizing the information needs and motivations of a multimedia document's intended audience. The aim of this…

  8. Lithographically defined 3-dimensional graphene scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Polsky, Ronen

    2015-09-01

    Interferometrically defined 3D photoresist scaffolds are formed through a series of three successive two-beam interference exposures, a post exposure bake and development. Heating the resist scaffold in a reducing atmosphere to > 1000 °C, results in the conversion of the resist structure into a carbon scaffold through pyrolysis, resulting in a 3D sp3- bonded glassy carbon scaffold which maintains the same in-plane morphology as the resist despite significant shrinkage. The carbon scaffolds are readily modified using a variety of deposition methods such as electrochemical, sputtering and CVD/ALD. Remarkably, sputtering metal into scaffolds with ~ 5 unit cells tall results in conformal coating of the scaffold with the metal. When the metal is a transition metal such as nickel, the scaffold can be re-annealed, during which time the carbon diffuses through the nickel, emerging on the exterior of the nickel as sp2-bonded carbon, termed 3D graphene. This paper details the fabrication, characterization and some potential applications for these structures.

  9. A Conceptualisation of Whole-Class Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Jantien; van Eerde, Henriëtte A. A.; Bakker, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding refers to temporary and adaptive support, originally in dyadic adult-child interaction. It has become widely used, also in whole-class settings, but often in loose ways. The aim of this paper is to theoretically and empirically ground a conceptualisation of whole-class scaffolding so that it remains close to the origin…

  10. Scaffolding Mathematical Modelling with a Solution Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schukajlow, Stanislaw; Kolter, Jana; Blum, Werner

    2015-01-01

    In the study presented in this paper, we examined the possibility to scaffold mathematical modelling with strategies. The strategies were prompted using an instrument called "solution plan" as a scaffold. The effects of this step by step instrument on mathematical modelling competency and on self-reported strategies were tested using…

  11. Scaffolding Adolescents' Comprehension of Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, David N. E.; Graves, Michael F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an approach to assisting seventh-grade students' comprehension of individual texts with a Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE). Includes an outline of the scaffolded reading experience. Describes a classroom study of the effect of using SREs. Finds SREs can increase students' comprehension of short stories. (SG)

  12. Cell culture and characterization of cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-g-starch 3D scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Liau, Jiun-Jia

    2013-10-15

    The research goal of this experiment is chemically to cross-link poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and starch to form a 3D scaffold that is effective water absorbent, has a stable structure, and supports cell growth. PVA and starch can be chemically cross-linked to form a PVA-g-starch 3D scaffold polymer, as observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with an absorbency of up to 800%. Tensile testing reveals that, as the amount of starch increases, the strength of the 3D scaffold strength reaches 4×10(-2) MPa. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the material reveal that the 3D scaffold is highly porous formed using a homogenizer at 500 rpm. In an enzymatic degradation, the 3D scaffold was degraded by various enzymes at a rate of up to approximately 30-60% in 28 days. In vitro tests revealed that cells proliferate and grow in the 3D scaffold material. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis further verified that the bio-compatibility of this scaffold.

  13. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Danyu

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  14. Thermally Drawn Fibers as Nerve Guidance Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Ryan A.; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Poorheravi, Negin Abdolrahim; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  15. Conducting scaffolds for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Ali, Naushad; Kotturi, Hari Shankar R; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Smay, Jim; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-11-01

    It is known that there is a correlation between a cell membrane potential and the proliferation of the cell. The high proliferation capacity of liver cells can also be attributed to its specific cell membrane potential as liver cell is recognized as one of the most depolarized of all differentiated cells. We hypothesized that this phenomenon can be emphasized by growing liver cells in conducting scaffolds that can increase the electrical communication among the cells. In this article, using tissue engineering techniques, we grew hepatocyte cells in scaffolds with various compositions. It was found that the scaffolds containing conducting polymer of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) provide the best condition for attachment and proliferation of the cells. More specifically, the blend of hyaluronan, PEDOT, and collagen (I) as dopants in gelatin-chitosan-based scaffold presented the best cell/scaffold interactions for regeneration of liver cells.

  16. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

  17. Classification of scaffold-hopping approaches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongmao; Tawa, Gregory; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-04-01

    The general goal of drug discovery is to identify novel compounds that are active against a preselected biological target with acceptable pharmacological properties defined by marketed drugs. Scaffold hopping has been widely applied by medicinal chemists to discover equipotent compounds with novel backbones that have improved properties. In this article we classify scaffold hopping into four major categories, namely heterocycle replacements, ring opening or closure, peptidomimetics and topology-based hopping. We review the structural diversity of original and final scaffolds with respect to each category. We discuss the advantages and limitations of small, medium and large-step scaffold hopping. Finally, we summarize software that is frequently used to facilitate different kinds of scaffold-hopping methods.

  18. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth.

  19. Calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and self-association PEG-PLLA diblock copolymer for controlled drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongpaiboonkit, Leenaporn

    phosphate cement scaffolds have mechanical properties that lie within the range of human trabecular bone. By employing an ex vivo gene therapy, scaffolds were then implanted subcutaneously to demonstrate tissue in-growth. The implanted scaffolds were evaluated histologically, mechanically, and using micro-computed tomography. The implant was found to be surrounded by a large amount of bone as well as within the scaffold pores at the four weeks time point. Almost the entire implant was enveloped by new bone after eight weeks of implantation. These techniques allow us to investigate the bone formation and the scaffold degradation both qualitatively and quantitatively. These results show that by integrating the computationally designed, biodegradable osteoconductive DCPD matrix, and ex vivo gene therapy, have potential for engineering of biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds for complex biomechanical applications.

  20. Mechanical properties and drug release behavior of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-09-01

    This article presents data related to the research article entitled "The effect of coating type on mechanical properties and controlled drug release of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering" [1]. We provide data on mechanical properties, in vitro bioactivity and drug release of bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds coated by poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein used as a controlled release device for tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). By coating the BG scaffolds with PCL or PCL/zein blend the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were substantially improved, i.e., the compressive strength increased from 0.004±0.001 MPa (uncoated BG scaffolds) to 0.15±0.02 MPa (PCL/zein coated BG scaffolds). A dense bone-like apatite layer formed on the surface of PCL/zein coated scaffolds immersed for 14 days in simulated body fluid (SBF). The data describe control of drug release and in vitro degradation behavior of coating by engineering the concentration of zein. Thus, the developed scaffolds exhibit attractive properties for application in bone tissue engineering research.

  1. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily.

  2. Mechanical properties and drug release behavior of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering application

    PubMed Central

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents data related to the research article entitled “The effect of coating type on mechanical properties and controlled drug release of PCL/zein coated 45S5 bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering” [1]. We provide data on mechanical properties, in vitro bioactivity and drug release of bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds coated by poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein used as a controlled release device for tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). By coating the BG scaffolds with PCL or PCL/zein blend the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were substantially improved, i.e., the compressive strength increased from 0.004±0.001 MPa (uncoated BG scaffolds) to 0.15±0.02 MPa (PCL/zein coated BG scaffolds). A dense bone-like apatite layer formed on the surface of PCL/zein coated scaffolds immersed for 14 days in simulated body fluid (SBF). The data describe control of drug release and in vitro degradation behavior of coating by engineering the concentration of zein. Thus, the developed scaffolds exhibit attractive properties for application in bone tissue engineering research. PMID:26966716

  3. The National Map - Elevation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean; Evans, Gayla; Mauck, James; Hutchinson, John; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Elevation Dataset (NED) is the primary elevation data product produced and distributed by the USGS. The NED provides seamless raster elevation data of the conterminous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and the island territories. The NED is derived from diverse source data sets that are processed to a specification with a consistent resolution, coordinate system, elevation units, and horizontal and vertical datums. The NED is the logical result of the maturation of the long-standing USGS elevation program, which for many years concentrated on production of topographic map quadrangle-based digital elevation models. The NED serves as the elevation layer of The National Map, and provides basic elevation information for earth science studies and mapping applications in the United States. The NED is a multi-resolution dataset that is updated bimonthly to integrate newly available, improved elevation source data. NED data are available nationally at grid spacings of 1 arc-second (approximately 30 meters) for the conterminous United States, and at 1/3 and 1/9 arc-seconds (approximately 10 and 3 meters, respectively) for parts of the United States. Most of the NED for Alaska is available at 2-arc-second (about 60 meters) grid spacing, where only lower resolution source data exist. Part of Alaska is available at the 1/3-arc-second resolution, and plans are in development for a significant upgrade in elevation data coverage of the State over the next 5 years. Specifications for the NED include the following: *Coordinate system: Geographic (decimal degrees of latitude and longitude), *Horizontal datum: North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), *Vertical datum: North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) over the conterminous United States and varies in other areas, and *Elevation units: Decimal meters.

  4. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo; Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  5. Optimization of protein cross-linking in bicomponent electrospun scaffolds for therapeutic use

    SciTech Connect

    Papa, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo Cirillo, Valentina; Oliviero, Olimpia; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-17

    Bio-instructive electrospun scaffolds based on the combination of synthetic polymers, such as PCL or PLLA, and natural polymers (e.g., collagen) have been extensively investigated as temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) analogues able to support cell proliferation and stem cell differentiation for the regeneration of several tissues. The growing use of natural polymers as carrier of bioactive molecules is introducing new ideas for the design of polymeric drug delivery systems based on electrospun fibers with improved bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and programmed drug release. In particular, the release mechanism is driven by the use of water soluble proteins (i.e., collagen, gelatin) which fully degrade in in vitro microenvironment, thus delivering the active principles. However, these protein are generally rapidly digested by enzymes (i.e., collagenase) produced by many different cell types, both in vivo and in vitro with significant drawbacks in tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery. Here, we aim at investigating different chemical strategies to improve the in vitro stability and mechanical strength of scaffolds against enzymatic degradation, by modifying the biodegradation rates of proteins embedded in bicomponent fibers. By comparing scaffolds treated by different cross-linking agents (i.e., GC, EDC, BDDGE), we have provided an extensive morphological/chemical/physical characterization via SEM and TGA to identify the best conditions to control drug release via protein degradation from bicomponent fibers without compromising in vitro cell response.

  6. House: Southeast/Front Elevation, Northeast/Side Elevation, Northwest/Rear Elevation, Southwest/Side Elevation, House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    House: Southeast/Front Elevation, Northeast/Side Elevation, Northwest/Rear Elevation, Southwest/Side Elevation, House Plan - Driapsa Centennial Farm, Potts Hill European Community, 4511 Potts Hill Road, Bainbridge, Ross County, OH

  7. Polysaccharide Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  8. Mars elevation distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.; Ablin, Karyn K.

    1991-01-01

    A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mars was derived with both Mercator and Sinusoidal Equal-Area projections from the global topographic map of Mars (scale 1:15 million, contour interval 1 km). Elevations on the map are referred to Mars' topographic datum that is defined by the gravity field at a 6.1-millibar pressure surface with respect to the center of mass of Mars. The DTM has a resolution at the equator of 1/59.226 degrees (exactly 1 km) per pixel. By using the DTM, the volumetric distribution of Mars topography above and below the datum has previously been calculated. Three types of elevation distributions of Mars' topography were calculated from the same DTM: (1) the frequency distribution of elevations at the pixel resolution; (2) average elevations in increments of 6 degrees in both longitude and latitude; and (3) average elevations in 36 separate blocks, each covering 30 degrees of latitude and 60 degrees of longitude.

  9. Mechanical properties and dual drug delivery application of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds fabricated with a poly(β-amino ester) porogen.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda; Milbrandt, Todd A; Hilt, J Zach; Puleo, David A

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric scaffolds that are biocompatible and biodegradable are widely used for tissue engineering applications. Scaffolds can be further enhanced by enabling the release of one or more drugs to stimulate regeneration or for the treatment of a specific disease or condition. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were mixed with poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) particles to create novel hybrid scaffolds capable of dual release of drug and growth factor. Fast-degrading PBAE particles loaded with the drug ketoprofen acted as porogens that provided a rapid 12h release. The PLGA microspheres were loaded with a growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein 2, and fused together around the porogens to create a slow-degrading matrix that provided sustained release lasting 70days. Drug release was further tailored by varying the amount of porogen added to the scaffold. Bioactivity measurements demonstrated that the scaffold fabrication technique did not damage the drug or protein. The compressive modulus was affected by the amount of porogen added, extending from 50 to 111MPa for loadings from 60 to 40% PBAE, and after 5days of degradation, it decreased to 0.6 to 1.1kPa when the porogen was gone. PLGA containing a quick-degrading porogen can be used to release two drugs while developing a porous microarchitecture for cell ingrowth with in a matrix capable of maintaining a compressive modulus applicable for soft tissue implants.

  10. 29 CFR 1910.28 - Safety requirements for scaffolding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opening, consisting of No. 18 gauge U.S. Standard Wire one-half-inch mesh or the equivalent, where persons.... (22) Wire or fiber rope used for scaffold suspension shall be capable of supporting at least six times..., wire rope supported scaffolds shall be used. (24) The use of shore scaffolds or lean-to scaffolds...

  11. Fabrication of combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Stephens, Jean S; Dorsey, Shauna M; Becker, Matthew L

    2007-07-01

    We have designed a novel combinatorial research platform to help accelerate tissue engineering research. Combinatorial methods combine many samples into a single specimen to enable accelerated experimentation and discovery. The platform for fabricating combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries can be used to rapidly identify scaffold formulations that maximize tissue formation. Many approaches for screening cell-biomaterial interactions utilize a two-dimensional format such as a film or surface to present test substrates to cells. However, cells in vivo exist in a three-dimensional milieu of extracellular matrix and cells in vitro behave more naturally when cultured in a three-dimensional environment than when cultured on a two-dimensional surface. Thus, we have designed a method for fabricating combinatorial biomaterial libraries where the materials are presented to cells in the form of three-dimensional, porous, salt-leached, polymer scaffolds. Many scaffold variations and compositions can be screened in a single experiment so that optimal scaffold formulations for tissue formation can be rapidly identified. In summary, we have developed a platform technology for fabricating combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries that can be used to screen cell response to materials in a three-dimensional, scaffold format.

  12. Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Holzwarth, Jeremy M.; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a highly interdisciplinary field that seeks to tackle the most challenging bone-related clinical issues. The major components of bone tissue engineering are the scaffold, cells, and growth factors. This review will focus on the scaffold and recent advancements in developing scaffolds that can mimic the natural extracellular matrix of bone. Specifically, these novel scaffolds mirror the nanofibrous collagen network that comprises the majority of the non-mineral portion of bone matrix. Using two main fabrication techniques, electrospinning and thermally-induced phase separation, and incorporating bone-like minerals, such as hydroxyapatite, composite nanofibrous scaffolds can improve cell adhesion, stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation. This review will cover the two main processing techniques and how they are being applied to fabricate scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. It will then cover how these scaffolds can enhance the osteogenic capabilities of a variety of cell types and survey the ability of the constructs to support the growth of clinically relevant bone tissue. PMID:21944829

  13. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  14. Scaffold Translation: Barriers Between Concept and Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapies to clinical use remains, bluntly, a failure. This dearth of translated tissue engineering therapies (including scaffolds) remains despite 25 years of research, research funding totaling hundreds of millions of dollars, over 12,000 papers on BTE and over 2000 papers on BTE scaffolds alone in the past 10 years (PubMed search). Enabling scaffold translation requires first an understanding of the challenges, and second, addressing the complete range of these challenges. There are the obvious technical challenges of designing, manufacturing, and functionalizing scaffolds to fill the Form, Fixation, Function, and Formation needs of bone defect repair. However, these technical solutions should be targeted to specific clinical indications (e.g., mandibular defects, spine fusion, long bone defects, etc.). Further, technical solutions should also address business challenges, including the need to obtain regulatory approval, meet specific market needs, and obtain private investment to develop products, again for specific clinical indications. Finally, these business and technical challenges present a much different model than the typical research paradigm, presenting the field with philosophical challenges in terms of publishing and funding priorities that should be addressed as well. In this article, we review in detail the technical, business, and philosophical barriers of translating scaffolds from Concept to Clinic. We argue that envisioning and engineering scaffolds as modular systems with a sliding scale of complexity offers the best path to addressing these translational challenges. PMID:21902613

  15. Fabrication of combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Carl G.; Stephens, Jean S.; Dorsey, Shauna M.; Becker, Matthew L.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed a novel combinatorial research platform to help accelerate tissue engineering research. Combinatorial methods combine many samples into a single specimen to enable accelerated experimentation and discovery. The platform for fabricating combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries can be used to rapidly identify scaffold formulations that maximize tissue formation. Many approaches for screening cell-biomaterial interactions utilize a two-dimensional format such as a film or surface to present test substrates to cells. However, cells in vivo exist in a three-dimensional milieu of extracellular matrix and cells in vitro behave more naturally when cultured in a three-dimensional environment than when cultured on a two-dimensional surface. Thus, we have designed a method for fabricating combinatorial biomaterial libraries where the materials are presented to cells in the form of three-dimensional, porous, salt-leached, polymer scaffolds. Many scaffold variations and compositions can be screened in a single experiment so that optimal scaffold formulations for tissue formation can be rapidly identified. In summary, we have developed a platform technology for fabricating combinatorial polymer scaffold libraries that can be used to screen cell response to materials in a three-dimensional, scaffold format.

  16. Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological study of biomimetic three-dimensional gelatin-montmorillonite/cellulose scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Ahmed A; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira; Harding, David R K

    2009-12-01

    This work focused on studying the effect of blending gelatin (Gel) with Cellulose (Cel), in the presence of montmorillonite (MMT), on the swelling behavior, in vitro degradation and surface morphology. Additionally, the effect of the prepared biocomposites on the characteristics of the human osteosarcoma cells (Saos-2), including proliferation, scaffold/cells interactions, apoptosis and their potential of the cells to induce osteogenesis and differentiation was evaluated. The crosslinked biocomposites with glutaraldehyde (GA) or N,N-methylene-bisacrylamide (MBA) was prepared via an intercalation process and freeze-drying technique. Properties including SEM morphology, X-ray diffraction characterization and in vitro biodegradation were investigated. The successful generation of 3-D biomimetic porous scaffolds incorporating Saos-2 cells indicated their potential for de novo bone formation that exploits cell-matrix interactions. In vitro studies revealed that the scaffolds containing 12 and 6% MMT crosslinked by 5 and 0.5% GA seem to be the two most efficient and effective biodegradable scaffolds, which promoted Saos-2 cells proliferation, migration, expansion, adhesion, penetration, spreading, and differentiation, respectively. MMT improved cytocompatibility between the osteoblasts and the biocomposite. In vitro analysis indicated good biocompatibility of the scaffold and presents the scaffold as a new potential candidate as suitable biohybrid material for tissue engineering.

  17. Prolonged release of TGF-β from polyelectrolyte nanoparticle loaded macroporous chitin-poly(caprolactone) scaffold for chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Jayakumar, R

    2016-12-01

    Cartilage degeneration occurs when the catabolic factors overtakes the anabolic factors. The regeneration capability of damaged cartilage is poor due to its hypovascular and hypocellular tissue. Tissue engineering strategies aims in development of a suitable substrate that provide the required physical, chemical and biological cues to the proliferating cells to direct chondrogenesis. A macroporous polymeric blend scaffold of chitin and poly(caprolactone) (PCL) was fabricated by lyophilisation technique and characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermogravimetric/Differential thermal Analysis (TG/DTA). The effect of prolonged release of Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was studied by encapsulating it in chondroitin sulphate nanoparticles (nCS) incorporated in chitin-PCL scaffold. Chondroitin sulphate nanoparticles containing TGF-β (TGF-β-nCS) was developed by polyelectrolyte crosslinking using chitosan. Characterization of TGF-β-nCS by Dynamic Light Scattering particle sizer and SEM showed a 230±20nm sized spherical particles. Swelling and degradation studies of the composite scaffold showed its stability. Protein adsorption was enhanced in nanoparticle containing scaffold. The effect of TGF-β was well addressed by the increased attachment and proliferation of rabbit adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (rASCs). The chondrogenic potential of rASCs in the presence of TGF-β releasing composite scaffold showed an increased proteoglycan deposition. These studies highlight the positive effects of chitin-PCL-TGF-β-nCS scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  18. Development of bioactive glass based scaffolds for controlled antibiotic release in bone tissue engineering via biodegradable polymer layered coating.

    PubMed

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Li, Wei; Roether, Judith A; Mouriño, Viviana; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous 45S5 Bioglass(®)-based scaffolds coated with two polymer layers were fabricated to serve as a multifunctional device with controlled drug release capability for bone regeneration applications. An interior poly(d,l-lactide)/poly(ethylene glycol)-(polypropylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) triblock copolymer (Pluronic P123) coating improved the mechanical stability of Bioglass-based scaffolds, while an exterior natural polymer (alginate or gelatin) coating served as an antibiotic drug carrier. The results showed improved mechanical properties of Bioglass-based scaffolds by the bilayer polymer coating. In addition, hydrochloride tetracycline loaded in either alginate or gelatin coatings was released rapidly at the initial stage (∼1 h), while the released rate subsequently decreased and was sustained for 14 days in phosphate buffered saline. Therefore, these layered polymer coated scaffolds exhibit attractive characteristics in terms of improved mechanical properties and controlled drug release, simultaneously with the added advantage that the drug release rate is decoupled from the intrinsic scaffold Bioglass degradation mechanism. The layered polymer coated scaffolds are of interest for drug-delivery enhanced bone regeneration applications.

  19. Three-dimensional zinc incorporated borosilicate bioactive glass scaffolds for rodent critical-sized calvarial defects repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhao, Shichang; Xiao, Wei; Cui, Xu; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Deping

    2015-06-01

    The biomaterials with high osteogenic ability are being intensively investigated. In this study, we evaluated the bioactivity and osteogenesis of BG-Zn scaffolds in vitro and in vivo with a rodent calvarial defects model. Zinc containing borosilicate bioactive glass was prepared by doping glass with 1.5, 5 and 10 wt.% ZnO (denoted as BG-1.5Zn, BG-5Zn and BG-10Zn, respectively). When immersed in simulated body fluid, dopant ZnO retarded the degradation process, but did not affect the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) after long-period soaking. BG-Zn scaffolds showed controlled release of Zn ions into the medium for over 8 weeks. Human bone marrow derived stem cells (hBMSCs) attached well on the BG-1.5Zn and BG-5Zn scaffolds, which exhibited no cytotoxicity to hBMSCs. In addition, the alkaline phosphatase activity of the hBMSCs increased with increasing dopant amount in the glass, while the BG-10Zn group showed over-dose of Zn. Furthermore, when implanted in rat calvarial defects for 8 weeks, the BG-5Zn scaffolds showed a significantly better capacity to regenerate bone tissue compared to the non-doping scaffolds. Generally, these results showed the BG-Zn scaffolds with high osteogenic capacity will be promising candidates using in bone tissue repair and regeneration.

  20. Electrospinning of Bioinspired Polymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jose V; Carvalho, Pedro P; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a technique used in the production of polymer nanofibre meshes. The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers to produce nanofibres that closely mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of different tissues has opened a wide range of possibilities for the application of electrospinning in Tissue Engineering. It is believed that nano-features (such as voids and surface cues) present in nanofibre mesh scaffolds, combined with the chemical composition of the fibres, can stimulate cell attachment, growth and differentiation. Despite the widespread use of electrospun nanofibres in tissue engineering, the present chapter will focus on the advances made in the utilisation of these materials in bone, cartilage and tooth related applications. Several aspects will be taken into consideration, namely the choice of polymers, the surface modification of the nanofibres in order to achieve mineralisation, and also the biological application of such materials.

  1. Computational Exploration of Molecular Scaffolds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-12

    The scaffold concept is widely applied in medicinal chemistry. Scaffolds are mostly used to represent core structures of bioactive compounds. Although the scaffold concept has limitations and is often viewed differently from a chemical and computational perspective, it has provided a basis for systematic investigations of molecular cores and building blocks, going far beyond the consideration of individual compound series. Over the past 2 decades, alternative scaffold definitions and organization schemes have been introduced and scaffolds have been studied in a variety of ways and increasingly on a large scale. Major applications of the scaffold concept include the generation of molecular hierarchies, structural classification, association of scaffolds with biological activities, and activity prediction. This contribution discusses computational approaches for scaffold generation and analysis, with emphasis on recent developments impacting medicinal chemistry. A variety of scaffold-based studies are discussed, and a perspective on scaffold methods is provided.

  2. Functionalized mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for enhanced bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingdi; Zeng, Deliang; Li, Nan; Wen, Jin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG), which possesses excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, has played an important role in bone tissue regeneration. However, it is difficult to prepare MBG scaffolds with high compressive strength for applications in bone regeneration; this difficulty has greatly hindered its development and use. To solve this problem, a simple powder processing technique has been successfully developed to fabricate a novel type of MBG scaffold (MBGS). Furthermore, amino or carboxylic groups could be successfully grafted onto MBGSs (denoted as N-MBGS and C-MBGS, respectively) through a post-grafting process. It was revealed that both MBGS and the functionalized MBGSs could significantly promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs. Due to its positively charged surface, N-MBGS presented the highest in vitro osteogenic capability of the three samples. Moreover, in vivo testing results demonstrated that N-MBGS could promote higher levels of bone regeneration compared with MBGS and C-MBGS. In addition to its surface characteristics, it is believed that the decreased degradation rate of N-MBGS plays a vital role in promoting bone regeneration. These findings indicate that MBGSs are promising materials with potential practical applications in bone regeneration, which can be successfully fabricated by combining a powder processing technique and post-grafting process. PMID:26763311

  3. In vitro non-viral gene delivery with nanofibrous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dehai; Luu, Yen K.; Kim, Kwangsok; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Chu, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular and intracellular barriers typically prevent non-viral gene vectors from having an effective transfection efficiency. Formulation of a gene delivery vehicle that can overcome the barriers is a key step for successful tissue regeneration. We have developed a novel core-shelled DNA nanoparticle by invoking solvent-induced condensation of plasmid DNA (β-galactosidase or GFP) in a solvent mixture [94% N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + 6% 1× TE buffer] and subsequent encapsulation of the condensed DNA globule in a triblock copolymer, polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (L8E78L8), in the same solvent environment. The polylactide shell protects the encapsulated DNA from degradation during electrospinning of a mixture of encapsulated DNA nanoparticles and biodegradable PLGA (a random copolymer of lactide and glycolide) to form a nanofibrous non-woven scaffold using the same solution mixture. The bioactive plasmid DNA can then be released in an intact form from the scaffold with a controlled release rate and transfect cells in vitro. PMID:16269820

  4. Using glucosamine to improve the properties of photocrosslinked gelatin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Suo, Hairui; Xu, Kedi; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-02-01

    The use of hydrogel-based cell transport scaffolds holds great promise in regenerative medicine, such as treating osteoarthritis. Gelatin and glucosamine are the ideal materials to be used in the hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage regeneration for they could act as compositions of cartilage. To overcome the weak strength of traditional gelatin hydrogels and down-regulate cell toxicity of glucosamine, gelatin and glucosamine molecules were grafted with acrylate groups and covalently crosslinked under photo-radiation to form hydrogels. Hydrogels with tuning physiochemical properties were produced according to different proportions of methacrylate gelatin (GelMA) and N-acryloyl glucosamine (AGA). The process of photocrosslinking was elaborated, and the hypothesis of increasing AGA concentration leading to higher strength of hydrogels was corroborated by testing rheological property and scanning micro-morphological features. A serial of properties, including smaller swelling ratio, lower gelatin dissolution and slower degradation of GelMA/AGA hydrogels with higher AGA concentration further proved our hypothesis. Moreover, AGA molecules showed less cytotoxicity than unmodified glucosamine molecules and the incorporation of AGA molecules in GelMA/AGA hydrogels upregulated cell adhesion and spreading on the hydrogel surface. All of these results indicated that addition of AGA molecules could significantly alter the physiochemical properties of GelMA/AGA hydrogels, which may have broad application prospects in the future.

  5. Extrusion-based, three-dimensional printing of calcium-phosphate scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witek, Lukasz

    Small or large bone defects, can occur due to a variety of reasons: congenital disorders, infections, tumors, or traumas which can lead to significant disabilities. There is an assortment of bone grafting procedures, each having their own respective advantages and disadvantages and exhibiting certain essential characteristics. Among the available grafts, autogenous (autograft), allograft, xenograft, and alloplasts, all exhibit a minimum of two-thirds of the essential characteristics and have been proven useful in fully or partially repairing skeletal defects. However, different host-to-grafting material responses have been reported and should be taken into consideration when determining treatment options. A large range of physical and chemical properties can be achieved with calcium phosphate based materials, which possess two of the ideal characteristics for grafting procedures: osteoconduction and osseointegration. Calcium phosphate based scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tri-calcium phosphate (beta-TCP), or a combination of both (HA/beta-TCP) were investigated as materials for three-dimensional printing process to create layer-by-layer structures for use as bone regeneration scaffolds. Different calcium-phosphate phases will result in different degrees of in vivo dissolution and/or cell-mediated resorption. There has been a growing interest in BCP because it has been shown that this material improves the formation of new bone inside the implanted scaffold. The literature indicates that the faster dissolution rate of ?-TCP would be greatly responsible of this enhancement. However, in vitro tests indicate that fast dissolution can decrease the mechanical strength of BCP scaffolds. Furthermore, studies reported that HA has higher mechanical strength and lower degradation rate than beta-TCP. Therefore, the HA/beta-TCP ratio is a key parameter controlling the performance of the scaffold for bone repair applications, since it determines degradation rate

  6. Osteogenic evaluation of calcium/magnesium-doped mesoporous silica scaffold with incorporation of rhBMP-2 by synchrotron radiation-based μCT.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenglong; Guo, Han; Lu, Jingxiong; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Jie; Liu, Changsheng

    2011-11-01

    The regenerative treatment of large osseous defects remains a formidable challenge in orthopedic surgery today. In the present study, we have synthesized biodegradable calcium/magnesium-doped silica-based scaffolds with hierarchically macro/mesoporous structure (CMMS), and incorporated recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) into the scaffolds to obtain a hybrid system for osteogenic factor delivery in the functional repair of bone defects. The developed CMMS/rhBMP-2 scaffolds presented interconnected porous network, macropores (200-500 μm) and mesopores (5.7 nm), as well as good bioactivity and biocompatibility and proper degradation rate. Combined with the capacity to deliver ions and growth factors, the CMMS/rhBMP-2 scaffolds significantly promoted the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs), as evidenced by the enhanced expression of Runx-2, osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, and induced the ectopic bone formation in the thigh muscle pouches of mice. We further assessed the in vivo effects of CMMS/rhBMP-2 scaffolds in a rabbit femur cavity defect model by using synchrotron radiation-based μCT (SRμCT) imaging and histological analysis, indicating that the CMMS/rhBMP-2 scaffolds resulted in more bone regeneration compared to that observed with the CMMS scaffolds without rhBMP-2. Moreover, scaffolds with or without rhBMP-2 underwent gradual resorption and replacement with bone and almost disappeared at 12 weeks, while the dense CMMS/rhBMP-2 material showed slower degradation rate and promoted the least extensive neo-bone formation. This study suggested that the hybrid CMMS/rhBMP-2 scaffolds system demonstrates promise for bone regeneration in clinical case of large bone defects.

  7. Hybrid Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Combination of Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Photoencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Marica; Van Hoorick, Jasper; Hölzl, Katja; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers versatile possibilities for adapting the structural parameters of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, it is also essential to develop procedures allowing efficient cell seeding independent of scaffold geometry and pore size. The aim of this study was to establish a method for seeding the scaffolds using photopolymerizable cell-laden hydrogels. The latter facilitates convenient preparation, and handling of cell suspension, while distributing the hydrogel precursor throughout the pores, before it is cross-linked with light. In addition, encapsulation of living cells within hydrogels can produce constructs with high initial cell loading and intimate cell-matrix contact, similar to that of the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Three dimensional scaffolds were produced from poly(lactic) acid (PLA) by means of fused deposition modeling. A solution of methacrylamide-modified gelatin (Gel-MOD) in cell culture medium containing photoinitiator Li-TPO-L was used as a hydrogel precursor. Being an enzymatically degradable derivative of natural collagen, gelatin-based matrices are biomimetic and potentially support the process of cell-induced remodeling. Preosteoblast cells MC3T3-E1 at a density of 10 × 106 cells per 1 mL were used for testing the seeding procedure and cell proliferation studies. Obtained results indicate that produced constructs support cell survival and proliferation over extended duration of our experiment. The established two-step approach for scaffold seeding with the cells is simple, rapid, and is shown to be highly reproducible. Furthermore, it enables precise control of the initial cell density, while yielding their uniform distribution throughout the scaffold. Such hybrid tissue engineering constructs merge the advantages of rigid 3D printed constructs with the soft hydrogel matrix, potentially mimicking the process of ECM remodeling. PMID:26858826

  8. Hybrid biomimetic scaffold composed of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Tambralli, Ajay; Blakeney, Bryan; Anderson, Joel; Kushwaha, Meenakshi; Andukuri, Adinarayana; Dean, Derrick; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanofibrous electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (ePCL) scaffolds have inherent structural advantages, but lack of bioactivity has limited their usefulness in biomedical applications. Thus, here we report the development of a hybrid, nanostructured, extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffold by a combination of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. The PAs have ECM mimicking characteristics including a cell adhesive ligand (RGDS) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mediated degradable sites. TEM imaging verified successful PA self-assembly into nanofibers (diameters of 8 – 10 nm) using a solvent evaporation method. This evaporation coating method was then used to successfully coat PAs onto ePCL nanofibers (diameters of 300 – 400 nm), to develop the hybrid, bioactive scaffolds. SEM characterization showed that the PA coatings did not interfere with the porous ePCL nanofiber network. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the hybrid scaffolds to evaluate their bioactivity. Significantly greater attachment and spreading of hMSCs were observed on ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-RGDS as compared to ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-S (no cell adhesive ligand) and uncoated ePCL nanofibers. Overall, this novel strategy presents a new solution to overcome the current bioactivity challenges of electrospun scaffolds and combines the unique characteristics of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled PA nanofibers to provide an ECM mimicking environment. This has great potential to be applied to many different electrospun scaffolds for various biomedical applications. PMID:20811101

  9. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE). Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions. PMID:25881610

  10. 3D scaffold with effective multidrug sequential release against bacteria biofilm.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, Rafaela; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2017-02-01

    Bone infection is a feared complication following surgery or trauma that remains as an extremely difficult disease to deal with. So far, the outcome of therapy could be improved with the design of 3D implants, which combine the merits of osseous regeneration and local multidrug therapy so as to avoid bacterial growth, drug resistance and the feared side effects. Herein, hierarchical 3D multidrug scaffolds based on nanocomposite bioceramic and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) prepared by rapid prototyping with an external coating of gelatin-glutaraldehyde (Gel-Glu) have been fabricated. These 3D scaffolds contain three antimicrobial agents (rifampin, levofloxacin and vancomycin), which have been localized in different compartments of the scaffold to obtain different release kinetics and more effective combined therapy. Levofloxacin was loaded into the mesopores of nanocomposite bioceramic part, vancomycin was localized into PVA biopolymer part and rifampin was loaded in the external coating of Gel-Glu. The obtained results show an early and fast release of rifampin followed by sustained and prolonged release of vancomycin and levofloxacin, respectively, which are mainly governed by the progressive in vitro degradability rate of these scaffolds. This combined therapy is able to destroy Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria biofilms as well as inhibit the bacteria growth. In addition, these multifunctional scaffolds exhibit excellent bioactivity as well as good biocompatibility with complete cell colonization of preosteoblast in the entire surface, ensuring good bone regeneration. These findings suggest that these hierarchical 3D multidrug scaffolds are promising candidates as platforms for local bone infection therapy.

  11. Porous scaffolds of gelatin-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites obtained by biomimetic approach: characterization and antibiotic drug release.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2005-08-01

    Gelatin-hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocomposite porous scaffolds were fabricated biomimetically, and their feasibility as a drug-delivery carrier for tissue-regeneration and wound-healing treatments was addressed. The composite sols were prepared by the precipitation of HA up to 30 wt % within a gelatin solution with the use of calcium and phosphate precursors, and the porous scaffold was obtained by casting the sols and further freeze drying. The obtained bodies were crosslinked with carbodiimide derivatives to retain chemical and thermal integrity. The apatite precipitates were observed to be a poorly crystallized carbonate-substituted HA. The nanocomposite scaffolds had porosities of approximately 89-92% and exhibited a bimodal pore distribution, that is, the macropores (approximately 300-500 microm) of the framework structure, and micropores (approximately 0.5-1 microm) formed on the framework surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation revealed the precipitation of highly elongated HA nanocrystals on the gelatin network. The well-developed porous structure and organized nanocomposite configurations were in marked contrast to the directly mixed gelatin-HA powder conventional composites. For drug-release tests, tetracycline, an antibiotic drug, was entrapped within the scaffold, and the drug-release profile was examined with processing parameters, such as HA amount in gelatin, crosslinking degree, and initial drug addition. The drug entrapment decreased with increasing HA amount, but increased with increasing crosslinking degree and initial drug addition. The crosslinking of the gelatin was the prerequisite to sustaining and controlling the drug releases. Compared to pure gelatin, the gelatin-HA nanocomposites had lower drug releases, because of their lower water uptake and degradation. All the nanocomposite scaffolds released drugs in proportion to the initial drug addition, suggesting their capacity to deliver drugs in a controlled manner. Based on

  12. Porous CaP/silk composite scaffolds to repair femur defects in an osteoporotic model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ning; Dai, Jing; Cheng, Xiangrong; Li, Shu'e; Miron, Richard J; Wu, Tao; Chen, Wenli; Zhang, Yufeng; Shi, Bin

    2013-08-01

    The most common complication for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis is bone-related defects and fractures. While routine medication has a high probability of undesirable side effects, new approaches have aimed to develop regeneration procedures that stimulate new bone formation while reversing bone loss. Recently, we have synthesized a new hybrid CaP/silk scaffold with a CaP-phase distribution and pore architecture better suited to facilitate cell differentiation and bone formation. The aim of the present study was to compare the involved remodeling process and therapeutic effect of porous CaP/silk composite scaffolds upon local implantation into osteoporotic defects. Wistar rats were used to induce postmenopausal osteoporotic model by bilateral ovariectomy. The pure silk and hybrid CaP/silk scaffolds were implanted into critical sized defects created in distal femoral epiphysis. After 14 and 28 days, the in vivo osteogenetic efficiency was evaluated by μCT analysis, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Safranin O staining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, and immunohistochemical assessment. Animals with or without critical-sized defects were used as drill or blank controls, respectively. The osteoporotic defect model was well established with significantly decreased μCT parameters of BV/TV, Tb.N and increased Tb.Sp, porosity, combined with changes in histological observations. During the healing process, the critical-sized drill control defects failed to regenerate appreciable bone tissue, while more significantly increased bone formation and mineralization with dynamic scaffold degradation and decreased osteoclastic bone resorption could be detected within defects with hybrid CaP/silk scaffolds compared to pure silk scaffolds.

  13. Analog series-based scaffolds: computational design and exploration of a new type of molecular scaffolds for medicinal chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Computational design of and systematic search for a new type of molecular scaffolds termed analog series-based scaffolds. Materials & methods: From currently available bioactive compounds, analog series were systematically extracted, key compounds identified and new scaffolds isolated from them. Results: Using our computational approach, more than 12,000 scaffolds were extracted from bioactive compounds. Conclusion: A new scaffold definition is introduced and a computational methodology developed to systematically identify such scaffolds, yielding a large freely available scaffold knowledge base. PMID:28116132

  14. Injectable alginate/hydroxyapatite gel scaffold combined with gelatin microspheres for drug delivery and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jingxuan; Miao, Yuting; Tan, Huaping; Zhou, Tianle; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong; Xing, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Injectable and biodegradable alginate-based composite gel scaffolds doubly integrated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) and gelatin microspheres (GMs) were cross-linked via in situ release of calcium cations. As triggers of calcium cations, CaCO3 and glucono-D-lactone (GDL) were fixed as a mass ratio of 1:1 to control pH value ranging from 6.8 to 7.2 during gelation. Synchronously, tetracycline hydrochloride (TH) was encapsulated into GMs to enhance bioactivity of composite gel scaffolds. The effects of HAp and GMs on characteristics of gel scaffolds, including pH value, gelation time, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, degradation behavior and drug release, were investigated. The results showed that HAp and GMs successfully improved mechanical properties of gel scaffolds at strain from 0.1 to 0.5, which stabilized the gel network and decreased weight loss, as well as swelling ratio and gelation time. TH could be released from this composite gel scaffold into the local microenvironment in a controlled fashion by the organic/inorganic hybrid of hydrogel network. Our results demonstrate that the HAp and GMs doubly integrated alginate-based gel scaffolds, especially the one with 6% (w/v) HAp and 5% (w/v) GMs, have suitable physical performance and bioactive properties, thus provide a potential opportunity to be used for bone tissue engineering. The potential application of this gel scaffold in bone tissue engineering was confirmed by encapsulation behavior of osteoblasts. In combination with TH, the gel scaffold exhibited beneficial effects on osteoblast activity, which suggested a promising future for local treatment of pathologies involving bone loss.

  15. Characterization of hydroxyapatite whisker reinforced composites and scaffolds for mechanical and biological function in orthopaedic and spinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Timothy L.

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the mechanical and biological properties of HA whisker reinforced polyaryletherketone (PAEK) composites and scaffolds which are key to clinical translation for orthopedic and spinal implants. The fatigue behavior of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) reinforced with 0, 20, and 40 vol% hydroxyapatite (HA) was investigated in four-point bending fatigue. The fatigue life decreased with increasing HA reinforcement. However, PEKK reinforced with 40 vol% HA whiskers exhibited a fatigue life greater than 2.106 cycles at 40 MPa. Moreover, HA whisker reinforcement resulted in decreased creep deformation and minimal modulus degradation. The effects of the mold temperature and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) powder were investigated on the mechanical properties and crystallinity of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared using compression molding and porogen leaching. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds increased while the PEEK crystallinity decreased, with increasing mold temperature and suggested an optimal mold temperature of 370--375°C for PEEK scaffolds comprising of 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA whisker reinforcement, regardless of the PEEK powder size. The effects of the porogen morphology on the architecture, mechanical properties, and permeability of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds were investigated in 75--90% porous scaffolds. HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared with an ellipsoidal porogen exhibited a greater permeability than scaffolds prepared with a cubic porogen. The compressive modulus, yield strength, and yield strain were not affected by the porogen morphology. The effects of HA reinforcement morphology and content was investigated on the behavior of primary osteoblasts on dense HA reinforced PEEK substrates in vitro. At day 7, the number of osteoblasts attached to PEEK substrate surfaces increased with increasing HA content and for HA whiskers compared to equiaxed HA powder reinforcement

  16. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds technology: current use and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Coronary bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are a new appealing therapeutic option in interventional cardiology. The most used and studied is currently the Absorb BVS™. Its backbone is made of poly-L-lactide and coated by a thin layer of poly-D,L-lactide, it releases everolimus and is fully degraded to H2O and CO2 in 2–3 years. Absorb BVS™ seems to offer several theoretical advantages over metallic stent, as it gives temporary mechanical support to vessel wall without permanently caging it. Therefore, long-term endothelial function and structure are not affected. A possible future surgical revascularization is not compromised. Natural vasomotion in response to external stimuli is also recovered. Several observational and randomized trials have been published about BVS clinical outcomes. The main aim of this review is to carry out a systematic analysis about Absorb BVS™ studies, evaluating also the technical improvements of the Absorb GT1 BVS™. PMID:27468252

  17. Bioresorbable scaffolds for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: do we need an off-the-shelf ACL substitute?

    PubMed

    Richmond, John C; Weitzel, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    Currently available anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft sources, autograft and allograft, present potential problems that a natural biomaterial ACL graft might be able to solve. Earlier efforts in the development of synthetic ACL grafts were less than optimal, and those devices have largely been abandoned. We can learn from these past failures, and potentially develop a bioresorbable scaffold for ACL reconstruction, which will provide immediate stability, promote and direct tissue in growth, and degrade at an appropriate rate, without harmful wear debris. We have developed a modified silk scaffold, which is currently being evaluated in humans in a pilot study.

  18. Fabrication of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by incorporating ligand-free hydroxyapatite nanoparticles into biodegradable polymer scaffolds and release studies.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Balazs; Rodio, Marina; Romano, Ilaria; Diaspro, Alberto; Intartaglia, Romuald; Beke, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical fabrication approach of preparing free-standing composite thin films of hydroxyapatite (HA) and biodegradable polymers by combining pulsed laser ablation in liquid and mask-projection excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). Ligand-free HA nanoparticles were prepared by ultrafast laser ablation of a HA target in a solvent, and then the nanoparticles were dispersed into the liquid polymer resin prior to the photocuring process using MPExSL. The resin is poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a photo-polymerizable, biodegradable material. The polymer is blended with diethyl fumarate in 7:3 w/w to adjust the resin viscosity. The evaluation of the structural and mechanical properties of the fabricated hybrid thin film was performed by means of SEM and nanoindentation, respectively, while the chemical and degradation studies were conducted through thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR. The photocuring efficiency was found to be dependent on the nanoparticle concentration. The MPExSL process yielded PPF thin films with a stable and homogenous dispersion of the embedded HA nanoparticles. Here, it was not possible to tune the stiffness and hardness of the scaffolds by varying the laser parameters, although this was observed for regular PPF scaffolds. Finally, the gradual release of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles over thin film biodegradation is reported.

  19. Fabrication of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by incorporating ligand-free hydroxyapatite nanoparticles into biodegradable polymer scaffolds and release studies

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Balazs; Rodio, Marina; Romano, Ilaria; Diaspro, Alberto; Intartaglia, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report on the optical fabrication approach of preparing free-standing composite thin films of hydroxyapatite (HA) and biodegradable polymers by combining pulsed laser ablation in liquid and mask-projection excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). Ligand-free HA nanoparticles were prepared by ultrafast laser ablation of a HA target in a solvent, and then the nanoparticles were dispersed into the liquid polymer resin prior to the photocuring process using MPExSL. The resin is poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a photo-polymerizable, biodegradable material. The polymer is blended with diethyl fumarate in 7:3 w/w to adjust the resin viscosity. The evaluation of the structural and mechanical properties of the fabricated hybrid thin film was performed by means of SEM and nanoindentation, respectively, while the chemical and degradation studies were conducted through thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR. The photocuring efficiency was found to be dependent on the nanoparticle concentration. The MPExSL process yielded PPF thin films with a stable and homogenous dispersion of the embedded HA nanoparticles. Here, it was not possible to tune the stiffness and hardness of the scaffolds by varying the laser parameters, although this was observed for regular PPF scaffolds. Finally, the gradual release of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles over thin film biodegradation is reported. PMID:26734513

  20. Bioactive scaffolds for bone and ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2007-05-01

    Bone and ligament injuries present the greatest challenges in connective tissue regeneration. The design of materials for these applications lies at the forefront of material science and is the epitome of its current ambition. Indeed, its goal is to design and fabricate reproducible, bioactive and bioresorbable 3D scaffolds with tailored properties that are able to maintain their structure and integrity for predictable times, even under load-bearing conditions. Unfortunately, the mechanical properties of today's available porous scaffolds fall short of those exhibited by complex human tissues, such as bone and ligament. The manipulation of structural parameters in the design of scaffolds and their bioactivation, through the incorporation of soluble and insoluble signals capable of promoting cell activities, are discussed as possible strategies to improve the formation of new tissues both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the different approaches adopted to develop bioactive composite systems for use as temporary scaffolds for bone and anterior ligament regeneration.

  1. Biomimetic biphasic scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral defects caused by vigorous trauma or physical disease are difficult to be managed. Tissue engineering provides a possible option to regenerate the damaged osteochondral tissues. For osteochondral reconstruction, one intact scaffold should be considered to support the regeneration of both cartilage and subchondral bone. Therefore, the biphasic scaffolds with the mimic structures of osteochondral tissues have been developed to close this chasm. A variety of biomimetic bilayer scaffolds fabricated from natural or synthetic polymers, or the ones loading with growth factors, cells, or both of them make great progresses in osteochondral defect repair. In this review, the preparation and in vitro and/or in vivo verification of bioinspired biphasic scaffolds are summarized and discussed, as well as the prospect is predicted. PMID:26816644

  2. Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Ernesto; Baldino, Lucia; Cardea, Stefano; De Marco, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue regeneration is aimed at producing biological or synthetic scaffolds to be implanted in the body for regenerate functional tissues. Several techniques and materials have been used to obtain biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, on which adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation of human cells has been attempted. Scaffolds for tendon regeneration have been less frequently proposed, because they have a complex hierarchical structure and it is very difficult to mimic their peculiar mechanical properties. In this review, we critically analyzed the proposed materials and fabrication techniques for tendon tissue engineering and we indicated new preparation processes, based on the use of supercritical fluids, to produce scaffolds with characteristics very similar to the native tendon structure. PMID:23738295

  3. Strategies for developing decellularized corneal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Amy P; Ahearne, Mark

    2013-03-01

    The main obstacle to successfully engineering corneal tissue has been the replication of the structural and biochemical composition of native cornea in a scaffold. In recent years decellularized corneas have been under investigation as an alternative scaffold source for use in engineering cornea. Several strategies for lysing cells and removing cellular material from corneas are discussed. The removal of such cellular components and antigen molecules whilst maintaining the corneal extracellular matrix components and architecture is required to generate scaffolds capable of generating functional tissue grafts suitable for transplantation. Different techniques to ascertain the degree of decellularization and the change in structural, mechanical and biological characteristics of the corneas after treatment are examined. In addition several in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to ascertain the suitability of decellularized corneas as a scaffold for restoring vision.