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Sample records for scale immune profiling

  1. Large-Scale and Comprehensive Immune Profiling and Functional Analysis of Normal Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Chan C.; Siebert, Janet; Newman, Aaron M.; Du, Hong-wu; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Goronzy, Jorg; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Krishnan, Eswar; Fathman, C. Garrison; Maecker, Holden T.

    2015-01-01

    While many age-associated immune changes have been reported, a comprehensive set of metrics of immune aging is lacking. Here we report data from 243 healthy adults aged 40–97, for whom we measured clinical and functional parameters, serum cytokines, cytokines and gene expression in stimulated and unstimulated PBMC, PBMC phenotypes, and cytokine-stimulated pSTAT signaling in whole blood. Although highly heterogeneous across individuals, many of these assays revealed trends by age, sex, and CMV status, to greater or lesser degrees. Age, then sex and CMV status, showed the greatest impact on the immune system, as measured by the percentage of assay readouts with significant differences. An elastic net regression model could optimally predict age with 14 analytes from different assays. This reinforces the importance of multivariate analysis for defining a healthy immune system. These data provide a reference for others measuring immune parameters in older people. PMID:26197454

  2. Large-scale microarray profiling reveals four stages of immune escape in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Algans, Christelle; Pont, Frédéric; Ycart, Bernard; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) are aggressive lymphoid malignancies that develop in patients due to oncogenic activation, chemo-resistance, and immune evasion. Tumor biopsies show that B-NHL frequently uses several immune escape strategies, which has hindered the development of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies in these diseases. To gain a better understanding of B-NHL immune editing, we hypothesized that the transcriptional hallmarks of immune escape associated with these diseases could be identified from the meta-analysis of large series of microarrays from B-NHL biopsies. Thus, 1446 transcriptome microarrays from seven types of B-NHL were downloaded and assembled from 33 public Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, and a method for scoring the transcriptional hallmarks in single samples was developed. This approach was validated by matching scores to phenotypic hallmarks of B-NHL such as proliferation, signaling, metabolic activity, and leucocyte infiltration. Through this method, we observed a significant enrichment of 33 immune escape genes in most diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, with fewer in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) samples. Comparing these gene expression patterns with overall survival data evidenced four stages of cancer immune editing in B-NHL: non-immunogenic tumors (stage 1), immunogenic tumors without immune escape (stage 2), immunogenic tumors with immune escape (stage 3), and fully immuno-edited tumors (stage 4). This model complements the standard international prognostic indices for B-NHL and proposes that immune escape stages 3 and 4 (76% of the FL and DLBCL samples in this data set) identify patients relevant for checkpoint blockade immunotherapies. PMID:27622044

  3. Large-scale microarray profiling reveals four stages of immune escape in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Algans, Christelle; Pont, Frédéric; Ycart, Bernard; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) are aggressive lymphoid malignancies that develop in patients due to oncogenic activation, chemo-resistance, and immune evasion. Tumor biopsies show that B-NHL frequently uses several immune escape strategies, which has hindered the development of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies in these diseases. To gain a better understanding of B-NHL immune editing, we hypothesized that the transcriptional hallmarks of immune escape associated with these diseases could be identified from the meta-analysis of large series of microarrays from B-NHL biopsies. Thus, 1446 transcriptome microarrays from seven types of B-NHL were downloaded and assembled from 33 public Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, and a method for scoring the transcriptional hallmarks in single samples was developed. This approach was validated by matching scores to phenotypic hallmarks of B-NHL such as proliferation, signaling, metabolic activity, and leucocyte infiltration. Through this method, we observed a significant enrichment of 33 immune escape genes in most diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, with fewer in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) samples. Comparing these gene expression patterns with overall survival data evidenced four stages of cancer immune editing in B-NHL: non-immunogenic tumors (stage 1), immunogenic tumors without immune escape (stage 2), immunogenic tumors with immune escape (stage 3), and fully immuno-edited tumors (stage 4). This model complements the standard international prognostic indices for B-NHL and proposes that immune escape stages 3 and 4 (76% of the FL and DLBCL samples in this data set) identify patients relevant for checkpoint blockade immunotherapies.

  4. Gene expression profiling of anticancer immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ena; Panelli, Monica C; Monsurró, Vladia; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-06-01

    Anticancer immune responses can be enhanced by immune manipulation, however, the biological mechanism responsible for these immune responses remains largely unexplained. Conventional immunology researchers have extensively studied specific interactions between immune and cancer cells, and additional investigations have identified co-factors that may enhance the effectiveness of such interactions. As the molecular understanding of individual interactions increases, it is becoming apparent that no single mechanism can explain the phenomenon of tumor rejection. The contribution of several components of the innate and adaptive immune response is likely to be required for successful tumor rejection. These components may be variably recruited and activated by molecules with immune modulatory properties being produced by tumor and bystander cells within the tumor micro-environment. Such complexity can only be appreciated and solved by high-throughput tools capable of providing a global view of biological processes as they occur. This review will present selected examples of how high-throughput gene expression profiling may contribute to the understanding of anticancer immune responses. As reviews on technological aspects of the genomic analysis of cancer are already available, this review will provide a speculative discussion about their potential usefulness.

  5. Informatics-Based Discovery of Disease-Associated Immune Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Amber; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Lacey, Precious N.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Hommes, Daniel W.; Sundrud, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in flow and mass cytometry are enabling ultra-high resolution immune profiling in mice and humans on an unprecedented scale. However, the resulting high-content datasets challenge traditional views of cytometry data, which are both limited in scope and biased by pre-existing hypotheses. Computational solutions are now emerging (e.g., Citrus, AutoGate, SPADE) that automate cell gating or enable visualization of relative subset abundance within healthy versus diseased mice or humans. Yet these tools require significant computational fluency and fail to show quantitative relationships between discrete immune phenotypes and continuous disease variables. Here we describe a simple informatics platform that uses hierarchical clustering and nearest neighbor algorithms to associate manually gated immune phenotypes with clinical or pre-clinical disease endpoints of interest in a rapid and unbiased manner. Using this approach, we identify discrete immune profiles that correspond with either weight loss or histologic colitis in a T cell transfer model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and show distinct nodes of immune dysregulation in the IBDs, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This streamlined informatics approach for cytometry data analysis leverages publicly available software, can be applied to manually or computationally gated cytometry data, is suitable for any clinical or pre-clinical setting, and embraces ultra-high content flow and mass cytometry as a discovery engine. PMID:27669154

  6. Epigenetic and immune function profiles associated with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Monica; Aiello, Allison E.; Wildman, Derek E.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Pawelec, Graham; de los Santos, Regina; Goldmann, Emily; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The biologic underpinnings of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have not been fully elucidated. Previous work suggests that alterations in the immune system are characteristic of the disorder. Identifying the biologic mechanisms by which such alterations occur could provide fundamental insights into the etiology and treatment of PTSD. Here we identify specific epigenetic profiles underlying immune system changes associated with PTSD. Using blood samples (n = 100) obtained from an ongoing, prospective epidemiologic study in Detroit, the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study, we applied methylation microarrays to assay CpG sites from more than 14,000 genes among 23 PTSD-affected and 77 PTSD-unaffected individuals. We show that immune system functions are significantly overrepresented among the annotations associated with genes uniquely unmethylated among those with PTSD. We further demonstrate that genes whose methylation levels are significantly and negatively correlated with traumatic burden show a similar strong signal of immune function among the PTSD affected. The observed epigenetic variability in immune function by PTSD is corroborated using an independent biologic marker of immune response to infection, CMV—a typically latent herpesvirus whose activity was significantly higher among those with PTSD. This report of peripheral epigenomic and CMV profiles associated with mental illness suggests a biologic model of PTSD etiology in which an externally experienced traumatic event induces downstream alterations in immune function by reducing methylation levels of immune-related genes. PMID:20439746

  7. Immune cell profiling to guide therapeutic decisions in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ermann, Joerg; Rao, Deepak A.; Teslovich, Nikola C.; Brenner, Michael B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are needed to guide treatment decisions for patients with rheumatic diseases. Although the phenotypic and functional analysis of immune cells is an appealing strategy for understanding immune-mediated disease processes, immune cell profiling currently has no role in clinical rheumatology. New technologies, including mass cytometry, gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and multiplexed functional assays, enable the analysis of immune cell function with unprecedented detail and promise not only a deeper understanding of pathogenesis, but also the discovery of novel biomarkers. The large and complex data sets generated by these technologies—big data—require specialized approaches for analysis and visualization of results. Standardization of assays and definition of the range of normal values are additional challenges when translating these novel approaches into clinical practice. In this Review, we discuss technological advances in the high-dimensional analysis of immune cells and consider how these developments might support the discovery of predictive biomarkers to benefit the practice of rheumatology and improve patient care. PMID:26034835

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  9. Immune profile of IgA-dominant diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Eric; Maillard, Nicolas; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Hall, Stacy; Fatima, Huma; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may be challenging, as it must be differentiated from that of active IgA nephropathy. Predominant clinicopathologic features of IgA-dominant PIGN substantially overlap with those of active IgA nephropathy. Here, we present a case of a 67-year-old woman with rapidly rising serum creatinine, proteinuria and severe hypertension. The kidney biopsy findings included some features of IgA-dominant PIGN while others were more consistent with classical IgA nephropathy. We describe this patient's immune profile at the time of acute kidney injury and review the literature regarding differentiation of the two entities.

  10. Immune profile of IgA-dominant diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Eric; Maillard, Nicolas; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Hall, Stacy; Fatima, Huma; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may be challenging, as it must be differentiated from that of active IgA nephropathy. Predominant clinicopathologic features of IgA-dominant PIGN substantially overlap with those of active IgA nephropathy. Here, we present a case of a 67-year-old woman with rapidly rising serum creatinine, proteinuria and severe hypertension. The kidney biopsy findings included some features of IgA-dominant PIGN while others were more consistent with classical IgA nephropathy. We describe this patient's immune profile at the time of acute kidney injury and review the literature regarding differentiation of the two entities. PMID:25878780

  11. Multiplex immune serum biomarker profiling in sarcoidosis and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beirne, P; Pantelidis, P; Charles, P; Wells, A U; Abraham, D J; Denton, C P; Welsh, K I; Shah, P L; du Bois, R M; Kelleher, P

    2009-12-01

    Multiplex protein technology has the potential to identify biomarkers for the differentiation, classification and improved understanding of the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether a 30-inflammatory biomarker panel could discriminate between healthy controls, sarcoidosis and systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients independently of other clinical indicators. We also evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers could differentiate between the presence or absence of lung fibrosis in SSc patients. We measured 30 circulating biomarkers in 20 SSc patients, 21 sarcoidosis patients and 20 healthy controls using Luminex bead technology and used Fisher's discriminant function analysis to establish the groups of classification mediators. There were significant differences in median concentration measurements between study groups for 20 of the mediators but with considerable range overlap between the groups, limiting group differentiation by single analyte measurements. However, a 17-analyte biomarker model correctly classified 90% of study individuals to their respective group and another 14-biomarker panel correctly identified the presence of lung fibrosis in SSc patients. These findings, if they are corroborated by independent studies in other centres, have potential for clinical application and may generate novel insights into the modulation of immune profiles during disease evolution. PMID:19541722

  12. Type 1 and type 2 immune response profiles of commercial dairy cows in 4 regions across Canada

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen A.; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of dairy cattle have adverse implications for both the dairy industry and animal welfare. Understanding adaptive immune response profiles of cattle on a national scale will provide insight into the potential for improving health and decreasing disease. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate immune response phenotypes of Holstein cows outside the peripartum period and to determine if antibody isotype bias to putative type 1 and type 2 test antigens is maintained. The cows, housed on commercial farms in 4 key dairy regions across Canada, were immunized with test antigens to measure their ability to mount cell-mediated immune responses (CMIR) and antibody-mediated immune responses (AMIR). Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) was used as an indicator of CMIR and primary and secondary serum antibodies of the immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 and IgG2 isotypes were used to determine AMIR to the test antigens. Immune response phenotypes varied significantly among regions, herds, and cows. Cows in Alberta had significantly higher DTH responses and secondary responses to the type 2 test antigen than those in other regions. However, cows in Alberta had significantly lower primary antibody responses. It was found that Alberta had the lowest incidence of mastitis caused by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus compared with other regions. The IgG1/IgG2 antibody isotype ratio confirmed the nature of the test antigens. This was the first study to evaluate adaptive immune response profiles and disease incidence of dairy cows on a national scale and it therefore provides a glimpse of the current situation in Canada. PMID:23024454

  13. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  14. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    PubMed

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  15. Proteomic profile of circulating immune complexes in chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, K; Huy, N T; Yoshimi, H; Kishikawa, N; Nishizawa, J E; Roca, Y; Revollo Guzmán, R J; Velarde, F U G; Kuroda, N; Hirayama, K

    2016-10-01

    Immune complexes (ICs) are the direct and real-time products of humoral immune responses. The identification of constituent foreign or autoantigens within ICs might bring new insights into the pathology of infectious diseases. We applied immune complexome analysis of plasma to the study of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Twenty seropositive plasma samples including cardiac and/or megacolon determinate patients (n = 11) and indeterminate (n = 9) were analysed along with 10 seronegative individuals to characterize the antigens bound to circulating ICs. We identified 39 T. cruzi antigens and 114 human autoantigens specific to patients with Chagas. Among those antigens, two T. cruzi antigens (surface protease GP63, glucose-6-isomerase) and six human autoantigens (CD180 antigen, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen beta chain, fibrinogen beta chain isoform 2 preprotein, isoform gamma-A of fibrinogen γ-chain, serum paraoxonase) were detected in more than 50% of the patients tested. Human isoform short of complement factor H-related protein 2 and trans-sialidase of T. cruzi were more frequently found in the indeterminate (5/9 for both) compared with in the determinate Chagas (0/11, P = 0·046 for human, 1/11, P = 0·0498 for T. cruzi). The immune complexome could illustrate the difference of immune status between clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease.

  16. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  17. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  18. Determining the significance of scale values from multidimensional scaling profile analysis using a resampling method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cody S

    2005-02-01

    Although multidimensional scaling (MDS) profile analysis is widely used to study individual differences, there is no objective way to evaluate the statistical significance of the estimated scale values. In the present study, a resampling technique (bootstrapping) was used to construct confidence limits for scale values estimated from MDS profile analysis. These bootstrap confidence limits were used, in turn, to evaluate the significance of marker variables of the profiles. The results from analyses of both simulation data and real data suggest that the bootstrap method may be valid and may be used to evaluate hypotheses about the statistical significance of marker variables of MDS profiles. PMID:16097342

  19. Age and genetic selection affect auto-immune profiles of chickens.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Henk K; Harms, Elmer; Lammers, Aart; Nieuwland, Mike G B

    2014-12-01

    Specificity, antibody isotype distribution and levels, of natural autoantibodies (NAAb) may be potential informative parameters for immune mediated natural disease resistance, immune modulation, and maintenance of physiological homeostasis. In a previous study we detected IgM and IgG antibodies to liver antigens in plasma from 1 year old chickens. Auto-immune profiles directed towards liver antigens differed between chicken lines divergently selected for specific antibody responses to sheep red blood cells. In the present study we measured the presence and typed levels and antibody isotypes (IgG and IgM) of NAAb binding the 'auto-antigen' complex chicken liver cell lysate (CLL) in plasma samples obtained from chickens at 5 weeks and at 1-year of age, respectively, by quantitative western blotting. Extensive staining patterns of plasma antibodies binding CLL were found for both isotypes and at both ages in all birds. At both ages, IgM and IgG bound similar numbers of CLL antigens, which remained almost constant for IgM, whereas the number of IgG stained bands in time was enhanced. Significant differences of binding patterns of NAAb (stained antigen fragments of CLL and staining intensity) were detected between the three different chicken lines at both ages and between both ages, and lines could be clustered on the basis of their auto-antibody profile. The present results indicate that analysis of the plasma NAAb repertoire of poultry like in mammals could provide a way of distinguishing differences of immune competence (as reflected by the selection criterion of antibody responses) between individuals and lines, and could provide tools to select individual birds for health and other traits. The age-dependency of the auto-immune profile suggest that such profiles may also reflect immune maturation, which should be taken into account when relating an auto-immune profile with other traits.

  20. A graphic method for projecting topographic profiles to various scales

    SciTech Connect

    Cluer, J.K. )

    1992-01-01

    This note describes the construction and application of a simple graphical technique for enlarging or reducing topographic profiles from contour maps of any scale. The technique, referred to as radial projection, relies on a few simple tools and mathematical operations whereby lines and index points are laid out on the contour map and linear projections of topographic contours from the map form enlarged or reduced topographic profiles in cross section.

  1. Characteristic Cytokine and Chemokine Profiles in Encephalitis of Infectious, Immune-Mediated, and Unknown Aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Benedict D.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Granerod, Julia; Brown, David; Davies, Nicholas W. S.; Borrow, Ray; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background Encephalitis is parenchymal brain inflammation due to infectious or immune-mediated processes. However, in 15–60% the cause remains unknown. This study aimed to determine if the cytokine/chemokine-mediated host response can distinguish infectious from immune-mediated cases, and whether this may give a clue to aetiology in those of unknown cause. Methods We measured 38 mediators in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients from the Health Protection Agency Encephalitis Study. Of serum from 78 patients, 38 had infectious, 20 immune-mediated, and 20 unknown aetiology. Of CSF from 37 patients, 20 had infectious, nine immune-mediated and eight unknown aetiology. Results Heat-map analysis of CSF mediator interactions was different for infectious and immune-mediated cases, and that of the unknown aetiology group was similar to the infectious pattern. Higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentrations were found in infectious than immune-mediated cases, in serum and CSF (p = 0.01 and p = 0.006). Serum MPO was also higher in unknown than immune-mediated cases (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis selected serum MPO; classifying 31 (91%) as infectious (p = 0.008) and 17 (85%) as unknown (p = 0.009) as opposed to immune-mediated. CSF data also selected MPO classifying 11 (85%) as infectious as opposed to immune-mediated (p = 0.036). CSF neutrophils were detected in eight (62%) infective and one (14%) immune-mediated cases (p = 0.004); CSF MPO correlated with neutrophils (p<0.0001). Conclusions Mediator profiles of infectious aetiology differed from immune-mediated encephalitis; and those of unknown cause were similar to infectious cases, raising the hypothesis of a possible undiagnosed infectious cause. Particularly, neutrophils and MPO merit further investigation. PMID:26808276

  2. Evaluating the Invariance of Cognitive Profile Patterns Derived from Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS): A Bootstrapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to validate the invariance of major profile patterns derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS) by bootstrapping. Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) was employed to obtain profiles and bootstrapping was used to construct the sampling distributions of the profile coordinates and the empirical…

  3. Expression profiling analysis of immune-related genes in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) skin mucus following Flavobacterium columnare challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yichao; Zhao, Honggang; Su, Baofeng; Peatman, Eric; Li, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Fish are covered by a watery gel-mucus, mainly secreted by the goblet cells, serving as the physical and biochemical barrier between the external environment and the interior milieu, playing more important roles in fish that without scale. Despite the important roles of mucus in fish immunity, the knowledge of detailed molecular events happened during infection process is still limited. While most studies were focused on characterizing the protein and enzyme activities in the mucus following challenge, no studies have examined the gene expression profiles in fish mucus. In this regard, herein we carried out the first gene profiling analysis in catfish mucus using real-time PCR. Ten important immune-related genes were selected according to our previous studies. Their expression levels were examined in the early timepoints (namely, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h) following Flavobacterium columnare challenge. Notably, expression levels of most of the selected genes were rapidly altered by the challenge. Seven genes were down-regulated, while only three genes were up-regulated. In addition, the gene expression patterns in mucus were very different from the mucosal surfaces (skin, gill and intestine) and the classical immune organs (liver, spleen and kidney). The unique expression patterns obtained here may be resulted from the great advantage of the large amount of attached bacteria in the mucus than the internal tissues, and resulted from the bacteria virulent actors to suppress the host immune response. Taken together, our results can expand our knowledge of fish mucosal immunity, and the un-lethal mucus sampling can provide early insight for developing the strategies for selection of disease resistant families and strains in catfish as well as other fish species. PMID:26220643

  4. Aberrant host immune response induced by highly virulent PRRSV identified by digital gene expression tag profiling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There was a large scale outbreak of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in China and Vietnam during 2006 and 2007 that resulted in unusually high morbidity and mortality among pigs of all ages. The mechanisms underlying the molecular pathogenesis of the highly virulent PRRS virus (H-PRRSV) remains unknown. Therefore, the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after H-PRRSV infection and infection pathology were analyzed in this study using high-throughput deep sequencing and histopathology. Results H-PRRSV infection resulted in severe lung pathology. The results indicate that aberrant host innate immune responses to H-PRRSV and induction of an anti-apoptotic state could be responsible for the aggressive replication and dissemination of H-PRRSV. Prolific rapid replication of H-PRRSV could have triggered aberrant sustained expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines leading to a markedly robust inflammatory response compounded by significant cell death and increased oxidative damage. The end result was severe tissue damage and high pathogenicity. Conclusions The systems analysis utilized in this study provides a comprehensive basis for better understanding the pathogenesis of H-PRRSV. Furthermore, it allows the genetic components involved in H-PRRSV resistance/susceptibility in swine populations to be identified. PMID:20929578

  5. Characterization of the immune inflammatory profile in obese asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Simone, Maria; Altamura, Maria; Munno, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and obesity are two common disorders often associated in children and characterized by an inflammatory status. Growing evidences support a connection between obesity and asthma since weight reduction can improve asthmatic symptoms. In this study, we have enrolled eighty children: 17 non asthmatics and non obese, 19 obese, 28 asthmatics-obese and, 16 asthmatics non-obese, respectively. In all participants, respiratory functional tests and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. Moreover, systemic inflammation of biomarkers such as T helper (h)1-type, Th2-type and T regulatory-type serum cytokines along with major adipokines was determined. Data will show that the association between asthma and obesity leads to a predominant Th1-type response with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. This inflammatory profile in asthmatics-obese children is sustained by elevated serum levels of leptin and visfatin, while adiponectin concentration is rather diminished. Finally, levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers positively correlate with the increase in BMI values in all population subgroups.

  6. Immune response profiles after caterpillar exposure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Norowitz, Kevin B; Kohlhoff, Stephan; Kalra, Kaushal; Chice, Seto; Bluth, Martin H

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The role of the immune response to caterpillar exposure is not well described. This case study is the first to report a patient who presented with an allergic reaction after exposure to the larvae of the sycamore tussock moth, Halysidota harrisii Walsh, 1864. Methods Blood was collected from an allergic asthmatic adult (m/42 y/o) at 2 hrs – 2 wks after contact urticaria with associated dyspnea after exposure to the larvae of the sycamore tussock moth, Halysidota harrisii Walsh, 1864. Distributions of blood lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD60+, CD19+, CD23+, CD16/56+, CD25, CD45RA+, CD45RO+), monocytes (CD1d+), levels of serum immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE), and cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α) were studied (flow cytometry, nephelometry, UniCAP Total IgE Fluoroenzymeimmunoassay, cytokine ELISA, clinical toxicology). Results Numbers of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ cells, CD19+ B cells, and CD1d+ monocytes decreased (22, 27, 33, 20%, respectively) one week post reaction, CD45RA+ naïve T cells decreased at 36 hours (21%),while CD8+CD60+ T cells and CD23+ cells decreased 48 hrs (33, 74%, respectively) post reaction. In contrast, numbers of CD16/56+ NK precursor cells increased (60%) 12 hrs, then decreased (65%) 48 hrs post reaction; other lymphocyte subsets were unaffected. Serum IgM, IgG and IgA were within normal range; however, serum IgE demonstrated a bimodal elevation at 2 hrs (15%) and one week post reaction. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, and TNF-α were not detected in serum pre-exposure (<1.0–4.0 pg/mL). However, high levels of IFN-γ (187–319 pg/mL) and TNF-α (549–749 pg/mL) were detected in serum 24–36 hrs and 3.5–24 hrs post reaction, respectively. In contrast, levels of IL-4 were undetected (<1.0 pg/mL) in serum at all time points. Conclusions Exposure to the larvae of the sycamore tussock moth, Halysidota harrisii Walsh, 1864 may result in increased cytokine levels and blood CD16/56+ NK precursor cells. PMID:22096356

  7. Immune response in human visceral leishmaniasis: analysis of the correlation between innate immunity cytokine profile and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Peruhype-Magalhães, V; Martins-Filho, O A; Prata, A; Silva, L de A; Rabello, A; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Figueiredo, R M; Guimarães-Carvalho, S F; Ferrari, T C A; Correa-Oliveira, R

    2005-11-01

    We investigated the cytokine profile of cells of the innate immune response and its association with active (ACT), asymptomatic (AS) and cured (CUR) human visceral leishmaniasis (VL), as well as noninfected (NI) subjects. The frequency of cytokine-producing cells was determined after short-term in vitro incubation of whole peripheral blood samples with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA). Our data demonstrated a predominant type 2 cytokine profile in NI and ACT. In NI, we observed an increase of IL-4+ neutrophils, IL-10+ eosinophils besides a decrease of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha+ eosinophils/monocytes. Yet in ACT, we observed an increase of IL-4+ neutrophils and natural killer (NK) cells and IL-10+ monocytes, a reduced frequency of IL-12+ and IFN-gamma+ eosinophils and lower levels of TNF-alpha+ and IL-12+ monocytes. AS presented a mixed profile, characterized by an increase of IFN-gamma+ neutrophils/eosinophils and NK cells, of IL-12+ eosinophils/monocytes, as well as increase of IL-4+ neutrophils and NK cells and IL-10+ eosinophils/monocytes. In contrast, CUR was characterized by a type 1 response with an increase of IFN-gamma+ neutrophils/eosinophils and NK cells, associated with an increase in IL-12+ monocytes. In conclusion, we show a correlation between innate immune cytokine patterns and clinical status of VL, suggesting that these cells, in addition to other factors, may contribute to the cytokine microenvironment in which Leishmania-specific T cells are primed and to disease outcome.

  8. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-04-15

    Two mechanisms at the origin of profile consistency in models of electrostatic turbulence in magnetized plasmas are considered. One involves turbulent diffusion in collisionless plasmas and the subsequent turbulent equipartition of Lagrangian invariants. By the very nature of its definition, this state can only be reached in the absence of imposed fluxes of the transported quantities. As such, the concept of turbulent equipartition cannot be used to interpret profiles in numerical simulations of interchange modes, as it has nevertheless been done in the past. It is shown in this article that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar 'magnetic flux expulsion' in magnetohydrodynamics. This expulsion process involves a 'pinch' across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer and thus the transport scaling at large Rayleigh numbers. This contradicts mixing-length arguments which do not account for collisional processes. For interchange modes, the problem of coherent structure formation, profile consistency, and transport scaling are thus intimately linked.

  9. Immune Neuroendocrine Phenotypes in Coturnix coturnix: Do Avian Species Show LEWIS/FISCHER-Like Profiles?

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, F. Nicolas; Barrios, Bibiana E.; Kaiser, Pete; Marin, Raul H.; Correa, Silvia G.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoneuroendocrinology studies have identified conserved communicational paths in birds and mammals, e.g. the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis with anti-inflammatory activity mediated by glucocorticoids. Immune neuroendocrine phenotypes (INPs) have been proposed for mammals implying the categorization of a population in subgroups underlying divergent immune-neuroendocrine interactions. These phenotypes were studied in the context of the LEWIS/FISCHER paradigm (rats expressing high or low pro-inflammatory profiles, respectively). Although avian species have some common immunological mechanisms with mammals, they have also evolved some distinct strategies and, until now, it has not been studied whether birds may also share with mammals similar INPs. Based on corticosterone levels we determined the existence of two divergent groups in Coturnix coturnix that also differed in other immune-neuroendocrine responses. Quail with lowest corticosterone showed higher lymphoproliferative and antibody responses, interferon-γ and interleukin-1β mRNA expression levels and lower frequencies of leukocyte subpopulations distribution and interleukin-13 levels, than their higher corticosterone counterparts. Results suggest the existence of INPs in birds, comparable to mammalian LEWIS/FISCHER profiles, where basal corticosterone also underlies responses of comparable variables associated to the phenotypes. Concluding, INP may not be a mammalian distinct feature, leading to discuss whether these profiles represent a parallel phenomenon evolved in birds and mammals, or a common feature inherited from a reptilian ancestor millions of years ago. PMID:25793369

  10. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  11. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  12. Transcriptional profiling of vaccine‐induced immune responses in humans and non‐human primates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I‐Ming; Bett, Andrew J.; Cristescu, Razvan; Loboda, Andrey; ter Meulen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for pre‐clinical and clinical biomarkers predictive of vaccine immunogenicity, efficacy and safety to reduce the risks and costs associated with vaccine development. Results emerging from immunoprofiling studies in non‐human primates and humans demonstrate clearly that (i) type and duration of immune memory are largely determined by the magnitude and complexity of the innate immune signals and (ii) genetic signatures highly predictive of B‐cell and T‐cell responses can be identified for specific vaccines. For vaccines with similar composition, e.g. live attenuated viral vaccines, these signatures share common patterns. Signatures predictive of vaccine efficacy have been identified in a few experimental challenge studies. This review aims to give an overview of the current literature on immunoprofiling studies in humans and also presents some of our own data on profiling of licensed and experimental vaccines in non‐human primates. PMID:22103427

  13. Unique transcriptional profile of liver-resident memory CD8+ T cells induced by immunization with malaria sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Sze-Wah; Cockburn, Ian A.; Zhang, Hao; Scott, Alan L.; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-01-01

    Sterile immunity against live Plasmodium infection can be achieved by immunization with radiation attenuated sporozoites. This protection is known to be mediated in part by antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cells, presumably those residing in the liver. We characterized and compared the transcriptional profile of parasite-specific memory CD8+ T cells residing in the liver and spleen after immunization of mice with irradiated sporozoites. Microarray-based expression analysis of these memory CD8+ T cells indicated that liver resident memory cells display a distinct gene expression profile. We found major differences in the expression of immune function genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle, cell trafficking, transcription and intracellular signaling. Importantly, the malaria parasite-induced liver resident CD8+ T cells display a transcriptional profile different to that described for CD8+ T cells following other microbial challenges. PMID:23594961

  14. Expression profiling of constitutive mast cells reveals a unique identity within the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel F.; Barrett, Nora A.; Austen, K. Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are evolutionarily ancient sentinel cells. Like basophils, mast cells express the high-affinity IgE receptor and are implicated in host defense and diverse immune-mediated diseases. To better characterize the function of these cells, we assessed the transcriptional profiles of mast cells isolated from peripheral connective tissues and basophils isolated from spleen and blood. We found that mast cells were transcriptionally distinct, clustering independently from all other profiled cells, and that mast cells demonstrated considerably greater heterogeneity across tissues than previously appreciated. We observed minimal homology between mast cells and basophils, which share more overlap with other circulating granulocytes than with mast cells. Derivation of mast cell and basophil transcriptional signatures underscores their differential capacity to detect environmental signals and influence the inflammatory milieu. PMID:27135604

  15. Multi-analyte profile analysis of plasma immune proteins: altered expression of peripheral immune factors is associated with neuropsychiatric symptom severity in adults with and without chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huckans, Marilyn; Fuller, Bret E; Olavarria, Hannah; Sasaki, Anna W; Chang, Michael; Flora, Kenneth D; Kolessar, Michael; Kriz, Daniel; Anderson, Jeanne R; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Loftis, Jennifer M

    2014-03-01

    BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to characterize hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated differences in the expression of 47 inflammatory factors and to evaluate the potential role of peripheral immune activation in HCV-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms-depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. An additional objective was to evaluate the role of immune factor dysregulation in the expression of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms to identify biomarkers that may be relevant to the treatment of these neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with or without HCV. MethodsBlood samples and neuropsychiatric symptom severity scales were collected from HCV-infected adults (HCV+, n = 39) and demographically similar noninfected controls (HCV-, n = 40). Multi-analyte profile analysis was used to evaluate plasma biomarkers. ResultsCompared with HCV- controls, HCV+ adults reported significantly (P < 0.050) greater depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain, and they were more likely to present with an increased inflammatory profile as indicated by significantly higher plasma levels of 40% (19/47) of the factors assessed (21%, after correcting for multiple comparisons). Within the HCV+ group, but not within the HCV- group, an increased inflammatory profile (indicated by the number of immune factors > the LDC) significantly correlated with depression, anxiety, and pain. Within the total sample, neuropsychiatric symptom severity was significantly predicted by protein signatures consisting of 4-10 plasma immune factors; protein signatures significantly accounted for 19-40% of the variance in depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. ConclusionsOverall, the results demonstrate that altered expression of a network of plasma immune factors contributes to neuropsychiatric symptom severity. These findings offer new biomarkers to potentially facilitate pharmacotherapeutic development and to increase our understanding of the molecular pathways associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms in

  16. Multi-analyte profile analysis of plasma immune proteins: altered expression of peripheral immune factors is associated with neuropsychiatric symptom severity in adults with and without chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huckans, Marilyn; Fuller, Bret E; Olavarria, Hannah; Sasaki, Anna W; Chang, Michael; Flora, Kenneth D; Kolessar, Michael; Kriz, Daniel; Anderson, Jeanne R; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Loftis, Jennifer M

    2014-03-01

    BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to characterize hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated differences in the expression of 47 inflammatory factors and to evaluate the potential role of peripheral immune activation in HCV-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms-depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. An additional objective was to evaluate the role of immune factor dysregulation in the expression of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms to identify biomarkers that may be relevant to the treatment of these neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with or without HCV. MethodsBlood samples and neuropsychiatric symptom severity scales were collected from HCV-infected adults (HCV+, n = 39) and demographically similar noninfected controls (HCV-, n = 40). Multi-analyte profile analysis was used to evaluate plasma biomarkers. ResultsCompared with HCV- controls, HCV+ adults reported significantly (P < 0.050) greater depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain, and they were more likely to present with an increased inflammatory profile as indicated by significantly higher plasma levels of 40% (19/47) of the factors assessed (21%, after correcting for multiple comparisons). Within the HCV+ group, but not within the HCV- group, an increased inflammatory profile (indicated by the number of immune factors > the LDC) significantly correlated with depression, anxiety, and pain. Within the total sample, neuropsychiatric symptom severity was significantly predicted by protein signatures consisting of 4-10 plasma immune factors; protein signatures significantly accounted for 19-40% of the variance in depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. ConclusionsOverall, the results demonstrate that altered expression of a network of plasma immune factors contributes to neuropsychiatric symptom severity. These findings offer new biomarkers to potentially facilitate pharmacotherapeutic development and to increase our understanding of the molecular pathways associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms in

  17. Multi-analyte profile analysis of plasma immune proteins: altered expression of peripheral immune factors is associated with neuropsychiatric symptom severity in adults with and without chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Huckans, Marilyn; Fuller, Bret E; Olavarria, Hannah; Sasaki, Anna W; Chang, Michael; Flora, Kenneth D; Kolessar, Michael; Kriz, Daniel; Anderson, Jeanne R; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Loftis, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to characterize hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated differences in the expression of 47 inflammatory factors and to evaluate the potential role of peripheral immune activation in HCV-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms—depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. An additional objective was to evaluate the role of immune factor dysregulation in the expression of specific neuropsychiatric symptoms to identify biomarkers that may be relevant to the treatment of these neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with or without HCV. Methods Blood samples and neuropsychiatric symptom severity scales were collected from HCV-infected adults (HCV+, n = 39) and demographically similar noninfected controls (HCV−, n = 40). Multi-analyte profile analysis was used to evaluate plasma biomarkers. Results Compared with HCV− controls, HCV+ adults reported significantly (P < 0.050) greater depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain, and they were more likely to present with an increased inflammatory profile as indicated by significantly higher plasma levels of 40% (19/47) of the factors assessed (21%, after correcting for multiple comparisons). Within the HCV+ group, but not within the HCV− group, an increased inflammatory profile (indicated by the number of immune factors > the LDC) significantly correlated with depression, anxiety, and pain. Within the total sample, neuropsychiatric symptom severity was significantly predicted by protein signatures consisting of 4–10 plasma immune factors; protein signatures significantly accounted for 19–40% of the variance in depression, anxiety, fatigue, and pain. Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrate that altered expression of a network of plasma immune factors contributes to neuropsychiatric symptom severity. These findings offer new biomarkers to potentially facilitate pharmacotherapeutic development and to increase our understanding of the molecular pathways associated with neuropsychiatric

  18. Comprehensive molecular profiling of the B7 family of immune-regulatory ligands in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenyu; Shen, Jing; Wang, Maggie Haitian; Yi, Tao; Yu, Yangyang; Zhu, Yinxin; Chen, Bo; Chen, Jianping; Li, Longfei; Li, Minxing; Zuo, Jian; Jiang, Hui; Zhou, Dexi; Luan, Jiajie; Xiao, Zhangang

    2016-08-01

    The B7 gene family has crucial roles in the regulation of adaptive cellular immunity. In cancer, deregulation of co-inhibitory B7 molecules is associated with reduced antitumor immunity and cancer immune evasion. FDA approval of cancer immunotherapy antibodies against cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-both ligands of the B7 family-demonstrate the impact of these checkpoint regulators in cancer. Using data from cBioPortal, we performed comprehensive molecular profiling of the 10 currently known B7 family proteins in 105 different cancers. B7 family members were amplified in breast cancer: with B7 mRNA levels upregulated in a cohort of 1,098 patients with all types of breast cancer and in 82 patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Promoter methylation analysis indicated an epigenetic basis for deregulation of certain B7 family genes in breast cancer. Moreover, patients with B7-H6 genomic alterations had significantly worse overall survival, and certain clinical attributes were associated with B7-H6 expression, which indicates that B7-H6 may be a potential target for breast cancer immunotherapy. Finally, using network analysis (based on data from cBioportal), we identified BTLA, MARCH8, PLSCR1 and SMAD3 as potentially involved in T cell signaling under regulation of B7 family proteins. PMID:27622076

  19. Transcriptome profiling of immune tissues reveals habitat-specific gene expression between lake and river sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Chain, Frédéric J J; Panchal, Mahesh; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Kalbe, Martin; Lenz, Tobias L; Samonte, Irene E; Stoll, Monika; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Milinski, Manfred; Feulner, Philine G D

    2016-02-01

    The observation of habitat-specific phenotypes suggests the action of natural selection. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) has repeatedly colonized and adapted to diverse freshwater habitats across the northern hemisphere since the last glaciation, while giving rise to recurring phenotypes associated with specific habitats. Parapatric lake and river populations of sticklebacks harbour distinct parasite communities, a factor proposed to contribute to adaptive differentiation between these ecotypes. However, little is known about the transcriptional response to the distinct parasite pressure of those fish in a natural setting. Here, we sampled wild-caught sticklebacks across four geographical locations from lake and river habitats differing in their parasite load. We compared gene expression profiles between lake and river populations using 77 whole-transcriptome libraries from two immune-relevant tissues, the head kidney and the spleen. Differential expression analyses revealed 139 genes with habitat-specific expression patterns across the sampled population pairs. Among the 139 differentially expressed genes, eight are annotated with an immune function and 42 have been identified as differentially expressed in previous experimental studies in which fish have been immune challenged. Together, these findings reinforce the hypothesis that parasites contribute to adaptation of sticklebacks in lake and river habitats.

  20. Regulation of chicken immunity-related genes and host response profiles against Avibacterium paragallinarum pathogen challenge.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Charlotte E; Theron, Chrispian W; Hitzeroth, Arina C; Bragg, Robert R

    2015-09-15

    Infectious coryza (IC) is a well-recognised and commonly encountered upper respiratory tract disease in chickens. The aim of this study was to monitor aspects of the immune response of chickens infected with Avibacterium paragallinarum. Gene expression profiling of 30 genes was carried out for 11 chicken nasal area samples belonging to four groups, including one non-infected control group. For this purpose, 30 biomarker transcripts were selected for comparative gene expression analysis and were analysed by real-time PCR using TaqMan(®) assays. The biomarkers included three reference genes. The reference genes were used to normalise the results in a relative quantification approach. The gene expression changes of the 27 biomarker transcripts (genes of interest) were quantified between all treated groups in six pair-wise comparisons. It was concluded from the data that immune response initiation is via TLR4, which leads to a Th2 dominant type response. Furthermore, TLR4 results in signalling via the MyD88-dependent pathway, resulting in early onset of NF-kβ leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. This work provides an informative outlay of immune response initiation upon infection with this pathogen.

  1. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shone, Clifford C.; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E.; Edwards, Laura J.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. PMID:26178385

  2. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J. A.; Islam, M. M.; Ahmed, S. T.; Mun, H. S.; Kim, G. M.; Kim, Y. J.; Yang, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  3. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. PMID:25300922

  4. Sparse detector sensor: profiling experiments for broad-scale classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomanno, D. J.; Yeasin, M.; Jacobs, E.; Smith, M.; Sorower, S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a simple prototype sparse detector imaging sensor built using sixteen off-the-shelf, retro-reflective, infrared-sensing elements placed at five-inch intervals in a vertical configuration. Profiling experiments for broad-scale classification of objects, such as humans, humans wearing large backpacks, and humans wearing small backpacks were conducted from data acquired from the sensor. Empirical analysis on models developed using fusion of various classifiers based on a diversity measure shows over ninety percent (90.07%) accuracy (using 10-fold cross validation) in categorizing sensed data into specific classes of interest, such as, humans wearing a large backpack. The results demonstrate that shadow images of sufficient resolution can be captured by the sensor such that broad-scale classification of objects is feasible. The sensor appears to be a low-cost alternative to traditional, high-resolution imaging sensors, and, after industrial packaging, it may be a good candidate for deployment in vast geographic regions in which low-cost, unattended ground sensors with highly accurate classification algorithms are needed.

  5. Transcriptome profiling and functional analyses of the zebrafish embryonic innate immune response to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Stockhammer, Oliver W; Zakrzewska, Anna; Hegedûs, Zoltán; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2009-05-01

    Due to the clear separation of innate immunity from adaptive responses, the externally developing zebrafish embryo represents a useful in vivo model for identification of innate host determinants of the response to bacterial infection. Here we performed a time-course transcriptome profiling study and gene ontology analysis of the embryonic innate immune response to infection with two model Salmonella strains that elicit either a lethal infection or an attenuated response. The transcriptional response to infection with both the lethal strain and the avirulent LPS O-Ag mutant strain showed clear conservation with host responses detected in other vertebrate models and human cells, including induction of genes encoding cell surface receptors, signaling intermediates, transcription factors, and inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, our study led to the identification of a large set of novel immune response genes and infection markers, the future functional characterization of which will support vertebrate genome annotation. From the time series and bacterial strain comparisons, matrix metalloproteinase genes, including mmp9, were among the most consistent infection-responsive genes. Purified Salmonella flagellin also strongly induced mmp9 expression. Using knockdown analysis, we showed that this gene was downstream of the zebrafish homologs of the flagellin receptor TLR5 and the adaptor MyD88. Additionally, flagellin-mediated induction of other inflammation markers, including il1b, il8, and cxcl-C1c, was reduced upon Tlr5 knockdown as well as expression of irak3, a putative negative TLR pathway regulator. Finally, we showed that induction of il1b, mmp9, and irak3 requires Myd88-dependent signaling, while ifn1 and il8 were induced Myd88 independently during Salmonella infection. PMID:19380811

  6. Predicting and comparing long-term measles antibody profiles of different immunization policies.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. S.; Nokes, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Measles outbreaks are infrequent and localized in areas with high coverage of measles vaccine. The need is to assess long-term effectiveness of coverage. Since 1991, no measles epidemic affecting the whole island has occurred in Taiwan, China. Epidemiological models are developed to predict the long-term measles antibody profiles and compare the merits of different immunization policies on the island. METHODS: The current measles immunization policy in Taiwan, China, is 1 dose of measles vaccine at 9 months of age and 1 dose of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine at 15 months of age, plus a 'mop-up' of MMR-unvaccinated schoolchildren at 6 years of age. Refinements involve a change to a two-dose strategy. Five scenarios based on different vaccination strategies are compared. The models are analysed using Microsoft Excel. FINDINGS: First, making the assumption that measles vaccine-induced immunity will not wane, the predicted measles IgG seroprevalences in preschool children range from 81% (lower bound) to 94% (upper bound) and in schoolchildren reach 97-98% in all strategy scenarios. Results are dependent on the association of vaccine coverage between the first and second dose of vaccine. Second, if it is assumed that vaccine-induced antibody titres decay, the long-term measles seroprevalence will depend on the initial titres post vaccination, decay rates of antibody titres and cut-off of seropositivity. CONCLUSION: If MMR coverage at 12 months of age can reach > 90%, it would be worth changing the current policy to 2 doses at 12 months and 6 years of age to induce higher antibody titres. These epidemiological models could be applied wherever a similar stage of measles elimination has been reached. PMID:11477964

  7. Identification of novel biomarkers in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) by microarray-based serum protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bal, Gürkan; Futschik, Matthias E; Hartl, Daniela; Ringel, Frauke; Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Sterzer, Viktor; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2016-02-01

    The pathological mechanisms underlying the development of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are unclear and its diagnosis remains a process of exclusion. Currently, there are no known specific biomarkers for ITP to support differential diagnosis and treatment decisions. Profiling of serum proteins may be valuable for identifying such biomarkers. Sera from 46 patients with primary chronic ITP and 34 healthy blood donors were analysed using a microarray of 755 antibodies. We identified 161 differentially expressed proteins. In addition to oncoproteins and tumour-suppressor proteins, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), Fanconi anaemia complementation group C (FANCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), we detected six anti-nuclear autoantibodies in a subset of ITP patients: anti-PCNA, anti-SmD, anti-Ro/SSA60, anti-Ro/SSA52, anti-La/SSB and anti-RNPC antibodies. This finding may provide a rational explanation for the association of ITP with malignancies and other autoimmune diseases. While RUNX1mRNA expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients was significantly downregulated, an accumulation of RUNX1 protein was observed in the platelets of ITP patients. This may indicate dysregulation of RUNX1 expression in PBMC and megakaryocytes and may lead to an imbalanced immune response and impaired thrombopoiesis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of ITP that warrant further exploration.

  8. Identification of novel biomarkers in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) by microarray-based serum protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bal, Gürkan; Futschik, Matthias E; Hartl, Daniela; Ringel, Frauke; Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Sterzer, Viktor; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2016-02-01

    The pathological mechanisms underlying the development of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are unclear and its diagnosis remains a process of exclusion. Currently, there are no known specific biomarkers for ITP to support differential diagnosis and treatment decisions. Profiling of serum proteins may be valuable for identifying such biomarkers. Sera from 46 patients with primary chronic ITP and 34 healthy blood donors were analysed using a microarray of 755 antibodies. We identified 161 differentially expressed proteins. In addition to oncoproteins and tumour-suppressor proteins, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), Fanconi anaemia complementation group C (FANCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), we detected six anti-nuclear autoantibodies in a subset of ITP patients: anti-PCNA, anti-SmD, anti-Ro/SSA60, anti-Ro/SSA52, anti-La/SSB and anti-RNPC antibodies. This finding may provide a rational explanation for the association of ITP with malignancies and other autoimmune diseases. While RUNX1mRNA expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients was significantly downregulated, an accumulation of RUNX1 protein was observed in the platelets of ITP patients. This may indicate dysregulation of RUNX1 expression in PBMC and megakaryocytes and may lead to an imbalanced immune response and impaired thrombopoiesis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of ITP that warrant further exploration. PMID:26628061

  9. Large-scale and Convective-scale Updraft Profiles from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, H.; Luo, Z. J.

    2015-12-01

    Among the crucial problems involved in the tropical energy budget are the thermodynamic effects of an ensemble of convective clouds on their environment and the large-scale influence imposed back on the convective-scale dynamics. Efforts to seek observational evidence for this problem, however, are challenged by limitations in the capability of measuring vertical motion across different horizontal scales. We have recently been exploring new analysis strategies in hopes to make this seemingly impossible possible, exploiting a suite of satellite instruments including the CloudSat and TRMM radars and Aqua AIRS. Since a complete vertical structure of in-cloud vertical velocity, wc, is unable to be reconstructed from satellite measurements alone, a single-column plume model is run with the environmental soundings from AIRS to obtain a set of synthetic wc profiles under a range of entrainment rates. The solutions are then narrowed down in a Bayesian manner so as to match the cloud-top vertical velocity and buoyancy estimates from A-Train infrared and radar measurements. The vertical profile of large-scale mean vertical motion, ω, is also evaluated from satellite observations in its own approach: ω as a function of pressure is determined so that it satisfies the horizontal divergence terms in the tropospheric water and thermal budget equations in which the remaining terms are constrained by satellite measurements. In this talk, the methodology is briefly outlined and the results are presented and discussed in light of outstanding issues in tropical dynamics. The wc and ω estimates above, although subject to intrinsic uncertainties yet to be verified, do not involve any closure assumption as required for cumulus parameterizations and would offer a useful test bed for climate models and reanalysis data as well as a unique opportunity to study the mechanism of tropical convection.

  10. Transcriptome profiling of immune responses to cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) in Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) is a disease associated with severe myocarditis primarily in adult farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), caused by a double-stranded RNA virus named piscine myocarditis virus (PMCV) with structural similarities to the Totiviridae family. Here we present the first characterisation of host immune responses to CMS assessed by microarray transcriptome profiling. Results Unvaccinated farmed Atlantic salmon post-smolts were infected by intraperitoneal injection of PMCV and developed cardiac pathology consistent with CMS. From analysis of heart samples at several time points and different tissues at early and clinical stages by oligonucleotide microarrays (SIQ2.0 chip), six gene sets representing a broad range of immune responses were identified, showing significant temporal and spatial regulation. Histopathological examination of cardiac tissue showed myocardial lesions from 6 weeks post infection (wpi) that peaked at 8-9 wpi and was followed by a recovery. Viral RNA was detected in all organs from 4 wpi suggesting a broad tissue tropism. High correlation between viral load and cardiac histopathology score suggested that cytopathic effect of infection was a major determinant of the myocardial changes. Strong and systemic induction of antiviral and IFN-dependent genes from 2 wpi that levelled off during infection, was followed by a biphasic activation of pathways for B cells and MHC antigen presentation, both peaking at clinical pathology. This was preceded by a distinct cardiac activation of complement at 6 wpi, suggesting a complement-dependent activation of humoral Ab-responses. Peak of cardiac pathology and viral load coincided with cardiac-specific upregulation of T cell response genes and splenic induction of complement genes. Preceding the reduction in viral load and pathology, these responses were probably important for viral clearance and recovery. Conclusions By comparative analysis of gene expression, histology and

  11. The substance use risk profile scale: a scale measuring traits linked to reinforcement-specific substance use profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Woicik, P.A.; Stewart, S.H.; Pihl, R.O.; Conrod, P.J.

    2009-12-01

    The Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) is based on a model of personality risk for substance abuse in which four personality dimensions (hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) are hypothesized to differentially relate to specific patterns of substance use. The current series of studies is a preliminary exploration of the psychometric properties of the SURPS in two populations (undergraduate and high school students). In study 1, an analysis of the internal structure of two versions of the SURPS shows that the abbreviated version best reflects the 4-factor structure. Concurrent, discriminant, and incremental validity of the SURPS is supported by convergent/divergent relationships between the SURPS subscales and other theoretically relevant personality and drug use criterion measures. In Study 2, the factorial structure of the SURPS is confirmed and evidence is provided for its test-retest reliability and validity with respect to measuring personality vulnerability to reinforcement-specific substance use patterns. In Study 3, the SURPS was administered in a more youthful population to test its sensitivity in identifying younger problematic drinkers. The results from the current series of studies demonstrate support for the reliability and construct validity of the SURPS, and suggest that four personality dimensions may be linked to substance-related behavior through different reinforcement processes. This brief assessment tool may have important implications for clinicians and future research.

  12. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The processes of weaning and exposure to pathogenic bacteria induce stress responses, which may alter the metabolism. In this study, we investigated the changes in plasma metabolites and immune responses in piglets in response to the stress induced by weaning and Escherichia coli challenge. Results Fecal dry matter decreased (P = 0.003) and nearly half (44.4%) the piglets developed diarrhea on day 2 and 3 postweaning. The concentration of plasma immunoglobulin A was higher (P < 0.001) on day 11 postweaning than on day 0 or 4 postweaning. The levels of white blood cells increased continuously (P < 0.001) from day 0 to day 11 postweaning. Differences in the percentages of neutrophils (P = 0.029) and lymphocytes (P = 0.022) were seen, but the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio did not differ in the period after weaning. A clear separation of the metabolomic profile data for day 0 and day 4 postweaning was observed with a principal components analysis (PCA) scores plot, and the data for day 11 were located between those for day 0 and day 4 postweaning. The plasma levels of proline, taurine, and carnitine were higher, whereas those of betaine, creatine, L-arginine and acetylcarnitine were lower on day 4 postweaning than on day 0. Levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine were either higher or lower after weaning, depending on the chain lengths or characters of these metabolites. Conclusions Our results show a clear separation in the plasma metabolomic profiles of piglets that corresponded to the fecal responses to stress on the piglets induced by weaning or exposure to a pathogen (E. coli). These plasma metabolite profiles suggest that the challenges induced proinflammatory responses in the piglets, resulting in postweaning diarrhea, which was associated with higher concentrations of IgA in the plasma. PMID:24624922

  13. The Facial Affective Scale as a Predictor for Pain Unpleasantness When Children Undergo Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Finnström, Berit; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2014-01-01

    Needle fear is a common problem in children undergoing immunization. To ensure that the individual child's needs are met during a painful procedure it would be beneficial to be able to predict whether there is a need for extra support. The self-reporting instrument facial affective scale (FAS) could have potential for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the FAS can predict pain unpleasantness in girls undergoing immunization. Girls, aged 11-12 years, reported their expected pain unpleasantness on the FAS at least two weeks before and then experienced pain unpleasantness immediately before each vaccination. The experienced pain unpleasantness during the vaccination was also reported immediately after each immunization. The level of anxiety was similarly assessed during each vaccination and supplemented with stress measures in relation to the procedure in order to assess and evaluate concurrent validity. The results show that the FAS is valid to predict pain unpleasantness in 11-12-year-old girls who undergo immunizations and that it has the potential to be a feasible instrument to identify children who are in need of extra support to cope with immunization. In conclusion, the FAS measurement can facilitate caring interventions. PMID:24734174

  14. Genome-wide characterization and expression profiling of immune genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaofeng; Yu, Liying; Xue, Minqian; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Vasseur, Liette; Gurr, Geoff M.; Baxter, Simon W.; Lin, Hailan; Lin, Junhan; You, Minsheng

    2015-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is a destructive pest that attacks cruciferous crops worldwide. Immune responses are important for interactions between insects and pathogens and information on these underpins the development of strategies for biocontrol-based pest management. Little, however, is known about immune genes and their regulation patterns in P. xylostella. A total of 149 immune-related genes in 20 gene families were identified through comparison of P. xylostella genome with the genomes of other insects. Complete and conserved Toll, IMD and JAK-STAT signaling pathways were found in P. xylostella. Genes involved in pathogen recognition were expanded and more diversified than genes associated with intracellular signal transduction. Gene expression profiles showed that the IMD pathway may regulate expression of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes in the midgut, and be related to an observed down-regulation of AMPs in experimental lines of insecticide-resistant P. xylostella. A bacterial feeding study demonstrated that P. xylostella could activate different AMPs in response to bacterial infection. This study has established a framework of comprehensive expression profiles that highlight cues for immune regulation in a major pest. Our work provides a foundation for further studies on the functions of P. xylostella immune genes and mechanisms of innate immunity. PMID:25943446

  15. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  17. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  18. Large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ze-Yuan; Xia, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Quan-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Chan; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Cong-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is a recurrent fungal disease, and resistance to fungal infection is a complex trait. Therefore, a comprehensive examination of rice transcriptome and its variation during fungal infection is necessary to understand the complex gene regulatory networks. In this study, adopting Next-Generation Sequencing we profiled the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of rice varieties, one susceptible and the other resistant to M. oryzae, at multiple time points during the fungal infection. Our results revealed a substantial variation in the plant transcriptome and microRNAome as well as change to rice innate immunity during fungal infection. A number of putative R gene candidates were identified from a perturbed rice transcriptome analysis. The expression of genes and non-coding RNA molecules changed in both fungal resistant and susceptible plants during M. oryzae invasion discovered distinct pathways triggered in the susceptible and resistant plants. In addition, a number of fungus genes in the susceptible and resistant plants were constantly expressed at different time points, suggesting that they were likely to be the potential AVR genes. Our results revealed large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection, which would help to develop more robust blast-resistant rice plants. PMID:27150822

  19. Large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ze-Yuan; Xia, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Quan-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Chan; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Cong-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is a recurrent fungal disease, and resistance to fungal infection is a complex trait. Therefore, a comprehensive examination of rice transcriptome and its variation during fungal infection is necessary to understand the complex gene regulatory networks. In this study, adopting Next-Generation Sequencing we profiled the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of rice varieties, one susceptible and the other resistant to M. oryzae, at multiple time points during the fungal infection. Our results revealed a substantial variation in the plant transcriptome and microRNAome as well as change to rice innate immunity during fungal infection. A number of putative R gene candidates were identified from a perturbed rice transcriptome analysis. The expression of genes and non-coding RNA molecules changed in both fungal resistant and susceptible plants during M. oryzae invasion discovered distinct pathways triggered in the susceptible and resistant plants. In addition, a number of fungus genes in the susceptible and resistant plants were constantly expressed at different time points, suggesting that they were likely to be the potential AVR genes. Our results revealed large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection, which would help to develop more robust blast-resistant rice plants. PMID:27150822

  20. Comparison between impairment and disability scales in immune-mediated polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Merkies, Ingemar S J; Schmitz, Paul I M; Van Der Meché, Frans G A; Van Doorn, Pieter A

    2003-07-01

    The ability of a scale to detect clinical relevant changes over time, i.e., its "responsiveness," may help clinicians to choose among valid and reliable measures. Therefore, we investigated the responsiveness' rank ordering (best to worse) of six selected valid and reliable scales, namely the Medical Research Council (MRC)-sumscore, sensory-sumscore, grip-strength (Vigorimeter), nine-hole peg, ten-meters walking, and a disability-sumscore, in immune-mediated polyneuropathies. Patients with newly diagnosed Guillain-Barré syndrome (n = 7) or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 13) were examined over 52 weeks. Responsiveness of each scale was measured using different methods (effect-size, standardized response mean score, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank, and a newly devised Schmitz's distribution-free responsiveness score), and the obtained scores in each method were plotted against the follow-up period, thus allowing area-under-the-curve calculations (higher area-under-the-curve indicating better responsiveness). Also, longitudinal correlations were performed between the scales' values and patients' own clinical judgments (deteriorated, unchanged, improved) (higher correlation = better responsiveness). A consistent rank ordering was observed in each technique with the disability-sumscore, MRC-sumscore, and Vigorimeter being among the best responsive scales. Hence, the primary use of these measures is suggested in studies of immune-mediated polyneuropathies. PMID:12811779

  1. Transcription Profiling of Malaria-Naïve and Semi-immune Colombian Volunteers in a Plasmodium vivax Sporozoite Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Peña, Monica L.; Vallejo, Andres; Herrera, Sócrates; Gibson, Greg; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background Continued exposure to malaria-causing parasites in endemic regions of malaria induces significant levels of acquired immunity in adult individuals. A better understanding of the transcriptional basis for this acquired immunological response may provide insight into how the immune system can be boosted during vaccination, and into why infected individuals differ in symptomology. Methodology/Principal Findings Peripheral blood gene expression profiles of 9 semi-immune volunteers from a Plasmodium vivax malaria prevalent region (Buenaventura, Colombia) were compared to those of 7 naïve individuals from a region with no reported transmission of malaria (Cali, Colombia) after a controlled infection mosquito bite challenge with P. vivax. A Fluidigm nanoscale quantitative RT-PCR array was used to survey altered expression of 96 blood informative transcripts at 7 timepoints after controlled infection, and RNASeq was used to contrast pre-infection and early parasitemia timepoints. There was no evidence for transcriptional changes prior to the appearance of blood stage parasites at day 12 or 13, at which time there was a strong interferon response and, unexpectedly, down-regulation of transcripts related to inflammation and innate immunity. This differential expression was confirmed with RNASeq, which also suggested perturbations of aspects of T cell function and erythropoiesis. Despite differences in clinical symptoms between the semi-immune and malaria naïve individuals, only subtle differences in their transcriptomes were observed, although 175 genes showed significantly greater induction or repression in the naïve volunteers from Cali. Conclusion/Significance Gene expression profiling of whole blood reveals the type and duration of the immune response to P. vivax infection, and highlights a subset of genes that may mediate adaptive immunity. PMID:26244760

  2. Dynamic changes in immune cell profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Immunomodulatory effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Sakakura, Koichi; Mito, Ikko; Ida, Shota; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cells have evolved sophisticated means of escape from the host immune system. To date, several important immunological phenomena have been revealed in peripheral blood as well as within tumors. In the present study, we first investigated the proportion and activation status of peripheral immune regulatory cells and CD8(+) T-cell subsets in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a multicolor flow cytometer, and then evaluated how therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil modulated the immune cell profile in peripheral blood. The proportion of naïve T cells was lower and that of effector memory T cells (TEM ) was higher in HNSCC patients than in healthy donors. Moreover, the proportions of activated TEM cells and effector T cells (TEFF ) were dramatically increased in patients with advanced stage disease. The proportion of regulatory T cells and CD14(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid-derived suppressor cells was elevated in HNSCC patients. Of note, after therapy, in addition to the transient reduction in immune regulatory cells, decreases in central memory T cells and increases in TEFF cells were observed among CD8(+) T-cell subsets, suggesting differentiation from central memory T cells into TEFF cells. Our results suggested that, despite the immunosuppressive status in HNSCC patients, tumor-specific immune responses mediated by CD8(+) T cells might be induced and maintained. Moreover, chemotherapy can trigger not only a transient reduction in immune regulatory cells but also further activation of CD8(+) T cells. PMID:27228557

  3. Short communication: Cytokine profiles from blood mononuclear cells of dairy cows classified with divergent immune response phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Martin, C E; Paibomesai, M A; Emam, S M; Gallienne, J; Hine, B C; Thompson-Crispi, K A; Mallard, B A

    2016-03-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced immune response has been shown to decrease disease occurrence in dairy cattle. Cows can be classified as high (H), average, or low responders based on antibody-mediated immune response (AMIR), predominated by type-2 cytokine production, and cell-mediated immune response (CMIR) through estimated breeding values for these traits. The purpose of this study was to identify in vitro tests that correlate with in vivo immune response phenotyping in dairy cattle. Blood mononuclear cells (BMC) isolated from cows classified as H-AMIR and H-CMIR through estimated breeding values for immune response traits were stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA; Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) and gene expression, cytokine production, and cell proliferation was determined at multiple time points. A repeated measures model, which included the effects of immune response group, parity, and stage of lactation, was used to compare differences between immune response phenotype groups. The H-AMIR cows produced more IL-4 protein than H-CMIR cows at 48 h; however, no difference in gene expression of type-2 transcription factor GATA3 or IL4 was noted. The BMC from H-CMIR cows had increased production of IFN-γ protein at 48, 72, and 96 h compared with H-AMIR animals. Further, H-CMIR cows had increased expression of the IFNG gene at 16, 24, and 48 h post-treatment with ConA, although expression of the type-1 transcription factor gene TBX21 did not differ between immune response groups. Although proliferation of BMC increased from 24 to 72 h after ConA stimulation, no differences were found between the immune response groups. Overall, stimulation of H-AMIR and H-CMIR bovine BMC with ConA resulted in distinct cytokine production profiles according to genetically defined groups. These distinct cytokine profiles could be used to define disease resistance phenotypes in dairy cows according to stimulation in vitro; however, other immune response phenotypes should be assessed.

  4. Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents: Profiles of Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowder, Melissa H.; Cummings, Jack A.; McKinney, Robert

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study of resiliency profiles of male and female juvenile offenders committed to a juvenile correctional facility was conducted. The goal of the present study was to examine juvenile offenders' positive characteristics (e.g., adaptability, optimism, self-efficacy, tolerance of differences). To assess positive characteristics and…

  5. The Systemic Profile of Soluble Immune Mediators in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kittang, Astrid Olsnes; Sand, Kristoffer; Brenner, Annette Katharina; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by bone marrow failure due to disturbed bone marrow maturation. MDS is associated with increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and features of immunological dysregulation. Materials and methods: Serum levels of 47 soluble immune mediators were examined in samples derived from 49 MDS patients (35 low-risk and 14 high-risk) and 23 healthy adults. Our patients represent an unselected population-based cohort. The mediators included cytokines, soluble adhesion proteins, matrix metalloproteases, and tissue inhibitors of proteases. Levels were determined using Luminex assays. Patients were classified as low- and high-risk based on the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) score. Results: When comparing the serum levels of single mediators the MDS patients showed a relatively wide variation range for several mediators compared with healthy adults, especially interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8/CXCL8, CCL3, and CCL4. The high-risk patients had lower levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (CD40L), CCL5, CCL11, CXCL5, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2) compared with low-risk patients. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis visualized marked serum mediator profile differences between MDS patients; based on this analysis three patient subsets could be identified. The healthy adults were also included in this analysis and, as expected, they formed their own separate cluster, except for one outlier. Both low- and high-risk patients showed considerable heterogeneity with regard to serum profile, and this heterogeneity seems stable over time (one year follow-up). Finally, very few mediators differed between low- and high-risk patients, but hierarchical clustering based both on all mediators, as well as five selected mediators (EGF, CCL11, TIMP-2, MMP-1, and MMP-9) identified subsets of

  6. Oral immunization of rainbow trout to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (Ipnv) induces different immune gene expression profiles in head kidney and pyloric ceca.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Saint-Jean, Sylvia S Rodriguez; Encinas, Paloma A; Perez-Prieto, Sara I; Coll, Julio M

    2012-08-01

    Induction of neutralizing antibodies and protection by oral vaccination with DNA-alginates of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was recently reported. Because orally induced immune response transcript gene profiles had not been described yet neither in fish, nor after IPNV vaccination, we studied them in head kidney (an immune response internal organ) and a vaccine entry tissue (pyloric ceca). By using an oligo microarray enriched in immune-related genes validated by RTqPCR, the number of increased transcripts in head kidney was higher than in pyloric ceca while the number of decreased transcripts was higher in pyloric ceca than in head kidney. Confirming previous reports on intramuscular DNA vaccination or viral infection, mx genes increased their transcription in head kidney. Other transcript responses such as those corresponding to interferons, their receptors and induced proteins (n=91 genes), VHSV-induced genes (n=25), macrophage-related genes (n=125), complement component genes (n=176), toll-like receptors (n=31), tumor necrosis factors (n=32), chemokines and their receptors (n=121), interleukines and their receptors (n=119), antimicrobial peptides (n=59), and cluster differentiation antigens (n=58) showed a contrasting and often complementary behavior when head kidney and pyloric ceca were compared. For instance, classical complement component transcripts increased in head kidney while only alternative pathway transcripts increased in pyloric ceca, different β-defensins increased in head kidney but remained constant in pyloric ceca. The identification of new gene markers on head kidney/pyloric ceca could be used to follow up and/or to improve immunity during fish oral vaccination.

  7. Minimal residual disease monitoring and immune profiling in multiple myeloma in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Cedena, Maria-Teresa; Puig, Noemi; Arana, Paula; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Cordon, Lourdes; Flores-Montero, Juan; Gutierrez, Norma C; Martín-Ramos, María-Luisa; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Ocio, Enrique M; Hernandez, Miguel T; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Rosiñol, Laura; Echeveste, María-Asunción; Martinez, Rafael; Gironella, Mercedes; Oriol, Albert; Cabrera, Carmen; Martin, Jesus; Bargay, Joan; Encinas, Cristina; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Lahuerta, Juan José; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-06-23

    The value of minimal residual disease (MRD) in multiple myeloma (MM) has been more frequently investigated in transplant-eligible patients than in elderly patients. Because an optimal balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity is of utmost importance in patients with elderly MM, sensitive MRD monitoring might be particularly valuable in this patient population. Here, we used second-generation 8-color multiparameter-flow cytometry (MFC) to monitor MRD in 162 transplant-ineligible MM patients enrolled in the PETHEMA/GEM2010MAS65 study. The transition from first- to second-generation MFC resulted in increased sensitivity and allowed us to identify 3 patient groups according to MRD levels: MRD negative (<10(-5); n = 54, 34%), MRD positive (between <10(-4) and ≥10(-5); n = 20, 12%), and MRD positive (≥10(-4); n = 88, 54%). MRD status was an independent prognostic factor for time to progression (TTP) (hazard ratio [HR], 2.7; P = .007) and overall survival (OS) (HR, 3.1; P = .04), with significant benefit for MRD-negative patients (median TTP not reached, 70% OS at 3 years), and similar poorer outcomes for cases with MRD levels between <10(-4) and ≥10(-5) vs ≥10(-4) (both with a median TTP of 15 months; 63% and 55% OS at 3 years, respectively). Furthermore, MRD negativity significantly improved TTP of patients >75 years (HR, 4.8; P < .001), as well as those with high-risk cytogenetics (HR, 12.6; P = .01). Using second-generation MFC, immune profiling concomitant to MRD monitoring also contributed to identify patients with poor, intermediate, and favorable outcomes (25%, 61%, and 100% OS at 3 years, respectively; P = .01), the later patients being characterized by an increased compartment of mature B cells. Our results show that similarly to transplant candidates, MRD monitoring is one of the most relevant prognostic factors in elderly MM patients, irrespectively of age or cytogenetic risk. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01237249

  8. Autoantibody‐Positive Healthy Individuals Display Unique Immune Profiles That May Regulate Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Slight‐Webb, Samantha; Lu, Rufei; Ritterhouse, Lauren L.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Maecker, Holden T.; Fathman, Charles G.; Utz, Paul J.; Merrill, Joan T.; Guthridge, Joel M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are detected in ∼18% of females, yet autoimmune disease develops in only 5–8%. Immunologic differences between ANA‐positive healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may elucidate the regulatory mechanisms by which ANA‐positive individuals avoid transition to clinical autoimmune disease. Methods Healthy individuals (n = 790) were screened for autoantibodies specific for 11 antigens associated with lupus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome. From this screening, 31 European American ANA‐positive healthy individuals were selected and demographically matched to ANA‐negative controls and SLE patients. Serum cytokine profiles, leukocyte subset frequency, and reactivity were analyzed by multiplex assays, immunophenotyping, and phosphospecific flow cytometry. Results Of 790 individuals screened, 57 (7%) were ANA‐positive. The majority of proinflammatory cytokines, including interferon‐γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor, interleukin‐17 (IL‐17), and granulocyte colony‐stimulating factor, exhibited a stepwise increase in serum levels from ANA‐negative controls to ANA‐positive healthy individuals to SLE patients (P < 0.0001). IFNα, IFNβ, IL‐12p40, and stem cell factor/c‐Kit ligand were increased in SLE patients only (P < 0.05). B lymphocyte stimulator (BlyS) was elevated in SLE patients but decreased in ANA‐positive individuals (P < 0.001). Further, IL‐1 receptor antagonist (IL‐1Ra) was down‐regulated in SLE patients only (P < 0.0001). ANA‐positive individuals had increased frequencies of monocytes, memory B cells, and plasmablasts and increased levels of pSTAT‐1 and pSTAT‐3 following IFNα stimulation compared with ANA‐negative controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion ANA‐positive healthy individuals exhibit dysregulation in multiple immune pathways yet differ from SLE patients by the absence of elevated IFNs, BLyS, IL‐12p40, and stem cell factor

  9. Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Davies, Richard G; Phillips, Karl P; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess whether landscape-level differences in pathogen-mediated selection generate fine-scale spatial structuring in these immune genes. Specifically, we tested for spatial associations between the distribution of avian malaria, and the factors previously shown to influence that distribution, and MHC variation within resident individuals. Although we found no overall genetic structure across the population for either neutral or MHC loci, we did find localized associations between environmental factors and MHC variation. One MHC class I allele (ANBE48) was directly associated with malaria infection risk, while the presence of the ANBE48 and ANBE38 alleles within individuals correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with distance to the nearest poultry farm, an anthropogenic factor previously shown to be an important determinant of disease distribution in the study population. Our findings highlight the importance of considering small spatial scales when studying the patterns and processes involved in evolution at adaptive loci. PMID:27411090

  10. Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Davies, Richard G; Phillips, Karl P; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess whether landscape-level differences in pathogen-mediated selection generate fine-scale spatial structuring in these immune genes. Specifically, we tested for spatial associations between the distribution of avian malaria, and the factors previously shown to influence that distribution, and MHC variation within resident individuals. Although we found no overall genetic structure across the population for either neutral or MHC loci, we did find localized associations between environmental factors and MHC variation. One MHC class I allele (ANBE48) was directly associated with malaria infection risk, while the presence of the ANBE48 and ANBE38 alleles within individuals correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with distance to the nearest poultry farm, an anthropogenic factor previously shown to be an important determinant of disease distribution in the study population. Our findings highlight the importance of considering small spatial scales when studying the patterns and processes involved in evolution at adaptive loci.

  11. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity.

  12. The Oral Health Impact Profile-14: a unidimensional scale?

    PubMed

    Santos, Camila Mello dos; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa de; Nadanovsky, Paulo; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Celeste, Roger Keller; Hugo, Fernando Neves

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional structure of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14: (OHIP-14). Data was obtained from studies carried out in Rio de Janeiro (N = 504) and Carlos Barbosa (N = 872), in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to identify the latent dimensions of the OHIP-14. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out of both samples to compare the one-dimensional structure found by the EFA and the proposed three-dimensional structure. This factorial structure was assessed using goodness-of-fit indices. In the Rio de Janeiro study, the eigenvalue was 9.2 and this one factor explained 65.6% of total variance, while in the Carlos Barbosa study the eigenvalue was 7.9 and this one factor explained 56.6% of variance. CFA indicated an adequate fit of the one-factor model for the Rio de Janeiro study (RMSEA = 0.04; CFI = 0.98; TLI = 0.98) and for the Carlos Barbosa study (RMSEA = 0.05; CFI = 0.97; TLI = 0.97). Our findings suggest that the OHIP-14 measures one single construct.

  13. Evolutionary causes and consequences of diversified CRISPR immune profiles in natural populations.

    PubMed

    England, Whitney E; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2013-12-01

    Host-pathogen co-evolution is a significant force which shapes the ecology and evolution of all types of organisms, and such interactions are driven by resistance and immunity mechanisms of the host. Diversity of resistance and immunity can affect the co-evolutionary trajectory of both host and pathogen. The microbial CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system is one host immunity mechanism which offers a tractable model for examining the dynamics of diversity in an immune system. In the present article, we review CRISPR variation observed in a variety of natural populations, examine the forces which can push CRISPRs towards high or low diversity, and investigate the consequences of various levels of diversity on microbial populations.

  14. Expression Profiling of Innate Immune Genes in Milk Somatic Cells During Subclinical Mastitis in Crossbred Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, A; Radhika, G; Aravindhakshan, T V; Anilkumar, K

    2016-10-01

    Innate immune mechanism plays a key role in mammary defense, from recognition of pathogens to activation of nonspecific and specific immunity involved in elimination of pathogens. Expression profiles of innate immune response genes namely Toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2), Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP-1), Interleukin 8 receptor (IL-8 R), L-Selectin (SELL), and Osteopontin (OPN) in milk somatic cells of subclinical mastitis (SCM) affected crossbred cows were investigated under this study at transcript level using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dairy cows in mid lactation were screened for SCM using California Mastitis Test (CMT), Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and Electrical Conductivity test (EC). Based on results of SCM screening tests, crossbred cows were clustered into two groups with four Staphylococcus aureus infected SCM cows and four apparently healthy cows. The expressions levels of TLR-2, PGLYRP-1, IL-8 R, SELL, and OPN in milk somatic cells of SCM affected cows were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than healthy cows. These genes could be considered as candidate genes for innate immune response against S. aureus SCM infection.

  15. Expression Profiling of Innate Immune Genes in Milk Somatic Cells During Subclinical Mastitis in Crossbred Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, A; Radhika, G; Aravindhakshan, T V; Anilkumar, K

    2016-10-01

    Innate immune mechanism plays a key role in mammary defense, from recognition of pathogens to activation of nonspecific and specific immunity involved in elimination of pathogens. Expression profiles of innate immune response genes namely Toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2), Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP-1), Interleukin 8 receptor (IL-8 R), L-Selectin (SELL), and Osteopontin (OPN) in milk somatic cells of subclinical mastitis (SCM) affected crossbred cows were investigated under this study at transcript level using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dairy cows in mid lactation were screened for SCM using California Mastitis Test (CMT), Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and Electrical Conductivity test (EC). Based on results of SCM screening tests, crossbred cows were clustered into two groups with four Staphylococcus aureus infected SCM cows and four apparently healthy cows. The expressions levels of TLR-2, PGLYRP-1, IL-8 R, SELL, and OPN in milk somatic cells of SCM affected cows were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than healthy cows. These genes could be considered as candidate genes for innate immune response against S. aureus SCM infection. PMID:27565875

  16. Biochemical, Histopathological and Morphological Profiling of a Rat Model of Early Immune Stimulation: Relation to Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Kubesova, Anna; Tejkalova, Hana; Syslova, Kamila; Kacer, Petr; Vondrousova, Jana; Tyls, Filip; Fujakova, Michaela; Palenicek, Tomas; Horacek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal immune challenge leads to neurodevelopmental dysfunction, permanent immune dysregulation and abnormal behaviour, which have been shown to have translational validity to findings in human neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g. schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, autism, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease). The aim of this animal study was to elucidate the influence of early immune stimulation triggered by systemic postnatal lipopolysaccharide administration on biochemical, histopathological and morphological measures, which may be relevant to the neurobiology of human psychopathology. In the present study of adult male Wistar rats we examined the brain and plasma levels of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin), their metabolites, the levels of the main excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid and the levels of tryptophan and its metabolites from the kynurenine catabolic pathway. Further, we focused on histopathological and morphological markers related to pathogenesis of brain diseases - glial cell activation, neurodegeneration, hippocampal volume reduction and dopaminergic synthesis in the substantia nigra. Our results show that early immune stimulation in adult animals alters the levels of neurotransmitters and their metabolites, activates the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism and leads to astrogliosis, hippocampal volume reduction and a decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra. These findings support the crucial pathophysiological role of early immune stimulation in the above mentioned neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25602957

  17. RNA-seq profiles of immune related genes in the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis infected with white band disease.

    PubMed

    Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Vollmer, Steven V

    2013-01-01

    Coral diseases are among the most serious threats to coral reefs worldwide, yet most coral diseases remain poorly understood. How the coral host responds to pathogen infection is an area where very little is known. Here we used next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to produce a transcriptome-wide profile of the immune response of the Staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis to White Band Disease (WBD) by comparing infected versus healthy (asymptomatic) coral tissues. The transcriptome of A. cervicornis was assembled de novo from A-tail selected Illumina mRNA-seq data from whole coral tissues, and parsed bioinformatically into coral and non-coral transcripts using existing Acropora genomes in order to identify putative coral transcripts. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the coral and non-coral datasets to identify genes that were up- and down-regulated due to disease infection. RNA-seq analyses indicate that infected corals exhibited significant changes in gene expression across 4% (1,805 out of 47,748 transcripts) of the coral transcriptome. The primary response to infection included transcripts involved in macrophage-mediated pathogen recognition and ROS production, two hallmarks of phagocytosis, as well as key mediators of apoptosis and calcium homeostasis. The strong up-regulation of the enzyme allene oxide synthase-lipoxygenase suggests a key role of the allene oxide pathway in coral immunity. Interestingly, none of the three primary innate immune pathways--Toll-like receptors (TLR), Complement, and prophenoloxydase pathways, were strongly associated with the response of A. cervicornis to infection. Five-hundred and fifty differentially expressed non-coral transcripts were classified as metazoan (n = 84), algal or plant (n = 52), fungi (n = 24) and protozoans (n = 13). None of the 52 putative Symbiodinium or algal transcript had any clear immune functions indicating that the immune response is driven by the coral host, and not its algal

  18. RNA-seq profiles of immune related genes in the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis infected with white band disease.

    PubMed

    Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Vollmer, Steven V

    2013-01-01

    Coral diseases are among the most serious threats to coral reefs worldwide, yet most coral diseases remain poorly understood. How the coral host responds to pathogen infection is an area where very little is known. Here we used next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to produce a transcriptome-wide profile of the immune response of the Staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis to White Band Disease (WBD) by comparing infected versus healthy (asymptomatic) coral tissues. The transcriptome of A. cervicornis was assembled de novo from A-tail selected Illumina mRNA-seq data from whole coral tissues, and parsed bioinformatically into coral and non-coral transcripts using existing Acropora genomes in order to identify putative coral transcripts. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the coral and non-coral datasets to identify genes that were up- and down-regulated due to disease infection. RNA-seq analyses indicate that infected corals exhibited significant changes in gene expression across 4% (1,805 out of 47,748 transcripts) of the coral transcriptome. The primary response to infection included transcripts involved in macrophage-mediated pathogen recognition and ROS production, two hallmarks of phagocytosis, as well as key mediators of apoptosis and calcium homeostasis. The strong up-regulation of the enzyme allene oxide synthase-lipoxygenase suggests a key role of the allene oxide pathway in coral immunity. Interestingly, none of the three primary innate immune pathways--Toll-like receptors (TLR), Complement, and prophenoloxydase pathways, were strongly associated with the response of A. cervicornis to infection. Five-hundred and fifty differentially expressed non-coral transcripts were classified as metazoan (n = 84), algal or plant (n = 52), fungi (n = 24) and protozoans (n = 13). None of the 52 putative Symbiodinium or algal transcript had any clear immune functions indicating that the immune response is driven by the coral host, and not its algal

  19. RNA-seq Profiles of Immune Related Genes in the Staghorn Coral Acropora cervicornis Infected with White Band Disease

    PubMed Central

    Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan T.; Vollmer, Steven V.

    2013-01-01

    Coral diseases are among the most serious threats to coral reefs worldwide, yet most coral diseases remain poorly understood. How the coral host responds to pathogen infection is an area where very little is known. Here we used next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to produce a transcriptome-wide profile of the immune response of the Staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis to White Band Disease (WBD) by comparing infected versus healthy (asymptomatic) coral tissues. The transcriptome of A. cervicornis was assembled de novo from A-tail selected Illumina mRNA-seq data from whole coral tissues, and parsed bioinformatically into coral and non-coral transcripts using existing Acropora genomes in order to identify putative coral transcripts. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the coral and non-coral datasets to identify genes that were up- and down-regulated due to disease infection. RNA-seq analyses indicate that infected corals exhibited significant changes in gene expression across 4% (1,805 out of 47,748 transcripts) of the coral transcriptome. The primary response to infection included transcripts involved in macrophage-mediated pathogen recognition and ROS production, two hallmarks of phagocytosis, as well as key mediators of apoptosis and calcium homeostasis. The strong up-regulation of the enzyme allene oxide synthase-lipoxygenase suggests a key role of the allene oxide pathway in coral immunity. Interestingly, none of the three primary innate immune pathways - Toll-like receptors (TLR), Complement, and prophenoloxydase pathways, were strongly associated with the response of A. cervicornis to infection. Five-hundred and fifty differentially expressed non-coral transcripts were classified as metazoan (n = 84), algal or plant (n = 52), fungi (n = 24) and protozoans (n = 13). None of the 52 putative Symbiodinium or algal transcript had any clear immune functions indicating that the immune response is driven by the coral host, and not its algal

  20. Standardized Whole-Blood Transcriptional Profiling Enables the Deconvolution of Complex Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Alejandra; Duffy, Darragh; Rouilly, Vincent; Posseme, Céline; Djebali, Raouf; Illanes, Gabriel; Libri, Valentina; Albaud, Benoit; Gentien, David; Piasecka, Barbara; Hasan, Milena; Fontes, Magnus; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Albert, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Systems approaches for the study of immune signaling pathways have been traditionally based on purified cells or cultured lines. However, in vivo responses involve the coordinated action of multiple cell types, which interact to establish an inflammatory microenvironment. We employed standardized whole-blood stimulation systems to test the hypothesis that responses to Toll-like receptor ligands or whole microbes can be defined by the transcriptional signatures of key cytokines. We found 44 genes, identified using Support Vector Machine learning, that captured the diversity of complex innate immune responses with improved segregation between distinct stimuli. Furthermore, we used donor variability to identify shared inter-cellular pathways and trace cytokine loops involved in gene expression. This provides strategies for dimension reduction of large datasets and deconvolution of innate immune responses applicable for characterizing immunomodulatory molecules. Moreover, we provide an interactive R-Shiny application with healthy donor reference values for induced inflammatory genes. PMID:27568558

  1. A dual challenge of corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin alters immune cell profiles in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The duration and magnitude of cortisol release can have different effects on the immune response. Over the last decade, studies have suggested that acute stress, when cortisol is elevated for a short duration of time, can be immuno-stimulatory rather than immuno-suppressive. This study was designed ...

  2. Profile and persistence of the virus-specific neutralizing humoral immune response in human survivors of Sudan ebolavirus (Gulu).

    PubMed

    Sobarzo, Ariel; Groseth, Allison; Dolnik, Olga; Becker, Stephan; Lutwama, Julius Julian; Perelman, Eddie; Yavelsky, Victoria; Muhammad, Majidat; Kuehne, Ana I; Marks, Robert S; Dye, John M; Lobel, Leslie

    2013-07-15

    To better understand humoral immunity following ebolavirus infection, a serological study of the humoral immune response against the individual viral proteins of Sudan ebolavirus (Gulu) in human survivors was performed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for full-length recombinant viral proteins NP, VP30, VP40, and GP1-649 (GP lacking the transmembrane domain) of Sudan ebolavirus (Gulu) was used as well as a plaque reduction neutralization test. Serum samples from human survivors, which were collected up to 10 years following recovery, were screened and analyzed. Results demonstrate that samples obtained 10 years following infection contain virus-specific antibodies that can neutralize virus. Neutralization correlates well with immunoreactivity against the viral proteins NP, VP30, and GP1-649. Sera from individuals who died or those with no documented infection but immunoreactive to ebolavirus did not neutralize. This work provides insight into the duration, profile of immunoreactivity, and neutralization capacity of the humoral immune response in ebolavirus survivors. PMID:23585686

  3. Analysis of the transcriptomic profilings of Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) infected with Flavobacterium columnare with an emphasis on immune responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhang, Yulei; Wen, Yi; Ji, Wei; Zhou, Yang; Ji, Yachan; Liu, Xiaoling; Wang, Weimin; Asim, Muhammad; Liang, Xufang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-03-01

    Flavobacterium columnare (FC) is the causative pathogen of columnaris which has caused great economic loss in fish culture worldwide, including in Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) culture. In the present study, the transcriptomic profiles of the head kidneys from FC-infected and non-infected Mandarin fish were obtained using HiSeq™ 2000 (Illumina). Totally 31,168 unigenes with high quality were obtained. Genes involved in protein folding, metabolism and energy, immune responses, oxidoreductase activity, cell growth and death were identified as enriched classes. 1019 differently expressed genes between the two groups were identified, including 603 up-regulated and 416 down-regulated genes. 27 differently expressed immune related genes were scrutinized, including 17 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated genes. Six of the differently expressed genes were further validated by qRT-PCR. The roles of the immune related genes were discussed. Identification of the host genes in response to FC infection will shed a new light on the prevention of columnaris.

  4. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Francis, Suzanna C; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R; Hayes, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies.

  5. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Suzanna C.; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T.; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R.; Hayes, Richard J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  6. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Francis, Suzanna C; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R; Hayes, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  7. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world’s most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity. PMID:26599861

  8. Altered Immune Profiles of Natural Killer Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong-Fang; Shao, Jian-Ying; Yin, Wen-Wei; Xia, Yang; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xing; Hu, Huai-Dong; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong; Zhang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells are the main effective component of the innate immune system that responds to chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. Although numerous studies have reported the immune profiles of NK cells in CHB patients, they are limited by inconsistent results. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to characterize reliably the immune profiles of NK cells after CHB infection, specifically frequency, phenotype, and function. Methods A literature search of the computer databases MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trails was performed and 19 studies were selected. The standard mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of each continuous variable was estimated with a fixed effects model when I2 < 50% for the test for heterogeneity, or the random effects model otherwise. Publication bias was evaluated using Begg’s and Egger’s tests. Results The meta-analysis of publications that reported frequency of peripheral NK cells showed that NK cell levels in CHB patients were significantly lower compared with that of healthy controls. A higher frequency of CD56bright NK subsets was found in CHB patients, but the CD56dim NK subsets of CHB patients and healthy controls were similar. CHB patients before and after antiviral therapy with nucleotide analogues (NUCs) showed no statistical difference in NK frequency. The activating receptors were upregulated, whereas inhibitory receptors were comparable in the peripheral NK cells of CHB individuals and healthy controls. NK cells of CHB patients displayed higher cytotoxic potency as evidenced by CD107a protein levels and conserved potency to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ), compared with their healthy counterparts. Conclusion Our results revealed that CHB patients had a lower frequency of NK cells compared with healthy individuals not treatable with antiviral NUC therapy. With an activating phenotype, NK cells in CHB patients showed better cytotoxic potency and conserved

  9. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity. PMID:26599861

  10. Antioxidant status, metabolic profile and immune response of lambs supplemented with tannin rich Ficus infectoria leaf meal.

    PubMed

    Dey, Avijit; Dutta, Narayan; Pattanaik, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Kusumakar

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of supplementation of tanniferous tree leaves Ficus infectoria on antioxidant status and immune response, twenty four lambs were randomly divided into four groups of six each in a completely randomized design and fed either a conventional supplement (CON) or experimental supplements (FILM-I, FILM-II and FILM-III) containing 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% condensed tannins (CT), respectively by replacement of wheat bran of supplement CON with Ficus infectoria leaf meal (FILM). Blood biochemical profile was monitored in all lambs at 0, 45, 90, 135, 180 days of feeding. Although haemato-biochemical parameters remained similar, there was significant (p < 0.05) improvement in catalase activity, total thiol and protein thiol groups with reduction in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in lambs fed FILM diet irrespective of levels. However, intracellular status of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity was improved (p < 0.05) only in FILM-II and FILM-III supplemented lambs. The cell-mediated immune response was significantly (p < 0.05) improved in all the lambs fed FILM supplemented diets. Improved antioxidant status and immunity in FILM supplemented lambs increased voluntary feed intake irrespective of level. However, the average daily gain for a period of 180 d showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase by the supplementation of FILM-II diet containing 1.5% CT. The present study reveals that the supplementation of Ficus infectoria leaf meal up to 21.2% in the concentrate mixture could improve the antioxidant status and immunity in lambs. However, as feed efficiency was reduced at higher levels due to presence of CT, 15.9% supplementation containing 1.5% condensed tannins in concentrate mixture is suggested to improve the health and production performance of lambs.

  11. Transcription profiling of immune genes during parasite infection in susceptible and resistant strains of the flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Mei-Hui; Pai, Aditi; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-05-01

    The flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an intermediate host for the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta and has become an important genetic model to explore immune responses to parasite infection in insect hosts. The present study examined the immune responses to tapeworm infection in resistant (TIW1) and susceptible (cSM) strains of the red flour beetle, T. castaneum, using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR on 29 immunity-related genes that exhibit antimicrobial properties. Thirteen of the 29 genes showed constitutive differences in expression between the two strains. Fourteen to fifteen of the 29 genes exhibited significant differences in transcription levels when beetles were challenged with tapeworm parasite in the resistant and susceptible strains. Nine genes (GNBP3, cSPH2, lysozyme4, defensin1, PGRP-SA, defensin2, coleoptericin1, attacin2 and serpin29) in cSM and 13 genes (lysozyme2, proPO1, GNBP3, cSPH2, lysozyme4, defensin1, PGRP-SA, defensin2, coleoptericin1, attacin2, proPO2/3, PGRP-LE and PGRP-SB) in TIW1 were up-regulated by infections or showed parasite infection-induced expression. Seven genes (attacin2, coleoptericin1, defensin1, defensin2, lysozyme2, PGRP-SA and PGRP-SB) were more than 10 folds higher in the resistant TIW1 strain than in the susceptible cSM strain after exposure to tapeworm parasites. This study demonstrated the effects of genetic background, the transcription profile to parasite infection, and identified the immunity-related genes that were significantly regulated by the infection of tapeworms in Tribolium beetles.

  12. Lymphocytic Profiling in Thyroid Cancer Provides Clues for Failure of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Paparodis, Rodis; Sharma, Deepak; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is usually surrounded by a significant number of immune reactive cells. Tumor associated lymphocytes as well as background lymphocytic thyroiditis is frequently mentioned in pathology reports of patients operated for thyroid cancer. The nature of this lymphocytic reaction in not well understood. Evidently, the fact that cancer can survive in this adverse microenvironment speaks for immune regulation. We characterized the lymphocytic infiltration that accompanies thyroid cancer and compared it to that present in thyroid autoimmunity. We found that double-negative (DN) T cells were significantly more abundant in thyroid cancer than in thyroid autoimmunity. Although FOXP3+ Tregs were also present, DN T cells were the dominant cell type associated with thyroid cancer. Furthermore, upon stimulation, the DN T cells associated with cancer remained unchanged while the few (<5%) DN T cells associated with thyroid autoimmunity increased in numbers (>20%). CD25 expression on DN T cells remained unchanged after stimulation which suggests that the increase in the absolute number of DN T cells in thyroid autoimmunity was at the expense of inactivation of single positive T cells. We concluded that in the setting of thyroid cancer, DN T cells appear to suppress tumor immunity. In contrast, in thyroid autoimmunity, DN T cells were barely present and only increased at the expense of inactivated, single positive T cells upon induction. Together, these findings suggest that thyroid cancer associated DN T cells might regulate proliferation and effector function of T cells and thereby contribute to tumor tolerance and active avoidance of tumor immunity. PMID:24623740

  13. Transcriptome Profile of the Chicken Thrombocyte: New Implications as an Advanced Immune Effector Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Farzana; Saski, Christopher; Bridges, William; Burns, Matthew; Dunn, Heather; Elliott, Kathryn; Scott, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytes are nucleated platelets involved in immune functions such as pathogen recognition and release of pro-inflammatory bioactive compounds when exposed to bacterial and viral molecules. However, the complete role of these cells in innate and adaptive immune responses is not understood, and little is known about their biology at the molecular-genetic level. Highly sensitive RNA-sequencing technologies were used to analyze the complete transcriptome of thrombocytes for the first time with analytical resolution focused on cell-based components of the immune system/response. Amongst all the genes listed in the current chicken genome assembly, 10,041 gene transcripts were found in the chicken thrombocyte. After 1-hour in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Salmonella minnesota), 490 genes were upregulated and 359 genes were downregulated, respectively, with at least a 1-fold change relative to unexposed thrombocytes. Additionally, by constructing a de novo assembly, we were able to identify a total of 3,030 novel genes in the thrombocyte transcriptome. The information generated here is useful in development of novel solutions to lower the economic burden and zoonotic threat that accompanies infectious diseases for birds and fish. In addition, the resources created here have translational utility as a model system to find orthologous genes and genes related to its enucleated counterpart, the platelet. PMID:27711235

  14. Generalizing Nigrescence Profiles: Cluster Analyses of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) Scores in Three Independent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Frank C.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Cross, William E., Jr.; Fhagen-Smith, Peony E.

    2006-01-01

    The two studies in this article examine the interpretability and generalizability of nigrescence profiles based on Cross Racial Identity Scale scores across different educational contexts. Study 1 participants (N=333) came from a predominantly White institution (PWI) and were grouped into six clusters labeled Afrocentric, multiculturalist,…

  15. 1H NMR-Based Profiling Reveals Differential Immune-Metabolic Networks during Influenza Virus Infection in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milner, J. Justin; Wang, Jue; Sheridan, Patricia A.; Ebbels, Tim; Beck, Melinda A.; Saric, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Obese individuals are at greater risk for death from influenza virus infection. Paralleling human evidence, obese mice are also more susceptible to influenza infection mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms driving greater influenza severity in the obese remain unclear. Metabolic profiling has been utilized in infectious disease models to enhance prognostic or diagnostic methods, and to gain insight into disease pathogenesis by providing a more global picture of dynamic infection responses. Herein, metabolic profiling was used to develop a deeper understanding of the complex processes contributing to impaired influenza protection in obese mice and to facilitate generation of new explanatory hypotheses. Diet-induced obese and lean mice were infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of urine, feces, lung, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum revealed distinct metabolic signatures in infected obese mice, including perturbations in nucleotide, vitamin, ketone body, amino acid, carbohydrate, choline and lipid metabolic pathways. Further, metabolic data was integrated with immune analyses to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of potential immune-metabolic interactions. Of interest, uncovered metabolic signatures in urine and feces allowed for discrimination of infection status in both lean and obese mice at an early influenza time point, which holds prognostic and diagnostic implications for this methodology. These results confirm that obesity causes distinct metabolic perturbations during influenza infection and provide a basis for generation of new hypotheses and use of this methodology in detection of putative biomarkers and metabolic patterns to predict influenza infection outcome. PMID:24844920

  16. Continuously distributed magnetization profile for millimeter-scale elastomeric undulatory swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, Eric; Zhuang, Jiang; Zhan Lum, Guo; Edwards, Matthew R.; Sitti, Metin

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a millimeter-scale magnetically driven swimming robot for untethered motion at mid to low Reynolds numbers. The robot is propelled by continuous undulatory deformation, which is enabled by the distributed magnetization profile of a flexible sheet. We demonstrate control of a prototype device and measure deformation and speed as a function of magnetic field strength and frequency. Experimental results are compared with simple magnetoelastic and fluid propulsion models. The presented mechanism provides an efficient remote actuation method at the millimeter scale that may be suitable for further scaling down in size for micro-robotics applications in biotechnology and healthcare.

  17. Immunological evaluation of four arc welders exposed to fumes from ignited polyurethane (isocyanate) foam: antibodies and immune profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, A.; Thrasher, J.D.; Gard, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Four arc welders having a flu-like illness with multiple health complaints following an exposure to high concentrations of isocyanate fumes from ignited polyurethane foam underwent immunological tests as follows: ELISA antibody assays, activated lymphocyte profiles, and lymphocyte blastogenesis. ELISA procedures revealed the presence of antibodies to hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and formaldehyde (F) conjugated to human serum albumin (HDI-SA and F-SA). The results from the activated lymphocyte profiles showed deviations from the norm as follows: three welders had elevated helper/suppressor (H/S) ratios; all four had elevated percentages of Tal positive cells; two had decreases in B cells; and one had low total white cell and lymphocyte counts. In contrast, the percentage and absolute numbers of ILS receptor cells were normal in the four subjects. T cell blastogenesis to PHA, Con A and PWM resulted in the following: T-cells from one subject responded normally; in another, a high response (212% of controls) to PHA occurred with normal mitogenesis to Con A and PWM. In the remaining two welders, the T cells responded abnormally low (50 to 75% of controls) to the three mitogens. In conclusion, the existence of IgG antibodies to HDI-SA and F-SA, the altered activated immune profiles, the elevated Tal cells, and the abnormal blastogenesis are interpreted as being linked with the episode of HDI and F exposure and the subsequent flu-like illness of the four welders.

  18. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines during Immune Stimulation: Modulation of Iron Status and Red Blood Cell Profile

    PubMed Central

    Koorts, A. M.; Levay, P. F.; Becker, P. J.; Viljoen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Forty-eight patients were subdivided according to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, resulting in 19 patients with normal (2.8 ± 2.8 mg/L) and 29 with elevated (82.2 ± 76.2 mg/L) CRP levels. The elevated CRP group had iron and red blood cell (RBC) profiles characteristic of chronic immune stimulation (CIS), and the normal CRP group, profiles of true iron deficiency. Normal relationships between storage iron, bioavailable iron, and RBC indices were absent in the elevated CRP group—implying the role of iron as major determinant of the RBC profile to be diminished during CIS. The elevated CRP group had significant increases in proinflammatory cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, Il-1β, Il-6, and Il-8). Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels were normal, except for Il-10, supporting previous indications that Il-10 contributes to reducing bioavailable iron. Regression analysis suggested decreases in transferrin to be related to increases in Il-8 and an increase in ferritin to be related to a decrease in Il-12 levels. TGF-β levels were positively related to transferrin and negatively to ferritin. PMID:21547258

  19. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Disruption of Innate Immunity in Chronic Heavy Ethanol Consuming Female Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sureshchandra, Suhas; Rais, Maham; Stull, Cara; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that heavy ethanol consumption interferes with the immune system and inflammatory processes, resulting in increased risk for infectious and chronic diseases. However, these processes have yet to be systematically studied in a dose and sex-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the impact of chronic heavy ethanol consumption on gene expression using RNA-seq in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from female rhesus macaques with daily consumption of 4% ethanol available 22hr/day for 12 months resulting in average ethanol consumption of 4.3 g/kg/day (considered heavy drinking). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using edgeR and gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore™. We identified 1106 differentially expressed genes, meeting the criterion of ≥ two-fold change and p-value ≤ 0.05 in expression (445 up- and 661 down-regulated). Pathway analysis of the 879 genes with characterized identifiers showed that the most enriched gene ontology processes were “response to wounding”, “blood coagulation”, “immune system process”, and “regulation of signaling”. Changes in gene expression were seen despite the lack of differences in the frequency of any major immune cell subtype between ethanol and controls, suggesting that heavy ethanol consumption modulates gene expression at the cellular level rather than altering the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Collectively, these observations provide mechanisms to explain the higher incidence of infection, delay in wound healing, and increase in cardiovascular disease seen in subjects with Alcohol use disorder. PMID:27427759

  20. Tomato Aqueous Extract Modulates the Inflammatory Profile of Immune Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Mussler, Bernd; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients transiently or chronically modulate functional and biochemical characteristics of cells and tissues both in vivo and in vitro. The influence of tomato aqueous extract (TAE) on the in vitro inflammatory response of activated human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and macrophages was investigated. Its effect on endothelial dysfunction (ED) was analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), PBLs and HUVECs were incubated with TAE. They were activated with LPS or TNF-α in order to induce inflammatory processes and ED, respectively. Inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules were measured by immune assay-based multiplex analysis. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR. TAE altered the production of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12) and chemokines (CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10) in PBLs. TAE reduced ED-associated expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) in endothelial cell. In macrophages, the production of nitric oxide, PGE2, cytokines and ILs (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12), which reflects chronic inflammatory processes, was reduced. Adenosine was identified as the main bioactive of TAE. Thus, TAE had cell-specific and context-dependent effects. We infer from these in vitro data, that during acute inflammation TAE enhances cellular alertness and therefore the sensing of disturbed immune homeostasis in the vascular-endothelial compartment. Conversely, it blunts inflammatory mediators in macrophages during chronic inflammation. A novel concept of immune regulation by this extract is proposed. PMID:26840280

  1. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a = 0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a > 0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures.

  2. Leucocyte profiles and H/L ratios in chicks of Red-tailed Tropicbirds reflect the ontogeny of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, Nina; Quillfeldt, Petra; Hennicke, Janos C

    2011-07-01

    Immune defence is fundamentally important for the survival prospects of young animals. While innate immunity offers initial protection from a variety of pathogens, acquired immunity responds more specifically to pathogens, but is considered to be more costly and to respond slower. Moreover, the acquired immunity is not yet fully developed in neonatal chicks. Little is known about the ontogeny of the immune system of wild birds. Long-lived seabirds, with their slow chick development, are good models to investigate how young birds invest in both arms of their immune system. We determined leucocyte profiles and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratios of Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda westralis) on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean. Young chicks (N = 10) had significantly higher H/L ratios than older chicks (N = 19), while adults (N = 47) showed intermediate values and did not differ from either chick age class. High H/L ratios in young chicks were caused by high initial numbers of heterophils per 10,000 erythrocytes that declined with age. In contrast, the number of lymphocytes per 10,000 erythrocytes was similar for young and older chicks. These data suggest that young chicks invested heavily in innate immunity to protect themselves from pathogens, while investment into acquired immunity became more important in older chicks with a functional acquired immune response. Body condition did not have a significant influence on any leucocyte parameter.

  3. Leveraging large-scale behavioral profiling in zebrafish to explore neuroactive polypharmacology

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Matthew N; Gendelev, Leo; Keiser, Michael J; Kokel, David

    2016-01-01

    Many psychiatric drugs modulate the nervous system through multi-target mechanisms. However, systematic identification of multi-target compounds has been difficult using traditional in vitro screening assays. New approaches to phenotypic profiling in zebrafish can help researchers identify novel compounds with complex polypharmacology. For example, large-scale behavior-based chemical screens can rapidly identify large numbers of structurally diverse and phenotype-related compounds. Once these compounds have been identified, a systems-level analysis of their structures may help to identify statistically enriched target pathways. Together, systematic behavioral profiling and multi-target predictions may help researchers identify new behavior-modifying pathways and CNS therapeutics. PMID:26845413

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific cellular immune profiles suggest bacillary persistence decades after spontaneous cure in untreated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Millington, Kerry A; Gooding, Sarah; Hinks, Timothy S C; Reynolds, D John M; Lalvani, Ajit

    2010-12-01

    Individuals with self-healed tuberculosis from the preantibiotic era offer a unique insight into the natural history of and protective immunity to tuberculosis. In 27 such persons whose tuberculosis self-healed >50 years earlier, circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 2 (IL-2)-secreting T cells were detected ex vivo in 16 and 19 individuals, respectively. The M. tuberculosis-specific T cell cytokine profile was dominated by effector memory T cells that secrete both IFN-γ and IL-2 and included T cells that secrete only IFN-γ or IL-2, suggesting persistence of antigen secreted by viable bacilli. Of 10 individuals with no M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IFN-γ-secreting T cells detectable ex vivo, 7 had evidence of central memory T cells, consistent with clearance of infection. PMID:20958211

  5. Pollen Lipidomics: Lipid Profiling Exposes a Notable Diversity in 22 Allergenic Pollen and Potential Biomarkers of the Allergic Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamed Elfatih H.; Lui, Jan Hsi; Palnivelu, Ravishankar; Naclerio, Robert M.; Preuss, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim Pollen grains are the male gametophytes that deliver sperm cells to female gametophytes during sexual reproduction of higher plants. Pollen is a major source of aeroallergens and environmental antigens. The pollen coat harbors a plethora of lipids that are required for pollen hydration, germination, and penetration of the stigma by pollen tubes. In addition to proteins, pollen displays a wide array of lipids that interact with the human immune system. Prior searches for pollen allergens have focused on the identification of intracellular allergenic proteins, but have largely overlooked much of the extracellular pollen matrix, a region where the majority of lipid molecules reside. Lipid antigens have attracted attention for their potent immunoregulatory effects. By being in close proximity to allergenic proteins on the pollen surface when they interact with host cells, lipids could modify the antigenic properties of proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a comparative pollen lipid profiling of 22 commonly allergenic plant species by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, followed by detailed data mining and statistical analysis. Three experiments compared pollen lipid profiles. We built a database library of the pollen lipids by matching acquired pollen-lipid mass spectra and retention times with the NIST/EPA/NIH mass-spectral library. We detected, identified, and relatively quantified more than 106 lipid molecular species including fatty acids, n-alkanes, fatty alcohols, and sterols. Pollen-derived lipids stimulation up-regulate cytokines expression of dendritic and natural killer T cells co-culture. Conclusions/Significance Here we report on a lipidomic analysis of pollen lipids that can serve as a database for identifying potential lipid antigens and/or novel candidate molecules involved in allergy. The database provides a resource that facilitates studies on the role of lipids in the immunopathogenesis of allergy. Pollen

  6. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  7. Scale profile as feature for quick satellite image object-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, David; Lepage, Richard

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing precision of recent spaceborne sensors, remotely sensed images have become exceedingly large. These images are being used more and more often in the preparation of emergency maps when a disaster occurs. Visual interpretation of these images is long and automatic pixel-based methods require a lot of memory, processing power and time. In this paper, we propose to use a fast level-set image transformation in order to obtain a hierarchical representation of image's objects. A scale profile is then extracted and included as a relevant feature for land-use classification in urban areas. The main contribution of this paper is the analysis of the scale profile for remote sensing applications. The data set from the earthquake that occurred on 12 January 2012 in Haiti is used.

  8. Assessment of Error in Synoptic-Scale Diagnostics Derived from Wind Profiler and Radiosonde Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1996-01-01

    A topic of current practical interest is the accurate characterization of the synoptic-scale atmospheric state from wind profiler and radiosonde network observations. We have examined several related and commonly applied objective analysis techniques for performing this characterization and considered their associated level of uncertainty both from a theoretical and a practical standpoint. A case study is presented where two wind profiler triangles with nearly identical centroids and no common vertices produced strikingly different results during a 43-h period. We conclude that the uncertainty in objectively analyzed quantities can easily be as large as the expected synoptic-scale signal. In order to quantify the statistical precision of the algorithms, we conducted a realistic observing system simulation experiment using output from a mesoscale model. A simple parameterization for estimating the uncertainty in horizontal gradient quantities in terms of known errors in the objectively analyzed wind components and temperature is developed from these results.

  9. Turbulence length scales in stably stratified free shear flow analyzed from slant aircraft profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere close to a coastline is investigated using airborne measurements. The measurements are from a field experiment close to the coast in the southeast of Sweden, in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic Sea has two main properties that make it particularly interesting to study: significant annual lag in sea surface temperature compared to inland surface temperatures and the fact that it is surrounded by land in all directions within advection distances of from a few hours up to 10-15 hours in normal meteorological conditions. The present results are mostly from spring or early summer with mainly cool water: with a stable or neutral marine boundary layer but with substantial heating of the land area during daytime. When the daytime inland convective boundary layer is advected out over the cool sea, there is a frictional decoupling in space analogous to the same nocturnal process in time. This sometimes creates a residual layer, a remnant of the inland convective boundary layer, that can be advected for considerable distances over the sea. At the top of this layer, wind shear gives rise to a local increase in turbulent kinetic energy. These layers are used for an analysis of turbulent scales for free shear flow in stable stratification. The analysis is based on different length scales used in numerical model closures for turbulence processes and reveals the asymptotic behavior of different scales in the neutral limit and their functional form, and illustrates the nonlinear relationship between scales for different properties. The profiles from the aircraft are taken from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low-level boundary-layer flights. The results are calculated from turbulence data extracted through filtering techniques on instantaneous time series (individual profiles). The calculated turbulence parameters from all profiles are grouped and averaged compositely over all profiles. 48 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  11. Profile of differentially expressed intratumoral cytokines to predict the immune-polarizing side effects of tamoxifen in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bailiang; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Zi-Qiao; Liu, Huidi; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Factors within the tissue of breast cancer (BC) may shift the polarization of CD4+ T cells towards Th2 direction. This tendency can promote tumor development and be enhanced by the use of tamoxifen during the treatment. Thus, the patients with low levels of tumor-induced Th2 polarization prior to tamoxifen treatment may better endure the immune-polarizing side effects (IPSE) of tamoxifen and have better prognoses. Estimation of Th2 polarization status should help predict the IPSE among tamoxifen-treated patients and guide the use of tamoxifen among all BC patients before the tamoxifen therapy. Here, we report profiling of differentially expressed (DE) intratumoral cytokines as a signature to evaluate the IPSE of tamoxifen. The DE genes of intratumoral CD4+ T cells (CD4 DEGs) were identified by gene expression profiles of purified CD4+ T cells from BC patients and validated by profiling of cultured intratumoral CD4+ T cells. Functional enrichment analyses showed a directed Th2 polarization of intratumoral CD4+ T cells. To find the factors inducing the Th2 polarization of CD4+ T cells, we identified 995 common DE genes of bulk BC tissues (BC DEGs) by integrating five independent datasets. Five DE cytokines observed in bulk BC tissues with dysregulated receptors in the intratumoral CD4+ T cells were selected as the predictor of the IPSE of tamoxifen. The patients predicted to suffer low IPSE (low Th2 polarization) had a significantly lower distant relapse risk than the patients predicted to suffer high IPSE in independent datasets (n = 608; HR = 4.326, P = 0.000897; HR = 2.014, P = 0.0173; HR = 2.72, P = 0.04077). Patients predicted to suffer low IPSE would benefit from tamoxifen treatment (HR = 2.908, P = 0.03905). The DE intratumoral cytokines identified in this study may help predict the IPSE of tamoxifen and justify the use of tamoxifen in BC treatment. PMID:25973310

  12. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile

    PubMed Central

    Vescovini, Rosanna; Telera, Anna Rita; Pedrazzoni, Mario; Abbate, Barbara; Rossetti, Pietro; Verzicco, Ignazio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana; Volpi, Riccardo; Sansoni, Paolo; Fagnoni, Francesco Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin. PMID:26990192

  13. Natural Experiments in Outcrop- vs. Landscape-scale Controls on Longitudinal Profile Form, Finger Lakes, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, E. B.; Hauser, D.; Hoke, G. D.; Knuepfer, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Longitudinal stream profiles are commonly used to extract information about the geologic histories of transient landscapes. Correct interpretation of these histories requires understanding the impacts on profile morphology of outcrop-scale controls relative to those imposed by landscape-scale processes driving incision. Previous researchers have suggested that joint-perpendicular channel reaches form waterfalls while joint-oblique channel reaches form cascades. The Finger Lakes region of central New York offers a natural laboratory in which to test this hypothesis. The region is underpinned primarily by relatively flat-lying, well-jointed Devonian shales of the Hamilton Group. Ice retreated from the region and pro-glacial lake levels fell episodically some 14 ka ago, triggering post-glacial incision through plucking and abrasion that has sculpted gorges and waterfalls. All post-glacial streams draining to a given lake have essentially a common lithology and base level history. Using GIS, we analyzed the orientation of 50 m long channel segments relative to mapped patterns of joint orientation. All moderately sized (<20 km2) streams exhibit convex profiles which mimic the overall form of the valley slopes. For streams draining to southern Cayuga Lake, joint perpendicular reaches had an average slope of 4.2 degrees, while joint oblique reaches had an average slope of 3.6 degrees (p = 3e-19). However, the spatial location of major knickpoints do not appear to be controlled by joint orientation patterns, whose alignment with channel orientation varies over wavelengths shorter than knickpoint spacing (order 10-100 m vs. order 100-1000 m). On the other hand, knickpoint location and spacing along streams draining to southern Seneca Lake do not appear to differ systematically from those of the Cayuga profiles. Since Seneca's lake level was more stable than Cayuga's during glacial retreat, this suggests that base level history alone is also not controlling profile

  14. Plasma microRNA profiling of pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Coskun, Enes; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Ergun, Sercan; Yilmaz, Fatih; Aktekin, Elif

    2014-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a commonly acquired autoimmune bleeding disorder in children. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs which are found in cells and circulation, and play a role in protein synthesis and regulation. In this study, we aimed to determine a biomarker for childhood ITP comparing the plasma miRNA levels of children having ITP with healthy children. A total of 86 patients with ITP and 56 healthy children followed up by the Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology in University of Gaziantep since July 2011 were enrolled in the study. The 86 patients with ITP were evaluated in two groups as 43 acute ITP (aITP) and 43 chronic ITP (cITP) patients. Plasma expression levels of 379 miRNAs were investigated by RT-PCR (quantitative RT-PCR) technique and they were compared between aITP, cITP, and control groups. For all miRNAs, the average of raw quantification cycle values of three groups separately in the analysis chip was accepted as the reference gene value, and normalization was done according to this value. Statistically significant differences were detected in seven miRNAs (miR-302c-3p, miR-483-5p, miR-410, miR-544a, miR-302a-3p, miR-223-3p, and miR-597) investigated between the groups with respect to the expression levels. The expression rates were found to be over 95% in miR-302c-3p and miR-483-5p, over 75% in miR-410, and over 40% in miR-544, miR-302a-3p, and miR-223-3p in all three groups. The detection of significant differences between plasma miRNA levels of aITP and cITP patients and healthy children may provide useful information in the prediction of the course of disease, determination of disease etiopathogenesis, and the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  15. Transcriptome profiling of the antiviral immune response in Atlantic cod macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eslamloo, Khalil; Xue, Xi; Booman, Marije; Smith, Nicole C; Rise, Matthew L

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the transcriptome response of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) macrophages to the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC), using a 20K Atlantic cod microarray platform and qPCR. We identified 285 significantly up-regulated and 161 significantly down-regulated probes in cod macrophages 24 h after pIC stimulation. A subset of 26 microarray-identified transcripts was subjected to qPCR validation using samples treated with pIC or phosphate-buffered saline (control) over time (3, 6, 12, 24, 48 h), and 77% of them showed a significant response to pIC. The microarray and qPCR analyses in this study showed that pIC induced the expression of cod macrophage transcripts involved in RLR- and TLR-dependent pathogen recognition (e.g. tlr3, tlr7, mda5 and lgp2), as well as signal transducers (e.g. stat1 and nfkbia) and transcription activators (e.g. irf7 and irf10) in the MyD88-independent and dependent signalling pathways. Several immune effectors (e.g. isg15s, viperin, herc4, mip2 and ccl13) were significantly up-regulated in pIC-stimulated cod macrophages. The expression of some transcripts (e.g. irf7, irf10, viperin) was significantly up-regulated by pIC as early as 12 h. All pIC-induced transcripts had peak expression at either 24 h (e.g. tlr7, irf7, mip2) or 48 h (e.g. tlr3, lgp2, stat1). This study suggests possible roles of both vertebrate-conserved (e.g. tlr3 as an up-regulated gene) and fish-specific (tlr22g as a down-regulated gene) receptors in dsRNA recognition, and the importance of conserved and potentially fish-specific interferon stimulated genes in cod macrophages.

  16. Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis and Immunological Memory: Effect on Phenotypic Lymphocyte Profiles and Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, Veerle; Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Kestens, Luc; Boel, Luc; Barbé, Barbara; Kande Betu, Victor; van Griensven, Johan; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Muyembe Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Jacobs, Jan; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In mice, experimental infection with Trypanosoma brucei causes decreased bone marrow B-cell development, abolished splenic B-cell maturation and loss of antibody mediated protection including vaccine induced memory responses. Nothing is known about this phenomenon in human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), but if occurring, it would imply the need of revaccination of HAT patients after therapy and abolish hope for a HAT vaccine. The effect of gambiense HAT on peripheral blood memory T- and B-cells and on innate and vaccine induced antibody levels was examined. The percentage of memory B- and T-cells was quantified in peripheral blood, prospectively collected in DR Congo from 117 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected HAT patients before and six months after treatment and 117 controls at the same time points. Antibodies against carbohydrate antigens on red blood cells and against measles were quantified. Before treatment, significantly higher percentages of memory B-cells, mainly T-independent memory B-cells, were observed in HAT patients compared to controls (CD20+CD27+IgM+, 13.0% versus 2.0%, p<0.001). The percentage of memory T-cells, mainly early effector/memory T-cells, was higher in HAT (CD3+CD45RO+CD27+, 19.4% versus 16.7%, p = 0.003). After treatment, the percentage of memory T-cells normalized, the percentage of memory B-cells did not. The median anti-red blood cell carbohydrate IgM level was one titer lower in HAT patients than in controls (p<0.004), and partially normalized after treatment. Anti-measles antibody concentrations were lower in HAT patients than in controls (medians of 1500 versus 2250 mIU/ml, p = 0.02), and remained so after treatment, but were above the cut-off level assumed to provide protection in 94.8% of HAT patients, before and after treatment (versus 98.3% of controls, p = 0.3). Although functionality of the B-cells was not verified, the results suggest that immunity was conserved in T.b. gambiense infected HAT patients and

  17. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  18. Extracting tumor tissue immune status from expression profiles: correlating renal cancer prognosis with tumor-associated immunome.

    PubMed

    Teltsh, Omri; Porgador, Angel; Rubin, Eitan

    2015-10-20

    Investigating the expression of genes in cancer-associated immune cells (immunome) is imperative for prognosis prediction. However, evaluating the expression of immune-associated genes within cancer biopsy is subject to significant inconsistencies related to the sampling methodology. Here, we present immFocus, a method for extracting immune signals from total RNA sequencing of tumor biopsies, intended for immunity depiction and prognosis evaluation. It is based on reducing the variation which biopsy preparation adds to the apparent expression levels of immune genes. We employed immFocus to normalize gene expression with an immune index using data obtained from renal clear cell carcinoma biopsies. Genes that became less variable due to normalization were found to be preferentially immune-related. Moreover, immune-related genes tended to become more prognostic due to the normalization. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that whole transcriptome sequencing can be used for interrogation of a cancer immunome and for advancing immune-based prognosis.

  19. A high-frequency sonar for profiling small-scale subaqueous bedforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Boylls, J.C.; Lowe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    A high-resolution ultrasonic profiler has been developed which permits both laboratory and field studies of small-scale subaqueous bedforms. The device uses a 2.5-cm diameter piezoelectric ceramic crystal pulsed at a frequency of 4.5 MHz to obtain vertical accuracy and resolution of at least 1 mm. Compared to other small-scale profiling methods, this ultrasonic technique profiles the bottom more accurately and more rapidly without disturbing the bedforms. These characteristics are vital in wave-dominated nearshore zones where oscillatory flow and low visibility for the most part have stymied detailed bedform studies. In the laboratory the transducer is mounted directly to an instrument carriage. For field work the transducer housing is mounted in a 2 m long aluminum frame which is situated and operated by scuba divers. Observations using the device include ripple geometry and migration, the suspension height of sand during sheet flow, and long-term erosion/deposition at a point. ?? 1977.

  20. Hematological, oxidative stress, and immune status profiling in elite combat sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Dopsaj, Violeta; Martinovic, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Kasum, Goran; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Koropanovski, Nenad

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to profile hematological, oxidative stress, and immunological parameters in male athletes who practiced combat sports and to determine whether the type of combat sport influenced the measured parameters. Eighteen karate professionals, 15 wrestlers, and 14 kickboxers participated in the study. Hematological, iron-related, oxidative stress, and immunological parameters were measured at the beginning of a precompetitive period. The general linear model showed significant differences between the karate professionals, wrestlers, and kickboxers with respect to their hematological and iron status parameters (Wilks' Lambda = 0.270, F = 2.186, p < 0.05) and oxidative stress status (Wilks' Lambda = 0.529, F = 1.940, p < 0.05). The immature reticulocyte fraction was significantly higher in wrestlers (0.30 ± 0.03) compared with kickboxers (0.24 ± 0.04; p < 0.05) and karate professionals (0.26 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Low hemoglobin density was significantly lower in wrestlers and kickboxers (p < 0.05) compared with karate professionals (karate: 3.51 ± 1.19, wrestlers: 1.95 ± 1.10, and kickboxers: 1.77 ± 0.76). Significant differences were observed between the karate professionals and wrestlers with respect to their pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (437 ± 103 vs. 323 ± 148, p < 0.05) and superoxide-dismutase activity (SOD) (73 ± 37 vs. 103 ± 30, p < 0.05). All the measured parameters (with the exception of SOD activity) fell within their physiological ranges, indicating that the study participants represented a young and healthy male population. Hematological parameters differed between kickboxers and karate professionals. The low pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance and high SOD activity in wrestlers could be associated with the long-term impact of wrestling as a type of strenuous exercise.

  1. Depth Estimation from the Scaling Power Spectral Density of Nonstationary Gravity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A. R.; Dimri, V. P.

    A technique to estimate the depth to anomalous sources from the scaling power spectra of long nonstationary gravity profiles is presented. The nonstationary profile is divided into piecewise stationary segments based on the criterion of optimum gate length in which the time-varying and time-invariant autocorrelation functions are similar. The division of a nonstationary into piecewise stationary allows identification of the portion of the crust with different geological histories, and using the stationary portion of the gravity profiles, more consistent depths to the anomalous sources have been obtained. The technique is tested with the synthetic gravity profile and applied along the Jaipur-Raipur geotransect in western and central India. The geotransect has been divided into four stationary parts: Vindhyan low, Bundelkhand low, Narmada rift and Chhattisgarh basin; each section corresponding to a different geological formation. Forward modeling of gravity data using results of each stationary section is carried out to propose the subsurface structure along the Jaipur-Raipur transect.

  2. Echinoderm immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  3. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  4. In Silico Modeling of the Immune System: Cellular and Molecular Scale Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Belfiore, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Giuseppina; Ronsisvalle, Simone

    2014-01-01

    The revolutions in biotechnology and information technology have produced clinical data, which complement biological data. These data enable detailed descriptions of various healthy and diseased states and responses to therapies. For the investigation of the physiology and pathology of the immune responses, computer and mathematical models have been used in the last decades, enabling the representation of biological processes. In this modeling effort, a major issue is represented by the communication between models that work at cellular and molecular level, that is, multiscale representation. Here we sketch some attempts to model immune system dynamics at both levels. PMID:24804217

  5. Calibrating system errors of large scale three-dimensional profile measurement instruments by subaperture stitching method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Su, Jingshi; Wu, Hengyu; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2015-07-01

    This study presents a subaperture stitching method to calibrate system errors of several ∼2  m large scale 3D profile measurement instruments (PMIs). The calibration process was carried out by measuring a Φ460  mm standard flat sample multiple times at different sites of the PMI with a length gauge; then the subaperture data were stitched together using a sequential or simultaneous stitching algorithm that minimizes the inconsistency (i.e., difference) of the discrete data in the overlapped areas. The system error can be used to compensate the measurement results of not only large flats, but also spheres and aspheres. The feasibility of the calibration was validated by measuring a Φ1070  mm aspheric mirror, which can raise the measurement accuracy of PMIs and provide more reliable 3D surface profiles for guiding grinding, lapping, and even initial polishing processes. PMID:26193139

  6. Discriminating precursors of common fragments for large-scale metabolite profiling by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nikolskiy, Igor; Siuzdak, Gary; Patti, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The goal of large-scale metabolite profiling is to compare the relative concentrations of as many metabolites extracted from biological samples as possible. This is typically accomplished by measuring the abundances of thousands of ions with high-resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometers. Although the data from these instruments provide a comprehensive fingerprint of each sample, identifying the structures of the thousands of detected ions is still challenging and time intensive. An alternative, less-comprehensive approach is to use triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass spectrometry to analyze predetermined sets of metabolites (typically fewer than several hundred). This is done using authentic standards to develop QqQ experiments that specifically detect only the targeted metabolites, with the advantage that the need for ion identification after profiling is eliminated. Results: Here, we propose a framework to extend the application of QqQ mass spectrometers to large-scale metabolite profiling. We aim to provide a foundation for designing QqQ multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiments for each of the 82 696 metabolites in the METLIN metabolite database. First, we identify common fragmentation products from the experimental fragmentation data in METLIN. Then, we model the likelihoods of each precursor structure in METLIN producing each common fragmentation product. With these likelihood estimates, we select ensembles of common fragmentation products that minimize our uncertainty about metabolite identities. We demonstrate encouraging performance and, based on our results, we suggest how our method can be integrated with future work to develop large-scale MRM experiments. Availability and implementation: Our predictions, Supplementary results, and the code for estimating likelihoods and selecting ensembles of fragmentation reactions are made available on the lab website at http://pattilab.wustl.edu/FragPred. Contact: gjpattij

  7. Canine zona pellucida glycoprotein-3: up-scaled production, immunization strategy and its outcome on fertility.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Abhinav; Srichandan, Sudeepa; Minhas, Vidisha; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins based contraceptive vaccines have been proposed for the management of wildlife population. In the present study, a fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by a dilysine linker and an ectodomain of dog ZP3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) without any affinity tag (TT-KK-ZP3) has been expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was successfully produced in fed-batch fermentor and purified. The average yield of purified refolded protein was 12.20 ± 0.61 mg/2g wet cell pellet. Female FvB/J mice immunized with the varying doses of recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 supplemented with alum/PetGel A as adjuvants following a three injection schedule, showed dose dependent increase in serum IgG titer. Antibodies against TT-KK-ZP3 recognized native mouse/dog ZP and significantly inhibited mouse in-vitro fertilization (p=0.012). Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility (p<0.05). Higher antibody titers were associated with a decrease in the number of pups born to the immunized female mice. To reduce the number of injections, two injection schedule using various dose combinations of TT-KK-ZP3 supplemented with alum revealed lower immunogenicity and contraceptive efficacy as compared to the three injection schedule. To overcome this, CpG motif was included in addition to alum and both intraperitoneal and intranasal route of immunization following the two injection schedule was investigated. Inclusion of CpG significantly enhanced the antibody titer and improved contraceptive efficacy. In the mice immunized following intraperitoneal route, serum/vaginal IgG and in the mice immunized through intranasal route, vaginal IgA seemed to be important for curtailment in fertility. To conclude, the recombinant protein described herein may be a good candidate for developing contraceptive vaccine for the wildlife population management, in particular street dogs. PMID

  8. Spatial Scaling of the Profile of Selective Attention in the Visual Field.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Matthew A; Knapp, Ashley A; Adams, Thomas G; Long, Stephanie M; Parks, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of selective attention must be capable of adapting to variation in the absolute size of an attended stimulus in the ever-changing visual environment. To date, little is known regarding how attentional selection interacts with fluctuations in the spatial expanse of an attended object. Here, we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the scaling of attentional enhancement and suppression across the visual field. We measured ERPs while participants performed a task at fixation that varied in its attentional demands (attentional load) and visual angle (1.0° or 2.5°). Observers were presented with a stream of task-relevant stimuli while foveal, parafoveal, and peripheral visual locations were probed by irrelevant distractor stimuli. We found two important effects in the N1 component of visual ERPs. First, N1 modulations to task-relevant stimuli indexed attentional selection of stimuli during the load task and further correlated with task performance. Second, with increased task size, attentional modulation of the N1 to distractor stimuli showed a differential pattern that was consistent with a scaling of attentional selection. Together, these results demonstrate that the size of an attended stimulus scales the profile of attentional selection across the visual field and provides insights into the attentional mechanisms associated with such spatial scaling. PMID:27606426

  9. Spatial Scaling of the Profile of Selective Attention in the Visual Field

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Matthew A.; Knapp, Ashley A.; Adams, Thomas G.; Long, Stephanie M.; Parks, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of selective attention must be capable of adapting to variation in the absolute size of an attended stimulus in the ever-changing visual environment. To date, little is known regarding how attentional selection interacts with fluctuations in the spatial expanse of an attended object. Here, we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the scaling of attentional enhancement and suppression across the visual field. We measured ERPs while participants performed a task at fixation that varied in its attentional demands (attentional load) and visual angle (1.0° or 2.5°). Observers were presented with a stream of task-relevant stimuli while foveal, parafoveal, and peripheral visual locations were probed by irrelevant distractor stimuli. We found two important effects in the N1 component of visual ERPs. First, N1 modulations to task-relevant stimuli indexed attentional selection of stimuli during the load task and further correlated with task performance. Second, with increased task size, attentional modulation of the N1 to distractor stimuli showed a differential pattern that was consistent with a scaling of attentional selection. Together, these results demonstrate that the size of an attended stimulus scales the profile of attentional selection across the visual field and provides insights into the attentional mechanisms associated with such spatial scaling. PMID:27606426

  10. Assessment of error in synoptic-scale diagnostics derived from wind profiler and radiosonde network data

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.

    1996-07-01

    A topic of current practical interest is the accurate characterization of the synoptic-scale atmospheric state from wind profiler and radiosonde network observations. The authors have examined several related and commonly applied objective analysis techniques for performing this characterization and considered their associated level of uncertainty both from a theoretical and a practical standpoint. A case study is presented where two wind profiler triangles with nearly identical centroids and no common vertices produced strikingly different results during a 43-h period. It is concluded that the uncertainty in objectively analyzed quantities can easily be as large as the expected synoptic-scale signal. In order to quantify the statistical precision of the algorithms, the authors conducted a realistic observing system simulation experiment using output from a mesoscale model. A simple parameterization for estimating the uncertainty in horizontal gradient quantities in terms of known errors in the objectively analyzed wind components and temperature is developed from these results. 18 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Large-scale similarity search profiling of ChEMBL compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-08-22

    A large-scale similarity search investigation has been carried out on 266 well-defined compound activity classes extracted from the ChEMBL database. The analysis was performed using two widely applied two-dimensional (2D) fingerprints that mark opposite ends of the current performance spectrum of these types of fingerprints, i.e., MACCS structural keys and the extended connectivity fingerprint with bond diameter four (ECFP4). For each fingerprint, three nearest neighbor search strategies were applied. On the basis of these search calculations, a similarity search profile of the ChEMBL database was generated. Overall, the fingerprint search campaign was surprisingly successful. In 203 of 266 test cases (∼76%), a compound recovery rate of at least 50% was observed with at least the better performing fingerprint and one search strategy. The similarity search profile also revealed several general trends. For example, fingerprint searching was often characterized by an early enrichment of active compounds in database selection sets. In addition, compound activity classes have been categorized according to different similarity search performance levels, which helps to put the results of benchmark calculations into perspective. Therefore, a compendium of activity classes falling into different search performance categories is provided. On the basis of our large-scale investigation, the performance range of state-of-the-art 2D fingerprinting has been delineated for compound data sets directed against a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical targets.

  12. Bedrock fluvial incision and longitudinal profile development over geologic time scales determined by fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Merritts, Dorothy J.

    Fluvial terraces preserve the history of river incision into bedrock over geologic time scales. In this paper we use terraces and a comparison of terrace longitudinal profiles to stream longitudinal profiles to develop a conceptual model of bedrock fluvial incision in diverse geologic, tectonic, and climatic settings. The conceptual model highlights a distinction between bedrock stream behavior in settings of relatively high versus relatively low tectonic activity. This distinction arises from the fundamentally different ways in which runoff is generated in these respective tectonic settings and the positive feedbacks that exist between topography and climate. The model allows for qualitative predictions of long profile shape that can be directly compared to the longitudinal profiles predicted by the stream power law. Our approach has the advantage of helping understand the geologic (and climatic) constraints on the wide variations in k, m, and n revealed in recent applications of the stream power law. We reconcile diverse longitudinal profile shapes and long-term rates of bedrock fluvial incision by considering how a drainage basin generates fluvial discharge and whether that discharge can produce the necessary stream power distributed across a valley bottom such that the long profile can rapidly accommodate changes in base level, climate, and/or rates of rock uplift. We propose that in tectonically active settings (Type I basins), the entire drainage basin experiences uplift which, in turn, builds steep slopes and concomitant increases in orographic precipitation that effectively generate the high peak discharges and fluvial-system wide stream power necessary to create and maintain concave-up long profiles and rates of incision equal and opposite to rates of rock uplift. Measured stream power for one of these basins is highly correlated to the width of the channel and valley bottom which argues for a conservation of energy along the profile and the apportionment

  13. On the use of Cloud Profiling Radar to detect solid precipitation over Antarctica at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Lisa; Kulie, Mark S.; Casella, Daniele; D'Adderio, Leo Pio; Dietrich, Stefano; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Panegrossi, Giulia; Porcù, Federico; Sanò, Paolo; Wood, Norman B.

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a key geophysical parameter in understanding the Antarctic climate. However, the particular environmental conditions of the Continent make it difficult to measure directly solid precipitation rate and accumulation from either ground based instruments or passive space-borne sensors. A significant improvement in the study of solid precipitation over Antarctica is possible by using active space-borne instruments: the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a nadir-pointing 94 GHz radar, on board the low earth orbit CloudSat satellite. Five years (2006-2011) of CPR data and products over Antarctica are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of solid precipitation. The aim of this work is twofold: 1) to compare a global snowfall rate retrieval algorithm (Kulie and Bennartz, 2009) with the official CloudSat product (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) over the Antarctic environment, evaluating the sensitivity of the estimated snow fields to: ground clutter, choice of reflectivity-snowfall rate relationship (Z-S), presence of melting snow/liquid precipitation; 2) to provide snow fall rates and accumulation at different scales over Antarctica, evaluating the impact of background physiography and seasonal cycle on the precipitation distribution. Further comparisons are also performed with ERA-Interim snowfall fields and point-like snow stack height measurements by acoustic depth gauges. Results show that the difference between the Kulie and Bennartz (2009) algorithm and the 2C-SNOW-PROFILE product is mainly due to the choice of the Z-S relationship. Furthermore, despite the CPR limited temporal and spatial sampling capabilities, CPR is able to evidence precipitation characteristics difficult to study from conventional ground-based instruments, at spatial and temporal scales of interest for the study of the hydrological cycle over Antarctica. This is of particular relevance given that the CPR follow-on mission on EarthCare will ensure a long-term coverage.

  14. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence and horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.

  15. Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Hume, Timothy; Jakob, Christian; Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the characteristics of the large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles observed during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which was conducted in January–February 2006 in Darwin during the northern Australian monsoon season. The examined profiles exhibit significant variations between four distinct synoptic regimes that were observed during the experiment. The active monsoon period is characterized by strong upward motion and large advective cooling and moistening throughout the entire troposphere, while the suppressed and clear periods are dominated by moderate midlevel subsidence and significant low- to midlevel drying through horizontal advection. The midlevel subsidence andmore » horizontal dry advection are largely responsible for the dry midtroposphere observed during the suppressed period and limit the growth of clouds to low levels. During the break period, upward motion and advective cooling and moistening located primarily at midlevels dominate together with weak advective warming and drying (mainly from horizontal advection) at low levels. The variations of the diabatic heating and drying profiles with the different regimes are closely associated with differences in the large-scale structures, cloud types, and rainfall rates between the regimes. Strong diabatic heating and drying are seen throughout the troposphere during the active monsoon period while they are moderate and only occur above 700 hPa during the break period. The diabatic heating and drying tend to have their maxima at low levels during the suppressed periods. Furthermore, the diurnal variations of these structures between monsoon systems, continental/coastal, and tropical inland-initiated convective systems are also examined.« less

  16. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, G. M.; Silva, E. F. F.; Montenegro, A. A. A.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2013-07-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV), skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  17. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - III. Thermodynamic profiles and scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.; Schmidt, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot (i.e. massive) in Papers I and II of this series. Here we consider the thermodynamics of the intracluster medium, in particular the profiles of density, temperature and related quantities, as well as integrated measurements of gas mass, average temperature, total luminosity and centre-excluded luminosity. We fit power-law scaling relations of each of these quantities as a function of redshift and cluster mass, which can be measured precisely and with minimal bias for these relaxed clusters using hydrostatic arguments. For the thermodynamic profiles, we jointly model the density and temperature and their intrinsic scatter as a function of radius, thus also capturing the behaviour of the gas pressure and entropy. For the integrated quantities, we also jointly fit a multidimensional intrinsic covariance. Our results reinforce the view that simple hydrodynamical models provide a good description of relaxed clusters outside their centres, but that additional heating and cooling processes are important in the inner regions (radii r ≲ 0.5 r2500 ≈ 0.15 r500). The thermodynamic profiles remain regular, with small intrinsic scatter, down to the smallest radii where deprojection is straightforward (˜20 kpc); within this radius, even the most relaxed systems show clear departures from spherical symmetry. Our results suggest that heating and cooling are continuously regulated in a tight feedback loop, allowing the cluster atmosphere to remain stratified on these scales.

  18. Gene expression profiling of coelomic cells and discovery of immune-related genes in the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, using expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Tak, Eun Sik; Cho, Sung-Jin; Park, Soon Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The coelomic cells of the earthworm consist of leukocytes, chlorogocytes, and coelomocytes, which play an important role in innate immunity reactions. To gain insight into the expression profiles of coelomic cells of the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, we analyzed 1151 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the cDNA library of the coelomic cells. Among the 1151 ESTs analyzed, 493 ESTs (42.8%) showed a significant similarity to known genes and represented 164 unique genes, of which 93 ESTs were singletons and 71 ESTs manifested as two or more ESTs. From the 164 unique genes sequenced, we found 24 immune-related and cell defense genes. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that levels of lysenin-related proteins mRNA in coelomic cells of E. andrei were upregulated after the injection of Bacillus subtilis bacteria. This EST data-set would provide a valuable resource for future researches of earthworm immune system.

  19. Evaluating the Stability of RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles and Drug-Induced Immune-Related Expression Changes in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, John F; Tranter, Karen M; Hanig, Joseph P; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Schleimer, Robert P; George, Nysia I

    2015-01-01

    Methods were developed to evaluate the stability of rat whole blood expression obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and assess changes in whole blood transcriptome profiles in experiments replicated over time. Expression was measured in globin-depleted RNA extracted from the whole blood of Sprague-Dawley rats, given either saline (control) or neurotoxic doses of amphetamine (AMPH). The experiment was repeated four times (paired control and AMPH groups) over a 2-year span. The transcriptome of the control and AMPH-treated groups was evaluated on: 1) transcript levels for ribosomal protein subunits; 2) relative expression of immune-related genes; 3) stability of the control transcriptome over 2 years; and 4) stability of the effects of AMPH on immune-related genes over 2 years. All, except one, of the 70 genes that encode the 80s ribosome had levels that ranked in the top 5% of all mean expression levels. Deviations in sequencing performance led to significant changes in the ribosomal transcripts. The overall expression profile of immune-related genes and genes specific to monocytes, T-cells or B-cells were well represented and consistent within treatment groups. There were no differences between the levels of ribosomal transcripts in time-matched control and AMPH groups but significant differences in the expression of immune-related genes between control and AMPH groups. AMPH significantly increased expression of some genes related to monocytes but down-regulated those specific to T-cells. These changes were partially due to changes in the two types of leukocytes present in blood, which indicate an activation of the innate immune system by AMPH. Thus, the stability of RNA-seq whole blood transcriptome can be verified by assessing ribosomal protein subunits and immune-related gene expression. Such stability enables the pooling of samples from replicate experiments to carry out differential expression analysis with acceptable power.

  20. Evaluating the Stability of RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles and Drug-Induced Immune-Related Expression Changes in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John F.; Tranter, Karen M.; Hanig, Joseph P.; Crabtree, Nathaniel M.; Schleimer, Robert P.; George, Nysia I.

    2015-01-01

    Methods were developed to evaluate the stability of rat whole blood expression obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and assess changes in whole blood transcriptome profiles in experiments replicated over time. Expression was measured in globin-depleted RNA extracted from the whole blood of Sprague-Dawley rats, given either saline (control) or neurotoxic doses of amphetamine (AMPH). The experiment was repeated four times (paired control and AMPH groups) over a 2-year span. The transcriptome of the control and AMPH-treated groups was evaluated on: 1) transcript levels for ribosomal protein subunits; 2) relative expression of immune-related genes; 3) stability of the control transcriptome over 2 years; and 4) stability of the effects of AMPH on immune-related genes over 2 years. All, except one, of the 70 genes that encode the 80s ribosome had levels that ranked in the top 5% of all mean expression levels. Deviations in sequencing performance led to significant changes in the ribosomal transcripts. The overall expression profile of immune-related genes and genes specific to monocytes, T-cells or B-cells were well represented and consistent within treatment groups. There were no differences between the levels of ribosomal transcripts in time-matched control and AMPH groups but significant differences in the expression of immune-related genes between control and AMPH groups. AMPH significantly increased expression of some genes related to monocytes but down-regulated those specific to T-cells. These changes were partially due to changes in the two types of leukocytes present in blood, which indicate an activation of the innate immune system by AMPH. Thus, the stability of RNA-seq whole blood transcriptome can be verified by assessing ribosomal protein subunits and immune-related gene expression. Such stability enables the pooling of samples from replicate experiments to carry out differential expression analysis with acceptable power. PMID:26177368

  1. Gene expression profiling of immune-competent human cells exposed to engineered zinc oxide or titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Soile; Autio, Reija; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Arslan, Osman; Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson-Willman, Britta; Wick, Peter; Mathur, Sanjay; Scheynius, Annika; Krug, Harald F; Fadeel, Bengt; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive in vitro assessment of two commercial metal oxide nanoparticles, TiO2 and ZnO, was performed using human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), and Jurkat T cell leukemia-derived cell line. TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic whereas ZnO nanoparticles caused dose-dependent cell death. Subsequently, global gene expression profiling was performed to identify transcriptional response underlying the cytotoxicity caused by ZnO nanoparticles. Analysis was done with doses 1 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, 2703 genes were significantly differentially expressed in HMDM upon exposure to 10 µg/ml ZnO nanoparticles, while in MDDCs only 12 genes were affected. In Jurkat cells, 980 genes were differentially expressed. It is noteworthy that only the gene expression of metallothioneins was upregulated in all the three cell types and a notable proportion of the genes were regulated in a cell type-specific manner. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the top biological processes disturbed in HMDM and Jurkat cells were regulating cell death and growth. In addition, genes controlling immune system development were affected. Using a panel of modified ZnO nanoparticles, we obtained an additional support that the cellular response to ZnO nanoparticles is largely dependent on particle dissolution and show that the ligand used to modify ZnO nanoparticles modulates Zn(2+) leaching. Overall, the study provides an extensive resource of transcriptional markers for mediating ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity for further mechanistic studies, and demonstrates the value of assessing nanoparticle responses through a combined transcriptomics and bioinformatics approach.

  2. Immune gene expression profile of Penaeus monodon in response to marine yeast glucan application and white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wilsy; Lowman, Douglas; Antony, Swapna P; Puthumana, Jayesh; Bright Singh, I S; Philip, Rosamma

    2015-04-01

    Immunostimulant potential of eight marine yeast glucans (YG) from Candida parapsilosis R20, Hortaea werneckii R23, Candida spencermartinsiae R28, Candida haemulonii R63, Candida oceani R89, Debaryomyces fabryi R100, Debaryomyces nepalensis R305 and Meyerozyma guilliermondii R340 were tested against WSSV challenge in Penaeus monodon post larvae (PL). Structural characterization of these marine yeast glucans by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicated structures containing (1-6)-branched (1-3)-β-D-glucan. PL were fed 0.2% glucan incorporated diet once in seven days for a period of 45 days and the animals were challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The immunostimulatory activity of yeast glucans were assessed pre- and post-challenge WSSV by analysing the expression profile of six antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes viz., anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF), crustin-1, crustin-2, crustin-3, penaeidin-3 and penaeidin-5 and 13 immune genes viz., alpha-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M), astakine, caspase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, haemocyanin, peroxinectin, pmCathepsinC, prophenol oxidase (proPO), Rab-7, superoxide dismutase and transglutaminase. Expression of seven WSSV genes viz., DNA polymerase, endonuclease, protein kinase, immediate early gene, latency related gene, thymidine kinase and VP28 were also analysed to detect the presence and intensity of viral infection in the experimental animals post-challenge. The study revealed that yeast glucans (YG) do possess immunostimulatory activity against WSSV and also supported higher survival (40-70 %) post-challenge WSSV. Among the various glucans tested, YG23 showed maximum survival (70.27%), followed by YG20 (66.66%), YG28 (60.97%), YG89 (58.53%), YG100 (54.05%), YG63 (48.64%), YG305 (45.7%) and YG340 (43.24%). PMID:25555812

  3. External Validation of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) Profile and Factor Scales: Parent, Teacher, and Clinician Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachar, David; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Attempted to expand the construct validity of the profile and factor scales for the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) by determining the relationship of these scales to empirically derived dimensions of problem behaviors in children and adolescents (N=691). Results provided substantial evidence of convergent and discriminant validity. (LLL)

  4. Construct Validation of Analytic Rating Scales in a Speaking Assessment: Reporting a Score Profile and a Composite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawaki, Yasuyo

    2007-01-01

    This is a construct validation study of a second language speaking assessment that reported a language profile based on analytic rating scales and a composite score. The study addressed three key issues: score dependability, convergent/discriminant validity of analytic rating scales and the weighting of analytic ratings in the composite score.…

  5. Comparing Longitudinal Profile Patterns of Mathematics and Reading in Early Child Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten: The Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare longitudinal patterns from Mathematics and Reading data from the direct child assessment of Early Child Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten (ECLS-K, US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics 2006), utilizing Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS). PAMS has been used initially…

  6. Extracting tumor tissue immune status from expression profiles: correlating renal cancer prognosis with tumor-associated immunome

    PubMed Central

    Teltsh, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the expression of genes in cancer-associated immune cells (immunome) is imperative for prognosis prediction. However, evaluating the expression of immune-associated genes within cancer biopsy is subject to significant inconsistencies related to the sampling methodology. Here, we present immFocus, a method for extracting immune signals from total RNA sequencing of tumor biopsies, intended for immunity depiction and prognosis evaluation. It is based on reducing the variation which biopsy preparation adds to the apparent expression levels of immune genes. We employed immFocus to normalize gene expression with an immune index using data obtained from renal clear cell carcinoma biopsies. Genes that became less variable due to normalization were found to be preferentially immune-related. Moreover, immune-related genes tended to become more prognostic due to the normalization. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that whole transcriptome sequencing can be used for interrogation of a cancer immunome and for advancing immune-based prognosis. PMID:26384298

  7. Immune response-associated gene analysis of 1,000 cancer patients using whole-exome sequencing and gene expression profiling-Project HOPE.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Kondou, Ryota; Iizuka, Akira; Ohshima, Keiichi; Urakami, Kenichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Shimoda, Yuji; Tanabe, Tomoe; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohnami, Shumpei; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Project HOPE (High-tech Omics-based Patient Evaluation) has been progressing since its implementation in 2014 using whole-exome sequencing (WES) and gene expression profiling (GEP). With the aim of evaluating immune status in cancer patients, a gene panel consisting of 164 immune response-associated genes (56 antigen-presenting cell and T-cell-associated genes, 34 cytokine- and metabolism-associated genes, 47 TNF and TNF receptor superfamily genes, and 27 regulatory T-cell-associated genes) was established, and its expression and mutation status were investigated using 1,000 cancer patient-derived tumors. Regarding WES, sequencing and variant calling were performed using the Ion Proton system. The average number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) detected per sample was 183 ± 507, and the number of hypermutators with more than 500 total SNVs was 51 cases. Regarding GEP, seven immune response-associated genes (VTCN1, IL2RA, ULBP2, TREM1, MSR1, TNFSF9 and TNFRSF12A) were more than 2-fold overexpressed compared with normal tissues in more than 2 organs. Specifically, the positive rate of PD-L1 expression in all patients was 25.8%, and PD-L1 expression was significantly upregulated in hypermutators. The simultaneous analyses of WES and GEP based on immune response-associated genes are very intriguing tools to screen cancer patients suitable for immune checkpoint antibody therapy. PMID:27544999

  8. Single-cell network profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors reveals age- and race-associated differences in immune signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Putta, Santosh; Evensen, Erik; Ptacek, Jason; Cordeiro, James; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Hawtin, Rachael E; Marincola, Francesco M; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-02-15

    A greater understanding of the function of the human immune system at the single-cell level in healthy individuals is critical for discerning aberrant cellular behavior that occurs in settings such as autoimmunity, immunosenescence, and cancer. To achieve this goal, a systems-level approach capable of capturing the response of the interdependent immune cell types to external stimuli is required. In this study, an extensive characterization of signaling responses in multiple immune cell subpopulations within PBMCs from a cohort of 60 healthy donors was performed using single-cell network profiling (SCNP). SCNP is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based approach that enables the simultaneous measurement of basal and evoked signaling in multiple cell subsets within heterogeneous populations. In addition to establishing the interindividual degree of variation within a broad panel of immune signaling responses, the possible association of any observed variation with demographic variables including age and race was investigated. Using half of the donors as a training set, multiple age- and race-associated variations in signaling responses in discrete cell subsets were identified, and several were subsequently confirmed in the remaining samples (test set). Such associations may provide insight into age-related immune alterations associated with high infection rates and diminished protection following vaccination and into the basis for ethnic differences in autoimmune disease incidence and treatment response. SCNP allowed for the generation of a functional map of healthy immune cell signaling responses that can provide clinically relevant information regarding both the mechanisms underlying immune pathological conditions and the selection and effect of therapeutics.

  9. Nutrient content in sludge profiles from a full-scale stabilization pond in a temperate location.

    PubMed

    Faleschini, Mauricio; Esteves, José L

    2014-09-01

    The inorganic nutrient concentrations in sludge profiles from a full-scale municipal facultative pond in Puerto Madryn City (Argentina) were measured. Sludge samples were collected with cores during autumn, winter, and summer at three sites: inlet, intermediate, and outlet. In general, the sludge accumulates NH4+ and PO4(3-), increasing their concentrations with depth. However, NH4+ presented a different behavior at the outlet station during the summer, when the lower concentrations were recorded. This finding reflects a nutrient release, originating in their greater demand from the water column. In the sludge, the NO3- followed the spatial and seasonal pattern recorded in the surface water: detectable concentrations in the warmer months at the outlet. The vertical reduction of NO3- could be an indication of denitrification. The study supported the hypothesis that the sludge can act as a nutrient trap or source, depending on factors such as the temperature, nutrients/oxygen concentration, mixing processes, and location.

  10. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-05-15

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  11. Deep sequencing-based transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus reveals insight into the immune-relevant genes in marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Systematic research on fish immunogenetics is indispensable in understanding the origin and evolution of immune systems. This has long been a challenging task because of the limited number of deep sequencing technologies and genome backgrounds of non-model fish available. The newly developed Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq and Digital gene expression (DGE) are high-throughput sequencing approaches and are powerful tools for genomic studies at the transcriptome level. This study reports the transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus using RNA-seq and DGE in an attempt to gain insights into the immunogenetics of marine fish. Results RNA-seq analysis generated 169,950 non-redundant consensus sequences, among which 48,987 functional transcripts with complete or various length encoding regions were identified. More than 52% of these transcripts are possibly involved in approximately 219 known metabolic or signalling pathways, while 2,673 transcripts were associated with immune-relevant genes. In addition, approximately 8% of the transcripts appeared to be fish-specific genes that have never been described before. DGE analysis revealed that the host transcriptome profile of Vibrio harveyi-challenged L. japonicus is considerably altered, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 1,224 strong infection-responsive transcripts. Results indicated an overall conservation of the components and transcriptome alterations underlying innate and adaptive immunity in fish and other vertebrate models. Analysis suggested the acquisition of numerous fish-specific immune system components during early vertebrate evolution. Conclusion This study provided a global survey of host defence gene activities against bacterial challenge in a non-model marine fish. Results can contribute to the in-depth study of candidate genes in marine fish immunity, and help improve current understanding of host-pathogen interactions and evolutionary history

  12. On the computation of a retina resistivity profile for applications in multi-scale modeling of electrical stimulation and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizos, Kyle; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Anderson, James; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes a methodology for computationally estimating resistive properties of tissue in multi-scale computational models, used for studying the interaction of electromagnetic fields with neural tissue, with applications to both dosimetry and neuroprosthetics. Traditionally, models at bulk tissue- and cellular-level scales are solved independently, linking resulting voltage from existing resistive tissue-scale models as extracellular sources to cellular models. This allows for solving the effects that external electric fields have on cellular activity. There are two major limitations to this approach: first, the resistive properties of the tissue need to be chosen, of which there are contradicting measurements in literature; second, the measurements of resistivity themselves may be inaccurate, leading to the mentioned contradicting results found across different studies. Our proposed methodology allows for constructing computed resistivity profiles using knowledge of only the neural morphology within the multi-scale model, resulting in a practical implementation of the effective medium theory; this bypasses concerns regarding the choice of resistive properties and accuracy of measurement setups. A multi-scale model of retina is constructed with an external electrode to serve as a test bench for analyzing existing and resulting resistivity profiles, and validation is presented through the reconstruction of a published resistivity profile of retina tissue. Results include a computed resistivity profile of retina tissue for use with a retina multi-scale model used to analyze effects of external electric fields on neural activity.

  13. On the computation of a retina resistivity profile for applications in multi-scale modeling of electrical stimulation and absorption

    PubMed Central

    Loizos, Kyle; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Anderson, James; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a methodology for computationally estimating resistive properties of tissue in multi-scale computational models, used for studying the interaction of electromagnetic fields with neural tissue, with applications to both dosimetry and neuroprosthetics. Traditionally, models at bulk tissue- and cellular-level scales are solved independently, linking resulting voltage from existing resistive tissue-scale models as extracellular sources to cellular models. This allows for solving the effects that external electric fields have on cellular activity. There are two major limitations to this approach: first, the resistive properties of the tissue need to be chosen, of which there are contradicting measurements in literature; second, the measurements of resistivity themselves may be inaccurate, leading to the mentioned contradicting results found across different studies. Our proposed methodology allows for constructing computed resistivity profiles using knowledge of only the neural morphology within the multi-scale model, resulting in a practical implementation of the effective medium theory; this bypasses concerns regarding the choice of resistive properties and accuracy of measurement setups. A multi-scale model of retina is constructed with an external electrode to serve as a test bench for analyzing existing and resulting resistivity profiles, and validation is presented through the reconstruction of a published resistivity profile of retina tissue. Results include a computed resistivity profile of retina tissue for use with a retina multi-scale model used to analyze effects of external electric fields on neural activity. PMID:27223656

  14. Protective immunity in cattle vaccinated with a commercial scale, inactivated, bivalent vesicular stomatitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    House, James A; House, Carol; Dubourget, Philippe; Lombard, Michel

    2003-05-16

    A commercially prepared oil-adjuvanted, inactivated vaccine containing antigens of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotypes New Jersey (NJ) and Indiana 1 (IND1) was administered to calves to determine its ability to induce protective immunity. Weekly serological studies were conducted. The 12 calves in Group I were vaccinated once and challenge inoculated with VSV New Jersey 28 days later. Two calves were fully protected and two were partially protected. The five calves in Group II were vaccinated twice 40 days apart and challenge inoculated on 14 days post-second vaccination (dp2v) with VSV Indiana 1. All animals were fully protected. The 14 calves in Group III were vaccinated twice 91 days apart and challenge inoculated on 91 dp2v with VSV Indiana 1. All animals were fully protected. All control calves in each group became clinically ill. Two calves inoculated with VSV Indiana 1 challenge virus on day 0 and 11 weeks later showed clinical disease after each inoculation. No virus was isolated from the blood of four acutely ill calves 48 h after challenge inoculation. PMID:12706679

  15. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis. PMID:27354295

  16. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis.

  17. Gene expression profiling by mRNA sequencing reveals increased expression of immune/inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y; Kim, J; Shin, J Y; Kim, J Ii; Seo, J S; Webster, M J; Lee, D; Kim, S

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome expression profiling in postmortem brain tissue has recently provided insight into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Previous microarray and RNA-Seq studies identified several biological processes including synaptic function, mitochondrial function and immune/inflammation response as altered in the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Now using RNA-Seq data from the hippocampus, we have identified 144 differentially expressed genes in schizophrenia cases as compared with unaffected controls. Immune/inflammation response was the main biological process over-represented in these genes. The upregulation of several of these genes, IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, APOL1 (Apolipoprotein L1), ADORA2A (adenosine receptor 2A), IGFBP4 and CD163 were validated in the schizophrenia subjects using data from the SNCID database and with quantitative RT-PCR. We identified a co-expression module associated with schizophrenia that includes the majority of differentially expressed genes related to immune/inflammation response as well as with the density of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the hippocampus. The results indicate that abnormal immune/inflammation response in the hippocampus may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and may be associated with abnormalities in the parvalbumin-containing neurons that lead to the cognitive deficits of the disease. PMID:24169640

  18. Antibody Profiling in Naïve and Semi-immune Individuals Experimentally Challenged with Plasmodium vivax Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Dotsey, Emmanuel; Jain, Aarti; Rubiano, Kelly; Felgner, Philip L.; Davies, D. Huw; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquisition of malaria immunity in low transmission areas usually occurs after relatively few exposures to the parasite. A recent Plasmodium vivax experimental challenge trial in malaria naïve and semi-immune volunteers from Colombia showed that all naïve individuals developed malaria symptoms, whereas semi-immune subjects were asymptomatic or displayed attenuated symptoms. Sera from these individuals were analyzed by protein microarray to identify antibodies associated with clinical protection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum samples from naïve (n = 7) and semi-immune (n = 9) volunteers exposed to P. vivax sporozoite-infected mosquito bites were probed against a custom protein microarray displaying 515 P. vivax antigens. The array revealed higher serological responses in semi-immune individuals before the challenge, although malaria naïve individuals also had pre-existing antibodies, which were higher in Colombians than US adults (control group). In both experimental groups the response to the P. vivax challenge peaked at day 45 and returned to near baseline at day 145. Additional analysis indicated that semi-immune volunteers without fever displayed a lower response to the challenge, but recognized new antigens afterwards. Conclusion Clinical protection against experimental challenge in volunteers with previous P. vivax exposure was associated with elevated pre-existing antibodies, an attenuated serological response to the challenge and reactivity to new antigens. PMID:27014875

  19. Depth profiles of methane oxidation potentials and methanotrophic community in a lab-scale biocover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2014-08-20

    The depth profiles of the CH4 oxidation potentials and the methanotrophic community were characterized in a lab-scale soil mixture biocover. The soil mixture samples were collected from the top (0-10cm), middle (10-40cm), and bottom (40-50cm) layers of the biocover where most of methane was oxidized at the top layer due to consumption of O2. Batch tests using serum bottles showed that the middle and bottom samples displayed CH4 oxidation activity under aerobic conditions, and their CH4 oxidation rates were 85 and 71% of the rate of top sample (8.40μmolgdry sample(-1)h(-1)), respectively. The numbers of methanotrophs in the middle and bottom were not significantly different from those in the top sample. There was no statistical difference in the community stability indices (diversity and evenness) among the methanotrophic communities of the three layer samples, even though the community structures were distinguished from each other. Based on microarray analysis, type I and type II methanotrophs were equally present in the top sample, while type I was more dominant than type II in the middle and bottom samples. We suggested that the qualitative difference in the community structures was probably caused by the difference in the depth profiles of the CH4 and O2 concentrations. The results for the CH4 oxidation potential, methanotrophic biomass, and community stability indices in the middle and bottom layer samples indicated that the deeper layer in the methanotrophic biocover serves as a bioresource reservoir for sustainable CH4 mitigation.

  20. Projected profile similarity in gyrokinetic simulations of Bohm and gyro-Bohm scaled DIII-D L and H modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.

    2006-07-15

    Global gyrokinetic simulations of DIII-D [M. A. Mahdavi and J. L. Luxon, in 'DIII-D Tokamak Special Issue', Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] L- and H-mode dimensionally similar discharge pairs are treated in detail. The simulations confirm the Bohm scaling of the well-matched L-mode pair. The paradoxical but experimentally apparent gyro-Bohm scaling of the H-mode pair at larger relative gyroradius (rho-star) and lower transport levels is due to poor profile similarity. Simulations of projected experimental plasma profiles with perfect similarity show both the L- and H-mode pairs to have Bohm scaling. A {rho}{sub *} stabilization rule for predicting the breakdown of gyro-Bohm scaling from simulations of a single discharge is presented.

  1. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I.; Allwood, J. William; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham

    2015-01-01

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  2. Low- versus high-baseline epinephrine output shapes opposite innate cytokine profiles: presence of Lewis- and Fischer-like neurohormonal immune phenotypes in humans?

    PubMed

    Elenkov, Ilia J; Kvetnansky, Richard; Hashiramoto, Akira; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Link, Amrey A; Zachman, Keith; Crane, Marianna; Jezova, Daniela; Rovensky, Jozef; Dimitrov, Mariana A; Gold, Philip W; Bonini, Sergio; Fleisher, Thomas; Chrousos, George P; Wilder, Ronald L

    2008-08-01

    Immunogenetic mechanisms operating within the immune system are known to influence cytokine profiles and disease susceptibility. Yet the role of the individual's neurohormonal background in these processes remains undefined. Hormonal imbalances are documented in immune-related diseases, but it is unclear whether this represents a secondary phenomenon or a primary "defect" related to specific neurohormonal immune phenotype(s). We report that in a large subpopulation of healthy humans the baseline epinephrine output (but not cortisol and sex steroid hormones) correlated inversely with proinflammatory and positively with anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Thus, low vs high epinephrine excretors had a 2- to 5-fold higher TNF-alpha and IL-12 production but 2-fold lower IL-10 production induced by LPS ex vivo. In alternative settings, we found low baseline levels and profoundly blunted stress-induced epinephrine responses but high TNF-alpha levels in Lewis vs Fischer inbred rats. Additionally, isoproterenol, a beta adrenoreceptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced TNF-alpha production, with more pronounced effect in Lewis than in Fischer rats. In human monocytes, epinephrine and the beta(2) adrenoreceptor agonist fenoterol potently inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-12, but stimulated IL-10 production. The order of potency for hormones able to inhibit IL-12 production ex vivo was: epinephrine > norepinephrine > or = 1,25-(OH)(2) vitamin D(3) > hydrocortisone. This indicates that baseline epinephrine conditions cytokine responsiveness and through this mechanism intrinsic hypo- or hyperactive adrenal medullas in some individuals may shape opposite cytokine profiles. Since Lewis and Fischer rats have opposite susceptibility to experimental immunological diseases, this suggests that the parallel human phenotypes could be linked to differing responsiveness and susceptibility to infections and immune/inflammatory-related conditions. PMID:18641310

  3. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D; Udagama, Preethi V

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~5ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~9360pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P<0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P<0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P<0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  4. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D; Udagama, Preethi V

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~5ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~9360pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P<0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P<0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P<0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco-challenges.

  5. Maternal immune activation by LPS selectively alters specific gene expression profiles of interneuron migration and oxidative stress in the fetus without triggering a fetal immune response

    PubMed Central

    Oskvig, Devon B.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Johnson, Kory R.; Phillips, Terry M.; Herkenham, Miles

    2012-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Infections during pregnancy activate the mother’s immune system and alter the fetal environment, with consequential effects on CNS function and behavior in the offspring, but the cellular and molecular links between infection-induced altered fetal development and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders are unknown. We investigated the immunological, molecular, and behavioral effects of MIA in the offspring of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats given an intraperitoneal (0.25 mg/kg) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational day 15. LPS significantly elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, and fetal brain at 4 h, and levels decreased but remained elevated at 24 h. Offspring born to LPS-treated dams exhibited reduced social preference and exploration behaviors as juveniles and young adults. Whole genome microarray analysis of the fetal brain at 4 h post maternal LPS was performed to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms by which MIA affects the fetal brain. We observed dysregulation of 3,285 genes in restricted functional categories, with increased mRNA expression of cellular stress and cell death genes and reduced expression of developmentally-regulated and brain-specific genes, specifically those that regulate neuronal migration of GABAergic interneurons, including the Distal-less (Dlx) family of transcription factors required for tangential migration from progenitor pools within the ganglionic eminences into the cerebral cortex. Our results provide a novel mechanism by which MIA induces the widespread down-regulation of critical neurodevelopmental genes, including those previously associated with autism. PMID:22310921

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of the Virus-Induced Innate Immune Response in Pteropus vampyrus and Its Attenuation by Nipah Virus Interferon Antagonist Functions

    PubMed Central

    Glennon, Nicole B.; Jabado, Omar; Lo, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bats are important reservoirs for several viruses, many of which cause lethal infections in humans but have reduced pathogenicity in bats. As the innate immune response is critical for controlling viruses, the nature of this response in bats and how it may differ from that in other mammals are of great interest. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing (mRNA-seq), we profiled the transcriptional response of Pteropus vampyrus bat kidney (PVK) cells to Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus known to elicit a strong innate immune response in mammalian cells. The Pteropus genus is a known reservoir of Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). Analysis of the 200 to 300 regulated genes showed that genes for interferon (IFN) and antiviral pathways are highly upregulated in NDV-infected PVK cells, including genes for beta IFN, RIG-I, MDA5, ISG15, and IRF1. NDV-infected cells also upregulated several genes not previously characterized to be antiviral, such as RND1, SERTAD1, CHAC1, and MORC3. In fact, we show that MORC3 is induced by both IFN and NDV infection in PVK cells but is not induced by either stimulus in human A549 cells. In contrast to NDV infection, HeV and NiV infection of PVK cells failed to induce these innate immune response genes. Likewise, an attenuated response was observed in PVK cells infected with recombinant NDVs expressing the NiV IFN antagonist proteins V and W. This study provides the first global profile of a robust virus-induced innate immune response in bats and indicates that henipavirus IFN antagonist mechanisms are likely active in bat cells. IMPORTANCE Bats are the reservoir host for many highly pathogenic human viruses, including henipaviruses, lyssaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and filoviruses, and many other viruses have also been isolated from bats. Viral infections are reportedly asymptomatic or heavily attenuated in bat populations. Despite their ecological importance to viral

  7. Gender-based measurement invariance of the substance use risk profile scale.

    PubMed

    Memetovic, Jasmina; Ratner, Pamela A; Richardson, Christopher G

    2014-03-01

    Gender may influence the psychometric properties of psychological and affect-related measures. The American Psychological Association has made recommendations to conduct tests of group-level measurement invariance (MI) before comparing scores between groups. Gender-based measurement invariance has been examined in many well-known psycho-social scales such as the CES-D and the Big Five Inventory. The Substance Use Risk Profile is a 23-item scale measuring affective- and personality-related traits known to increase risk for substance use, with 4 dimensions: anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking and impulsivity. Despite similarities in the constructs assessed by the SURPS, the CES-D and the Big Five Inventory, gender-based measurement invariance of the SURPS has not yet been published. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the measurement invariance of the four dimensions of the SURPS across gender. MI was conducted with M-Plus 6.2 using a 2-step analysis for ordinal variables suggested by Muthén and Muthén, and model fit was assessed using the comparative fit index (CFI) criteria recommended by Cheung and Rensvold. A single group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was also conducted. The sample was composed of 1352 adolescents (56% female, mean age of 14years) participating in the BC Adolescent Substance Use Survey, an online survey capturing substance use and psychosocial trends in secondary students across British Columbia, Canada. Measurement invariance across gender was demonstrated for the SURPS (ΔCFI=0.003), and the single group CFA supported a four-dimensional structure for the SURPS items (CFI=0.92, RMSEA=061, 95% CI=0.058-0.065).

  8. Immune gene expression profiling of PBMC isolated from horses vaccinated with attenuated African horsesickness virus serotype 4.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A; Faber, F E; van Kleef, M

    2016-02-01

    Development of African horsesickness (AHS) subunit vaccines will have to include a rational approach that uses knowledge of how the virus interacts with the host immune system. The global in vivo immune response induced by attenuated AHSV serotype 4 in horses was characterised using transcriptome sequencing. PBMC were collected with 24h intervals for four days after inoculation and four days after a second boost, 21 days later. Transcriptome data were normalised to the day 0 naïve transcriptome and up- or down-regulated immune genes identified using the CLC workbench. Peak expression was observed 24h after each inoculation. Innate immunity was up-regulated after both inoculations and was characterised by type-1 interferon activation via the RIG-1/MDA5 pathway and the up-regulation of complement cascade components. After the second boost an adaptive immune response could be identified that included the production of cytokines indicative of T helper (Th)1, Th2 and Th17 responses.

  9. Genomic and Immunological Tumor Profiling Identifies Targetable Pathways and Extensive CD8+/PDL1+ Immune Infiltration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Moran, Diarmuid; Rao, Kakuturu; Trusk, Patricia B; Pry, Karen; Sausen, Mark; Jones, Siân; Velculescu, Victor E; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Bacus, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Comprehensive tumor profiling was performed to understand clinically actionable alterations in IBC. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and IHC were performed to identify activated pathways in IBC tumor tissues. siRNA studies examined the impact of IBC genomic variants in cellular models. IBC tumor tissues were further characterized for immune infiltration and immune checkpoint expression by IHC. Genomic analysis identified recurrent alterations in core biologic pathways, including activating and targetable variants in HER/PI3K/mTOR signaling. High rates of activating HER3 point mutations were discovered in IBC tumors. Cell line studies confirmed a role for mutant HER3 in IBC cell proliferation. Immunologic analysis revealed a subset of IBC tumors associated with high CD8(+)/PD-L1(+) lymphocyte infiltration. Immune infiltration positively correlated with an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure derived from the somatic mutation rate and mutant allele frequency, iScore. Additionally, DNA mismatch repair alterations, which may contribute to higher iScores, occurred at greater frequency in tumors with higher immune infiltration. Our study identifies genomic alterations that mechanistically contribute to oncogenic signaling in IBC and provides a genetic basis for the selection of clinically relevant targeted and combination therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure developed in this study (iScore) may be a useful biomarker to predict immune infiltration in IBC and other cancers. The iScore may be associated with greater levels of response to immunotherapies, such as PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1746-56. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Concordant or discordant results by the tuberculin skin test and the quantiFERON-TB test in children reflect immune biomarker profiles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, S; Jenum, S; Stavrum, R; Ritz, C; Kenneth, J; Vaz, M; Doherty, T M; Grewal, H M S

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB-Gold-In-tube (QFTGIT) are adjunctive tests used in the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB). Neither test can rule out TB; however, a positive test usually triggers preventive treatment in TB contacts aged <5 years. TST and QFTGIT can give divergent results and it is unclear how discordant results should be interpreted in terms of TB risk and preventive treatment. To understand the immune processes underlying concordant or discordant TST and QFTGIT results, we analyzed immune responses in children from Palamaner Taluk in India (a TB-endemic region with routine neonatal BCG vaccination) who were referred to a TB case verification ward on suspicion of TB. Two hundred and ten children aged <3 years were classified according to their TST and QFTGIT results, and their immune responses analyzed by dual-colour-Reverse-Transcriptase-Multiple-Ligation-dependent-Probe-Amplification, using a panel of 45 genes and a 10-plex antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We show that immune biomarkers FPR1, TNFRSF1A and interferon (IFN)-γ are upregulated (all P<0.05) in concordant test-positive children, whereas BPI is downregulated (P<0.05). In contrast, SEC14L1 (P=0.034) and Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (P=0.001) are differentially expressed between the TST+QFTGIT- /TST-QFTGIT+ groups. Known TB exposure was more frequent in concordant positive children and results were consistent with elevated expression of genes associated with inflammatory responses. Children with discordant test results displayed a mixed profile with activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. TST and/or QFTGIT positivity appears to reflect distinct but overlapping aspects of host immunity.

  11. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell / antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease. PMID:23865616

  12. Profiling and Improving I/O Performance of a Large-Scale Climate Scientific Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Bin; Wang, Teng; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Cong; Wang, Yandong; Yu, Weikuan; Cruz, Carlos A.; Zhou, Shujia; Clune, Tom; Klasky, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Exascale computing systems are soon to emerge, which will pose great challenges on the huge gap between computing and I/O performance. Many large-scale scientific applications play an important role in our daily life. The huge amounts of data generated by such applications require highly parallel and efficient I/O management policies. In this paper, we adopt a mission-critical scientific application, GEOS-5, as a case to profile and analyze the communication and I/O issues that are preventing applications from fully utilizing the underlying parallel storage systems. Through in-detail architectural and experimental characterization, we observe that current legacy I/O schemes incur significant network communication overheads and are unable to fully parallelize the data access, thus degrading applications' I/O performance and scalability. To address these inefficiencies, we redesign its I/O framework along with a set of parallel I/O techniques to achieve high scalability and performance. Evaluation results on the NASA discover cluster show that our optimization of GEOS-5 with ADIOS has led to significant performance improvements compared to the original GEOS-5 implementation.

  13. Gene Selection in Arthritis Classification With Large-Scale Microarray Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Naijun; Brown, Philip J.; Trower, Michael K.; Amphlett, Gillian; Falciani, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The use of large-scale microarray expression profiling to identify predictors of disease class has become of major interest. Beyond their impact in the clinical setting (i.e. improving diagnosis and treatment), these markers are also likely to provide clues on the molecular mechanisms underlining the diseases. In this paper we describe a new method for the identification of multiple gene predictors of disease class. The method is applied to the classification of two forms of arthritis that have a similar clinical endpoint but different underlying molecular mechanisms: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). We aim at both the classification of samples and the location of genes characterizing the different classes. We achieve both goals simultaneously by combining a binary probit model for classification with Bayesian variable selection methods to identify important genes.We find very small sets of genes that lead to good classification results. Some of the selected genes are clearly correlated with known aspects of the biology of arthritis and, in some cases, reflect already known differences between RA and OA. PMID:18629129

  14. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  15. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: A Concurrent Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagborg, Winston J.

    1993-01-01

    Administered Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents to 150 adolescents in grades 8 through 12. Correlational and cross-validation multiple regression analyses found that RSE total score and both its factor scores were strongly related to Global Self-Worth. Females reported significantly lower RSE…

  16. Measuring Child Poverty in South Africa: Sensitivity to the Choice of Equivalence Scale and an Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streak, Judith Christine; Yu, Derek; Van der Berg, Servaas

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers evidence on the sensitivity of child poverty in South Africa to changes in the adult equivalence scale (AES) and updates the child poverty profile based on the Income and Expenditure Survey 2005/06. Setting the poverty line at the 40th percentile of households calculated with different AESs the scope and composition of child…

  17. Measuring the Interactive Skills of Caregivers in Child Care Centers: Development and Validation of the Caregiver Interaction Profile Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmerhorst, Katrien O. W.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Vermeer, Harriet J.; Fukkink, Ruben G.; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: High-quality caregiver-child interactions constitute the core of high-quality child care for young children. This article describes the background and development of the Caregiver Interaction Profile (CIP) scales to rate 6 key skills of caregivers for interacting with 0-to 4-year-old children in child care centers: sensitive…

  18. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  19. Gene expression profile analysis of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) hemocytes after a Vibrio alginolyticus challenge using an immune-enriched oligo-microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) is a cultured bivalve with worldwide commercial importance, and diseases cause high economic losses. For this reason, interest in the immune genes in this species has recently increased. The present work describes the construction of the first R. philippinarum microarray containing immune-related hemocyte sequences and its application to study the gene transcription profiles of hemocytes from clams infected with V. alginolyticus through a time course. Results The complete set of sequences from R. philippinarum available in the public databases and the hemocyte sequences enriched in immune transcripts were assembled successfully. A total of 12,156 annotated sequences were used to construct the 8 ×15 k oligo-microarray. The microarray experiments yielded a total of 579 differentially expressed transcripts. Using the gene expression results, the associated Gene Ontology terms and the enrichment analysis, we found different response mechanisms throughout the experiment. Genes related to signaling, transcription and apoptosis, such as IL-17D, NF-κB or calmodulin, were typically expressed as early as 3 hours post-challenge (hpc), while characteristic immune genes, such as PGRPs, FREPs and defense proteins appeared later at 8 hpc. This immune-triggering response could have affected a high number of processes that seemed to be activated 24 hpc to overcome the Vibrio challenge, including the expression of many cytoskeleton molecules, which is indicative of the active movement of hemocytes. In fact functional studies showed an increment in apoptosis, necrosis or cell migration after the infection. Finally, 72 hpc, activity returned to normal levels, and more than 50% of the genes were downregulated in a negative feedback of all of the previously active processes. Conclusions Using a new version of the R. philippinarum oligo-microarray, a putative timing for the response against a Vibrio infection was established. The key

  20. Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores and profiles in African American adolescents involved with the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Frank C; Andretta, James R; Woodland, Malcolm H

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the internal consistency and structural validity of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores in a sample of 477 African American adolescents who had been arrested in a city in the mid-Atlantic. Using cluster analysis, we also identified profiles of CRIS scores and compared adolescents with different profiles on Major Depressive Episode, Manic Episode, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder scores. Results indicated that CRIS subscale scores were reliable, and the 6-factor structure of the CRIS was supported. Five nigrescence profiles were identified: Miseducation-Pro-Black, Conflicted-Self-Hatred, Multiculturalist, Low Race Salience, and Conflicted-Anti-White. Individuals with Conflicted-Self-Hatred profiles reported significantly and meaningfully higher scores on the 4 syndromes than did their peers, and individuals with the Multiculturalist and Low Race Salience profiles reported the lowest scores. A greater percentage of individuals with Conflicted racial identity profiles had syndrome scores in the clinically significant range. The results of this study demonstrate that some of the nigrescence profiles found in college-age students generalize to adolescents. The implications of the findings for theory, research, and practice are discussed. PMID:25151117

  1. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  2. Transcriptome profiling analysis of naked carp (Gymnocypris przewalskii) provides insights into the immune-related genes in highland fish.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chao; Zhang, Cunfang; Zhang, Renyi; Zhao, Kai

    2015-10-01

    The naked carp, Gymnocypris przewalskii, is one of the dominant aquaculture fish species in Qinghai Province, China. Its wild stocks have severely suffered from overfishing, and the farming species are vulnerable to various pathogens infections. Here we report the first immune-related tissues transcriptome of a wild naked carp using a deep sequencing approach. A total of 158,087 unigenes are generated, 2687 gill-specific gene and 3215 kidney-specific genes are identified, respectively. Gene ontology analysis shows that 51,671 unigenes are involved in three major functional categories: biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. Further analysis shows that numerous consensus sequences are homologous to known immune-related genes. Pathways mapping annotate 56,270 unigenes and identify a large number of immune-related pathways. In addition, we focus on the immune-related genes and gene family in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway involved in innate immunity, including toll-like receptors (TLRs), interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), interleukins (ILs) and tumor necrosis factors (TNFs). Eventually, we identify 5 TLRs, 4 IRFs, 3 ILs and 2 TNFs with a completed coding sequence though mining the transcriptome data. Phylogeny analysis shows these genes of naked carp are mostly close to zebrafish. Protein domain and selection pressure analyses together show that all these genes are highly conserved in gene sequence and protein domain structure with other species, and purifying selection underwent in these genes, implied functionally important features are conserved in the genes above. Intriguingly, we detect positive selection signals in naked carp TLR4, and significant divergence occurred among tested species TLR4, suggested that naked carp TLR4 function may be affected. Finally, we identify 23,867 simple sequence repeat (SSR) marks in this transcriptome. Taken together, this study not only contributes a large number of candidate genes in naked carp

  3. Transcriptome profiling analysis of naked carp (Gymnocypris przewalskii) provides insights into the immune-related genes in highland fish.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chao; Zhang, Cunfang; Zhang, Renyi; Zhao, Kai

    2015-10-01

    The naked carp, Gymnocypris przewalskii, is one of the dominant aquaculture fish species in Qinghai Province, China. Its wild stocks have severely suffered from overfishing, and the farming species are vulnerable to various pathogens infections. Here we report the first immune-related tissues transcriptome of a wild naked carp using a deep sequencing approach. A total of 158,087 unigenes are generated, 2687 gill-specific gene and 3215 kidney-specific genes are identified, respectively. Gene ontology analysis shows that 51,671 unigenes are involved in three major functional categories: biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. Further analysis shows that numerous consensus sequences are homologous to known immune-related genes. Pathways mapping annotate 56,270 unigenes and identify a large number of immune-related pathways. In addition, we focus on the immune-related genes and gene family in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway involved in innate immunity, including toll-like receptors (TLRs), interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), interleukins (ILs) and tumor necrosis factors (TNFs). Eventually, we identify 5 TLRs, 4 IRFs, 3 ILs and 2 TNFs with a completed coding sequence though mining the transcriptome data. Phylogeny analysis shows these genes of naked carp are mostly close to zebrafish. Protein domain and selection pressure analyses together show that all these genes are highly conserved in gene sequence and protein domain structure with other species, and purifying selection underwent in these genes, implied functionally important features are conserved in the genes above. Intriguingly, we detect positive selection signals in naked carp TLR4, and significant divergence occurred among tested species TLR4, suggested that naked carp TLR4 function may be affected. Finally, we identify 23,867 simple sequence repeat (SSR) marks in this transcriptome. Taken together, this study not only contributes a large number of candidate genes in naked carp

  4. Population-scale three-dimensional reconstruction and quantitative profiling of microglia arbors

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Lu, Yanbin; Mukherjee, Amit; Trett, Kristen; Chong, Peter; Harris, Carolyn; Shain, William; Roysam, Badrinath

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The arbor morphologies of brain microglia are important indicators of cell activation. This article fills the need for accurate, robust, adaptive and scalable methods for reconstructing 3-D microglial arbors and quantitatively mapping microglia activation states over extended brain tissue regions. Results: Thick rat brain sections (100–300 µm) were multiplex immunolabeled for IBA1 and Hoechst, and imaged by step-and-image confocal microscopy with automated 3-D image mosaicing, producing seamless images of extended brain regions (e.g. 5903 × 9874 × 229 voxels). An over-complete dictionary-based model was learned for the image-specific local structure of microglial processes. The microglial arbors were reconstructed seamlessly using an automated and scalable algorithm that exploits microglia-specific constraints. This method detected 80.1 and 92.8% more centered arbor points, and 53.5 and 55.5% fewer spurious points than existing vesselness and LoG-based methods, respectively, and the traces were 13.1 and 15.5% more accurate based on the DIADEM metric. The arbor morphologies were quantified using Scorcioni’s L-measure. Coifman’s harmonic co-clustering revealed four morphologically distinct classes that concord with known microglia activation patterns. This enabled us to map spatial distributions of microglial activation and cell abundances. Availability and implementation: Experimental protocols, sample datasets, scalable open-source multi-threaded software implementation (C++, MATLAB) in the electronic supplement, and website (www.farsight-toolkit.org). http://www.farsight-toolkit.org/wiki/Population-scale_Three-dimensional_Reconstruction_and_Quanti-tative_Profiling_of_Microglia_Arbors Contact: broysam@central.uh.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25701570

  5. Profiling of a few immune responsive genes expressed in postlarvae of Fenneropenaeus indicus challenged with Vibrio harveyi D3.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S; Ajay, K M; Ramaiah, N; Meena, Ram M; Sreepada, R A

    2011-06-01

    We identified 38 genes and eight hypothetical proteins by sequencing of 1200 clones from a Vibrio harveyi challenged Fenneropenaeus indicus subtracted cDNA library. Based on physiological roles and functions these genes were categorized into 10 groups with ∼29% of the sequences having no matches in the databases. Immune related transcripts in the library were carboxypeptidase B, ferritin, translationally controlled tumor proteins (TCTP), hemocyanin, chitinase and serine carboxy peptidase. Remarkably, qPCR results imply 4.15, 3.45 and 1.86-fold rises in expression of ferritin, TCTP and hemocyanin transcripts respectively. Additionally, minor upregulation of other immune relevant genes lectin, penaeidin, crustin, MnSOD was observed in the challenged postlarvae.

  6. The fight-or-flight response is associated with PBMC expression profiles related to immune defence and recovery in swine.

    PubMed

    Oster, Michael; Scheel, Mathias; Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Zebunke, Manuela; Puppe, Birger; Wimmers, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Defining phenotypes according to molecular features would promote the knowledge of functional traits like behaviour in both human and animal research. Beside physiological states or environmental factors, an innate predisposition of individual coping strategies was discussed, including the proactive and reactive pattern. According to backtest reactivity, animals assigned as high-resisting (proactive) and low-resisting (reactive) were immune challenged with tetanus toxoid in a time course experiment. Using the Affymetrix platform and qPCR, individual coping characteristics were reflected as gene expression signatures in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at naïve state (day 0) and in response to the model antigen (day 14, day 28, and day 140). Further, the blood cell count was analysed at all stages. On the transcriptional level, processes acting on cell communication, vasculogenesis, and blood coagulation were highlighted in high-resisting animals at naïve state (day 0), temporarily blurred due to immune challenge (day 14) but subsequently restored and intensified (day 28). Notably, similar amounts of white and red blood cells, platelets and haematocrit between high-resisting and low-resisting samples suggest coping-specific expression patterns rather than alterations in blood cell distribution. Taken together, the gene expression patterns indicate that proactive pigs might favour molecular pathways enabling an effective strategy for defence and recovery. This corroborates the previously suggested belief, that proactive animals are prone to an increased number of injuries as an evolutionary inherited mechanism. In contrast to previous assumptions, coping-specific immunity in pigs lacks inherited shifts between cellular and humoral immune responses.

  7. Transcriptome Profiling Analysis on Whole Bodies of Microbial Challenged Eriocheir sinensis Larvae for Immune Gene Identification and SNP Development

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhaoxia; Li, Xihong; Liu, Yuan; Song, Chengwen; Hui, Min; Shi, Guohui; Luo, Danli; Li, Yingdong

    2013-01-01

    To study crab immunogenetics of individuals, newly hatched Eriocheir sinensis larvae were stimulated with a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 108 cfu·mL-1). A total of 44,767,566 Illumina clean reads corresponding to 4.52 Gb nucleotides were generated and assembled into 100,252 unigenes (average length: 1,042 bp; range: 201-19,357 bp). 17,097 (26.09%) of 65,535 non-redundant unigenes were annotated in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr) database. Moreover, 23,188 (35.38%) unigenes were assigned to three Gene Ontology (GO) categories, 15,071 (23.00%) to twenty-six Clusters of orthologous Groups (COG) and 8,574 (13.08%) to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, respectively. Numerous genes were further identified to be associated with multiple immune pathways, including Toll, immune deficiency (IMD), janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Some of them, such as tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP), JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1), were first identified in E. sinensis. TRAF6 was even first discovered in crabs. Additionally, 49,555 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were developed from over 13,309 unigenes. This is the first transcriptome report of whole bodies of E. sinensis larvae after immune challenge. Data generated here not only provide detail information to identify novel genes in genome reference-free E. sinensis, but also facilitate our understanding on host immunity and defense mechanism of the crab at whole transcriptome level. PMID:24324760

  8. The fight-or-flight response is associated with PBMC expression profiles related to immune defence and recovery in swine.

    PubMed

    Oster, Michael; Scheel, Mathias; Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Zebunke, Manuela; Puppe, Birger; Wimmers, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Defining phenotypes according to molecular features would promote the knowledge of functional traits like behaviour in both human and animal research. Beside physiological states or environmental factors, an innate predisposition of individual coping strategies was discussed, including the proactive and reactive pattern. According to backtest reactivity, animals assigned as high-resisting (proactive) and low-resisting (reactive) were immune challenged with tetanus toxoid in a time course experiment. Using the Affymetrix platform and qPCR, individual coping characteristics were reflected as gene expression signatures in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at naïve state (day 0) and in response to the model antigen (day 14, day 28, and day 140). Further, the blood cell count was analysed at all stages. On the transcriptional level, processes acting on cell communication, vasculogenesis, and blood coagulation were highlighted in high-resisting animals at naïve state (day 0), temporarily blurred due to immune challenge (day 14) but subsequently restored and intensified (day 28). Notably, similar amounts of white and red blood cells, platelets and haematocrit between high-resisting and low-resisting samples suggest coping-specific expression patterns rather than alterations in blood cell distribution. Taken together, the gene expression patterns indicate that proactive pigs might favour molecular pathways enabling an effective strategy for defence and recovery. This corroborates the previously suggested belief, that proactive animals are prone to an increased number of injuries as an evolutionary inherited mechanism. In contrast to previous assumptions, coping-specific immunity in pigs lacks inherited shifts between cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:25793368

  9. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  10. Luminous and Dark Matter Profiles from Galaxies to Clusters: Bridging the Gap with Group-scale Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Observations of strong gravitational lensing, stellar kinematics, and larger-scale tracers enable accurate measures of the distribution of dark matter (DM) and baryons in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs). While such techniques have been applied to galaxy-scale and cluster-scale lenses, the paucity of intermediate-mass systems with high-quality data has precluded a uniform analysis of mass-dependent trends. With the aim of bridging this gap, we present new observations and analyses of 10 group-scale lenses at < z> =0.36, characterized by Einstein radii {θ }{{Ein}}=2\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5-5\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 1 and a mean halo mass of {M}200={10}14.0 {M}⊙ . We measure a mean concentration c200 = 5.0 ± 0.8 consistent with unmodified cold dark matter halos. By combining our data with other lens samples, we analyze the mass structure of ETGs in 1013 {M}⊙ -1015 {M}⊙ halos using homogeneous techniques. We show that the slope of the total density profile γtot within the effective radius depends on the stellar surface density, as demonstrated previously, but also on the halo mass. We analyze these trends using halo occupation models and resolved stellar kinematics with the goal of testing the universality of the DM profile. Whereas the central galaxies of clusters require a shallow inner DM density profile, group-scale lenses are consistent with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile or one that is slightly contracted. The largest uncertainties arise from the sample size and likely radial gradients in stellar populations. We conclude that the net effect of baryons on the DM distribution may not be universal, but more likely varies with halo mass due to underlying trends in star formation efficiency and assembly history.

  11. An Exercise on Magnetic-Anomaly Profiles and the Geomagnetic Polar-Reversal Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1988-01-01

    Develops an exercise in which students use magnetic-profile data gathered in the South Pacific to test the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis. Uses the Eltanin 19N and 20N profiles. Relates the exercise to 20 current geology texts. (MVL)

  12. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  13. Expression of simian immunodeficiency virus Nef protein in CD4+ T cells leads to a molecular profile of viral persistence and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Ndolo, Thomas; George, Michael; Nguyen, Hau; Dandekar, Satya

    2006-09-30

    The Nef protein of human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus is expressed early in infection and plays an important role in disease progression in vivo. In addition, Nef has been shown to modulate cellular functions. To decipher Nef-mediated changes in gene expression, we utilized DNA microarray analysis to elucidate changes in gene expression in a Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line stably expressing SIV-Nef protein under the control of an inducible promoter. Our results showed that genes associated with antigen presentation including members of the T-cell receptor and major histocompatibility class 1 complex were consistently down-regulated at the transcript level in SIV-Nef-expressing cells. In addition, Nef induced a transcriptional profile of cell-cycle-related genes that support the survival of Nef-expressing cells. Furthermore, Nef enhanced the transcription of genes encoding enzymes and factors that catalyze the biosynthesis of membrane glycolipids and phospholipids. In conclusion, gene expression profiling showed that SIV-Nef induces a transcriptional profile in CD4+ T cells that promotes immune evasion and cell survival, thus facilitating viral persistence.

  14. Spanish version of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale: factor structure, reliability, and validity in Mexican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robles-García, Rebeca; Fresán, Ana; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Conrod, Patricia; Gómez, Diego; de Quevedo Y Domínguez, María Emilia G; Rafful, Claudia; Real, Tania; Vásquez, Lucía; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2014-12-30

    To validate the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in a sample of Mexican adolescents, this brief 23-item self-report questionnaire has been developed to screen four high-risk personality traits for substance misuse, to guide targeted approaches to prevention of addictions in adolescents. The scale has been previously validated in United Kingdom, Canada, Sri Lanka and China. A sample of 671 adolescents aged 11-17 completed a Spanish translation of the SURPS as well as other measures of personality and substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS has moderate internal consistency, and demonstrated a four-factor structure very similar to the original scale. The four subscales show good concurrent validity and three of the subscales were found to correlate with measures of substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS seems to be a valid and sensitive scale that can be used in a Mexican adolescent population.

  15. Spanish version of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale: factor structure, reliability, and validity in Mexican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robles-García, Rebeca; Fresán, Ana; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Conrod, Patricia; Gómez, Diego; de Quevedo Y Domínguez, María Emilia G; Rafful, Claudia; Real, Tania; Vásquez, Lucía; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2014-12-30

    To validate the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in a sample of Mexican adolescents, this brief 23-item self-report questionnaire has been developed to screen four high-risk personality traits for substance misuse, to guide targeted approaches to prevention of addictions in adolescents. The scale has been previously validated in United Kingdom, Canada, Sri Lanka and China. A sample of 671 adolescents aged 11-17 completed a Spanish translation of the SURPS as well as other measures of personality and substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS has moderate internal consistency, and demonstrated a four-factor structure very similar to the original scale. The four subscales show good concurrent validity and three of the subscales were found to correlate with measures of substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS seems to be a valid and sensitive scale that can be used in a Mexican adolescent population. PMID:25240942

  16. MicroRNA Profile in CD8+ T-Lymphocytes from HIV-Infected Individuals: Relationship with Antiviral Immune Response and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bargalló, Manel E.; Planet, Evarist; Vilaplana, Elisenda; Escribà, Tuixent; Pérez, Iñaki; Gatell, Josep Maria; García, Felipe; Arnedo, Mireia; Plana M, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between host microRNAs (miRNA), viral control and immune response has not yet been elucidated in the field of HIV. The aim of this study was to assess the differential miRNA profile in CD8+ T-cells between HIV-infected individuals who differ in terms of viral replication control and immune response. Methods miRNA profile from resting and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD8+ T-cells from uninfected individuals (HIV-, n = 11), Elite Controllers (EC, n = 15), Viremic Controllers (VC, n = 15), Viremic Progressors (VP, n = 13) and HIV-infected patients on therapy (ART, n = 14) was assessed using Affymetrix miRNA 3.1 arrays. After background correction, quantile normalization and median polish summarization, normalized data were fit to a linear model. The analysis comprised: resting samples between groups; stimulated samples between groups; and stimulated versus resting samples within each group. Enrichment analyses of the putative target genes were perfomed using bioinformatic algorithms. Results A downregulated miRNA pattern was observed when resting samples from all infected groups were compared to HIV-. A miRNA downregulation was also observed when stimulated samples from EC, ART and HIV- groups were compared to VP, being hsa-miR-4492 the most downregulated. Although a preferential miRNA downregulation was observed when stimulated samples were compared to the respective resting samples, VP presented a differential miRNA expression pattern. In fact, hsa-miR-155 and hsa-miR-181a were downregulated in VP whereas in the other groups, either an upregulation or no differences were observed after stimulation, respectively. Overall, functional enrichment analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were involved in signal transduction pathways, metabolic regulation, apoptosis, and immune response. Conclusions Resting CD8+ T-cells do not exhibit a differential miRNA expression between HIV-infected individuals but they do differ from non

  17. Ascites Bacterial Burden and Immune Cell Profile Are Associated with Poor Clinical Outcomes in the Absence of Overt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Kevin J.; Rogers, Geraint B.; Melino, Michelle; Arthur, Dionne M.; Costello, Mary-Ellen; Morrison, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections, most commonly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with ascites, occur in one third of admitted patients with cirrhosis, and account for a 4-fold increase in mortality. Bacteria are isolated from less than 40% of ascites infections by culture, necessitating empirical antibiotic treatment, but culture-independent studies suggest bacteria are commonly present, even in the absence of overt infection. Widespread detection of low levels of bacteria in ascites, in the absence of peritonitis, suggests immune impairment may contribute to higher susceptibility to infection in cirrhotic patients. However, little is known about the role of ascites leukocyte composition and function in this context. We determined ascites bacterial composition by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing in 25 patients with culture-negative, non-neutrocytic ascites, and compared microbiological data with ascites and peripheral blood leukocyte composition and phenotype. Bacterial DNA was detected in ascitic fluid from 23 of 25 patients, with significant positive correlations between bacterial DNA levels and poor 6-month clinical outcomes (death, readmission). Ascites leukocyte composition was variable, but dominated by macrophages or T lymphocytes, with lower numbers of B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Consistent with the hypothesis that impaired innate immunity contributes to susceptibility to infection, high bacterial DNA burden was associated with reduced major histocompatibility complex class II expression on ascites (but not peripheral blood) monocytes/macrophages. These data indicate an association between the presence of ascites bacterial DNA and early death and readmission in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. They further suggest that impairment of innate immunity contributes to increased bacterial translocation, risk of peritonitis, or both. PMID:25781164

  18. Behavioral coping strategies in response to social stress are associated with distinct neuroendocrine, monoaminergic and immune response profiles in mice.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Zurine; Vegas, Oscar; Garmendia, Larraitz; Arregi, Amaia; Beitia, Garikoitz; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2011-12-01

    Individual variation in behavioral coping strategies to stress implies that animals may have a distinct physiological adaptation to stress; these differences may underlie differences in vulnerability to stress-related diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that different behavioral coping strategies (active vs. passive) are stable over time and that they would be associated with differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adreno-medular (SAM) axes, and monoaminergic and immune activity. Male mice were subjected to social stress. Twelve days after the first social interaction, mice were subjected to a second identical social stress interaction. Behavior was videotaped and assessed during both sessions. One hour after the final social interaction, serum was collected for corticosterone and adrenaline concentrations and brains were collected for hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA expression. Monoaminergic system activity was determined by mRNA expression of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline synthetic enzymes in the brain stem. Immune system activity was determined by mRNA expression of hypothalamic interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and splenic IL-1β and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Mice engaging in a passive strategy had higher serum corticosterone and lower serum adrenaline concentrations than the active group. The passive group showed lower hypothalamic mRNA expression of IL-1β and CRH and lower splenic mRNA expression of IL-2 and IL-1β relative to mice in the active group. An active strategy was associated with higher expression of the dopaminergic synthetic enzyme, while a passive strategy was associated with decreased expression of the serotonergic synthetic enzyme. These findings indicate that individual coping strategies are stable over time and are related to differences in the physiological stress response and immune activity. PMID:21864582

  19. Innate immune mediator profiles and their regulation in a novel polarized immortalized epithelial cell model derived from human endocervix.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Schust, Danny J; Ding, Jian; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Beatty, Wandy; Chang, Theresa L; Greene, Sheila J; Lewis, Maria E; Ruiz, Bernardo; Holman, Stacey L; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Pyles, Richard B; Quayle, Alison J

    2011-12-01

    The endocervix in the female reproductive tract (FRT) is susceptible to sexually transmitted pathogens such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Endocervical epithelial cells in vivo make innate immune mediators that likely aid in the protection from these pathogens. In vitro studies to investigate the innate epithelial cell immune response to endocervical pathogens have been hindered by the paucity of human endocervix-derived epithelial cell lines that display the differentiation proteins and functional characteristics of their site of origin. We have established an immortalized epithelial cell line (A2EN) derived from an endocervical tissue explant that can be polarized to exhibit distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. Polarized A2EN cells secrete mucus at their apical surface, and express MUC5B, a mucin specific to the endocervix. Polarized A2EN cells also express hormone receptors that respond appropriately to female steroid hormones. Polarized A2EN cells can be stimulated with the toll-like receptor 3 agonist, polyI:C, to express anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Cytokines and chemokines are also differentially secreted depending on the hormone milieu in which the cells are exposed. We conclude that polarized A2EN cells maintain distinctive phenotypic and functional characteristics of the epithelial cells found in the endocervix and, hence, could provide a useful, new in vitro model system for investigations on the role of endogenous and exogenous factors that regulate endocervical epithelial cell immunity including studies on sexually transmitted infections and topical microbicides.

  20. Yeast-containing feed additive alters gene expression profiles associated with innate immunity in whole blood of a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Branson, Jennifer A; McLean, Derek J; Forsberg, Neil E; Bobe, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Feeding a yeast-containing additive (YCA; OmniGen-AF) improves immune responses in ruminant livestock and reduces subsequent production losses. The objective was to identify molecular pathways by which dietary YCA may modify immune responses using a rodent model. Thirty-seven healthy, unchallenged CD rats received a diet containing 0 (control; n = 5, only 28 d), 0.5% (n = 15) or 1% (n = 17) YCA for 7 (n = 4/group), 14 (n = 3 or 4/group), 21 (n = 3 or 4/group) or 28 (n = 5/group) d. At the end of the feeding periods, whole blood was collected and the isolated RNA was analyzed for the expression of 84 genes involved in innate and cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. Three bacterial pattern recognition receptors TLR1 (0.5%: + 2.01; 1%: + 2.38), TLR6 (0.5%: + 2.11; 1%: + 2.34) and NOD2 (0.5%: + 2.32; 1%: + 2.23), two APC surface receptors CD1D1 (0.5%: + 1.75; 1%: + 2.33) and CD80 (0.5%: +2.45; 1%: +3.00), and the cell signaling molecule MAPK8 (0.5%: +1.87; 1%: +2.35) were significantly up-regulated by YCA at both inclusion rates. In conclusion, feeding YCA may potentially increase recognition and responses to bacterial pathogens and T-cell activation and differentiation and thereby maintain health and prevent production losses. PMID:27033362

  1. Ascites bacterial burden and immune cell profile are associated with poor clinical outcomes in the absence of overt infection.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Kevin J; Rogers, Geraint B; Melino, Michelle; Arthur, Dionne M; Costello, Mary-Ellen; Morrison, Mark; Powell, Elizabeth E; Irvine, Katharine M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections, most commonly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with ascites, occur in one third of admitted patients with cirrhosis, and account for a 4-fold increase in mortality. Bacteria are isolated from less than 40% of ascites infections by culture, necessitating empirical antibiotic treatment, but culture-independent studies suggest bacteria are commonly present, even in the absence of overt infection. Widespread detection of low levels of bacteria in ascites, in the absence of peritonitis, suggests immune impairment may contribute to higher susceptibility to infection in cirrhotic patients. However, little is known about the role of ascites leukocyte composition and function in this context. We determined ascites bacterial composition by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing in 25 patients with culture-negative, non-neutrocytic ascites, and compared microbiological data with ascites and peripheral blood leukocyte composition and phenotype. Bacterial DNA was detected in ascitic fluid from 23 of 25 patients, with significant positive correlations between bacterial DNA levels and poor 6-month clinical outcomes (death, readmission). Ascites leukocyte composition was variable, but dominated by macrophages or T lymphocytes, with lower numbers of B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Consistent with the hypothesis that impaired innate immunity contributes to susceptibility to infection, high bacterial DNA burden was associated with reduced major histocompatibility complex class II expression on ascites (but not peripheral blood) monocytes/macrophages. These data indicate an association between the presence of ascites bacterial DNA and early death and readmission in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. They further suggest that impairment of innate immunity contributes to increased bacterial translocation, risk of peritonitis, or both. PMID:25781164

  2. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  3. West Nile Virus Challenge Alters the Transcription Profiles of Innate Immune Genes in Rabbit Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Muhammad J.; Suen, Willy W.; Prow, Natalie A.; Hall, Roy A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral innate immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) is crucial for control of virus spread to the central nervous system. Therefore, transcriptomes encoding the innate immune response proteins against WNV were investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of New Zealand White rabbits, a recently established novel rabbit model for WNV pathogenesis studies. PBMCs were challenged with an Australian WNV strain, WNVNSW2011, in vitro, and mRNA expression of selected immune response genes were quantified at 2-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h post-infection (pi) using qRT-PCR. Compared to mock-inoculated PBMCs, WNV-stimulated PBMCs expressed high levels of interferon (IFN) alpha (IFNA), gamma (IFNG), IL6, IL12, IL22, CXCL10, and pentraxin 3 (PTX3) mRNA. Likewise, TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10 mRNA became up-regulated with the highest expression seen for TLR3, 4, and 6. TLRs-signaling downstream genes (MyD88, STAT1, TRAF3, IRF7, and IRF9) subsequently became up-regulated. The high expression of IFNs, TLR3, TLR4, TRAF3, STAT1, IRF7, and IRF9 are in accordance with antiviral activities, while expression of TNFA, HO1, iNOS, caspase 3, and caspase 9 transcripts suggests the involvement of oxidative stress and apoptosis in WNV-stimulated rabbit PBMCs, respectively. The level of WNVNSW2011 RNA increased at 24-h pi in PBMCs challenged with virus in vitro compared to input virus. The expression dynamics of selected genes were validated in PBMCs from rabbits experimentally infected with WNV in vivo. Higher expression of IFNA, IFN beta (IFNB), IFNG, TNFA, IL6, IL22, PTX3, TLR3 and TLR4, IRF7, IRF9, STST1, TRAF3, caspase 3, and caspase 9 were seen in PBMCs from WNV-infected rabbits on day 3 post-intradermal virus inoculation compared to PBMCs from uninfected control rabbits. This study highlights the array of cytokines and TLRs involved in the host innate immune response to WNV in the rabbit leukocytes and suggests that these cells may be a useful in vitro model for WNV

  4. Molecular aspects, genomic arrangement and immune responsive mRNA expression profiles of two CXC chemokine receptor homologs (CXCR1 and CXCR2) from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Wan, Qiang; Revathy, Kasthuri Saranya; Whang, Ilson; Noh, Jae Koo; Kim, Seokryel; Park, Myoung-Ae; Lee, Jehee

    2014-09-01

    The CXCR1 and CXCR2 are the prototypical receptors and are the only known receptors for mammalian ELR+ (Glu-Leu-Arg) CXC chemokines, including CXCL8 (interleukin 8). These receptors transduce the ELR+ chemokine signals and operate the downstream signaling pathways in inflammation and innate immunity. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of CXCR1 and CXCR2 genes from rock bream fish (OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2) at the molecular level. The cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 were identified from a transcriptome library and a custom-constructed BAC library, respectively. Both OfCXCR genes consisted of two exons, separated by an intron. The 5'-flanking regions of OfCXCR genes possessed multiple putative transcription factor binding sites related to immune response. The coding sequences of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 encoded putative peptides of 355 and 360 amino acids (aa), respectively. The deduced aa sequences of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 comprised of a G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) family 1 profile with a GPCR signature and a DRY motif. In addition, seven conserved transmembrane regions were predicted in both OfCXCRs. While our multiple alignment study revealed the functionally significant conserved elements of the OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2, phylogeny analyses further confirmed their position in teleost sub clade, in which they manifested an evolutionary relatedness with other fish counterparts. Based on comparative analyses, teleost CXC chemokine receptors appear to be distinct from their non-fish orthologs in terms of evolution (both CXCR1 and CXCR2) and genomic organization (CXCR2). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) detected the transcripts of OfCXCR1 and OfCXCR2 in eleven examined tissues, with higher levels in head kidney, kidney and spleen highlighting their crucial importance in immunity. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) with concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in modulation of OfCXCR2 transcription, but not

  5. Biomarker Analysis Revealed Distinct Profiles of Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Infants with Ocular Lesions of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Anderson Silva; Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Andrade, Gláucia Manzan Queiroz; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Januário, José Nélio; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; —UFMG-CTBG, UFMG Congenital Toxoplasmosis Brazilian Group

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the main infectious cause of human posterior retinochoroiditis, the most frequent clinical manifestation of congenital toxoplasmosis. This investigation was performed after neonatal screening to identify biomarkers of immunity associated with immunopathological features of the disease by flow cytometry. The study included infected infants without NRL and with retinochoroidal lesions (ARL, ACRL, and CRL) as well as noninfected individuals (NI). Our data demonstrated that leukocytosis, with increased monocytes and lymphocytes, was a relevant hematological biomarker of ARL. Immunophenotypic analysis also revealed expansion of CD14+CD16+HLA-DRhigh monocytes and CD56dim cytotoxic NK-cells in ARL. Moreover, augmented TCRγδ+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were apparently good biomarkers of morbidity. Biomarker network analysis revealed that complex and intricated networks underscored the negative correlation of monocytes with NK- and B-cells in NRL. The remarkable lack of connections involving B-cells and a relevant shift of NK-cell connections from B-cells toward T-cells observed in ARL were outstanding. A tightly connected biomarker network was observed in CRL, with relevant connections of NK- and CD8+ T-cells with a broad range of cell subsets. Our findings add novel elements to the current knowledge on the innate and adaptive immune responses in congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:25328286

  6. Biomarker analysis revealed distinct profiles of innate and adaptive immunity in infants with ocular lesions of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Anderson Silva; Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Andrade, Gláucia Manzan Queiroz; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Januário, José Nélio; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the main infectious cause of human posterior retinochoroiditis, the most frequent clinical manifestation of congenital toxoplasmosis. This investigation was performed after neonatal screening to identify biomarkers of immunity associated with immunopathological features of the disease by flow cytometry. The study included infected infants without NRL and with retinochoroidal lesions (ARL, ACRL, and CRL) as well as noninfected individuals (NI). Our data demonstrated that leukocytosis, with increased monocytes and lymphocytes, was a relevant hematological biomarker of ARL. Immunophenotypic analysis also revealed expansion of CD14(+)CD16(+)HLA-DR(high) monocytes and CD56(dim) cytotoxic NK-cells in ARL. Moreover, augmented TCRγ δ (+) and CD8(+) T-cell counts were apparently good biomarkers of morbidity. Biomarker network analysis revealed that complex and intricated networks underscored the negative correlation of monocytes with NK- and B-cells in NRL. The remarkable lack of connections involving B-cells and a relevant shift of NK-cell connections from B-cells toward T-cells observed in ARL were outstanding. A tightly connected biomarker network was observed in CRL, with relevant connections of NK- and CD8(+) T-cells with a broad range of cell subsets. Our findings add novel elements to the current knowledge on the innate and adaptive immune responses in congenital toxoplasmosis.

  7. Th9/IL-9 profile in human echinococcosis: their involvement in immune response during infection by Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Pang, Nannan; Zhang, Fengbo; Ma, Xiumin; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Hui; Xin, Yan; Wang, Song; Zhu, Yuejie; Wen, Hao; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-01-01

    Th9 cells have been reported to contribute to immune responses; however, the role of Th9 cells in Echinococcus granulosus infection is unknown. This study is to determine whether Th9 cells and IL-9 are involved in human Echinococcus granulosus infection. Compared with healthy controls (HC group), the mRNA levels of PU.1, IL-9, and GATA-3 were significantly increased in patients before therapy (CE group), as revealed by qRT-PCR. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the percentages of Th9 and Th2 cells in CE group were significantly higher. The levels of IL-9, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF- β in CE group were also significantly increased, as detected by CBA assay. The percentages of Th9 and Th2 cells in CE group were positively correlated. After treatments of surgery in combination with albendazole, the PU.1 and GATA-3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in patients after therapy (PCE group) compared with CE group. The numbers of Th9 and Th2 cells and levels of IL-9, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF- β were also significantly decreased in PCE group. In conclusion, the ratios of Th9 cells and IL-9 levels were significantly decreased after treatment, suggesting that Th9/IL-9 may be involved in immune response induced by Echinococcus granulosus infection.

  8. The AlternativeTranslational Profile That Underlies the Immune-Evasive State of Persistence in Chlamydiaceae Exploits Differential Tryptophan Contents of the Protein Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: One form of immune evasion is a developmental state called “persistence” whereby chlamydial pathogens respond to the host-mediated withdrawal of l-tryptophan (Trp). A sophisticated survival mode of reversible quiescence is implemented. A mechanism has evolved which suppresses gene products necessary for rapid pathogen proliferation but allows expression of gene products that underlie the morphological and developmental characteristics of persistence. This switch from one translational profile to an alternative translational profile of newly synthesized proteins is proposed to be accomplished by maximizing the Trp content of some proteins needed for rapid proliferation (e.g., ADP/ATP translocase, hexose-phosphate transporter, phosphoenolpyruvate [PEP] carboxykinase, the Trp transporter, the Pmp protein superfamily for cell adhesion and antigenic variation, and components of the cell division pathway) while minimizing the Trp content of other proteins supporting the state of persistence. The Trp starvation mechanism is best understood in the human-Chlamydia trachomatis relationship, but the similarity of up-Trp and down-Trp proteomic profiles in all of the pathogenic Chlamydiaceae suggests that Trp availability is an underlying cue relied upon by this family of pathogens to trigger developmental transitions. The biochemically expensive pathogen strategy of selectively increased Trp usage to guide the translational profile can be leveraged significantly with minimal overall Trp usage by (i) regional concentration of Trp residue placements, (ii) amplified Trp content of a single protein that is required for expression or maturation of multiple proteins with low Trp content, and (iii) Achilles'-heel vulnerabilities of complex pathways to high Trp content of one or a few enzymes. PMID:22688818

  9. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin- receptor agonist in the treatment of adult chronic immune thrombocytopenia: a review of the efficacy and safety profile

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a low platelet count that has persisted for more than 12 months. Patients may be asymptomatic but those with severe disease may have significant morbidity and require treatment. Corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin are recommended as first-line treatments. Recently, two thrombopoietin-receptor agonists, romiplostim and eltrombopag have been licensed for the treatment of chronic ITP. The current indications for thrombopoietin-receptor agonists are for splenectomized adult patients with chronic ITP who are refractory to other treatments and adult nonsplenectomized patients in whom splenectomy is contraindicated. This article reviews data on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety profile of eltrombopag in the treatment of ITP. PMID:23556122

  10. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin- receptor agonist in the treatment of adult chronic immune thrombocytopenia: a review of the efficacy and safety profile.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gregory

    2012-06-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a low platelet count that has persisted for more than 12 months. Patients may be asymptomatic but those with severe disease may have significant morbidity and require treatment. Corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin are recommended as first-line treatments. Recently, two thrombopoietin-receptor agonists, romiplostim and eltrombopag have been licensed for the treatment of chronic ITP. The current indications for thrombopoietin-receptor agonists are for splenectomized adult patients with chronic ITP who are refractory to other treatments and adult nonsplenectomized patients in whom splenectomy is contraindicated. This article reviews data on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety profile of eltrombopag in the treatment of ITP.

  11. Effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Zhou, Jishu; Ye, Zhi; Lan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to understand the effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and the immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka). Five experimental diets were prepared, containing graded levels of n-3 HUFAs (0.46%, 0.85%, 1.25%, 1.61% and 1.95%, respectively), and the 0.46% group was used as control group. The specific growth rates, fatty acid profiles, activities and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes and lysozyme of the sea cucumbers that were fed with the 5 experimental diets were determined. The results showed that the specific growth rate of sea cucumbers in all the treatment groups significantly increased compared to the control group (P < 0.05), indicating the positive effects of n-3 HUFAs on the growth of sea cucumbers. The contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) in the body wall of the sea cucumbers gradually increased with the increasing levels of n-3 HUFAs in the diets. The suitable supplement of n-3 HUFAs in diets improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of sea cucumbers by up-regulating the expression of SOD and CAT mRNA in sea cucumbers. However, excess n-3 HUFAs in diets caused lipid peroxidation, inhibited the expression of lysozyme (LSZ) mRNA and decreased the activities of LSZ in sea cucumbers. In summary, the suitable supplement levels of n-3 HUFAs in diets of sea cucumbers A. japonicus were estimated between 0.85% and 1.25% considering the growth performance, cost and the indicators of antioxidant capacity and immunity.

  12. Effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Zhou, Jishu; Ye, Zhi; Lan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to understand the effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and the immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka). Five experimental diets were prepared, containing graded levels of n-3 HUFAs (0.46%, 0.85%, 1.25%, 1.61% and 1.95%, respectively), and the 0.46% group was used as control group. The specific growth rates, fatty acid profiles, activities and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes and lysozyme of the sea cucumbers that were fed with the 5 experimental diets were determined. The results showed that the specific growth rate of sea cucumbers in all the treatment groups significantly increased compared to the control group (P < 0.05), indicating the positive effects of n-3 HUFAs on the growth of sea cucumbers. The contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) in the body wall of the sea cucumbers gradually increased with the increasing levels of n-3 HUFAs in the diets. The suitable supplement of n-3 HUFAs in diets improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of sea cucumbers by up-regulating the expression of SOD and CAT mRNA in sea cucumbers. However, excess n-3 HUFAs in diets caused lipid peroxidation, inhibited the expression of lysozyme (LSZ) mRNA and decreased the activities of LSZ in sea cucumbers. In summary, the suitable supplement levels of n-3 HUFAs in diets of sea cucumbers A. japonicus were estimated between 0.85% and 1.25% considering the growth performance, cost and the indicators of antioxidant capacity and immunity. PMID:27079426

  13. IRIS Si IV Line Profiles: An Indication for the Plasmoid Instability during Small-scale Magnetic Reconnection on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of the process of fast reconnection has undergone a dramatic change in the last 10 years driven, in part, by the availability of high-resolution numerical simulations that have consistently demonstrated the break-up of current sheets into magnetic islands, with reconnection rates that become independent of Lundquist number, challenging the belief that fast magnetic reconnection in flares proceeds via the Petschek mechanism which invokes pairs of slow-mode shocks connected to a compact diffusion region. The reconnection sites are too small to be resolved with images, but these reconnection mechanisms, Petschek and the plasmoid instability, have reconnection sites with very different density and velocity structures and so can be distinguished by high-resolution line-profile observations. Using IRIS spectroscopic observations we obtain a survey of typical line profiles produced by small-scale events thought to be reconnection sites on the Sun. Slit-jaw images are used to investigate the plasma heating and re-configuration at the sites. A sample of 15 events from 2 active regions is presented. The line profiles are complex with bright cores and broad wings extending to over 300 km s-1. The profiles can be reproduced with the multiple magnetic islands and acceleration sites that characterize the plasmoid instability but not by bi-directional jets that characterize the Petschek mechanism. This result suggests that if these small-scale events are reconnection sites, then fast reconnection proceeds via the plasmoid instability, rather than the Petschek mechanism during small-scale reconnection on the Sun.

  14. IRIS Si iv LINE PROFILES: AN INDICATION FOR THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY DURING SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-10

    Our understanding of the process of fast reconnection has undergone a dramatic change in the last 10 years driven, in part, by the availability of high-resolution numerical simulations that have consistently demonstrated the break-up of current sheets into magnetic islands, with reconnection rates that become independent of Lundquist number, challenging the belief that fast magnetic reconnection in flares proceeds via the Petschek mechanism which invokes pairs of slow-mode shocks connected to a compact diffusion region. The reconnection sites are too small to be resolved with images, but these reconnection mechanisms, Petschek and the plasmoid instability, have reconnection sites with very different density and velocity structures and so can be distinguished by high-resolution line-profile observations. Using IRIS spectroscopic observations we obtain a survey of typical line profiles produced by small-scale events thought to be reconnection sites on the Sun. Slit-jaw images are used to investigate the plasma heating and re-configuration at the sites. A sample of 15 events from 2 active regions is presented. The line profiles are complex with bright cores and broad wings extending to over 300 km s{sup −1}. The profiles can be reproduced with the multiple magnetic islands and acceleration sites that characterize the plasmoid instability but not by bi-directional jets that characterize the Petschek mechanism. This result suggests that if these small-scale events are reconnection sites, then fast reconnection proceeds via the plasmoid instability, rather than the Petschek mechanism during small-scale reconnection on the Sun.

  15. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  16. Immunohistochemical study and mRNA cytokine profile of the local immune response in cattle naturally infected with Calicophoron daubneyi.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Miguel; Manga-González, Yolanda; Benavides, Julio; González-Lanza, M Camino; Giráldez, Francisco Javier; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Fernández, Miguel; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Castaño, Pablo; Royo, Marcos; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Pérez, Valentín; Ferreras, M Carmen

    2015-11-30

    In order to recognize the local immune response of the definitive host to Calicophoron daubneyi natural infection, an immunohistochemical study was carried out in the reticulum and rumen in 49 naturally infected cattle. The role of cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 interleukins and IFN-γ) in the activation of specific defence mechanisms was evaluated by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays to study cytokine mRNA expression. In all infected animals, CD3+ T lymphocytes seemed to be the main element of the inflammatory infiltrate in the reticular and ruminal lamina propria at the point of the parasite adhesion. Intraepithelial globule leukocytes also showed immunolabelling for CD3. Most CD3+ cells also expressed CD4 (T cell helper) antigen although sporadic CD8+-cytotoxic lymphocytes were observed. Local expression of IFN-γ was observed in damaged papillae at the site of parasite attachment and in scattered cells in the lamina propria. B cells (CD79αcy+, CD45+ and IgG+) were found constantly in relation to lymphoid aggregates. MAC387 was expressed in squamous epithelium and in macrophages of the lamina propria of affected papillae. Macrophages in this location also stained positively for CD163 and CD68. Intraepithelial Langerhans cells and macrophages located in the lamina propria showed immunopositivity for MHCII in the affected areas. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed a statistical significant increase of IFN-γ, and IL-10 expression (p<0.01) in the rumen associated with the presence of flukes. These findings suggest a predominant Th1 polarized local immune response with the probable involvement of Th regulatory cells in cattle C. daubneyi natural infection. PMID:26508417

  17. Saturation Profiles from Lab-scale Permittivity Measurements and 2-Phase Flow Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorriti, A. G.

    2005-05-01

    Laboratory fluid-flow experiments through soils are important to study the different fluid-flow processes that occur in the subsurface of the Earth. Most of them, measure the flow conditions at the entry and exit points of the sample, while, the saturation profile in the sample, and its change with time, is unknown. Until now, only very expensive and time-consuming techniques, such as CT or MRI scans, could provide information about the flow in the sample. Now, for the first time, we have developed a technique to measure the saturation profile of soil samples that is cheap and easy. With this technique, we obtain the saturation profiles from the inversion of permittivity measurements. The experimental set-up consists of a coaxial transmission line with a large sample holder (3 cm of diameter and 10 cm long) that allows for fluid-flow through the sample. The complex electric permittivity is reconstructed, per frequency, from the electromagnetic reflection and transmission responses of the line. Relative changes in the permittivity in the order of 1% can be detected over a wide frequency band up to 3 GHz, while the lowest usable frequency depends on the permittivity of the material filling the sample holder. The accurate measurements of permittivity performed with the described tool assume that the measured quantity is an effective property. The assumption then is that the sample is homogeneous. Under non-flowing conditions this can be a reasonable assumption, but during a flow experiment it cannot. This is clear from the fact that the reconstruction of the permittivity of these samples is not successful. The model of the sample must be modified to include the resulting heterogeneity. This is done by assuming a multilayered sample, each layer considered to be homogeneous with a constant permittivity and a known frequency dependence. Minimizing a cost function involving the measured reflection and transmission coefficients and the modelled response of the multilayered

  18. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Tackett, Sean; Bakar, Hamidah Abu; Shilkofski, Nicole A.; Coady, Niamh; Rampal, Krishna; Wright, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. Methods: First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. Results: The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%). After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%), with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%). The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92) and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85). Conclusion: The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention. PMID:26165949

  19. Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Studying Typical and Atypical Individuals via Multidimensional Scaling Profile Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of problem behavior theory, the purpose of this study was to examine risk behavior profiles of typical and atypical adolescents and the differential outcomes of well-beings for these individuals in the United States. Based on the data from the survey of Health Behavior of School-Aged Children by World Health Organization,…

  20. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: II Profile of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sabrina; Paynter, Jessica M.; Gilmore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour is a crucial area of assessment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study examined the adaptive behaviour profile of 77 young children with ASD using the Vineland-II, and analysed factors associated with adaptive functioning. Consistent with previous research with the original Vineland a distinct autism…

  1. Dysarthria Impact Profile: Development of a Scale to Measure Psychosocial Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…

  2. RNA-seq Profiles of Immune Related Genes in the Spleen of Necrotic Enteritis-afflicted Chicken Lines

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Anh Duc; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Hyun S.

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the necrotic enteritis (NE)-induced transcriptome differences between the spleens of Marek’s disease resistant chicken line 6.3 and susceptible line 7.2 co-infected with Eimeria maxima/Clostridium perfringens using RNA-Seq. Total RNA from the spleens of two chicken lines were used to make libraries, generating 42,736,296 and 42,617,720 usable reads, which were assembled into groups of 29,897 and 29,833 mRNA genes, respectively. The transcriptome changes were investigated using the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) package, which indicated 3,255, 2,468 and 2,234 DEGs of line 6.3, line 7.2, and comparison between two lines, respectively (fold change ≥2, p<0.01). The transcription levels of 14 genes identified were further examined using qRT-PCR. The results of qRT-PCR were consistent with the RNA-seq data. All of the DEGs were analysed using gene ontology terms, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and the DEGs in each term were found to be more highly expressed in line 6.3 than in line 7.2. RNA-seq analysis indicated 139 immune related genes, 44 CD molecular genes and 150 cytokines genes which were differentially expressed among chicken lines 6.3 and 7.2 (fold change ≥2, p<0.01). Novel mRNA analysis indicated 15,518 novel genes, for which the expression was shown to be higher in line 6.3 than in line 7.2 including some immune-related targets. These findings will help to understand host-pathogen interaction in the spleen and elucidate the mechanism of host genetic control of NE, and provide basis for future studies that can lead to the development of marker-based selection of highly disease-resistant chickens. PMID:26323406

  3. Immune cell-specific transcriptional profiling highlights distinct molecular pathways controlled by Tob1 upon experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Baranzini, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Despite the recent advances in understanding MS molecular basis, no reliable biomarkers have been identified yet to monitor disease progression. Our group has previously reported that low levels of TOB1 in CD4+ T cells are strongly associated with a higher risk of MS conversion in individuals experiencing an initial demyelinating event. Consistently, Tob1 ablation in mice exacerbates the clinical phenotype of the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To shed light on Tob1 molecular functions in the immune system, we have conducted the first cell-based transcriptomic analysis in Tob1−/− and wildtype mice upon EAE. Next-generation sequencing was employed to characterize the changes in gene expression in T and B cells at pre- and post-symptomatic EAE stages. Remarkably, we found only modest overlap among the different genetic signatures, suggesting that Tob1 may control distinct genetic programs in the different cytotypes. This hypothesis was corroborated by gene ontology and global interactome analyses, which highlighted specific cellular pathways in each cellular subset before and after EAE induction. In summary, our work pinpoints a multifaceted activity of Tob1 in both homeostasis and disease progression. PMID:27546286

  4. Effect of thrombopoietin receptor agonists on the apoptotic profile of platelets in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William Beau; Pinheiro, Mariana P; Boulad, Nayla; Kaplan, David; Edison, Michele N; Psaila, Bethan; Karpoff, Marissa; White, Michael J; Josefsson, Emma C; Kile, Benjamin T; Bussel, James B

    2014-12-01

    Platelet survival depends upon mediators of apoptosis e.g., Bcl-xL, Bax, and Bak, which are regulated by thrombopoietin (TPO)-mediated AKT signaling. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) signaling might decrease platelet and/or megakaryocyte apoptosis and increase the platelet count. This study therefore explored anti-apoptotic effects of TPO-R-agonists in vivo on platelets of patients with immune thrombocytopenia. Patients received eltrombopag or romiplostim for two weeks. Total, immature, and large platelet counts were assessed as were Bcl-xL inhibitor assay; Bcl-xL Western blot; and flow cytometric (FACS) analysis of the AKT-signaling pathway. Eight/ten patients had platelet responses to eltrombopag and all three to romiplostim. Platelet sensitivity to apoptosis by Bcl-xL inhibition was greater in pretreatment patients than controls. This sensitivity normalized after one week of therapy, but surprisingly returned to pretreatment levels at week two. FACS analysis revealed increased AKT-pathway signaling after one week, followed by a decrease at week two. Platelet counts correlated with the Bcl-xL /Bak ratio. Platelet survival may be enhanced by TPO-R-agonists as a transient decrease in platelet sensitivity to apoptosis was accompanied by transient activation of AKT. However, this mechanism has only a short-lived effect. Megakaryocytes and platelets already present at the start of TPO-R-agonist treatment appear to respond differently than those generated de novo. PMID:25132654

  5. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition profiles and their relationship to self-reported outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Harman-Smith, Yasmin E; Mathias, Jane L; Bowden, Stephen C; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessments of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often unrelated to self-reported problems after TBI. The current study cluster-analyzed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) subtest scores from mild, moderate, and severe TBI (n=220) and orthopedic injury control (n=95) groups, to determine whether specific cognitive profiles are related to people's perceived outcomes after TBI. A two-stage cluster analysis produced 4- and 6-cluster solutions, with the 6-cluster solution better capturing subtle variations in cognitive functioning. The 6 clusters differed in the levels and profiles of cognitive performance, self-reported recovery, and education and injury severity. The findings suggest that subtle cognitive impairments after TBI should be interpreted in conjunction with patient's self-reported problems.

  6. GHEP-ISFG collaborative simulated exercise for DVI/MPI: Lessons learned about large-scale profile database comparisons.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Carlos M; Romero, Magdalena; Catelli, Laura; Šakić, Mustafa; Saragoni, Victor G; Jimenez Pleguezuelos, María Jose; Romanini, Carola; Anjos Porto, Maria João; Puente Prieto, Jorge; Bofarull Castro, Alicia; Hernandez, Alexis; Farfán, María José; Prieto, Victoria; Alvarez, David; Penacino, Gustavo; Zabalza, Santiago; Hernández Bolaños, Alejandro; Miguel Manterola, Irati; Prieto, Lourdes; Parsons, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The GHEP-ISFG Working Group has recognized the importance of assisting DNA laboratories to gain expertise in handling DVI or missing persons identification (MPI) projects which involve the need for large-scale genetic profile comparisons. Eleven laboratories participated in a DNA matching exercise to identify victims from a hypothetical conflict with 193 missing persons. The post mortem database was comprised of 87 skeletal remain profiles from a secondary mass grave displaying a minimal number of 58 individuals with evidence of commingling. The reference database was represented by 286 family reference profiles with diverse pedigrees. The goal of the exercise was to correctly discover re-associations and family matches. The results of direct matching for commingled remains re-associations were correct and fully concordant among all laboratories. However, the kinship analysis for missing persons identifications showed variable results among the participants. There was a group of laboratories with correct, concordant results but nearly half of the others showed discrepant results exhibiting likelihood ratio differences of several degrees of magnitude in some cases. Three main errors were detected: (a) some laboratories did not use the complete reference family genetic data to report the match with the remains, (b) the identity and/or non-identity hypotheses were sometimes wrongly expressed in the likelihood ratio calculations, and (c) many laboratories did not properly evaluate the prior odds for the event. The results suggest that large-scale profile comparisons for DVI or MPI is a challenge for forensic genetics laboratories and the statistical treatment of DNA matching and the Bayesian framework should be better standardized among laboratories. PMID:26716885

  7. GHEP-ISFG collaborative simulated exercise for DVI/MPI: Lessons learned about large-scale profile database comparisons.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Carlos M; Romero, Magdalena; Catelli, Laura; Šakić, Mustafa; Saragoni, Victor G; Jimenez Pleguezuelos, María Jose; Romanini, Carola; Anjos Porto, Maria João; Puente Prieto, Jorge; Bofarull Castro, Alicia; Hernandez, Alexis; Farfán, María José; Prieto, Victoria; Alvarez, David; Penacino, Gustavo; Zabalza, Santiago; Hernández Bolaños, Alejandro; Miguel Manterola, Irati; Prieto, Lourdes; Parsons, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The GHEP-ISFG Working Group has recognized the importance of assisting DNA laboratories to gain expertise in handling DVI or missing persons identification (MPI) projects which involve the need for large-scale genetic profile comparisons. Eleven laboratories participated in a DNA matching exercise to identify victims from a hypothetical conflict with 193 missing persons. The post mortem database was comprised of 87 skeletal remain profiles from a secondary mass grave displaying a minimal number of 58 individuals with evidence of commingling. The reference database was represented by 286 family reference profiles with diverse pedigrees. The goal of the exercise was to correctly discover re-associations and family matches. The results of direct matching for commingled remains re-associations were correct and fully concordant among all laboratories. However, the kinship analysis for missing persons identifications showed variable results among the participants. There was a group of laboratories with correct, concordant results but nearly half of the others showed discrepant results exhibiting likelihood ratio differences of several degrees of magnitude in some cases. Three main errors were detected: (a) some laboratories did not use the complete reference family genetic data to report the match with the remains, (b) the identity and/or non-identity hypotheses were sometimes wrongly expressed in the likelihood ratio calculations, and (c) many laboratories did not properly evaluate the prior odds for the event. The results suggest that large-scale profile comparisons for DVI or MPI is a challenge for forensic genetics laboratories and the statistical treatment of DNA matching and the Bayesian framework should be better standardized among laboratories.

  8. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: II Profile of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sabrina; Paynter, Jessica M; Gilmore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour is a crucial area of assessment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study examined the adaptive behaviour profile of 77 young children with ASD using the Vineland-II, and analysed factors associated with adaptive functioning. Consistent with previous research with the original Vineland a distinct autism profile of Vineland-II age equivalent scores, but not standard scores, was found. Highest scores were in motor skills and lowest scores were in socialisation. The addition of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule calibrated severity score did not contribute significant variance to Vineland-II scores beyond that accounted for by age and nonverbal ability. Limitations, future directions, and implications are discussed.

  9. Dryline on 22 May 2002 During IHOP: Convective Scale Measurements at the Profiling Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Flamant, Cyrille; Miller, David; Evans, Keith; Fabry, Federic; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Whiteman, David; Geerts, Bart; Weckwerth, Tammy; Brown, William

    2004-01-01

    A unique set of measurements of wind, water vapor mixing ratio and boundary layer height variability was observed during the first MOP dryline mission of 22 May 2002. Water vapor mixing ratio from the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), high-resolution profiles of aerosol backscatter from the HARLIE and wind profiles from the GLOW are combined with the vertical velocity derived from the NCAR/ISS/MAPR and the high-resolution FMCW radar to reveal the convective variability of the cumulus cloud-topped boundary layer. A combined analysis of the in-situ and remote sensing data from aircraft, radiosonde, lidars, and radars reveals moisture variability within boundary layer updraft and downdraft regions as well as characterizes the boundary layer height variability in the dry and moist sides of the dryline. The profiler site measurements will be tied to aircraft data to reveal the relative intensity and location of these updrafts to the dry line. This study provides unprecedented high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of wind, moisture and backscatter within a dryline and the associated convective boundary layer.

  10. Watershed Scale Shear Stress From Tethersonde Wind Profile Measurements Under Near Neutral and Unstable Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, M. B.; Katul, G. G.

    1995-04-01

    Mean wind speed profiles were measured in the atmospheric surface layer, using a tethersonde system, above the Ojai Valley Watershed in southern California. The valley is mainly planted with mature avocado and orange trees. The surface shear stress and latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured above the trees which are up to 9 m in height. Near-neutral wind speed profile measurements allowed the determination of the watershed surface roughness (z0 = 1.4 m) and the momentum displacement height (d0 = 7.0 m). The wind speed measurements obtained under unstable atmospheric stability were analyzed using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. New stability correction functions proposed based on theory and experiments of Kader-Yaglom as well as the now classic Businger-Dyer type functions were tested. The watershed shear stress values calculated using the surface layer wind speed profiles with the new Monin-Obukhov stability functions were found to be improved in comparison with the values obtained with the Businger-Dyer functions under strongly unstable stability conditions. The Monin-Obukhov model with the Businger-Dyer stability correction function underpredicted the momentum flux by 25% under strongly unstable stability conditions, while the new Kader-Yaglom formulation compared well on average (R2 = 0.77) with the surface eddy correlation measurements for all atmospheric stability conditions. The unstable 100-m drag coefficient was found to be u*2/V1002 = 0.0182.

  11. Variability of the vertical profile of wind speed: characterization at various time scales and analytical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdier, Bénédicte; Plougonven, Riwal; Drobinski, Philippe; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2014-05-01

    Wind measurements are key for the wind resource assessment. But as wind turbines get higher, wind measurement masts are often lower than the future wind turbine hub height. Therefore one of the first steps in the energy yield assessment is the vertical extrapolation of wind measurements. Such extrapolation is often done by approximating the vertical profile of wind speed with an analytical expression: either a logarithmic law which has a theoretical basis in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; or a power law which is empirical. The present study analyzes the variability of the wind profile and how this variability affects the results of the vertical extrapolation methods. The study is conducted with data from the SIRTA observatory, 20km south of Paris (France). A large set of instrumentation is available, including sonic anemometers at 10 and 30 meters, a LIDAR measuring wind speeds from 40 to 200 meters and a SODAR measuring wind speeds starting from 100m up to 1km. The comparison between the instruments enables to characterize the measurements uncertainties. The observations show that close to the ground the wind is stronger during daytime and weaker at night while higher, around 150 m, the wind is weaker during daytime and stronger at night. Indeed the wind shear has a pronounced diurnal cycle. The vertical extrapolation methods currently used in the industry do not usually take into account the strong variability of the wind profile. The often fit the parameters of the extrapolation law, not on each time step, but on time-averaged profiles. The averaging period may be the whole measurement period or some part of it: there may be one constant parameter computed on the wind profile that was averaged on the whole year of measures, or the year of measures may be divided into a small number of cases (for example into night or daytime data, or into 4 seasons) and the parameter is adjusted for each case. The study analyzes thoroughly the errors generated by both

  12. Expression profile of innate immune receptors, NLRs and AIM2, in human colorectal cancer: correlation with cancer stages and inflammasome components

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Hu, Peizhen; Li, Zengshan; Chen, Jun; Song, Chaojun; Chen, Lihua; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun

    2015-01-01

    NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat proteins or NOD-like receptors) are regulators of inflammation and immunity. A subgroup of NLRs and the innate immune receptor, AIM2 (absent-in-melanoma 2), can induce the assembly of a large caspase-1 activating complex called the inflammasome. Other NLRs regulate key signaling pathways such as NF-kB and MAPK. Since inflammation is a central component of colorectal cancer (CRC), this work was undertaken to analyze NLR and AIM2 expression in human CRC by combining bioinformatics analysis and experimental verification using clinical tissue samples. Additional experiments analyzed the association of (i) gene expression and cancer staging, and (ii) gene expression among inflammasome components. Ten public CRC datasets from the Oncomine® Platform were analyzed. Genes analyzed include NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP6, NLRP12, NLRC3, NLRC4, NLRC5, NOD1, NOD2 and AIM2. Additionally, forty case-matched cancer samples and adjacent healthy control tissues isolated from a cohort of Chinese CRC patients were profiled. Three patterns of gene expression in CRC are shown. The expression of NLRC3, a checkpoint of inflammation, and the inflammasome components NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 were reduced in CRC. NOD1 and NOD2 expression was increased in CRC, while NLRC5, NLRP6 and NLRP12 showed little difference compared to controls. Reduced expression of NLRC3 in CRC was verified in all available databases analyzed and confirmed with our patient cohort. Furthermore, the extent of NLRC3 and AIM2 gene reduction was correlated with cancer progression. This report reveals the potential value of NLR and AIM2 genes as biomarkers of CRC and cancer progression. PMID:26378020

  13. Expression profiles and interaction suggest TBK1 can be regulated by Nrdp1 in response to immune stimulation in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong Ling; Yu, Da Hui; Chen, Jian; Fan, Sigang; Wang, Zhi Yong

    2015-10-01

    TBK1 has been extensively studied in mammals because of its important roles as a molecular bridge, linking the TLRs (TLR3 and TLR4) and RLRs signals to activate transcriptional factors IRF3 and IRF7 for IFN-I production. However, the information on molecular and functional characteristics of TBK1 in teleosts is limited. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune response of TBK1 in Larimichthys crocea (named as LcTBK1) as well as its interaction with Nrdp1 were investigated. Sequence analysis demonstrated that LcTBK1 included four functional motifs, the N-terminal protein kinase domain and ATP-binding site, middle ULD and C-terminal coiled-coil domain. The tissue expression profiles indicated that LcTBK1 gene was constitutively expressed in the twelve tissues examined, with high expression in brain. Temporal expression analysis showed that LcTBK1 mRNA was obviously increased in the liver after injection of LPS, Poly I:C and inactive Vibrio parahaemolyticus, however, declined at some time points in spleen and head-kidney. Furthermore, we found that LcTBK1 can interact with LcNrdp1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that involved in immune response to Cryptocaryon irritans infection in L. crocea. The qPCR showed that LcNrdp1 was also significantly up-regulated in liver, down-regualted at some time points in spleen and head-kidney after LPS, Poly I:C and inactive V. parahaemolyticus injection, although the expression patterns of the two genes after the three treatments were different in change magnitude and up-regulation timespan. These results suggested that LcTBK1 was involved in L. crocea defense against the pathogen infection and can be regulated by Nrdp1 in PPRs signaling pathway of fishes.

  14. Effect of tanniferous leaf meal based multi-nutrient blocks on feed intake, hematological profile, immune response, and body weight changes in Haemonchus contortus infected goats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Pathak, A. K.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the effect of multi nutrient block (MNB) supplementation with and without tanniferous leaf meal mixture on feed intake, hematological profile, immune response, and body weight changes of goats that were experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus. Materials and Methods: Total 12 adult male goats of similar age and body weight (26.49±0.87) were allocated in 3 groups in completely randomized design. MNB supplemented in first two groups i.e. in T1 (no infection) and T2 (H. contortus infection @ 1500 L3/goat) group, while, MNB-condensed tannin (CT) supplemented in T3 (H. contortus infection @ 1500 L3/goat + CT source). All goats were fed concentrate mixture @ 100 g/day/goat, ad lib wheat straw and MNB or MNB-CT to meet their requirement for maintenance. Body weights were recorded and blood and fecal samples were collected at 0 day and thereafter at 15 days intervals for a period of 75 days for the assessment of body weight changes, hematological profile and H. contortus loads. Both humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) response were assessed at the end of feeding trial. Results: Mean hemoglobin and packed cell volume (PCV) levels were found to be highest (p<0.001, p<0.05) in T1 group followed by T3 group and lowest values were observed in T2 group. However, The PCV values between T1 and T3 groups were found to be statistically non-significant (p<0.05). The humoral and CMI response were significantly (p<0.036) higher in T3 group as compared to T2 group. MNB-CT supplementation significantly (p<0.001) reduced fecal egg counts in T3 group as compared to MNB supplemented T2 group. Conclusion: Supplementation of MNB-CT could be used as an alternative sustainable method to control H. contortus and maintained health status and performance of goats in face of parasitic challenge. PMID:27047137

  15. Large Scale Non-targeted Metabolomic Profiling of Serum by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Broeckling, Corey D.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) is a powerful technique to investigate metabolism. The approach offers an unbiased and in-depth analysis that can enable the development of diagnostic tests, novel therapies, and further our understanding of disease processes. The inherent chemical diversity of the metabolome creates significant analytical challenges and there is no single experimental approach that can detect all metabolites. Additionally, the biological variation in individual metabolism and the dependence of metabolism on environmental factors necessitates large sample numbers to achieve the appropriate statistical power required for meaningful biological interpretation. To address these challenges, this tutorial outlines an analytical workflow for large scale non-targeted metabolite profiling of serum by UPLC-MS. The procedure includes guidelines for sample organization and preparation, data acquisition, quality control, and metabolite identification and will enable reliable acquisition of data for large experiments and provide a starting point for laboratories new to non-targeted metabolite profiling by UPLC-MS. PMID:23524330

  16. Neighborhood-Scale Spatial Models of Diesel Exhaust Concentration Profile Using 1-Nitropyrene and Other Nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Jill K; Fox, Julie R; Oron, Assaf P; Larson, Timothy V; Simpson, Christopher D; Paulsen, Michael; Beaudet, Nancy; Kaufman, Joel D; Magzamen, Sheryl

    2015-11-17

    With emerging evidence that diesel exhaust exposure poses distinct risks to human health, the need for fine-scale models of diesel exhaust pollutants is growing. We modeled the spatial distribution of several nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) to identify fine-scale gradients in diesel exhaust pollution in two Seattle, WA neighborhoods. Our modeling approach fused land-use regression, meteorological dispersion modeling, and pollutant monitoring from both fixed and mobile platforms. We applied these modeling techniques to concentrations of 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), a highly specific diesel exhaust marker, at the neighborhood scale. We developed models of two additional nitroarenes present in secondary organic aerosol: 2-nitropyrene and 2-nitrofluoranthene. Summer predictors of 1-NP, including distance to railroad, truck emissions, and mobile black carbon measurements, showed a greater specificity to diesel sources than predictors of other NPAHs. Winter sampling results did not yield stable models, likely due to regional mixing of pollutants in turbulent weather conditions. The model of summer 1-NP had an R(2) of 0.87 and cross-validated R(2) of 0.73. The synthesis of high-density sampling and hybrid modeling was successful in predicting diesel exhaust pollution at a very fine scale and identifying clear gradients in NPAH concentrations within urban neighborhoods. PMID:26501773

  17. Cost control in nursing homes by means of economies of scale and care profile optimization.

    PubMed

    Hoess, Victoria; Bachler, Adi; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The call to enlarge or merge nursing homes in order to lower costs rests on the assumption that economies of scale exist within the cost structure of these homes. Economies of scale means that an increasing number of residents will reduce the costs per person needing care. However, the existence and the extent of economies of scale as such in nursing homes are the subject of controversy because studies of this issue performed in nursing homes up to now have yielded contradictory results. In this study, researchers demonstrated economies of scale in Tyrolean, Austria, nursing homes and showed that the composition of the nursing home residents in respect to their care needs influences the development of the average costs. Changing the size of the facility and/or influencing the average care level can have a considerable influence on the progression of average costs in nursing homes. Cost reductions can be achieved by increasing the size of the facility or by improved distribution of the care levels of the persons in need of care.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the inflamed intestinal mucosa reveals distinctive immune response profiles in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Uta; Bartsch, Sebastian; Philipsen, Lars; Danese, Silvio; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Dignass, Axel U; Hämmerle, Marcus; Sturm, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    Although Crohn's disease (CrD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) share several clinical features, the mechanisms of tissue injury differ. Because the global cellular function depends upon the protein network environment as a whole, we explored changes in the distribution and association of mucosal proteins to define key events involved in disease pathogenesis. Endoscopic biopsies were taken from CrD, UC, and control colonic mucosa, and Multi-Epitope-Ligand-Cartographie immunofluorescence microscopy with 32 different Abs was performed. Multi-Epitope-Ligand-Cartographie is a novel, highly multiplexed robotic imaging technology which allows integrating cell biology and biomathematical tools to visualize dozens of proteins simultaneously in a structurally intact cell or tissue. In CrD, the number of CD3+CD45RA+ naive T cells was markedly increased, but only activated memory, but not naive, T cells expressed decreased levels of Bax, active caspase-3 or -8. In UC, only CD4+ T cells coexpressing NF-kappaB were caspase-8 and poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase positive. Furthermore, the number of CD4+CD25+ T cells was elevated only in UC, whereas in CrD and controls, the number of these cells was similar. By using hub analysis, we also identified that the colocalization pattern with NF-kappaB+ and poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase+ as base motifs distinguished CrD from UC. High-content proteomic analysis of the intestinal mucosa demonstrated for the first time that different T cell populations within the intestinal mucosa express proteins translating distinct biological functions in each form of inflammatory bowel disease. Thus, topological proteomic analysis may help to unravel the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease by defining distinct immunopathogenic profiles in CrD and UC. PMID:17579049

  19. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  20. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, James; Ryan, Colm J.; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Pemberton, Helen N.; Chong, Irene Y.; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Frankum, Jessica; Gulati, Aditi; Holme, Harriet; Miller, Rowan; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Rafiq, Rumana; Wei, Wenbin; Williamson, Chris T.; Quigley, David A.; Tym, Joe; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Fenton, Timothy; Natrajan, Rachael; Strauss, Sandra J.; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors. PMID:26947069

  1. Profiling motives behind hedonic eating. Preliminary validation of the Palatable Eating Motives Scale.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E E; Turan, B; Lokken, K L; Morse, A; Boggiano, M M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a new scale designed to measure individual motives for eating tasty foods and determine if any specific motive(s) are associated with obesity. The "Palatable Eating Motives Scale" (PEMS) is a self-report measure adapted from the Drinking Motives Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R). N=150 racially-diverse college students (mean age: 24.4, BMI: 16-51kg/m(2)) were administered the PEMS along with the Binge-Eating Scale (BES) and the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) to test for convergent and incremental validity and the Sensitivity to Punishment and Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ) for discriminant validity. The PEMS identified four motives for eating tasty food, the same ones found with the DMQ-R for alcohol intake: Social, Conformity, Enhancement, and Coping motives. The scales had good convergent validity with BES and YFAS scores but discriminated from the broader motivational constructs of inhibition and activation measured by the SPSRQ. Of the PEMS motives, Coping (eating tasty food to deal with problems and negative feelings) accounted for unique variance in BMI, and added to variance in BMI contributed by BES scores, showing incremental validity. YFAS scores did not contribute to BMI after controlling for binge-eating. Coping subscale scores were also significantly higher (p<0.001) among the severely obese (BMI>40). Motives behind palatable food intake are not homogenous and should be considered in personalized weight-loss strategies in future studies. In normal weight individuals, knowing one's dominant motive for eating tasty foods may help promote healthier food choices in times and places where they are most vulnerable to do otherwise.

  2. V S Profiles from Noise Cross Correlation at Local and Small Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.

    2011-03-01

    Ambient noise measurements have been performed at local and small scales in the Neapolitan and surrounding areas (Campania, southern Italy) by employing two broad-band Kinemetrics Q330 stations, equipped with Episensor ES-T three component accelerometers. In both experiments frequency time analysis (FTAN method) has been performed on the vertical and radial components of noise cross correlations to retrieve the Rayleigh wave dispersion (Green's function). At local scale, over an interstation distance of about 26 km, the group velocity dispersion values have been compared with those obtained from FTAN analysis on recordings of two earthquakes with similar path. At small scale, measurements have been carried out over an interstation distance of about 440 m in the public gardens of Scampia, the northernmost quarter of Naples. The Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion data obtained from noise cross correlation, have been combined with those from active seismic experiment along the same alignment, but shorter (120 m offset). The non linear inversion of such a dispersion curve has allowed the definition of V S models to depths of 100 m, in agreement with nearby stratigraphy. Moreover, a good agreement has resulted for the resonance frequency among the H/V ratio, the ellipticity of the fundamental mode computed for the chosen V S model, and the average two-dimensional (2D) spectral amplification computed along a cross section representative of the Scampia quarter.

  3. Small scale temporal distribution of radiocesium in undisturbed coniferous forest soil: Radiocesium depth distribution profiles.

    PubMed

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    The depth distribution of pre-Fukushima and Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in undisturbed coniferous forest soil was investigated at four sampling dates from nine months to 18 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The migration rate and short-term temporal variability among the sampling profiles were evaluated. Taking the time elapsed since the peak deposition of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs and the median depth of the peaks, its downward displacement rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.67 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 0.46 ± 0.25 mm yr(-1). On the other hand, in each examined profile considerable amount of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found in the organic layer (51%-92%). At this moment, the effect of time-distance on the downward distribution of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs seems invisible as its large portion is still found in layers where organic matter is maximal. This indicates that organic matter seems the primary and preferential sorbent of radiocesium that could be associated with the physical blockage of the exchanging sites by organic-rich dusts that act as a buffer against downward propagation of radiocesium, implying radiocesium to be remained in the root zone for considerable time period. As a result, this soil section can be a potential source of radiation dose largely due to high radiocesium concentration coupled with its low density. Generally, such kind of information will be useful to establish a dynamic safety-focused decision support system to ease and assist management actions.

  4. A diagnostic scale for Alzheimer’s disease based on cerebrospinal fluid biomarker profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders is clearly established. However, the question remains on how to use these data, which are often heterogeneous (not all biomarkers being pathologic). The objective of this study is to propose to physicians in memory clinics a biologic scale of probabilities that the patient with cognitive impairments has an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathologic process. Methods For that purpose, we took advantage of the multicenter data of our Paris-North, Lille, and Montpellier (PLM) study, which has emerged through the initial sharing of information from these memory centers. Different models combining the CSF levels of amyloid-β 42, tau, and p-tau(181) were tested to generate categories of patients with very low (<10%), low (<25%), high (>75%), and very high predictive values (>90%) for positive AD. In total, 1,273 patients (646 AD and 627 non-AD) from six independent memory-clinic cohorts were included. Results A prediction model based on logistic regressions achieved a very good stratification of the population but had the disadvantages of needing mathematical optimization and being difficult to use in daily clinical practice. Remarkably, a simple and intuitive model based on the number (from zero to three) of three pathologic CSF biomarkers resulted in a very efficient predictive scale for AD in patients seen in memory clinics. The scale’s overall predictive value for AD for the different categories were as follows: class 0, 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.0% to 13.2%); class 1, 24.7% (95% CI, 18.0% to 31.3%); class 2, 77.2% (95% CI, 67.8% to 86.5%); and class 3, 94.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.7%). In addition, with this scale, significantly more patients were correctly classified than with the logistic regression. Its superiority in model performance was validated by the computation of the net reclassification index (NRI). The

  5. A Direct Dynamical Measurement of the Milky Way's Disk Surface Density Profile, Disk Scale Length, and Dark Matter Profile at 4 kpc <~ R <~ 9 kpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-12-01

    We present and apply rigorous dynamical modeling with which we infer unprecedented constraints on the stellar and dark matter mass distribution within our Milky Way (MW), based on large sets of phase-space data on individual stars. Specifically, we model the dynamics of 16,269 G-type dwarfs from SEGUE, which sample 5 kpc < RGC < 12 kpc and 0.3 kpc <~ |Z| <~ 3 kpc. We independently fit a parameterized MW potential and a three-integral, action-based distribution function (DF) to the phase-space data of 43 separate abundance-selected sub-populations (MAPs), accounting for the complex selection effects affecting the data. We robustly measure the total surface density within 1.1 kpc of the mid-plane to 5% over 4.5 kpc < RGC < 9 kpc. Using metal-poor MAPs with small radial scale lengths as dynamical tracers probes 4.5 kpc <~ RGC <~ 7 kpc, while MAPs with longer radial scale lengths sample 7 kpc <~ RGC <~ 9 kpc. We measure the mass-weighted Galactic disk scale length to be Rd = 2.15 ± 0.14 kpc, in agreement with the photometrically inferred spatial distribution of stellar mass. We thereby measure dynamically the mass of the Galactic stellar disk to unprecedented accuracy: M * = 4.6 ± 0.3 + 3.0 (R 0/ kpc - 8) × 1010 M ⊙ and a total local surface density of \\Sigma _{R_0}(Z=1.1\\,{kpc}) = 68\\, {+/- }\\, 4\\,M_\\odot \\,{pc}^{-2} of which 38 ± 4 M ⊙ pc-2 is contributed by stars and stellar remnants. By combining our surface density measurements with the terminal velocity curve, we find that the MW's disk is maximal in the sense that V c, disk/V c, total = 0.83 ± 0.04 at R = 2.2 Rd . We also constrain for the first time the radial profile of the dark halo at such small Galactocentric radii, finding that ρDM(r ≈R 0)vprop1/r α with α < 1.53 at 95% confidence. Our results show that action-based DF modeling of complex stellar data sets is now a feasible approach that will be fruitful for interpreting Gaia data.

  6. Transcriptional Profiles of Cytokine/Chemokine Factors of Immune Cell-Homing to the Parasitic Lesions: A Comprehensive One-Year Course Study in the Liver of E. multilocularis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenbao; Li, Liang; Gottstein, Bruno; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Lü, Guodong; Zhang, Chuangshan; Lu, Xiaomei; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Wen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of chronically developing alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is characterized by a continuous, granulomatous, periparasitic infiltration of immune cells surrounding the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis (E.multilocularis) in the affected liver. A detailed cytokine and chemokine profile analysis of the periparasitic infiltrate in the liver has, however, not yet been carried out in a comprehensive way all along the whole course of infection in E. multilocularis intermediate hosts. We thus assessed the hepatic gene expression profiles of 18 selected cytokine and chemokine genes using qRT-PCR in the periparasitic immune reaction and the subsequent adjacent, not directly affected, liver tissue of mice from day 2 to day 360 post intra-hepatic injection of metacestode. DNA microarray analysis was also used to get a more complete picture of the transcriptional changes occurring in the liver surrounding the parasitic lesions. Profiles of mRNA expression levels in the hepatic parasitic lesions showed that a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, characterized by the concomitant presence of IL-12α, IFN-γ and IL-4, was established very early in the development of E. multilocularis. Subsequently, the profile extended to a combined tolerogenic profile associating IL-5, IL-10 and TGF-β. IL-17 was permanently expressed in the liver, mostly in the periparasitic infiltrate; this was confirmed by the increased mRNA expression of both IL-17A and IL-17F from a very early stage, with a subsequent decrease of IL-17A after this first initial rise. All measured chemokines were significantly expressed at a given stage of infection; their expression paralleled that of the corresponding Th1, Th2 or Th17 cytokines. In addition to giving a comprehensive insight in the time course of cytokines and chemokines in E. multilocularis lesion, this study contributes to identify new targets for possible immune therapy to minimize E. multilocularis-related pathology and to complement the only

  7. INTERPRETING PERSONAL TRANSCRIPTOMES: PERSONALIZED MECHANISM-SCALE PROFILING OF RNA-SEQ DATA

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Rathke, Alan; Li, Haiquan

    2013-01-01

    Despite thousands of reported studies unveiling gene-level signatures for complex diseases, few of these techniques work at the single-sample level with explicit underpinning of biological mechanisms. This presents both a critical dilemma in the field of personalized medicine as well as a plethora of opportunities for analysis of RNA-seq data. In this study, we hypothesize that the “Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression” (FAIME) method we developed could be smoothly extended to RNA-seq data and unveil intrinsic underlying mechanism signatures across different scales of biological data for the same complex disease. Using publicly available RNA-seq data for gastric cancer, we confirmed the effectiveness of this method (i) to translate each sample transcriptome to pathway-scale scores, (ii) to predict deregulated pathways in gastric cancer against gold standards (FDR<5%, Precision=75%, Recall =92%), and (iii) to predict phenotypes in an independent dataset and expression platform (RNA-seq vs microarrays, Fisher Exact Test p<10−6). Measuring at a single-sample level, FAIME could differentiate cancer samples from normal ones; furthermore, it achieved comparative performance in identifying differentially expressed pathways as compared to state-of-the-art cross-sample methods. These results motivate future work on mechanism-level biomarker discovery predictive of diagnoses, treatment, and therapy. PMID:23424121

  8. Large-scale profiling of microRNAs for The Cancer Genome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andy; Robertson, Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Mungall, Andrew J.; Birol, Inanc; Coope, Robin; Ma, Yussanne; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive multiplatform genomics data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network is an enabling resource for cancer research. It includes an unprecedented amount of microRNA sequence data: ∼11 000 libraries across 33 cancer types. Combined with initiatives like the National Cancer Institute Genomics Cloud Pilots, such data resources will make intensive analysis of large-scale cancer genomics data widely accessible. To support such initiatives, and to enable comparison of TCGA microRNA data to data from other projects, we describe the process that we developed and used to generate the microRNA sequence data, from library construction through to submission of data to repositories. In the context of this process, we describe the computational pipeline that we used to characterize microRNA expression across large patient cohorts. PMID:26271990

  9. Large-scale profiling of microRNAs for The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andy; Robertson, Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Mungall, Andrew J; Birol, Inanc; Coope, Robin; Ma, Yussanne; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco A

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive multiplatform genomics data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network is an enabling resource for cancer research. It includes an unprecedented amount of microRNA sequence data: ~11 000 libraries across 33 cancer types. Combined with initiatives like the National Cancer Institute Genomics Cloud Pilots, such data resources will make intensive analysis of large-scale cancer genomics data widely accessible. To support such initiatives, and to enable comparison of TCGA microRNA data to data from other projects, we describe the process that we developed and used to generate the microRNA sequence data, from library construction through to submission of data to repositories. In the context of this process, we describe the computational pipeline that we used to characterize microRNA expression across large patient cohorts.

  10. Bacterial profiling of soil using genus-specific markers and multidimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Erin J; Foran, David R

    2010-11-01

    Forensic identification of soil based on microbial DNA fingerprinting has met with mixed success, with research efforts rarely considering temporal variability or local heterogeneity in soil's microbial makeup. In the research presented, the nitrogen fixing bacteria rhizobia were specifically examined. Soils were collected monthly from five habitats for 1 year, and quarterly in each cardinal direction from the main collection site. When all habitats were compared simultaneously using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis of the rhizobial recA gene and multidimensional scaling, only two were differentiated over a year's time, however pairwise comparisons allowed four of five soils to be effectively differentiated. Adding in 10-foot distant soils as "questioned" samples correctly grouped them in 40-70% of cases, depending on restriction enzyme used. The results indicate that the technique has potential for forensic soil identification, although extensive anthropogenic manipulation of a soil makes such identification much more tentative. PMID:20533986

  11. Extensive light profile fitting of galaxy-scale strong lenses. Towards an automated lens detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brault, F.; Gavazzi, R.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the merits of a massive forward-modeling of ground-based optical imaging as a diagnostic for the strong lensing nature of early-type galaxies, in the light of which blurred and faint Einstein rings can hide. Methods: We simulated several thousand mock strong lenses under ground- and space-based conditions as arising from the deflection of an exponential disk by a foreground de Vaucouleurs light profile whose lensing potential is described by a singular isothermal ellipsoid. We then fitted for the lensed light distribution with sl_fit after subtracting the foreground light emission (ideal case) and also after fitting the deflector light with galfit. By setting thresholds in the output parameter space, we can determine the lensed or unlensed status of each system. We finally applied our strategy to a sample of 517 lens candidates in the CFHTLS data to test the consistency of our selection approach. Results: The efficiency of the fast modeling method at recovering the main lens parameters such as Einstein radius, total magnification, or total lensed flux is quite similar under CFHT and HST conditions when the deflector is perfectly subtracted (only possible in simulations), fostering a sharp distinction between good and poor candidates. Conversely, a substantial fraction of the lensed light is absorbed into the deflector model for a more realistic subtraction, which biases the subsequent fitting of the rings and then disturbs the selection process. We quantify completeness and purity of the lens-finding method in both cases. Conclusions: This suggests that the main limitation currently resides in the subtraction of the foreground light. Provided further enhancement of the latter, the direct forward-modeling of large numbers of galaxy-galaxy strong lenses thus appears tractable and might constitute a competitive lens finder in the next generation of wide-field imaging surveys.

  12. Impact of HIV Infection and Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Immune Profile of and Microbial Translocation in HIV-Infected Children in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Lam Van; Matsuda, Kazunori; Pham, Hung Viet; Phan, Chung Thi Thu; Ogata, Kiyohito; Giang, Thuy Thi Thanh; Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Nguyen, Tuyen Thi; Tokoro, Masaharu; Pham, An Nhat; Khu, Dung Thi Khanh; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    CD4⁺ T-lymphocyte destruction, microbial translocation, and systemic immune activation are the main mechanisms of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection. To investigate the impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the immune profile of and microbial translocation in HIV-infected children, 60 HIV vertically infected children (31 without ART: HIV(+) and 29 with ART: ART(+)) and 20 HIV-uninfected children (HIV(-)) aged 2-12 years were recruited in Vietnam, and their blood samples were immunologically and bacteriologically analyzed. Among the HIV(+) children, the total CD4⁺-cell and their subset (type 1 helper T-cell (Th1)/Th2/Th17) counts were inversely correlated with age (all p < 0.05), whereas regulatory T-cell (Treg) counts and CD4/CD8 ratios had become lower, and the CD38⁺HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-DR⁺CD8⁺- (activated CD8⁺) cell percentage and plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14, a monocyte activation marker) levels had become higher than those of HIV(-) children by the age of 2 years; the CD4/CD8 ratio was inversely correlated with the plasma HIV RNA load and CD8⁺-cell activation status. Among the ART(+) children, the total CD4⁺-cell and Th2/Th17/Treg-subset counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio gradually increased, with estimated ART periods of normalization being 4.8-8.3 years, whereas Th1 counts and the CD8⁺-cell activation status normalized within 1 year of ART initiation. sCD14 levels remained high even after ART initiation. The detection frequency of bacterial 16S/23S ribosomal DNA/RNA in blood did not differ between HIV-infected and -uninfected children. Thus, in children, HIV infection caused a rapid decrease in Treg counts and the early activation of CD8⁺ cells and monocytes, and ART induced rapid Th1 recovery and early CD8⁺-cell activation normalization but had little effect on monocyte activation. The CD4/CD8 ratio could therefore be an additional marker for ART monitoring. PMID:27490536

  13. Impact of HIV Infection and Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Immune Profile of and Microbial Translocation in HIV-Infected Children in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Lam Van; Matsuda, Kazunori; Pham, Hung Viet; Phan, Chung Thi Thu; Ogata, Kiyohito; Giang, Thuy Thi Thanh; Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Nguyen, Tuyen Thi; Tokoro, Masaharu; Pham, An Nhat; Khu, Dung Thi Khanh; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T-lymphocyte destruction, microbial translocation, and systemic immune activation are the main mechanisms of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection. To investigate the impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the immune profile of and microbial translocation in HIV-infected children, 60 HIV vertically infected children (31 without ART: HIV(+) and 29 with ART: ART(+)) and 20 HIV-uninfected children (HIV(−)) aged 2–12 years were recruited in Vietnam, and their blood samples were immunologically and bacteriologically analyzed. Among the HIV(+) children, the total CD4+-cell and their subset (type 1 helper T-cell (Th1)/Th2/Th17) counts were inversely correlated with age (all p < 0.05), whereas regulatory T-cell (Treg) counts and CD4/CD8 ratios had become lower, and the CD38+HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-DR+CD8+- (activated CD8+) cell percentage and plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14, a monocyte activation marker) levels had become higher than those of HIV(−) children by the age of 2 years; the CD4/CD8 ratio was inversely correlated with the plasma HIV RNA load and CD8+-cell activation status. Among the ART(+) children, the total CD4+-cell and Th2/Th17/Treg-subset counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio gradually increased, with estimated ART periods of normalization being 4.8–8.3 years, whereas Th1 counts and the CD8+-cell activation status normalized within 1 year of ART initiation. sCD14 levels remained high even after ART initiation. The detection frequency of bacterial 16S/23S ribosomal DNA/RNA in blood did not differ between HIV-infected and -uninfected children. Thus, in children, HIV infection caused a rapid decrease in Treg counts and the early activation of CD8+ cells and monocytes, and ART induced rapid Th1 recovery and early CD8+-cell activation normalization but had little effect on monocyte activation. The CD4/CD8 ratio could therefore be an additional marker for ART monitoring. PMID:27490536

  14. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  15. Quantitative sensomics profiling of hop-derived bitter compounds throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Haseleu, Gesa; Lagemann, Annika; Stephan, Andreas; Intelmann, Daniel; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-07-14

    Although the complex taste profile of beer is well accepted to be reflected by the molecular blueprint of its sensometabolites, the knowledge available on the process-induced transformation of hop-derived phytochemicals into key sensometabolites during beer manufacturing is far from comprehensive. The objective of the present investigation was, therefore, to develop and apply a suitable HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous and comprehensive quantitative monitoring of a total of 69 hop-derived sensometabolites in selected intermediary products throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process. After data normalization, the individual sensometabolites were arranged into different clusters by means of agglomerative hierarchical analysis and visualized using a sensomics heatmap to verify the structure-specific reaction routes proposed for their formation during the beer brewing process.

  16. Large-scale cellular-resolution gene profiling in human neocortex reveals species-specific molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hongkui; Shen, Elaine H.; Hohmann, John G.; Oh, Wook Seung; Bernard, Amy; Royall, Joshua J.; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Morris, John A.; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Ebbert, Amanda J.; Swanson, Beryl; Kuan, Leonard; Page, Damon T.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Jones, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although there have been major advances in elucidating the functional biology of the human brain, relatively little is known of its cellular and molecular organization. Here we report a large-scale characterization of the expression of ~1,000 genes important for neural functions, by in situ hybridization with cellular resolution in visual and temporal cortices of adult human brains. These data reveal diverse gene expression patterns and remarkable conservation of each individual gene’s expression among individuals (95%), cortical areas (84%), and between human and mouse (79%). A small but substantial number of genes (21%) exhibited species-differential expression. Distinct molecular signatures, comprised of genes both common between species and unique to each, were identified for each major cortical cell type. The data suggest that gene expression profile changes may contribute to differential cortical function across species, in particular, a shift from corticosubcortical to more predominant corticocortical communications in the human brain. PMID:22500809

  17. Translating aboveground cosmic-ray neutron intensity to high-frequency soil moisture profiles at sub-kilometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, R.; Hoar, T.; Arellano, A.; Anderson, J. L.; Shuttleworth, W. J.; Zeng, X.; Franz, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    Above-ground cosmic-ray neutron measurements provide an opportunity to infer soil moisture at the sub-kilometer scale. Initial efforts to assimilate those measurements have shown promise. This study expands such analysis by investigating (1) how the information from aboveground cosmic-ray neutrons can constrain the soil moisture at distinct depths simulated by a land surface model, and (2) how changes in data availability (in terms of retrieval frequency) impact the dynamics of simulated soil moisture profiles. We employ ensemble data assimilation techniques in a "nearly-identical twin" experiment applied at semi-arid shrubland, rainfed agricultural field, and mixed forest biomes in the USA. The performance of the Noah land surface model is compared with and without assimilation of observations at hourly intervals, as well as every 2 days. Synthetic observations of aboveground cosmic-ray neutrons better constrain the soil moisture simulated by Noah in root-zone soil layers (0-100cm), despite the limited measurement depth of the sensor (estimated to be 12-20cm). The ability of Noah to reproduce a "true" soil moisture profile is remarkably good, regardless of the frequency of observations at the semi-arid site. However, soil moisture profiles are better constrained when assimilating synthetic cosmic-ray neutron observations hourly rather than every 2 days at the cropland and mixed forest sites. This indicates potential benefits for hydrometeorological modeling when soil moisture measurements are available at a relatively high frequency. Moreover, differences in summertime meteorological forcing between the semi-arid site and the other two sites may indicate a possible controlling factor to soil moisture dynamics in addition to differences in soil and vegetation properties.

  18. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N L; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers. The current study aimed to characterize the physical injuries associated with ASGM in Ghana to guide policy formulation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Tarkwa mining district of the Western Region of Ghana in 2014. A total of 404 small-scale miners were recruited and interviewed regarding their occupational injury experiences over the preceding 10 years using a paper-based structured questionnaire. Nearly one-quarter (23.5%) of the miners interviewed reported getting injured over the previous 10 years, and the overall injury rate was calculated to be 5.39 per 100 person years. The rate was significantly higher for women (11.93 per 100 person years) and those with little mining experience (e.g., 25.31 per 100 person years for those with less than one year of work experience). The most injury-prone mining activities were excavation (58.7%) and crushing (23.1%), and over 70% of the injuries were reported to be due to miners being hit by an object. The majority of the injuries (57%) were lacerations, and nearly 70% of the injuries were to the upper or lower limbs. Approximately one-third (34.7%) of the injuries resulted in miners missing more than two weeks of work. One-quarter of the injured workers believed that abnormal work pressure played a role in their injuries, and nearly two-fifths believed that their injuries could have been prevented, with many citing personal protective equipment as a solution. About one-quarter of the employees reported that their employers never seemed to be interested in the welfare or safety of their employees. These findings greatly advance our understanding of occupational hazards and injuries amongst ASGM workers and help identify several intervention points.

  19. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N. L.; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers. The current study aimed to characterize the physical injuries associated with ASGM in Ghana to guide policy formulation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Tarkwa mining district of the Western Region of Ghana in 2014. A total of 404 small-scale miners were recruited and interviewed regarding their occupational injury experiences over the preceding 10 years using a paper-based structured questionnaire. Nearly one-quarter (23.5%) of the miners interviewed reported getting injured over the previous 10 years, and the overall injury rate was calculated to be 5.39 per 100 person years. The rate was significantly higher for women (11.93 per 100 person years) and those with little mining experience (e.g., 25.31 per 100 person years for those with less than one year of work experience). The most injury-prone mining activities were excavation (58.7%) and crushing (23.1%), and over 70% of the injuries were reported to be due to miners being hit by an object. The majority of the injuries (57%) were lacerations, and nearly 70% of the injuries were to the upper or lower limbs. Approximately one-third (34.7%) of the injuries resulted in miners missing more than two weeks of work. One-quarter of the injured workers believed that abnormal work pressure played a role in their injuries, and nearly two-fifths believed that their injuries could have been prevented, with many citing personal protective equipment as a solution. About one-quarter of the employees reported that their employers never seemed to be interested in the welfare or safety of their employees. These findings greatly advance our understanding of occupational hazards and injuries amongst ASGM workers and help identify several intervention points. PMID:26184264

  20. Millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohbati, R.; Liu, J.; Murray, A. S.; Jain, M.; Pederson, J. L.; Guralnik, B.; Egholm, D. L.; Gupta, S.

    2015-12-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a well-established Quaternary dating method that is conventionally used to determine the time when sedimentary grains were last exposed to daylight. Recently, a very different approach to this concept has helped develop a new technique to estimate the length of time a rock surface was exposed to daylight. When a rock surface is first exposed to daylight the charge population (and so the latent luminescence signal) trapped in its constituent minerals (e.g. quartz and feldspar) starts to decrease. This charge had accumulated due to previous exposure to natural ionizing radiation. As the surface is exposed to light for longer periods, the latent luminescence signal is reduced farther into the rock. In a rock surface which has been exposed to light for a prolonged period (decades to millennia), the remaining luminescence will be zero (fully bleached) at the surface and then increase, initially exponentially, before approaching saturation at a depth where charge detrapping due to light penetration is negligible compared to the rate of charge trapping due to the environmental dose rate. By modelling the characteristic shape of luminescence resetting with depth into rock surfaces, Sohbati et al. (2012) proposed a new surface-exposure dating technique based on OSL. Here we further develop the current model to include the effect of erosion rate on luminescence-depth profiles. By fitting the model to local known-age calibration samples, we first determine the site-specific resetting rates of the luminescence signal at rock surfaces. We then use the calibration values in a numerical model to derive the steady-state erosion rate for rocks of different mineralogy and different geological settings. The preliminary erosion rates obtained from glacial and landslide granite boulders from the Chinese Pamir Plateau are ~1 mm.ka-1, whereas active streambeds of Permian sandstone in the Grabens district of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, are

  1. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  2. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, T. H.; Cho, H. S.

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  3. Validation of a theory-driven profile interpretation of the Dutch short form of the MMPI using the TAT Social Cognitions and Object Relations Scale (SCORS).

    PubMed

    Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth H M; Luyten, Patrick; Snellen, Wim

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the construct validity of the theory-driven profile interpretation of the Dutch Short Form of the MMPI (DSFM; Luteijn & Kok, 1985), an interpretation method aimed at assessing structural features of personality based on Kernberg and Caligor's (2005) views concerning personality organization. We utilized the four dimensions of the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale (SCORS; Westen, Lohr, Silk, Gold, & Kerber, 1990) as external criteria. Results showed that, congruent with theoretical expectations, the DSFM profiles predicted structural features of personality functioning, especially identity diffusion as measured by the SCORS, after adjustment for the effect of the single scales used to construct the profiles. These findings provide further support for the construct validity of the DSFM profiles to measure structural features of personality organization. We discuss directions for future research and clinical implications.

  4. Microbial Forensics: Predicting Phenotypic Characteristics and Environmental Conditions from Large-Scale Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseung; Zorraquino, Violeta; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5%) to 98.3% (±2.3%) for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain) achieved 10.6% (±1.0%) higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications. PMID:25774498

  5. Microbial forensics: predicting phenotypic characteristics and environmental conditions from large-scale gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseung; Zorraquino, Violeta; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5%) to 98.3% (±2.3%) for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain) achieved 10.6% (±1.0%) higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications.

  6. Advanced Enzymology, Expression Profile and Immune Response of Clonorchis sinensis Hexokinase Show Its Application Potential for Prevention and Control of Clonorchiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zeli; Xie, Zhizhi; Lin, Zhipeng; Sun, Hengchang; Wan, Shuo; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 35 million people are infected with Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) globally, of whom 15 million are in China. Glycolytic enzymes are recognized as crucial molecules for trematode survival and have been targeted for vaccine and drug development. Hexokinase of C. sinensis (CsHK), as the first key regulatory enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, was investigated in the current study. Principal Findings There were differences in spatial structure and affinities for hexoses and phosphate donors between CsHK and HKs from humans or rats, the definitive hosts of C. sinensis. Effectors (AMP, PEP, and citrate) and a small molecular inhibitor regulated the enzymatic activity of rCsHK, and various allosteric systems were detected. CsHK was distributed in the worm extensively as well as in liver tissue and serum from C. sinensis infected rats. Furthermore, high-level specific IgG1 and IgG2a were induced in rats by immunization with rCsHK. The enzymatic activity of CsHK was suppressed by the antibody in vitro. Additionally, the survival of C. sinensis was inhibited by the antibody in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Due to differences in putative spatial structure and enzymology between CsHK and HK from the host, its extensive distribution in adult worms, and its expression profile as a component of excretory/secretory products, together with its good immunogenicity and immunoreactivity, as a key glycolytic enzyme, CsHK shows potential as a vaccine and as a promising drug target for Clonorchiasis. PMID:25799453

  7. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Deciphers Host Responses Altered during Dengue Shock Syndrome and Reveals the Role of Innate Immunity in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Devignot, Stéphanie; Bergon, Aurélie; Rihet, Pascal; Ong, Sivuth; Lorn, Patrich T.; Chroeung, Norith; Ngeav, Sina; Tolou, Hugues J.; Buchy, Philippe; Couissinier-Paris, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background Deciphering host responses contributing to dengue shock syndrome (DSS), the life-threatening form of acute viral dengue infections, is required to improve both the differential prognosis and the treatments provided to DSS patients, a challenge for clinicians. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on a prospective study, we analyzed the genome-wide expression profiles of whole blood cells from 48 matched Cambodian children: 19 progressed to DSS while 16 and 13 presented respectively classical dengue fever (DF) or dengue hemorrhagic fever grades I/II (DHF). Using multi-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and adjustment of p-values to control the False Discovery Rate (FDR<10%), we identified a signature of 2959 genes differentiating DSS patients from both DF and DHF, and showed a strong association of this DSS-gene signature with the dengue disease phenotype. Using a combined approach to analyse the molecular patterns associated with the DSS-gene signature, we provide an integrative overview of the transcriptional responses altered in DSS children. In particular, we show that the transcriptome of DSS children blood cells is characterized by a decreased abundance of transcripts related to T and NK lymphocyte responses and by an increased abundance of anti-inflammatory and repair/remodeling transcripts. We also show that unexpected pro-inflammatory gene patterns at the interface between innate immunity, inflammation and host lipid metabolism, known to play pathogenic roles in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases associated with systemic vascular dysfunction, are transcriptionnally active in the blood cells of DSS children. Conclusions/Significance We provide a global while non exhaustive overview of the molecular mechanisms altered in of DSS children and suggest how they may interact to lead to final vascular homeostasis breakdown. We suggest that some mechanisms identified should be considered putative therapeutic targets or biomarkers of progression to DSS

  8. Alleviation of chronic heat stress in broilers by dietary supplementation of betaine and turmeric rhizome powder: dynamics of performance, leukocyte profile, humoral immunity, and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Akhavan-Salamat, Hossein; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress (HS), one of the most serious climate problems of tropical and subtropical countries, negatively affects the production performance of broilers. Keeping this in view, the current study was aimed at elucidating the effects of supplementing betaine (Bet) and dried turmeric rhizome powder (TRP), either singly or in combination, on growth performance, leukocyte profile, humoral immunity, and antioxidant status in broilers kept under chronic HS. A total of 625 one-day-old Ross male chicks were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (5 replicates of 25 birds per replicate pen). From day 1, the birds were either kept at the thermoneutral zone (TN) or exposed to HS (33 ± 1°C) to the conclusion of study, day 42. THeat stress (HS), one of the most serious climate problems of tropical and subtropical countries, negatively affects the production performance of broilers. Keeping this in view, the current study was aimed at elucidating the effects of supplementing betaine (Bet) and dried turmeric rhizome powder (TRP), either singly or in combination, on growth performance, leukocyte profile, humoral immunity, and antioxidant status in broilers kept under chronic HS. A total of 625 one-day-old Ross male chicks were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (5 replicates of 25 birds per replicate pen). From day 1, the birds were either kept at the thermoneutral zone (TN) or exposed to HS (33 ± 1°C) to the conclusion of study, day 42. The treatment groups were as follows: thermoneutral control (TN-CON), HS-CON, HS-Bet, HS-TRP, and HS-BT (fed Bet and TRP). The results showed that decreases in body weight gain, feed intake, and increases in feed-to-gain ratio and mortality induced by HS were partially restored by dietary supplementation of Bet and TRP. The heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, total, and IgG antibody titers against sheep red blood cell for secondary responses in the HS-TRP and HS-BT groups were also similar to those of the broilers in the TN

  9. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  10. Differentiation of F4 receptor profiles in pigs based on their mucin 4 polymorphism, responsiveness to oral F4 immunization and in vitro binding of F4 to villi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V U; Goetstouwers, T; Coddens, A; Van Poucke, M; Peelman, L; Deforce, D; Melkebeek, V; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4(+) ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhoea and mortality in piglets. F4(+) ETEC use their F4 fimbriae to adhere to specific receptors (F4Rs) on small intestinal brush borders, resulting in colonization of the small intestine. To prevent pigs from post-weaning diarrhoea, pigs should be vaccinated during the suckling period. Previously, we demonstrated that F4acR(+), but not F4acR(-) piglets could be orally immunized with purified F4 fimbriae resulting in a protective immunity against F4(+) ETEC infections, indicating that this immune response was F4R dependent. Recently, aminopeptidase N has been identified as a glycoprotein receptor important for this oral immune response. However, in some oral immunization experiments, a few F4acR(+) piglets did not show an antibody response upon oral immunization, suggesting additional receptors. Therefore, the binding profile of F4 to brush border membrane (glyco)proteins was determined for pigs differing in F4-specific antibody response upon oral immunization, in in vitro adhesion of F4(+)E. coli to small intestinal villi, and in Muc4 genotype. Six groups of pigs could be identified. Only two groups positive in all three assays showed two high molecular weight (MW) glycoprotein bands (>250kDa) suggesting that these high MW bands are linked to the MUC4 susceptible genotype. The fact that these bands were absent in the MUC4 resistant group which showed a positive immune response against F4 and was positive in the adhesion test confirm that at least one or perhaps more other F4Rs exist. Interestingly, two pigs that were positive in the villous adhesion assay did not show an immune response against F4 fimbriae. This suggests that a third receptor category might exist which allows the bacteria to adhere but does not allow effective immunization with soluble F4 fimbriae. Future research will be necessary to confirm or reveal the identity of these receptors. PMID:23084626

  11. National-Scale Changes in Soil Profile C and N in New Zealand Pastures are Determined by Land Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; Parfitt, R.; Ross, C.; Baisden, W. T.; Claydon, J.; Fraser, S.

    2010-12-01

    Grazed pasture is New Zealand’s predominant agricultural land-use and has been relatively recently developed from forest and native grasslands/shrub communities. From the 1850s onwards, land was cleared and exotic pastures established. Phosphorus fertilizer was increasingly used after 1950 which accelerated N fixation by clover. In the last two decades N fertilizers have been used, and grazing intensity has increased, thus affecting soil C and N. Re-sampling of 31 New Zealand soil profiles under grazed pasture measured surprisingly large losses of C and N over the last 2-3 decades (Schipper et al., 2007 Global Change Biology 13:1138-1144). These profiles were predominantly on the most intensively grazed flat land. We extended this re-sampling to 83 profiles (to 90 cm depth), to investigate whether changes in soil C and N stocks also occurred in less intensively managed pasture. Archived soils samples were analysed for total soil C and N alongside the newly collected samples. Intact cores were collected to determine bulk density through the profile. Over an average of 27 years, soils (0-30 cm) in flat dairy pastures significantly lost 0.73±0.16 Mg C ha-1y-1 and 57±16 kg N ha-1y-1 while we observed no change in soil C or N in flat pasture grazed by “dry stock” (e.g., sheep, beef), or in grazed tussock grasslands. Grazed hill country soils (0-30 cm) gained 0.52±0.18 Mg C ha-1y-1 and 66±18 kg N ha-1y-1. The losses of C and N were strongly correlated and C:N ratio has generally declined suggesting soils are becoming N saturated. Losses and gains also occurred in soil layers below 30 cm demonstrating that organic matter throughout the profile was responding to land use. The losses under dairying may be due to greater grazing pressure, fertilizer inputs and exports of C and N. There is evidence that grazing pressure reduces inputs of C below ground, reduces soil microbial C, and that dairy cow urine can mobilise C and N. Gains in hill country pastures may be due

  12. Source profiles of particulate matter emissions from a pilot-scale boiler burning North American coal blends.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W

    2001-11-01

    Recent awareness of suspected adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) emission has prompted publication of new standards for fine PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5). However, scientific data on fine PM emissions from various point sources and their characteristics are very limited. Source apportionment methods are applied to identify contributions of individual regional sources to tropospheric particulate concentrations. The existing industrial database developed using traditional source measurement techniques provides total emission rates only, with no details on chemical nature or size characteristics of particulates. This database is inadequate, in current form, to address source-receptor relationships. A source dilution system was developed for sampling and characterization of total PM, PM2.5, and PM10 (i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 pm) from residual oil and coal combustion. This new system has automatic control capabilities for key parameters, such as relative humidity (RH), temperature, and sample dilution. During optimization of the prototype equipment, three North American coal blends were burned using a 0.7-megawatt thermal (MWt) pulverized coal-fired, pilot-scale boiler. Characteristic emission profiles, including PM2.5 and total PM soluble acids, and elemental and carbon concentrations for three coal blends are presented. Preliminary results indicate that volatile trace elements such as Pb, Zn, Ti, and Se are preferentially enriched in PM2.5. PM2.5 is also more concentrated in soluble sulfates relative to total PM. Coal fly ash collected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) contains about 85-90% PM10 and 30-50% PM2.5. Particles contain the highest elemental concentrations of Si and Al while Ca, Fe, Na, Ba, and K also exist as major elements. Approximately 4-12% of the materials exists as soluble sulfates in fly ash generated by coal blends containing 0.2-0.8% sulfur by mass

  13. The Dryline on 22 May 2002 during IHOP_2002: Convective-Scale Measurements at the Profiling Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Flamant, Cyrille; Weckwerth, Tammy; Whiteman, David; Evans, Keith; Fabry, Frederic; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Miller, David; Geerts, Bart; Brown, William; Schwemmer, Geary; Gentry, Bruce; Feltz, Wayne; Wang, Zhien

    2006-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the structure of a double dryline observed over the Oklahoma panhandle during the first International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) convective initiation (CI) mission on 22 May 2002 is presented. A unique and unprecedented set of high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of water vapor mixing ratio, wind, and boundary layer structure parameters were acquired using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) scanning Raman lidar (SRL), the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW), and the Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE), respectively. These measurements are combined with the vertical velocity measurements derived from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Multiple Antenna Profiler Radar (MAPR) and radar structure function from the high-resolution University of Massachusetts frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar to reveal the evolution and structure of the late afternoon double-dryline boundary layer. The eastern dryline advanced and then retreated over the Homestead profiling site in the Oklahoma panhandle, providing conditions ripe for a detailed observation of the small-scale variability within the boundary layer and the dryline. In situ aircraft data, dropsonde and radiosonde data, along with NCAR S-band dual-polarization Doppler radar (S-Pol) measurements, are also used to provide the larger-scale picture of the double-dryline environment. Moisture and temperature jumps of about 3 g kg(sup -1) and 1 -2 K, respectively, were observed across the eastern radar fine line (dryline), more than the moisture jumps (1-2 g kg(sup -1)) observed across the western radar fine line (secondary dryline). Most updraft plumes observed were located on the moist side of the eastern dryline with vertical velocities exceeding 3 m s(sup -1) and variable horizontal widths of 2-5 km, although some were as wide as 7-8 km. These updrafts were up to 1.5 g kg(sup -1) moister than the

  14. Near-bed hydrodynamics and turbulence below a large-scale plunging breaking wave over a mobile barred bed profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Hurther, D.; Cáceres, I.; O'Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Detailed measurements are presented of velocities and turbulence under a large-scale regular plunging breaking wave in a wave flume. Measurements were obtained at 12 cross-shore locations around a mobile medium-sand breaker bar. They focused particularly on the dynamics of the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) and near-bed turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), measured with an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP). The breaking process and outer flow hydrodynamics are in agreement with previous laboratory and field observations of plunging waves, including a strong undertow in the bar trough region. The WBL thickness matches with previous studies at locations offshore from the bar crest, but it increases near the breaking-wave plunge point. This relates possibly to breaking-induced TKE or to the diverging flow at the shoreward slope of the bar. Outer flow TKE is dominated by wave breaking and exhibits strong spatial variation with largest TKE above the breaker bar crest. Below the plunge point, breaking-induced turbulence invades the WBL during both crest and trough half cycle. This results in an increase in the time-averaged TKE in the WBL (with a factor 3) and an increase in peak onshore and offshore near-bed Reynolds stresses (with a factor 2) from shoaling to breaking region. A fraction of locally produced TKE is advected offshore over a distance of a few meters to shoaling locations during the wave trough phase, and travels back onshore during the crest half cycle. The results imply that breaking-induced turbulence, for large-scale conditions, may significantly affect near-bed sediment transport processes.

  15. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  16. Carrier separation and transport in perovskite solar cells studied by nanometre-scale profiling of electrical potential.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Mengjin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; To, Bobby; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; Luther, Joseph M; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Padture, Nitin P; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M

    2015-01-01

    Organometal-halide perovskite solar cells have greatly improved in just a few years to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. This technology shows unprecedented promise for terawatt-scale deployment of solar energy because of its low-cost, solution-based processing and earth-abundant materials. We have studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells-which are the fundamental mechanisms of device operation and critical factors for power output-by determining the junction structure across the device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. The distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates p-n junction structure at the TiO2/perovskite interfaces and minority-carrier diffusion/drift operation of the devices, rather than the operation mechanism of either an excitonic cell or a p-i-n structure. Combining the potential profiling results with solar cell performance parameters measured on optimized and thickened devices, we find that carrier mobility is a main factor that needs to be improved for further gains in efficiency of the perovskite solar cells. PMID:26411597

  17. Carrier separation and transport in perovskite solar cells studied by nanometre-scale profiling of electrical potential.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Mengjin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; To, Bobby; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; Luther, Joseph M; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Padture, Nitin P; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M

    2015-09-28

    Organometal-halide perovskite solar cells have greatly improved in just a few years to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. This technology shows unprecedented promise for terawatt-scale deployment of solar energy because of its low-cost, solution-based processing and earth-abundant materials. We have studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells-which are the fundamental mechanisms of device operation and critical factors for power output-by determining the junction structure across the device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. The distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates p-n junction structure at the TiO2/perovskite interfaces and minority-carrier diffusion/drift operation of the devices, rather than the operation mechanism of either an excitonic cell or a p-i-n structure. Combining the potential profiling results with solar cell performance parameters measured on optimized and thickened devices, we find that carrier mobility is a main factor that needs to be improved for further gains in efficiency of the perovskite solar cells.

  18. Carrier Separation and Transport in Perovskite Solar Cells Studied by Nanometre-Scale Profiling of Electrical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Mengjin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; To, Bobby; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Luther, Joseph M.; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Padture, Nitin P.; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2015-09-28

    Organometal–halide perovskite solar cells have greatly improved in just a few years to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. This technology shows unprecedented promise for terawatt-scale deployment of solar energy because of its low-cost, solution-based processing and earth-abundant materials. We have studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells—which are the fundamental mechanisms of device operation and critical factors for power output—by determining the junction structure across the device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. Moreover, the distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates p–n junction structure at the TiO2/perovskite interfaces and minority-carrier diffusion/drift operation of the devices, rather than the operation mechanism of either an excitonic cell or a p-i-n structure. When we combined the potential profiling results with solar cell performance parameters measured on optimized and thickened devices, we find that carrier mobility is a main factor that needs to be improved for further gains in efficiency of the perovskite solar cells.

  19. Carrier Separation and Transport in Perovskite Solar Cells Studied by Nanometre-Scale Profiling of Electrical Potential

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Mengjin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; To, Bobby; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Luther, Joseph M.; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Padture, Nitin P.; et al

    2015-09-28

    Organometal–halide perovskite solar cells have greatly improved in just a few years to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. This technology shows unprecedented promise for terawatt-scale deployment of solar energy because of its low-cost, solution-based processing and earth-abundant materials. We have studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells—which are the fundamental mechanisms of device operation and critical factors for power output—by determining the junction structure across the device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. Moreover, the distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates p–n junction structure at the TiO2/perovskite interfacesmore » and minority-carrier diffusion/drift operation of the devices, rather than the operation mechanism of either an excitonic cell or a p-i-n structure. When we combined the potential profiling results with solar cell performance parameters measured on optimized and thickened devices, we find that carrier mobility is a main factor that needs to be improved for further gains in efficiency of the perovskite solar cells.« less

  20. Carrier separation and transport in perovskite solar cells studied by nanometre-scale profiling of electrical potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Mengjin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; To, Bobby; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Luther, Joseph M.; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Padture, Nitin P.; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2015-01-01

    Organometal–halide perovskite solar cells have greatly improved in just a few years to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 20%. This technology shows unprecedented promise for terawatt-scale deployment of solar energy because of its low-cost, solution-based processing and earth-abundant materials. We have studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells—which are the fundamental mechanisms of device operation and critical factors for power output—by determining the junction structure across the device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. The distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates p–n junction structure at the TiO2/perovskite interfaces and minority-carrier diffusion/drift operation of the devices, rather than the operation mechanism of either an excitonic cell or a p-i-n structure. Combining the potential profiling results with solar cell performance parameters measured on optimized and thickened devices, we find that carrier mobility is a main factor that needs to be improved for further gains in efficiency of the perovskite solar cells. PMID:26411597

  1. A Pilot Genome-Scale Profiling of DNA Methylation in Sporadic Pituitary Macroadenomas: Association with Tumor Invasion and Histopathological Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chao; Pease, Matthew; Shi, Lingling; Punj, Vasu; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Commins, Deborah; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Wang, Kai; Zada, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are neoplasms that may cause a variety of neurological and endocrine effects. Although known causal contributors include heredity, hormonal influence and somatic mutations, the pathophysiologic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and invasion of sporadic PAs remain unknown. We hypothesized that alterations in DNA methylation are associated with PA invasion and histopathology subtype, and that genome-scale methylation analysis may complement current classification methods for sporadic PAs. Twenty-four surgically-resected sporadic PAs with varying histopathological subtypes were assigned dichotomized Knosp invasion scores and examined using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling and RNA sequencing. PA samples clustered into subgroups according to functional status. Compared with hormonally-active PAs, nonfunctional PAs exhibited global DNA hypermethylation (mean beta-value 0.47 versus 0.42, P = 0.005); the most significant site of differential DNA methylation was within the promoter region of the potassium voltage-gated channel KCNAB2 (FDR = 5.11×10−10). Pathway analysis of promoter-associated CpGs showed that nonfunctional PAs are potentially associated with the ion-channel activity signal pathway. DNA hypermethylation tended to be negatively correlated with gene expression. DNA methylation analysis may be used to identify candidate genes involved in PA function and may potentially complement current standard immunostaining classification in sporadic PAs. DNA hypermethylation of KCNAB2 and downstream ion-channel activity signal pathways may contribute to the endocrine-inactive status of nonfunctional PAs. PMID:24781529

  2. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts. PMID:26867748

  3. Large-scale chemical similarity networks for target profiling of compounds identified in cell-based chemical screens.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Li, Chien-Ming; Hu, Qiyang; Huang, Yong; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-03-01

    Target identification is one of the most critical steps following cell-based phenotypic chemical screens aimed at identifying compounds with potential uses in cell biology and for developing novel disease therapies. Current in silico target identification methods, including chemical similarity database searches, are limited to single or sequential ligand analysis that have limited capabilities for accurate deconvolution of a large number of compounds with diverse chemical structures. Here, we present CSNAP (Chemical Similarity Network Analysis Pulldown), a new computational target identification method that utilizes chemical similarity networks for large-scale chemotype (consensus chemical pattern) recognition and drug target profiling. Our benchmark study showed that CSNAP can achieve an overall higher accuracy (>80%) of target prediction with respect to representative chemotypes in large (>200) compound sets, in comparison to the SEA approach (60-70%). Additionally, CSNAP is capable of integrating with biological knowledge-based databases (Uniprot, GO) and high-throughput biology platforms (proteomic, genetic, etc) for system-wise drug target validation. To demonstrate the utility of the CSNAP approach, we combined CSNAP's target prediction with experimental ligand evaluation to identify the major mitotic targets of hit compounds from a cell-based chemical screen and we highlight novel compounds targeting microtubules, an important cancer therapeutic target. The CSNAP method is freely available and can be accessed from the CSNAP web server (http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/).

  4. Large-Scale Chemical Similarity Networks for Target Profiling of Compounds Identified in Cell-Based Chemical Screens

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Li, Chien-Ming; Hu, Qiyang; Huang, Yong; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z.

    2015-01-01

    Target identification is one of the most critical steps following cell-based phenotypic chemical screens aimed at identifying compounds with potential uses in cell biology and for developing novel disease therapies. Current in silico target identification methods, including chemical similarity database searches, are limited to single or sequential ligand analysis that have limited capabilities for accurate deconvolution of a large number of compounds with diverse chemical structures. Here, we present CSNAP (Chemical Similarity Network Analysis Pulldown), a new computational target identification method that utilizes chemical similarity networks for large-scale chemotype (consensus chemical pattern) recognition and drug target profiling. Our benchmark study showed that CSNAP can achieve an overall higher accuracy (>80%) of target prediction with respect to representative chemotypes in large (>200) compound sets, in comparison to the SEA approach (60–70%). Additionally, CSNAP is capable of integrating with biological knowledge-based databases (Uniprot, GO) and high-throughput biology platforms (proteomic, genetic, etc) for system-wise drug target validation. To demonstrate the utility of the CSNAP approach, we combined CSNAP's target prediction with experimental ligand evaluation to identify the major mitotic targets of hit compounds from a cell-based chemical screen and we highlight novel compounds targeting microtubules, an important cancer therapeutic target. The CSNAP method is freely available and can be accessed from the CSNAP web server (http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/). PMID:25826798

  5. Performance assessment and calibration of a profiling lab-scale acoustic Doppler velocimeter for application over mixed sand-gravel beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimetry has made high-resolution turbulence measurements in sediment-laden flows possible. Recent developments have resulted in a commercially available lab-scale acoustic Doppler profiling device, a Nortek Vectrino II, that allows for three-dimensional velocity data to be colle...

  6. Cognitive Profiles in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Investigation of Base Rate Discrepancies Using the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowell, Kerri P.; Schanding, G. Thomas, Jr.; Kanne, Stephen M.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.

    2015-01-01

    Extant data suggest that the cognitive profiles of individuals with ASD may be characterized by variability, particularly in terms of verbal intellectual functioning (VIQ) and non-verbal intellectual functioning (NVIQ) discrepancies. The "Differential Ability Scales, Second Edition" (DAS-II) has limited data available on its use with…

  7. Improving the Quality and Applicability of the Dutch Scales of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired Using Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokkink, Lidwine B.; Knol, Dirk L.; van Nispen, Ruth M. A.; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to improve the quality and applicability of the 6 Dutch scales of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI; Demorest & Erdman, 1986, 1987, 1988) using item response theory (IRT). IRT modeling can produce precise, valid, and relatively brief instruments, resulting in minimal response burden (Edelen…

  8. Improving immunization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Argyrakis, Panos; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-04-01

    We introduce an immunization method where the percentage of required vaccinations for immunity are close to the optimal value of a targeted immunization scheme of highest degree nodes. Our strategy retains the advantage of being purely local, without the need for knowledge on the global network structure or identification of the highest degree nodes. The method consists of selecting a random node and asking for a neighbor that has more links than himself or more than a given threshold and immunizing him. We compare this method to other efficient strategies on three real social networks and on a scale-free network model and find it to be significantly more effective.

  9. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  10. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  11. Expression profile of immune-associated genes in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in the East China Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shujiang; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Yinghua; Lv, Baoqiang; Wu, Xiongfei; Liu, Huihui; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-08-01

    To explore the effect of environment conditions on immune activity of fish, eight immune-associated genes responsible for innate immunity were selected from the GenBank, i.e. Pgrn-a, Ifit2, P-hepcidin, Lect2, β2m, Irf1, Il25 and Hsp96, and the mRNA expressions of them in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in different sea areas in the East China Sea were examined with qPCR techniques. In the contrasts of immune-associated gene expression between areas and populations, significant differences were found, expression levels of these immune-associated genes were lower in the clear water area than in the poor water quantity area, and lower in May than in October. MY was more sensitive to environmental factors than DQ, which was coincident with the water quality in the culturing areas. Differential analyses of the expression levels of these immune-associated genes showed that significant up-regulation could be triggered by poor environmental factors. The expression patterns indicated that the expression levels of these genes were sensitive to ecological changes, thereby the immune-associated genes, especially Pgrn-a, Ifit2, β2m, Il25 and Hsp96, might serve as immediate and sensitive indicators of population immunologic vigor and ecosystem health. But the expression of immunity-associated genes at the level of gene transcription is highly influenced by multiple factors, and the exact causes or influencing factors of the up-regulation or down-regulation of these genes still need further thorough investigation.

  12. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiles > Asian American > Immunizations Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian/Pacific Islander adults are 10% less likely to ever ... to non-Hispanic white adults. In 2014, Asian/Pacific Islander adults aged 65 years and older were ...

  13. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holá, Markéta; Kalvoda, Jiří; Nováková, Hana; Škoda, Radek; Kanický, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp ( Cyprinus carpio) scales: A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 μm width and 50 μm depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  14. Some implications of Scale Relativity theory in avascular stages of growth of solid tumors in the presence of an immune system response.

    PubMed

    Buzea, C Gh; Agop, M; Moraru, Evelina; Stana, Bogdan A; Gîrţu, Manuela; Iancu, D

    2011-08-01

    We present a traveling-wave analysis of a reduced mathematical model describing the growth of a solid tumor in the presence of an immune system response in the framework of Scale Relativity theory. Attention is focused upon the attack of tumor cells by tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic lymphocytes (TICLs), in a small multicellular tumor, without necrosis and at some stage prior to (tumor-induced) angiogenesis. For a particular choice of parameters, the underlying system of partial differential equations is able to simulate the well-documented phenomenon of cancer dormancy and propagation of a perturbation in the tumor cell concentration by cnoidal modes, by depicting spatially heterogeneous tumor cell distributions that are characterized by a relatively small total number of tumor cells. This behavior is consistent with several immunomorphological investigations. Moreover, the alteration of certain parameters of the model is enough to induce soliton like modes and soliton packets into the system, which in turn result in tumor invasion in the form of a standard traveling wave. In the same framework of Scale Relativity theory, a very important feature of malignant tumors also results, that even in avascular stages they might propagate and invade healthy tissues, by means of a diffusion on a Newtonian fluid.

  15. Effect of blade profile on the performance of a large-scale Wells turbine for wave-energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Manabu; Thakker, Ajit; Abdulhadi, Rahil; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of rotor blade profile on the performance of the Wells turbine operated at high Reynolds number. In the study, four kinds of blade profile were selected with regard to the blade profile of the Wells turbine. The types of blade profile are as follows: NACA0020, NACA0015, CA9, and HSIM 15-262123-1576. In order to determine the optimum rotor blade profile of the turbine, experimental investigations have been performed for two solidities by model testing and numerical simulation. As a result, it has been concluded that a suitable choice, namely the preferable rotor geometry, is the blade profile of NACA0015. Furthermore, it has been found that the critical Reynolds number of the turbine is around 4×105.

  16. Expression profile of key immune-related genes in Penaeus monodon juveniles after oral administration of recombinant envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2016-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most catastrophic pathogen the shrimp industry has ever encountered. VP28, the abundant envelope protein of WSSV was expressed in bacteria, the purified protein administered orally to Penaeus monodon juveniles and its immune modulatory effects examined. The results indicated significant up-regulation of caspase, penaeidin, crustin, astakine, syntenin, PmRACK, Rab7, STAT and C-type lectin in animals orally administered with this antigen. This revealed the immune modulations in shrimps followed by oral administration of rVP28P which resulted in the reduced transcription of viral gene vp28 and delay in mortality after WSSV challenge. The study suggests the potential of rVP28P to elicit a non-specific immune stimulation in shrimps.

  17. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  18. Moving toward finer scales in oceanography: Predictive linear functional model of Chlorophyll a profile from light data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayle, Séverine; Monestiez, Pascal; Guinet, Christophe; Nerini, David

    2015-05-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a key role in ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide fluxes. Estimation of carbon exchanges between ocean and atmosphere must rely on accurate estimations of primary productivity which require measurements of phytoplankton concentration within the water column. In this paper, we are interested in relationships between primary productivity and light in the Antarctic ocean. The originality of this work is twofold. Starting from physical hypothesis, a statistical model is constructed for the prediction of Chlorophyll a (Chl a) profiles where light profiles are used as a covariate. Taking into account of the functional nature of the data, solutions are proposed to estimate continuous vertical profiles from discrete data sampled by elephant seals equipped with a new generation of oceanographic tags. Bootstrapped prediction intervals show a good quality of prediction of Chl a profiles, giving access to the shape of the profiles along depth and to the submesoscale structure of phytoplankton within the euphotic layer of the Southern Ocean.

  19. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  20. Immune Repertoire Profiling Reveals that Clonally Expanded B and T Cells Infiltrating Diseased Human Kidneys Can Also Be Tracked in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Susanne; Suessner, Susanne; Sunzenauer, Judith; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Weiss, Richard; Winkler, Stephan; Gabriel, Christian; Danzer, Martin; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing allow for the competitive analysis of the human B and T cell immune repertoire. In this study we compared Immunoglobulin and T cell receptor repertoires of lymphocytes found in kidney and blood samples of 10 patients with various renal diseases based on next-generation sequencing data. We used Biomed-2 primer panels and ImmunExplorer software to sequence, analyze and compare complementarity determining regions and V-(D)-J elements. While generally an individual’s renal receptor repertoire is different from the repertoire present in blood, 94% (30/32) of the lymphocytes with clonal expansion in kidney can also be traced in blood however, not all of these clonotypes are equally abundant. Summarizing the data of all analyzed patients, 68% of highly expanded T cell clonotypes and 30% of the highly expanded B cell clonotypes that have infiltrated the kidney can be found amongst the five most abundant clonotypes in blood. In addition, complementarity determining region 3 sequences of the immunoglobulin heavy chains are on average more diverse than T cell receptor beta chains. Immune repertoire analysis of tissue infiltrating B and T cells adds new approaches to the assessment of adaptive immune response in kidney diseases. Our data suggest that expanded clonotypes in the tissues might be traceable in blood samples in the course of treatment or the natural history of the disease. PMID:26600245

  1. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system.

  2. Characterization of Mucosal Immune Responses to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Antigens in a Human Challenge Model: Response Profiles after Primary Infection and Homologous Rechallenge with Strain H10407.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Ram, Malathi; Feller, Andrea; Cage, Alicia; Bauers, Nicole; Bourgeois, A Louis; Walker, Richard; Sack, David A

    2015-11-18

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in children in resource-poor settings as well as in travelers. Although there are several approaches to develop an effective vaccine for ETEC, no licensed vaccines are currently available. A significant challenge to successful vaccine development is our poor understanding of the immune responses that correlate best with protection against ETEC illness. In this study, ETEC-specific mucosal immune responses were characterized and compared in subjects challenged with ETEC strain H10407 and in subjects rechallenged with the homologous organism. IgA responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB), and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) in antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), feces, lavage fluid, and saliva samples were evaluated. In all assay comparisons, ALS was the most sensitive indicator of a local immune response, but serum IgA was also a useful indirect marker of immune response to oral antigens. Volunteers challenged and then rechallenged with strain H10407 were protected from illness following rechallenge. Comparing mucosal antibody responses after primary and homologous rechallenge, protection against disease was reflected in reduced antibody responses to key ETEC antigens and in reduced fecal shedding of the H10407 challenge strain. Subjects challenged with strain H10407 mounted stronger antibody responses to LPS and LTB than subjects in the rechallenge group, while responses to CFA/I in the rechallenge group were higher than in the challenge group. We anticipate that this study will help provide an immunological benchmark for the evaluation of ETEC vaccines and immunization regimens in the future.

  3. Immune Profile Predicts Survival and Reflects Senescence in a Small, Long-Lived Mammal, the Greater Sac-Winged Bat (Saccopteryx bilineata)

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Karin; Courtiol, Alexandre; Czirják, Gábor Á.; Voigt, Christian C.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system imposes costs that may have to be traded against investment of resources in other costly life-history traits. Yet, it is unknown if a trade-off between immunity and longevity occurs in free-ranging mammals. Here, we tested if age and survival, two aspects associated with longevity, are linked to immune parameters in an 8 g bat species. Using a combination of cross-sectional and longitudinal data, we assessed whether total white blood cell (WBC) counts, bacterial killing ability of the plasma (BKA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration change with age. Furthermore, we asked if these immune parameters impose costs resulting in decreased survival probabilities. We found that WBC counts decreased with age both within and among individuals. IgG concentrations were higher in older individuals, but did not change with age within individuals. Furthermore, individuals with above average WBC counts or IgG concentration had lower probabilities to survive the next six months. High WBC counts and IgG concentrations may reflect infections with parasites and pathogens, however, individuals that were infected with trypanosomes or nematodes showed neither higher WBC counts or IgG concentrations, nor was infection connected with survival rates. BKA was higher in infected compared with uninfected bats, but not related to age or survival. In conclusion, cellular (WBC) and humoral (IgG) parts of the immune system were both connected to age and survival, but not to parasite infections, which supports the hypothesis that energetically costly immunological defences are traded against other costly life-history traits, leading to a reduced lifespan in this free-ranging mammal. PMID:25254988

  4. Characterization of Mucosal Immune Responses to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Antigens in a Human Challenge Model: Response Profiles after Primary Infection and Homologous Rechallenge with Strain H10407.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Ram, Malathi; Feller, Andrea; Cage, Alicia; Bauers, Nicole; Bourgeois, A Louis; Walker, Richard; Sack, David A

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in children in resource-poor settings as well as in travelers. Although there are several approaches to develop an effective vaccine for ETEC, no licensed vaccines are currently available. A significant challenge to successful vaccine development is our poor understanding of the immune responses that correlate best with protection against ETEC illness. In this study, ETEC-specific mucosal immune responses were characterized and compared in subjects challenged with ETEC strain H10407 and in subjects rechallenged with the homologous organism. IgA responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB), and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) in antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), feces, lavage fluid, and saliva samples were evaluated. In all assay comparisons, ALS was the most sensitive indicator of a local immune response, but serum IgA was also a useful indirect marker of immune response to oral antigens. Volunteers challenged and then rechallenged with strain H10407 were protected from illness following rechallenge. Comparing mucosal antibody responses after primary and homologous rechallenge, protection against disease was reflected in reduced antibody responses to key ETEC antigens and in reduced fecal shedding of the H10407 challenge strain. Subjects challenged with strain H10407 mounted stronger antibody responses to LPS and LTB than subjects in the rechallenge group, while responses to CFA/I in the rechallenge group were higher than in the challenge group. We anticipate that this study will help provide an immunological benchmark for the evaluation of ETEC vaccines and immunization regimens in the future. PMID:26581889

  5. Differential immune gene expression profiles in susceptible and resistant full-sibling families of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) challenged with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV).

    PubMed

    Reyes-López, Felipe E; Romeo, Jose S; Vallejos-Vidal, Eva; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana M; Tort, Lluis; Mackenzie, Simon; Imarai, Mónica

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to identify at the expression level the immune-related genes associated with IPN-susceptible and resistant phenotypes in Atlantic salmon full-sibling families. We have analyzed thirty full-sibling families infected by immersion with IPNV and then classified as resistant or susceptible using a multivariate survival analysis based on a gamma-Cox frailty model and the Kaplan-Meier mortality curves. In four families within each group head kidneys were pooled for real-time PCR and one-color salmon-specific oligonucleotide microarray (21K) analysis at day 1 and 5 post-infection. Transcripts involved in innate response (IL-6, IFN-α), antigen presentation (HSP-70, HSP-90, MHC-I), TH1 response (IL-12, IFN-γ, CRFB6), immunosuppression (IL-10, TGF-β1) and leukocyte activation and migration (CCL-19, CD18) showed a differential expression pattern between both phenotypes, except in IL-6. In susceptible families, except for IFN-γ, the expressions dropped to basal values at day 5 post-infection. In resistant families, unlike susceptible families, levels remained high or increased (except for IL-6) at day 5. Transcriptomic analysis showed that both families have a clear differential expression pattern, resulting in a marked down-regulation in immune related genes involved in innate response, complement system, antigen recognition and activation of immune response in IPN-resistant. Down-regulation of genes, mainly related to tissue differentiation and protein degradation metabolism, was also observed in resistant families. We have identified an immune-related gene patterns associated with susceptibility and resistance to IPNV infection of Atlantic salmon. This suggests that a limited immune response is associated with resistant fish phenotype to IPNV challenge while a highly inflammatory but short response is associated with susceptibility.

  6. Differential immune gene expression profiles in susceptible and resistant full-sibling families of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) challenged with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV).

    PubMed

    Reyes-López, Felipe E; Romeo, Jose S; Vallejos-Vidal, Eva; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana M; Tort, Lluis; Mackenzie, Simon; Imarai, Mónica

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to identify at the expression level the immune-related genes associated with IPN-susceptible and resistant phenotypes in Atlantic salmon full-sibling families. We have analyzed thirty full-sibling families infected by immersion with IPNV and then classified as resistant or susceptible using a multivariate survival analysis based on a gamma-Cox frailty model and the Kaplan-Meier mortality curves. In four families within each group head kidneys were pooled for real-time PCR and one-color salmon-specific oligonucleotide microarray (21K) analysis at day 1 and 5 post-infection. Transcripts involved in innate response (IL-6, IFN-α), antigen presentation (HSP-70, HSP-90, MHC-I), TH1 response (IL-12, IFN-γ, CRFB6), immunosuppression (IL-10, TGF-β1) and leukocyte activation and migration (CCL-19, CD18) showed a differential expression pattern between both phenotypes, except in IL-6. In susceptible families, except for IFN-γ, the expressions dropped to basal values at day 5 post-infection. In resistant families, unlike susceptible families, levels remained high or increased (except for IL-6) at day 5. Transcriptomic analysis showed that both families have a clear differential expression pattern, resulting in a marked down-regulation in immune related genes involved in innate response, complement system, antigen recognition and activation of immune response in IPN-resistant. Down-regulation of genes, mainly related to tissue differentiation and protein degradation metabolism, was also observed in resistant families. We have identified an immune-related gene patterns associated with susceptibility and resistance to IPNV infection of Atlantic salmon. This suggests that a limited immune response is associated with resistant fish phenotype to IPNV challenge while a highly inflammatory but short response is associated with susceptibility. PMID:26123889

  7. Characterization of Mucosal Immune Responses to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Antigens in a Human Challenge Model: Response Profiles after Primary Infection and Homologous Rechallenge with Strain H10407

    PubMed Central

    Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Ram, Malathi; Feller, Andrea; Cage, Alicia; Bauers, Nicole; Bourgeois, A. Louis; Walker, Richard; Sack, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in children in resource-poor settings as well as in travelers. Although there are several approaches to develop an effective vaccine for ETEC, no licensed vaccines are currently available. A significant challenge to successful vaccine development is our poor understanding of the immune responses that correlate best with protection against ETEC illness. In this study, ETEC-specific mucosal immune responses were characterized and compared in subjects challenged with ETEC strain H10407 and in subjects rechallenged with the homologous organism. IgA responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB), and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) in antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), feces, lavage fluid, and saliva samples were evaluated. In all assay comparisons, ALS was the most sensitive indicator of a local immune response, but serum IgA was also a useful indirect marker of immune response to oral antigens. Volunteers challenged and then rechallenged with strain H10407 were protected from illness following rechallenge. Comparing mucosal antibody responses after primary and homologous rechallenge, protection against disease was reflected in reduced antibody responses to key ETEC antigens and in reduced fecal shedding of the H10407 challenge strain. Subjects challenged with strain H10407 mounted stronger antibody responses to LPS and LTB than subjects in the rechallenge group, while responses to CFA/I in the rechallenge group were higher than in the challenge group. We anticipate that this study will help provide an immunological benchmark for the evaluation of ETEC vaccines and immunization regimens in the future. PMID:26581889

  8. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  9. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  10. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup high} regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1{sup +}Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4{sup +}Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  11. Altered HLA Class I Profile Associated with Type A/D Nucleophosmin Mutation Points to Possible Anti-Nucleophosmin Immune Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kuželová, Kateřina; Brodská, Barbora; Fuchs, Ota; Dobrovolná, Marie; Soukup, Petr; Cetkovský, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) mutations are frequently found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the newly generated sequences were suggested to induce immune response contributing to the relatively favorable outcome of patients in this AML subset. We hypothesized that if an efficient immune response against mutated nucleophosmin can be induced in vivo, the individuals expressing HLA alleles suitable for presenting NPM-derived peptides should be less prone to developing AML associated with NPM1 mutation. We thus compared HLA class I frequencies in a cohort of patients with mutated NPM1 (63 patients, NPMc+), a cohort of patients with wild-type NPM1 (94 patients, NPMwt) and in normal individuals (large datasets available from Allele Frequency Net Database). Several HLA allelic groups were found to be depleted in NPMc+ patients, but not in NPMwt compared to the normal distribution. The decrease was statistically significant for HLA B(*)07, B(*)18, and B(*)40. Furthermore, statistically significant advantage in the overall survival was found for patients with mutated NPM1 expressing at least one of the depleted allelic groups. The majority of the depleted alleles were predicted to bind potent NPM-derived immunopeptides and, importantly, these peptides were often located in the unmutated part of the protein. Our analysis suggests that individuals expressing specific HLA allelic groups are disposed to develop an efficient anti-AML immune response thanks to aberrant cytoplasmic localization of the mutated NPM protein.

  12. Altered HLA Class I Profile Associated with Type A/D Nucleophosmin Mutation Points to Possible Anti-Nucleophosmin Immune Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuželová, Kateřina; Brodská, Barbora; Fuchs, Ota; Dobrovolná, Marie; Soukup, Petr; Cetkovský, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) mutations are frequently found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the newly generated sequences were suggested to induce immune response contributing to the relatively favorable outcome of patients in this AML subset. We hypothesized that if an efficient immune response against mutated nucleophosmin can be induced in vivo, the individuals expressing HLA alleles suitable for presenting NPM-derived peptides should be less prone to developing AML associated with NPM1 mutation. We thus compared HLA class I frequencies in a cohort of patients with mutated NPM1 (63 patients, NPMc+), a cohort of patients with wild-type NPM1 (94 patients, NPMwt) and in normal individuals (large datasets available from Allele Frequency Net Database). Several HLA allelic groups were found to be depleted in NPMc+ patients, but not in NPMwt compared to the normal distribution. The decrease was statistically significant for HLA B*07, B*18, and B*40. Furthermore, statistically significant advantage in the overall survival was found for patients with mutated NPM1 expressing at least one of the depleted allelic groups. The majority of the depleted alleles were predicted to bind potent NPM-derived immunopeptides and, importantly, these peptides were often located in the unmutated part of the protein. Our analysis suggests that individuals expressing specific HLA allelic groups are disposed to develop an efficient anti-AML immune response thanks to aberrant cytoplasmic localization of the mutated NPM protein. PMID:25992555

  13. Age-related profiling of DNA methylation in CD8+ T cells reveals changes in immune response and transcriptional regulator genes.

    PubMed

    Tserel, Liina; Kolde, Raivo; Limbach, Maia; Tretyakov, Konstantin; Kasela, Silva; Kisand, Kai; Saare, Mario; Vilo, Jaak; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-01-01

    Human ageing affects the immune system resulting in an overall decline in immunocompetence. Although all immune cells are affected during aging, the functional capacity of T cells is most influenced and is linked to decreased responsiveness to infections and impaired differentiation. We studied age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from younger and older individuals. We observed marked difference between T cell subsets, with increased number of methylation changes and higher methylome variation in CD8+ T cells with age. The majority of age-related hypermethylated sites were located at CpG islands of silent genes and enriched for repressive histone marks. Specifically, in CD8+ T cell subset we identified strong inverse correlation between methylation and expression levels in genes associated with T cell mediated immune response (LGALS1, IFNG, CCL5, GZMH, CCR7, CD27 and CD248) and differentiation (SATB1, TCF7, BCL11B and RUNX3). Our results thus suggest the link between age-related epigenetic changes and impaired T cell function. PMID:26286994

  14. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  15. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  16. A Comparison of Physical Self-Perception Profile Questionnaire Formats: Structured Alternative and Ordered Response Scale Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmet, Natalie; Fouladi, Rachel T.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the performance of the original version of the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP; Fox & Corbin, 1989) as compared to a revised version. University students (N = 259) participated in the study, each answering and comparing the clarity of the original and a revised PSPP. While participants found the revised version to be…

  17. Transcriptional profiling of the ovine abomasal lymph node reveals a role for timing of the immune response in gastrointestinal nematode resistance.

    PubMed

    McRae, Kathryn M; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P; McCabe, Matthew S; Cormican, Paul; Sweeney, Torres; O'Connell, Mary J; Keane, Orla M

    2016-07-15

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in grazing ruminants. The major ovine defence mechanism is acquired immunity, with protective immunity developing over time in response to infection. Nematode resistance varies both within and between breeds and is moderately heritable. A detailed understanding of the genes and mechanisms involved in protective immunity, and the factors that regulate this response, is required to aid both future breeding strategies and the development of effective and sustainable nematode control methods. The aim of this study was to compare the abomasal lymph node transcriptome of resistant and susceptible lambs in order to determine biological processes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible individuals. Scottish Blackface lambs, with divergent phenotypes for resistance, were challenged with 30,000 Teladorsagia circumcincta larvae (L3), and abomasal lymph nodes recovered at 7 and 14days post-infection (dpi). High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from the abomasal lymph node was used to quantitatively sample the transcriptome with an average of 32 million reads per sample. A total of 194 and 144 genes were differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible lambs at 7 and 14 dpi respectively. Differentially expressed networks and biological processes were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Genes involved in the inflammatory response, attraction of T lymphocytes and binding of leukocytes were more highly expressed in resistant animals at 7 dpi and in susceptible animals at 14 dpi indicating that resistant animals respond to infection earlier than susceptible animals. Twenty-four Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) within 11 differentially expressed genes, were tested for association with gastrointestinal nematode resistance in the Scottish Blackface lambs. Four SNP, in 2 genes (SLC30A2 and ALB), were suggestively associated with faecal egg count. In conclusion, a large

  18. Co-occurring genomic alterations define major subsets of KRAS - mutant lung adenocarcinoma with distinct biology, immune profiles, and therapeutic vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Byers, Lauren A.; Diao, Lixia; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Tong, Pan; Izzo, Julie; Behrens, Carmen; Kadara, Humam; Parra, Edwin R.; Canales, Jaime Rodriguez; Zhang, Jianjun; Giri, Uma; Gudikote, Jayanthi; Cortez, Maria A.; Yang, Chao; Fan, You Hong; Peyton, Michael; Girard, Luc; Coombes, Kevin R.; Toniatti, Carlo; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Choi, Murim; Frampton, Garrett M.; Miller, Vincent; Weinstein, John N.; Herbst, Roy S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Zhang, Jianhua; Sharma, Padmanee; Mills, Gordon B.; Hong, Waun K.; Minna, John D.; Allison, James P.; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Jing; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Heymach, John V.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular underpinnings that drive the heterogeneity of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma (LUAC) are poorly characterized. We performed an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data from early-stage and chemo-refractory LUAC and identified three robust subsets of KRAS-mutant LUAC dominated, respectively, by co-occurring genetic events in STK11/LKB1 (the KL subgroup), TP53 (KP) and CDKN2A/B inactivation coupled with low expression of the NKX2-1 (TTF1) transcription factor (KC). We further reveal biologically and therapeutically relevant differences between the subgroups. KC tumors frequently exhibited mucinous histology and suppressed mTORC1 signaling. KL tumors had high rates of KEAP1 mutational inactivation and expressed lower levels of immune markers, including PD-L1. KP tumors demonstrated higher levels of somatic mutations, inflammatory markers, immune checkpoint effector molecules and improved relapse-free survival. Differences in drug sensitivity patterns were also observed; notably, KL cells showed increased vulnerability to HSP90-inhibitor therapy. This work provides evidence that co-occurring genomic alterations identify subgroups of KRAS-mutant LUAC with distinct biology and therapeutic vulnerabilities. PMID:26069186

  19. RNA-seq Analysis of δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-treated T Cells Reveals Altered Gene Expression Profiles That Regulate Immune Response and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoming; Bam, Marpe; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-07-22

    Marijuana has drawn significant public attention and concern both for its medicinal and recreational use. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main bioactive component in marijuana, has also been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of its ability to activate cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB-2) expressed on immune cells. In this study, we used RNA-seq to quantify the transcriptomes and transcript variants that are differentially regulated by THC in super antigen-activated lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. We found that the expressions of many transcripts were altered by THC in both total lymph node cells and CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the abundance of many miRNA precursors and long non-coding RNAs was dramatically altered in THC-treated mice. For example, the expression of miR-17/92 cluster and miR-374b/421 cluster was down-regulated by THC. On the other hand miR-146a, which has been shown to induce apoptosis, was up-regulated by THC. Long non-coding RNAs that are expressed from the opposite strand of CD27 and Appbp2 were induced by THC. In addition, THC treatment also caused alternative promoter usage and splicing. The functions of those altered transcripts were mainly related to immune response and cell proliferation. PMID:27268054

  20. SPECIAL TOPIC: A two-time-scale dynamic-model approach for magnetic and kinetic profile control in advanced tokamak scenarios on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, D.; Mazon, D.; Ariola, M.; DeTommasi, G.; Laborde, L.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Tala, T.; Zabeo, L.; Boboc, A.; Bouvier, E.; Brix, M.; Brzozowski, J.; Challis, C. D.; Cocilovo, V.; Cordoliani, V.; Crisanti, F.; DeLa Luna, E.; Felton, R.; Hawkes, N.; King, R.; Litaudon, X.; Loarer, T.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.; Nunes, I.; Surrey, E.; Zimmerman, O.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2008-10-01

    Real-time simultaneous control of several radially distributed magnetic and kinetic plasma parameters is being investigated on JET, in view of developing integrated control of advanced tokamak scenarios. This paper describes the new model-based profile controller which has been implemented during the 2006-2007 experimental campaigns. The controller aims to use the combination of heating and current drive (H&CD) systems—and optionally the poloidal field (PF) system—in an optimal way to regulate the evolution of plasma parameter profiles such as the safety factor, q(x), and gyro-normalized temperature gradient, \\rho _Te^*(x) . In the first part of the paper, a technique for the experimental identification of a minimal dynamic plasma model is described, taking into account the physical structure and couplings of the transport equations, but making no quantitative assumptions on the transport coefficients or on their dependences. To cope with the high dimensionality of the state space and the large ratio between the time scales involved, the model identification procedure and the controller design both make use of the theory of singularly perturbed systems by means of a two-time-scale approximation. The second part of the paper provides the theoretical basis for the controller design. The profile controller is articulated around two composite feedback loops operating on the magnetic and kinetic time scales, respectively, and supplemented by a feedforward compensation of density variations. For any chosen set of target profiles, the closest self-consistent state achievable with the available actuators is uniquely defined. It is reached, with no steady state offset, through a near-optimal proportional-integral control algorithm. Conventional optimal control is recovered in the limiting case where the ratio of the plasma confinement time to the resistive diffusion time tends to zero. Closed-loop simulations of the controller response have been performed in

  1. Resampling soil profiles can constrain large-scale changes in the C cycle: obtaining robust information from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Prior, C.; Lambie, S.; Tate, K.; Bruhn, F.; Parfitt, R.; Schipper, L.; Wilde, R. H.; Ross, C.

    2006-12-01

    Soil organic matter contains more C than terrestrial biomass and atmospheric CO2 combined, and reacts to climate and land-use change on timescales requiring long-term experiments or monitoring. The direction and uncertainty of soil C stock changes has been difficult to predict and incorporate in decision support tools for climate change policies. Moreover, standardization of approaches has been difficult because historic methods of soil sampling have varied regionally, nationally and temporally. The most common and uniform type of historic sampling is soil profiles, which have commonly been collected, described and archived in the course of both soil survey studies and research. Resampling soil profiles has considerable utility in carbon monitoring and in parameterizing models to understand the ecosystem responses to global change. Recent work spanning seven soil orders in New Zealand's grazed pastures has shown that, averaged over approximately 20 years, 31 soil profiles lost 106 g C m-2 y-1 (p=0.01) and 9.1 g N m{^-2} y-1 (p=0.002). These losses are unexpected and appear to extend well below the upper 30 cm of soil. Following on these recent results, additional advantages of resampling soil profiles can be emphasized. One of the most powerful applications afforded by resampling archived soils is the use of the pulse label of radiocarbon injected into the atmosphere by thermonuclear weapons testing circa 1963 as a tracer of soil carbon dynamics. This approach allows estimation of the proportion of soil C that is `passive' or `inert' and therefore unlikely to respond to global change. Evaluation of resampled soil horizons in a New Zealand soil chronosequence confirms that the approach yields consistent values for the proportion of `passive' soil C, reaching 25% of surface horizon soil C over 12,000 years. Across whole profiles, radiocarbon data suggest that the proportion of `passive' C in New Zealand grassland soil can be less than 40% of total soil C. Below 30 cm

  2. Measurement and characterization of a nano-scale multiple-step height sample using a stylus profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Yiming; Wang, Chenying; Ren, Wei; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we discussed a method for the measurement and characterization of a three-step height sample using a stylus profiler. The original measurement data were processed by a polynomial fitting based algorithm to reduce low frequency artefacts. A low pass filter with the cutoff frequency of 0.8/μm was used to remove the high frequency noise, and a ten order polynomial was used to effectively remove the low frequency artefacts. The experimental results indicated that the uncertainties of the step heights were between 1 nm and 2.2 nm. Furthermore, the deposition rate of the step films with uncertainty was calculated as an application of the sample measurement. The results indicate that the deposition rate for the step films based on the measurement of the stylus profiler was consistent with that of a spectroscopic ellipsometer.

  3. Characterising the Profile of Everyday Executive Functioning and Relation to IQ in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Is the BRIEF Adult Version a Valid Rating Scale?

    PubMed

    Hocking, Darren R; Reeve, Jessica; Porter, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence of a distinct profile of executive dysfunction in Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, the utility of informant reports of everyday executive function (EF) impairments and their relation to intelligence is not yet clear. Here we aimed to evaluate the functional impact of executive dysfunction in adults with WS and to establish the validity of child and adult versions of the most commonly used rating scale for EF assessment, the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). We were also interested in whether distinct components of everyday EF relate to intelligence in WS. Parent report child (BRIEF-C) and adult (BRIEF-A) ratings were collected on 20 adults with WS (aged 18.5 to 53 years), with a mean IQ of 60.95 (SD = 17.67). Neuropsychological measures of EF included: The Shape School Test (Espy, 2007); select subdomains of EF from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Australian Adaptation (WJ III COG); and select subdomains from the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, Second Edition-Parent Survey (Vineland-II). Results showed that the BRIEF-A, but not the BRIEF-C, was the most highly correlated with neuropsychological measures of EF, suggesting that it was a valid measure of the profile of EF impairments in adults with WS. The profile of everyday EF dysfunction revealed relative impairments in monitoring, working memory, planning and organisation in WS. In addition, both neuropsychological and rating scale measures showed an association between the shifting component of EF and intelligence. These findings indicate that the BRIEF-A is a valid measure of the multidimensional nature of real-world impairments in EF, and highlight its utility as a less labor intensive and low-cost screening tool for measuring specific EF impairments that could become the focus of targeted intervention in adults with WS.

  4. Characterising the Profile of Everyday Executive Functioning and Relation to IQ in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Is the BRIEF Adult Version a Valid Rating Scale?

    PubMed

    Hocking, Darren R; Reeve, Jessica; Porter, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence of a distinct profile of executive dysfunction in Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, the utility of informant reports of everyday executive function (EF) impairments and their relation to intelligence is not yet clear. Here we aimed to evaluate the functional impact of executive dysfunction in adults with WS and to establish the validity of child and adult versions of the most commonly used rating scale for EF assessment, the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). We were also interested in whether distinct components of everyday EF relate to intelligence in WS. Parent report child (BRIEF-C) and adult (BRIEF-A) ratings were collected on 20 adults with WS (aged 18.5 to 53 years), with a mean IQ of 60.95 (SD = 17.67). Neuropsychological measures of EF included: The Shape School Test (Espy, 2007); select subdomains of EF from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Australian Adaptation (WJ III COG); and select subdomains from the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, Second Edition-Parent Survey (Vineland-II). Results showed that the BRIEF-A, but not the BRIEF-C, was the most highly correlated with neuropsychological measures of EF, suggesting that it was a valid measure of the profile of EF impairments in adults with WS. The profile of everyday EF dysfunction revealed relative impairments in monitoring, working memory, planning and organisation in WS. In addition, both neuropsychological and rating scale measures showed an association between the shifting component of EF and intelligence. These findings indicate that the BRIEF-A is a valid measure of the multidimensional nature of real-world impairments in EF, and highlight its utility as a less labor intensive and low-cost screening tool for measuring specific EF impairments that could become the focus of targeted intervention in adults with WS. PMID:26355600

  5. Characterising the Profile of Everyday Executive Functioning and Relation to IQ in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Is the BRIEF Adult Version a Valid Rating Scale?

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence of a distinct profile of executive dysfunction in Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, the utility of informant reports of everyday executive function (EF) impairments and their relation to intelligence is not yet clear. Here we aimed to evaluate the functional impact of executive dysfunction in adults with WS and to establish the validity of child and adult versions of the most commonly used rating scale for EF assessment, the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). We were also interested in whether distinct components of everyday EF relate to intelligence in WS. Parent report child (BRIEF-C) and adult (BRIEF-A) ratings were collected on 20 adults with WS (aged 18.5 to 53 years), with a mean IQ of 60.95 (SD = 17.67). Neuropsychological measures of EF included: The Shape School Test (Espy, 2007); select subdomains of EF from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Australian Adaptation (WJ III COG); and select subdomains from the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, Second Edition—Parent Survey (Vineland-II). Results showed that the BRIEF-A, but not the BRIEF-C, was the most highly correlated with neuropsychological measures of EF, suggesting that it was a valid measure of the profile of EF impairments in adults with WS. The profile of everyday EF dysfunction revealed relative impairments in monitoring, working memory, planning and organisation in WS. In addition, both neuropsychological and rating scale measures showed an association between the shifting component of EF and intelligence. These findings indicate that the BRIEF-A is a valid measure of the multidimensional nature of real-world impairments in EF, and highlight its utility as a less labor intensive and low-cost screening tool for measuring specific EF impairments that could become the focus of targeted intervention in adults with WS. PMID:26355600

  6. TFF2 deficiency exacerbates weight loss and alters immune cell and cytokine profiles in DSS colitis, and this cannot be rescued by wild-type bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Judd, Louise M; Chalinor, Heather V; Walduck, Anna; Pavlic, Daniel I; Däbritz, Jan; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Wang, Timothy C; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Giraud, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    The trefoil factor TFF2 is a member of a tripartite family of small proteins that is produced by the stomach and the colon. Recombinant TFF2, when applied intrarectally in a rodent model of hapten colitis, hastens mucosal healing and reduces inflammatory indexes. Additionally, TFF2 is expressed in immune organs, supporting a potential immunomodulatory and reparative role in the bowel. In this study we confirm that TFF2 is expressed in the colon and is specifically enriched in epithelial cells relative to colonic leukocytes. TFF2-deficient, but not TFF1-deficient, mice exhibit a more severe response to acute or chronic dextran sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that correlates with a 50% loss of expression of TFF3, the principal colonic trefoil. In addition, the response to acute colitis is associated with altered expression of IL-6 and IL-33, but not other inflammatory cytokines. While TFF2 can reduce macrophage responsiveness and block inflammatory cell recruitment to the colon, the major role in limiting the susceptibility to acute colitis appears to be maintenance of barrier function. Bone marrow transfer experiments demonstrate that leukocyte expression of TFF2 is not sufficient for prevention of colitis induction but, rather, that the gastrointestinal epithelium is the primary source of TFF2. Together, these findings illustrate that epithelial TFF2 is an important endogenous regulator of gut mucosal homeostasis that can modulate immune and epithelial compartments. Because of its extreme stability, even in the corrosive gut lumen, TFF2 is an attractive candidate as an oral therapeutic scaffold for future drug development in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission.

  8. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  9. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M.; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A.; Crow, John A.; Soderlund, Carol A.; Gang, David R.; Brown, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  10. Meso-γ-scale convective systems observed by a 443-MHz wind-profiling radar with RASS in the Okinawa subtropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Aya; Kawabata, Takuya; Satoh, Shinsuke; Furumoto, Jun-Ichi; Nagai, Seiji; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2011-06-01

    We observed a meso-γ-scale convective system in July 2007 using a 443-MHz wind profiler radar (WPR) with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) at the NICT Ogimi observatory in Okinawa, Japan. We analyzed the virtual temperature, Tv, the Brunt-Vaisala frequency squared, N2, and three components of wind velocity profiles from the WPR-RASS data. We also employed a non-hydrostatic meso-scale (NHM) numerical model. Although the island of Okinawa was covered with a Pacific high-pressure system from 21-26 July, the atmospheric condition was convectively unstable below about 5 km. A number of convective clouds generally appeared from 11:00-18:00 in local time (i.e., Japan Standard Time; JST) with a typical horizontal scale of 10 km and temporal scale of 40-60 min. We focused on the convective system that passed over the Ogimi radar site on 23rd and 25th July. Just before rain occurred on these days, a low N2 region extended upward to 2.0 km, and this characteristics is also commonly seen around a convective cloud in the NHM model. The cloud water content from the NHM model indicated that the cloud top height correlates with the low N2 structure. Before the convective system was generated, N2 decreased below an altitude of about 1 km, because air with low Tv intruded at 1-3 km, and the surface temperature increased due to solar radiation. The sea-breeze from both the east and west coasts of Okinawa collided to force the convergence below 1 km. Thus, the synergetic effects of the low static stability and convergence seemed to trigger the generation of a convective system, which eventually grew to 11 km over the radar site.

  11. Large-scale profiling of signalling pathways reveals an asthma specific signature in bronchial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Elena; Nassa, Giovanni; Corleone, Giacomo; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander M.; Terekhanova, Nadezhda; Shepelin, Denis; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Tamm, Michael; Milanesi, Luciano; Weisz, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) cells from asthmatic patients maintain in vitro a distinct hyper-reactive (“primed”) phenotype, characterized by increased release of pro-inflammatory factors and mediators, as well as hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy. This “primed” phenotype helps to understand pathogenesis of asthma, as changes in BSM function are essential for manifestation of allergic and inflammatory responses and airway wall remodelling. Objective To identify signalling pathways in cultured primary BSMs of asthma patients and non-asthmatic subjects by genome wide profiling of differentially expressed mRNAs and activated intracellular signalling pathways (ISPs). Methods Transcriptome profiling by cap-analysis-of-gene-expression (CAGE), which permits selection of preferentially capped mRNAs most likely to be translated into proteins, was performed in human BSM cells from asthmatic (n=8) and non-asthmatic (n=6) subjects and OncoFinder tool were then exploited for identification of ISP deregulations. Results CAGE revealed >600 RNAs differentially expressed in asthma vs control cells (p≤0.005), with asthma samples showing a high degree of similarity among them. Comprehensive ISP activation analysis revealed that among 269 pathways analysed, 145 (p<0.05) or 103 (p<0.01) are differentially active in asthma, with profiles that clearly characterize BSM cells of asthmatic individuals. Notably, we identified 7 clusters of coherently acting pathways functionally related to the disease, with ISPs down-regulated in asthma mostly targeting cell death-promoting pathways and up-regulated ones affecting cell growth and proliferation, inflammatory response, control of smooth muscle contraction and hypoxia-related signalization. Conclusions These first-time results can now be exploited toward development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting ISP signatures linked to asthma pathophysiology. PMID:26863634

  12. Profiling the ionome of rice and its use in discriminating geographical origins at the regional scale, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Nunes, Luis; Wang, Yijie; Williams, Paul N; Zheng, Maozhong; Zhang, Qiufang; Zhu, Yongguan

    2013-01-01

    Element profile was investigated for their use to trace the geographical origin of rice (Oryza sativa L.) samples. The concentrations of 13 elements (calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), boron (B), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd)) were determined in the rice samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectrometry. Most of the essential elements for human health in rice were within normal ranges except for Mo and Se. Mo concentrations were twice as high as those in rice from Vietnam and Spain. Meanwhile, Se concentrations were three times lower in the whole province compared to the Chinese average level of 0.088 mg/kg. About 12% of the rice samples failed the Chinese national food safety standard of 0.2 mg/kg for Cd. Combined with the multi-elemental profile in rice, the principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA) and Fibonacci index analysis (FIA) were applied to discriminate geographical origins of the samples. Results indicated that the FIA method could achieve a more effective geographical origin classification compared with PCA and DFA, due to its efficiency in making the grouping even when the elemental variability was so high that PCA and DFA showed little discriminatory power. Furthermore, some elements were identified as the most powerful indicators of geographical origin: Ca, Ni, Fe and Cd. This suggests that the newly established methodology of FIA based on the ionome profile can be applied to determine the geographical origin of rice. PMID:23586309

  13. Properties of blends for profiles and semi-rigid films made of PVC nanocomposites produced in pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obloj-Muzaj, Maria; Abramowicz, Agnieszka; Kumosinski, Marcin; Zielecka, Maria; Kozakiewicz, Janusz; Gorska, Agnieszka

    2016-05-01

    PVC nanocomposites containing 0.5 wt. %/VCM of either nanosilica or hybrid core/shell type nanofiller were produced in-situ in suspension polymerisation. Significant increase in impact strength of PVC composites obtained was observed (higher 25 - 60 % in comparison with PVC). The amount of impact modifier in selected rigid PVC blends (e.g. in window profiles) could be significantly reduced (≥ 50 %). Tensile and flexural properties of nanocomposites were similar to PVC, however, at smaller amount of impact modifier other mechanical properties improve. Tear resistance of rigid films was better.

  14. Cohort Profile of the Goals Study: A Large-Scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Renate H. M.; van Dijk, Martin L.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and mental well-being. It was conducted at a…

  15. Intravenous Rh immune globulin for treating immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    2001-11-01

    Intravenous Rh [corrected] immune globulin was licensed by the U. S. Food and Drug administration in 1995 for the treatment of acute and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in adults. In 1996, the American Society of Hematology published a practice guideline for immune thrombocytopenic purpura, but treatment recommendations of necessity were formulated using only results of early clinical trials with intravenous Rh immune globulin. To date, there are no published results of large-scale clinical trials comparing conventional doses of intravenous immune globulin with the most promising dose range for intravenous Rh immune globulin (50-75 microg/kg). However, clinical experience is accumulating to indicate that intravenous Rh immune globulin is as effective, probably safer, and easier to administer than intravenous immune globulin. Acute intravascular hemolysis after infusions of intravenous Rh immune globulin for immune thrombocytopenic purpura has been reported with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1,115 patients. The risk factors for this adverse event have not been defined.

  16. Pilot-scale data provide enhanced estimates of the life cycle energy and emissions profile of algae biofuels produced via hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Saydah, Benjamin; Eranki, Pragnya; Colosi, Lisa M; Greg Mitchell, B; Rhodes, James; Clarens, Andres F

    2013-11-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used widely to estimate the environmental implications of deploying algae-to-energy systems even though no full-scale facilities have yet to be built. Here, data from a pilot-scale facility using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is used to estimate the life cycle profiles at full scale. Three scenarios (lab-, pilot-, and full-scale) were defined to understand how development in the industry could impact its life cycle burdens. HTL-derived algae fuels were found to have lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than petroleum fuels. Algae-derived gasoline had significantly lower GHG emissions than corn ethanol. Most algae-based fuels have an energy return on investment between 1 and 3, which is lower than petroleum biofuels. Sensitivity analyses reveal several areas in which improvements by algae bioenergy companies (e.g., biocrude yields, nutrient recycle) and by supporting industries (e.g., CO2 supply chains) could reduce the burdens of the industry. PMID:24045203

  17. Pilot-scale data provide enhanced estimates of the life cycle energy and emissions profile of algae biofuels produced via hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Saydah, Benjamin; Eranki, Pragnya; Colosi, Lisa M; Greg Mitchell, B; Rhodes, James; Clarens, Andres F

    2013-11-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used widely to estimate the environmental implications of deploying algae-to-energy systems even though no full-scale facilities have yet to be built. Here, data from a pilot-scale facility using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is used to estimate the life cycle profiles at full scale. Three scenarios (lab-, pilot-, and full-scale) were defined to understand how development in the industry could impact its life cycle burdens. HTL-derived algae fuels were found to have lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than petroleum fuels. Algae-derived gasoline had significantly lower GHG emissions than corn ethanol. Most algae-based fuels have an energy return on investment between 1 and 3, which is lower than petroleum biofuels. Sensitivity analyses reveal several areas in which improvements by algae bioenergy companies (e.g., biocrude yields, nutrient recycle) and by supporting industries (e.g., CO2 supply chains) could reduce the burdens of the industry.

  18. On the consistency of personality types across adulthood: latent profile analyses in two large-scale panel studies.

    PubMed

    Specht, Jule; Luhmann, Maike; Geiser, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Consistency and change in personality were analyzed by examining personality types across adulthood and old age using data from 2 nationally representative panel studies from Germany (N = 14,718; 16-82 years) and Australia (N = 8,315; 15-79 years). In both samples, the Big Five personality traits were measured twice across a period of 4 years. Latent profile analyses and latent profile transition analyses revealed 4 main findings: First, solutions with 3 (in the German sample) or 4 (in the Australian sample) personality types were found to be most interpretable. Second, measurement invariance tests revealed that these personality types were consistent across all age groups but differed slightly between men and women. Third, age was related to the number of individuals classified within each personality type. Namely, there were more resilients and fewer undercontrollers in older compared with younger age groups. Fourth, there was strong consistency of personality type membership across a period of 4 years in both genders and most age cohorts. Comparatively less consistency across time was found for undercontrollers and individuals in old age. Taken together, these findings show that in the 2 nations studied here, personality types were highly consistent across gender, age, and time.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: long-term results of bacterium eradication and association with bacterium virulence profiles.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Luppi, Mario; Zucchini, Patrizia; Morselli, Monica; Potenza, Leonardo; Forghieri, Fabio; Volzone, Francesco; Jovic, Gordana; Leonardi, Giovanna; Donelli, Amedea; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori may lead to improvement of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), although its efficacy over time is uncertain. We report the results of H pylori screening and eradication in 75 consecutive adult patients with ITP. We also used molecular methods to investigate lymphocyte clonality and H pylori genotypes in the gastric biopsies from 10 H pylori-positive patients with ITP and 19 H pylori-positive patients without ITP with chronic gastritis. Active H pylori infection was documented in 38 (51%) patients and successfully eradicated in 34 (89%) patients. After a median follow-up of 60 months, a persistent platelet response in 23 (68%) of patients with eradicated infection was observed; 1 relapse occurred. No differences in mucosal B- or T-cell clonalities were observed between patients with ITP and control participants. Of note, the frequency of the H pylori cagA gene (P = .02) and the frequency of concomitant H pylori cagA, vacAs1, and iceA genes (triple-positive strains; P = .015) resulted statistically higher in patients with ITP than in control participants. All asymptomatic H pylori-positive patients with ITP were suffering from chronic gastritis. Our data suggest a sustained platelet recovery in a proportion of patients with ITP by H pylori eradication alone. Overrepresentation of specific H pylori genotypes in ITP suggests a possible role for bacterium-related factors in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:17652264

  20. Gaining insight into the spatial distribution of soil hydraulic properties on the soil profile scale by high resolution TDR and tensiometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfelder, S.; Ganz, C.; Noell, U.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.; Bachmann, J.

    2010-05-01

    different structures visible in the soil profile. For these groups, water characteristic reference functions are calculated and heterogeneity is formulated using different scaling approaches. The resulting heterogeneous distributions are compared and evaluated with regard to their ability to capture the characteristics of the true heterogeneity in the profile. Results of this investigation will eventually be fed into a soil water transport model that will be used for a hindcast model exercise aiming at remodelling the infiltration experiment. Model results will be compared to electrical resistivity tomography measurements carried out parallel to the infiltration experiment.

  1. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  2. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Somasundar, Vinay; Megjhani, Murad; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yanbin; Padmanabhan, Raghav; Trett, Kristen; Shain, William; Roysam, Badri

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes, including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis tasks, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral images of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels. Each channel consists of 6000 × 10,000 × 500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250 GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analysis for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN) capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between computers and storage servers, logs all the processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries. PMID:24808857

  3. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python.

    PubMed

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Somasundar, Vinay; Megjhani, Murad; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yanbin; Padmanabhan, Raghav; Trett, Kristen; Shain, William; Roysam, Badri

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes, including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis tasks, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral images of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels. Each channel consists of 6000 × 10,000 × 500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250 GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analysis for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN) capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between computers and storage servers, logs all the processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  4. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python.

    PubMed

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Somasundar, Vinay; Megjhani, Murad; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yanbin; Padmanabhan, Raghav; Trett, Kristen; Shain, William; Roysam, Badri

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes, including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis tasks, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral images of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels. Each channel consists of 6000 × 10,000 × 500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250 GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analysis for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN) capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between computers and storage servers, logs all the processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries. PMID:24808857

  5. Genome-scale analysis and comparison of gene expression profiles in developing and germinated pollen in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pollen development from the microspore involves a series of coordinated cellular events, and the resulting mature pollen has a specialized function to quickly germinate, produce a polar-growth pollen tube derived from the vegetative cell, and deliver two sperm cells into the embryo sac for double fertilization. The gene expression profiles of developing and germinated pollen have been characterised by use of the eudicot model plant Arabidopsis. Rice, one of the most important cereal crops, has been used as an excellent monocot model. A comprehensive analysis of transcriptome profiles of developing and germinated pollen in rice is important to understand the conserved and diverse mechanism underlying pollen development and germination in eudicots and monocots. Results We used Affymetrix GeneChip® Rice Genome Array to comprehensively analyzed the dynamic changes in the transcriptomes of rice pollen at five sequential developmental stages from microspores to germinated pollen. Among the 51,279 transcripts on the array, we found 25,062 pollen-preferential transcripts, among which 2,203 were development stage-enriched. The diversity of transcripts decreased greatly from microspores to mature and germinated pollen, whereas the number of stage-enriched transcripts displayed a "U-type" change, with the lowest at the bicellular pollen stage; and a transition of overrepresented stage-enriched transcript groups associated with different functional categories, which indicates a shift in gene expression program at the bicellular pollen stage. About 54% of the now-annotated rice F-box protein genes were expressed preferentially in pollen. The transcriptome profile of germinated pollen was significantly and positively correlated with that of mature pollen. Analysis of expression profiles and coexpressed features of the pollen-preferential transcripts related to cell cycle, transcription, the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system, phytohormone signalling, the kinase system

  6. Motor profile of Portuguese preschool children on the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Linda; Rodrigues, Luís P; Cordovil, Rita; Barreiros, João

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to examine the cultural sensitivity of the PDMS-2 for Portuguese preschool children aged 36-71 months. A total of 540 children (255 males and 285 females) from 15 public preschools of Viana do Castelo, Portugal, were assessed. Age and gender effects in motor performance were examined. Results indicated that PDMS-2 is valid instrument to differentiate Portuguese age groups. Girls presented higher scores than boys in the Grasping and Visuo-motor integration subtests and lower scores in the Object Manipulation subtest. Portuguese preschoolers performed above US norms on Grasping, Visual-motor integration, and Stationary subtests, and bellow on Locomotion and Object Manipulation subtests. Overall, Portuguese children showed better results on the Fine Motor Quotient comparing to the Gross Motor Quotient. These results underline different motor development profiles between Portuguese and American children. PMID:23584176

  7. Effect of biostimulation on community level physiological profiles of microorganisms in field-scale biopiles composed of aged oil sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Shijie; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Guanlin

    2012-05-01

    Four biopiles were constructed for the bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in aged oily sludge by indigenous microorganisms. Three biopiles were treated with bulking agent, nutrients or their combination with the fourth pile serving as the control. Responses of microbial community level physiological profiles (CLPPs) to these biostimulation strategies were estimated, and variances among three layers within each biopile were evaluated. Microbial metabolic activity and diversity and the numbers of two species of bacteria were significantly enhanced by the addition of bulking agent, which also made the layers more homogeneous. In contrast, the application of large amounts of nutrients had a suppressing effect on the microbes. After 220 days, 49.62% of TPHs were removed from the middle layer of the bulking agent pile, whereas only 20.44% were removed from the inner layer of the control. This study aims to provide experience to improve the remediation efficiency of future investigations.

  8. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  9. Rapid High-pH Reverse Phase StageTip for Sensitive Small-Scale Membrane Proteomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dimayacyac-Esleta, Baby Rorielyn T; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Kitata, Reta Birhanu; Lin, Pei-Yi; Choong, Wai-Kok; Lin, Tai-Du; Wang, Yi-Ting; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Arco, Susan D; Sung, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-15

    Membrane proteins are crucial targets for cancer biomarker discovery and drug development. However, in addition to the inherent challenges of hydrophobicity and low abundance, complete membrane proteome coverage of clinical specimen is usually hindered by the requirement of large amount of starting materials. Toward comprehensive membrane proteomic profiling for small amounts of samples (10 μg), we developed high-pH reverse phase (Hp-RP) combined with stop-and-go extraction tip (StageTip) technique, as a fast (∼15 min.), sensitive, reproducible, high-resolution and multiplexed fractionation method suitable for accurate quantification of the membrane proteome. This approach provided almost 2-fold enhanced detection of peptides encompassing transmembrane helix (TMH) domain, as compared with strong anion exchange (SAX) and strong cation exchange (SCX) StageTip techniques. Almost 5000 proteins (∼60% membrane proteins) can be identified in only 10 μg of membrane protein digests, showing the superior sensitivity of the Hp-RP StageTip approach. The method allowed up to 9- and 6-fold increase in the identification of unique hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides, respectively. The Hp-RP StageTip method enabled in-depth membrane proteome profiling of 11 lung cancer cell lines harboring different EGFR mutation status, which resulted in the identification of 3983 annotated membrane proteins. This provides the largest collection of reference peptide spectral data for lung cancer membrane subproteome. Finally, relative quantification of membrane proteins between Gefitinib-resistant and -sensitive lung cancer cell lines revealed several up-regulated membrane proteins with key roles in lung cancer progression.

  10. Mixed-Effects Modelling of Scale Growth Profiles Predicts the Occurrence of Early and Late Fish Migrants

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Rius, Francisco; Caballero, Pablo; Morán, Paloma; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Fish growth is commonly used as a proxy for fitness but this is only valid if individual growth variation can be interpreted in relation to conspecifics' performance. Unfortunately, assessing individual variation in growth rates is problematic under natural conditions because subjects typically need to be marked, repeated measurements of body size are difficult to obtain in the field, and recaptures may be limited to a few time events which will generally vary among individuals. The analysis of consecutive growth rings (circuli) found on scales and other hard structures offers an alternative to mark and recapture for examining individual growth variation in fish and other aquatic vertebrates where growth rings can be visualized, but accounting for autocorrelations and seasonal growth stanzas has proved challenging. Here we show how mixed-effects modelling of scale growth increments (inter-circuli spacing) can be used to reconstruct the growth trajectories of sea trout (Salmo trutta) and correctly classify 89% of individuals into early or late seaward migrants (smolts). Early migrants grew faster than late migrants during their first year of life in freshwater in two natural populations, suggesting that migration into the sea was triggered by ontogenetic (intrinsic) drivers, rather than by competition with conspecifics. Our study highlights the profound effects that early growth can have on age at migration of a paradigmatic fish migrant and illustrates how the analysis of inter-circuli spacing can be used to reconstruct the detailed growth of individuals when these cannot be marked or are only caught once. PMID:23613922

  11. Quality of life profile--adolescent version: assessing the relationship of covariates to scale scores using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Meuleners, Lynn B; Lee, Andy H

    2005-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of covariates on adolescent quality of life (QOL) using structural equation modeling (SEM). The Quality of Life Profile--Adolescent Version, a generic 54 item self-reported questionnaire, was administered to 363 adolescents aged between 10 and 18 years who were enrolled in 20 secondary schools within metropolitan Perth, the capital of Western Australia. Previous results based on a second-order SEM provided preliminary support for measuring adolescent QOL in terms of physical health, psychological, social, environment and opportunities for growth and development. The second-order model is further enhanced in this study by incorporating covariates age, presence of a chronic condition, amount of control and perception of health. The amount of control the adolescent perceived had a significant positive impact on QOL, whereas poorer reports of health had a negative impact. However, the presence of a chronic condition was found to have little effect on QOL, while the modest inverse relationship between age and QOL was not statistically significant.

  12. Large-scale gene expression profiling reveals physiological response to deletion of chaperone dnaKJ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Chuanpeng; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Chaperone DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ plays various essential roles such as in assisting in the folding of nascent peptides, preventing protein aggregation and maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. Global transcriptional changes in vivo associated with deletion of dnaKJ were monitored using DNA microarray to elucidate the role of DnaKJ at the transcriptional level. Microarray profiling and bioinformatics analysis revealed that a few chaperone and protease genes, stress-related genes and genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation were up-regulated, whereas various transporter genes, pentose phosphate pathway and transcriptional regulation related genes were down-regulated. This study is the first to systematically analyze the alterations at the transcriptional level in vivo in deletion of dnaKJ. Fatty acid methyl esters analysis indicated that the amount of unsaturated fatty acid sharply increased and subcellular location prediction analysis showed a marked decrease in transcription of inner-membrane protein genes, which might have triggered the development of aberrant cell shape and susceptibility for some antibiotics in the ΔdnaKJ strain. PMID:27242140

  13. MOND implications for spectral line profiles of shell galaxies: shell formation history and mass-velocity scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílek, M.; Jungwiert, B.; Ebrová, I.; Bartošková, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Many ellipticals are surrounded by round stellar shells probably stemming from minor mergers. A new method for constraining gravitational potential in elliptical galaxies has recently been suggested. It uses the spectral line profiles of these shells to measure the circular velocity at the edge of the shell and the expansion velocity of the shell itself. MOND is an alternative to the dark matter framework aiming to solve the missing mass problem. Aims: We study how the circular and expansion velocities behave in MOND for large shells. Methods: The asymptotic behavior for infinitely large shells is derived analytically. The applicability of the asymptotic results for finitely sized shells is studied numerically on a grid of galaxies modeled with Sérsic spheres. Results: Circular velocity settles asymptotically at a value determined by the baryonic mass of the galaxy forming the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation known for disk galaxies. Shell expansion velocity also becomes asymptotically constant. The expansion velocities of large shells form a multibranched analogy to the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, together with the galactic baryonic masses. For many - but not all - shell galaxies, the asymptotic values of these two types of velocities are reached under the effective radius. If MOND is assumed to work in ellipticals, then the shell spectra allow many details of the history to be revealed about the formation of the shell system, including its age. The results pertaining to circular velocities apply to all elliptical galaxies, not only those with shells.

  14. The Oral Intake of Organic Germanium, Ge-132, Elevates α-Tocopherol Levels in the Plas-ma and Modulates Hepatic Gene Expression Profiles to Promote Immune Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takeda, Tomoya; Tokuji, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The common water-soluble organic germanium compound poly-trans-[(2-carboxyethyl) germasesquioxane] (Ge-132) exhibits activities related to immune responses and antioxidant induction. In this study, we evaluated the antioxidative effect of dietary Ge-132 in the plasma of mice. Male ICR mice (seven mice per group) received an AIN-76 diet with 0.05% Ge-132; three groups received the Ge-132-containing diet for 0, 1 or 4 days. The plasma alpha-tocopherol (α-tocopherol) concentration increased from 6.85 to 9.60 μg/ml after 4 days of Ge-132 intake (p<0.05). We evaluated the changes in hepatic gene expression related to antioxidative activity as well as in the entire expression profile after one day of Ge-132 intake, using DNA microarray technology. We identified 1,220 genes with altered expression levels greater than 1.5-fold (increased or decreased) as a result of Ge-132 intake, and α-tocopherol transfer protein (Ttpa) gene expression was increased 1.62-fold. Immune activation was identified as the category with the most changes (containing 60 Gene Ontology (GO) term biological processes (BPs), 41 genes) via functional clustering analysis of altered gene expression. Ge-132 affected genes in clusters related to ATP production (22 GO term BPs, 21 genes), lipid metabolism (4 GO term BPs, 38 genes) and apoptosis (5 GO term BPs). Many GO term BPs containing these categories were significantly affected by the Ge-132 intake. Oral Ge-132 intake may therefore have increased plasma α-tocopherol levels by up-regulating α-tocopherol transfer protein (Ttpa) gene expression.

  15. Immune modulatory treatment of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis with calcitriol is associated with a change of a T helper (Th) 1/Th17 to a Th2 and regulatory T cell profile.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Carolin; Sartory, Nico A; Zahn, Nadine; Radeke, Heinfried H; Stein, Jürgen M

    2008-01-01

    A number of recent studies testify that calcitriol alone or in combination with corticosteroids exerts strong immune modulatory activity. As a new approach, we evaluated the protolerogenic potential of calcitriol and dexamethasone in acute T helper (Th)1-mediated colitis in mice. A rectal enema of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) (100 mg/kg) was applied to BALB/c mice. Calcitriol and/or dexamethasone were administered i.p. from days 0 to 3 or 3 to 5 following the instillation of the haptenating agent. Assessment of colitis severity was performed daily. Colon tissue was analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and myeloperoxidase activity, as well as cytokine levels [tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-1beta, IL-10, IL-4] were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, T-bet, GATA family of transcription factors 3, a Th2 master regulator (GATA3), Foxp3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), IL-23p19 and IL-17 expression by immunoblot analysis. The combination of the steroids most effectively reduced the clinical and histopathologic severity of TNBS colitis. Th1-related parameters were down-regulated, whereas Th2 markers like IL-4 and GATA3 were up-regulated. Apart from known steroid effects, calcitriol in particular promoted regulatory T cell profiles as indicated by a marked increase of IL-10, TGFbeta, FoxP3, and CTLA4. Furthermore, analysis of dendritic cell mediators responsible for a proinflammatory differentiation of T cells revealed a significant reduction of IL-12p70 and IL23p19 as well as IL-6 and IL-17. Thus, our data support a rationale for a steroid-sparing, clinical application of calcitriol derivatives in inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore they suggest that early markers of inflammatory dendritic cell and Th17 differentiation qualify as new target molecules for both calcitriol and highly selective immune-modulating vitamin D analogs.

  16. Differential Gene Expression Profiles and Selected Cytokine Protein Analysis of Mediastinal Lymph Nodes of Horses with Chronic Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO) Support an Interleukin-17 Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is a pulmonary inflammatory condition that afflicts certain mature horses exposed to organic dust particulates in hay. Its clinical and pathological features, manifested by reversible bronchoconstriction, excessive mucus production and airway neutrophilia, resemble the pulmonary alterations that occur in agricultural workers with occupational asthma. The immunological basis of RAO remains uncertain although its chronicity, its localization to a mucosal surface and its domination by a neutrophilic, non-septic inflammatory response, suggest involvement of Interleukin-17 (IL-17). We examined global gene expression profiles in mediastinal (pulmonary-draining) lymph nodes isolated from RAO-affected and control horses. Differential expression of > 200 genes, coupled with network analysis, supports an IL-17 response centered about NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of mediastinal lymph node sections demonstrated increased IL-17 staining intensity in diseased horses. This result, along with the finding of increased IL-17 concentrations in lymph node homogenates from RAO-affected horses (P = 0.1) and a down-regulation of IL-4 gene and protein expression, provides additional evidence of the involvement of IL-17 in the chronic stages of RAO. Additional investigations are needed to ascertain the cellular source of IL-17 in this equine model of occupational asthma. Understanding the immunopathogenesis of this disorder likely will enhance the development of therapeutic interventions beneficial to human and animal pulmonary health. PMID:26561853

  17. CD8(+) T cell cross-reactivity profiles and HIV-1 immune escape towards an HLA-B35-restricted immunodominant Nef epitope.

    PubMed

    Motozono, Chihiro; Miles, John J; Hasan, Zafrul; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Meribe, Stanley C; Price, David A; Oka, Shinichi; Sewell, Andrew K; Ueno, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    Antigen cross-reactivity is an inbuilt feature of the T cell compartment. However, little is known about the flexibility of T cell recognition in the context of genetically variable pathogens such as HIV-1. In this study, we used a combinatorial library containing 24 billion octamer peptides to characterize the cross-reactivity profiles of CD8(+) T cells specific for the immunodominant HIV-1 subtype B Nef epitope VY8 (VPLRPMTY) presented by HLA-B(*)35∶01. In conjunction, we examined naturally occurring antigenic variations within the VY8 epitope. Sequence analysis of plasma viral RNA isolated from 336 HIV-1-infected individuals revealed variability at position (P) 3 and P8 of VY8; Phe at P8, but not Val at P3, was identified as an HLA-B(*)35∶01-associated polymorphism. VY8-specific T cells generated from several different HIV-1-infected patients showed unique and clonotype-dependent cross-reactivity footprints. Nonetheless, all T cells recognized both the index Leu and mutant Val at P3 equally well. In contrast, competitive titration assays revealed that the Tyr to Phe substitution at P8 reduced T cell recognition by 50-130 fold despite intact peptide binding to HLA-B(*)35∶01. These findings explain the preferential selection of Phe at the C-terminus of VY8 in HLA-B(*)35∶01(+) individuals and demonstrate that HIV-1 can exploit the limitations of T cell recognition in vivo.

  18. Discriminating the molecular basis of hepatotoxicity using the large-scale characteristic molecular signatures of toxicants by expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Ryu, So Yeon; Noh, Ji Heon; Lee, Min-Jae; Jang, Ja-Jun; Ryu, Jae Chun; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hongjian; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sug Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2008-07-30

    Predicting the potential human health risk posed by chemical stressors has long been a major challenge for toxicologists, and the use of microarrays to measure responses to toxicologically relevant genes, and to identify selective, sensitive biomarkers of toxicity is a major application of predictive and discovery toxicology. To investigate this possibility, we investigated whether carcinogens (at doses known to induce liver tumors in chronic exposure bioassays) deregulate characteristic sets of genes in mice. Male C3H/He mice were dosed with two hepatocarcinogens (vinyl chloride (VC, 50-25 mg/kg), aldrin (AD, 0.8-0.4 mg/kg)), or two non-hepatocarcinogens (copper sulfate (CS, 150-60 mg/kg), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T, 150-60 mg/kg)). Large-scale molecular changes elicited by these four hepatotoxicants in liver tissues were analyzed using DNA microarray. Three days after administration, no significant phenotypic changes were induced by these four different hepatotoxicants in terms of histological examination or blood biochemical assay. However, unsupervised hierarchical analysis of gene expressional changes induced by hepatotoxicants resulted in two major gene subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., a carcinogen (VN, AD) and non-carcinogen group (CS, 2,4,5-T), and also revealed that distinct molecular signatures exist. These signatures were founded on well-defined functional gene categories and may differentiate genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Venn diagram analysis allowed us to identify carcinogen and non-carcinogen-associated molecular signatures. Using statistical methods, we analyzed outlier genes for four different classes (genotoxic-, non-genotoxic-carcinogen, genotoxic-, non-genotoxic non-carcinogen) in terms of their potential to predict different modes-of-action. In conclusion, the identification of large-scale molecular changes in different hepatocarcinogen exposure models revealed that different types of hepatotoxicants are

  19. Influence of shockwave profile on ejection of micron-scale material from shocked Sn surfaces: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, Michael B; Byers, Mark E; Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Tim C; Dimonte, Guy; Rigg, Paulo A; Buttler, William T

    2009-01-01

    This effort experimentally investigates the relationship between shock-breakout pressure and the amount of micron-scale fragments ejected (ejecta) upon shock release at the metal/vacuum interface of Sn targets shocked with a supported shockwave. The results are compared with an analogous set derived from HE shocked Sn targets, Taylor shockwave loading. The supported shock-pulse was created by impacting a Sn target with a Ti64 (Ti-6Al-4V) impactor that was accelerated using a powder gun. Ejecta production at the free-surface or back-side of the Sn targets were characterized through use of piezoelectric pins and Asay foils, and heterodyne velocimetry verified the time of shock release and the breakout pressure.

  20. Genes versus environment: geography and phylogenetic relationships shape the chemical profiles of stingless bees on a global scale.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Rasmussen, Claus; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Chemical compounds are highly important in the ecology of animals. In social insects, compounds on the body surface represent a particularly interesting trait, because they comprise different compound classes that are involved in different functions, such as communication, recognition and protection, all of which can be differentially affected by evolutionary processes. Here, we investigate the widely unknown and possibly antagonistic influence of phylogenetic and environmental factors on the composition of the cuticular chemistry of tropical stingless bees. We chose stingless bees because some species are unique in expressing not only self-produced compounds, but also compounds that are taken up from the environment. By relating the cuticular chemistry of 40 bee species from all over the world to their molecular phylogeny and geographical occurrence, we found that distribution patterns of different groups of compounds were differentially affected by genetic relatedness and biogeography. The ability to acquire environmental compounds was, for example, highly correlated with the bees' phylogeny and predominated in evolutionarily derived species. Owing to the presence of environmentally derived compounds, those species further expressed a higher chemical and thus functional diversity. In Old World species, chemical similarity of both environmentally derived and self-produced compounds was particularly high among sympatric species, even when they were less related to each other than to allopatric species, revealing a strong environmental effect even on largely genetically determined compounds. Thus, our findings do not only reveal an unexpectedly strong influence of the environment on the cuticular chemistry of stingless bees, but also demonstrate that even within one morphological trait (an insect's cuticular profile), different components (compound classes) can be differentially affected by different drivers (relatedness and biogeography), depending on the

  1. Genes versus environment: geography and phylogenetic relationships shape the chemical profiles of stingless bees on a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Sara D.; Rasmussen, Claus; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are highly important in the ecology of animals. In social insects, compounds on the body surface represent a particularly interesting trait, because they comprise different compound classes that are involved in different functions, such as communication, recognition and protection, all of which can be differentially affected by evolutionary processes. Here, we investigate the widely unknown and possibly antagonistic influence of phylogenetic and environmental factors on the composition of the cuticular chemistry of tropical stingless bees. We chose stingless bees because some species are unique in expressing not only self-produced compounds, but also compounds that are taken up from the environment. By relating the cuticular chemistry of 40 bee species from all over the world to their molecular phylogeny and geographical occurrence, we found that distribution patterns of different groups of compounds were differentially affected by genetic relatedness and biogeography. The ability to acquire environmental compounds was, for example, highly correlated with the bees' phylogeny and predominated in evolutionarily derived species. Owing to the presence of environmentally derived compounds, those species further expressed a higher chemical and thus functional diversity. In Old World species, chemical similarity of both environmentally derived and self-produced compounds was particularly high among sympatric species, even when they were less related to each other than to allopatric species, revealing a strong environmental effect even on largely genetically determined compounds. Thus, our findings do not only reveal an unexpectedly strong influence of the environment on the cuticular chemistry of stingless bees, but also demonstrate that even within one morphological trait (an insect's cuticular profile), different components (compound classes) can be differentially affected by different drivers (relatedness and biogeography), depending on the

  2. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. An ... avoided, however, if global vaccination coverage improves. An estimated 19.4 million infants worldwide are still missing ...

  3. Adolescent immunization.

    PubMed

    Handal, G A

    2000-06-01

    The dramatic improvements achieved in the control of vaccine-preventable diseases in children have only been shared partially by adolescents and young adults, as today several million adolescents are not receiving the full complement of vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). This article discusses the reasons for this problem and the tools to bridge this gap. In particular, medical societies and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend a close assessment of the adolescentís immunization status between 11 and 12 years of age, inclusion of school immunization, and providing missing immunizations at any opportunity. The article also addresses other vaccines recommended for groups of adolescents with special needs, reporting information, and provides an update on the vaccines of the future.

  4. Large-scale gene expression profiling data for the model moss Physcomitrella patens aid understanding of developmental progression, culture and stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Hiss, Manuel; Laule, Oliver; Meskauskiene, Rasa M; Arif, Muhammad A; Decker, Eva L; Erxleben, Anika; Frank, Wolfgang; Hanke, Sebastian T; Lang, Daniel; Martin, Anja; Neu, Christina; Reski, Ralf; Richardt, Sandra; Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Szövényi, Peter; Tiko, Theodhor; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Wolf, Luise; Zimmermann, Philip; Rensing, Stefan A

    2014-08-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an important model organism for studying plant evolution, development, physiology and biotechnology. Here we have generated microarray gene expression data covering the principal developmental stages, culture forms and some environmental/stress conditions. Example analyses of developmental stages and growth conditions as well as abiotic stress treatments demonstrate that (i) growth stage is dominant over culture conditions, (ii) liquid culture is not stressful for the plant, (iii) low pH might aid protoplastation by reduced expression of cell wall structure genes, (iv) largely the same gene pool mediates response to dehydration and rehydration, and (v) AP2/EREBP transcription factors play important roles in stress response reactions. With regard to the AP2 gene family, phylogenetic analysis and comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana shows commonalities as well as uniquely expressed family members under drought, light perturbations and protoplastation. Gene expression profiles for P. patens are available for the scientific community via the easy-to-use tool at https://www.genevestigator.com. By providing large-scale expression profiles, the usability of this model organism is further enhanced, for example by enabling selection of control genes for quantitative real-time PCR. Now, gene expression levels across a broad range of conditions can be accessed online for P. patens.

  5. Integration of genome-scale modeling and transcript profiling reveals metabolic pathways underlying light and temperature acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Nadine; Caldana, Camila; Grimbs, Sergio; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-04-01

    Understanding metabolic acclimation of plants to challenging environmental conditions is essential for dissecting the role of metabolic pathways in growth and survival. As stresses involve simultaneous physiological alterations across all levels of cellular organization, a comprehensive characterization of the role of metabolic pathways in acclimation necessitates integration of genome-scale models with high-throughput data. Here, we present an integrative optimization-based approach, which, by coupling a plant metabolic network model and transcriptomics data, can predict the metabolic pathways affected in a single, carefully controlled experiment. Moreover, we propose three optimization-based indices that characterize different aspects of metabolic pathway behavior in the context of the entire metabolic network. We demonstrate that the proposed approach and indices facilitate quantitative comparisons and characterization of the plant metabolic response under eight different light and/or temperature conditions. The predictions of the metabolic functions involved in metabolic acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to the changing conditions are in line with experimental evidence and result in a hypothesis about the role of homocysteine-to-Cys interconversion and Asn biosynthesis. The approach can also be used to reveal the role of particular metabolic pathways in other scenarios, while taking into consideration the entirety of characterized plant metabolism.

  6. Convective and large-scale mass flux profiles over tropical oceans determined from synergistic analysis of a suite of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny

    2016-07-01

    A new, satellite-based methodology is developed to evaluate convective mass flux and large-scale total mass flux. To derive the convective mass flux, candidate profiles of in-cloud vertical velocity are first constructed with a simple plume model under the constraint of ambient sounding and then narrowed down to the solution that matches satellite-derived cloud top buoyancy. Meanwhile, the large-scale total mass flux is provided separately from satellite soundings by a method developed previously. All satellite snapshots are sorted into a composite time series that delineates the evolution of a vigorous and organized convective system. Principal findings are the following. First, convective mass flux is modulated primarily by convective cloud cover, with the intensity of individual convection being less variable over time. Second, convective mass flux dominates the total mass flux only during the early hours of the convective evolution; as convective system matures, a residual mass flux builds up in the mass flux balance that is reminiscent of stratiform dynamics. The method developed in this study is expected to be of unique utility for future observational diagnosis of tropical convective dynamics and for evaluation of global climate model cumulus parameterizations in a global sense.

  7. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  8. A combined analysis of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R): Different perfectionist profiles in adolescent high school students.

    PubMed

    Sironic, Amanda; Reeve, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences and similarities in the dimensional constructs of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS; Flett, Hewitt, Boucher, Davidson, & Munro, 2000), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R; Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001), 938 high school students completed the 3 perfectionism questionnaires, as well as the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995). Preliminary analyses revealed commonly observed factor structures for each perfectionism questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis of item responses from the questionnaires (combined) yielded a 4-factor solution (factors were labeled High Personal Standards, Concerns, Doubts and Discrepancy, Externally Motivated Perfectionism, and Organization and Order). A latent class analysis of individuals' mean ratings on each of the 4 factors yielded a 6-class solution. Three of the 6 classes represented perfectionist subgroups (labeled adaptive perfectionist, externally motivated maladaptive perfectionist, and mixed maladaptive perfectionist), and 3 represented nonperfectionist subgroups (labeled nonperfectionist A, nonperfectionist B, and order and organization nonperfectionist). Each of the 6 subgroups was meaningfully associated with the DASS. Findings showed that 3 out of 10 students were classified as maladaptive perfectionists, and maladaptive perfectionists were more prevalent than adaptive perfectionists. In sum, it is evident that combined ratings from the FMPS, CAPS, and APS-R offer a meaningful characterization of perfectionism. PMID:25984636

  9. A combined analysis of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R): Different perfectionist profiles in adolescent high school students.

    PubMed

    Sironic, Amanda; Reeve, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences and similarities in the dimensional constructs of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (FMPS; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990), Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS; Flett, Hewitt, Boucher, Davidson, & Munro, 2000), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R; Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001), 938 high school students completed the 3 perfectionism questionnaires, as well as the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995). Preliminary analyses revealed commonly observed factor structures for each perfectionism questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis of item responses from the questionnaires (combined) yielded a 4-factor solution (factors were labeled High Personal Standards, Concerns, Doubts and Discrepancy, Externally Motivated Perfectionism, and Organization and Order). A latent class analysis of individuals' mean ratings on each of the 4 factors yielded a 6-class solution. Three of the 6 classes represented perfectionist subgroups (labeled adaptive perfectionist, externally motivated maladaptive perfectionist, and mixed maladaptive perfectionist), and 3 represented nonperfectionist subgroups (labeled nonperfectionist A, nonperfectionist B, and order and organization nonperfectionist). Each of the 6 subgroups was meaningfully associated with the DASS. Findings showed that 3 out of 10 students were classified as maladaptive perfectionists, and maladaptive perfectionists were more prevalent than adaptive perfectionists. In sum, it is evident that combined ratings from the FMPS, CAPS, and APS-R offer a meaningful characterization of perfectionism.

  10. Exploring the Effects of Genetic Variants on Clinical Profiles of Parkinson's Disease Assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn-Yahr Stage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chaodong; Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min; Chan, Piu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Many genetic variants have been linked to familial or sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), among which those identified in PARK16, BST1, SNCA, LRRK2, GBA and MAPT genes have been demonstrated to be the most common risk factors worldwide. Moreover, complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions have been highlighted in PD pathogenesis. Compared to studies focusing on the predisposing effects of genes, there is a relative lack of research investigating how these genes and their interactions influence the clinical profiles of PD. In a cohort consisting of 2,011 Chinese Han PD patients, we selected 9 representative variants from the 6 above-mentioned common PD genes to analyze their main and epistatic effects on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage of PD. With multiple linear regression models adjusting for medication status, disease duration, gender and age at onset, none of the variants displayed significant main effects on UPDRS or the H-Y scores. However, for gene-gene interaction analyses, 7 out of 37 pairs of variants showed significant or marginally significant associations with these scores. Among these, the GBA rs421016 (L444P)×LRRK2 rs33949390 (R1628P) interaction was consistently significant in relation to UPDRS III and UPDRS total (I+II+III), even after controlling for the family-wise error rate using False Discovery Rate (FDR-corrected p values are 0.0481 and 0.0070, respectively). Although the effects of the remaining pairs of variants did not survive the FDR correction, they showed marginally significant associations with either UPDRS or the H-Y stage (raw p<0.05). Our results highlight the importance of epistatic effects of multiple genes on the determination of PD clinical profiles and may have implications for molecular classification and personalized intervention of the disease.

  11. Exploring the Effects of Genetic Variants on Clinical Profiles of Parkinson's Disease Assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn-Yahr Stage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chaodong; Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min; Chan, Piu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Many genetic variants have been linked to familial or sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), among which those identified in PARK16, BST1, SNCA, LRRK2, GBA and MAPT genes have been demonstrated to be the most common risk factors worldwide. Moreover, complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions have been highlighted in PD pathogenesis. Compared to studies focusing on the predisposing effects of genes, there is a relative lack of research investigating how these genes and their interactions influence the clinical profiles of PD. In a cohort consisting of 2,011 Chinese Han PD patients, we selected 9 representative variants from the 6 above-mentioned common PD genes to analyze their main and epistatic effects on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage of PD. With multiple linear regression models adjusting for medication status, disease duration, gender and age at onset, none of the variants displayed significant main effects on UPDRS or the H-Y scores. However, for gene-gene interaction analyses, 7 out of 37 pairs of variants showed significant or marginally significant associations with these scores. Among these, the GBA rs421016 (L444P)×LRRK2 rs33949390 (R1628P) interaction was consistently significant in relation to UPDRS III and UPDRS total (I+II+III), even after controlling for the family-wise error rate using False Discovery Rate (FDR-corrected p values are 0.0481 and 0.0070, respectively). Although the effects of the remaining pairs of variants did not survive the FDR correction, they showed marginally significant associations with either UPDRS or the H-Y stage (raw p<0.05). Our results highlight the importance of epistatic effects of multiple genes on the determination of PD clinical profiles and may have implications for molecular classification and personalized intervention of the disease. PMID:27299523

  12. Adult immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Chawla, Sumit; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequel. The primary focus of vaccination programs has historically been directed to childhood immunizations. For adults, chronic diseases have been the primary focus of preventive and medical health care, though there has been increased emphasis on preventing infectious diseases. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most of the routinely recommended vaccines. Though adults are less susceptible to fall prey to traditional infectious agents, the probability of exposure to infectious agents has increased manifold owing to globalization and increasing travel opportunities both within and across the countries. Thus, there is an urgent need to address the problem of adult immunization. The adult immunization enterprise is more complex, encompassing a wide variety of vaccines and a very diverse target population. There is no coordinated public health infrastructure to support an adult immunization program as there is for children. Moreover, there is little coordination among adult healthcare providers in terms of vaccine provision. Substantial improvement in adult vaccination is needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Routine assessment of adult patient vaccination needs, recommendation, and offer of needed vaccines for adults should be incorporated into routine clinical care of adults. PMID:24128707

  13. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  14. Immunization of epidemics in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dawei; Wang, Lianhai; Li, Shudong; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Gao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Up to now, immunization of disease propagation has attracted great attention in both theoretical and experimental researches. However, vast majority of existing achievements are limited to the simple assumption of single layer networked population, which seems obviously inconsistent with recent development of complex network theory: each node could possess multiple roles in different topology connections. Inspired by this fact, we here propose the immunization strategies on multiplex networks, including multiplex node-based random (targeted) immunization and layer node-based random (targeted) immunization. With the theory of generating function, theoretical analysis is developed to calculate the immunization threshold, which is regarded as the most critical index for the effectiveness of addressed immunization strategies. Interestingly, both types of random immunization strategies show more efficiency in controlling disease spreading on multiplex Erdös-Rényi (ER) random networks; while targeted immunization strategies provide better protection on multiplex scale-free (SF) networks. PMID:25401755

  15. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tkatchenko, Andrei V; Luo, Xiaoyan; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  16. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p < 0.000001, n = 12) of myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression. PMID:27622715

  17. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile. PMID:26626017

  18. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile.

  19. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  20. Efficient Qualitative and Quantitative Determination of Antigen-induced Immune Responses*

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of immunization strategies used in therapeutic antibody or vaccine development, it is critical to assess the quality of immunization-induced polyclonal antibody responses. Here, we developed a workflow that uses sensitive methods to quantitatively and qualitatively assess immune responses against foreign antigens with regard to antibody binding affinity and epitope diversity. The application of such detailed assessments throughout an immunization campaign can significantly reduce the resources required to generate highly specific antibodies. Our workflow consists of the following two steps: 1) the use of surface plasmon resonance to quantify antigen-specific antibodies and evaluate their apparent binding affinities, and 2) the recovery of serum IgGs using an automated small scale purification system, followed by the determination of their epitope diversity using hydrogen deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. We showed that these methods were sensitive enough to detect antigen-specific IgGs in the nanogram/μl range and that they provided information for differentiating the antibody responses of the various immunized animals that could not be obtained by conventional methods. We also showed that this workflow can guide the selection of an animal that produces high affinity antibodies with a desired epitope coverage profile, resulting in the generation of potential therapeutic monoclonal antibody clones with desirable functional profiles. We postulate that this workflow will be an important tool in the development of effective vaccines to combat the highly sophisticated evasion mechanisms of pathogens. PMID:27288409

  1. Monitoring childhood immunizations: a Canadian approach.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J D; Poffenroth, L A; Roos, L L; Bebchuk, J D; Carter, A O

    1994-01-01

    In Manitoba, Canada, a centralized, computerized childhood immunization monitoring system serves a population with insured medical coverage; each individual has a unique identification number. All physicians bill a single payer, and specific billing codes are used to identify immunizations given by physicians and by public health nurses. Together with dates of service, this information is used to construct immunizations-to-date and age-at-immunization profiles for individuals and groups. Reminders seeking missing information are built into the system and executed at strategic ages. The quality of input data has been assessed as high. The approach could be used readily by health maintenance organizations in the United States. PMID:7943493

  2. The genome- and transcriptome-wide analysis of innate immunity in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) is one of the most serious rice plant pests in Asia. N. lugens causes extensive rice damage by sucking rice phloem sap, which results in stunted plant growth and the transmission of plant viruses. Despite the importance of this insect pest, little is known about the immunological mechanisms occurring in this hemimetabolous insect species. Results In this study, we performed a genome- and transcriptome-wide analysis aiming at the immune-related genes. The transcriptome datasets include the N. lugens intestine, the developmental stage, wing formation, and sex-specific expression information that provided useful gene expression sequence data for the genome-wide analysis. As a result, we identified a large number of genes encoding N. lugens pattern recognition proteins, modulation proteins in the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating cascade, immune effectors, and the signal transduction molecules involved in the immune pathways, including the Toll, Immune deficiency (Imd) and Janus kinase signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathways. The genome scale analysis revealed detailed information of the gene structure, distribution and transcription orientations in scaffolds. A comparison of the genome-available hemimetabolous and metabolous insect species indicate the differences in the immune-related gene constitution. We investigated the gene expression profiles with regards to how they responded to bacterial infections and tissue, as well as development and sex expression specificity. Conclusions The genome- and transcriptome-wide analysis of immune-related genes including pattern recognition and modulation molecules, immune effectors, and the signal transduction molecules involved in the immune pathways is an important step in determining the overall architecture and functional network of the immune components in N. lugens. Our findings provide the comprehensive gene sequence resource and

  3. Large-Scale Exome-wide Association Analysis Identifies Loci for White Blood Cell Traits and Pleiotropy with Immune-Mediated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Hill, W David; Kacprowski, Tim; Li, Jin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Manichaikul, Ani; Mihailov, Evelin; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Pankratz, Nathan; Pazoki, Raha; Polfus, Linda M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Schurmann, Claudia; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Waterworth, Dawn M; Evangelou, Evangelos; Yanek, Lisa R; Burt, Amber; Chen, Ming-Huei; van Rooij, Frank J A; Floyd, James S; Greinacher, Andreas; Harris, Tamara B; Highland, Heather M; Lange, Leslie A; Liu, Yongmei; Mägi, Reedik; Nalls, Mike A; Mathias, Rasika A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Nikus, Kjell; Starr, John M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Wallentin, Lars; Bartz, Traci M; Becker, Lewis C; Denny, Joshua C; Raffield, Laura M; Rioux, John D; Friedrich, Nele; Fornage, Myriam; Gao, He; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Liewald, David C M; Rich, Stephen S; Uitterlinden, Andre; Bastarache, Lisa; Becker, Diane M; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Denus, Simon; Bottinger, Erwin P; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Lange, Ethan; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yingchang; Metspalu, Andres; O'Donnell, Chris J; Quarells, Rakale C; Richard, Melissa; Torstenson, Eric S; Taylor, Kent D; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Zonderman, Alan B; Crosslin, David R; Deary, Ian J; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Evans, Michele K; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kähönen, Mika; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Slater, Andrew J; Dehghan, Abbas; White, Harvey D; Ganesh, Santhi K; Loos, Ruth J F; Esko, Tõnu; Faraday, Nauder; Wilson, James G; Cushman, Mary; Johnson, Andrew D; Edwards, Todd L; Zakai, Neil A; Lettre, Guillaume; Reiner, Alex P; Auer, Paul L

    2016-07-01

    White blood cells play diverse roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Genetic association analyses of phenotypic variation in circulating white blood cell (WBC) counts from large samples of otherwise healthy individuals can provide insights into genes and biologic pathways involved in production, differentiation, or clearance of particular WBC lineages (myeloid, lymphoid) and also potentially inform the genetic basis of autoimmune, allergic, and blood diseases. We performed an exome array-based meta-analysis of total WBC and subtype counts (neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, basophils, and eosinophils) in a multi-ancestry discovery and replication sample of ∼157,622 individuals from 25 studies. We identified 16 common variants (8 of which were coding variants) associated with one or more WBC traits, the majority of which are pleiotropically associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on functional annotation, these loci included genes encoding surface markers of myeloid, lymphoid, or hematopoietic stem cell differentiation (CD69, CD33, CD87), transcription factors regulating lineage specification during hematopoiesis (ASXL1, IRF8, IKZF1, JMJD1C, ETS2-PSMG1), and molecules involved in neutrophil clearance/apoptosis (C10orf54, LTA), adhesion (TNXB), or centrosome and microtubule structure/function (KIF9, TUBD1). Together with recent reports of somatic ASXL1 mutations among individuals with idiopathic cytopenias or clonal hematopoiesis of undetermined significance, the identification of a common regulatory 3' UTR variant of ASXL1 suggests that both germline and somatic ASXL1 mutations contribute to lower blood counts in otherwise asymptomatic individuals. These association results shed light on genetic mechanisms that regulate circulating WBC counts and suggest a prominent shared genetic architecture with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Large-Scale Exome-wide Association Analysis Identifies Loci for White Blood Cell Traits and Pleiotropy with Immune-Mediated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Hill, W David; Kacprowski, Tim; Li, Jin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Manichaikul, Ani; Mihailov, Evelin; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Pankratz, Nathan; Pazoki, Raha; Polfus, Linda M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Schurmann, Claudia; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Waterworth, Dawn M; Evangelou, Evangelos; Yanek, Lisa R; Burt, Amber; Chen, Ming-Huei; van Rooij, Frank J A; Floyd, James S; Greinacher, Andreas; Harris, Tamara B; Highland, Heather M; Lange, Leslie A; Liu, Yongmei; Mägi, Reedik; Nalls, Mike A; Mathias, Rasika A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Nikus, Kjell; Starr, John M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Wallentin, Lars; Bartz, Traci M; Becker, Lewis C; Denny, Joshua C; Raffield, Laura M; Rioux, John D; Friedrich, Nele; Fornage, Myriam; Gao, He; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Liewald, David C M; Rich, Stephen S; Uitterlinden, Andre; Bastarache, Lisa; Becker, Diane M; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Denus, Simon; Bottinger, Erwin P; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Lange, Ethan; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yingchang; Metspalu, Andres; O'Donnell, Chris J; Quarells, Rakale C; Richard, Melissa; Torstenson, Eric S; Taylor, Kent D; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Zonderman, Alan B; Crosslin, David R; Deary, Ian J; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Evans, Michele K; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kähönen, Mika; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Slater, Andrew J; Dehghan, Abbas; White, Harvey D; Ganesh, Santhi K; Loos, Ruth J F; Esko, Tõnu; Faraday, Nauder; Wilson, James G; Cushman, Mary; Johnson, Andrew D; Edwards, Todd L; Zakai, Neil A; Lettre, Guillaume; Reiner, Alex P; Auer, Paul L

    2016-07-01

    White blood cells play diverse roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Genetic association analyses of phenotypic variation in circulating white blood cell (WBC) counts from large samples of otherwise healthy individuals can provide insights into genes and biologic pathways involved in production, differentiation, or clearance of particular WBC lineages (myeloid, lymphoid) and also potentially inform the genetic basis of autoimmune, allergic, and blood diseases. We performed an exome array-based meta-analysis of total WBC and subtype counts (neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, basophils, and eosinophils) in a multi-ancestry discovery and replication sample of ∼157,622 individuals from 25 studies. We identified 16 common variants (8 of which were coding variants) associated with one or more WBC traits, the majority of which are pleiotropically associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on functional annotation, these loci included genes encoding surface markers of myeloid, lymphoid, or hematopoietic stem cell differentiation (CD69, CD33, CD87), transcription factors regulating lineage specification during hematopoiesis (ASXL1, IRF8, IKZF1, JMJD1C, ETS2-PSMG1), and molecules involved in neutrophil clearance/apoptosis (C10orf54, LTA), adhesion (TNXB), or centrosome and microtubule structure/function (KIF9, TUBD1). Together with recent reports of somatic ASXL1 mutations among individuals with idiopathic cytopenias or clonal hematopoiesis of undetermined significance, the identification of a common regulatory 3' UTR variant of ASXL1 suggests that both germline and somatic ASXL1 mutations contribute to lower blood counts in otherwise asymptomatic individuals. These association results shed light on genetic mechanisms that regulate circulating WBC counts and suggest a prominent shared genetic architecture with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27346689

  5. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Large-Scale Glycomics of Livestock: Discovery of Highly Sensitive Serum Biomarkers Indicating an Environmental Stress Affecting Immune Responses and Productivity of Holstein Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Ibrahim F; Ueda, Koichiro; Mitani, Tomohiro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Tetsu; Kondo, Seiji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Because various stresses strongly influence the food productivity of livestock, biomarkers to indicate unmeasurable environmental stress in domestic animals are of increasing importance. Thermal comfort is one of the basic principles of dairy cow welfare that enhances productivity. To discover sensitive biomarkers that monitor such environmental stresses in dairy cows, we herein performed, for the first time, large-scale glycomics on 336 lactating Holstein cow serum samples over 9 months between February and October. Glycoblotting combined with MALDI-TOF/MS and DMB/HPLC allowed for comprehensive glycomics of whole serum glycoproteins. The results obtained revealed seasonal alterations in serum N-glycan levels and their structural characteristics, such as an increase in high-mannose type N-glycans in spring, the occurrence of di/triantennary complex type N-glycans terminating with two or three Neu5Gc residues in summer and autumn, and N-glycans in winter dominantly displaying Neu5Ac. A multivariate analysis revealed a correlation between the serum expression levels of these season-specific glycoforms and productivity.

  7. Large-Scale Glycomics of Livestock: Discovery of Highly Sensitive Serum Biomarkers Indicating an Environmental Stress Affecting Immune Responses and Productivity of Holstein Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Ibrahim F; Ueda, Koichiro; Mitani, Tomohiro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Tetsu; Kondo, Seiji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Because various stresses strongly influence the food productivity of livestock, biomarkers to indicate unmeasurable environmental stress in domestic animals are of increasing importance. Thermal comfort is one of the basic principles of dairy cow welfare that enhances productivity. To discover sensitive biomarkers that monitor such environmental stresses in dairy cows, we herein performed, for the first time, large-scale glycomics on 336 lactating Holstein cow serum samples over 9 months between February and October. Glycoblotting combined with MALDI-TOF/MS and DMB/HPLC allowed for comprehensive glycomics of whole serum glycoproteins. The results obtained revealed seasonal alterations in serum N-glycan levels and their structural characteristics, such as an increase in high-mannose type N-glycans in spring, the occurrence of di/triantennary complex type N-glycans terminating with two or three Neu5Gc residues in summer and autumn, and N-glycans in winter dominantly displaying Neu5Ac. A multivariate analysis revealed a correlation between the serum expression levels of these season-specific glycoforms and productivity. PMID:26595672

  8. Immunity and immunization in elderly.

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice

    2003-12-01

    As the average life expectancy increases, retired people want to travel. Five to 8% of travellers in tropical areas are old persons. Immune system suffers of old age as the other organs. The number and the functions of the T-lymphocytes decrease, but the B-lymphocytes are not altered. So, the response to the vaccinations is slower and lower in the elderly. Influenza is a great cause of death rate in old people. The seroconversion, after vaccine, is 50% from 60 to 70 years old, 31% from 70 to 80 years old, and only 11% after 80 years old. But in public health, the vaccination reduced the morbidity by 25%, admission to hospital by 20%, pneumonia by 50%, and mortality by 70%. Antipoliomyelitis vaccine is useful for travellers, as the vaccines against hepatitis and typhoid fever. Pneumococcal vaccine is effective in 60%. Tetanus is fatal in at last 32% of the people above 80 years, therefore this vaccine is very important.

  9. Immune System Involvement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... swollen and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  10. Immunization and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunization & Pregnancy Vaccines help keep apregnant woman and her growing family healthy. Vaccine Before pregnancy Hepatitis A ... 232-4636) • English or Spanish National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Immunization Services Division CS238938B 03/ ...

  11. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  12. Global analysis of the immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Dickman, Ronald; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2008-10-01

    The immune system may be seen as a complex system, characterized using tools developed in the study of such systems, for example, surface roughness and its associated Hurst exponent. We analyze densitometric (Panama blot) profiles of immune reactivity, to classify individuals into groups with similar roughness statistics. We focus on a population of individuals living in a region in which malaria endemic, as well as a control group from a disease-free region. Our analysis groups individuals according to the presence, or absence, of malaria symptoms and number of malaria manifestations. Applied to the Panama blot data, our method proves more effective at discriminating between groups than principal-components analysis or super-paramagnetic clustering. Our findings provide evidence that some phenomena observed in the immune system can be only understood from a global point of view. We observe similar tendencies between experimental immune profiles and those of artificial profiles, obtained from an immune network model. The statistical entropy of the experimental profiles is found to exhibit variations similar to those observed in the Hurst exponent.

  13. Gut microbiota, metabolites and host immunity.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Michelle G; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-05-27

    The microbiota - the collection of microorganisms that live within and on all mammals - provides crucial signals for the development and function of the immune system. Increased availability of technologies that profile microbial communities is facilitating the entry of many immunologists into the evolving field of host-microbiota studies. The microbial communities, their metabolites and components are not only necessary for immune homeostasis, they also influence the susceptibility of the host to many immune-mediated diseases and disorders. In this Review, we discuss technological and computational approaches for investigating the microbiome, as well as recent advances in our understanding of host immunity and microbial mutualism with a focus on specific microbial metabolites, bacterial components and the immune system. PMID:27231050

  14. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Robida, Mark D; Judy, Barbara M; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens' proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  15. Protective Antigens Against Glanders Identified by Expression Library Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Robida, Mark D.; Judy, Barbara M.; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y.; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A.; Magee, D. Mitchell; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine. PMID:22125550

  16. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs - A Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyu; Kye, Yoon Chul; Kim, Girak; Kim, Han Wool; Gu, Min Jeong; Umboh, Johnny; Maaruf, Kartini; Kim, Sung Woo; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-08-01

    Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature), nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles.

  17. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs - A Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyu; Kye, Yoon Chul; Kim, Girak; Kim, Han Wool; Gu, Min Jeong; Umboh, Johnny; Maaruf, Kartini; Kim, Sung Woo; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-08-01

    Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature), nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles. PMID:27189643

  18. When acculturation hurts: the case of immunization.

    PubMed

    Prislin, R; Suarez, L; Simpson, D M; Simspon, D M; Dyer, J A

    1998-12-01

    The study examined the relationship between the acculturation of Mexican American mothers in Texas and immunization status of their children between 3 and 24 months of age. Mothers' acculturation, demographic characteristics, and immunization status of their children were assessed in in-person interviews with a sample of Mexican American respondents representative for Texas (n = 2193). Acculturation was measured with ten scales assessing oral and written language use, proficiency, and preference, music and TV viewing preferences, ethnic identity, place where a person was reared, and contacts with Mexico. Immunization status, defined according to the recommendation of the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, was determined from official shot records obtained directly from respondents or, for respondents without records, obtained from their health care providers. Regression analysis revealed that acculturation significantly contributed to inadequate immunization status, even when socioeconomic status and other demographic covariates of acculturation were statistically controlled. Mediational analysis revealed that acculturation contributed to inadequate immunization through less positive attitudes toward immunization, a diminished sense of parental responsibility for children's immunization, and more perceived barriers to immunization. It is concluded that culture-specific beliefs encouraging childhood immunization should be fostered among Mexican Americans.

  19. ACUTE PHASE IMMUNE GENE PROFILING OF SPLEEN AND PEYER’S PATCH IN NAÏVE AND VACCINATED CHICKENS FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA A (H5N1) VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we applied functional genomics tools to investigate the early immunological response of chickens to highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV). Infection with HPAIV usually results in the rapid death of poultry. The aim of this study was to identify host immune genes which a...

  20. Modular and coordinated expression of immune system regulatory and signaling components in the developing and adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Crampton, Sean; McKelvey, Laura; Nolan, Aoife; O'Keeffe, Gerard; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    During development, the nervous system (NS) is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signaling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult NS. While the involvement of individual immune-related signaling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune-related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the NS. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the NS, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system (IS) genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the NS.

  1. Non-coding RNAs revealed during identification of genes involved in chicken immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ahanda, Marie-Laure Endale; Ruby, Thomas; Wittzell, Håkan; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Morin, Veronique; Oudin, Anne; Chevalier, Catherine; Young, John R; Zoorob, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA cloning studies have shown that a significant proportion of the transcripts expressed from vertebrate genomes do not appear to encode protein. Moreover, it was reported in mammals (human and mice) that these non-coding transcripts are expressed and regulated by mechanisms similar to those involved in the control of protein-coding genes. We have produced a collection of cDNA sequences from immunologically active tissues with the aim of discovering chicken genes involved in immune mechanisms, and we decided to explore the non-coding component of these immune-related libraries. After finding known non-coding RNAs (miRNA, snRNA, snoRNA), we identified new putative mRNA-like non-coding RNAs. We characterised their expression profiles in immune-related samples. Some of them showed changes in expression following viral infections. As they exhibit patterns of expression that parallel the behaviour of protein-coding RNAs in immune tissues, our study suggests that they could play an active role in the immune response.

  2. A model of immunity to Burkholderia pseudomallei: unique responses following immunization and acute lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Ulett, Glen C; Labrooy, Justin T; Currie, Bart J; Barnes, Jodie L; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2005-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis, causes significant mortality in endemic regions, but little is known regarding the immune mechanisms required for successful protective immunity. To establish a model of immunization that could be used to study this we screened a library of B. pseudomallei strains for immunogenicity in mice. BALB/c mice were immunized with test strains, and 2 weeks later were given a lethal challenge (LC) of virulent B. pseudomallei. Among 49 strains tested, a single strain, CL04, exhibited strong immunoprotective capacity. Interestingly, CL04 had been cultured from a patient with chronic colonization of B. pseudomallei, which is a rare phenomenon. Mice immunized with 0.1 x LD50 (5 x 10(3) CFU) of CL04 had significantly better survival and lower bacterial loads after LC compared to naïve controls. Dose-response analysis demonstrated more robust immunity after higher immunizing doses, and bacterial inactivation by gamma irradiation diminished the protective effect, indicating a requirement for viable organism for immunity. CL04-induced immunity was demonstrated both in B. pseudomallei-susceptible BALB/c and -resistant C57BL/6 mice. We investigated the gene profile of CL04-induced immunity by analyzing responses to immunization using cDNA microarray. Unique responses involving granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the proapoptotic regulator Bad and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK5) were detected in immunized mice, but these responses were absent in naïve-LC mice. Further, responses differed between mouse strains, indicating dependence on host genetic background. This model will be useful in identifying elements of the immune response required for successful adaptive immunity against B. pseudomallei.

  3. An Item Response Theory Analysis of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children or Why Strong Clinical Scales Should Be Distrusted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egberink, Iris J. L.; Meijer, Rob R.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343) were compared. The authors found that most scales…

  4. Computational Typologies of Multidimensional End-of-Primary-School Performance Profiles from an Educational Perspective of Large-Scale TIMSS and PIRLS Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unlu, Ali; Schurig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recently, performance profiles in reading, mathematics and science were created using the data collectively available in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. In addition, a classification of children to the end of their primary school years was…

  5. Our Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  6. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  7. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations Print A A A Text Size What's in ... But in both cases, the protection is temporary. Immunization (vaccination) is a way of creating immunity to ...

  8. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  9. Estimating Age-Specific Immunity and Force of Infection of Varicella Zoster Virus in Norway Using Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Rimseliene, Grazina; Flem, Elmira; Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    This study applies mixture modelling to examine age-specific immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in Norway based on the first large-scale serological study in the general population. We estimated the seropositive proportions at different ages and calculated the underlying force of infection by using a sample of 2103 residual sera obtained from patients seeking primary and hospital care. A rapid increase in the VZV-associated immunity is observed in the first years of life with 63% of children being immune by age 5. The increase in the immunity levels slows down thereafter, with a large proportion of adults still susceptible by age 20 (around 14.5%), thus at risk of serious sequelae of varicella infection. The corresponding force of infection peaks during the preschool period, subsequently declines to a minimum between ages 10 and 20 years, and afterwards moderately increases to reach a plateau lasting throughout the childbearing period. In comparison with the traditional cut-off approach, mixture modelling used the whole data without producing any inconclusive cases, led to an unbiased classification of individuals between susceptible and immune, and provided a smoother immune profile by age. These findings represent an important step towards any decision about the introduction of varicella vaccination in Norway, as they are a primary input for mathematical transmission models aimed at evaluating potential vaccination scenarios. PMID:27689800

  10. Immune Responses in Hookworm Infections

    PubMed Central

    Loukas, Alex; Prociv, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Hookworms infect perhaps one-fifth of the entire human population, yet little is known about their interaction with our immune system. The two major species are Necator americanus, which is adapted to tropical conditions, and Ancylostoma duodenale, which predominates in more temperate zones. While having many common features, they also differ in several key aspects of their biology. Host immune responses are triggered by larval invasion of the skin, larval migration through the circulation and lungs, and worm establishment in the intestine, where adult worms feed on blood and mucosa while injecting various molecules that facilitate feeding and modulate host protective responses. Despite repeated exposure, protective immunity does not seem to develop in humans, so that infections occur in all age groups (depending on exposure patterns) and tend to be prolonged. Responses to both larval and adult worms have a characteristic T-helper type 2 profile, with activated mast cells in the gut mucosa, elevated levels of circulating immunoglobulin E, and eosinoophilia in the peripheral blood and local tissues, features also characteristic of type I hypersensitivity reactions. The longevity of adult hookworms is determined probably more by parasite genetics than by host immunity. However, many of the proteins released by the parasites seem to have immunomodulatory activity, presumably for self-protection. Advances in molecular biotechnology enable the identification and characterization of increasing numbers of these parasite molecules and should enhance our detailed understanding of the protective and pathogenetic mechanisms in hookworm infections. PMID:11585781

  11. Eosinophils elicit proliferation of naive and fungal-specific cells in vivo so enhancing a T helper type 1 cytokine profile in favour of a protective immune response against Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Garro, Ana P; Chiapello, Laura S; Baronetti, Jose L; Masih, Diana T

    2011-10-01

    Experimental Cryptococcus neoformans infection in rats has been shown to have similarities with human cryptococcosis, because as in healthy humans, rats can effectively contain cryptococcal infection. Moreover, it has been shown that eosinophils are components of the immune response to C. neoformans infections. In a previous in vitro study, we demonstrated that rat peritoneal eosinophils phagocytose opsonized live yeasts of C. neoformans, thereby triggering their activation, as indicated by the up-regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules and the increase in interleukin-12, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production. Furthermore, this work demonstrated that C. neoformans-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes cultured with these activated C. neoformans-pulsed eosinophils proliferated, and produced important amounts of T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines in the absence of Th2 cytokine synthesis. In the present in vivo study, we have shown that C. neoformans-pulsed eosinophils are also able to migrate into lymphoid organs to present C. neoformans antigens, thereby priming naive and re-stimulating infected rats to induce T-cell and B-cell responses against infection with the fungus. Furthermore, the antigen-specific immune response induced by C. neoformans-pulsed eosinophils, which is characterized by the development of a Th1 microenvironment with increased levels of NO synthesis and C. neoformans-specific immunoglobulin production, was demonstrated to be able to protect rats against subsequent infection with fungus. In summary, the present work demonstrates that eosinophils act as antigen-presenting cells for the fungal antigen, hence initiating and modulating a C. neoformans-specific immune response. Finally, we suggest that C. neoformans-loaded eosinophils might participate in the protective immune response against these fungi.

  12. Theoretical aspects of immunity.

    PubMed

    Deem, Michael W; Hejazi, Pooya

    2010-01-01

    The immune system recognizes a myriad of invading pathogens and their toxic products. It does so with a finite repertoire of antibodies and T cell receptors. We here describe theories that quantify the dynamics of the immune system. We describe how the immune system recognizes antigens by searching the large space of receptor molecules. We consider in some detail the theories that quantify the immune response to influenza and dengue fever. We review theoretical descriptions of the complementary evolution of pathogens that occurs in response to immune system pressure. Methods including bioinformatics, molecular simulation, random energy models, and quantum field theory contribute to a theoretical understanding of aspects of immunity.

  13. Frequency of Discrepancies between Deviation Quotients in Profiles of Children with Above-Average IQs on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Stephen J.; Clampit, Michael K.

    1990-01-01

    Presents table for determining relative rarity of quotient discrepancies on Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) to be used with children at higher Intelligence Quotient levels. Theoretically derived table has been confirmed through empirical observation of WISC-R standardization sample. Suggests table use should reduce…

  14. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  15. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. PMID:27312156

  16. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders.

  17. Immune cell profile of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with malignant melanoma – FOXP3+ cell density in cases with positive sentinel node status is associated with unfavorable clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Besides being a preferential site of early metastasis, the sentinel lymph node (SLN) is also a privileged site of T-cell priming, and may thus be an appropriate target for investigating cell types involved in antitumor immune reactions. Methods In this retrospective study we determined the prevalence of OX40+ activated T lymphocytes, FOXP3+ (forkhead box P3) regulatory T cells, DC-LAMP+ (dendritic cell-lysosomal associated membrane protein) mature dendritic cells (DCs) and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs by immunohistochemistry in 100 SLNs from 60 melanoma patients. Density values of each cell type in SLNs were compared to those in non-sentinel nodes obtained from block dissections (n = 37), and analyzed with regard to associations with clinicopathological parameters and disease outcome. Results Sentinel nodes showed elevated amount of all cell types studied in comparison to non-sentinel nodes. Metastatic SLNs had higher density of OX40+ lymphocytes compared to tumor-negative nodes, while no significant difference was observed in the case of the other cell types studied. In patients with positive sentinel node status, high amount of FOXP3+ cells in SLNs was associated with shorter progression-free (P = 0.0011) and overall survival (P = 0.0014), while no significant correlation was found in the case of sentinel-negative patients. The density of OX40+, CD123+ or DC-LAMP+ cells did not show significant association with the outcome of the disease. Conclusions Taken together, our results are compatible with the hypothesis of functional competence of sentinel lymph nodes based on the prevalence of the studied immune cells. The density of FOXP3+ lymphocytes showed association with progression and survival in patients with positive SLN status, while the other immune markers studied did not prove of prognostic importance. These results, together with our previous findings on the prognostic value of activated T cells and mature DCs infiltrating primary

  18. Modular and coordinated expression of immune system regulatory and signaling components in the developing and adult nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Crampton, Sean; McKelvey, Laura; Nolan, Aoife; O’Keeffe, Gerard; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    During development, the nervous system (NS) is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signaling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult NS. While the involvement of individual immune-related signaling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune–related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the NS. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the NS, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system (IS) genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the NS. PMID:26379506

  19. Immunity by equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  20. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  1. Immunity to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens; Immune Responses to Tumor Antigens; Regulation of the Immune Response to Tumor Cells, Immunotherapy and Biomodulators, and Immunotherapy and Immunoprophylaxis.

  2. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  3. Retrieving the vertical distribution of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition from in situ fluorescence profiles: A method based on a neural network with potential for global-scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzède, R.; Claustre, H.; Jamet, C.; Uitz, J.; Ras, J.; Mignot, A.; D'Ortenzio, F.

    2015-01-01

    neural network-based method is developed to assess the vertical distribution of (1) chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl]) and (2) phytoplankton community size indices (i.e., microphytoplankton, nanophytoplankton, and picophytoplankton) from in situ vertical profiles of chlorophyll fluorescence. This method (FLAVOR for Fluorescence to Algal communities Vertical distribution in the Oceanic Realm) uses as input only the shape of the fluorescence profile associated with its acquisition date and geo-location. The neural network is trained and validated using a large database including 896 concomitant in situ vertical profiles of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments and fluorescence. These profiles were collected during 22 oceanographic cruises representative of the global ocean in terms of trophic and oceanographic conditions, making our method applicable to most oceanic waters. FLAVOR is validated with respect to the retrieval of both [Chl] and phytoplankton size indices using an independent in situ data set and appears to be relatively robust spatially and temporally. To illustrate the potential of the method, we applied it to in situ measurements of the BATS (Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study) site and produce monthly climatologies of [Chl] and associated phytoplankton size indices. The resulting climatologies appear very promising compared to climatologies based on available in situ HPLC data. With the increasing availability of spatially and temporally well-resolved data sets of chlorophyll fluorescence, one possible global-scale application of FLAVOR could be to develop 3-D and even 4-D climatologies of [Chl] and associated composition of phytoplankton communities. The Matlab and R codes of the proposed algorithm are provided as supporting information.

  4. Intestinal Parasite Profile in the Stool of HIV Positive Patients in relation to Immune Status and Comparison of Various Diagnostic Techniques with Special Reference to Cryptosporidium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Moorkoth, Anitha Puduvail; Mathew, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and related opportunistic infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible population. This study aims to negate the paucity of data regarding the relation between CD4 levels, prevalence of enteric parasites, and the outcome of treatment with HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) and Cotrimoxazole in Kerala, India. Multiple stool samples from 200 patients in a cross-sectional study were subjected to microscopy and Cryptosporidium stool antigen ELISA. Parasites were identified in 18 samples (9%). Cystoisospora and Cryptosporidium spp. were seen in 9 cases (4.5%) and 5 cases (2.5%), respectively. Microsporidium spores and Chilomastix mesnili cysts were identified in 1 case each (0.5% each). Seven cases of Cystoisospora diarrhoea recovered after treatment with Cotrimoxazole. Diarrhoea due to Cryptosporidium spp. in all 5 cases subsided after immune reconstitution with HAART. This study concludes that a positive association was seen between low CD4 count (<200 cells/μL) and overall parasite positivity (P value < 0.01). ELISA is a more sensitive modality for the diagnosis of Cryptosporidium diarrhoea. Chilomastix mesnili, generally considered a nonpathogen, may be a cause of diarrhoeal disease in AIDS. Immune reconstitution and Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis remain to be the best therapeutic approach in AIDS-related diarrhoea. PMID:27493988

  5. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A Text Size How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! View Survey ...

  6. Aging changes in immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... keeps your immune system strong. DO NOT smoke. Smoking weakens your immune system. Limit your intake of alcohol . Ask your provider how much alcohol is safe for you. Look into safety measures to prevent falls and injuries. A weak immune system can ...

  7. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  8. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  9. WRFv3.2-SPAv2: development and validation of a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model, scaling from surface fluxes of CO2 and energy to atmospheric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallman, T. L.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting meteorological (WRF) model has been coupled to the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere (SPA) terrestrial ecosystem model, to produce WRF-SPA. SPA generates realistic land-atmosphere exchanges through fully coupled hydrological, carbon and energy cycles. The addition of a~land surface model (SPA) capable of modelling biospheric CO2 exchange allows WRF-SPA to be used for investigating the feedbacks between biosphere carbon balance, meteorology, and land use and land cover change. We have extensively validated WRF-SPA using multi-annual observations of air temperature, turbulent fluxes, net radiation and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 at three sites, representing the dominant vegetation types in Scotland (forest, managed grassland and arable agriculture). For example air temperature is well simulated across all sites (forest R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 1.7 °C, bias = 0.88 °C; managed grassland R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 2.7 °C, bias = -0.30 °C; arable agriculture R2 = 0.82, RMSE = 2.2 °C, bias = 0.46 °C; RMSE, root mean square error). WRF-SPA generates more realistic seasonal behaviour at the site level compared to an unmodified version of WRF, such as improved simulation of seasonal transitions in latent heat flux in arable systems. WRF-SPA also generates realistic seasonal CO2 exchanges across all sites. WRF-SPA is also able to realistically model atmospheric profiles of CO2 over Scotland, spanning a 3 yr period (2004-2006), capturing both profile structure, indicating realistic transport, and magnitude (model-data residual <±4 ppm) indicating appropriate source sink distribution and CO2 exchange. WRF-SPA makes use of CO2 tracer pools and can therefore identify and quantify land surface contributions to the modelled atmospheric CO2 signal at a specified location.

  10. Determination of Planetary Boundary Layer Heights on Short Spatial and Temporal Scales from Surface and Airborne Vertical Profilers during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, R.; Berkoff, T.; Compton, J. S.; St Pé, A.; Baker, B.; Hoff, R. M.; Martins, D. K.; Thompson, A. M.; Yang, E.; Christopher, S. A.; Joseph, E.; Tzortziou, M.; Lolli, S.; Landry, L.; Woodman, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The National Research Council [2009] identified lower troposphere profiling of trace gases, aerosol and thermodynamic quantities as a cross-cutting need for air quality, weather, climate, energy and other national priority economic areas. A critical parameter in determining air pollution concentrations near the ground is the depth through which pollutants are vigorously mixed. The planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) is an important meteorological parameter that affects near-surface atmospheric pollutant concentrations since it determines the volume of air into which pollutants and their precursors are emitted. This height is also important in determining the relationship between column measures of gases and aerosols and the concentration measured at the surface, since pollutants are frequently contained within the PBL. Determining the mixing in the PBL was one goal of a study of the spatial and diurnal variations of the PBLH over Maryland for July 2011, during NASA's Earth Venture mission DISCOVER-AQ. The PBLHs were obtained from elastic lidars (surface and airborne) and wind profiler observations by determining the convective mixed layer using the covariance wavelet technique (CWT) and comparing it to the virtual potential temperature measurements from soundings. This July, a total of 16 ozone episode days (National Ambient Air Quality Standard 8 hour ozone concentrations greater than 75 ppb) occurred. The relationship between PBLH and surface ozone concentrations was evaluated against ventilation coefficients (product of the PBLH times the surface wind speed) and PBL growth rates during ozone episode and non-episode days. The temporal and spatial distribution of the PBLH in Maryland was modeled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to characterize the role of shoreline circulation and thermally-induced boundary layers on locations along the Chesapeake Bay. National Research Council (2009), Observing Weather and Climate from the Ground Up: A

  11. Large-scale identification and comparative analysis of miRNA expression profile in the respiratory tree of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muyan; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-02-01

    The sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus withstands high water temperatures in the summer by suppressing its metabolic rate and entering a state of aestivation. We hypothesized that changes in the expression of miRNAs could provide important post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression during hypometabolism via control over mRNA translation. The present study analyzed profiles of miRNA expression in the sea cucumber respiratory tree using Solexa deep sequencing technology. We identified 279 sea cucumber miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs specific to sea cucumber. Animals sampled during deep aestivation (DA; after at least 15 days of continuous torpor) were compared with animals from a non-aestivation (NA) state (animals that had passed through aestivation and returned to an active state). We identified 30 differentially expressed miRNAs ([RPM (reads per million) >10, |FC| (|fold change|)≥1, FDR (false discovery rate)<0.01]) during aestivation, which were validated by two other miRNA profiling methods: miRNA microarray and real-time PCR. Among the most prominent miRNA species, miR-124, miR-124-3p, miR-79, miR-9 and miR-2010 were significantly over-expressed during deep aestivation compared with non-aestivation animals, suggesting that these miRNAs may play important roles in metabolic rate suppression during aestivation. High-throughput sequencing data and microarray data have been submitted to the GEO database with accession number: 16902695.

  12. Expression profiles of the immune genes CD4, CD8β, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in mitogen-stimulated koala lymphocytes (Phascolarctos cinereus) by qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Maher, Iona E; Griffith, Joanna E; Lau, Quintin; Reeves, Thomas; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the immune response of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is needed urgently, but has been limited by scarcity of species-specific reagents and methods for this unique and divergent marsupial. Infectious disease is an important threat to wild populations of koalas; the most widespread and important of these is Chlamydial disease, caused by Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia pneumoniae. In addition, koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is of 100% prevalence in northern Australia, has been proposed as an important agent of immune suppression that could explain the koala's susceptibility to disease. The correct balance of T regulatory, T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 lymphocyte responses are important to an individual's susceptibility or resistance to chlamydial infection. The ability to study chlamydial or KoRV pathogenesis, effects of environmental stressors on immunity, and the response of koalas to vaccines under development, by examining the koala's adaptive response to natural infection or in-vitro stimulation, has been limited to date by a paucity of species- specific reagents. In this study we have used cytokine sequences from four marsupial genomes to identify mRNA sequences for key T regulatory, Th1 and Th2 cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) along with CD4 and CD8β. The koala sequences used for primer design showed >58% homology with grey short-tailed opossum, >71% with tammar wallaby and 78% with Tasmanian devil amino acid sequences. We report the development of real-time RT-PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes in unstimulated cells and after three common mitogen stimulation protocols (phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin, phorbol myristate acetate/phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A). Phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin was found to be the most effective mitogen to up-regulate the production of IL-4, IL-10 and IFNγ. IL-6 production was not consistently up-regulated by

  13. [The ageing immune system].

    PubMed

    Djukic, M; Nau, R; Sieber, C

    2014-10-01

    The aging of the immune system, also called immunosenescence, contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality from infections, autoimmune diseases and cancer as well as to the low efficacy of vaccination in elderly persons. Immunosenescence is characterized by a decrease in cell-mediated immune function and by reduced humoral immune responses caused by age-related changes in the innate immune system and age-dependent defects in T-and B-cell function. This paper gives an overview of the most important modifications in the different compartments of the immune system during the ageing process.

  14. [The ageing immune system].

    PubMed

    Djukic, M; Nau, R; Sieber, C

    2014-10-01

    The aging of the immune system, also called immunosenescence, contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality from infections, autoimmune diseases and cancer as well as to the low efficacy of vaccination in elderly persons. Immunosenescence is characterized by a decrease in cell-mediated immune function and by reduced humoral immune responses caused by age-related changes in the innate immune system and age-dependent defects in T-and B-cell function. This paper gives an overview of the most important modifications in the different compartments of the immune system during the ageing process. PMID:25254392

  15. Breakthrough of two pesticides into tile drain and shallow groundwater: comparison of tile drain reaction and soil profiles within a field scale irrigation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin; Elsner, Martin; Palm, Juliane; Schneider, Dorothee; Schröder, Boris; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; West, Stephanie

    2010-05-01

    Preferential flow in macropores is a key process which strongly affects infiltration and may cause rapid transport of pesticides into depths of 80 to 150 cm. At these depths they experience a much slower degradation, may leach into shallow groundwater or enter a tile-drain and are transported into surface water bodies. Therefore, preferential transport might be an environmental problem, if the topsoil is bypassed, which has been originally thought to act as a filter to protect the subsoil and shallow groundwater. To investigate the behaviour of two pesticides with different chemical characteristics and to compare their transport behaviour in soil and into the tile drain an irrigation experiment was performed on a 400 m² field site. The experimental plot is located in the Weiherbach valley, south-west Germany, which basic geology consists of Loess and Keuper layers, the soil at the test site is a gleyic Colluvisol. The distance of the irrigation site to the Weiherbach brook is approximately 12 m, the field is drained with a tile-drain in about 1.2 m depth and shows discharge over the entire year. Three hours before the irrigation started, the farmer applied a pesticide solution consisting of Isoproturon (80 g) and Flufenacet (20 g) (IPU and FLU) according to conventional agricultural practice on the field plot. The irrigation took place in three time blocks (80 min, 60 min, 80 min) with in total 33.6 mm of precipitation. During the first block 1600 g of Bromide were mixed in the irrigation water. The drainage outlet was instrumented with a pressure probe. About 50 water samples ware taken during the experimental day, and several samples more the days after the experiment. They were analysed for the pesticides, bromide and water isotopes. In the two days after the experiment three soil profiles were excavated and soil samples were taken on a 10x10 cm² scheme. One week after the experiment two additional profiles were excavated. The soil was analysed for IPU, FLU

  16. Regional-scale geometry of the central Skellefte district, northern Sweden—results from 2.5D potential field modeling along three previously acquired seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Saman; Bauer, Tobias E.; Elming, Sten-Åke; Thunehed, Hans; Weihed, Pär

    2012-10-01

    The Skellefte district in northern Sweden is one of the most important mining districts in Europe hosting approximately 80 volcanic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Due to its economical importance, geological and geophysical studies were carried out in order to create an image of the geometry of the upper crustal structure and integral geological elements and to evaluate their relationship to mineral deposits. Consequently, seismic reflection data along three sub-parallel profiles were acquired during 2009-2010 to map the spatial relationships between the geological structures down to a depth of ~ 4.5 km. Although these seismic studies helped researchers understand the regional relationship between geologic units in the central Skellefte district (CSD), the seismic reflection data did not succeed entirely in mapping the lithological contacts in the area. In this study, the model derived from the seismic reflection data was examined by using 2.5D modeling of potential field data (down to a 5 km depth) constrained by physical properties of the rocks and surface geology. Moreover, we modeled gravity and magnetic data along the non-reflective or poorly reflective parts of the seismic profiles to identify major lithological contacts and shear zones in the CSD, which could not be modeled on the basis of the seismic reflection data. Gravity and magnetic data helped reveal the spatial relationship between the Skellefte volcanic rocks, Vargfors group meta-sedimentary rocks and two meta­intrusive complexes. Results suggest a maximum depth extent of 2.1 km for the tectonic contact at the southern border of the Jörn granitoid. Furthermore, this north-dipping Skellefte-Jörn contact coincides closely with magnetic lows and gravity highs, which implies that the Jörn intrusive rocks have a greater thickness than the underlying basalt. Further to the NW, gravity and magnetic data suggest a depth extent of 2 km for the Gallejaur complex, which coincides with a set of gently

  17. Early-Life Environmental Variation Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Immune Development in New-Born Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling-li; Vastenhouw, Stéphanie A.; Heilig, Hans G. H. J.; Smidt, Hauke; Rebel, Johanna M. J.; Smits, Mari A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early-life environmental variation affects gut microbial colonization and immune competence development; however, the timing and additional specifics of these processes are unknown. The impact of early-life environmental variations, as experienced under real life circumstances, on gut microbial colonization and immune development has not been studied extensively so far. We designed a study to investigate environmental variation, experienced early after birth, to gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate effects of early-life environmental changes, the piglets of 16 piglet litters were divided into 3 groups per litter and experimentally treated on day 4 after birth. During the course of the experiment, the piglets were kept with their mother sow. Group 1 was not treated, group 2 was treated with an antibiotic, and group 3 was treated with an antibiotic and simultaneously exposed to several routine, but stressful management procedures, including docking, clipping and weighing. Thereafter, treatment effects were measured at day 8 after birth in 16 piglets per treatment group by community-scale analysis of gut microbiota and genome-wide intestinal transcriptome profiling. We observed that the applied antibiotic treatment affected the composition and diversity of gut microbiota and reduced the expression of a large number of immune-related processes. The effect of management procedures on top of the use of an antibiotic was limited. Conclusions/Significance We provide direct evidence that different early-life conditions, specifically focusing on antibiotic treatment and exposure to stress, affect gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. This reinforces the notion that the early phase of life is critical for intestinal immune development, also under regular production circumstances. PMID:24941112

  18. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  19. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions.

  20. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  1. Triacylglycerol Analysis in Human Milk and Other Mammalian Species: Small-Scale Sample Preparation, Characterization, and Statistical Classification Using HPLC-ELSD Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ten-Doménech, Isabel; Beltrán-Iturat, Eduardo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel; Sancho-Llopis, Juan Vicente; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto Francisco

    2015-06-24

    In this work, a method for the separation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in human milk and from other mammalian species by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using a core-shell particle packed column with UV and evaporative light-scattering detectors is described. Under optimal conditions, a mobile phase containing acetonitrile/n-pentanol at 10 °C gave an excellent resolution among more than 50 TAG peaks. A small-scale method for fat extraction in these milks (particularly of interest for human milk samples) using minimal amounts of sample and reagents was also developed. The proposed extraction protocol and the traditional method were compared, giving similar results, with respect to the total fat and relative TAG contents. Finally, a statistical study based on linear discriminant analysis on the TAG composition of different types of milks (human, cow, sheep, and goat) was carried out to differentiate the samples according to their mammalian origin.

  2. The scope for using the volatile profiles of Pinus caribaea var. bahamensis as indicators of susceptibility to pine tortoise scale and as predictors of environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Green, Paul W C; Hamilton, Martin A; Sanchez, Michele D; Corcoran, Marcella R; Manco, Bryan N; Malumphy, Chris P

    2015-04-01

    Climate change, unseasonal fire and urbanization are contributing to the decline of Pinus caribaea var. bahamensis populations in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI). Infestation of pines with the invasive pine tortoise scale (PTS, Toumeyella parvicornis) is accelerating this decline. Pine trees in the Bahamas are larger and healthier and are not infested with PTS although they are subject to some of the same environmental pressures as the trees in TCI. Volatile compounds were collected from wild and nursery-reared P. caribaea var. bahamensis from TCI and the Bahamas and characterized using GC/MS analysis, to look for differences between the compounds detected in insect-infested pines of TCI and the healthy pines of the Bahamas. Ten compounds contributing at least 1% of the total detected peak areas in any one of the samples were selected for further study. Eight of these compounds were identified using authentic standards and mass spectral libraries. The main constituents in the samples were α- and β-pinene as well as β-phellandrene, and, together with β-myrcene, their contents varied the most between samples collected at different locations. Principal-component analysis showed that the two structural isomers of pinene, together with β-myrcene and β-phellandrene, contributed 98.4% of the variance between samples. There was a positive relationship between the concentrations of the two structural isomers of pinene and between levels of β-myrcene and β-phellandrene. The results are discussed in relation to the biology and adaptations of invasive scale insects, the importance of monoterpenes in pine as a defense against insect predation, whether these compounds can be used as indicators of tree health, and future directions for research into conserving the Caicos pine. PMID:25879508

  3. Comparing global-scale topographic and climatic metrics to long-term erosion rates using ArcSwath, an efficient new ArcGIS tool for swath profile analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomqvist, Niclas; Whipp, David

    2016-04-01

    The topography of the Earth's surface is the result of the interaction of tectonics, erosion and climate. Thus, topography should contain a record of these processes that can be extracted by topographic analysis. The question considered in this study is whether the spatial variations in erosion that have sculpted the modern topography are representative of the long-term erosion rates in mountainous regions. We compare long-term erosion rates derived from low-temperature thermochronometry to erosional proxies calculated from topographic and climatic data analysis. The study has been performed on a global scale including six orogens: The Himalaya, Andes, Taiwan, Olympic Mountains, Southern Alps in New Zealand and European Alps. The data was analyzed using a new swath profile analysis tool for ArcGIS called ArcSwath (https://github.com/HUGG/ArcSwath) to determine the correlations between the long-term erosion rates and modern elevations, slope angles, relief in 2.5-km- and 5-km-diameter circles, erosion potential, normalized channel steepness index ksn, and annual rainfall. ArcSwath uses a Python script that has been incorporated into an ArcMap 10.2 add-in tool, extracting swath profiles in about ten seconds compared to earlier workflows that could take more than an hour. In ArcMap, UTM-projected point or raster files can be used for creating swath profiles. Point data are projected onto the swath and the statistical parameters (minimum, mean and maximum of the values across the swath) are calculated for the raster data. Both can be immediately plotted using the Python matplotlib library, or plotted externally using the csv-file that is produced by ArcSwath. When raster and point data are plotted together, it is easier to make comparisons and see correlations between the selected data. An unambiguous correlation between the topographic or climatic metrics and long-term erosion rates was not found. Fitting of linear regression lines to the topographic/ climatic metric

  4. Variations in the depth distribution of phosphorus in soil profiles and implications for model-based catchment-scale predictions of phosphorus delivery to surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, P. N.; Deeks, L. K.; Wood, G. A.; Betson, M. J.; Lord, E. I.; Davison, P. S.

    2008-02-01

    SummaryThe PSYCHIC process-based model for predicting sediment and phosphorus (P) transfer within catchments uses spatial data on soil-P derived from the National Soil Inventory (NSI) data set. These soil-P values are based on bulked 0-15 cm depth and do not account for variations in soil-P with depth. We describe the depth distribution of soil-P (total and Olsen) in grassland and arable soils for the dominant soil types in the two PSYCHIC study catchments: the Avon and the Wye, UK. There were clear variations in soil-P (particularly Olsen-P) concentrations with depth in untilled grassland soils while concentrations of total-P were broadly constant within the plough layer of arable soils. Concentrations of Olsen-P in arable soils, however, exhibited maximum values near the soil surface reflecting surface applications of fertilisers and manures between consecutive ploughing events. When the soil-P concentrations for the surface soil (0-5 cm average) were compared to both the profile-averaged (0-15 cm) and the NSI (0-15 cm) values, those for the surface soil were considerably greater than those for the average 0-15 cm depth. Modelled estimates of P loss using the depth-weighted average soil-P concentrations for the 0-5 cm depth layer were up to 14% greater than those based on the NSI data set due to the preferential accumulation of P at the soil surface. These findings have important implications for the use of soil-P data (and other data) in models to predict P losses from land to water and the interpretation of these predictions for river basin management.

  5. Developmental expression profiles of axon guidance signaling and the immune system in the marmoset cortex: potential molecular mechanisms of pruning of dendritic spines during primate synapse formation in late infancy and prepuberty (I).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Oga, Tomofumi; Nakagaki, Keiko; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Sumida, Kayo; Hoshino, Kohei; Miyawaki, Izuru; Saito, Koichi; Suto, Fumikazu; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2014-02-14

    The synapse number and the related dendritic spine number in the cerebral cortex of primates shows a rapid increase after birth. Depending on the brain region and species, the number of synapses reaches a peak before adulthood, and pruning takes place after this peak (overshoot-type synaptic formation). Human mental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, are hypothesized to be a result of either too weak or excessive pruning after the peak is reached. Thus, it is important to study the molecular mechanisms underlying overshoot-type synaptic formation, particularly the pruning phase. To examine the molecular mechanisms, we used common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Microarray analysis of the marmoset cortex was performed in the ventrolateral prefrontal, inferior temporal, and primary visual cortices, where changes in the number of dendritic spines have been observed. The spine number of all the brain regions above showed a peak at 3 months (3 M) after birth and gradually decreased (e.g., at 6 M and in adults). In this study, we focused on genes that showed differential expression between ages of 3 M and 6 M and on the differences whose fold change (FC) was greater than 1.2. The selected genes were subjected to canonical pathway analysis, and in this study, we describe axon guidance signaling, which had high plausibility. The results showed a large number of genes belonging to subsystems within the axon guidance signaling pathway, macrophages/immune system, glutamate system, and others. We divided the data and discussion of these results into 2 papers, and this is the first paper, which deals with the axon guidance signaling and macrophage/immune system. Other systems will be described in the next paper. Many components of subsystems within the axon guidance signaling underwent changes in gene expression from 3 M to 6 M so that the synapse/dendritic spine number would decrease at 6 M. Thus, axon guidance signaling probably contributes to the decrease in

  6. Large-scale variability of wind erosion mass flux rates at Owens Lake 1. Vertical profiles of horizontal mass fluxes of wind-eroded particles with diameter greater than 50 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Dale A.; Fryrear, D.W.; Xiao, Jing Bing; Stockton, Paul; Ono, Duane; Helm, Paula J.; Gill, Thomas E; Ley, Trevor

    1997-01-01

    A field experiment at Owens (dry) Lake, California, tested whether and how the relative profiles of airborne horizontal mass fluxes for >50-μm wind-eroded particles changed with friction velocity. The horizontal mass flux at almost all measured heights increased proportionally to the cube of friction velocity above an apparent threshold friction velocity for all sediment tested and increased with height except at one coarse-sand site where the relative horizontal mass flux profile did not change with friction velocity. Size distributions for long-time-averaged horizontal mass flux samples showed a saltation layer from the surface to a height between 30 and 50 cm, above which suspended particles dominate. Measurements from a large dust source area on a line parallel to the wind showed that even though the saltation flux reached equilibrium ∼650 m downwind of the starting point of erosion, weakly suspended particles were still input into the atmosphere 1567 m downwind of the starting point; thus the saltating fraction of the total mass flux decreased after 650 m. The scale length difference and ratio of 70/30 suspended mass flux to saltation mass flux at the farthest down wind sampling site confirm that suspended particles are very important for mass budgets in large source areas and that saltation mass flux can be a variable fraction of total horizontal mass flux for soils with a substantial fraction of <100-μm particles.

  7. Current transcriptomics in pig immunity research.

    PubMed

    Schroyen, Martine; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2015-02-01

    Swine performance in the face of disease challenge is becoming progressively more important. To improve the pig's robustness and resilience against pathogens through selection, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic factors in the immune response is required. This review highlights results from the most recent transcriptome research, and the meta-analyses performed, in the context of pig immunity. A technological overview is given including wholegenome microarrays, immune-specific arrays, small-scale high-throughput expression methods, high-density tiling arrays, and next generation sequencing (NGS). Although whole genome microarray techniques will remain complementary to NGS for some time in domestic species, research will transition to sequencing-based methods due to cost-effectiveness and the extra information that such methods provide. Furthermore, upcoming high-throughput epigenomic studies, which will add greatly to our knowledge concerning the impact of epigenetic modifications on pig immune response, are listed in this review. With emphasis on the insights obtained from transcriptomic analyses for porcine immunity, we also discuss the experimental design in pig immunity research and the value of the newly published porcine genome assembly in using the pig as a model for human immune response. We conclude by discussing the importance of establishing community standards to maximize the possibility of integrative computational analyses, such as was clearly beneficial for the human ENCODE project.

  8. The immune system, adaptation, and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. Doyne; Packard, Norman H.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1986-10-01

    The immune system is capable of learning, memory, and pattern recognition. By employing genetic operators on a time scale fast enough to observe experimentally, the immune system is able to recognize novel shapes without preprogramming. Here we describe a dynamical model for the immune system that is based on the network hypothesis of Jerne, and is simple enough to simulate on a computer. This model has a strong similarity to an approach to learning and artificial intelligence introduced by Holland, called the classifier system. We demonstrate that simple versions of the classifier system can be cast as a nonlinear dynamical system, and explore the analogy between the immune and classifier systems in detail. Through this comparison we hope to gain insight into the way they perform specific tasks, and to suggest new approaches that might be of value in learning systems.

  9. A mm-Scale Dosimetry System Based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Beryllium Oxide for Investigation of Dose Rate Profiles in Constricted Environments - 12219

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Marian; Jahn, Axel; Sommer, Dora; Henniger, Juergen; Praetorius, Reiner M.

    2012-07-01

    The dismantling of the former German fuel reprocessing research center Wiederaufbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe requires extensive investigations of contamination and dose rate inside of the shielded areas. Particularly for first the exploration of radiation field existing thermo-element pipes may offer access to the tanks and to other interesting points without the risk of contamination. Because of their small dimension, almost no active dosimetry systems are able to measure inside the pipes. New mm-scale luminescence dosimeters in combination with a packing and transport technique are presented. The dosimeters could measure doses from 0.1 mGy up to more than 100 Gy. Hence, over the possible exposure time durations, dose rates from μGyh{sup -1} up to 1000 Gyh{sup -1} are ascertainable. For potential users the system opens the opportunity for investigation of dose rates inside of shielding and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is a unique solution for dose and dose rate measurement tasks. Within the linear dose range up to several ten Gy, the uncertainty of the results is less than 5%. 100 Gy-doses can be specified within 20%, with individual high dose calibration of the detectors even better. For WAK and other potential users the system offers the opportunity to investigate dose rates inside of shieldings and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is an unique solution for dose and dose rate measurements. (authors)

  10. Neural circuitry and immunity.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuro-immune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex, are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases define the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine.

  11. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  12. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  13. Feeding the immune system.

    PubMed

    Calder, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    A well-functioning immune system is key to providing good defence against pathogenic organisms and to providing tolerance to non-threatening organisms, to food components and to self. The immune system works by providing an exclusion barrier, by identifying and eliminating pathogens and by identifying and tolerating non-threatening sources of antigens, and by maintaining a memory of immunological encounters. The immune system is complex involving many different cell types distributed throughout the body and many different chemical mediators some of which are involved directly in defence while others have a regulatory role. Babies are born with an immature immune system that fully develops in the first few years of life. Immune competence can decline with ageing. The sub-optimal immune competence that occurs early and late in life increases susceptibility to infection. Undernutrition decreases immune defences, making an individual more susceptible to infection. However, the immune response to an infection can itself impair nutritional status and alter body composition. Practically all forms of immunity are affected by protein-energy malnutrition, but non-specific defences and cell-mediated immunity are most severely affected. Micronutrient deficiencies impair immune function. Here, vitamins A, D and E, and Zn, Fe and Se are discussed. The gut-associated lymphoid tissue is especially important in health and well-being because of its close proximity to a large and diverse population of organisms in the gastrointestinal tract and its exposure to food constituents. Certain probiotic bacteria which modify the gut microbiota enhance immune function in laboratory animals and may do so in human subjects.

  14. Clinical immunity to malaria.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Louis; Mueller, Ivo

    2006-03-01

    Under appropriate conditions of transmission intensity, functional immunity to malaria appears to be acquired in distinct stages. The first phase reduces the likelihood of severe or fatal disease; the second phase limits the clinical impact of 'mild' malaria; and the third provides partial but incomplete protection against pathogen burden. These findings suggest clinical immunity to mortality and morbidity is acquired earlier, with greater ease, and via distinct mechanisms as compared to anti-parasite immunity, which is more difficult to achieve, takes longer and is only ever partially efficacious. The implications of this view are significant in that current vaccination strategies aim predominantly to achieve anti-parasite immunity, although imparting clinical immunity is the public health objective. Despite enormous relevance for global public health, the mechanisms governing these processes remain obscure. Four candidate mechanisms might mediate clinical immunity, namely immunity to cytoadherence determinants, tolerance to toxins, acquired immunity to toxins, and immunoregulation. This review addresses the targets and determinants of clinical immunity, and considers the implications for vaccine development.

  15. Immunity, ageing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Solana, Rafael; Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Compromised immunity contributes to the decreased ability of the elderly to control infectious disease and to their generally poor response to vaccination. It is controversial as to how far this phenomenon contributes to the well-known age-associated increase in the occurrence of many cancers in the elderly. However, should the immune system be important in controlling cancer, for which there is a great deal of evidence, it is logical to propose that dysfunctional immunity in the elderly would contribute to compromised immunosurveillance and increased cancer occurrence. The chronological age at which immunosenescence becomes clinically important is known to be influenced by many factors, including the pathogen load to which individuals are exposed throughout life. It is proposed here that the cancer antigen load may have a similar effect on "immune exhaustion" and that pathogen load and tumor load may act additively to accelerate immunosenescence. Understanding how and why immune responsiveness changes in humans as they age is essential for developing strategies to prevent or restore dysregulated immunity and assure healthy longevity, clearly possible only if cancer is avoided. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of age on human immune competence, emphasizing T-cell-dependent adaptive immunity, which is the most sensitive to ageing. This knowledge will pave the way for rational interventions to maintain or restore appropriate immune function not only in the elderly but also in the cancer patient. PMID:18816370

  16. Innate Immunity in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, David E.; Siddique, Sana S.; Weinstock, Joel V.

    2014-01-01

    Cells can innately recognize generic products of viruses, bacteria, fungi, or injured tissue by engagement of pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune cells rapidly respond to this engagement in order to control commensals, thwart pathogens and/or prompt repair. Insufficient or excessive activation of the innate immune response results in disease. This review focuses on pattern recognition receptors and cells of the innate immune system important for intestinal function. Our improving knowledge pertaining to this important aspect of our immune response is opening potential important new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of disease. PMID:24632348

  17. Use of the distributions of adamantane acids to profile short-term temporal and pond-scale spatial variations in the composition of oil sands process-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Lengger, Sabine K; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Milestone, Craig B; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    Oil industry produced waters, such as the oils sands process-affected waters (OSPW) of Alberta, Canada, represent a challenge in terms of risk assessment and reclamation due to their extreme complexity, particularly of the organic chemical constituents, including the naphthenic acids (NA). The identification of numerous NA in single samples has raised promise for the use of NA distributions for profiling OSPW. However, monitoring of the success of containment is still difficult, due to the lack of knowledge of the homogeneity (or otherwise) of OSPW composition within, and between, different industry containments. Here we used GC×GC-MS to compare the NA of five OSPW samples from each of two different industries. Short-term temporal and pond-scale spatial variations in the distributions of known adamantane acids and diacids and other unknown tricyclic acids were examined and a statistical appraisal of the replicate data made. The presence/absence of individual acids easily distinguished the OSPW NA of one industry from those of the other. The proportions of tricyclic acids with different carbon numbers also varied significantly between the OSPW of the two industries. The pond-scale spatial variation in NA in OSPW samples was higher than the short-term (2 weeks) temporal variations. An OSPW sample from an aged pond was exceptionally high in the proportion of C15,16,17 compounds, possibly due to increased biotransformation. Such techniques could possibly also help to distinguish different sources of NA in the environment. PMID:26160340

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  19. Differential protein network analysis of the immune cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Trevor; Hovig, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen) completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks. PMID:25309909

  20. Immune Cells and Inflammation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zihan; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of diabetes. At its core, DN is a metabolic disorder which can also manifest itself in terms of local inflammation in the kidneys. Such inflammation can then drive the classical markers of fibrosis and structural remodeling. As a result, resolution of immune-mediated inflammation is critical towards achieving a cure for DN. Many immune cells play a part in DN, including key members of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. While these cells were classically understood to primarily function against pathogen insult, it has also become increasingly clear that they also serve a major role as internal sensors of damage. In fact, damage sensing may serve as the impetus for much of the inflammation that occurs in DN, in a vicious positive feedback cycle. Although direct targeting of these proinflammatory cells may be difficult, new approaches that focus on their metabolic profiles may be able to alleviate DN significantly, especially since dysregulation of the local metabolic environment may well be responsible for triggering inflammation to begin with. In this review, the authors consider the metabolic profile of several relevant immune types and discuss their respective roles. PMID:26824038

  1. Environmental exposure to lead induces oxidative stress and modulates the function of the antioxidant defense system and the immune system in the semen of males with normal semen profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Dobrakowski, Michał; Czuba, Zenon P.; Horak, Stanisław; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the associations between environmental exposure to lead and a repertoire of cytokines in seminal plasma of males with normal semen profile according to the WHO criteria. Based on the median lead concentration in seminal plasma, 65 samples were divided into two groups: low (LE) and high exposure to lead (HE). Differences in semen volume and the pH, count, motility and morphology of sperm cells were not observed between the examined groups. The total oxidant status value and the level of protein sulfhydryl groups as well as the activities of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly higher in the HE group, whereas the total antioxidant capacity value and the activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase were depressed. IL-7, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the HE group compared with the LE group. Environmental exposure to lead is sufficient to induce oxidative stress in seminal plasma and to modulate antioxidant defense system. - Highlights: • Lead induces oxidative stress in seminal plasma in human. • Lead modulates antioxidant defense system in seminal plasma in human. • Lead does not change a Th1/Th2 imbalance in seminal plasma in human.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces Expansion of Foxp3 Positive CD4 T-cells with a Regulatory Profile in Tuberculin Non-sensitized Healthy Subjects: Implications for Effective Immunization against TB

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Christina S; Rojas, Roxana; Wu, Mianda; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infection by MTB or exposure to MTB constituents is associated with intense microbial stimulation of the immune system, through both antigenic and TLR components, and induction of a milieu that is rich in pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines. Here, we addressed the basis of induced regulatory T-cell (iT-reg) expansion in response to MTB stimulation, in the absence of prior T cell antigen responsiveness. Methods PBMC from HIV-1 un-infected TST negative and TST positive control subjects were stimulated by virulent MTB H37Rv lysate (L), a French press preparation of MTB that includes all bacterial components. Phenotype of MTB H37RvL induced iT-reg was assessed using immunostaining and flow cytometry. Functional capacity of iT-reg was assessed using 3H-Thymidine incorporation and IFNγ production of non-adherent T cells (NAC) in the presence or absence of iT-reg in corresponding culture supernatants in response to TCR stimulation. Realtime PCR was used to assess IDO and FoxP3 mRNA expression. Results The capacity of MTB H37RvL to induce CD4+CD25hi+ Foxp3+ T-cells in PBMC from TST negative subjects was robust (p<0.001), and in fact comparable to induction of iT-reg in PBMC from TST positive subjects. MTB-induced CD4+CD25hi+ T-reg were TGFβ positive (p<0.05). Further, MTB H37RvL induced CD4+CD25hi+ Foxp3+ iT-reg suppressed 3H-Thymidine incorporation and IFNγ production of non-adherent T cells (NAC) in response to TCR stimulation. MTB H37RvL induction of iT-reg was significantly stronger (p<0.01) than that by TLR-2, TLR-4, TLR-9 ligands, or combination of all TLR ligands. MTB H37RvL inducted indoleamine 2,3-dideoxygenase (IDO) mRNA expression in monocytes (p<0.001), and co-culture with the IDO inhibitor, D-1MT, decreased frequencies of T-reg (p<0.05). Inhibition of TGFβ by siRNA reduced Foxp3 mRNA expression in CD4 T cells (p<0.05). Conclusion Therefore, MTB and its components expand functional iT-reg in human mononuclear cells from MTB non

  3. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  4. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  5. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J A; Scanes, C G

    1994-07-01

    The role of the neuroendocrine system in influencing both immune development and function has become an area of active research within many model systems, including the chicken. It is now clear that the neuroendocrine system can exert immediate feedback regulation on the immune system as well as control specific aspects of immune differentiation and development. The primary lymphoid organs of avian species (i.e., the thymus and the bursa of Fabricius) are also known to function as endocrine organs. These produce hormonal products that influence the development of lymphoid cells and that may feed back on the neuroendocrine system. In conjunction with the endocrine activities of the primary lymphoid organs, immune and accessory cells are known to produce a variety of secreted products or cytokines that have the potential not only for the regulation of immune function but also for mediating neuroendocrine activities. Finally, it has been demonstrated in a variety of species that leukocytes are capable of producing endocrine mediators previously believed to be produced only under the direct control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Thus, there are numerous possibilities for bidirectional interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. This discussion focuses primarily on these interactions with an emphasis on the means by which the hormonal mediators, growth hormone and thyroid hormone, may affect the thymus and the thymic microenvironment. The role of the adrenocorticoids and gonadal steroids in regulating immune function and their involvement in immune feedback circuits are also discussed.

  6. The genetics of immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P; Schneider, David S

    2014-06-17

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals.

  7. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and contro