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Sample records for scaling-up technique applied

  1. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    SciTech Connect

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  2. Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Scaling up in Class 1 reservoir type rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, L.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Doughty, D.

    1993-04-01

    A synergistic rock characterization methodology has been developed. It derives reservoir engineering parameters from X-ray tomography (CT) scanning, computer assisted petrographic image analysis, minipermeameter measurements, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). This rock characterization methodology is used to investigate the effect of small-scale rock heterogeneity on oil distribution and recovery. It is also used to investigate the applicability of imaging technologies to the development of scaleup procedures from core plug to whole core, by comparing the results of detailed simulations with the images ofthe fluid distributions observed by CT scanning. By using the rock and fluid detailed data generated by imaging technology describe, one can verify directly, in the laboratory, various scaling up techniques. Asan example, realizations of rock properties statistically and spatially compatible with the observed values are generated by one of the various stochastic methods available (fuming bands) and are used as simulator input. The simulation results were compared with both the simulation results using the true rock properties and the fluid distributions observed by CT. Conclusions regarding the effect of the various permeability models on waterflood oil recovery were formulated.

  3. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are

  4. Applying a framework for assessing the health system challenges to scaling up mHealth in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mobile phone technology has demonstrated the potential to improve health service delivery, but there is little guidance to inform decisions about acquiring and implementing mHealth technology at scale in health systems. Using the case of community-based health services (CBS) in South Africa, we apply a framework to appraise the opportunities and challenges to effective implementation of mHealth at scale in health systems. Methods A qualitative study reviewed the benefits and challenges of mHealth in community-based services in South Africa, through a combination of key informant interviews, site visits to local projects and document reviews. Using a framework adapted from three approaches to reviewing sustainable information and communication technology (ICT), the lessons from local experience and elsewhere formed the basis of a wider consideration of scale up challenges in South Africa. Results Four key system dimensions were identified and assessed: government stewardship and the organisational, technological and financial systems. In South Africa, the opportunities for successful implementation of mHealth include the high prevalence of mobile phones, a supportive policy environment for eHealth, successful use of mHealth for CBS in a number of projects and a well-developed ICT industry. However there are weaknesses in other key health systems areas such as organisational culture and capacity for using health information for management, and the poor availability and use of ICT in primary health care. The technological challenges include the complexity of ensuring interoperability and integration of information systems and securing privacy of information. Finally, there are the challenges of sustainable financing required for large scale use of mobile phone technology in resource limited settings. Conclusion Against a background of a health system with a weak ICT environment and limited implementation capacity, it remains uncertain that the potential

  5. Scale effects: HCMM data simulation. Usage of filtering techniques for scaling-up simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digennaro, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Image reduction used to simulate increase in altitude of an acquisition platform is equivalent to data smoothing, and can be achieved either by neighborhood averaging or by filtering techniques. The averaging approach is limited for accurate simulation. A filtering method is described which was based on the hypothesis that all changes due to altitude increase can be represented by a point spread function. Determination of the scale function and factor are discussed as well as implementation of the filtering. Filtering can be either in the spatial or frequency domain. In the spatial domain, filtering consists of the convolution of the image with the weights mask, and then of the declination of the points according to the appropriates scale factor. A simulation of an aircraft day image in the infrared channel is examined.

  6. Scaling up Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation contains several projects, each addressing different questions with different techniques. In chapter 1, I argue that they are unified thematically by their goal of "scaling up psycholinguistics"; they are all aimed at analyzing large data-sets using tools that reveal patterns to propose and test mechanism-neutral hypotheses about…

  7. Extraction of bioactives from Orthosiphon stamineus using microwave and ultrasound-assisted techniques: Process optimization and scale up.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung-Hung; See, Tiam-You; Yusoff, Rozita; Ngoh, Gek-Cheng; Kow, Kien-Woh

    2017-04-15

    This work demonstrated the optimization and scale up of microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of bioactive compounds from Orthosiphon stamineus using energy-based parameters such as absorbed power density and absorbed energy density (APD-AED) and response surface methodology (RSM). The intensive optimum conditions of MAE obtained at 80% EtOH, 50mL/g, APD of 0.35W/mL, AED of 250J/mL can be used to determine the optimum conditions of the scale-dependent parameters i.e. microwave power and treatment time at various extraction scales (100-300mL solvent loading). The yields of the up scaled conditions were consistent with less than 8% discrepancy and they were about 91-98% of the Soxhlet extraction yield. By adapting APD-AED method in the case of UAE, the intensive optimum conditions of the extraction, i.e. 70% EtOH, 30mL/g, APD of 0.22W/mL, AED of 450J/mL are able to achieve similar scale up results.

  8. Scaling up as Catachresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The metaphor of scaling up is the wrong one to use for describing and prescribing educational change. Many of the strategies being employed to achieve scaling up are counter-productive: they conceive of practitioners as delivery agents or consumers, rather than as co-constructors of change. An approach to educational innovation based on the…

  9. Scaling up Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Richards, Evan; Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Ding, Lin; Beichner, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment for Undergraduate Programs) project was developed to implement reforms designed for small classes into large physics classes. Over 50 schools across the country, ranging from Wake Technical Community College to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have adopted it for classes of…

  10. Laboratory and scaled up evaluation of cis-permethrin applied as a new ultra low volume formulation against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Seccacini, Emilia; Masuh, Héctor; Licastro, Susana A; Zerba, Eduardo Nicolás

    2006-01-01

    Ultra low volume (ULV) aerial spraying is a common methodology for spatial treatments for Aedes aegypti (L.) control. Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that the cis isomer of permethrin has an excellent efficacy for vector control, in particular for Triatoma infestans. It was of interest to determine the efficacy of this pure isomer in a ULV water-based formulation for adult A. aegypti control, since both vectors usually are found together in South America. A method is presented to make a quick measure at laboratory level of the knock down effect (KT50) of a new EC water-based formulation of cis-permethrin, in a small Peet Grady chamber of 0.34 m3, with a specially designed glass sprayer. A deltamethrin standard ULV formulation "CISLIN" was used for comparison. cis-Permethrin showed a significantly lower KT50 value than deltamethrin (7.50 and 9.65 min, respectively). When the mosquitoes were introduced into the chamber 10 min after spraying KT50 values were almost equal (15.59 and 15.88 min, respectively). In scaled up bioassays the ULV formulation of cis-permethrin showed 100% mortality of A. aegypti adult mosquitoes at the beginning of the treatment (t=0) and some mortality at 1h post treatment of freshly introduced mosquitoes. It was concluded that cis-permethrin could be an excellent tool for control of A. aegypti and other vectors of medical importance, with fewer side effects and better cost-effectiveness than with the cyanopyrethroids.

  11. Scale up of large ALON windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Kashalikar, Uday; Foti, Robyn; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet has established a robust manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, and ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in our production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for larger sizes and higher quantities, is currently underway. ALON® transparent armor represents the state of the art in protection against armor piercing threats, offering a factor of two in weight and thickness savings over conventional glass laminates. Tiled and monolithic windows have been successfully produced and tested against a range of threats. Large ALON® window are also of interest to a range of visible to Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor applications. These applications often have stressing imaging requirements which in turn require that these large windows have optical characteristics including excellent homogeneity of index of refraction and very low stress birefringence. Surmet is currently scaling up its production facility to be able to make and deliver ALON® monolithic windows as large as ~19x36-in. Additionally, Surmet has plans to scale up to windows ~3ftx3ft in size in the coming years. Recent results with scale up and characterization of the resulting blanks will be presented.

  12. The SCALE-UP Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) project was developed nearly 20 years ago as an economical way to provide collaborative, interactive instruction even for large enrollment classes. Nearly all research-based pedagogies have been designed with fairly high faculty-student ratios. The economics of introductory courses at large universities often precludes that situation, so SCALE-UP was created as a way to facilitate highly collaborative active learning with large numbers of students served by only a few faculty and assistants. It enables those students to learn and succeed not only in acquiring content, but also to practice important 21st century skills like problem solving, communication, and teamsmanship. The approach was initially targeted at undergraduate science and engineering students taking introductory physics courses in large enrollment sections. It has since expanded to multiple content areas, including chemistry, math, engineering, biology, business, nursing, and even the humanities. Class sizes range from 24 to over 600. Data collected from multiple sites around the world indicates highly successful implementation at more than 250 institutions. NSF support was critical for initial development and dissemination efforts. Generously supported by NSF (9752313, 9981107) and FIPSE (P116B971905, P116B000659).

  13. Scaling up Strategies for Change: Change in Formative Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Truus; Feijs, Els

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses some of the results of the CATCH (Classroom Assessment as a basis for Teacher Change) project. CATCH was meant to develop, apply and scale up a professional development programme designed to change teachers' instruction by helping them change their formative assessment practices. The authors focus on the analysis of three…

  14. Diagnostic technique applied for FEL electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, O.; Grebentsov, A.; Morozov, N.; Syresin, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic technique applied for FEL ultrashort electron bunches is developed at JINR-DESY collaboration within the framework of the FLASH and XFEL projects. Photon diagnostics are based on calorimetric measurements and detection of undulator radiation. The infrared undulator constructed at JINR and installed at FLASH is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements and for two-color lasing provided by the FIR and VUV undulators. The pump probe experiments with VUV and FIR undulators provide the bunch profile measurements with resolution of several femtosecond. The new three microchannel plates (MCP) detectors operated in X-ray range are under development now in JINR for SASE1-SASE 3 European XFEL.

  15. Flash Diffusivity Technique Applied to Individual Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Yowell, Leonard; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the flash diffusivity technique has been devised for determining the thermal diffusivities, and thus the thermal conductivities, of individual aligned fibers. The technique is intended especially for application to nanocomposite fibers, made from narrower fibers of polyphenylene benzobisthiazole (PBZT) and carbon nanotubes. These highly aligned nanocomposite fibers could exploit the high thermal conductivities of carbon nanotubes for thermal-management applications. In the flash diffusivity technique as practiced heretofore, one or more heat pulse(s) is (are) applied to the front face of a plate or disk material specimen and the resulting time-varying temperature on the rear face is measured. Usually, the heat pulse is generated by use of a xenon flash lamp, and the variation of temperature on the rear face is measured by use of an infrared detector. The flash energy is made large enough to produce a usefully high temperature rise on the rear face, but not so large as to significantly alter the specimen material. Once the measurement has been completed, the thermal diffusivity of the specimen is computed from the thickness of the specimen and the time dependence of the temperature variation on the rear face. Heretofore, the infrared detector used in the flash diffusivity technique has been a single-point detector, which responds to a spatial average of the thermal radiation from the rear specimen surface. Such a detector cannot distinguish among regions of differing diffusivity within the specimen. Moreover, two basic assumptions of the thermaldiffusivity technique as practiced heretofore are that the specimen is homogeneous and that heat flows one-dimensionally from the front to the rear face. These assumptions are not valid for an inhomogeneous (composite) material.

  16. Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

    2009-03-09

    The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite

  17. "Scaling Up" Good Practices in Girls' Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanian, Ramya

    2005-01-01

    This publication focuses on strategies for meeting international targets and national goals for universalizing girls' access to, retention in and completion of quality education. This will be done through "scaling up" successful interventions, or components of interventions that can be replicated. UNESCO published this book within the…

  18. Lessons Learned on "Scaling Up" of Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Having developed a technology-based teaching unit on weather that appeared to work well for middle school students, Nancy Butler Songer and her colleagues at the University of Michigan decided in the late 1990s to take the next logical step in their research program: They scaled up. This article discusses lessons learned by several faculty…

  19. Scaling up: Distributed machine learning with cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Machine-learning methods are becoming increasingly popular for automated data analysis. However, standard methods do not scale up to massive scientific and business data sets without expensive hardware. This paper investigates a practical alternative for scaling up: the use of distributed processing to take advantage of the often dormant PCs and workstations available on local networks. Each workstation runs a common rule-learning program on a subset of the data. We first show that for commonly used rule-evaluation criteria, a simple form of cooperation can guarantee that a rule will look good to the set of cooperating learners if and only if it would look good to a single learner operating with the entire data set. We then show how such a system can further capitalize on different perspectives by sharing learned knowledge for significant reduction in search effort. We demonstrate the power of the method by learning from a massive data set taken from the domain of cellular fraud detection. Finally, we provide an overview of other methods for scaling up machine learning.

  20. Magnetic Analysis Techniques Applied to Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Desert varnish is a black or reddish coating commonly found on rock samples from arid regions. Typically, the coating is very thin, less than half a millimeter thick. Previous research has shown that the primary components of desert varnish are silicon oxide clay minerals (60%), manganese and iron oxides (20-30%), and trace amounts of other compounds [1]. Desert varnish is thought to originate when windborne particles containing iron and manganese oxides are deposited onto rock surfaces where manganese oxidizing bacteria concentrate the manganese and form the varnish [4,5]. If desert varnish is indeed biogenic, then the presence of desert varnish on rock surfaces could serve as a biomarker, indicating the presence of microorganisms. This idea has considerable appeal, especially for Martian exploration [6]. Magnetic analysis techniques have not been extensively applied to desert varnish. The only previous magnetic study reported that based on room temperature demagnetization experiments, there were noticeable differences in magnetic properties between a sample of desert varnish and the substrate sandstone [7]. Based upon the results of the demagnetization experiments, the authors concluded that the primary magnetic component of desert varnish was either magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite ( Fe2O3).

  1. Scaling up complex interventions: insights from a realist synthesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Stockton, Lisa; Abramowicz, Aneta; Zummach, Dana; Wong, Geoff; Robinson, Kerry L; Best, Allan

    2016-12-19

    legislation, or agreements with new funding partners.This synthesis applies and advances theory, realist methods and the practice of scaling up complex interventions. Practitioners may benefit from a number of coordinated efforts, including conducting or commissioning evaluations at strategic moments, mobilising local and political support through relevant partnerships, and promoting ongoing knowledge exchange in peer learning networks. Action research studies guided by these findings, and studies on knowledge translation for realist syntheses are promising future directions.

  2. Scale up of proteoliposome derived Cochleate production.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Caridad; Bracho, Gustavo; Lastre, Miriam; González, Domingo; Gil, Danay; Acevedo, Reinaldo; del Campo, Judith; Taboada, Carlos; Solís, Rosa L; Barberá, Ramón; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Cochleate are highly stable structures with promising immunological features. Cochleate structures are usually obtaining from commercial lipids. Proteoliposome derived Cochleate are derived from an outer membrane vesicles of Neisseria meningitidis B. Previously, we obtained Cochleates using dialysis procedures. In order to increase the production process, we used a crossflow system (CFS) that allows easy scale up to obtain large batches in an aseptic environment. The raw material and solutions used in the production process are already approved for human application. This work demonstrates that CFS is very efficient process to obtain Cochleate structures with a yield of more than 80% and the immunogenicity comparable to that obtained by dialysis membrane.

  3. Applying Mixed Methods Techniques in Strategic Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    In its most basic form, strategic planning is a process of anticipating change, identifying new opportunities, and executing strategy. The use of mixed methods, blending quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques and data, in the process of assembling a strategic plan can help to ensure a successful outcome. In this article, the author…

  4. Applying Nonverbal Techniques to Organizational Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubbs, Stewart L.; Koske, W. Cary

    Ongoing research programs conducted at General Motors Institute are motivated by the practical objective of improving the company's organizational effectiveness. Computer technology is being used whenever possible; for example, a technique developed by Herman Chernoff was used to process data from a survey of employee attitudes into 18 different…

  5. Applying Cryopreservation Techniques to Diverse Biological Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing new cryopreservation protocols for each new plant or tissue is time consuming and often unnecessary. Existing standard protocols can be applied to many plants resulting in moderate to excellent results or protocols may require only a few changes for optimum recovery of plants. Protocols ...

  6. Neural networks techniques applied to reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, M.; Barragan, C.

    1995-12-31

    Neural Networks are considered the greatest technological advance since the transistor. They are expected to be a common household item by the year 2000. An attempt to apply Neural Networks to an important geothermal problem has been made, predictions on the well production and well completion during drilling in a geothermal field. This was done in Los Humeros geothermal field, using two common types of Neural Network models, available in commercial software. Results show the learning capacity of the developed model, and its precision in the predictions that were made.

  7. Scale-up of hollow fiber extractors

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, A.F.; Fair, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a commercial-scale hollow fiber extraction system was investigated by the Separations Research Program (SRP) at the University of Texas at Austin. In this work, hexanol was extracted from water into octanol using a large-scale extraction/distillation system. In the membrane extractor studies, the octanol-rich phase was fed on the tube-side while in the packed column studies, the octanol-rich phase was chosen as the dispersed phase. This chemical system was selected because of its high solute distribution coefficient. As a result, the required solvent to feed ratio was low which creates hydraulic problems for conventional dispersive extractors such as the packed column. Under identical operating conditions, the mass transfer performance of the hollow fiber extractor compared favorably with that of a commercial-scale type 2 structured packing. A height equivalent to a theoretical stage (HETS) of 1.5 meters was obtained with the membrane extractor as compared to 15 meters for the type 2 structured packing. A staged hollow fiber extraction mass transfer model for scale-up was developed and found to agree with data obtained in this work and with data obtained earlier using the n-butanol/succinic acid/water system.

  8. Scaling Up Decision Theoretic Planning to Planetary Rover Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Dearden, Richard; Washington, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Because of communication limits, planetary rovers must operate autonomously during consequent durations. The ability to plan under uncertainty is one of the main components of autonomy. Previous approaches to planning under uncertainty in NASA applications are not able to address the challenges of future missions, because of several apparent limits. On another side, decision theory provides a solid principle framework for reasoning about uncertainty and rewards. Unfortunately, there are several obstacles to a direct application of decision-theoretic techniques to the rover domain. This paper focuses on the issues of structure and concurrency, and continuous state variables. We describes two techniques currently under development that address specifically these issues and allow scaling-up decision theoretic solution techniques to planetary rover planning problems involving a small number of goals.

  9. Scale-up in microwave-accelerated organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-assisted organic chemistry has received strong exposure in the literature over the last decade, and nowadays more and more research chemists are successfully applying microwave technology to organic reactions on a small scale. However, the efficient application of this technology to cover the specific needs of larger-scale preparations, e.g., in a kilo lab, remains to be shown. We therefore initiated a study to investigate the scalability of microwave technology. Two different microwave systems designed for large-scale operation were evaluated in order to characterize strengths and weaknesses of each instrument with regard to scale-up. Special focus was directed on temperature/pressure limits, handling of suspensions, ability to rapidly heat and cool, robustness, and overall processing time. Based on the results of this study, a batch microwave reactor with a reaction volume of approximately 1.1 1 was purchased and installed in the kilo lab. Several reactions have been performed successfully on a 50- to 100-g scale in our laboratory, showing that a scale-up from a 15 ml scale to a 1-1 scale is feasible. In general, a significant reduction of reaction time was achievable, in some cases yields and selectivity were also improved. Nevertheless, a major weakness of the available systems is the limited vessel size, which is, in most cases, far below a suitable reaction volume required for work in a kilo lab.

  10. Applying knowledge compilation techniques to model-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers in the area of knowledge compilation are developing general purpose techniques for improving the efficiency of knowledge-based systems. In this article, an attempt is made to define knowledge compilation, to characterize several classes of knowledge compilation techniques, and to illustrate how some of these techniques can be applied to improve the performance of model-based reasoning systems.

  11. Scale-up of ecological experiments: Density variation in the mobile bivalve Macomona liliana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Davod C.; Walters, R.; Thrush, S.; Dayton, P.

    1997-01-01

    At present the problem of scaling up from controlled experiments (necessarily at a small spatial scale) to questions of regional or global importance is perhaps the most pressing issue in ecology. Most of the proposed techniques recommend iterative cycling between theory and experiment. We present a graphical technique that facilitates this cycling by allowing the scope of experiments, surveys, and natural history observations to be compared to the scope of models and theory. We apply the scope analysis to the problem of understanding the population dynamics of a bivalve exposed to environmental stress at the scale of a harbour. Previous lab and field experiments were found not to be 1:1 scale models of harbour-wide processes. Scope analysis allowed small scale experiments to be linked to larger scale surveys and to a spatially explicit model of population dynamics.

  12. Accounting for the cost of scaling-up health interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Benjamin; Baltussen, Rob

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies such as the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health have highlighted the need for expanding the coverage of services for HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, immunisations and other diseases. In order for policy makers to plan for these changes, they need to analyse the change in costs when interventions are 'scaled-up' to cover greater percentages of the population. Previous studies suggest that applying current unit costs to an entire population can misconstrue the true costs of an intervention. This study presents the methodology used in WHO-CHOICE's generalised cost effectiveness analysis, which includes non-linear cost functions for health centres, transportation and supervision costs, as well as the presence of fixed costs of establishing a health infrastructure. Results show changing marginal costs as predicted by economic theory.

  13. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and proteomic techniques applied to reproductive biology
    John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Tria...

  14. A guide to scaling up population health interventions.

    PubMed

    Milat, Andrew J; Newson, Robyn; King, Lesley; Rissel, Chris; Wolfenden, Luke; Bauman, Adrian; Redman, Sally; Giffin, Michael

    2016-01-28

    The 'how to' of scaling up public health interventions for maximum reach and outcomes is receiving greater attention; however, there remains a paucity of practical tools to guide those actively involved in scaling up processes in high-income countries. To fill this gap, the New South Wales Ministry of Health developed Increasing the scale of population health interventions: a guide (2014). The guide was informed by a systematic review of scaling up models and methods, and a two-round Delphi process with a sample of senior policy makers, practitioners and researchers actively involved in scaling up processes. Although it is a practical guide to assist health policy makers, health practitioners and others responsible for scaling up effective population health interventions, it can also be used by researchers in the design of research studies that are potentially suitable for scaling up, particularly where research-practice collaborations are involved. The guide is divided into four steps: step 1, 'scalability assessment', aims to determine if an intervention is scalable; step 2, 'developing a scale up plan', aims to develop a practical and workable scaling up plan that can be used to convince stakeholders there is a compelling case for action. Step 3, 'preparing for scale up', aims to identify ways of securing resources needed for going to scale, operating at scale, and building a foundation of legitimacy and support to sustain the scaling up effort through the implementation stage; and step 4, 'scaling up the intervention', involves putting the plan developed in step 2 into place. Although the guide is written as though the user is starting from the point of assessing the scalability of an intervention, later steps can be used by those already involved in scaling up to review their implementation processes. The guide is not intended to be prescriptive. Its purpose is to help policy makers, practitioners, researchers and other decision makers decide on appropriate

  15. Understanding pathways for scaling up health services through the lens of complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Paina, Ligia; Peters, David H

    2012-08-01

    Despite increased prominence and funding of global health initiatives, efforts to scale up health services in developing countries are falling short of the expectations of the Millennium Development Goals. Arguing that the dominant assumptions for scaling up are inadequate, we propose that interpreting change in health systems through the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS) provides better models of pathways for scaling up. Based on an understanding of CAS behaviours, we describe how phenomena such as path dependence, feedback loops, scale-free networks, emergent behaviour and phase transitions can uncover relevant lessons for the design and implementation of health policy and programmes in the context of scaling up health services. The implications include paying more attention to local context, incentives and institutions, as well as anticipating certain types of unintended consequences that can undermine scaling up efforts, and developing and implementing programmes that engage key actors through transparent use of data for ongoing problem-solving and adaptation. We propose that future efforts to scale up should adapt and apply the models and methodologies which have been used in other fields that study CAS, yet are underused in public health. This can help policy makers, planners, implementers and researchers to explore different and innovative approaches for reaching populations in need with effective, equitable and efficient health services. The old assumptions have led to disappointed expectations about how to scale up health services, and offer little insight on how to scale up effective interventions in the future. The alternative perspectives offered by CAS may better reflect the complex and changing nature of health systems, and create new opportunities for understanding and scaling up health services.

  16. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  17. Scale Up in Education. Volume 1: Ideas in Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barbara Ed.; McDonald, Sarah-Kathryn Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Scale Up in Education, Volume 1: Ideas in Principle" examines the challenges of "scaling up" from a multidisciplinary perspective. It brings together contributions from disciplines that routinely take promising innovations to scale, including medicine, business, engineering, computing, and education. Together the contributors explore appropriate…

  18. Readiness for Change. Scaling-Up Brief. Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixsen, Dean L.; Blase, Karen A.; Horner, Rob; Sugai, George

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this "Brief" is to define the variables a state or large district leadership team may wish to consider as they determine if they are "ready" to invest in the scaling-up of an innovation in education. As defined here, "scaling up" means that at least 60% of the students who could benefit from an innovation have access to that…

  19. Multisite Studies and Scaling up in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A scale-up study in education typically expands the sample of students, schools, districts, and/or practices or materials used in smaller studies in ways that build in heterogeneity. Yet surprisingly little is known about the factors that promote successful scaling up efforts in education, in large part due to the absence of empirically supported…

  20. Scaling up depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA): a systematic literature review illustrating the AIDED model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), often known by the brand name Depo-Provera, has increased globally, particularly in multiple low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). As a reproductive health technology that has scaled up in diverse contexts, DMPA is an exemplar product innovation with which to illustrate the utility of the AIDED model for scaling up family health innovations. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the enabling factors and barriers to scaling up DMPA use in LMICs. We searched 11 electronic databases for academic literature published through January 2013 (n = 284 articles), and grey literature from major health organizations. We applied exclusion criteria to identify relevant articles from peer-reviewed (n = 10) and grey literature (n = 9), extracting data on scale up of DMPA in 13 countries. We then mapped the resulting factors to the five AIDED model components: ASSESS, INNOVATE, DEVELOP, ENGAGE, and DEVOLVE. Results The final sample of sources included studies representing variation in geographies and methodologies. We identified 15 enabling factors and 10 barriers to dissemination, diffusion, scale up, and/or sustainability of DMPA use. The greatest number of factors were mapped to the ASSESS, DEVELOP, and ENGAGE components. Conclusions Findings offer early empirical support for the AIDED model, and provide insights into scale up of DMPA that may be relevant for other family planning product innovations. PMID:23915274

  1. Light deviation based optical techniques applied to solid propellant combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.; Eradès, C.; Desse, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    The Investigation in Combustion of Energetic Materials (InCoME) program is aimed at validating the numerical simulation of composite propellant combustion using nonintrusive optical techniques. The Focusing Schlieren Technique (FST) was selected; it allows catching light deviation from a thin vertical planar section centered above the propellant combustion surface. The optical system is described in the paper. Significant results are presented showing the capabilities of this technique when applied to solid propellant combustion in terms of studying flame structure, flame propagation, and particle tracking.

  2. Signal processing applied to photothermal techniques for materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need to make noncontact measurements of material characteristics in the microgravity environment. Photothermal and photoacoustics techniques offer one approach for attaining this capability since lasers can be used to generate the required thermal or acoustic signals. The perturbations in the materials that can be used for characterization can be detected by optical reflectance, infrared detection or laser detection of photoacoustics. However, some of these laser techniques have disadvantages of either high energy pulsed excitation or low signal-to-noise ratio. Alternative signal processing techniques that have been developed can be applied to photothermal or photoacoustic instrumentation. One fully coherent spread spectrum signal processing technique is called time delay spectrometry (TDS). With TDS the system is excited using a combined frequency-time domain by employing a linear frequency sweep excitation function. The processed received signal can provide either frequency, phase or improved time resolution. This signal processing technique was shown to outperform other time selective techniques with respect to noise rejection and was recently applied to photothermal instrumentation. The technique yields the mathematical equivalent of pulses yet the input irradiances are orders of magnitude less than pulses with the concomitant reduction in perturbation of the sample and can increase the capability of photothermal methods for materials characterization.

  3. Applying DEA Technique to Library Evaluation in Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik

    2003-01-01

    This study applied an analytical technique called Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to calculate the relative technical efficiency of 95 academic research libraries, all members of the Association of Research Libraries. DEA, with the proper model of library inputs and outputs, can reveal best practices in the peer groups, as well as the technical…

  4. Distributed machine learning: Scaling up with coarse-grained parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    Machine teaming methods are becoming accepted as additions to the biologist`s data-analysis tool kit. However, scaling these techniques up to large data sets, such as those in biological and medical domains, is problematic in terms of both the required computational search effort and required memory (and the detrimental effects of excessive swapping). Our approach to tackling the problem of scaling up to large datasets is to take advantage of the ubiquitous workstation networks that are generally available in scientific and engineering environments. This paper introduces the notion of the invariant-partitioning property--that for certain evaluation criteria it is possible to partition a data set across multiple processors such that any rule that is satisfactory over the entire data set will also be satisfactory on at least one subset. In addition, by taking advantage of cooperation through interprocess communication, it is possible to build distributed learning algorithms such that only rules that are satisfactory over the entire data set will be learned. We describe a distributed learning system, CorPRL, that takes advantage of the invariant-partitioning property to learn from very large data sets, and present results demonstrating CorPRL`s effectiveness in analyzing data from two databases.

  5. Digital image correlation techniques applied to LANDSAT multispectral imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrud, L. O. (Principal Investigator); Miller, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Automatic image registration and resampling techniques applied to LANDSAT data achieved accuracies, resulting in mean radial displacement errors of less than 0.2 pixel. The process method utilized recursive computational techniques and line-by-line updating on the basis of feedback error signals. Goodness of local feature matching was evaluated through the implementation of a correlation algorithm. An automatic restart allowed the system to derive control point coordinates over a portion of the image and to restart the process, utilizing this new control point information as initial estimates.

  6. An overview of statistical decomposition techniques applied to complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Yalcin; Tanik, Murat M.; Allison, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The current state of the art in applied decomposition techniques is summarized within a comparative uniform framework. These techniques are classified by the parametric or information theoretic approaches they adopt. An underlying structural model common to all parametric approaches is outlined. The nature and premises of a typical information theoretic approach are stressed. Some possible application patterns for an information theoretic approach are illustrated. Composition is distinguished from decomposition by pointing out that the former is not a simple reversal of the latter. From the standpoint of application to complex systems, a general evaluation is provided. PMID:19724659

  7. Sensor Data Qualification Technique Applied to Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies a previously developed sensor data qualification technique to a commercial aircraft engine simulation known as the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (C-MAPSS40k). The sensor data qualification technique is designed to detect, isolate, and accommodate faulty sensor measurements. It features sensor networks, which group various sensors together and relies on an empirically derived analytical model to relate the sensor measurements. Relationships between all member sensors of the network are analyzed to detect and isolate any faulty sensor within the network.

  8. A new scale-up approach for dispersive mixing in twin-screw compounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Graeme; Bigio, David I.; Andersen, Paul; Wetzel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Scale-up rules in polymer processing are critical in ensuring consistency in product quality and properties when transitioning from low volume laboratory mixing processes to high volume industrial compounding. The scale-up approach investigated in this study evaluates the processes with respect to dispersive mixing. Demand of polymer composites with solid additives, such as carbon microfibers and nanotubes, has become increasingly popular. Dispersive mixing breaks down particles that agglomerate, which is paramount in processing composites because solid additives tend to collect and clump. The amount of stress imparted on the material governs the degree of dispersive mixing. A methodology has been developed to characterize the Residence Stress Distribution (RSD) within a twin-screw extruder in real time through the use of polymeric stress beads. Through this technique, certain mixing scale-up rules can be analyzed. The following research investigated two different scale-up rules. The industry standard for mixing scale-up takes the ratio of outer diameters cubed to convert the volumetric flow rate from the smaller process to a flow rate appropriate in the larger machine. This procedure then resolves both operating conditions since shear rate remains constant. The second rule studied is based on percent drag flow, or the fraction of pumping potential, for different elements along the screw configuration. The percent drag flow rule aims to bring greater focus to operating conditions when scaling-up with respect to dispersive mixing. Through the use of the RSD methodology and a Design of Experiment (DOE) approach, rigorous statistical analysis was used to determine the validity between the scale-up rules of argument.

  9. Applying data mining techniques to detect abnormal flight characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslaner, H. E.; Unal, Cagri; Iyigun, Cem

    2016-05-01

    This paper targets to highlight flight safety issues by applying data mining techniques to recorded flight data and proactively detecting abnormalities in certain flight phases. For this purpose, a result oriented method is offered which facilitates the process of post flight data analysis. In the first part of the study, a common time period of flight is defined and critical flight parameters are selected to be analyzed. Then the similarities of the flight parameters in time series basis are calculated for each flight by using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) method. In the second part, hierarchical clustering technique is applied to the aggregate data matrix which is comprised of all the flights to be studied in terms of similarities among chosen parameters. Consequently, proximity levels among flight phases are determined. In the final part, an algorithm is constructed to distinguish outliers from clusters and classify them as suspicious flights.

  10. Diagonal ordering operation technique applied to Morse oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Dušan; Dong, Shi-Hai; Popov, Miodrag

    2015-11-15

    We generalize the technique called as the integration within a normally ordered product (IWOP) of operators referring to the creation and annihilation operators of the harmonic oscillator coherent states to a new operatorial approach, i.e. the diagonal ordering operation technique (DOOT) about the calculations connected with the normally ordered product of generalized creation and annihilation operators that generate the generalized hypergeometric coherent states. We apply this technique to the coherent states of the Morse oscillator including the mixed (thermal) state case and get the well-known results achieved by other methods in the corresponding coherent state representation. Also, in the last section we construct the coherent states for the continuous dynamics of the Morse oscillator by using two new methods: the discrete–continuous limit, respectively by solving a finite difference equation. Finally, we construct the coherent states corresponding to the whole Morse spectrum (discrete plus continuous) and demonstrate their properties according the Klauder’s prescriptions.

  11. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review.

  12. Scaling up breastfeeding programmes in a complex adaptive world.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Hall Moran, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Breastfeeding Lancet Series continues to provide unequivocal evidence regarding the numerous benefits that optimal breastfeeding practices offer to children and women worldwide and the major savings that improving these practices can have as a result of their major public health benefits. Unfortunately, this knowledge remains underutilized as there has been little progress scaling up effective breastfeeding programmes globally. Improving the uptake and scaling up of effective national breastfeeding programmes that are potent enough to improve exclusive breastfeeding duration should be a top priority for all countries. Complex analysis systems longitudinal research is needed to understand how best to empower decision makers to achieve this goal through well-validated participatory decision-making tools to help their countries assess baseline needs, including costs, as well as progress with their scaling-up efforts. Sound systems thinking frameworks and scaling-up models are now available to guide and research prospectively future scaling-up efforts that can be replicated, with proper adaptations, across countries.

  13. Scale-up of a pan-coating process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Turton, Richard; Joshi, Nitin; Hammerman, Elizabeth; Ergun, James

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a practical scale-up model for a solvent-based pan-coating process. Practical scale-up rules to determine the key parameters (pan load, pan speed, spray rate, air flow) required to control the process are proposed. The proposed scale-up rules are based on a macroscopic evaluation of the coating process. Implementation of these rules does not require complex experimentation or prediction of model parameters. The proposed scale-up rules were tested by conducting coating scale-up and scale-down experiments on 24-inch and 52-inch Vector Hi-coaters. The data demonstrate that using these rules led to similar cumulative drug release profiles (f2 > 50; and P Analysis of Variance [PANOVA] > 0.05 for cumulative percentage of drug released after 12 hours [Cum12]) from tablets made at 24- and 52-inch scales. Membrane characteristics such as opacity and roughness were also similar across the 2 scales. The effects of the key process variables on coat weight uniformity and membrane characteristics were also studied. Pan speed was found to be the most significant factor related to coating uniformity. Spray droplet size was found to affect the membrane roughness significantly, whereas opacity was affected by the drying capacity.

  14. Scaling Up Impact on Nutrition: What Will It Take?1234

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Stuart; Menon, Purnima; Kennedy, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Despite consensus on actions to improve nutrition globally, less is known about how to operationalize the right mix of actions—nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive—equitably, at scale, in different contexts. This review draws on a large scaling-up literature search and 4 case studies of large-scale nutrition programs with proven impact to synthesize critical elements for impact at scale. Nine elements emerged as central: 1) having a clear vision or goal for impact; 2) intervention characteristics; 3) an enabling organizational context for scaling up; 4) establishing drivers such as catalysts, champions, systemwide ownership, and incentives; 5) choosing contextually relevant strategies and pathways for scaling up, 6) building operational and strategic capacities; 7) ensuring adequacy, stability, and flexibility of financing; 8) ensuring adequate governance structures and systems; and 9) embedding mechanisms for monitoring, learning, and accountability. Translating current political commitment to large-scale impact on nutrition will require robust attention to these elements. PMID:26178028

  15. Brazilian meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: Scaling up studies.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata Chagas; de Souza, Iaralice Medeiros; da Silva, Milton Neto; Silva, Flavia de Paiva; Figueira, Elza Scott; Leal, Maria de Lurdes; Jessouroun, Ellen; da Silva, José Godinho; Medronho, Ricardo de Andrade; da Silveira, Ivna Alana Freitas Brasileiro

    2015-08-20

    Several outbreaks caused by Neisseria meningitidis group C have been occurred in different regions of Brazil. A conjugate vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis was produced by chemical linkage between periodate-oxidized meningococcal C polysaccharide and hydrazide-activated monomeric tetanus toxoid via a modified reductive amination conjugation method. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity tested in Phase I and II trials showed satisfactory results. Before starting Phase III trials, vaccine production was scaled up to obtain industrial lots under Good Manufacture Practices (GMP). Comparative analysis between data obtained from industrial and pilot scales of the meningococcal C conjugate bulk showed similar execution times in the scaling up production process without significant losses or alterations in the quality attributes of purified compounds. In conclusion, scale up was considered satisfactory and the Brazilian meningococcal conjugate vaccine production aiming to perform Phase III trials is feasible.

  16. Probabilistic Analysis Techniques Applied to Complex Spacecraft Power System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power system performance predictions are critical to spacecraft, such as the International Space Station (ISS), to ensure that sufficient power is available to support all the spacecraft s power needs. In the case of the ISS power system, analyses to date have been deterministic, meaning that each analysis produces a single-valued result for power capability because of the complexity and large size of the model. As a result, the deterministic ISS analyses did not account for the sensitivity of the power capability to uncertainties in model input variables. Over the last 10 years, the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed advanced, computationally fast, probabilistic analysis techniques and successfully applied them to large (thousands of nodes) complex structural analysis models. These same techniques were recently applied to large, complex ISS power system models. This new application enables probabilistic power analyses that account for input uncertainties and produce results that include variations caused by these uncertainties. Specifically, N&R Engineering, under contract to NASA, integrated these advanced probabilistic techniques with Glenn s internationally recognized ISS power system model, System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE).

  17. Optimisation of rosemary oil encapsulation in polycaprolactone and scale-up of the process.

    PubMed

    Ephrem, Elissa; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fessi, Hatem; Charcosset, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Rosemary essential oil (REO) has many biological activities, such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, cognition-enhancing, analgesic and antimicrobial activities. The aim of this study was to prepare, at laboratory scale and larger scale, nanoencapsulating REO in order to reduce its volatilisation, light sensitivity and to enhance its water solubility. The nanoprecipitation method was applied to prepare polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanocapsules loaded with REO at laboratory scale and then the optimal formulation obtained was scaled-up (×6) using the membrane contactor technique. The effect of several parameters, such as the evaporation method, the type of emulsifiers and the amount of the formulation products (PCL, REO, emulsifiers, etc.) on the REO-loaded nanocapsules properties (mean size, polydispersity index (PdI), zeta potential and REO loss) was evaluated at laboratory scale in order to obtain the optimal formulation. REO-loaded nanocapsules obtained from nanoprecipitation presented a nanometric mean size (220 ± 10 nm) with a PdI below 0.25, indicating an adequate homogeneity of the system, a negative zeta potential (-19.9 ± 4.6 mV) and a high encapsulation efficiency (∼99% for the major components). In addition, the membrane contactor technique gave similar results using an adequate pressure of the organic phase (0.8-1.2 bar). It is then suggested that the nanoprecipitation method can be suitable for the preparation of essential oil-loaded nanocapsules.

  18. Data Mining Techniques Applied to Hydrogen Lactose Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno-Chamorro, Isabel; Pontes-Balanza, Beatriz; Hernández-Mendoza, Yoedusvany; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the results of applying data mining techniques to hydrogen breath test data. Disposal of H2 gas is of utmost relevance to maintain efficient microbial fermentation processes. Objectives Analyze a set of data of hydrogen breath tests by use of data mining tools. Identify new patterns of H2 production. Methods Hydrogen breath tests data sets as well as k-means clustering as the data mining technique to a dataset of 2571 patients. Results Six different patterns have been extracted upon analysis of the hydrogen breath test data. We have also shown the relevance of each of the samples taken throughout the test. Conclusions Analysis of the hydrogen breath test data sets using data mining techniques has identified new patterns of hydrogen generation upon lactose absorption. We can see the potential of application of data mining techniques to clinical data sets. These results offer promising data for future research on the relations between gut microbiota produced hydrogen and its link to clinical symptoms. PMID:28125620

  19. Scaling-Up Successfully: Pathways to Replication for Educational NGOs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jowett, Alice; Dyer, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Non-government organisations (NGOs) are big players in international development, critical to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and constantly under pressure to "achieve more". Scaling-up their initiatives successfully and sustainably can be an efficient and cost effective way for NGOs to increase their impact across a…

  20. Sustaining and Scaling up the Impact of Professional Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehetmeier, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a crucial topic: which factors influence the sustainability and scale-up of a professional development programme's impact? Theoretical models and empirical findings from impact research (e.g. Zehetmeier and Krainer, "ZDM Int J Math" 43(6/7):875-887, 2011) and innovation research (e.g. Cobb and Smith,…

  1. New tuberculosis technologies: challenges for retooling and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Pai, M; Palamountain, K M

    2012-10-01

    The availability of new tools does not mean that they will be adopted, used correctly, scaled up or have public health impact. Experience to date with new diagnostics suggests that many national tuberculosis programmes (NTPs) in high-burden countries are reluctant to adopt and scale up new tools, even when these are backed by evidence and global policy recommendations. We suggest that there are several common barriers to effective national adoption and scale-up of new technologies: global policy recommendations that do not provide sufficient information for scale-up, complex decision-making processes and weak political commitment at the country level, limited engagement of and support to NTP managers, high cost of tools and poor fit with user needs, unregulated markets and inadequate business models, limited capacity for laboratory strengthening and implementation research, and insufficient advocacy and donor support. Overcoming these barriers will require enhanced country-level advocacy, resources, technical assistance and political commitment. Some of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries are emerging as early adopters of policies and technologies, and are increasing their investments in TB control. They may provide the first opportunities to fully assess the public health impact of new tools.

  2. Lessons from a Scale-Up of Residentially Linked Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Jeffrey S.; Patch, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One form of learning community involves students taking a shared academic course while living together. At Elon University between 2011 and 2015, in a partnership between academic and student life portions of the university, this form of learning community was scaled up to include more than half of first-year students in the fall semester. Each…

  3. Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jenny Perlman; Winthrop, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    "Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries" tells the story of where and how quality education has scaled in low- and middle-income countries. The story emerges from wide-ranging research on scaling and learning, including 14 in-depth case studies from around the globe. Ultimately, "Millions…

  4. Three Collaborative Models for Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosemarie; Jones, Helen; Marsenich, Lynne; Sosna, Todd; Price, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes three models of research-practice collaboration to scale-up evidence-based practices (EBP): (1) the Rolling Cohort model in England, (2) the Cascading Dissemination model in San Diego County, and (3) the Community Development Team model in 53 California and Ohio counties. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) and KEEP are the focal evidence-based practices that are designed to improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health systems. The three scale-up models each originated from collaboration between community partners and researchers with the shared goal of wide-spread implementation and sustainability of MTFC/KEEP. The three models were implemented in a variety of contexts; Rolling Cohort was implemented nationally, Cascading Dissemination was implemented within one county, and Community Development Team was targeted at the state level. The current paper presents an overview of the development of each model, the policy frameworks in which they are embedded, system challenges encountered during scale-up, and lessons learned. Common elements of successful scale-up efforts, barriers to success, factors relating to enduring practice relationships, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21484449

  5. Charter Operators Spell Out Barriers to "Scaling Up"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    The pace at which the highest-performing charter-management organizations (CMOs) are "scaling up" is being determined largely by how rapidly they can develop and hire strong leaders and acquire physical space, and by the level of support they receive for growth from city or state policies, say leaders from some charter organizations…

  6. Collaborative Group Learning using the SCALE-UP Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    The time-honored conventional lecture (``teaching by telling'') has been shown to be an ineffective mode of instruction for science classes. In these cases, where the enhancement of critical thinking skills and the development of problem-solving abilities are emphasized, collaborative group learning environments have proven to be far more effective. In addition, students naturally improve their teamwork skills through the close interaction they have with their group members. Early work on the Studio Physics model at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the mid-1990's was extended to large classes via the SCALE-UP model pioneered at North Carolina State University a few years later. In SCALE-UP, students sit at large round tables in three groups of three --- in this configuration, they carry out a variety of pencil/paper exercises (ponderables) using small whiteboards and perform hands-on activities like demos and labs (tangibles) throughout the class period. They also work on computer simulations using a shared laptop for each group of three. Formal lecture is reduced to a minimal level and the instructor serves more as a ``coach'' to facilitate the academic ``drills'' that the students are working on. Since its inception in 1997, the SCALE-UP pedagogical approach has been adopted by over 100 institutions across the country and about 20 more around the world. In this talk, I will present an overview of the SCALE-UP concept and I will outline the details of its deployment at George Washington University over the past 4 years. I will also discuss empirical data from assessments given to the SCALE-UP collaborative classes and the regular lecture classes at GWU in order to make a comparative study of the effectiveness of the two methodologies.

  7. Hyperspectral-imaging-based techniques applied to wheat kernels characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Cesare, Daniela; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Single kernels of durum wheat have been analyzed by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Such an approach is based on the utilization of an integrated hardware and software architecture able to digitally capture and handle spectra as an image sequence, as they results along a pre-defined alignment on a surface sample properly energized. The study was addressed to investigate the possibility to apply HSI techniques for classification of different types of wheat kernels: vitreous, yellow berry and fusarium-damaged. Reflectance spectra of selected wheat kernels of the three typologies have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with an HSI system working in near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The hypercubes were analyzed applying principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the high dimensionality of data and for selecting some effective wavelengths. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied for classification of the three wheat typologies. The study demonstrated that good classification results were obtained not only considering the entire investigated wavelength range, but also selecting only four optimal wavelengths (1104, 1384, 1454 and 1650 nm) out of 121. The developed procedures based on HSI can be utilized for quality control purposes or for the definition of innovative sorting logics of wheat.

  8. Scale up services for mental disorders: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, D; Flisher, A J; Lund, C; Patel, V; Saxena, S; Thornicroft, G; Tomlinson, M

    2007-10-06

    We call for the global health community, governments, donors, multilateral agencies, and other mental health stakeholders, such as professional bodies and consumer groups, to scale up the coverage of services for mental disorders in all countries, but especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We argue that a basic, evidence-based package of services for core mental disorders should be scaled up, and that protection of the human rights of people with mental disorders and their families should be strengthened. Three questions are critical to the scaling-up process. What resources are needed? How can progress towards these goals be monitored? What should be the priorities for mental health research? To address these questions, we first estimated that the amount needed to provide services on the necessary scale would be US$2 per person per year in low-income countries and $3-4 in lower middle-income countries, which is modest compared with the requirements for scaling-up of services for other major contributors to the global burden of disease. Second, we identified a series of core and secondary indicators to track the progress that countries make toward achievement of mental health goals; many of these indicators are already routinely monitored in many countries. Third, we did a priority-setting exercise to identify gaps in the evidence base in global mental health for four categories of mental disorders. We show that funding should be given to research that develops and assesses interventions that can be delivered by people who are not mental health professionals, and that assesses how health systems can scale up such interventions across all routine-care settings. We discuss strategies to overcome the five main barriers to scaling-up of services for mental disorders; one major strategy will be sustained advocacy by diverse stakeholders, especially to target multilateral agencies, donors, and governments. This Series has provided the evidence for advocacy

  9. Vibration Monitoring Techniques Applied to Detect Damage in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2002-01-01

    Rotor health monitoring and online damage detection are increasingly gaining the interest of the manufacturers of aircraft engines. This is primarily due to the need for improved safety during operation as well as the need for lower maintenance costs. Applied techniques for detecting damage in and monitoring the health of rotors are essential for engine safety, reliability, and life prediction. The goals of engine safety are addressed within the NASA-sponsored Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). AvSP provides research and technology products needed to help the Federal Aviation Administration and the aerospace industry improve aviation safety. The Nondestructive Evaluation Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center is addressing propulsion health management and the development of propulsion-system-specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe.

  10. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a domain theory''), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  11. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W. . Dept. of Computer Sciences); Noordewier, M.O. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1992-01-01

    We are primarily developing a machine teaming (ML) system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being teamed. Using this information, our teaming algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, our KBANN algorithm maps inference rules about a given recognition task into a neural network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples to refine these inference rules. We call these rules a domain theory, following the convention in the machine teaming community. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis. In addition, we have been extending the capabilities of our teaming system along several dimensions. We have also been investigating parallel algorithms that perform sequence alignments in the presence of frameshift errors.

  12. Extrapolation techniques applied to matrix methods in neutron diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccready, Robert R

    1956-01-01

    A general matrix method is developed for the solution of characteristic-value problems of the type arising in many physical applications. The scheme employed is essentially that of Gauss and Seidel with appropriate modifications needed to make it applicable to characteristic-value problems. An iterative procedure produces a sequence of estimates to the answer; and extrapolation techniques, based upon previous behavior of iterants, are utilized in speeding convergence. Theoretically sound limits are placed on the magnitude of the extrapolation that may be tolerated. This matrix method is applied to the problem of finding criticality and neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron-diffusion equations is treated. Results for this example are indicated.

  13. Scaling up adsorption media reactors for copper removal with the aid of dimensionless numbers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption media may be used to sorb copper in an aquatic environment for pollution control. Effective design of adsorption media reactors is highly dependent on selection of the hydraulic residence time when scaling up a pilot-scale reactor to a field-scale reactor. This paper seeks to improve scaling-up technique of the reactor design process through the use of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers via a dimensional analysis. A new scaling-up theory is developed in this study through a joint consideration of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers for a constant media particle size such that a balance between transport control and reaction control can be harmonized. A series of column breakthrough tests at varying hydraulic residence times revealed a clear peak adsorption capacity at a Damköhler number of 2.74. The Péclet numbers for the column breakthrough tests indicated that mechanical dispersion is an important effect that requires further consideration in the scaling-up process. However, perfect similitude of the Damköhler number cannot be maintained for a constant media particle size, and relaxation of hydrodynamic similitude through variation of the Péclet number must occur.

  14. High-throughput screening and scale-up of cocrystals using resonant acoustic mixing.

    PubMed

    Nagapudi, Karthik; Umanzor, Evelyn Yanez; Masui, Colin

    2017-02-14

    This paper explores the effectiveness of resonant acoustic mixing RAM for screening and scale up of cocrystals. 16 cocrystal systems were selected as test cases based on previous literature precedent. A 96 well plate set up in conjunction with zirconia beads was used for cocrystal screening using RAM. A success rate of 80% was obtained in the screen for plates containing solvent or solvent plus Zirconia beads. A proof of concept production of hydrated and anhydrous cocrystals of 1:1 Theophylline Citric acid system at a 400mg scale was demonstrated using solvent and bead assisted RAM. Finally the parameters affecting the scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals was explored in a systematic fashion using a Design of Experiments DOE approach. The RAM parameters of acceleration and mixing time were optimized using the DOE approach. A quantitative XRPD method was developed to determine the extent of conversion to the cocrystal when using RAM Mixing time of 2h and an acceleration of 60G were determined to be optimal. The optimized parameters were used to demonstrate scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals at an 80 gram scale with a net yield of 94%. RAM is thus established as an environmentally friendly mechanochemical technique for both high throughput screening and scaled up production of cocrystals.

  15. Considerations for Scale-Up of Ferronickel Electric Smelting Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundermark, R. J.; Nelson, L. R.

    2017-02-01

    In ferronickel smelting, the selective carbothermic reduction of calcined nickel laterite ores in large electric furnaces yields a crude ferronickel product. The optimal process for nickel laterite smelting requires a fine balance between the metallurgical requirements of the process (feed composition, nickel recovery, energy consumption, product quality) and the capabilities of the feeding, tapping and off-gas systems, and especially of the furnace crucible and electrical system. The scale-up of nickel laterite smelting operations over the last 50 years has seen a tenfold increase in furnace power input. Furnace operations within the industry are examined to identify common trends and some new metrics are proposed which incorporate the combination of electrode power densities and the impact of alloy nickel grade on gas generation rates, and hence local electrode gas fluxes, which may impact on future scale-up of ferronickel furnaces.

  16. Scaling up of manufacturing processes of recycled carpet based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    In this work, feasibility of recycling post-consumer carpets using a modified vacuum assisted resisted molding process into large-scale components was successfully demonstrated. The scale up also included the incorporation of nano-clay films in the carpet composites. It is expected that the films will enhance the ability of the composite to withstand environmental degradation and also serve as a fire retardant. Low-cost resins were used to fabricate the recycled carpet-based composites. The scale up in terms of process was achieved by manufacturing composites without a hot press and thereby saving additional equipment cost. Mechanical and physical properties were evaluated. Large-scale samples demonstrated mechanical properties that were different from results from small samples. Acoustic tests indicate good sound absorption of the carpet composite. Cost analysis of the composite material based on the cost of the raw materials and the manufacturing process has been presented.

  17. Breastfeeding peer counseling: from efficacy through scale-up.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Donna J; Morel, Katherine; Anderson, Alex Kojo; Damio, Grace; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of publications have evaluated various breastfeeding peer counseling models. This article describes a systematic review of (a) the randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of breastfeeding peer counseling in improving rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, exclusivity, and maternal and child health outcomes and (b) scientific literature describing the scale-up of breastfeeding peer counseling programs. Twenty-six peer-reviewed publications were included in this review. The overwhelming majority of evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating breastfeeding peer counseling indicates that peer counselors effectively improve rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity. Peer counseling interventions were also shown to significantly decrease the incidence of infant diarrhea and significantly increase the duration of lactational amenorrhea. Breastfeeding peer counseling initiatives are effective and can be scaled up in both developed and developing countries as part of well-coordinated national breastfeeding promotion or maternal-child health programs.

  18. Drug nanocrystals: A way toward scale-up.

    PubMed

    Raghava Srivalli, Kale Mohana; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2016-07-01

    Drug nanocrystals comprise unique drug delivery platforms playing a significantly important and distinctive role in drug delivery and as such, the industry and academia are spending a lot of their time and money in developing the nanocrystal products. The current research works in this field depict a vivid shift from lab scale optimization studies to scale up focused studies. In this emerging scenario of nanocrystal technology, a review on some exemplary and progressing research studies with either scalability as their objective or upscaling as their future scope may smoothen the future upscaling attempts in this field. Hence, this paper reviews the efforts of such research works as case studies since an analysis of such research studies may input certain beneficial knowledge to carry out more scale up based research works on nanocrystals.

  19. Scale-up and modeling of forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Starr, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    The forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process has been scaled-up from a maximum of 7.6 cm dia. disk to fabrication of 24 cm dia. disks, 1.6 cm in thickness. The components are turbine rotor subelements produced from polar weave Tyranno fibers preforms. The disks were subjected to non-destructive testing and spin-tested to high rpm. The processing conditions were modeled with the GTCVI code to aid in optimization.

  20. Scale-up and kinetic modeling for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Imamoglu, Esra; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2013-09-01

    Bioethanol was produced from acidic hydrolysate of rice hulls using recombinant Escherichia coli KO11. Two different issues (scale-up and kinetic modeling) were evaluated simultaneously and concomitantly for bioethanol production. During the step-wise scale-up process from 100 mL shaken flask to 10 L stirred-tank bioreactor, the constant Reynolds number and the constant impeller tip speed were evaluated as scale-up methodologies under laboratory conditions. It was determined that the volumetric bioethanol productivity was 88% higher in 10 L bioreactor in comparison to the value of 0.21 g L(-1) h(-1) in shaken flask. The modified Monod and Luedeking-Piret models provided an accurate approach for the modeling of the experimental data. Ethanol concentration reached the maximum level of 29.03 g/L, which was 5% higher than the value of model prediction in 10 L bioreactor. The findings of this research could contribute to the industrial scale productions especially from lignocellulosic raw materials.

  1. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision – what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Nyanga, Robert O; Hagon, Jaclyn; Grignon, Jessica S; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Semo, Bazghina-werq

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15–49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008–2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an understanding of the contextual barriers and the facilitators of demand for the procedure is critical in reaching targets. There is a need for countries implementing VMMC programs to share their experiences more frequently to identify and to enhance best practices by other programs. PMID:25336991

  2. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision - what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Nyanga, Robert O; Hagon, Jaclyn; Grignon, Jessica S; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15-49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008-2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an understanding of the contextual barriers and the facilitators of demand for the procedure is critical in reaching targets. There is a need for countries implementing VMMC programs to share their experiences more frequently to identify and to enhance best practices by other programs.

  3. A dual-frequency applied potential tomography technique: computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Ahmed, A

    1987-01-01

    Applied potential tomography has been discussed in relation to both static and dynamic imaging. We have investigated the feasibility of obtaining static images by measuring profiles at two frequencies of drive current to exploit the differing gradients of electrical conductivity with frequency for different tissues. This method has the advantages that no profile for the homogeneous medium is then needed, and the electrodes can be coupled directly to the skin. To demonstrate the principle, computer simulations have been carried out using published electrical parameters for mammalian tissues at frequencies of 100 and 150 kHz. The distribution of complex electric potentials was calculated by the successive over-relaxation method in two dimensions for an abdominal cross-section with 16 electrodes equally spaced around the surface. From the computed electrode potentials, images were reconstructed using a back-projection method (neglecting phase information). Liver and kidney appeared most distinctly on the image because of their comparatively large conductivity gradients. The perturbations in the electrode potential differences between the two frequencies had a mean value of 5%, requiring accurate measurement in a practical system, compared with 150% when the 100 kHz values were related to a simulation of homogeneous saline equal in conductivity to muscle. The perturbations could be increased by widening the separation of the frequencies. Static imaging using a dual-frequency technique appears to be feasible, but a more detailed consideration of the electrical properties of tissues is needed to determine the optimum choice of frequencies.

  4. Droplet size measurements for spray dryer scale-up.

    PubMed

    Thybo, Pia; Hovgaard, Lars; Andersen, Sune Klint; Lindeløv, Jesper Saederup

    2008-01-01

    This study was dedicated to facilitate scale-up in spray drying from an atomization standpoint. The purpose was to investigate differences in operating conditions between a pilot and a production scale nozzle. The intension was to identify the operating ranges in which the two nozzles produced similar droplet size distributions. Furthermore, method optimization and validation were also covered. Externally mixing two-fluid nozzles of similar designs were used in this study. Both nozzles are typically used in commercially available spray dryers, and they have been characterized with respect to droplet size distributions as a function of liquid type, liquid flow rate, atomization gas flow rate, liquid orifice diameter, and atomization gas orifice diameter. All droplet size measurements were carried out by using the Malvern Spraytec with nozzle operating conditions corresponding to typical settings for spray drying. This gave droplets with Sauter Mean Diameters less than 40 microm and typically 5-20 microm. A model previously proposed by Mansour and Chigier was used to correlate the droplet size to the operating parameters. It was possible to make a correlation for water incorporating the droplet sizes for both the pilot scale and the production scale nozzle. However, a single correlation was not able to account properly for the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the droplet size distributions of ethanol could not be adequately predicted on the basis of the water data. This study has shown that it was possible to scale up from a pilot to production scale nozzle in a systematic fashion. However, a prerequisite was that the nozzles were geometrically similar. When externally mixing two-fluid nozzles are used as atomizers, the results obtained from this study could be a useful guideline for selecting appropriate operating conditions when scaling up the spray-drying process.

  5. Volcanic Monitoring Techniques Applied to Controlled Fragmentation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Hort, M. K.; Kremers, S.; Meier, K.; Scharff, L.; Scheu, B.; Taddeucci, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are an inevitable natural threat. The range of eruptive styles is large and short term fluctuations of explosivity or vent position pose a large risk that is not necessarily confined to the immediate vicinity of a volcano. Explosive eruptions rather may also affect aviation, infrastructure and climate, regionally as well as globally. Multiparameter monitoring networks are deployed on many active volcanoes to record signs of magmatic processes and help elucidate the secrets of volcanic phenomena. However, our mechanistic understanding of many processes hiding in recorded signals is still poor. As a direct consequence, a solid interpretation of the state of a volcano is still a challenge. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we combined volcanic monitoring and experimental volcanology. We performed 15 well-monitored, field-based, experiments and fragmented natural rock samples from Colima volcano (Mexico) by rapid decompression. We used cylindrical samples of 60 mm height and 25 mm and 60 mm diameter, respectively, and 25 and 35 vol.% open porosity. The applied pressure range was from 4 to 18 MPa. Using different experimental set-ups, the pressurised volume above the samples ranged from 60 - 170 cm3. The experiments were performed at ambient conditions and at controlled sample porosity and size, confinement geometry, and applied pressure. The experiments have been thoroughly monitored with 1) Doppler Radar (DR), 2) high-speed and high-definition cameras, 3) acoustic and infrasound sensors, 4) pressure transducers, and 5) electrically conducting wires. Our aim was to check for common results achieved by the different approaches and, if so, calibrate state-of-the-art monitoring tools. We present how the velocity of the ejected pyroclasts was measured by and evaluated for the different approaches and how it was affected by the experimental conditions and sample characteristics. We show that all deployed instruments successfully measured the pyroclast

  6. Pretreatment optimization of Sorghum pioneer biomass for bioethanol production and its scale-up.

    PubMed

    Koradiya, Manoj; Duggirala, Srinivas; Tipre, Devayani; Dave, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Based on one parameter at a time, saccharification of delignified sorghum biomass by 4% and 70% v/v sulfuric acid resulted in maximum 30.8 and 33.8 g% sugar production from biomass respectively. The Box Behnken Design was applied for further optimization of acid hydrolysis. As a result of the designed experiment 36.3g% sugar production was achieved when 3% v/v H2SO4 treatment given for 60 min at 180°C. The process was scaled-up to treat 2 kg of biomass. During the screening of yeast cultures, isolate C, MK-I and N were found to be potent ethanol producers from sorghum hydrolyzate. Culture MK-I was the best so used for scale up of ethanol production up to 25 L capacity, which gave a yield of 0.49 g ethanol/g sugar from hydrolyzate obtained from 2 kg of sorghum biomass.

  7. From Project to Program: Tupange's Experience with Scaling Up Family Planning Interventions in Urban Kenya.

    PubMed

    Keyonzo, Nelson; Nyachae, Paul; Kagwe, Peter; Kilonzo, Margaret; Mumba, Feddis; Owino, Kenneth; Kichamu, George; Kigen, Bartilol; Fajans, Peter; Ghiron, Laura; Simmons, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative in Kenya, the Tupange Project (2010-2015), successfully applied the ExpandNet approach to sustainably scale up family planning interventions, first in Machakos and Kakamega, and subsequently also in its three core cities, Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa. This new focus meant shifting from a "project" to a "program" approach, which required paying attention to government leadership and ownership, limiting external inputs, institutionalizing interventions in existing structures and emphasizing sustainability. The paper also highlights the project's efforts to prepare for the future scale up of Tupange's interventions in other counties to support continuing and improved access to family planning services in the new context of devolution (decentralization) in Kenya.

  8. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    PubMed

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  9. Scaling-up Transformation of Multisensor Images with Multiple Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaohui; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tian, Jing; Xia, Jun

    2009-01-01

    For scaling up low resolution multispectral images (LRMIs) with high resolution panchromatic image (HRPI), intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) can produce satisfactory spatial enhancement but usually introduces spectral distortion in the fused high resolution multispectral images (HRMIs). In this paper, to minimize this problem, we present a generalized intensity modulation (GIM) by extending the IHS transform to an arbitrary number of LRMIs, which uses the information of the spectral response functions (SRFs) of the multispectral and panchromatic sensors. Before modulation, the generalized intensity is enhanced by injecting details extracted from the HRPI by means of empirical mode decomposition. After the enhanced generalized intensity is substituted for the old one, the HRMIs are obtained through the GIM. Quickbird images are used to illustrate the superiority of this proposed method. Extensive comparison results based on visual analysis and Wald’s protocol demonstrate that the proposed method is more encouraging for scaling up the LRMIs with the HRPI spectrally and spatially than the tested fusion methods. PMID:22573959

  10. [Basics of PCR and related techniques applied in veterinary parasitology].

    PubMed

    Ben Abderrazak, S

    2004-01-01

    We attempte through the following overall review pertaining to the basics of PCR techniques (Polymerase Chain Reaction), to introduce the main applications used in veterinary parasitology. A major problem restricting the application possibilities of molecular biology techniques is of quantitative nature. Amplification techniques represent a real revolution, for it makes possible the production of tens, even hundreds of nanogrammes of sequences when starting from very small quantities. The PCR technique has dramatically transformed the strategies used so far in molecular biology and subsequently research and medical diagnosis.

  11. 77 FR 25469 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- Up Grants Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.411A (Scale-up grants). AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department... in Innovation (i3) Scale-up grant competition (March 27 i3 Scale-up NIA). This notice extends...

  12. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernandez, L.; Gonzalez, A.

    1998-08-28

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  13. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernández, L.; González, A.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  14. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Dennis M.; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  15. Quality by design: scale-up of freeze-drying cycles in pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Roberto; Fissore, Davide; Barresi, Antonello A; Rastelli, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows the application of mathematical modeling to scale-up a cycle developed with lab-scale equipment on two different production units. The above method is based on a simplified model of the process parameterized with experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients. In this study, the overall heat transfer coefficient between product and shelf was determined by using the gravimetric procedure, while the dried product resistance to vapor flow was determined through the pressure rise test technique. Once model parameters were determined, the freeze-drying cycle of a parenteral product was developed via dynamic design space for a lab-scale unit. Then, mathematical modeling was used to scale-up the above cycle in the production equipment. In this way, appropriate values were determined for processing conditions, which allow the replication, in the industrial unit, of the product dynamics observed in the small scale freeze-dryer. This study also showed how inter-vial variability, as well as model parameter uncertainty, can be taken into account during scale-up calculations.

  16. Microbial bioelectrosynthesis of hydrogen: Current challenges and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Kitching, Michael; Butler, Robin; Marsili, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable energy supplies are needed to supplement and eventually replace fossil fuels. Molecular hydrogen H2 is a clean burning, high-energy fuel that is also used as reducing gas in industrial processes. H2 is mainly synthesized by steam reforming of natural gas, a non-renewable fuel. There are biosynthetic strategies for H2 production; however, they are associated with poor yield and have high cost. The application of an electrochemical driving force in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) improves the yield of biological reactions. The performance of the MEC is influenced by experimental parameters such as the electrode material, reactor design, microbial consortia and the substrate. In this review, factors that affect the performance of MECs are discussed and critically analysed. The potential for scale-up of H2 bioelectrosynthesis is also discussed.

  17. Scaling up digital circuit computation with DNA strand displacement cascades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lulu; Winfree, Erik

    2011-06-03

    To construct sophisticated biochemical circuits from scratch, one needs to understand how simple the building blocks can be and how robustly such circuits can scale up. Using a simple DNA reaction mechanism based on a reversible strand displacement process, we experimentally demonstrated several digital logic circuits, culminating in a four-bit square-root circuit that comprises 130 DNA strands. These multilayer circuits include thresholding and catalysis within every logical operation to perform digital signal restoration, which enables fast and reliable function in large circuits with roughly constant switching time and linear signal propagation delays. The design naturally incorporates other crucial elements for large-scale circuitry, such as general debugging tools, parallel circuit preparation, and an abstraction hierarchy supported by an automated circuit compiler.

  18. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery.

  19. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  20. TA Beliefs in a SCALE-UP Style Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeck, George; Settelmeyer, Sam; Li, Sissi; Demaree, Dedra

    2010-10-01

    In Spring 2010, the Oregon State University physics department instituted a SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs) style studio classroom in the introductory, calculus-based physics series. In our initial implementation, comprised of two hours lecture, two hours of studio, and two hours lab work, the studio session was lead by a faculty member and either 2 GTAs or 1 GTA and 1 LA. We plan to move to a model where senior GTAs can lead studio sections after co-teaching with the faculty member. It is critical that we know how to prepare and support the instructional team in facilitating student learning in this setting. We examine GTA and LA pedagogical beliefs through reflective journaling, interviews, and personal experience of the authors. In particular, we examine how these beliefs changed over their first quarter of instruction, as well as the resources used to adapt to the new classroom environment.

  1. Identifying the Characteristics of Effective High Schools: Report from Year One of the National Center on Scaling up Effective Schools. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Stacey; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Osborne-Lampkin, La'Tara

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Scaling up Effective Schools (NCSU) is a five-year project working to develop, implement, and test new processes to scale up effective practices in high schools that districts will be able to apply within the context of their own unique goals and circumstances. This report describes the activities and findings of the first…

  2. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  3. Carnosol purification. Scaling-up centrifugal partition chromatography separations.

    PubMed

    Bouju, Elodie; Berthod, Alain; Faure, Karine

    2016-09-30

    This paper illustrates the application of a recently proposed protocol allowing the scale-up prediction on hydrostatic countercurrent chromatography columns (centrifugal partition chromatographs or CPC). A commercial extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) was used as the starting material containing 0.48% of carnosol, an active pharmaceutical ingredient with great potential. After a rapid method development on a small-scale 35-mL CPC instrument that allowed for the determination of the solvent system and maximum sample concentration and volume, the purification was transferred on two larger instruments using the "free space between peaks" method. The method takes into account the technical limitations of the larger instruments, such as pressure and/or maximum centrifugal field, and allows, by simply running an analytical-sized injection on the large scale rotor, to give an accurate prediction of the maximum sample load and best throughput. The 0.27g of rosemary extract maximum load on a 35-mL CPC was transferred as a 1.9g load on a 254-mL medium size CPC and 9g load on a 812-mL CPC. The maximum process efficiency of 3.1mg of carnosol per hour obtained on the small 35-mL column was transferred on the 254-mL CPC giving 8.3mg/h and, on the larger 812-mL column 49.4mg of carnosol could be obtained per hour. If the scaling-up in CPC instruments is not directly homothetic, it can be highly predictable through a few simple experiments.

  4. Experience Report Summary: Applying Adaptive Safety Analysis Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R.; Shaw, H-Y.

    1999-01-01

    Current needs for high-reliability, reusable software; rapid, evolutionary development; and verification of innovative software architectures have focused attention on improving techniques for analyzing the safety and reliability of embedded software.

  5. Applied Algebra: The Modeling Technique of Least Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelkowski, Jeremy; Mayes, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The article focuses on engaging students in algebra through modeling real-world problems. The technique of least squares is explored, encouraging students to develop a deeper understanding of the method. (Contains 2 figures and a bibliography.)

  6. Applying chroma-keying techniques in a virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, John D.; Wurpts, Malachi J.

    2000-06-01

    A chroma-keying technique for the insertion of real objects into a synthetic environment is being evaluated for incorporation into various United States Marine Corps ground combat training and simulation applications. The technique enables the insertion of real objects within the visual frame of a Head-Mounted Display. It allows individuals and actual equipment, such as maps, weapons, and other items, to be effectively inserted into the visual display of a simulated environment.

  7. Signal detection techniques applied to the Chandler wobble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    A sudden excitation event of the Chandler wobble should induce the earth's rotation pole to undergo damped harmonic motion. This type of motion has been searched for in the observations of the Chandler wobble using techniques based upon the concept of a matched filter. Although the signal detection techniques used here were not sensitive enough to detect any such isolated sudden excitation events, the result that was obtained is consistent with a randomly excited model of the Chandler wobble.

  8. Novel method for constructing a large-scale design space in lubrication process by using Bayesian estimation based on the reliability of a scale-up rule.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    A reliable large-scale design space was constructed by integrating the reliability of a scale-up rule into the Bayesian estimation without enforcing a large-scale design of experiments (DoE). A small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. A constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Experiments were conducted at four different small scales with the same Froude number and blending time in order to determine the discrepancies in the response variables between the scales so as to indicate the reliability of the scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on the large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results and the reliability of the scale-up rule. Large-scale experiments performed under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than the small-scale design space even when there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale.

  9. Gravimetry and Space Techniques Applied to Geodynamics and Ocean Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Bob E.; Anderson, Allen; Froidevaux, Claude; Parke, Michael

    The variety of disciplines represented in this volume (including space geodesy, oceanography, geophysics, and celestial mechanics) attest to the interdisciplinary applications of gravimetry and space techniques. The relation to sea level is addressed within some of the papers and the contributions of the techniques to development of global gravity models are discussed. The space technique of satellite altimetry has become a prominent contributor to sea surface topography as well as ocean tide models and determination of gravity, especially in ocean areas. Ocean tides influence the motion of near-Earth satellites and the rotation of the Earth. Modern space geodesy is increasingly relying on the Global Positioning System for measuring geophysical phenomena manifested at the surface through crustal deformations. Furthermore, the geophysical interpretation of gravity anomalies has been facilitated by the introduction of modern techniques. This volume represents only a small "snapshot" of the interdisciplinary research being conducted. Modem space geodesy is one of the common links between the disciplines reflected in this volume. New developments in gravimetry and space techniques will further enhance and foster interdisciplinary work in coming years.

  10. Imaging techniques applied to characterize bitumen and bituminous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ramón-Torregrosa, P; Páez-Dueñas, A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this article is to present some important advances in the imaging techniques currently used in the characterization of bitumen and bituminous emulsions. Bitumen exhibits some properties, such as a black colour and a reflecting surface at rest, which permit the use of optical techniques to study the macroscopic behaviour of asphalt mixes in the cold mix technology based on emulsion use. Imaging techniques allow monitoring in situ the bitumen thermal sensitivity as well as the complex phenomenon of emulsion breaking. Evaporation-driven breaking was evaluated from the shape of evaporating emulsion drops deposited onto non-porous and hydrophobic substrates. To describe the breaking kinetics, top-view images of a drying emulsion drop placed on an aggregate sheet were acquired and processed properly. We can conclude that computer-aided image analysis in road pavement engineering can elucidate the mechanism of breaking and curing of bituminous emulsion.

  11. Bioremediation techniques applied to aqueous media contaminated with mercury.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Benavides-Otaya, Holman D

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the environmental and human health impacts of mercury contamination have driven the search for alternative, eco-efficient techniques different from the traditional physicochemical methods for treating this metal. One of these alternative processes is bioremediation. A comprehensive analysis of the different variables that can affect this process is presented. It focuses on determining the effectiveness of different techniques of bioremediation, with a specific consideration of three variables: the removal percentage, time needed for bioremediation and initial concentration of mercury to be treated in an aqueous medium.

  12. Signal detection techniques applied to the Chandler wobble

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.S.

    1985-10-10

    A sudden excitation event of the Chandler wobble should induce the earth's rotation pole to undergo damped harmonic motion. This type of motion has been searched for in the observations of the Chandler wobble using techniques based upon the concept of a matched filter. Although the signal detection techniques used here were not sensitive enough to detect any such isolated sudden excitation events; the result that was obtained is consistent with a randomly excited model of the Chandler wobble. 16 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  13. Some Problem-Solving Techniques Applied to Nutrition Education Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njus, Helen Pyle; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes six techniques used in converting nutrition education materials to software systems for Apple microcomputers. Areas addressed include controlling pace of the program, simplifying student directions, ensuring user-friendly feedback, deterring tampering with the programs, providing time-efficient record keeping, and preventing abnormal…

  14. Applying Effective Reading Techniques in Content Area Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poindexter, Candace

    1995-01-01

    Provides brief descriptions of several techniques and strategies (Jigsaw method, anticipation/reaction guides, metacognition, "what I know" charts, and self-questioning) thought most useful and inspiring by preservice teachers enrolled in a mandatory content area reading class for secondary teachers. (RS)

  15. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  16. Power Line Carrier Techniques Applied to Spacecraft Data Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedu, J.-Y.; Morisse, J.; Auvergne, X.; Plancke, P.

    Power Line Carrier (PLC) data transmission coupled with spread spectrum technique is evaluated for onboard satellite purpose. Power Line Carrier present a great advantage in terms of mass saving and integration cost by suppressing the data bus harness. Spread Spectrum techniques allows data transmission inside the power supply noise. This paper will address the major functionality keys of this transmission method and will define the main trades off to conduct. INTRODUCTION A major trend for the next satellite generation stands in the increase of the equipment unit's quantity, of their complexity and of their communication needs. A first approach to reduce the number of links and also the overall mass stands in multiplexing Acq/Ctr on data bus. ALCATEL SPACE with its so-called new avionics 4000 has made a significant step with an intensive use of the data bus : round 140 units on its proprietary OBDH-485 bus and round 10 units on the MIL-STD-1553 data bus for Telecom Geostationnary satellite class. According to this state of the art, the following step is the suppression of the data bus harness by means of Wireless or Power Line Carrier (PLC) techniques that has been identified as a development axis. Many PLC components are available for domestic/industry applications. Nevertheless, transmission levels, operating frequencies, radiation hardening performances of these parts are usually not compatible with space environment constraints. 2/12

  17. Scaling Up Data-Centric Middleware on a Cluster Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D T; Franklin, M J; Garlick, J; Abdulla, G M

    2005-04-29

    Data-centric workflow middleware systems are workflow systems that treat data as first class objects alongside programs. These systems improve the usability, responsiveness and efficiency of workflow execution over cluster (and grid) computers. In this work, we explore the scalability of one such system, GridDB, on cluster computers. We measure the performance and scalability of GridDB in executing data-intensive image processing workflows from the SuperMACHO astrophysics survey on a large cluster computer. Our first experimental study concerns the scale-up of GridDB. We make a rather surprising finding, that while the middleware system issues many queries and transactions to a DBMS, file system operations present the first-tier bottleneck. We circumvent this bottleneck and increase the scalability of GridDB by more than 2-fold on our image processing application (up to 128 nodes). In a second study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of GridDB performance (and therefore application performance) to characteristics of the workflows being executed. To manage these sensitivities, we provide guidelines for trading off the costs and benefits of GridDB at a fine-grain.

  18. Fungal biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: mechanism and scale up

    PubMed Central

    Kitching, Michael; Ramani, Meghana; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a widespread research tool because of their oxidation resistance, biocompatibility and stability. Chemical methods for AuNP synthesis often produce toxic residues that raise environmental concern. On the other hand, the biological synthesis of AuNPs in viable microorganisms and their cell-free extracts is an environmentally friendly and low-cost process. In general, fungi tolerate higher metal concentrations than bacteria and secrete abundant extracellular redox proteins to reduce soluble metal ions to their insoluble form and eventually to nanocrystals. Fungi harbour untapped biological diversity and may provide novel metal reductases for metal detoxification and bioreduction. A thorough understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of AuNPs in fungi is needed to reduce the time of biosynthesis and to scale up the AuNP production process. In this review, we describe the known mechanisms for AuNP biosynthesis in viable fungi and fungal protein extracts and discuss the most suitable bioreactors for industrial AuNP biosynthesis. PMID:25154648

  19. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Jacki

    2011-04-15

    Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

  20. Challenges and Opportunities in Scaling-Up Nutrition in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Darnton-Hill, Ian; Samman, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare continues to be in a state of flux; conventionally, this provides opportunities and challenges. The opportunities include technological breakthroughs, improved economies and increasing availability of healthcare. On the other hand, economic disparities are increasing and leading to differing accessibility to healthcare, including within affluent countries. Nutrition has received an increase in attention and resources in recent decades, a lot of it stimulated by the rise in obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. An increase in ageing populations also has meant increased interest in nutrition-related chronic diseases. In many middle-income countries, there has been an increase in the double burden of malnutrition with undernourished children and overweight/obese parents and adolescents. In low-income countries, an increased evidence base has allowed scaling-up of interventions to address under-nutrition, both nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions. Immediate barriers (institutional, structural and biological) and longer-term barriers (staffing shortages where most needed and environmental impacts on health) are discussed. Significant barriers remain for the near universal access to healthcare, especially for those who are socio-economically disadvantaged, geographically isolated, living in war zones or where environmental damage has taken place. However, these barriers are increasingly being recognized, and efforts are being made to address them. The paper aims to take a broad view that identifies and then comments on the many social, political and scientific factors affecting the achievement of improved nutrition through healthcare. PMID:27417744

  1. Analysis of soil images applying Laplacian Pyramidal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, F.; de Castro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Méndez, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Laplacian pyramid is a technique for image encoding in which local operators of many scales but identical shape are the basis functions. Our work describes some properties of the filters of the Laplacian pyramid. Specially, we pay attention to Gaussian and fractal behaviour of these filters, and we determine the normal and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter filters, while studying the influence of these filters in soil image processing. One usual property of any image is that neighboring pixels are highly correlated. This property makes inefficient to represent the image directly in terms of the pixel values, because most of the encoded information would be redundant. Burt and Adelson designed a technique, named Laplacian pyramid, for removing image correlation which combines features of predictive and transform methods. This technique is non causal, and its computations are simple and local. The predicted value for each pixel is computed as a local weighted average, using a unimodal weighting function centred on the pixel itself. Pyramid construction is equivalent to convolving the original image with a set of weighting functions determined by a parameter that defines the filter. According to the parameter values, these filters have a behaviour that goes from the Gaussian shape to the fractal. Previous works only analyze Gaussian filters, but we determine the Gaussian and fractal intervals and study the energy of the Laplacian pyramid images according to the filter types. The different behaviour, qualitatively, involves a significant change in statistical characteristics at different levels of iteration, especially the fractal case, which can highlight specific information from the images. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  2. Advances in parameter estimation techniques applied to flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maben, Egbert; Zimmerman, David C.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, various parameter estimation techniques are investigated in the context of structural system identification utilizing distributed parameter models and 'measured' time-domain data. Distributed parameter models are formulated using the PDEMOD software developed by Taylor. Enhancements made to PDEMOD for this work include the following: (1) a Wittrick-Williams based root solving algorithm; (2) a time simulation capability; and (3) various parameter estimation algorithms. The parameter estimations schemes will be contrasted using the NASA Mini-Mast as the focus structure.

  3. Low background techniques applied in the BOREXINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzel, G.

    2015-08-17

    The BOREXINO detector, located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy, has been designed for real-time spectroscopy of low-energy solar neutrinos. Within the experiment several novel background reduction and assay techniques have been established. In many cases they are still the most sensitive world-wide. Developed methods and apparatus provided tools for a strict quality control program during the construction phase of the BOREXINO detector, which was the key to meet the background requirements. Achievement of extremely low background rate opened the possibility to probe in realtime almost entire spectrum of the solar neutrinos.

  4. Unconventional Coding Technique Applied to Multi-Level Polarization Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutigliano, G. G.; Betti, S.; Perrone, P.

    2016-05-01

    A new technique is proposed to improve information confidentiality in optical-fiber communications without bandwidth consumption. A pseudorandom vectorial sequence was generated by a dynamic system algorithm and used to codify a multi-level polarization modulation based on the Stokes vector. Optical-fiber birefringence, usually considered as a disturbance, was exploited to obfuscate the signal transmission. At the receiver end, the same pseudorandom sequence was generated and used to decode the multi-level polarization modulated signal. The proposed scheme, working at the physical layer, provides strong information security without introducing complex processing and thus latency.

  5. Applying NISHIJIN historical textile technique for e-Textile.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Hirano, Kikuo; Sugimura, Kazushige; Adachi, Satoshi; Igarashi, Hidetsugu; Ueshima, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hideo; Nambu, Masayuki; Doi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The e-Textile is the key technology for continuous ambient health monitoring to increase quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. The authors introduce techniques of Japanese historical textile, NISHIJIN, which illustrate almost any pattern from one continuous yarn within the machine weaving process, which is suitable for mixed flow production. Thus, NISHIJIN is suitable for e-Textile production, which requires rapid prototyping and mass production of very complicated patterns. The authors prototyped and evaluated a few vests to take twelve-lead electrocardiogram. The result tells that the prototypes obtains electrocardiogram, which is good enough for diagnosis.

  6. Boson mapping techniques applied to constant gauge fields in QCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Peter Otto; Lopez, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Pairs of coordinates and derivatives of the constant gluon modes are mapped to new gluon-pair fields and their derivatives. Applying this mapping to the Hamiltonian of constant gluon fields results for large coupling constants into an effective Hamiltonian which separates into one describing a scalar field and another one for a field with spin two. The ground state is dominated by pairs of gluons coupled to color and spin zero with slight admixtures of color zero and spin two pairs. As color group we used SU(2).

  7. Compressed Sensing Techniques Applied to Ultrasonic Imaging of Cargo Containers.

    PubMed

    López, Yuri Álvarez; Lorenzo, José Ángel Martínez

    2017-01-15

    One of the key issues in the fight against the smuggling of goods has been the development of scanners for cargo inspection. X-ray-based radiographic system scanners are the most developed sensing modality. However, they are costly and use bulky sources that emit hazardous, ionizing radiation. Aiming to improve the probability of threat detection, an ultrasonic-based technique, capable of detecting the footprint of metallic containers or compartments concealed within the metallic structure of the inspected cargo, has been proposed. The system consists of an array of acoustic transceivers that is attached to the metallic structure-under-inspection, creating a guided acoustic Lamb wave. Reflections due to discontinuities are detected in the images, provided by an imaging algorithm. Taking into consideration that the majority of those images are sparse, this contribution analyzes the application of Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques in order to reduce the amount of measurements needed, thus achieving faster scanning, without compromising the detection capabilities of the system. A parametric study of the image quality, as a function of the samples needed in spatial and frequency domains, is presented, as well as the dependence on the sampling pattern. For this purpose, realistic cargo inspection scenarios have been simulated.

  8. Applying manifold learning techniques to the CAESAR database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Schrock, Olga; Patrick, James; Arnold, Gregory; Ferrara, Matthew

    2010-04-01

    Understanding and organizing data is the first step toward exploiting sensor phenomenology for dismount tracking. What image features are good for distinguishing people and what measurements, or combination of measurements, can be used to classify the dataset by demographics including gender, age, and race? A particular technique, Diffusion Maps, has demonstrated the potential to extract features that intuitively make sense [1]. We want to develop an understanding of this tool by validating existing results on the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR) database. This database, provided by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Human Effectiveness Directorate and SAE International, is a rich dataset which includes 40 traditional, anthropometric measurements of 4400 human subjects. If we could specifically measure the defining features for classification, from this database, then the future question will then be to determine a subset of these features that can be measured from imagery. This paper briefly describes the Diffusion Map technique, shows potential for dimension reduction of the CAESAR database, and describes interesting problems to be further explored.

  9. Canvas and cosmos: Visual art techniques applied to astronomy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Jayanne

    Bold color images from telescopes act as extraordinary ambassadors for research astronomers because they pique the public’s curiosity. But are they snapshots documenting physical reality? Or are we looking at artistic spacescapes created by digitally manipulating astronomy images? This paper provides a tour of how original black and white data, from all regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum, are converted into the color images gracing popular magazines, numerous websites, and even clothing. The history and method of the technical construction of these images is outlined. However, the paper focuses on introducing the scientific reader to visual literacy (e.g. human perception) and techniques from art (e.g. composition, color theory) since these techniques can produce not only striking but politically powerful public outreach images. When created by research astronomers, the cultures of science and visual art can be balanced and the image can illuminate scientific results sufficiently strongly that the images are also used in research publications. Included are reflections on how they could feedback into astronomy research endeavors and future forms of visualization as well as on the relevance of outreach images to visual art. (See the color online PDF version at http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/S0218271817300105; the figures can be enlarged in PDF viewers.)

  10. Compressed Sensing Techniques Applied to Ultrasonic Imaging of Cargo Containers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez López, Yuri; Martínez Lorenzo, José Ángel

    2017-01-01

    One of the key issues in the fight against the smuggling of goods has been the development of scanners for cargo inspection. X-ray-based radiographic system scanners are the most developed sensing modality. However, they are costly and use bulky sources that emit hazardous, ionizing radiation. Aiming to improve the probability of threat detection, an ultrasonic-based technique, capable of detecting the footprint of metallic containers or compartments concealed within the metallic structure of the inspected cargo, has been proposed. The system consists of an array of acoustic transceivers that is attached to the metallic structure-under-inspection, creating a guided acoustic Lamb wave. Reflections due to discontinuities are detected in the images, provided by an imaging algorithm. Taking into consideration that the majority of those images are sparse, this contribution analyzes the application of Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques in order to reduce the amount of measurements needed, thus achieving faster scanning, without compromising the detection capabilities of the system. A parametric study of the image quality, as a function of the samples needed in spatial and frequency domains, is presented, as well as the dependence on the sampling pattern. For this purpose, realistic cargo inspection scenarios have been simulated. PMID:28098841

  11. Applied geophysical techniques to evaluate earth dams and foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopis, Jose L.; Sharp, Michael K.; Butler, Dwain K.; Yule, Donald E.

    1995-05-01

    Mill Creek Dam, near Walla Walla, Washington has experienced anomalous seepage since its first filling in 1941. Various attempts to abate and control the seepage, including construction of a concrete wall, have not been completely successful. Construction of the cutoff wall reduced the seepage by about 30 percent, from 33 cubic feet per second to 22 cubic feet per second, and downstream saturated farmland was reduced by 56 percent. However, there are indications of increased seepage pressures in a conglomerate formation in the right abutment. A comprehensive, integrated geophysics investigation of the right abutment area of the dam was conducted to detect and map anomalous conditions and assist in the evaluation of remedial measures. The geophysics program consisted of microgravity, ground penetrating radar, seismic reflection, electromagnetic conductivity, and electrical resistivity surveying. Results of the program indicate anomalous conditions extending from the reservoir area through the right abutment. The aspects of the program planning leading to technique selection and field procedures are emphasized, as well as the role of different geophysical techniques in defining the nature of anomalous condition.

  12. [New mass spectrometry techniques applied to the study of venoms].

    PubMed

    Auvin-Guette, C

    2002-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is a technique for the analysis and very sensitive identification of molecules. It allows one to determine the mass of the studied product, whether pure or in a mixture, and provides some information on its molecular structure. In the particular case of peptides, this method can, under certain conditions, also provide information on the amino acid sequence. There are two complementary methods in mass spectrometry for the study of the biological molecules: i) ionisation by laser desorption assisted by matrix (MALDI) coupled to a mass analyser of the time of flight type (TOF), which is very effective for the direct study of a mixture of products and ii) ionisation by electronebulisation (ESI) coupled to mass analysers of the quadripolar type and time of flight (Qq-TOF), which allows the interfacing between high phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These two complementary techniques were already used to draw up toxin charts of snake and spider venoms. The purpose is to be able to characterise species based on an actual peptide print of poisonous gland secretions.

  13. Model-based scale-up methodology for aerobic fed-batch bioprocesses: application to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Bravo, Gloria Milena; Garelli, Fabricio; Mozumder, Md Salatul Islam; Alvarez, Hernan; De Battista, Hernan

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a general model-based methodology to scale-up fed-batch bioprocesses. The idea behind this approach is to establish a dynamics hierarchy, based on a model of the process, that allows the designer to determine the proper scale factors as well as at which point of the fed-batch the process should be scaled up. Here, concepts and tools of linear control theory, such as the singular value decomposition of the Hankel matrix, are exploited in the context of process design. The proposed scale-up methodology is first described in a bioprocesses general framework highlighting its main features, key variables and parameters. Then, it is applied to a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) fed-batch bioreactor and compared with three empirical criteria, that are traditionally employed to determine the scale factors of these processes, showing the usefulness and distinctive features of this proposal. Moreover, this methodology provides theoretical support to a frequently used empirical rule: scale-up aerobic bioreactors at constant volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient. Finally, similar process dynamic behavior and PHB production set at the laboratory scale are predicted at the new operating scale, while it is also determined that is rarely possible to reproduce similar dynamic behavior of the bioreactor using empirical scale-up criteria.

  14. Signal processing techniques applied to a small circular seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, C. C.

    1980-03-01

    The travel time method (TTM) for locating earthquakes and the wavefront curvature method (WCM), which determines distance to an event by measuring the curvature of the wavefront can be combined in a procedure referred to as Apparent Velocity Mapping (AVM). Apparent velocities for mine blasts and local earthquakes computed by the WCM are inverted for a velocity structure. The velocity structure is used in the TTM to relocate events. Model studies indicate that AVM can adequately resolve the velocity structure for the case of linear velocity-depth gradient. Surface waves from mine blasts recorded by the Central Minnesota Seismic Array were analyzed using a modification of the multiple filter analysis (MFA) technique to determine group arrival times at several stations of an array. The advantages of array MFA are that source location need not be known, lateral refraction can be detected and removed, and multiple arrivals can be separated. A modeling procedure that can be used with array MFA is described.

  15. Object detection techniques applied on mobile robot semantic navigation.

    PubMed

    Astua, Carlos; Barber, Ramon; Crespo, Jonathan; Jardon, Alberto

    2014-04-11

    The future of robotics predicts that robots will integrate themselves more every day with human beings and their environments. To achieve this integration, robots need to acquire information about the environment and its objects. There is a big need for algorithms to provide robots with these sort of skills, from the location where objects are needed to accomplish a task up to where these objects are considered as information about the environment. This paper presents a way to provide mobile robots with the ability-skill to detect objets for semantic navigation. This paper aims to use current trends in robotics and at the same time, that can be exported to other platforms. Two methods to detect objects are proposed, contour detection and a descriptor based technique, and both of them are combined to overcome their respective limitations. Finally, the code is tested on a real robot, to prove its accuracy and efficiency.

  16. Security Verification Techniques Applied to PatchLink COTS Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David P.; Powell, John D.; Bishop, Matt; Andrew, Chris; Jog, Sameer

    2006-01-01

    Verification of the security of software artifacts is a challenging task. An integrated approach that combines verification techniques can increase the confidence in the security of software artifacts. Such an approach has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). Two security verification instruments were developed and then piloted on PatchLink's UNIX Agent, a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software product, to assess the value of the instruments and the approach. The two instruments are the Flexible Modeling Framework (FMF) -- a model-based verification instrument (JPL), and a Property-Based Tester (UC Davis). Security properties were formally specified for the COTS artifact and then verified using these instruments. The results were then reviewed to determine the effectiveness of the approach and the security of the COTS product.

  17. Object Detection Techniques Applied on Mobile Robot Semantic Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Astua, Carlos; Barber, Ramon; Crespo, Jonathan; Jardon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The future of robotics predicts that robots will integrate themselves more every day with human beings and their environments. To achieve this integration, robots need to acquire information about the environment and its objects. There is a big need for algorithms to provide robots with these sort of skills, from the location where objects are needed to accomplish a task up to where these objects are considered as information about the environment. This paper presents a way to provide mobile robots with the ability-skill to detect objets for semantic navigation. This paper aims to use current trends in robotics and at the same time, that can be exported to other platforms. Two methods to detect objects are proposed, contour detection and a descriptor based technique, and both of them are combined to overcome their respective limitations. Finally, the code is tested on a real robot, to prove its accuracy and efficiency. PMID:24732101

  18. Innovative Visualization Techniques applied to a Flood Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, António; Ho, Quan; Lopes, Pedro; Malamud, Bruce D.; Ribeiro, Rita; Jern, Mikael

    2013-04-01

    The large and ever-increasing amounts of multi-dimensional, time-varying and geospatial digital information from multiple sources represent a major challenge for today's analysts. We present a set of visualization techniques that can be used for the interactive analysis of geo-referenced and time sampled data sets, providing an integrated mechanism and that aids the user to collaboratively explore, present and communicate visually complex and dynamic data. Here we present these concepts in the context of a 4 hour flood scenario from Lisbon in 2010, with data that includes measures of water column (flood height) every 10 minutes at a 4.5 m x 4.5 m resolution, topography, building damage, building information, and online base maps. Techniques we use include web-based linked views, multiple charts, map layers and storytelling. We explain two of these in more detail that are not currently in common use for visualization of data: storytelling and web-based linked views. Visual storytelling is a method for providing a guided but interactive process of visualizing data, allowing more engaging data exploration through interactive web-enabled visualizations. Within storytelling, a snapshot mechanism helps the author of a story to highlight data views of particular interest and subsequently share or guide others within the data analysis process. This allows a particular person to select relevant attributes for a snapshot, such as highlighted regions for comparisons, time step, class values for colour legend, etc. and provide a snapshot of the current application state, which can then be provided as a hyperlink and recreated by someone else. Since data can be embedded within this snapshot, it is possible to interactively visualize and manipulate it. The second technique, web-based linked views, includes multiple windows which interactively respond to the user selections, so that when selecting an object and changing it one window, it will automatically update in all the other

  19. Status of text-mining techniques applied to biomedical text.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Ramón A-A; Schneider, Reinhard; Blaschke, Christian

    2006-04-01

    Scientific progress is increasingly based on knowledge and information. Knowledge is now recognized as the driver of productivity and economic growth, leading to a new focus on the role of information in the decision-making process. Most scientific knowledge is registered in publications and other unstructured representations that make it difficult to use and to integrate the information with other sources (e.g. biological databases). Making a computer understand human language has proven to be a complex achievement, but there are techniques capable of detecting, distinguishing and extracting a limited number of different classes of facts. In the biomedical field, extracting information has specific problems: complex and ever-changing nomenclature (especially genes and proteins) and the limited representation of domain knowledge.

  20. Active Learning Techniques Applied to an Interdisciplinary Mineral Resources Course.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    An interdisciplinary active learning course was introduced at the University of Puget Sound entitled 'Mineral Resources and the Environment'. Various formative assessment and active learning techniques that have been effective in other courses were adapted and implemented to improve student learning, increase retention and broaden knowledge and understanding of course material. This was an elective course targeted towards upper-level undergraduate geology and environmental majors. The course provided an introduction to the mineral resources industry, discussing geological, environmental, societal and economic aspects, legislation and the processes involved in exploration, extraction, processing, reclamation/remediation and recycling of products. Lectures and associated weekly labs were linked in subject matter; relevant readings from the recent scientific literature were assigned and discussed in the second lecture of the week. Peer-based learning was facilitated through weekly reading assignments with peer-led discussions and through group research projects, in addition to in-class exercises such as debates. Writing and research skills were developed through student groups designing, carrying out and reporting on their own semester-long research projects around the lasting effects of the historical Ruston Smelter on the biology and water systems of Tacoma. The writing of their mini grant proposals and final project reports was carried out in stages to allow for feedback before the deadline. Speakers from industry were invited to share their specialist knowledge as guest lecturers, and students were encouraged to interact with them, with a view to employment opportunities. Formative assessment techniques included jigsaw exercises, gallery walks, placemat surveys, think pair share and take-home point summaries. Summative assessment included discussion leadership, exams, homeworks, group projects, in-class exercises, field trips, and pre-discussion reading exercises

  1. Finite element techniques applied to cracks interacting with selected singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The finite-element method for computing the extensional stress-intensity factor for cracks approaching selected singularities of varied geometry is described. Stress-intensity factors are generated using both displacement and J-integral techniques, and numerical results are compared to those obtained experimentally in a photoelastic investigation. The selected singularities considered are a colinear crack, a circular penetration, and a notched circular penetration. Results indicate that singularities greatly influence the crack-tip stress-intensity factor as the crack approaches the singularity. In addition, the degree of influence can be regulated by varying the overall geometry of the singularity. Local changes in singularity geometry have little effect on the stress-intensity factor for the cases investigated.

  2. Neoliberal Optimism: Applying Market Techniques to Global Health.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yuyang

    2016-09-23

    Global health and neoliberalism are becoming increasingly intertwined as organizations utilize markets and profit motives to solve the traditional problems of poverty and population health. I use field work conducted over 14 months in a global health technology company to explore how the promise of neoliberalism re-envisions humanitarian efforts. In this company's vaccine refrigerator project, staff members expect their investors and their market to allow them to achieve scale and develop accountability to their users in developing countries. However, the translation of neoliberal techniques to the global health sphere falls short of the ideal, as profits are meager and purchasing power remains with donor organizations. The continued optimism in market principles amidst such a non-ideal market reveals the tenacious ideological commitment to neoliberalism in these global health projects.

  3. Modern Techniques and Technologies Applied to Training and Performance Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; Kavanaugh, Ashley A; Murray, Steven R; McNeal, Jeni R; Jemni, Monèm

    2016-12-05

    Athlete preparation and performance continues to increase in complexity and costs. Modern coaches are shifting from reliance on personal memory, experience, and opinion to evidence from collected training load data. Training load monitoring may hold vital information for developing systems of monitoring that follow the training process with such precision that both performance prediction and day-to-day management of training become an adjunct to preparation and performance. Time series data collection and analyses in sport are still in their infancy with considerable efforts being applied in "big-data" analytics and models of the appropriate variables to monitor and methods for doing so. Training monitoring has already garnered important applications, but lacks a theoretical framework from which to develop further. As such, we propose a framework involving the following: analyses of individuals, trend analyses, rules-based analysis, and statistical process control.

  4. Scaling-up ultrasound standing wave enhanced sedimentation filters.

    PubMed

    Prest, Jeff E; Treves Brown, Bernard J; Fielden, Peter R; Wilkinson, Stephen J; Hawkes, Jeremy J

    2015-02-01

    Particle concentration and filtration is a key stage in a wide range of processing industries and also one that can be present challenges for high throughput, continuous operation. Here we demonstrate some features which increase the efficiency of ultrasound enhanced sedimentation and could enable the technology the potential to be scaled up. In this work, 20 mm piezoelectric plates were used to drive 100 mm high chambers formed from single structural elements. The coherent structural resonances were able to drive particles (yeast cells) in the water to nodes throughout the chamber. Ultrasound enhanced sedimentation was used to demonstrate the efficiency of the system (>99% particle clearance). Sub-wavelength pin protrusions were used for the contacts between the resonant chamber and other elements. The pins provided support and transferred power, replacing glue which is inefficient for power transfer. Filtration energies of ∼4 J/ml of suspension were measured. A calculation of thermal convection indicates that the circulation could disrupt cell alignment in ducts >35 mm high when a 1K temperature gradient is present; we predict higher efficiencies when this maximum height is observed. For the acoustic design, although modelling was minimal before construction, the very simple construction allowed us to form 3D models of the nodal patterns in the fluid and the duct structure. The models were compared with visual observations of particle movement, Chladni figures and scanning laser vibrometer mapping. This demonstrates that nodal planes in the fluid can be controlled by the position of clamping points and that the contacts could be positioned to increase the efficiency and reliability of particle manipulations in standing waves.

  5. Fiber optic diagnostic techniques applied to electrical discharge machining sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillans, B. W.; Evensen, M. H.; Taylor, H. F.; Eubank, P. T.; Ma, Lianxi

    2002-02-01

    Plasma sparks from an electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned in the dielectric oil. Measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy environment. Optical data were used along with current pulse wave forms from the EDM machine to study the temporal characteristics of the spark in both the pulse time and the pause time. During the pause time, extinction of the sparks was longer than previously thought—perhaps due to the remaining infrared radiation after the collapse of the spark. Further, an optical pattern was identified that indicated in advance when an arc was being formed instead of a spark. Spectral data of the plasma spark was obtained by using a scanning grating spectrometer in conjunction with crosscorrelation to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Average spark temperatures from the spectral data were found to be significantly higher than those previously predicted from energy balances. The results showed a shift in the optical spectra to longer wavelengths during the spark, showing that the spark temperature decreased with time.

  6. Cleaning techniques for applied-B ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.E.; Menge, P.R.; Hanson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements and theoretical considerations indicate that the lithium-fluoride (LiF) lithium ion source operates by electron-assisted field-desorption, and provides a pure lithium beam for 10--20 ns. Evidence on both the SABRE (1 TW) and PBFA-II (20 TW) accelerators indicates that the lithium beam is replaced by a beam of protons, and carbon resulting from electron thermal desorption of hydrocarbon surface and bulk contamination with subsequent avalanche ionization. Appearance of contaminant ions in the beam is accompanied by rapid impedance collapse, possibly resulting from loss of magnetic insulation in the rapidly expanding and ionizing, neutral layer. Electrode surface and source substrate cleaning techniques are being developed on the SABRE accelerator to reduce beam contamination, plasma formation, and impedance collapse. We have increased lithium current density a factor of 3 and lithium energy a factor of 5 through a combination of in-situ surface and substrate coatings, impermeable substrate coatings, and field profile modifications.

  7. Sputtering as a Technique for Applying Tribological Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramalingam, S.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear-induced mechanical failures may be controlled to extend the life of tribological components through the interposition of selected solid materials between contacting surfaces. Thin solid films of soft and hard materials are appropriate to lower friction and enhance the wear resistance of precision tribo-elements. Tribological characteristics of thin hard coats deposited on a variety of ferrous and non-ferrous substrates were tested. The thin hard coats used were titanium nitride films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering of metallic titanium. High contact stress, low speed tests showed wear rate reductions of one or more magnitude, even with films a few micrometers in thickness. Low contact stress, high speed tests carried out under rather severe test conditions showed that thin films of TiN afforded significant friction reduction and wear protection. Thin hard coats were shown to improve the friction and wear performance of rolling contacts. Satisfactory film-to-substrate adhesion strengths can be obtained with reactive magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction and microhardness tests were employed to assess the effectiveness of the sputtering technique.

  8. Digital prototyping technique applied for redesigning plastic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, A.; Andrei, A.

    2015-11-01

    After products are on the market for some time, they often need to be redesigned to meet new market requirements. New products are generally derived from similar but outdated products. Redesigning a product is an important part of the production and development process. The purpose of this paper is to show that using modern technology, like Digital Prototyping in industry is an effective way to produce new products. This paper tries to demonstrate and highlight the effectiveness of the concept of Digital Prototyping, both to reduce the design time of a new product, but also the costs required for implementing this step. The results of this paper show that using Digital Prototyping techniques in designing a new product from an existing one available on the market mould offers a significantly manufacturing time and cost reduction. The ability to simulate and test a new product with modern CAD-CAM programs in all aspects of production (designing of the 3D model, simulation of the structural resistance, analysis of the injection process and beautification) offers a helpful tool for engineers. The whole process can be realised by one skilled engineer very fast and effective.

  9. Beginning with sustainable scale up in mind: initial results from a population, health and environment project in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Ghiron, Laura; Shillingi, Lucy; Kabiswa, Charles; Ogonda, Godfrey; Omimo, Antony; Ntabona, Alexis; Simmons, Ruth; Fajans, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that integrated population, health and environment approaches can address the needs and rights of vulnerable communities. However, these and other types of health and development projects have rarely gone on to influence larger policy and programme development. ExpandNet, a network of health professionals working on scaling up, argues this is because projects are often not designed with future sustainability and scaling up in mind. Developing and implementing sustainable interventions that can be applied on a larger scale requires a different mindset and new approaches to small-scale/pilot testing. This paper shows how this new approach is being applied and the initial lessons from its use in the Health of People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin Project currently underway in Uganda and Kenya. Specific lessons that are emerging are: 1) ongoing, meaningful stakeholder engagement has significantly shaped the design and implementation, 2) multi-sectoral projects are complex and striving for simplicity in the interventins is challenging, and 3) projects that address a sharply felt need experience substantial pressure for scale up, even before their effectiveness is established. Implicit in this paper is the recommendation that other projects would also benefit from applying a scale-up perspective from the outset.

  10. Semantic Data And Visualization Techniques Applied To Geologic Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, P. I. Q.; Royo-Leon, M.; Munoz, R.; Estrada, E.; Villanueva-Rosales, N.; Pennington, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic field mapping involves the use of technology before, during, and after visiting a site. Geologists utilize hardware such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS) connected to mobile computing platforms such as tablets that include software such as ESRI's ArcPad and other software to produce maps and figures for a final analysis and report. Hand written field notes contain important information and drawings or sketches of specific areas within the field study. Our goal is to collect and geo-tag final and raw field data into a cyber-infrastructure environment with an ontology that allows for large data processing, visualization, sharing, and searching, aiding in connecting field research with prior research in the same area and/or aid with experiment replication. Online searches of a specific field area return results such as weather data from NOAA and QuakeML seismic data from USGS. These results that can then be saved to a field mobile device and searched while in the field where there is no Internet connection. To accomplish this we created the GeoField ontology service using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Protégé software. Advanced queries on the dataset can be made using reasoning capabilities can be supported that go beyond a standard database service. These improvements include the automated discovery of data relevant to a specific field site and visualization techniques aimed at enhancing analysis and collaboration while in the field by draping data over mobile views of the site using augmented reality. A case study is being performed at University of Texas at El Paso's Indio Mountains Research Station located near Van Horn, Texas, an active multi-disciplinary field study site. The user can interactively move the camera around the study site and view their data digitally. Geologist's can check their data against the site in real-time and improve collaboration with another person as both parties have the same interactive view of the data.

  11. Applying perceptual and adaptive learning techniques for teaching introductory histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Krasne, Sally; Hillman, Joseph D.; Kellman, Philip J.; Drake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical students are expected to master the ability to interpret histopathologic images, a difficult and time-consuming process. A major problem is the issue of transferring information learned from one example of a particular pathology to a new example. Recent advances in cognitive science have identified new approaches to address this problem. Methods: We adapted a new approach for enhancing pattern recognition of basic pathologic processes in skin histopathology images that utilizes perceptual learning techniques, allowing learners to see relevant structure in novel cases along with adaptive learning algorithms that space and sequence different categories (e.g. diagnoses) that appear during a learning session based on each learner's accuracy and response time (RT). We developed a perceptual and adaptive learning module (PALM) that utilized 261 unique images of cell injury, inflammation, neoplasia, or normal histology at low and high magnification. Accuracy and RT were tracked and integrated into a “Score” that reflected students rapid recognition of the pathologies and pre- and post-tests were given to assess the effectiveness. Results: Accuracy, RT and Scores significantly improved from the pre- to post-test with Scores showing much greater improvement than accuracy alone. Delayed post-tests with previously unseen cases, given after 6-7 weeks, showed a decline in accuracy relative to the post-test for 1st-year students, but not significantly so for 2nd-year students. However, the delayed post-test scores maintained a significant and large improvement relative to those of the pre-test for both 1st and 2nd year students suggesting good retention of pattern recognition. Student evaluations were very favorable. Conclusion: A web-based learning module based on the principles of cognitive science showed an evidence for improved recognition of histopathology patterns by medical students. PMID:24524000

  12. Robustness of speckle imaging techniques applied to horizontal imaging scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Jeremy P.

    Atmospheric turbulence near the ground severely limits the quality of imagery acquired over long horizontal paths. In defense, surveillance, and border security applications, there is interest in deploying man-portable, embedded systems incorporating image reconstruction to improve the quality of imagery available to operators. To be effective, these systems must operate over significant variations in turbulence conditions while also subject to other variations due to operation by novice users. Systems that meet these requirements and are otherwise designed to be immune to the factors that cause variation in performance are considered robust. In addition to robustness in design, the portable nature of these systems implies a preference for systems with a minimum level of computational complexity. Speckle imaging methods are one of a variety of methods recently been proposed for use in man-portable horizontal imagers. In this work, the robustness of speckle imaging methods is established by identifying a subset of design parameters that provide immunity to the expected variations in operating conditions while minimizing the computation time necessary for image recovery. This performance evaluation is made possible using a novel technique for simulating anisoplanatic image formation. I find that incorporate as few as 15 image frames and 4 estimates of the object phase per reconstructed frame provide an average reduction of 45% reduction in Mean Squared Error (MSE) and 68% reduction in deviation in MSE. In addition, the Knox-Thompson phase recovery method is demonstrated to produce images in half the time required by the bispectrum. Finally, it is shown that certain blind image quality metrics can be used in place of the MSE to evaluate reconstruction quality in field scenarios. Using blind metrics rather depending on user estimates allows for reconstruction quality that differs from the minimum MSE by as little as 1%, significantly reducing the deviation in

  13. Azimuthally Varying Noise Reduction Techniques Applied to Supersonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeb, Nicholas S.

    An experimental investigation into the effect of azimuthal variance of chevrons and fluidically enhanced chevrons applied to supersonic jets is presented. Flow field measurements of streamwise and cross-stream particle imaging velocimetry were employed to determine the causes of noise reduction, which was demonstrated through acoustic measurements. Results were obtained in the over- and under- expanded regimes, and at the design condition, though emphasis was placed on the overexpanded regime due to practical application. Surveys of chevron geometry, number, and arrangement were undertaken in an effort to reduce noise and/or incurred performance penalties. Penetration was found to be positively correlated with noise reduction in the overexpanded regime, and negatively correlated in underexpanded operation due to increased effective penetration and high frequency penalty, respectively. The effect of arrangement indicated the beveled configuration achieved optimal abatement in the ideally and underexpanded regimes due to superior BSAN reduction. The symmetric configuration achieved optimal overexpanded noise reduction due to LSS suppression from improved vortex persistence. Increases in chevron number generally improved reduction of all noise components for lower penetration configurations. Higher penetration configurations reached levels of saturation in the four chevron range, with the potential to introduce secondary shock structures and generate additional noise with higher number. Alternation of penetration generated limited benefit, with slight reduction of the high frequency penalty caused by increased shock spacing. The combination of alternating penetration with beveled and clustered configurations achieved comparable noise reduction to the standard counterparts. Analysis of the entire data set indicated initial improvements with projected area that saturated after a given level and either plateaued or degraded with additional increases. Optimal reductions

  14. Using Advanced Modeling to Accelerate the Scale-Up of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sun, Xin; Storlie, Curtis; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-18

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of many approaches that are critical for significantly reducing domestic and global CO2 emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Coal Technology Program Plan envisions 2nd generation CO2 capture technologies ready for demonstration-scale testing around 2020 with the goal of enabling commercial deployment by 2025 [1]. Third generation technologies have a similarly aggressive timeline. A major challenge is that the development and scale-up of new technologies in the energy sector historically takes up to 15 years to move from the laboratory to pre-deployment and another 20 to 30 years for widespread industrial scale deployment. In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale up new carbon capture technologies. The CCSI Toolset (1) enables promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of processes and devices, (2) reduces the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes by using optimization techniques to focus development on the best overall process conditions and by using detailed device-scale models to better understand and improve the internal behavior of complex equipment, and (3) provides quantitative predictions of device and process performance during scale up based on rigorously validated smaller scale simulations that take into account model and parameter uncertainty[2]. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  15. Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C.; Capart, H.; Crone, T. J.; Grinspum, E.; Hsu, L.; Kaufman, D.; Li, L.; Ling, H.; Reitz, M. D.; Smith, B.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments. However, running experiments big enough to generate realistic boundary forces is a logistical challenge to say the least [1]. One alternative is to run table-top simulations with unnaturally weak but fast-eroding pseudo-bedrock, another is to extrapolate from micro-erosion of natural substrates driven by unnaturally weak impacts; hybrid-scale experiments have also been conducted [2]. Here we take a different approach in which we scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge [3]. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum [2] spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking [4], and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. The force structures and their fluctuations within the granular mass and at the boundaries are explored with contact dynamics numerical simulations that mimic the lab experimental conditions [5]. In this presentation we summarize these results and discuss how they can contribute to the formulation of debris-flow erosion law. [1] Major, J. J. (1997), Journal of Geology 105: 345-366, doi:10.1086/515930 [2] Hsu, L. (2010), Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Berkeley [3] Brucks, A., et al (2007), Physical Review E 75, 032301, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.75.032301 [4] Spinewine, B., et al (2011), Experiments in Fluids 50: 1507-1525, doi: 10.1007/s00348

  16. Scale up tools in reactive extrusion and compounding processes. Could 1D-computer modeling be helpful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradel, J.-L.; David, C.; Quinebèche, S.; Blondel, P.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial scale-up (or scale down) in Compounding and Reactive Extrusion processes is one of the most critical R&D challenges. Indeed, most of High Performances Polymers are obtained within a reactive compounding involving chemistry: free radical grafting, in situ compatibilization, rheology control... but also side reactions: oxidation, branching, chain scission... As described by basic Arrhenius and kinetics laws, the competition between all chemical reactions depends on residence time distribution and temperature. Then, to ensure the best possible scale up methodology, we need tools to match thermal history of the formulation along the screws from a lab scale twin screw extruder to an industrial one. This paper proposes a comparison between standard scale-up laws and the use of Computer modeling Software such as Ludovic® applied and compared to experimental data. Scaling data from a compounding line to another one, applying general rules (for example at constant specific mechanical energy), shows differences between experimental and computed data, and error depends on the screw speed range. For more accurate prediction, 1D-Computer Modeling could be used to optimize the process conditions to ensure the best scale-up product, especially in temperature sensitive reactive extrusion processes. When the product temperature along the screws is the key, Ludovic® software could help to compute the temperature profile along the screws and extrapolate conditions, even screw profile, on industrial extruders.

  17. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-06

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities.

  18. Scale-down/scale-up studies leading to improved commercial beer fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nienow, Alvin W; Nordkvist, Mikkel; Boulton, Christopher A

    2011-08-01

    Scale-up/scale-down techniques are vital for successful and safe commercial-scale bioprocess design and operation. An example is given in this review of recent studies related to beer production. Work at the bench scale shows that brewing yeast is not compromised by mechanical agitation up to 4.5 W/kg; and that compared with fermentations mixed by CO(2) evolution, agitation ≥ 0.04 W/kg is able to reduce fermentation time by about 20%. Work at the commercial scale in cylindroconical fermenters shows that, without mechanical agitation, most of the yeast sediments into the cone for about 50% of the fermentation time, leading to poor temperature control. Stirrer mixing overcomes these problems and leads to a similar reduction in batch time as the bench-scale tests and greatly reduces its variability, but is difficult to install in extant fermenters. The mixing characteristics of a new jet mixer, a rotary jet mixer, which overcomes these difficulties, are reported, based on pilot-scale studies. This change enables the advantages of stirring to be achieved at the commercial scale without the problems. In addition, more of the fermentable sugars are converted into ethanol. This review shows the effectiveness of scale-up/scale-down studies for improving commercial operations. Suggestions for further studies are made: one concerning the impact of homogenization on the removal of vicinal diketones and the other on the location of bubble formation at the commercial scale.

  19. Semantic Representation and Scale-Up of Integrated Air Traffic Management Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Ranjan, Shubha; Wei, Mie; Eshow, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Each day, the global air transportation industry generates a vast amount of heterogeneous data from air carriers, air traffic control providers, and secondary aviation entities handling baggage, ticketing, catering, fuel delivery, and other services. Generally, these data are stored in isolated data systems, separated from each other by significant political, regulatory, economic, and technological divides. These realities aside, integrating aviation data into a single, queryable, big data store could enable insights leading to major efficiency, safety, and cost advantages. In this paper, we describe an implemented system for combining heterogeneous air traffic management data using semantic integration techniques. The system transforms data from its original disparate source formats into a unified semantic representation within an ontology-based triple store. Our initial prototype stores only a small sliver of air traffic data covering one day of operations at a major airport. The paper also describes our analysis of difficulties ahead as we prepare to scale up data storage to accommodate successively larger quantities of data -- eventually covering all US commercial domestic flights over an extended multi-year timeframe. We review several approaches to mitigating scale-up related query performance concerns.

  20. Commercial scale validation of a process scale-up model for lubricant blending of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Schlack, Holger

    2014-11-20

    An experimental study was conducted to verify that lubrication mixing in commercial-scale bin blenders can be described by a previously-reported lubrication blending process scale-up model. Specifically, the mixing of two placebo formulations (2:1 MCC:lactose, and 2:1 MCC:DCP) with 1% magnesium stearate in 100, 400, and 2000 L bin blenders at 30% and 70% blend fill levels for several extents of lubricant mixing was examined. The lubricated powder blends were assessed for bulk/tapped density and powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio. The blends were then compressed into tablets and evaluated for tensile strength, friability, and disintegration. It was observed that the lubrication rate constant, γ, for tablet tensile strength and for bulk specific volume were similar. Furthermore, powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio, improved with increased extent of lubrication. Tablet disintegration and tablet friability were both minimally affected as a result of extended lubrication for the placebos blends evaluated in this study. The results of this study confirm that the lubrication mixing model can be applied to scale-up the lubrication blending process from batches made in 30 mL bottle blenders to batches made in 2000 L bin blenders, which is a range of nearly five orders of magnitude.

  1. Scale-up of hydrophobin-assisted recombinant protein production in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Lauri J; Bailey, Michael J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Ritala, Anneli

    2014-05-01

    Plant suspension cell cultures are emerging as an alternative to mammalian cells for production of complex recombinant proteins. Plant cell cultures provide low production cost, intrinsic safety and adherence to current regulations, but low yields and costly purification technology hinder their commercialization. Fungal hydrophobins have been utilized as fusion tags to improve yields and facilitate efficient low-cost purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase separation (ATPS) in plant, fungal and insect cells. In this work, we report the utilization of hydrophobin fusion technology in tobacco bright yellow 2 (BY-2) suspension cell platform and the establishment of pilot-scale propagation and downstream processing including first-step purification by ATPS. Green fluorescent protein-hydrophobin fusion (GFP-HFBI) induced the formation of protein bodies in tobacco suspension cells, thus encapsulating the fusion protein into discrete compartments. Cultivation of the BY-2 suspension cells was scaled up in standard stirred tank bioreactors up to 600 L production volume, with no apparent change in growth kinetics. Subsequently, ATPS was applied to selectively capture the GFP-HFBI product from crude cell lysate, resulting in threefold concentration, good purity and up to 60% recovery. The ATPS was scaled up to 20 L volume, without loss off efficiency. This study provides the first proof of concept for large-scale hydrophobin-assisted production of recombinant proteins in tobacco BY-2 cell suspensions.

  2. Volumetric scale-up of a three stage fermentation system for food waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kon; Han, Gui Hwan; Oh, Baek Rock; Chun, Young Nam; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Si Wouk

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a volumetric scale-up of this system was designed and built on a field pilot-scale (total digester volume 10 m(3)), with the results from the field pilot-scale experiments compared with those from the bench-scale (total digester volume 0.4 m(3)) process prior to scale-up. The reduction rate of total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) and the maximum methane content produced in the biogas from the bench-scale system were 90.6% and 72%; whereas those from the field pilot-scale system were 90.1% and 68%, respectively. The estimated methane yields were 282 and 254 l CH(4)/kg tCOD(degraded) in bench and field pilot-scale fermentation systems, respectively. These results indicate that the three stage fermentation system developed in this study can be applied as a commercial process for the disposal of food waste in view of process stability.

  3. Microbial electrolysis cell scale-up for combined wastewater treatment and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Gil-Carrera, L; Escapa, A; Mehta, P; Santoyo, G; Guiot, S R; Morán, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2013-02-01

    This study demonstrates microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) scale-up from a 50mL to a 10L cell. Initially, a 50mL membraneless MEC with a gas diffusion cathode was operated on synthetic wastewater at different organic loads. It was concluded that process scale-up might be best accomplished using a "reactor-in-series" concept. Consequently, 855mL and 10L MECs were built and operated. By optimizing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the 855mL MEC and individually controlling the applied voltages of three anodic compartments with a real-time optimization algorithm, a COD removal of 5.7g L(R)(-1)d(-1) and a hydrogen production of 1.0-2.6L L(R)(-1)d(-1) was achieved. Furthermore, a two MECs in series 10L setup was constructed and operated on municipal wastewater. This test showed a COD removal rate of 0.5g L(R)(-1)d(-1), a removal efficiency of 60-76%, and an energy consumption of 0.9Whperg of COD removed.

  4. Improving Skill Development: An Exploratory Study Comparing a Philosophical and an Applied Ethical Analysis Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam; Burmeister, Oliver K.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study compares and contrasts two types of critical thinking techniques; one is a philosophical and the other an applied ethical analysis technique. The two techniques analyse an ethically challenging situation involving ICT that a recent media article raised to demonstrate their ability to develop the ethical analysis skills of…

  5. Scale up, optimization and stability analysis of Curcumin C3 complex-loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle based delivery of anticancer drugs have been widely investigated. However, a very important process for Research & Development in any pharmaceutical industry is scaling nanoparticle formulation techniques so as to produce large batches for preclinical and clinical trials. This process is not only critical but also difficult as it involves various formulation parameters to be modulated all in the same process. Methods In our present study, we formulated curcumin loaded poly (lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-CURC). This improved the bioavailability of curcumin, a potent natural anticancer drug, making it suitable for cancer therapy. Post formulation, we optimized our process by Reponse Surface Methodology (RSM) using Central Composite Design (CCD) and scaled up the formulation process in four stages with final scale-up process yielding 5 g of curcumin loaded nanoparticles within the laboratory setup. The nanoparticles formed after scale-up process were characterized for particle size, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology, in vitro release kinetics and pharmacokinetics. Stability analysis and gamma sterilization were also carried out. Results Results revealed that that process scale-up is being mastered for elaboration to 5 g level. The mean nanoparticle size of the scaled up batch was found to be 158.5 ± 9.8 nm and the drug loading was determined to be 10.32 ± 1.4%. The in vitro release study illustrated a slow sustained release corresponding to 75% drug over a period of 10 days. The pharmacokinetic profile of PLGA-CURC in rats following i.v. administration showed two compartmental model with the area under the curve (AUC0-∞) being 6.139 mg/L h. Gamma sterilization showed no significant change in the particle size or drug loading of the nanoparticles. Stability analysis revealed long term physiochemical stability of the PLGA-CURC formulation. Conclusions A successful effort towards

  6. Community Health Workers in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: What Do We Know About Scaling Up and Sustainability?

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Dilpreet; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Taylor, Lauren; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to provide a systematic review of the determinants of success in scaling up and sustaining community health worker (CHW) programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods. We searched 11 electronic databases for academic literature published through December 2010 (n = 603 articles). Two independent reviewers applied exclusion criteria to identify articles that provided empirical evidence about the scale-up or sustainability of CHW programs in LMICs, then extracted data from each article by using a standardized form. We analyzed the resulting data for determinants and themes through iterated categorization. Results. The final sample of articles (n = 19) present data on CHW programs in 16 countries. We identified 23 enabling factors and 15 barriers to scale-up and sustainability, which were grouped into 3 thematic categories: program design and management, community fit, and integration with the broader environment. Conclusions. Scaling up and sustaining CHW programs in LMICs requires effective program design and management, including adequate training, supervision, motivation, and funding; acceptability of the program to the communities served; and securing support for the program from political leaders and other health care providers. PMID:23678926

  7. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part II): Intra-apparatus scale-up and inter-apparatus method transfer.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Vieira, Mariana Neves; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Jerz, Gerold; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2016-09-30

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is being widely used across the world for purification of various materials, especially in natural product research. The predictability of CCC scale-up has been successfully demonstrated using specially designed instruments of the same manufacturer. The reality is that the most of CCC users do not have access to such instruments and do not have enough experience to transfer methods from one CCC column to another. This unique study of three international teams is based on innovative approach to simplify the scale-up between different CCC machines using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. The optimized separation methodology, recently developed by the authors (Part I), was repeatedly performed on CCC columns of different design available at most research laboratories across the world. Hexane - ethyl acetate - methanol - water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds to monitor stationary phase retention and calculate peak resolution. It has been demonstrated that volumetric, linear and length scale-up transfer factors based on column characteristics can be directly applied to different i.d., volume and length columns independently on instrument make in an intra-apparatus scale-up and inter-apparatus method transfer.

  8. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers.

  9. Scale Up of Pan Coating Process Using Quality by Design Principles.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Pandey, Preetanshu

    2015-11-01

    Scale up of pan coating process is of high importance to the pharmaceutical and food industry. The number of process variables and their interdependence in a pan coating process can make it a rather complex scale-up problem. This review discusses breaking down the coating process variables into three main categories: pan-related, spray-related, and thermodynamic-related factors. A review on how to scale up each of these factors is presented via two distinct strategies--"macroscopic" and "microscopic" scale-up. In a Quality by Design paradigm, where an increased process understanding is required, there is increased emphasis on "microscopic" scale-up, which by definition ensures a more reproducible process and thereby robust scale-up. This article also reviews the various existing and new modeling and process analytical technology tools that can provide additional information to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of the coating process.

  10. SCALE-UP OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop advanced regenerable sorbents for hot gas desulfurization in IGCC systems. The specific objective was to develop durable advanced sorbents that demonstrate a strong resistance to attrition and chemical deactivation, and high sulfidation activity at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F). Twenty sorbents were synthesized in this work. Details of the preparation technique and the formulations are proprietary, pending a patent application, thus no details regarding the technique are divulged in this report. Sulfidations were conducted with a simulated gas containing (vol %) 10 H{sub 2}, 15 CO, 5 CO{sub 2}, 0.4-1 H{sub 2}S, 15 H{sub 2}O, and balance N{sub 2} in the temperature range of 343-538 C. Regenerations were conducted at temperatures in the range of 400-600 C with air-N{sub 2} mixtures. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives were investigated that promote regeneration at lower temperatures. Characterization were performed for fresh, sulfided and regenerated sorbents.

  11. [Scale-up preparation of phycoerythrin from Porphyra haitanensis].

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Yan, Daiyuan; Ni, Jing; Guo, Ziye; Cai, Chun'er; He, Peimin

    2011-04-01

    We developed large-scale preparation of phycoerythrin from Porphyra haitanensis, a main economic red algae in China. Firstly, P. haitanensis thallus was broken by using "swelling and smash" method. Then times of grads ammonium sulfate precipitation applied to the crude extraction were compared. Desalted solution was further purified with one-step chromatography using hydroxyapatite and properties on spectrum and molecular weight were identified finally. The results indicated that after four times of ammonium sulfate precipitation (15%, 50%, 10% and 40%), the absorption spectrum purity of P. haitanensis achieved 0.9 (A564/A280), and 507.82 mg phycoerythrin (A564/A280 > 3.2) was obtained from 7 kg fresh algae after further hydroxyapatite chromatography. This research provides a potential way for preparation of phycoerythrin in large sclae.

  12. What are the barriers to scaling up health interventions in low and middle income countries? A qualitative study of academic leaders in implementation science

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most low and middle income countries (LMICs) are currently not on track to reach the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). One way to accelerate progress would be through the large-scale implementation of evidence-based health tools and interventions. This study aimed to: (a) explore the barriers that have impeded such scale-up in LMICs, and (b) lay out an “implementation research agenda”—a series of key research questions that need to be addressed in order to help overcome such barriers. Methods Interviews were conducted with fourteen key informants, all of whom are academic leaders in the field of implementation science, who were purposively selected for their expertise in scaling up in LMICs. Interviews were transcribed by hand and manually coded to look for emerging themes related to the two study aims. Barriers to scaling up, and unanswered research questions, were organized into six categories, representing different components of the scaling up process: attributes of the intervention; attributes of the implementers; scale-up approach; attributes of the adopting community; socio-political, fiscal, and cultural context; and research context. Results Factors impeding the success of scale-up that emerged from the key informant interviews, and which are areas for future investigation, include: complexity of the intervention and lack of technical consensus; limited human resource, leadership, management, and health systems capacity; poor application of proven diffusion techniques; lack of engagement of local implementers and of the adopting community; and inadequate integration of research into scale-up efforts. Conclusions Key steps in expanding the evidence base on implementation in LMICs include studying how to: simplify interventions; train “scale-up leaders” and health workers dedicated to scale-up; reach and engage communities; match the best delivery strategy to the specific health problem and context; and raise the low

  13. Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, L.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Doughty, D.

    1993-04-01

    A synergistic rock characterization methodology has been developed. It derives reservoir engineering parameters from X-ray tomography (CT) scanning, computer assisted petrographic image analysis, minipermeameter measurements, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). This rock characterization methodology is used to investigate the effect of small-scale rock heterogeneity on oil distribution and recovery. It is also used to investigate the applicability of imaging technologies to the development of scaleup procedures from core plug to whole core, by comparing the results of detailed simulations with the images ofthe fluid distributions observed by CT scanning. By using the rock and fluid detailed data generated by imaging technology describe, one can verify directly, in the laboratory, various scaling up techniques. Asan example, realizations of rock properties statistically and spatially compatible with the observed values are generated by one of the various stochastic methods available (fuming bands) and are used as simulator input. The simulation results were compared with both the simulation results using the true rock properties and the fluid distributions observed by CT. Conclusions regarding the effect of the various permeability models on waterflood oil recovery were formulated.

  14. Scaling up watershed model parameters--Flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The Edisto River is the longest and largest river system completely contained in South Carolina and is one of the longest free flowing blackwater rivers in the United States. The Edisto River basin also has fish-tissue mercury concentrations that are some of the highest recorded in the United States. As part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River basin were made with the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). The potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River basin, was assessed. Scaling up was done in a step-wise process beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic wetness index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made with subsequent simulations culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the two models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the significant difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL hydrologic simulations, a visualization tool (the Edisto River Data Viewer) was developed to help assess trends and influencing variables in the stream ecosystem. Incorporated into the visualization tool were the water-quality load models TOPLOAD, TOPLOAD-H, and LOADEST

  15. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  16. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-05-15

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing bottles to an industrially relevant production level. Therefore, during upscaling of biomass production for a range of metal transformations, including the production of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens, from 100-ml bench-scale to 5-liter fermentors, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a metabolic fingerprinting approach followed by the analysis of bacterial cell extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling. FTIR results clearly differentiated between the phenotypic changes associated with different growth phases as well as the two culturing conditions. Furthermore, the clustering patterns displayed by multivariate analysis were in agreement with the turbidimetric measurements, which displayed an extended lag phase for cells grown in a 5-liter bioreactor (24 h) compared to those grown in 100-ml serum bottles (6 h). GC-MS analysis of the cell extracts demonstrated an overall accumulation of fumarate during the lag phase under both culturing conditions, coinciding with the detected concentrations of oxaloacetate, pyruvate, nicotinamide, and glycerol-3-phosphate being at their lowest levels compared to other growth phases. These metabolites were overlaid onto a metabolic network of G. sulfurreducens, and taking into account the levels of these metabolites throughout the fermentation process, the limited availability of oxaloacetate and nicotinamide would seem to be the main metabolic bottleneck resulting from this scale-up process. Additional metabolite-feeding experiments were carried out to validate the above hypothesis. Nicotinamide supplementation (1 mM) did not display any significant effects on the lag phase of G. sulfurreducens cells grown in the 100-ml serum bottles. However

  17. 31 CFR 205.11 - What requirements apply to funding techniques?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... techniques? 205.11 Section 205.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.11 What requirements apply to funding techniques? (a) A State and a Federal... electronic funds transfer methods to transfer funds to States unless a waiver is available....

  18. EFFECT OF PRELOADING ON THE SCALE-UP OF GAC MICRO- COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previously presented microcolumn scale-up procedure is evaluated. Scale-up assumptions that involve equal capacities in microcolumns and field columns are studied in an effort to determine whether preloading activated carbon with a natural water significantly reduces the carbo...

  19. What Does It Take to Scale Up and Sustain Evidence-Based Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Boardman, Alison G.; Mcmaster, Kristen L.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the strategic scaling up of evidence-based practices. The authors draw from the scholarly work of fellow special education researchers and from the field of learning sciences. The article defines scaling up as the process by which researchers or educators initially implement interventions on a small scale, validate them, and…

  20. Strategies for Scaling Up: Promoting Parent Involvement through Family-School-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Reynolds, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility, creativity, and collaboration are required to successfully meet the needs of each school when scaling up family engagement programs across a diverse range of communities. Flexibility, creativity, and collaboration are required to successfully meet the needs of each school when scaling up family engagement programs across a diverse…

  1. Fundamental Issues Concerning the Sustainment and Scaling Up of Professional Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirosh, Dina; Tsamir, Pessia; Levenson, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The issue of sustaining and scaling up professional development for mathematics teachers raises several fundamental issues for researchers. This commentary addresses various definitions for sustainability and scaling up and how these definitions may affect the design of programs as well as the design of research. We consider four of the papers in…

  2. Discrete element method based scale-up model for material synthesis using ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Priya Radhi

    Mechanical milling is a widely used technique for powder processing in various areas. In this work, a scale-up model for describing this ball milling process is developed. The thesis is a combination of experimental and modeling efforts. Initially, Discrete Element Model (DEM) is used to describe energy transfer from milling tools to the milled powder for shaker, planetary, and attritor mills. The rolling and static friction coefficients are determined experimentally. Computations predict a quasisteady rate of energy dissipation, E d, for each experimental configuration. It is proposed that the milling dose defined as a product of Ed and milling time, t, divided by the mass of milled powder, mp characterizes the milling progress independently of the milling device or milling conditions used. Once the milling dose is determined for one experimental configuration, it can be used to predict the milling time required to prepare the same material in any milling configuration, for which Ed is calculated. The concept is validated experimentally for DEM describing planetary and shaker mills. For attritor, the predicted Ed includes substantial contribution from milling tool interaction events with abnormally high forces (>103 N). The energy in such events is likely dissipated to heat or plastically deform milling tools rather than refine material. Indeed, DEM predictions for the attritor correlate with experiments when such events are ignored in the analysis. With an objective of obtaining real-time indicators of milling progress, power, torque, and rotation speed of the impeller of an attritor mill are measured during preparation of metal matrix composite powders in the subsequent portion of this thesis. Two material systems are selected and comparisons made between in-situ parameters and experimental milling progress indicators. It is established that real-time measurements can certainly be used to describe milling progress. However, they need to be interpreted carefully

  3. 'Scaling-up is a craft not a science': Catalysing scale-up of health innovations in Ethiopia, India and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Neil; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Dimka, Ritgak; Fanta, Feleke; Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Schellenberg, Joanna; Tamire-Woldemariam, Addis; Walt, Gill; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi

    2014-11-01

    Donors and other development partners commonly introduce innovative practices and technologies to improve health in low and middle income countries. Yet many innovations that are effective in improving health and survival are slow to be translated into policy and implemented at scale. Understanding the factors influencing scale-up is important. We conducted a qualitative study involving 150 semi-structured interviews with government, development partners, civil society organisations and externally funded implementers, professional associations and academic institutions in 2012/13 to explore scale-up of innovative interventions targeting mothers and newborns in Ethiopia, the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and the six states of northeast Nigeria, which are settings with high burdens of maternal and neonatal mortality. Interviews were analysed using a common analytic framework developed for cross-country comparison and themes were coded using Nvivo. We found that programme implementers across the three settings require multiple steps to catalyse scale-up. Advocating for government to adopt and finance health innovations requires: designing scalable innovations; embedding scale-up in programme design and allocating time and resources; building implementer capacity to catalyse scale-up; adopting effective approaches to advocacy; presenting strong evidence to support government decision making; involving government in programme design; invoking policy champions and networks; strengthening harmonisation among external programmes; aligning innovations with health systems and priorities. Other steps include: supporting government to develop policies and programmes and strengthening health systems and staff; promoting community uptake by involving media, community leaders, mobilisation teams and role models. We conclude that scale-up has no magic bullet solution - implementers must embrace multiple activities, and require substantial support from donors and governments in

  4. Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Lynd, Lee; Bakker, André; LaRoche, Richard; Wyman, Charles

    2010-05-01

    The absence of a systematic scale-up approach for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to commodity products is a significant bottleneck to realizing the potential benefits offered by such conversion. Motivated by this, we undertook to develop a scale-up approach for conversion of waste paper sludge to ethanol. Physical properties of the system were measured and correlations were developed for their dependence upon cellulose conversion. Just-suspension of solid particles was identified as the scale up criterion based on experiments at lab scale. The impeller speed for just solids suspension at large scale was predicted using computational fluid dynamics simulations. The scale-up strategy was validated by analyzing mixing requirements such as solid-liquid mass transfer under the predicted level of agitation at large scale. The scale-up approach enhances the prediction of reactor performance and helps provide guidelines for the analysis and design of large scale bioreactors based on bench scale experimentation.

  5. Image Enhancement and Display Techniques Applied to SAR580 Images of Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    applied to the images. This report discusses tht properties of SAR ship returns, reviews the various types of image enhancement techniques applied to...Figures , , a . . . . , , , . . . , . . . . , . . iii I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . I 2. PROPERTIES OF SAR SHIP IMAGES ... ... ...... I 3...Page 1 Original Ship Photos 5 2 Ship Profile and Plan Views 9 3 SAR Ship Images 14 4 SAR Contour Plots 16 5 SAR Three-Dimensional Plots 19 6 Container

  6. Scaling-up Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Techniques for Teaching Large Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevathan, Jarrod; Myers, Trina; Gray, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Promoting engagement during lectures becomes significantly more challenging as class sizes increase. Therefore, lecturers need to experiment with new teaching methodologies to embolden deep learning outcomes and to develop interpersonal skills amongst students. Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning is a teaching approach that uses highly…

  7. The technique of linear prediction filters applied to studies of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    Linear prediction filtering is a powerful empirical technique suitable for the study of stimulus-response behavior. The technique enables one to determine the most general linear relationship between multiple time-varying quantities, assuming that the physical systems relating the quantities are linear and time invariant. Several researchers have applied linear prediction analysis to investigate solar wind-magnetosphere interactions. This short review describes the method of linear prediction analysis, its application to solar wind-magnetosphere coupling studies both in terms of physical processes, and the results of investigations which have used this technique.

  8. Improving skill development: an exploratory study comparing a philosophical and an applied ethical analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam; Burmeister, Oliver K.

    2012-09-01

    This exploratory study compares and contrasts two types of critical thinking techniques; one is a philosophical and the other an applied ethical analysis technique. The two techniques analyse an ethically challenging situation involving ICT that a recent media article raised to demonstrate their ability to develop the ethical analysis skills of ICT students and professionals. In particular the skill development focused on includes: being able to recognise ethical challenges and formulate coherent responses; distancing oneself from subjective judgements; developing ethical literacy; identifying stakeholders; and communicating ethical decisions made, to name a few.

  9. Scale-up of stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) to industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Hoeks, Frans W J M M; Boon, Lotte A; Studer, Fabian; Wolff, Menno O; van der Schot, Freija; Vrabél, Peter; van der Lans, Rob G J M; Bujalski, Waldemar; Manelius, Asa; Blomsten, Gustav; Hjorth, Sven; Prada, Giovanna; Luyben, Karel Ch A M; Nienow, Alvin W

    2003-02-01

    Foam disruption by agitation-the stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) technique-was scaled up to pilot and production scale using Rushton turbines and an up-pumping hydrofoil impeller, the Scaba 3SHP1. The dominating mechanism behind SAFD-foam entrainment-was also demonstrated at production scale. The mechanistic model for SAFD defines a fictitious liquid velocity generated by the (upper) impeller near the dispersion surface, which is correlated with complete foam disruption. This model proved to be scalable, thus enabling the model to be used for the design of SAFD applications. Axial upward pumping impellers appeared to be more effective with respect to SAFD than Rushton turbines, as demonstrated by retrofitting a 12,000 l bioreactor, i.e. the triple Rushton configuration was compared with a mixed impeller configuration from Scaba with a 20% lower ungassed power draw. The retrofitted impeller configuration allowed 10% more broth without risking excessive foaming. In this way a substantial increase in the volumetric productivity of the bioreactor was achieved. Design recommendations for the application of SAFD are given in this paper. Using these recommendations for the design of a 30,000 l scale bioreactor, almost foamless Escherichia coli fermentations were realised.

  10. Scaling up graph-based semisupervised learning via prototype vector machines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Lan, Liang; Kwok, James T; Vucetic, Slobodan; Parvin, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    When the amount of labeled data are limited, semisupervised learning can improve the learner's performance by also using the often easily available unlabeled data. In particular, a popular approach requires the learned function to be smooth on the underlying data manifold. By approximating this manifold as a weighted graph, such graph-based techniques can often achieve state-of-the-art performance. However, their high time and space complexities make them less attractive on large data sets. In this paper, we propose to scale up graph-based semisupervised learning using a set of sparse prototypes derived from the data. These prototypes serve as a small set of data representatives, which can be used to approximate the graph-based regularizer and to control model complexity. Consequently, both training and testing become much more efficient. Moreover, when the Gaussian kernel is used to define the graph affinity, a simple and principled method to select the prototypes can be obtained. Experiments on a number of real-world data sets demonstrate encouraging performance and scaling properties of the proposed approach. It also compares favorably with models learned via l1 -regularization at the same level of model sparsity. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in producing highly parsimonious and accurate models for semisupervised learning.

  11. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  12. Experimental Study on Scale-Up of Solid-Liquid Stirred Tank with an Intermig Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Zhao, Xing; Zhang, Lifeng; Yin, Pan

    2017-02-01

    The scale-up of a solid-liquid stirred tank with an Intermig impeller was characterized via experiments. Solid concentration, impeller just-off-bottom speed and power consumption were measured in stirred tanks of different scales. The scale-up criteria for achieving the same effect of solid suspension in small-scale and large-scale vessels were evaluated. The solids distribution improves if the operating conditions are held constant as the tank is scaled-up. The results of impeller just-off-bottom speed gave X = 0.868 in the scale-up relationship ND X = constant. Based on this criterion, the stirring power per unit volume obviously decreased at N = N js, and the power number ( N P) was approximately equal to 0.3 when the solids are uniformly distributed in the vessels.

  13. Methodologies Used for Scaling-up From a Single Energy Production Unit to State Energy Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimdina, Ginta; Timma, Lelde; Veidenbergs, Ivars; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2015-12-01

    In a well-functioning and sustainable national energy sector, each of its elements should function with maximum efficiency. To ensure maximum efficiency and study possible improvement of the sector, a scaling-up framework is presented in this work. The scaling-up framework means that the starting point is a CHP unit and its operation, the next step of aggregation is in a district heating network, followed by a municipal energy plan and finally leading to a low carbon strategy. In this framework the authors argue, that the successful, innovative practices developed and tested at the lower level of aggregation can be then transferred to the upper levels of aggregation, thus leading to a scaling-up effect of innovative practices. The work summarizes 12 methodologies used in the energy sector, by dividing these methodologies among the levels of aggregation in a scaling-up framework.

  14. Scaling up and error analysis of transpiration for Populus euphratica in a desert riparian forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Water consumption information of the forest stand is the most important factor for regional water resources management. However, water consumption of individual trees are usually measured based on the limited sample trees , so, it is an important issue how to realize eventual scaling up of data from a series of sample trees to entire stand. Estimation of sap flow flux density (Fd) and stand sapwood area (AS-stand) are among the most critical factors for determining forest stand transpiration using sap flow measurement. To estimate Fd, the various links in sap flow technology have great impact on the measurement of sap flow, to estimate AS-stand, an appropriate indirect technique for measuring each tree sapwood area (AS-tree) is required, because it is impossible to measure the AS-tree of all trees in a forest stand. In this study, Fd was measured in 2 mature P. euphratic trees at several radial depths, 0~10, 10~30mm, using sap flow sensors with the heat ratio method, the relationship model between AS-tree and stem diameter (DBH), growth model of AS-tree were established, using investigative original data of DBH, tree-age, and AS-tree. The results revealed that it can achieve scaling up of transpiration from sample trees to entire forest stand using AS-tree and Fd, however, the transpiration of forest stand (E) will be overvalued by 12.6% if using Fd of 0~10mm, and it will be underestimated by 25.3% if using Fd of 10~30mm, it implied that major uncertainties in mean stand Fd estimations are caused by radial variations in Fd. E will be obviously overvalued when the AS-stand is constant, this result imply that it is the key to improve the prediction accuracy that how to simulate the AS-stand changes in the day scale; They also showed that the potential errors in transpiration with a sample size of approximately ≥30 were almost stable for P.euphrtica, this suggests that to make an allometric equation it might be necessary to sample at least 30 trees.

  15. Applying a Schema for Studying the Instructive Techniques Employed by Authors of Four Novels for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severin, Mary Susan

    The purpose of this study was to apply a schema to adolescent novels, to determine what lessons the authors teach and what techniques they employ in their teaching. A historical review of literary criticism established a background for interpreting the educational function of literature. A schema of questions based on the historical background was…

  16. Recreation in a Zoo Environment: Applying Animal Behavior Research Techniques to Understand How Visitors Allocate Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lisa

    1995-01-01

    A focal-animal sampling technique was applied to measure and quantify visitor behavior at an enclosed hummingbird aviary. The amount of time visitors stayed within the aviary and how they allocated time was measured. Results can be used by exhibit designers to create and modify museum exhibits. (LZ)

  17. Comparison of a laboratory and a production coating spray gun with respect to scale-up.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-01-19

    A laboratory spray gun and a production spray gun were investigated in a scale-up study. Two Schlick spray guns, which are equipped with a new antibearding cap, were used in this study. The influence of the atomization air pressure, spray gun-to tablet bed distance, polymer solution viscosity, and spray rate were analyzed in a statistical design of experiments. The 2 spray guns were compared with respect to the spray width and height, droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density. The droplet size, velocity, and spray density were measured with a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. A successful scale-up of the atomization is accomplished if similar droplet sizes, droplet velocities, and spray densities are achieved in the production scale as in the laboratory scale. This study gives basic information for the scale-up of the settings from the laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun. Both spray guns are highly comparable with respect to the droplet size and velocity. The scale-up of the droplet size should be performed by an adjustment of the atomization air pressure. The scale-up of the droplet velocity should be performed by an adjustment of the spray gun to tablet bed distance. The presented statistical model and surface plots are convenient and powerful tools for scaling up the spray settings if the spray gun is changed from laboratory spray gun to the production spray gun.

  18. The effect of applying orthogonal projection technique in short window segments to obtain fetal magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Lowery, Curtis L; Preissl, Hubert; Eswaran, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive recordings of fetal heart and brain have been possible for almost a decade with the advancement in biomagnetic sensors using the SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) technology. Techniques such as orthogonal projection and ICA have been applied to attenuate interference from other biological sources such as maternal heart. Successful application of such techniques among other factors depend on the non-stationary characteristics of the signals. To minimize the effect of non-stationarity due to maternal and/or fetal movement in long duration datasets, we proposed to investigate the minimal time window that is needed to obtain averaging with good SNR to apply the orthogonal projection technique to attenuate maternal magnetocardiogram (MCG) and obtain fetal MCG. The quantifying measure is based on spectral power of signals from 151-channel SQUID array system.

  19. The effect of applying orthogonal projection technique in short window segments to obtain fetal magnetocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D.; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Lowery, Curtis L.; Preissl, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive recordings of fetal heart and brain have been possible for almost a decade with the advancement in biomagnetic sensors using the SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) technology. Techniques such as orthogonal projection and ICA have been applied to attenuate interference from other biological sources such as maternal heart. Successful application of such techniques among other factors depend on the non-stationary characteristics of the signals. To minimize the effect of non-stationarity due to maternal and/or fetal movement in long duration datasets, we proposed to investigate the minimal time window that is needed to obtain averaging with good SNR to apply the orthogonal projection technique to attenuate maternal magnetocardiogram (MCG) and obtain fetal MCG. The quantifying measure is based on spectral estimation of signals from 151-channel SQUID array system. PMID:24109713

  20. Freeze-Drying Process Development and Scale-Up: Scale-Up of Edge Vial Versus Center Vial Heat Transfer Coefficients, Kv.

    PubMed

    Pikal, Michael J; Bogner, Robin; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Sharma, Puneet; Sane, Pooja

    2016-11-01

    This report presents calculations of the difference between the vial heat transfer coefficient of the "edge vial" and the "center vial" at all scales. The only scale-up adjustment for center vials is for the contribution of radiation from the shelf upon which the vial sits by replacing the emissivity of the laboratory dryer shelf with the emissivity of the production dryer shelf. With edge vials, scales-up adjustments are more complex. While convection is not important, heat transfer from the wall to the bands (surrounding the vial array) by radiation and directly from the band to the vials by both radiation and conduction is important; this radiation heat transfer depends on the emissivity of the vial and the bands and is nearly independent of the emissivity of the dryer walls. Differences in wall temperatures do impact the edge vial effect and scale-up, and estimates for wall temperatures are needed for both laboratory and manufacturing dryers. Auto-loading systems (no bands) may give different edge vial heat transfer coefficients than when operating with bands. Satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental values of the edge vial effect indicate that results calculated from the theory are of useful accuracy.

  1. Applied potential tomography. A new noninvasive technique for measuring gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Avill, R; Mangnall, Y F; Bird, N C; Brown, B H; Barber, D C; Seagar, A D; Johnson, A G; Read, N W

    1987-04-01

    Applied potential tomography is a new, noninvasive technique that yields sequential images of the resistivity of gastric contents after subjects have ingested a liquid or semisolid meal. This study validates the technique as a means of measuring gastric emptying. Experiments in vitro showed an excellent correlation between measurements of resistivity and either the square of the radius of a glass rod or the volume of water in a spherical balloon when both were placed in an oval tank containing saline. Altering the lateral position of the rod in the tank did not alter the values obtained. Images of abdominal resistivity were also directly correlated with the volume of air in a gastric balloon. Profiles of gastric emptying of liquid meals obtained using applied potential tomography were very similar to those obtained using scintigraphy or dye dilution techniques, provided that acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Profiles of emptying of a mashed potato meal using applied potential tomography were also very similar to those obtained by scintigraphy. Measurements of the emptying of a liquid meal from the stomach were reproducible if acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Thus, applied potential tomography is an accurate and reproducible method of measuring gastric emptying of liquids and particulate food. It is inexpensive, well tolerated, easy to use, and ideally suited for multiple studies in patients, even those who are pregnant.

  2. Subreflector Focusing Techniques Applied to New DSS-15 and DSS-45 34-meter Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.; Katow, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    An improved technique to determine the subreflector translations required to properly focus a Cassegrainian antenna, under gravity loading, at a full range of elevation angles, is presented. This technique is applied to the 34-m antenna configuration installed at stations DSS-15 (Goldstone, California) and DSS-45 (Australia). The subreflector lateral and axial translations, to be stored into the antenna-control systems, are computed and tabulated. The relationships that govern the main parameters are also presented for future subreflector focusing analysis under wind and thermal loadings.

  3. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  4. A comparison of two conformal mapping techniques applied to an aerobrake body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hommel, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Conformal mapping is a classical technique which has been utilized for solving problems in aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. Conformal mapping has been successfully applied in the construction of grids around airfoils, engine inlets and other aircraft configurations. Conformal mapping techniques were applied to an aerobrake body having an axis of symmetry. Two different approaches were utilized: (1) Karman-Trefftz transformation; and (2) Point Wise Schwarz Christoffel transformation. In both cases, the aerobrake body was mapped onto a near circle, and a grid was generated in the mapped plane. The mapped body and grid were then mapped back into physical space and the properties of the associated grids were examined. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are discussed.

  5. Non-Intrusive Measurement Techniques Applied to the Hybrid Solid Fuel Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of the solid fuel regression rate and the time evolution of the grain geometry are requested for hybrid motor design and control of its operating conditions. Two non-intrusive techniques (NDT) have been applied to hybrid propulsion : both are based on wave propagation, the X-rays and the ultrasounds, through the materials. X-ray techniques allow local thickness measurements (attenuated signal level) using small probes or 2D images (Real Time Radiography), with a link between the size of field of view and accuracy. Beside the safety hazards associated with the high-intensity X-ray systems, the image analysis requires the use of quite complex post-processing techniques. The ultrasound technique is more widely used in energetic material applications, including hybrid fuels. Depending upon the transducer size and the associated equipment, the application domain is large, from tiny samples to the quad-port wagon wheel grain of the 1.1 MN thrust HPDP motor. The effect of the physical quantities has to be taken into account in the wave propagation analysis. With respect to the various applications, there is no unique and perfect experimental method to measure the fuel regression rate. The best solution could be obtained by combining two techniques at the same time, each technique enhancing the quality of the global data.

  6. Scaling up experimental ocean acidification and warming research: from individuals to the ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Ana M; Fernandes, José A; Faulwetter, Sarah; Nunes, Joana; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Mieszkowska, Nova; Artioli, Yuri; Yool, Andrew; Calosi, Piero; Arvanitidis, Christos; Findlay, Helen S; Barange, Manuel; Cheung, William W L; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    . Scaling up the results of experimental climate change research requires approaches that account for long-term, multiscale responses to multiple stressors, in an ecosystem context.

  7. New techniques to apply an optical fiber image guide to harsh radiation environments in nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Takada, Eiji; Hosono, Yoneichi; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hayami, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    To apply optical fiber image guide (IG) to harsh radiation environments, we have developed two new techniques. One technique is a visible type IG with a color correcting system and the other technique is an IR type IG. We irradiated the IGs utilizing a 60Co gamma source. Measured Images with the visible type IG became dark and yellowish because of radiation induced loss. By using a color correction system, the original color of the images can be obtained. In the case of IR type IG, because of low radiation induced loss in the IR region, the degree of darkening was less than half of that for the visible type of IG. For a fixed irradiated length of 2.5m, the dose limit for using IG was estimated to be 4.6 X 108 with the visible type IG and 1.2 X 109 with the IR type IG. These radiation resistivities were more than 103 times of that for usual CCD cameras. With these techniques, IG can be applied to harsh radiation environment.

  8. Scaling-up in the vicinity of wells in heterogeneous field

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the equivalent gridblock permeability obtained by the scaling-up procedure from fine gridblocks depends on the boundary conditions. In the literature, most boundary conditions considered represent a ``linear`` flow pattern, while in reservoir simulation, ``radial`` flow plays an important role and is related directly to well production forecasts. In this paper, the authors will show the need for a specific treatment of the scaling-up procedure in the vicinity of wells due to the ``radial`` flow pattern with a high pressure gradient. On reservoir field scale, two types of flow should be considered: (1) the ``linear`` flow pattern, which usually represents a low pressure gradient region; and (2) the ``radial`` flow pattern, which usually represents a high pressure gradient region. The determination of the equivalent absolute permeabilities by ``radial`` flow patterns is discussed in this paper. The scaled-up parameters consist of transmissibility and numerical productivity index (PI).

  9. Statistical data generated through CFD to aid in the scale-up of shear sensitive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Irfan; Das, Shankhadeep; Cloeter, Mike; Gillis, Paul; Poindexter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes are considered shear-sensitive, where the product quality depends on achieving the right balance between mixing energy input and the resulting strain rate distribution in the process. Examples of such industrial processes are crystallization, flocculation and suspension polymerization. Scale-up of such processes are prone to a number of challenges including the optimization of mixing and shear rate distribution in the process. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be a valuable tool to aid in the process scale-up; however for modeling purpose, the process will often need to be simplified appropriately to reduce the computational complexity. Commercial CFD tools with appropriate Lagrangian particle tracking models can be used to gather statistical data such as maximum strain rate distribution and maximum number of passes through a specific strain rate. This presentation will discuss such statistical tools and their application to a model scale-up problem.

  10. Emerging freeze-drying process development and scale-up issues.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal Manubhai; Pikal, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    Although several guidelines do exist for freeze-drying process development and scale-up, there are still a number of issues that require additional attention. The objective of this review article is to discuss some emerging process development and scale-up issue with emphasis on effect of load condition and freeze-drying in novel container systems such as syringes, Lyoguard trays, ampoules, and 96-well plates. Understanding the heat and mass transfer under different load conditions and for freeze-drying in these novel container systems will help in developing a robust freeze-drying process which is also easier to scale-up. Further research and development needs in these emerging areas have also been addressed.

  11. Enabling and challenging factors in institutional reform: The case of SCALE-UP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional reform. SCALE-UP significantly restructures the classroom environment and pedagogy to promote highly active and interactive instruction. Although originally designed for university introductory physics courses, SCALE-UP has spread to many other disciplines at hundreds of departments around the world. This study reports findings from in-depth, open-ended interviews with 21 key contact people involved with successful secondary implementations of SCALE-UP throughout the United States. We defined successful implementations as those who restructured their pedagogy and classroom and sustained and/or spread the change. Interviews were coded to identify the most common enabling and challenging factors during reform implementation and compared to the theoretical framework of Kotter's 8-step Change Model. The most common enabling influences that emerged are documenting and leveraging evidence of local success, administrative support, interaction with outside SCALE-UP user(s), and funding. Many challenges are linked to the lack of these enabling factors including difficulty finding funding, space, and administrative and/or faculty support for reform. Our focus on successful secondary implementations meant that most interviewees were able to overcome challenges. Presentation of results is illuminated with case studies, quotes, and examples that can help secondary implementers with SCALE-UP reform efforts specifically. We also discuss the implications for policy makers, researchers, and the higher education community concerned with initiating structural change.

  12. 78 FR 19495 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Scale-Up and Post-Approval Changes: Manufacturing Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Scale-Up and Post-Approval...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a scale-up and... Oral Dosage Forms--Scale-Up and Post-Approval Changes: Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls, In...

  13. Roller compaction process development and scale up using Johanson model calibrated with instrumented roll data.

    PubMed

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Sprockel, Omar; Jerzweski, Robert

    2012-10-15

    Roller compaction is a dry granulation process used to convert powder blends into free flowing agglomerates. During scale up or transfer of roller compaction process, it is critical to maintain comparable ribbon densities at each scale in order to achieve similar tensile strengths and subsequently similar particle size distribution of milled material. Similar ribbon densities can be reached by maintaining analogous normal stress applied by the rolls on ribbon for a given gap between rolls. Johanson (1965) developed a model to predict normal stress based on material properties and roll diameter. However, the practical application of Johanson model to estimate normal stress on the ribbon is limited due to its requirement of accurate estimate of nip pressure i.e. pressure at the nip angle. Another weakness of Johanson model is the assumption of a fixed angle of wall friction that leads to use of a fixed nip angle in the model. To overcome the above mentioned limitations, we developed a novel approach using roll force equations based on a modified Johanson model in which the requirement of pressure value at nip angle was eliminated. An instrumented roll on WP120 roller compactor was used to collect normal stress data measured at three locations across the width of a roll (P1, P2, P3), as well as gap and nip angle data on ribbon for placebo and various active blends along with corresponding process parameters. The nip angles were estimated directly using experimental pressure profile data of each run. The roll force equation of Johanson model was validated using normal stress, gap, and nip angle data of the placebo runs. The calculated roll force values compared well with those determined from the roll force equation provided for the Alexanderwerk(®) WP120 roller compactor. Subsequently, the calculation was reversed to estimate normal stress and corresponding ribbon densities as a function of gap and RFU (roll force per unit roll width). A placebo model was developed

  14. The correlated k-distribution technique as applied to the AVHRR channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Correlated k-distributions have been created to account for the molecular absorption found in the spectral ranges of the five Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite channels. The production of the k-distributions was based upon an exponential-sum fitting of transmissions (ESFT) technique which was applied to reference line-by-line absorptance calculations. To account for the overlap of spectral features from different molecular species, the present routines made use of the multiplication transmissivity property which allows for considerable flexibility, especially when altering relative mixing ratios of the various molecular species. To determine the accuracy of the correlated k-distribution technique as compared to the line-by-line procedure, atmospheric flux and heating rate calculations were run for a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. For the atmospheric conditions taken into consideration, the correlated k-distribution technique has yielded results within about 0.5% for both the cases where the satellite spectral response functions were applied and where they were not. The correlated k-distribution's principal advantages is that it can be incorporated directly into multiple scattering routines that consider scattering as well as absorption by clouds and aerosol particles.

  15. A comparative study of progressive versus successive spectrophotometric resolution techniques applied for pharmaceutical ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Sarah S; Lotfy, Hayam M; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Salem, Hesham

    2014-11-11

    This work represents a comparative study of a novel progressive spectrophotometric resolution technique namely, amplitude center method (ACM), versus the well-established successive spectrophotometric resolution techniques namely; successive derivative subtraction (SDS); successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). All the proposed spectrophotometric techniques consist of several consecutive steps utilizing ratio and/or derivative spectra. The novel amplitude center method (ACM) can be used for the determination of ternary mixtures using single divisor where the concentrations of the components are determined through progressive manipulation performed on the same ratio spectrum. Those methods were applied for the analysis of the ternary mixture of chloramphenicol (CHL), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DXM) and tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZH) in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the official BP methods, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  16. A comparative study of progressive versus successive spectrophotometric resolution techniques applied for pharmaceutical ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Sarah S.; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hassan, Nagiba Y.; Salem, Hesham

    2014-11-01

    This work represents a comparative study of a novel progressive spectrophotometric resolution technique namely, amplitude center method (ACM), versus the well-established successive spectrophotometric resolution techniques namely; successive derivative subtraction (SDS); successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). All the proposed spectrophotometric techniques consist of several consecutive steps utilizing ratio and/or derivative spectra. The novel amplitude center method (ACM) can be used for the determination of ternary mixtures using single divisor where the concentrations of the components are determined through progressive manipulation performed on the same ratio spectrum. Those methods were applied for the analysis of the ternary mixture of chloramphenicol (CHL), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DXM) and tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZH) in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the official BP methods, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  17. Scaling up watershed model parameters: flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin, South Carolina, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River Basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River Basin were made using the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). A primary focus of the investigation was to assess the potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River Basin. Scaling up was done in a step-wise manner, beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic-wetness-index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made for subsequent simulations, culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River Basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. The scaling-up process resulted in nine simulations being made. Simulation 7 best matched the streamflows at station 02175000, Edisto River near Givhans, SC, which was the downstream limit for the TOPMODEL setup, and was obtained by adjusting the scaling factor, including streamflow routing, and using NEXRAD precipitation data for the Edisto River Basin. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of model-fit efficiency and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for simulation 7 were 0.78 and 0.89, respectively. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the McTier Creek and Edisto River models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the substantial difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL

  18. Heat and mass transfer scale-up issues during freeze drying: II. Control and characterization of the degree of supercooling.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, Shailaja; Ramot, Roee; Bhugra, Chandan; Pikal, Michael J

    2004-08-05

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the ice nucleation temperature on the primary drying process using an ice fog technique for temperature-controlled nucleation. In order to facilitate scale up of the freeze-drying process, this research seeks to find a correlation of the product resistance and the degree of supercooling with the specific surface area of the product. Freeze-drying experiments were performed using 5% wt/vol solutions of sucrose, dextran, hydroxyethyl starch (HES), and mannitol. Temperature-controlled nucleation was achieved using the ice fog technique where cold nitrogen gas was introduced into the chamber to form an "ice fog," thereby facilitating nucleation of samples at the temperature of interest. Manometric temperature measurement (MTM) was used during primary drying to evaluate the product resistance as a function of cake thickness. Specific surface areas (SSA) of the freeze-dried cakes were determined. The ice fog technique was refined to successfully control the ice nucleation temperature of solutions within 1 degrees C. A significant increase in product resistance was produced by a decrease in nucleation temperature. The SSA was found to increase with decreasing nucleation temperature, and the product resistance increased with increasing SSA. The ice fog technique can be refined into a viable method for nucleation temperature control. The SSA of the product correlates well with the degree of supercooling and with the resistance of the product to mass transfer (ie, flow of water vapor through the dry layer). Using this correlation and SSA measurements, one could predict scale-up drying differences and accordingly alter the freeze-drying process so as to bring about equivalence of product temperature history during lyophilization.

  19. "Scaling Up" Educational Change: Some Musings on Misrecognition and Doxic Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Educational policy-makers around the world are strongly committed to the notion of "scaling up". This can mean anything from encouraging more teachers to take up a pedagogical innovation, all the way through to system-wide efforts to implement "what works" across all schools. In this paper, I use Bourdieu's notions of…

  20. Final-Year Results from the i3 Scale-Up of Reading Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Henry; Sirinides, Philip; Gray, Abby; Davila, Heather Goldsworthy; Sam, Cecile; Blalock, Toscha; Blackman, Horatio; Anderson-Clark, Helen; Schiera, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the 2010 economic stimulus, a $55 million "Investing in Innovation" (i3) grant from the US Department of Education was awarded to scale up Reading Recovery across the nation. This paper presents the final round of results from the large-scale, mixed methods randomized evaluation of the implementation and impacts of Reading…

  1. Lessons from scaling up a depression treatment program in primary care in Chile.

    PubMed

    Araya, Ricardo; Alvarado, Rubén; Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Rojas, Graciela

    2012-09-01

    In Chile, the National Depression Detection and Treatment Program (Programa Nacional de Diagnóstico y Tratamiento de la Depresión, PNDTD) in primary care is a rare example of an evidence-based mental health program that was scaled up to the national level in a low- or middle-income country. This retrospective qualitative study aimed to better understand how policymakers made the decision to scale up mental health services to the national level, and to explore the elements, contexts, and processes that facilitated the decision to implement and sustain PNDTD. In-depth semistructured interviews with six key informants selected through intentional sampling were conducted in August-December 2008. Interviewees were senior officers at the Ministry of Health who were directly involved in the decision to scale up the program. Results yielded four elements pivotal to the decisionmaking process: scientific evidence, teamwork and leadership, strategic alliances, and program institutionalization. Each element contributed to building consensus, securing funding, attracting resources, and gaining lasting support from policymakers. Additionally, a review of available documentation led the authors to consider sociopolitical context and use of the media to be important factors. While research evidence for the effectiveness of mental health services in the primary care setting continues to accumulate, low- and middle-income countries should get started on the lengthy process of scaling up by incorporating the elements that led to decisionmaking and implementation of the PNDTD in Chile.

  2. 77 FR 25152 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- Up Grants Correction In notice document 2012-7362 appearing on pages 18216-18229 in the issue of Tuesday, March 27, 2012 make the...

  3. Scaling up Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Nigeria: From National Policy to Nationwide Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huaynoca, Silvia; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Yaqub, Nuhu, Jr.; Denno, Donna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Nigeria is one of few countries that reports having translated national policies on school-based comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) into near-nationwide implementation. We analysed data using the World Health Organization-ExpandNet framework, which provides a systematic structure for planning and managing the scaling up of health innovations.…

  4. Education Reform Support: A Framework for Scaling Up School Reform. Policy Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, F. Henry; DeStefano, Joseph

    The Bureau for Africa of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has been examining in detail the question of how best to support and sustain sectorwide education reform in Africa. The USAID and Education Commission of the States jointly sponsored a seminar in October 1996 to examine the issue of "scaling up" and…

  5. Investing in the foundation of sustainable development: pathways to scale up for early childhood development.

    PubMed

    Richter, Linda M; Daelmans, Bernadette; Lombardi, Joan; Heymann, Jody; Boo, Florencia Lopez; Behrman, Jere R; Lu, Chunling; Lucas, Jane E; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael; Dua, Tarun; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Stenberg, Karin; Gertler, Paul; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2017-01-07

    Building on long-term benefits of early intervention (Paper 2 of this Series) and increasing commitment to early childhood development (Paper 1 of this Series), scaled up support for the youngest children is essential to improving health, human capital, and wellbeing across the life course. In this third paper, new analyses show that the burden of poor development is higher than estimated, taking into account additional risk factors. National programmes are needed. Greater political prioritisation is core to scale-up, as are policies that afford families time and financial resources to provide nurturing care for young children. Effective and feasible programmes to support early child development are now available. All sectors, particularly education, and social and child protection, must play a role to meet the holistic needs of young children. However, health provides a critical starting point for scaling up, given its reach to pregnant women, families, and young children. Starting at conception, interventions to promote nurturing care can feasibly build on existing health and nutrition services at limited additional cost. Failure to scale up has severe personal and social consequences. Children at elevated risk for compromised development due to stunting and poverty are likely to forgo about a quarter of average adult income per year, and the cost of inaction to gross domestic product can be double what some countries currently spend on health. Services and interventions to support early childhood development are essential to realising the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals.

  6. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  7. Introduction to SCALE-UP: Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beichner, Robert J.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Allain, Rhett J.; Deardorff, Duane L.; Abbott, David S.

    SCALE-UP is an extension of the highly successful IMPEC (Integrated Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry) project, one of North Carolina State's curricular reform efforts undertaken as part of the SUCCEED coalition. The authors utilize the interactive, collaboratively based instruction that worked well in smaller class settings and find ways…

  8. Scaling Up Success: Lessons Learned from Technology-Based Educational Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Honan, James P., Ed.; Peters, Laurence C., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing from the information presented at a conference sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Technology in Education Consortium, educators, researchers, and policymakers translate theory into practice to provide a hands-on resource that describes different models for scaling up success. This resource…

  9. Declining tuberculosis case notification rates with the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Sandy, C.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Zishiri, C.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Zimbabwe has a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) driven tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, with antiretroviral therapy (ART) scaled up in the public sector since 2004. Objective: To determine whether national ART scale-up was associated with annual national TB case notification rates (CNR), stratified by disease type and category, between 2000 and 2013. Design: This was a retrospective study using aggregate data from global reports. Results: The number of people living with HIV and retained on ART from 2004 to 2013 increased from 8400 to 665 299, with ART coverage increasing from <0.5% to 48%. TB CNRs, all types and categories, increased from 2000 to 2003, and declined thereafter from 2004 to 2013. The decreases in annual TB notifications between the highest rates (before 2004) and lowest rates (2013) were all forms of TB (56%), new TB (60%), previously treated TB (53%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) (40%), new smear-negative/smear-unknown PTB (58%) and extra-pulmonary TB (58%). Conclusion: Significant declines in TB CNRs were observed during ART scale-up, especially for smear-negative PTB and extra-pulmonary TB. These encouraging national trends support the continued scale-up of ART for people living with HIV as a way of tackling the twin epidemics of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome and TB in Zimbabwe. PMID:27695678

  10. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  11. Integrated Graduate and Continuing Education in Protein Chromatography for Bioprocess Development and Scale-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carta, Jungbauer

    2011-01-01

    We describe an intensive course that integrates graduate and continuing education focused on the development and scale-up of chromatography processes used for the recovery and purification of proteins with special emphasis on biotherapeutics. The course includes lectures, laboratories, teamwork, and a design exercise and offers a complete view of…

  12. Declining tuberculosis case notification rates with the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Takarinda, K C; Harries, A D; Sandy, C; Mutasa-Apollo, T; Zishiri, C

    2016-09-01

    Setting: Zimbabwe has a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) driven tuberculosis (TB) epidemic, with antiretroviral therapy (ART) scaled up in the public sector since 2004. Objective: To determine whether national ART scale-up was associated with annual national TB case notification rates (CNR), stratified by disease type and category, between 2000 and 2013. Design: This was a retrospective study using aggregate data from global reports. Results: The number of people living with HIV and retained on ART from 2004 to 2013 increased from 8400 to 665 299, with ART coverage increasing from <0.5% to 48%. TB CNRs, all types and categories, increased from 2000 to 2003, and declined thereafter from 2004 to 2013. The decreases in annual TB notifications between the highest rates (before 2004) and lowest rates (2013) were all forms of TB (56%), new TB (60%), previously treated TB (53%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) (40%), new smear-negative/smear-unknown PTB (58%) and extra-pulmonary TB (58%). Conclusion: Significant declines in TB CNRs were observed during ART scale-up, especially for smear-negative PTB and extra-pulmonary TB. These encouraging national trends support the continued scale-up of ART for people living with HIV as a way of tackling the twin epidemics of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome and TB in Zimbabwe.

  13. Enabling and Challenging Factors in Institutional Reform: The Case of SCALE-UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional…

  14. Smallness, Autonomy, and Choice: Scaling Up. Statewide "Safe Places" for Distinctive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    For those who would like to see Ron Wolk's vision of schools realized, the challenge of scaling up is the most daunting one faced. Skeptics like to say, "Oh well, that 'X' and 'Y' did something really special is irrelevant; they're exceptions." But the author's experience suggests that today's exceptions can become tomorrow's norms. If that is to…

  15. Scaling up STEM Academies Statewide: Implementation, Network Supports, and Early Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Viki; House, Ann; Sherer, David; Singleton, Corinne; Wang, Haiwen; Klopfenstein, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a case study of scaling up the T-STEM initiative in Texas. Data come from the four-year longitudinal evaluation of the Texas High School Project (THSP). The evaluation studied the implementation and impact of T-STEM and the other THSP reforms using a mixed-methods design, including qualitative case studies; principal,…

  16. Early College for All: Efforts to Scale up Early Colleges in Multiple Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Given the positive impacts of the small, stand-alone early college model and the desire to provide those benefits to more students, organizations have begun efforts to scale up the early college model in a variety of settings. These efforts have been supported by the federal government, particularly by the Investing in Innovation (i3) program.…

  17. Using wavelet denoising and mathematical morphology in the segmentation technique applied to blood cells images.

    PubMed

    Boix, Macarena; Cantó, Begoña

    2013-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation is used in medical diagnosis since this technique is a noninvasive pre-processing step for biomedical treatment. In this work we present an efficient segmentation method for medical image analysis. In particular, with this method blood cells can be segmented. For that, we combine the wavelet transform with morphological operations. Moreover, the wavelet thresholding technique is used to eliminate the noise and prepare the image for suitable segmentation. In wavelet denoising we determine the best wavelet that shows a segmentation with the largest area in the cell. We study different wavelet families and we conclude that the wavelet db1 is the best and it can serve for posterior works on blood pathologies. The proposed method generates goods results when it is applied on several images. Finally, the proposed algorithm made in MatLab environment is verified for a selected blood cells.

  18. Mathematical Model and Artificial Intelligent Techniques Applied to a Milk Industry through DSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, P. Ravi; Divya, V. P. Sree

    2011-08-01

    The resources for electrical energy are depleting and hence the gap between the supply and the demand is continuously increasing. Under such circumstances, the option left is optimal utilization of available energy resources. The main objective of this chapter is to discuss about the Peak load management and overcome the problems associated with it in processing industries such as Milk industry with the help of DSM techniques. The chapter presents a generalized mathematical model for minimizing the total operating cost of the industry subject to the constraints. The work presented in this chapter also deals with the results of application of Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic and Demand Side Management (DSM) techniques applied to a medium scale milk industrial consumer in India to achieve the improvement in load factor, reduction in Maximum Demand (MD) and also the consumer gets saving in the energy bill.

  19. Synthetic aperture technique applied to a multi-beam echo sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Akira; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro

    2001-04-01

    We are developing a synthetic aperture technique using a Sea Beam 2000 multi-beam echo sounder to observe subsea crustal movements for earthquake studies. Augmented by the Kinematic GPS and a motion sensor, the synthetic aperture technique was successfully applied to the Sea Beam 2000 with a 12 kHz frequency acoustic signal. The 4.3-meter long projector produces a transmission fan beam in alongtrack beamwidth of 2 degrees, but a synthesis of the data achieved about 37 m aperture length, equivalent to a 0.3 degrees alongtrack beamwidth. Bathymetry measurements at the water depth of 900 m obtained through the synthetic aperture processing show considerable improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio and reveal detailed features of the seafloor.

  20. Geophysical techniques applied to urban planning in complex near surface environments. Examples of Zaragoza, NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo-Anchuela, Ó.; Casas-Sainz, A. M.; Soriano, M. A.; Pocoví-Juan, A.

    Complex geological shallow subsurface environments represent an important handicap in urban and building projects. The geological features of the Central Ebro Basin, with sharp lateral changes in Quaternary deposits, alluvial karst phenomena and anthropic activity can preclude the characterization of future urban areas only from isolated geomechanical tests or from non-correctly dimensioned geophysical techniques. This complexity is here analyzed in two different test fields, (i) one of them linked to flat-bottomed valleys with irregular distribution of Quaternary deposits related to sharp lateral facies changes and irregular preconsolidated substratum position and (ii) a second one with similar complexities in the alluvial deposits and karst activity linked to solution of the underlying evaporite substratum. The results show that different geophysical techniques allow for similar geological models to be obtained in the first case (flat-bottomed valleys), whereas only the application of several geophysical techniques can permit to correctly evaluate the geological model complexities in the second case (alluvial karst). In this second case, the geological and superficial information permit to refine the sensitivity of the applied geophysical techniques to different indicators of karst activity. In both cases 3D models are needed to correctly distinguish alluvial lateral sedimentary changes from superimposed karstic activity.

  1. Applying traditional signal processing techniques to social media exploitation for situational understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelzaher, Tarek; Roy, Heather; Wang, Shiguang; Giridhar, Prasanna; Al Amin, Md. Tanvir; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Kolodny, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Signal processing techniques such as filtering, detection, estimation and frequency domain analysis have long been applied to extract information from noisy sensor data. This paper describes the exploitation of these signal processing techniques to extract information from social networks, such as Twitter and Instagram. Specifically, we view social networks as noisy sensors that report events in the physical world. We then present a data processing stack for detection, localization, tracking, and veracity analysis of reported events using social network data. We show using a controlled experiment that the behavior of social sources as information relays varies dramatically depending on context. In benign contexts, there is general agreement on events, whereas in conflict scenarios, a significant amount of collective filtering is introduced by conflicted groups, creating a large data distortion. We describe signal processing techniques that mitigate such distortion, resulting in meaningful approximations of actual ground truth, given noisy reported observations. Finally, we briefly present an implementation of the aforementioned social network data processing stack in a sensor network analysis toolkit, called Apollo. Experiences with Apollo show that our techniques are successful at identifying and tracking credible events in the physical world.

  2. A systems approach of the nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to Scout solid rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    Review and appraisal of the status of the nondestructive tests applied to Scout solid-propellant rocket motors, using analytical techniques to evaluate radiography for detecting internal discontinuities such as voids and unbonds. Information relating to selecting, performing, controlling, and evaluating the results of NDE tests was reduced to a common simplified format. With these data and the results of the analytical studies performed, it was possible to make the basic appraisals of the ability of a test to meet all pertinent acceptance criteria and, where necessary, provide suggestions to improve the situation.

  3. Optical coherence tomography: a non-invasive technique applied to conservation of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haida; Gomez Cid, Marta; Cucu, Radu; Dobre, George; Kudimov, Boris; Pedro, Justin; Saunders, David; Cupitt, John; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2005-06-01

    It is current practice to take tiny samples from a painting to mount and examine in cross-section under a microscope. However, since conservation practice and ethics limit sampling to a minimum and to areas along cracks and edges of paintings, which are often unrepresentative of the whole painting, results from such analyses cannot be taken as representative of a painting as a whole. Recently in a preliminary study, we have demonstrated that near-infrared Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used directly on paintings to examine the cross-section of paint and varnish layers without contact and the need to take samples. OCT is an optical interferometric technique developed for in vivo imaging of the eye and biological tissues; it is essentially a scanning Michelson's interferometer with a "broad-band" source that has the spatial coherence of a laser. The low temporal coherence and high spatial concentration of the source are the keys to high depth resolution and high sensitivity 3D imaging. The technique is non-invasive and non-contact with a typical working distance of 2 cm. This non-invasive technique enables cross-sections to be examined anywhere on a painting. In this paper, we will report new results on applying near-infrared en-face OCT to paintings conservation and extend the application to the examination of underdrawings, drying processes, and quantitative measurements of optical properties of paint and varnish layers.

  4. Case study: how to apply data mining techniques in a healthcare data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Silver, M; Sakata, T; Su, H C; Herman, C; Dolins, S B; O'Shea, M J

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare provider organizations are faced with a rising number of financial pressures. Both administrators and physicians need help analyzing large numbers of clinical and financial data when making decisions. To assist them, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center and Hitachi America, Ltd. (HAL), Inc., have partnered to build an enterprise data warehouse and perform a series of case study analyses. This article focuses on one analysis, which was performed by a team of physicians and computer science researchers, using a commercially available on-line analytical processing (OLAP) tool in conjunction with proprietary data mining techniques developed by HAL researchers. The initial objective of the analysis was to discover how to use data mining techniques to make business decisions that can influence cost, revenue, and operational efficiency while maintaining a high level of care. Another objective was to understand how to apply these techniques appropriately and to find a repeatable method for analyzing data and finding business insights. The process used to identify opportunities and effect changes is described.

  5. Development of temper-bead technique applied to dissimilar welded joints of nuclear pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Makoto; Umemoto, Tadahiro; Matsusita, Akitake; Shiraiwa, Takanori

    1996-06-01

    When nuclear pressure vessels made of low-alloy steel (P-3 Group 3) need repair or modification, technical standards for welding of electrical structures should be applied, and then postweld heat treatment (PWHT) should be done. However, cases in which PWHT is impractical are theoretically possible due to a variety of restrictions. To deal with such a problem, there is a regulation for repair weld technique, without PWHT, in accordance with ASME B and PV Code. This method is called temper-bead technique, which gives the weldments sufficient toughness by tempering the hardened zone of the heat-affected zone on the first layer of the base metal using the heat of the following weld beads. Because there is no regulation in Japan covering this method, a procedure is required to perform it under a special license, after a verification test has been passed. An attempt has been made to develop a method, on the supposition that the temper-bead technique is adopted for replacement of what is called dissimilar welded joints, so that a nickel base alloy is buildup welded at the tip of the nozzle of the low-alloy steel pressure vessel, and a stainless steel pipe is butt welded.

  6. Operational modelling to guide implementation and scale-up of diagnostic tests within the health system: exploring opportunities for parasitic disease diagnostics based on example application for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Langley, Ivor; Adams, Emily; Doulla, Basra; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-12-01

    Research and innovation in the diagnosis of infectious and parasitic diseases has led to the development of several promising diagnostic tools, for example in malaria there is extensive literature concerning the use of rapid diagnostic tests. This means policymakers in many low and middle income countries need to make difficult decisions about which of the recommended tools and approaches to implement and scale-up. The test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity) of the tools alone are not a sufficient basis on which to make these decisions as policymakers need to also consider the best combination of tools, whether the new tools should complement or replace existing diagnostics and who should be tested. Diagnostic strategies need dovetailing to different epidemiology and structural resource constraints (e.g. existing diagnostic pathways, human resources and laboratory capacity). We propose operational modelling to assist with these complex decisions. Projections of patient, health system and cost impacts are essential and operational modelling of the relevant elements of the health system could provide these projections and support rational decisions. We demonstrate how the technique of operational modelling applied in the developing world to support decisions on diagnostics for tuberculosis, could in a parallel way, provide useful insights to support implementation of appropriate diagnostic innovations for parasitic diseases.

  7. Applied potential tomography: a new non-invasive technique for assessing gastric function.

    PubMed

    Mangnall, Y F; Baxter, A J; Avill, R; Bird, N C; Brown, B H; Barber, D C; Seagar, A D; Johnson, A G; Read, N W

    1987-01-01

    Applied potential tomography is a new, non-invasive technique that yields sequential images of the resistivity of gastric contents after subjects have ingested a liquid or semi-solid meal. This study validates the technique as a means of measuring gastric emptying. Experiments in vitro showed an excellent correlation between measurements of resistivity and either the square of the radius of a glass rod or the volume of water in a spherical balloon when both were placed in an oval tank containing saline. Altering the lateral position of the rod in the tank did not alter the values obtained. Images of abdominal resistivity were also directly correlated with the volume of air in a gastric balloon. Profiles of gastric emptying of liquid meals obtained using APT were very similar to those obtained using scintigraphy or dye dilution techniques provided that acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Profiles of emptying of a mashed potato meal using APT were also very similar to those obtained by scintigraphy. Measurements of the emptying of a liquid meal from the stomach were reproducible if acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Thus, APT is an accurate and reproducible method of measuring gastric emptying of liquids and particulate food. It is inexpensive, well tolerated, easy to use and ideally suited for multiple studies in patients, even those who are pregnant. A preliminary study is also presented that assesses the technique as a means of measuring gastric acid secretion. Comparison of resistivity changes with measured acid secretion following the injection of pentagastrin shows good correlations. APT might offer a non-invasive alternative to the use of a nasogastric tube and acid collection.

  8. Single Layer Centrifugation Can Be Scaled-Up Further to Process up to 150 mL Semen

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, J. M.; van Wienen, M.; Wallgren, M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-Layer centrifugation has been used to improve the quality of sperm samples in several species. However, where stallion or boar semen is to be used for AI, larger volumes of semen have to be processed than for other species, thus limiting the effectiveness of the original technique. The objective of the present study was to scale up the SLC method for both stallion and boar semen. Stallion semen could be processed in 100 mL glass tubes without a loss of sperm quality, and similarly, boar semen could be processed in 200 mL and 500 mL tubes without losing sperm quality. The results of these preliminary studies are encouraging, and larger trials are underway to evaluate using these methods in the field. PMID:23738111

  9. Freeze drying--principles and practice for successful scale-up to manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tsinontides, S C; Rajniak, P; Pham, D; Hunke, W A; Placek, J; Reynolds, S D

    2004-08-06

    Freeze Drying involves transfer of heat and mass to and from the product under preparation, respectively, thus it is necessary to scale these transport phenomena appropriately from pilot plant to manufacturing-scale units to maintain product quality attributes. In this manuscript we describe the principal approach and tools utilized to successfully transfer the lyophilization process of a labile pharmaceutical product from pilot plant to manufacturing. Based on pilot plant data, the lyophilization cycle was tested during limited scale-up trials in manufacturing to identify parameter set-point values and test process parameter ranges. The limited data from manufacturing were then used in a single-vial mathematical model to determine manufacturing lyophilizer heat transfer coefficients, and subsequently evaluate the cycle robustness at scale-up operating conditions. The lyophilization cycle was then successfully demonstrated at target parameter set-point values.

  10. Progress on scaling up integrated services for sexual and reproductive health and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Attawell, Kathy; Druce, Nel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers new developments to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and HIV linkages and discusses factors that continue to impede progress. It is based on a previous review undertaken for the United Kingdom Department for International Development in 2006 that examined the constraints and opportunities to scaling up these linkages. We argue that, despite growing evidence that linking sexual and reproductive health and HIV is feasible and beneficial, few countries have achieved significant scale-up of integrated service provision. A lack of common understanding of terminology and clear technical operational guidance, and separate policy, institutional and financing processes continue to represent significant constraints. We draw on experience with tuberculosis and HIV integration to highlight some lessons. The paper concludes that there is little evidence to determine whether funding for health systems is strengthening linkages and we make several recommendations to maximize opportunities represented by recent developments. PMID:20072770

  11. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation: challenges and prospects towards scaled-up production.

    PubMed

    RenNanqi; GuoWanqian; LiuBingfeng; CaoGuangli; DingJie

    2011-06-01

    Among different technologies of hydrogen production, bio-hydrogen production exhibits perhaps the greatest potential to replace fossil fuels. Based on recent research on dark fermentative hydrogen production, this article reviews the following aspects towards scaled-up application of this technology: bioreactor development and parameter optimization, process modeling and simulation, exploitation of cheaper raw materials and combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation. Bioreactors are necessary for dark-fermentation hydrogen production, so the design of reactor type and optimization of parameters are essential. Process modeling and simulation can help engineers design and optimize large-scale systems and operations. Use of cheaper raw materials will surely accelerate the pace of scaled-up production of biological hydrogen. And finally, combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation holds considerable promise, and has successfully achieved maximum overall hydrogen yield from a single substrate. Future development of bio-hydrogen production will also be discussed.

  12. Decline in national tuberculosis notifications with national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kanyerere, H; Mganga, A; Harries, A D; Tayler-Smith, K; Jahn, A; Chimbwandira, F M; Mpunga, J

    2014-06-21

    From 2000 to 2012, Malawi scaled up antiretroviral therapy (ART) from <3000 to 404 905 persons living with HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome), representing an ART coverage of 40.6% among those living with HIV. During this time, annual tuberculosis (TB) notifications declined by 28%, from 28 234 to 20 463. Percentage declines in annual TB case notifications were as follows: new TB (26%), recurrent TB (40%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (19%), new smear-negative pulmonary TB (42%), extra-pulmonary TB (19%), HIV-positive TB (30%) and HIV-negative TB (10%). The decline in TB notifications is associated with ART scale-up, supporting its value in controlling TB in high HIV prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price.

  14. Pore-Water Extraction Scale-Up Study for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2013-01-15

    The phenomena related to pore-water extraction from unsaturated sediments have been previously examined with limited laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. However, key scale-up issues have not yet been addressed. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling were conducted to specifically examine pore-water extraction for sediment conditions relevant to the vadose zone beneath the SX Tank Farm at Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Available SX Tank Farm data were evaluated to generate a conceptual model of the subsurface for a targeted pore-water extraction application in areas with elevated moisture and Tc-99 concentration. The hydraulic properties of the types of porous media representative of the SX Tank Farm target application were determined using sediment mixtures prepared in the laboratory based on available borehole sediment particle size data. Numerical modeling was used as an evaluation tool for scale-up of pore-water extraction for targeted field applications.

  15. Scale Up of Extended Thin Film Electrocatalyst Structures (ETFECS) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight discusses how NREL synthesized >1 gram of platinum ETFECS (nanotubes) for use as novel fuel cell catalysts. These materials represent the cumulative yield of four individual batch syntheses (each >250 milligrams yield). By producing these materials at gram quantity, NREL has shown the viability of scale up and produced sufficient material to allow further validation of properties, as well as in-depth electrode optimization and fuel cell testing.

  16. CYMIC{reg_sign} -- Boiler scale-up and full scale demonstration experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Kokko, A.; Karvinen, R.; Ahlstedt, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the CYMIC boiler scale-up principles, first full scale experiences from demonstration plant and results from mathematical modelling of the cyclones. CYMIC pilot testing was successfully completed with very positive results, the next step was a CYMIC scale-up and full scale demonstration. The 30 MWth demonstration plant was commissioned during the fall of 1994. The plant is owned by VAPO Oy and it is in the city of Lieksa, eastern Finland. The CYMIC has been scaled up by developing six different cyclones and the multiplication system to cover the capacity range from 30 to 600 MWth. The design of this CYMIC series and the first sold industrial scale CYMIC are presented in the paper. The scale-up of the cyclone was mathematically modelled by Professor Karvinen and his group at Tampere University of Technology. The model which uses Sflow-code was tested and the parameters were set using the pilot test results. The model operated well, so three bigger cyclones were calculated. The first was the cyclone for the Lieksa plant and the other two were bigger standard cyclones. Particles were also included in the model. The variables in the calculations were the cyclone diameter, inlet vane shape and position. Commissioning of the Lieksa plant began in August 1994. The process including operation of the cyclone and the gaslock were then verified at full scale. Flue gas emissions, the combustion efficiency and the performance of the cyclone were also measured. This paper discuss the most interesting results of the measurements.

  17. Mainstreaming nutrition into maternal and child health programmes: scaling up of exclusive breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Nita; Kabir, A K M Iqbal; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2008-04-01

    Interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding have been estimated to have the potential to prevent 13% of all under-5 deaths in developing countries and are the single most important preventive intervention against child mortality. According to World Health Organization and United Nations Children Funds (UNICEF), only 39% infants are exclusively breastfed for less than 4 months. This review examines programme efforts to scale up exclusive breastfeeding in different countries and draws lesson for successful scale-up. Opportunities and challenges in scaling up of exclusive breastfeeding into Maternal and Child Health programmes are identified. The key processes required for exclusive breastfeeding scale-up are: (1) an evidence-based policy and science-driven technical guidelines; and (2) an implementation strategy and plan for achieving high exclusive breastfeeding rates in all strata of society, on a sustainable basis. Factors related to success include political will, strong advocacy, enabling policies, well-defined short- and long-term programme strategy, sustained financial support, clear definition of roles of multiple stakeholders and emphasis on delivery at the community level. Effective use of antenatal, birth and post-natal contacts at homes and through community mobilization efforts is emphasized. Formative research to ensure appropriate intervention design and delivery is critical particularly in areas with high HIV prevalence. Strong communication strategy and support, quality trainers and training contributed significantly to programme success. Monitoring and evaluation with feedback systems that allow for periodic programme corrections and continued innovation are central to very high coverage. Legal framework must make it possible for mothers to exclusively breastfeed for at least 4 months. Sustained programme efforts are critical to achieve high coverage and this requires strong national- and state-level leadership.

  18. Scaling up functional traits for ecosystem services with remote sensing: concepts and methods.

    PubMed

    Abelleira Martínez, Oscar J; Fremier, Alexander K; Günter, Sven; Ramos Bendaña, Zayra; Vierling, Lee; Galbraith, Sara M; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Ordoñez, Jenny C

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem service-based management requires an accurate understanding of how human modification influences ecosystem processes and these relationships are most accurate when based on functional traits. Although trait variation is typically sampled at local scales, remote sensing methods can facilitate scaling up trait variation to regional scales needed for ecosystem service management. We review concepts and methods for scaling up plant and animal functional traits from local to regional spatial scales with the goal of assessing impacts of human modification on ecosystem processes and services. We focus our objectives on considerations and approaches for (1) conducting local plot-level sampling of trait variation and (2) scaling up trait variation to regional spatial scales using remotely sensed data. We show that sampling methods for scaling up traits need to account for the modification of trait variation due to land cover change and species introductions. Sampling intraspecific variation, stratification by land cover type or landscape context, or inference of traits from published sources may be necessary depending on the traits of interest. Passive and active remote sensing are useful for mapping plant phenological, chemical, and structural traits. Combining these methods can significantly improve their capacity for mapping plant trait variation. These methods can also be used to map landscape and vegetation structure in order to infer animal trait variation. Due to high context dependency, relationships between trait variation and remotely sensed data are not directly transferable across regions. We end our review with a brief synthesis of issues to consider and outlook for the development of these approaches. Research that relates typical functional trait metrics, such as the community-weighted mean, with remote sensing data and that relates variation in traits that cannot be remotely sensed to other proxies is needed. Our review narrows the gap between

  19. Strategy for applying scaling technique to water retention curves of forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Kosugi, K.; Mizuyama, T.

    2009-12-01

    Describing the infiltration of water in soils on a forested hillslope requires the information of spatial variability of water retention curve (WRC). By using a scaling technique, Hayashi et al. (2009), found that the porosity mostly characterizes the spatial variability of the WRCs on a forested hillslope. This scaling technique was based on a model, which assumes a lognormal pore size distribution and contains three parameters: the median of log-transformed pore radius, ψm, the variance of log-transformed pore radius, σ, and the effective porosity, θe. Thus, in the scaling method proposed by Hayashi et al. (2009), θe is a scaling factor, which should be determined for each individual soil, and that ψm and σ are reference parameter common for the whole data set. They examined this scaling method using θe calculated as a difference between the observed saturated water content and water content observed at ψ = -1000 cm for each sample and, ψm and σ derived from the whole data set of WRCs on the slope. Then it was showed that this scaling method could explain almost 90 % of the spatial variability in WRCs on the forested hillslope. However, this method requires the whole data set of WRCs for deriving the reference parameters (ψm and σ). For applying the scaling technique more practically, in this study, we tested a scaling method using the reference parameter derived from the WRCs at a small part of the slope. In order to examine the proposed scaling method, the WRCs for the 246 undisturbed forest soil samples, collected at 15 points distributed from downslope to upslope segments, were observed. In the proposed scaling method, we optimized the common ψm and σ to the WRCs for six soil samples, collected at one point on the middle-slope, and applied these parameters to a reference parameter for the whole data sets. The scaling method proposed by this study exhibited an increase of only 6 % in the residual sum of squares as compared with that of the method

  20. Moving from a project to programmatic response: scaling up harm reduction in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anindya; Sharma, Mukta

    2010-03-01

    The response to the HIV epidemics among people who inject drugs in Asia began to emerge in the early to mid 1990s, with the rather hesitant implementation of small-scale needle syringe programmes and community care initiatives aiming to support those who were already living with the virus. Since then Asia has seen a significant scaling up of harm reduction, despite very limited resources and difficult policy and legislative environments. One of the major reasons this has happened, is the utilisation of programme based approaches and the firm entrenchment of harm reduction thinking within national HIV/AIDS programmes and strategic plans--in most cases aided by multilateral and bilateral donors. Several models of scale up have been noted in Asia. The transition away from project based approaches, while on the whole positive, can also have a negative impact if the involvement of civil society and a client focussed approach is not protected. Also there are implications for which models of capacity building can be systematised for ongoing scale up. Most crucially, the tensions between drug policy, human rights and public health policies need to be resolved if harm reduction services are to be made available to the millions in Asia who are still unable to access these services.

  1. Innovate Use of SCALE-UP for Teaching General Education Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Luke; Rogers, M.

    2006-12-01

    Current development at Ithaca College is focused on transforming our general education astronomy courses from lecture-based into hands-on, active-learning courses by using the SCALE-UP model. SCALE-UP (Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics) pioneered at North Carolina State University expands the successes of Studio Physics (developed at RPI) to large enrollment courses. Studio Physics does away with the usual lecture/recitation/laboratory sessions by having one dynamic, active-learning environment for approximately 40 students. SCALE-UP expands this model to accommodate 100+ students by using large round tables usually seating nine students who work in groups of three. Classes meet three times per week with each class blending lecture, hands-on activities, group problem solving, and the use of student polling devices. It is expected that this mode of teaching astronomy will lead to a better understanding of astronomy and the nature of science. We just finished renovating two existing classrooms and two storerooms to create a 99-seat active learning room. This poster will present the steps we took from initial planning meetings to our current curriculum development stage. We will highlight how we obtained administration buy-in, obtained funding, and planned the renovation with our facilities staff. We will also present our plans for curriculum development and assessment of our efforts.

  2. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials. PMID:28074876

  3. Theoretical and Practical Issues That Are Relevant When Scaling Up hMSC Microcarrier Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jossen, Valentin; Schirmer, Cedric; Mostafa Sindi, Dolman; Eibl, Regine; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for allogeneic cell therapies has created a large amount of interest. However, this presupposes the availability of efficient scale-up procedures. Promising results have been reported for stirred bioreactors that operate with microcarriers. Recent publications focusing on microcarrier-based stirred bioreactors have demonstrated the successful use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and suspension criteria (NS1u, NS1) for rapidly scaling up hMSC expansions from mL- to pilot scale. Nevertheless, one obstacle may be the formation of large microcarrier-cell-aggregates, which may result in mass transfer limitations and inhomogeneous distributions of stem cells in the culture broth. The dependence of microcarrier-cell-aggregate formation on impeller speed and shear stress levels was investigated for human adipose derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) at the spinner scale by recording the Sauter mean diameter (d32) versus time. Cultivation at the suspension criteria provided d32 values between 0.2 and 0.7 mm, the highest cell densities (1.25 × 106 cells mL−1 hASCs), and the highest expansion factors (117.0 ± 4.7 on day 7), while maintaining the expression of specific surface markers. Furthermore, suitability of the suspension criterion NS1u was investigated for scaling up microcarrier-based processes in wave-mixed bioreactors for the first time. PMID:26981131

  4. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale.

  5. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  6. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials versus Scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-01-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8,860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale. PMID:26507844

  7. Scale-up of nature's tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joanna L; Knothe, Lillian E; Whan, Renee M; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L Knothe

    2017-01-11

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently "smart" material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues' biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  8. HIV testing as prevention among MSM in China: the business of scaling-up.

    PubMed

    Fan, Elsa L

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the emergence of goumai fuwu, or contracting with social organisations to provide social services, in the HIV/AIDS sector in China. In particular, I interrogate the outsourcing of HIV testing to community-based organisations (CBOs) serving men who have sex with men (MSM) as a means of scaling-up testing in this population, and how the commodification of testing enables new forms of surveillance and citizenship to emerge. In turn, I tie the scaling-up of testing and its commodification to the sustainability of CBOs as they struggle to survive. In recent years, the HIV/AIDS response in China has shifted to expanding testing among MSM in order to reduce new infections. This response has been catalysed by the transition to sexual contact as the primary transmission route for HIV and the rising rates of infection among MSM, leading government institutions and international donors to mobilise CBOs to expand testing. These efforts to scale-up are as much about testing as they are about making visible this hidden population. CBOs, in facilitating testing, come to rely on outsourcing as a long-term funding base and in doing so, unintentionally extend the reach of the state into the everyday lives of MSM.

  9. Data compression techniques applied to high resolution high frame rate video technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, William G.; Alexovich, Robert E.; Neustadter, Marc S.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is presented of video data compression applied to microgravity space experiments using High Resolution High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT). An extensive survey of methods of video data compression, described in the open literature, was conducted. The survey examines compression methods employing digital computing. The results of the survey are presented. They include a description of each method and assessment of image degradation and video data parameters. An assessment is made of present and near term future technology for implementation of video data compression in high speed imaging system. Results of the assessment are discussed and summarized. The results of a study of a baseline HHVT video system, and approaches for implementation of video data compression, are presented. Case studies of three microgravity experiments are presented and specific compression techniques and implementations are recommended.

  10. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis. Progress report, February 14, 1991--February 13, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a ``domain theory``), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  11. Systems Engineering Techniques Applied to the BepiColombo MPO Science Ground Segment Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fluente, Sara; Perez-Lopez, Fernando; Casale, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    BepiColombo is an interdisciplinary mission to Mercury scheduled for launch in 2015, arriving at Mercury in 2021. It is a joint mission between ESA and JAXA consisting of 2 complementary spacecraft, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). BepiColombo MPO scientific payload comprises 11 instrument packages comprising 17 experiments that will investigate the Mercury planet interior, surface composition and morphology, the intrinsic magnetic field and the composition of the exosphere and the coupling between all of these fields. Several Systems engineering techniques for requirements capture, verification, modelling and analysis, etc have been applied in the design of the Science Ground Segment, located at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) in Madrid, Spain.

  12. A comparative assessment of texture analysis techniques applied to bone tool use-wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Adam S.; Gleason, Matthew A.

    2016-06-01

    The study of bone tools, a specific class of artifacts often essential to perishable craft production, provides insight into industries otherwise largely invisible archaeologically. Building on recent breakthroughs in the analysis of microwear, this research applies confocal laser scanning microscopy and texture analysis techniques drawn from the field of surface metrology to identify use-wear patterns on experimental and archaeological bone artifacts. Our approach utilizes both conventional parameters and multi-scale geometric characterizations of the areas of worn surfaces to identify statistical similarities as a function of scale. The introduction of this quantitative approach to the study of microtopography holds significant potential for advancement in use-wear studies by reducing inter-observer variability and identifying new parameters useful in the detection of differential wear-patterns.

  13. Solar coronal magnetic fields derived using seismology techniques applied to omnipresent sunspot waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, David B.; Reznikova, Veronika E.; Ryans, Robert S. I.; Christian, Damian J.; Keys, Peter H.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Mackay, Duncan H.; Krishna Prasad, S.; Banerjee, Dipankar; Grant, Samuel D. T.; Yau, Sean; Diamond, Conor

    2016-02-01

    Sunspots on the surface of the Sun are the observational signatures of intense manifestations of tightly packed magnetic field lines, with near-vertical field strengths exceeding 6,000 G in extreme cases. It is well accepted that both the plasma density and the magnitude of the magnetic field strength decrease rapidly away from the solar surface, making high-cadence coronal measurements through traditional Zeeman and Hanle effects difficult as the observational signatures are fraught with low-amplitude signals that can become swamped with instrumental noise. Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) techniques have previously been applied to coronal structures, with single and spatially isolated magnetic field strengths estimated as 9-55 G (refs ,,,). A drawback with previous MHD approaches is that they rely on particular wave modes alongside the detectability of harmonic overtones. Here we show, for the first time, how omnipresent magneto-acoustic waves, originating from within the underlying sunspot and propagating radially outwards, allow the spatial variation of the local coronal magnetic field to be mapped with high precision. We find coronal magnetic field strengths of 32 +/- 5 G above the sunspot, which decrease rapidly to values of approximately 1 G over a lateral distance of 7,000 km, consistent with previous isolated and unresolved estimations. Our results demonstrate a new, powerful technique that harnesses the omnipresent nature of sunspot oscillations to provide magnetic field mapping capabilities close to a magnetic source in the solar corona.

  14. Applying different inversion techniques to retrieve stand variables of summer barley with PROSPECT + SAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohland, M.; Mader, S.; Dorigo, W.

    2010-04-01

    This study describes the retrieval of state variables (LAI, canopy chlorophyll, water and dry matter contents) for summer barley from airborne HyMap data by means of a canopy reflectance model (PROSPECT + SAIL). Three different inversion techniques were applied to explore the impact of the employed method on estimation accuracies: numerical optimization (downhill simplex method), a look-up table (LUT) and an artificial neural network (ANN) approach. By numerical optimization (Num Opt), reliable estimates were obtained for LAI and canopy chlorophyll contents (LAI × Cab) with r2 of 0.85 and 0.94 and RDP values of 1.81 and 2.65, respectively. Accuracies dropped for canopy water (LAI × Cw) and dry matter contents (LAI × Cm). Nevertheless, the range of leaf water contents ( Cw) was very narrow in the studied plant material. Prediction accuracies generally decreased in the order Num Opt > LUT > ANN. This decrease in accuracy mainly resulted from an increase in offset in the obtained values, as the retrievals from the different approaches were highly correlated. The same decreasing order in accuracy was found for the difference between the measured spectra and those reconstructed from the retrieved variable values. The parallel application of the different inversion techniques to one collective data set was helpful to identify modelling uncertainties, as shortcomings of the retrieval algorithms themselves could be separated from uncertainties in model structure and parameterisation schemes.

  15. Shadowgraph Technique Applied to STARDUST Facility for Dust Tracking: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Malizia, A.; Camplani, M.; Barbato, F.; Antonelli, L.; Gelfusa, M.; Del Vecchio, M.; Salgado, L.; Bellecci, C.; Richetta, M.

    The problem of dust resuspension in case of Loss Of Vacuum Accident (LOVA) in a nuclear fusion plant (ITER or DEMO like) is an important issue for the safety of workers and the security of environment. The Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics Research Group has implemented an optical set-up to track dust during a LOVA reproduction inside the experimental facility STARDUST. The shadowgraph technique, in this work, it is applied to track dark dust (like Tungsten). The shadowgraph technique is based on an expanded collimated beam of light emitted by a laser (or a lamp) transversely to the flow field direction. Inside STARDUST the dust moving in the air flow causes variations of refractive index of light that can be detected by the means of a CCD camera. A spatial modulation of the light-intensity distribution on the camera can be measured. The resulting pattern is a shadow of the refractive index field that prevails in the region of the disturbance. The authors use an incandescent white lamp to illuminate the vacuum vessel of STARDUST facility. The light-area passes through the test section that has to be investigated and the images of the dust shadows are collected with a fast CCD camera. The images are then elaborated with mathematical algorithms to obtain information about the velocity fields of dust during the accidents reproduction. The experimental set-up together with a critical analysis of the first results are presented in this paper.

  16. The Double Layer Methodology and the Validation of Eigenbehavior Techniques Applied to Lifestyle Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Bishal

    2017-01-01

    A novel methodology, the double layer methodology (DLM), for modeling an individual's lifestyle and its relationships with health indicators is presented. The DLM is applied to model behavioral routines emerging from self-reports of daily diet and activities, annotated by 21 healthy subjects over 2 weeks. Unsupervised clustering on the first layer of the DLM separated our population into two groups. Using eigendecomposition techniques on the second layer of the DLM, we could find activity and diet routines, predict behaviors in a portion of the day (with an accuracy of 88% for diet and 66% for activity), determine between day and between individual similarities, and detect individual's belonging to a group based on behavior (with an accuracy up to 64%). We found that clustering based on health indicators was mapped back into activity behaviors, but not into diet behaviors. In addition, we showed the limitations of eigendecomposition for lifestyle applications, in particular when applied to noisy and sparse behavioral data such as dietary information. Finally, we proposed the use of the DLM for supporting adaptive and personalized recommender systems for stimulating behavior change. PMID:28133607

  17. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R 2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  18. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  19. Micropillar Compression Technique Applied to Micron-Scale Mudstone Elasto-Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.; Boyce, B.; Buchheit, T.; Heath, J. E.; Chidsey, T.; Michael, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Specimen Referral Network to Rapidly Scale-Up CD4 Testing: The Hub and Spoke Model for Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Frantz Jean; Osborne, Anna Janick; Elias, Viala Jean; Buteau, Josiane; Boncy, Jacques; Elong, Angela; Dismer, Amber; Sasi, Vikram; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Lauture, Daniel; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Marston, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Regular and quality CD4 testing is essential to monitor disease progression in people living with HIV. In Haiti, most laboratories have limited infrastructure and financial resources and have relied on manual laboratory techniques. We report the successful implementation of a national specimen referral network to rapidly increase patient coverage with quality CD4 testing while at the same time building infrastructure for referral of additional sample types over time. Method Following a thorough baseline analysis of facilities, expected workload, patient volumes, cost of technology and infrastructure constraints at health institutions providing care to HIV patients, the Haitian National Public Health Laboratory designed and implemented a national specimen referral network. The specimen referral network was scaled up in a step-wise manner from July 2011 to July 2014. Results Fourteen hubs serving a total of 67 healthcare facilities have been launched; in addition, 10 healthcare facilities operate FACSCount machines, 21 laboratories operate PIMA machines, and 11 healthcare facilities are still using manual CD4 tests. The number of health institutions able to access automated CD4 testing has increased from 27 to 113 (315%). Testing volume increased 76% on average. The number of patients enrolled on ART at the first healthcare facilities to join the network increased 182% within 6 months following linkage to the network. Performance on external quality assessment was acceptable at all 14 hubs. Conclusion A specimen referral network has enabled rapid uptake of quality CD4 testing, and served as a backbone to allow for other future tests to be scaled-up in a similar way. PMID:26900489

  1. Implementation of legal abortion in Nepal: a model for rapid scale-up of high-quality care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Unsafe abortion's significant contribution to maternal mortality and morbidity was a critical factor leading to liberalization of Nepal's restrictive abortion law in 2002. Careful, comprehensive planning among a range of multisectoral stakeholders, led by Nepal's Ministry of Health and Population, enabled the country subsequently to introduce and scale up safe abortion services in a remarkably short timeframe. This paper examines factors that contributed to rapid, successful implementation of legal abortion in this mountainous republic, including deliberate attention to the key areas of policy, health system capacity, equipment and supplies, and information dissemination. Important elements of this successful model of scaling up safe legal abortion include: the pre-existence of postabortion care services, through which health-care providers were already familiar with the main clinical technique for safe abortion; government leadership in coordinating complementary contributions from a wide range of public- and private-sector actors; reliance on public-health evidence in formulating policies governing abortion provision, which led to the embrace of medical abortion and authorization of midlevel providers as key strategies for decentralizing care; and integration of abortion care into existing Safe Motherhood and the broader health system. While challenges remain in ensuring that all Nepali women can readily exercise their legal right to early pregnancy termination, the national safe abortion program has already yielded strong positive results. Nepal's experience making high-quality abortion care widely accessible in a short period of time offers important lessons for other countries seeking to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity from unsafe abortion and to achieve Millennium Development Goals. PMID:22475782

  2. Antiretroviral Treatment Scale-Up and Tuberculosis Mortality in High TB/HIV Burden Countries: An Econometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Isabel; Bendavid, Eran; Korenromp, Eline L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in patients with active tuberculosis (TB), but the population-level relationship between ART coverage and TB mortality is untested. We estimated the reduction in population-level TB mortality that can be attributed to increasing ART coverage across 41 high HIV-TB burden countries. Methods We compiled TB mortality trends between 1996 and 2011 from two sources: (1) national program-reported TB death notifications, adjusted for annual TB case detection rates, and (2) WHO TB mortality estimates. National coverage with ART, as proportion of HIV-infected people in need, was obtained from UNAIDS. We applied panel linear regressions controlling for HIV prevalence (5-year lagged), coverage of TB interventions (estimated by WHO and UNAIDS), gross domestic product per capita, health spending from domestic sources, urbanization, and country fixed effects. Results Models suggest that that increasing ART coverage was followed by reduced TB mortality, across multiple specifications. For death notifications at 2 to 5 years following a given ART scale-up, a 1% increase in ART coverage predicted 0.95% faster mortality rate decline (p = 0.002); resulting in 27% fewer TB deaths in 2011 alone than would have occurred without ART. Based on WHO death estimates, a 1% increase in ART predicted a 1.0% reduced TB death rate (p<0.001), and 31% fewer deaths in 2011. TB mortality was higher at higher HIV prevalence (p<0.001), but not related to coverage of isoniazid preventive therapy, cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, or other covariates. Conclusion This econometric analysis supports a substantial impact of ART on population-level TB mortality realized already within the first decade of ART scale-up, that is apparent despite variable-quality mortality data. PMID:27536864

  3. Site response obtained from array techniques applied to the seismic noise: Two examples in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, R.; Del Pezzo, E.; La Rocca, M.; Liguori, G.; Milana, G.; Sabbarese, C.

    The vertical component of the seismic noise has been recorded in two different sites near the towns of Mercato S. Severino and Benevento in Southern Italy by a small aperture array, in order to investigate the characteristics of the noise propagation and to study the site response. Three different array techniques have been applied in the two investigated sites: Beam Forming, High Resolution and Spatial Correlation methods. We used two simple array geometry for localising possible noise sources and estimating local shallow structure using ambient noise. The cross shaped array results effective for determining the phase velocity of waves in the case when the noise is from a single localised source; the circular array, on the other hand, is successfully used when the noise sources are distributed. The main results are: the analysis of a coherent component of the noise recorded in the two sites, interpreted as Rayleigh waves, results in reasonable velocity models; the noise recorded in the M.S.S. Plain is a space stationary signal, while the noise at the Benevento site is possibly produced by a stable noise source located close to the array. Due to this evidence, the correlation method does not yield satisfactory results when applied to the Benevento site. The 2-6 Hz spectral peaks of the noise recorded in the M.S.S. Plain can be interpreted as due to a site effect, considering the satisfactory agreement of the noise spectrum at those frequencies with the theoretical transfer function computed on the basis of the velocity model deduced from the Rayleigh waves dispersion analysis.

  4. Adaptive meshing technique applied to an orthopaedic finite element contact problem.

    PubMed

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants. Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely applied in the analysis and design of hip and knee implants, with additional joints (ankle, shoulder, wrist) attracting increased attention. The objective of this investigation was to develop a simplified adaptive meshing scheme to facilitate the finite element analysis of a dual-curvature total wrist implant. Using currently available software, the analyst has great flexibility in mesh generation, but must prescribe element sizes and refinement schemes throughout the domain of interest. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to predict in advance a mesh spacing that will give acceptable results. Adaptive finite-element mesh capabilities operate to continuously refine the mesh to improve accuracy where it is required, with minimal intervention by the analyst. Such mesh adaptation generally means that in certain areas of the analysis domain, the size of the elements is decreased (or increased) and/or the order of the elements may be increased (or decreased). In concept, mesh adaptation is very appealing. Although there have been several previous applications of adaptive meshing for in-house FE codes, we have coupled an adaptive mesh formulation with the pre-existing commercial programs PATRAN (MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., USA) and ABAQUS (Hibbit Karlson and Sorensen, Pawtucket, RI). In doing so, we have retained several attributes of the commercial software, which are very attractive for orthopaedic implant applications.

  5. Electrochemical microfluidic chip based on molecular imprinting technique applied for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Min; Tian, Liping; Sun, Shiguo; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Feilang; Li, Yingchun

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical detection platform was established by integrating molecularly imprinting technique with microfluidic chip and applied for trace measurement of three therapeutic drugs. The chip foundation is acrylic panel with designed grooves. In the detection cell of the chip, a Pt wire is used as the counter electrode and reference electrode, and a Au-Ag alloy microwire (NPAMW) with 3D nanoporous surface modified with electro-polymerized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film as the working electrode. Detailed characterization of the chip and the working electrode was performed, and the properties were explored by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two methods, respectively based on electrochemical catalysis and MIP/gate effect were employed for detecting warfarin sodium by using the prepared chip. The linearity of electrochemical catalysis method was in the range of 5×10(-6)-4×10(-4)M, which fails to meet clinical testing demand. By contrast, the linearity of gate effect was 2×10(-11)-4×10(-9)M with remarkably low detection limit of 8×10(-12)M (S/N=3), which is able to satisfy clinical assay. Then the system was applied for 24-h monitoring of drug concentration in plasma after administration of warfarin sodium in rabbit, and the corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained. In addition, the microfluidic chip was successfully adopted to analyze cyclophosphamide and carbamazepine, implying its good versatile ability. It is expected that this novel electrochemical microfluidic chip can act as a promising format for point-of-care testing via monitoring different analytes sensitively and conveniently.

  6. Formative evaluation of antiretroviral therapy scale-up efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn; Ryan, Gery; Taylor, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    With millions in need of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world, and scarce human and fiscal resources available, we conducted a formative evaluation of scale-up operations at clinics associated with AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Africa to identify lessons learned for improving scale-up efficiency. Site visits were made to six selected clinics in Uganda, Zambia, and South Africa, during which semistructured interviews with key stake-holders and observation of client flows and clinic operations were performed. This evaluation revealed the following lessons related to factors that are critical to efficient ART scale-up: (1) to ensure steady ART uptake, it is important to involve the community and community leaders in outreach, HIV education, and program decision-making; (2) minimizing bottlenecks to smooth patient flow requires efficient staff allocation to appropriate clinical duties, streamlined clinic visit schedule protocols, and tapping clients and the HIV community as a key source of labor; (3) to minimize clients dropping out of care, structures should be developed that enable clients to provide support and a "safety net" for helping each other remain in care; (4) computerized record management systems are essential for accurate antiretroviral inventory and dispensing records, quality assurance monitoring, and client enrollment records and visit scheduling; (5) effective organizational management and human resource policies are essential to maintain high job performance and satisfaction and limit burnout; (6) to maximize impact on social and economic health, it is important for ART programs to develop effective mechanisms for coordinating and referring clients to support service organizations.

  7. Scale up and application of biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis in Enhanced Oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Amani, Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Haghighi, Manouchehr; Soudi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-09-01

    There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the scale up of biosurfactant production. In order to develop suitable technology of commercialization, carrying out tests in shake flasks and bioreactors was essential. A reactor with integrated foam collector was designed for biosurfactant production using Bacillus subtilis isolated from agricultural soil. The yield of biosurfactant on biomass (Y(p/x)), biosurfactant on sucrose (Y(p/s)), and the volumetric production rate (Y) for shake flask were obtained about 0.45 g g(-1), 0.18 g g(-1), and 0.03 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The best condition for bioreactor was 300 rpm and 1.5 vvm, giving Y(x/s), Y(p/x), Y(p/s), and Y of 0.42 g g(-1), 0.595 g g(-1), 0.25 g g(-1), and 0.057 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The biosurfactant maximum production, 2.5 g l(-1), was reached in 44 h of growth, which was 28% better than the shake flask. The obtained volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) values at optimum conditions in the shake flask and the bioreactor were found to be around 0.01 and 0.0117 s(-1), respectively. Comparison of K(L)a values at optimum conditions shows that biosurfactant production scaling up from shake flask to bioreactor can be done with K(L) a as scale up criterion very accurately. Nearly 8% of original oil in place was recovered using this biosurfactant after water flooding in the sand pack.

  8. Scaling-up the medical workforce in Timor-Leste: challenges of a great leap forward.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Jorge; Dussault, Gilles; Buchan, James; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2013-11-01

    The health services system of Timor-Leste (T-L) will, by 2015, add 800 physicians, most of them trained in Cuba, to the 233 employed by the national health system in 2010-2011. The need for more physicians is not in discussion: poor health indicators, low coverage and utilization of services, and poor quality of services are well documented in T-L. However, the choice of this scaling-up, with a relatively narrow focus on the medical workforce, needs to be assessed for its relevance to the health profile of the country, for its comprehensiveness in terms of other complementary measures needed to make it effective. This article discusses the potential effects of the rapid scaling-up of the medical workforce, and the organizational capacity needed to monitor the process and eventually mitigate any deleterious consequences. The analysis is based on a review of documentation collected on site (T-L) and on interviews with key-informants conducted in 2011. We stress that any workforce scaling-up is not simply a matter of increasing numbers of professionals, but should combine improved training, distribution, working conditions, management and motivation, as a means towards better performing health services' systems. This is a major challenge in a context of limited organizational and managerial capacity, underdeveloped information systems, limited training and research capacity, and dependency on foreign aid and technical assistance. Potential risks are associated with funding the additional costs of recruiting more personnel, associated expenditures on infrastructure, equipment and consumables, the impact on current staff mix, and the expected increased demand for services. We conclude that failing to manage effectively the forthcoming "great leap forward" will have long term effects: formal policies and plans for the balanced development of the health workforce, as well as strengthened institutions are urgently needed.

  9. Scale-up considerations relevant to experimental studies of nuclear waste-package behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, D.G.; Peters, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    Results from a study that investigated whether testing large-scale nuclear waste-package assemblages was technically warranted are reported. It was recognized that the majority of the investigations for predicting waste-package performance to date have relied primarily on laboratory-scale experimentation. However, methods for the successful extrapolation of the results from such experiments, both geometrically and over time, to actual repository conditions have not been well defined. Because a well-developed scaling technology exists in the chemical-engineering discipline, it was presupposed that much of this technology could be applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance. A review of existing literature documented numerous examples where a consideration of scaling technology was important. It was concluded that much of the existing scale-up technology is applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance for both size and time extrapolations and that conducting scale-up studies may be technically merited. However, the applicability for investigating the complex chemical interactions needs further development. It was recognized that the complexity of the system, and the long time periods involved, renders a completely theoretical approach to performance prediction almost hopeless. However, a theoretical and experimental study was defined for investigating heat and fluid flow. It was concluded that conducting scale-up modeling and experimentation for waste-package performance predictions is possible using existing technology. A sequential series of scaling studies, both theoretical and experimental, will be required to formulate size and time extrapolations of waste-package performance.

  10. Scaling Up Early Infant Male Circumcision: Lessons From the Kingdom of Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Laura; Benzerga, Wendy; Mirira, Munamato; Adamu, Tigistu; Shissler, Tracey; Bitchong, Raymond; Malaza, Mandla; Mamba, Makhosini; Mangara, Paul; Curran, Kelly; Khumalo, Thembisile; Mlambo, Phumzile; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Maziya, Vusi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The government of the Kingdom of Swaziland recognizes that it must urgently scale up HIV prevention interventions, such as voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). Swaziland has adopted a 2-phase approach to male circumcision scale-up. The catch-up phase prioritizes VMMC services for adolescents and adults, while the sustainability phase involves the establishment of early infant male circumcision (EIMC). Swaziland does not have a modern-day tradition of circumcision, and the VMMC program has met with client demand challenges. However, since the launch of the EIMC program in 2010, Swaziland now leads the Eastern and Southern Africa region in the scale-up of EIMC. Here we review Swaziland’s program and its successes and challenges. Methods: From February to May 2014, we collected data while preparing Swaziland’s “Male Circumcision Strategic and Operational Plan for HIV Prevention 2014–2018.” We conducted structured stakeholder focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, and we collected EIMC service delivery data from an implementing partner responsible for VMMC and EIMC service delivery. Data were summarized in consolidated narratives. Results: Between 2010 and 2014, trained providers performed more than 5,000 EIMCs in 11 health care facilities in Swaziland, and they reported no moderate or severe adverse events. According to a broad group of EIMC program stakeholders, an EIMC program needs robust support from facility, regional, and national leadership, both within and outside of HIV prevention coordination bodies, to promote institutionalization and ownership. Providers and health care managers in 3 of Swaziland’s 4 regional hospitals suggest that when EIMC is introduced into reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health platforms, dedicated staff attention can help ensure that EIMC is performed amid competing priorities. Creating informed demand from communities also supports EIMC as a service delivery priority

  11. Recommendations for scale-up of community-based misoprostol distribution programs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nuriya; Kapungu, Chisina; Carnahan, Leslie; Geller, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in resource-poor settings has been shown to be safe and effective. However, global recommendations for prenatal distribution and monitoring within a community setting are not yet available. In order to successfully translate misoprostol and PPH research into policy and practice, several critical points must be considered. A focus on engaging the community, emphasizing the safe nature of community-based misoprostol distribution, supply chain management, effective distribution, coverage, and monitoring plans are essential elements to community-based misoprostol program introduction, expansion, or scale-up.

  12. Scale-Up of a Titanium Carbonitride Coating System for Titanium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    7J A09 25 pRATT AND HTNY AIRCRAFT GROUP WEST PALM BEACH FL 6-ETC F/6 116 SCALER OF A TITANIUM CARBONITRIDE COATING SYSTM FOR TITANIUN--ETC(U) JUL 80...on parts coated in the new reactor. DD OAN1 1473 to, TI0N of, I Nov6Go Is OBSOL.ETE Unclassified S N 002- L.01.t 6601SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS...alloy parts . DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SCALED-UP, HOT-WALL REACTOR The reactor design and construction, and the

  13. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  14. An integrated health sector response to violence against women in Malaysia: lessons for supporting scale up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaysia has been at the forefront of the development and scale up of One-Stop Crisis Centres (OSCC) - an integrated health sector model that provides comprehensive care to women and children experiencing physical, emotional and sexual abuse. This study explored the strengths and challenges faced during the scaling up of the OSCC model to two States in Malaysia in order to identify lessons for supporting successful scale-up. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with health care providers, policy makers and key informants in 7 hospital facilities. This was complemented by a document analysis of hospital records and protocols. Data were coded and analysed using NVivo 7. Results The implementation of the OSCC model differed between hospital settings, with practise being influenced by organisational systems and constraints. Health providers generally tried to offer care to abused women, but they are not fully supported within their facility due to lack of training, time constraints, limited allocated budget, or lack of referral system to external support services. Non-specialised hospitals in both States struggled with a scarcity of specialised staff and limited referral options for abused women. Despite these challenges, even in more resource-constrained settings staff who took the initiative found it was possible to adapt to provide some level of OSCC services, such as referring women to local NGOs or community support groups, or training nurses to offer basic counselling. Conclusions The national implementation of OSCC provides a potentially important source of support for women experiencing violence. Our findings confirm that pilot interventions for health sector responses to gender based violence can be scaled up only when there is a sound health infrastructure in place – in other words a supportive health system. Furthermore, the successful replication of the OSCC model in other similar settings requires that the model – and the system

  15. 78 FR 32381 - Applications for New Awards, Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-up and Validation Grants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Applications for New Awards, Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale- up and Validation Grants; Correction AGENCY... Scale-up and Validation grants (78 FR 25977) and (78 FR 25990). The NIAs inadvertently omitted part of... level of scale) on a relevant outcome (as defined in this notice). The grantee must make...

  16. Principles for Scaling Up: Choosing, Measuring Effects, and Promoting the Widespread Use of Educational Innovation. CSE Report 634

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of scaling up of educational innovation is to produce robust, effective, replicable outcomes. This report addresses requirements to support scale-up of scientifically vetted innovation (or new ideas that are built on the findings of quality research and development). In this report, a number of issues are considered: the context of…

  17. A study and evaluation of image analysis techniques applied to remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, R. J.; Dasarathy, B. V.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of phenomena causing nonlinearities in the transformation from Landsat multispectral scanner coordinates to ground coordinates is presented. Experimental results comparing rms errors at ground control points indicated a slight improvement when a nonlinear (8-parameter) transformation was used instead of an affine (6-parameter) transformation. Using a preliminary ground truth map of a test site in Alabama covering the Mobile Bay area and six Landsat images of the same scene, several classification methods were assessed. A methodology was developed for automatic change detection using classification/cluster maps. A coding scheme was employed for generation of change depiction maps indicating specific types of changes. Inter- and intraseasonal data of the Mobile Bay test area were compared to illustrate the method. A beginning was made in the study of data compression by applying a Karhunen-Loeve transform technique to a small section of the test data set. The second part of the report provides a formal documentation of the several programs developed for the analysis and assessments presented.

  18. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  19. Applying Toyota production system techniques for medication delivery: improving hospital safety and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Newell, Terry L; Steinmetz-Malato, Laura L; Van Dyke, Deborah L

    2011-01-01

    The inpatient medication delivery system used at a large regional acute care hospital in the Midwest had become antiquated and inefficient. The existing 24-hr medication cart-fill exchange process with delivery to the patients' bedside did not always provide ordered medications to the nursing units when they were needed. In 2007 the principles of the Toyota Production System (TPS) were applied to the system. Project objectives were to improve medication safety and reduce the time needed for nurses to retrieve patient medications. A multidisciplinary team was formed that included representatives from nursing, pharmacy, informatics, quality, and various operational support departments. Team members were educated and trained in the tools and techniques of TPS, and then designed and implemented a new pull system benchmarking the TPS Ideal State model. The newly installed process, providing just-in-time medication availability, has measurably improved delivery processes as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Other positive outcomes have included improved nursing satisfaction, reduced nursing wait time for delivered medications, and improved efficiency in the pharmacy. After a successful pilot on two nursing units, the system is being extended to the rest of the hospital.

  20. Spatial analysis techniques applied to uranium prospecting in Chihuahua State, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R.; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Sanín, Luz H.; Reyes Cortés, Manuel; Martínez Meyer, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the distribution of uranium minerals in Chihuahua, the advanced statistical model "Maximun Entropy Method" (MaxEnt) was applied. A distinguishing feature of this method is that it can fit more complex models in case of small datasets (x and y data), as is the location of uranium ores in the State of Chihuahua. For georeferencing uranium ores, a database from the United States Geological Survey and workgroup of experts in Mexico was used. The main contribution of this paper is the proposal of maximum entropy techniques to obtain the mineral's potential distribution. For this model were used 24 environmental layers like topography, gravimetry, climate (worldclim), soil properties and others that were useful to project the uranium's distribution across the study area. For the validation of the places predicted by the model, comparisons were done with other research of the Mexican Service of Geological Survey, with direct exploration of specific areas and by talks with former exploration workers of the enterprise "Uranio de Mexico". Results. New uranium areas predicted by the model were validated, finding some relationship between the model predictions and geological faults. Conclusions. Modeling by spatial analysis provides additional information to the energy and mineral resources sectors.

  1. Sampled-Data Techniques Applied to a Digital Controller for an Altitude Autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Stanley F.; Harper, Eleanor V.

    1959-01-01

    Sampled-data theory, using the Z transformation, is applied to the design of a digital controller for an aircraft-altitude autopilot. Particular attention is focused on the sensitivity of the design to parameter variations and the abruptness of the response, that is, the normal acceleration required to carry out a transient maneuver. Consideration of these two characteristics of the system has shown that the finite settling time design method produces an unacceptable system, primarily because of the high sensitivity of the response to parameter variations, although abruptness can be controlled by increasing the sampling period. Also demonstrated is the importance of having well-damped poles or zeros if cancellation is attempted in the design methods. A different method of smoothing the response and obtaining a design which is not excessively sensitive is proposed, and examples are carried through to demonstrate the validity of the procedure. This method is based on design concepts of continuous systems, and it is shown that if no pole-zero cancellations are allowed in the design, one can obtain a response which is not too abrupt, is relatively insensitive to parameter variations, and is not sensitive to practical limits on control-surface rate. This particular design also has the simplest possible pulse transfer function for the digital controller. Simulation techniques and root loci are used for the verification of the design philosophy.

  2. Culture-independent techniques applied to food industry water surveillance--a case study.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Jessica Varela; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula

    2010-07-31

    Culture-independent techniques were used for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water at potentially critical control points along the production lines at a German dairy company and a Spanish dry cured ham company. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to describe bacterial population shifts indicating biological instability in the drinking water samples. Autochthonous bacteria were identified by sequencing the excised DGGE DNA bands. More specifically, real-time PCR was applied to detect a number of pathogenic bacteria, i.e. Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella spp, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Due to the detection limits of the real-time PCR method, a specific protocol was established in order to meet the technical detection requirements and to avoid unwanted polymerase inhibitions. Autochthonous bacterial populations were found to be highly stable at most of the sampling points. Only one sampling point exhibited population shifts at the German dairy company. Enterococci and P.aeruginosa were detected in some water samples from these companies by molecular biology detection methods, but not by conventional culturing methods. Some opportunistic bacteria as Enterobacter sp., Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas sp. and non-pathogenic Bacillus, were also detected after DNA sequencing of DGGE bands.

  3. Phase-ratio technique as applied to the assessment of lunar surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaydash, Vadym; Videen, Gorden; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    Regoliths of atmosphereless celestial bodies demonstrate prominent light backscattering that is common for particulate surfaces. This occurs over a wide range of phase angles and can be seen in the phase function [1]. The slope of the function may characterize the complexity of planetary surface structure. Imagery of such a parameter suggests that information can be obtained about the surface, like variations of unresolved surface roughness and microtopography [2]. Phase-ratio imagery allows one to characterize the phase function slope. This imagery requires the ratio of two co-registered images acquired at different phase angles. One important advantage of the procedure is that the inherent albedo variations of the surface are suppressed, and, therefore, the resulting image is sensitive to the surface structure variation [2,3]. The phase-ratio image characterizes surface roughness variation at spatial scales on the order of the incident wavelengths to that of the image resolution. Applying the phase-ratio technique to ground-based telescope data has allowed us to find new lunar surface formations in the southern part of Oceanus Procellarum. These are suggested to be weak swirls [4]. We also combined the phase-ratio technique with the space-derived photometry data acquired from the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter with high spatial resolution. Thus we exploited the method to analyze the sites of Apollo landings and Soviet sample-return missions. Phase-ratio imagery has revealed anomalies of the phase-curve slope indicating a smoothing of the surface microstructure at the sites caused by dust uplifted by the engine jets of the descent and ascent modules [5,6]. Analysis of phase-ratios helps to understand how the regolith properties have been affected by robotic and human activity on the Moon [7,8]. We have demonstrated the use of the method to search for fresh natural disturbances of surface structure, e.g., to detect areas of fresh slumps, accumulated material on

  4. Nano-emulsions prepared by the phase inversion composition method: preparation variables and scale up.

    PubMed

    Solè, Isabel; Pey, Carmen M; Maestro, Alicia; González, Carmen; Porras, Montserrat; Solans, Conxita; Gutiérrez, José M

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this work is to study, through experimental design, the effect of vessel geometry and scale-up in the properties of nano-emulsions prepared through the phase inversion composition method (PIC). Results show that a proper mixing is crucial for small droplet-sized nano-emulsions, especially when remaining free oil is found together with the key liquid crystal phase formed during the emulsification process. In these cases, mixing must be near the perfect mixed model. Proper geometries must be selected to promote a good mixture. Small addition rates V(ad) and high mixing rates omega promote the necessary mixing level. However, results indicate that, if free oil remains together with liquid crystal formed during emulsification, a too high omega could promote coalescence of oil droplets. When a cubic liquid crystal phase Pm3n is formed instead during emulsification, without free oil, coalescence is not promoted, probably due to the extremely high viscosity. For the system where Pm3n is formed during emulsification, scale-up cannot be done, as it would be expected, maintaining adimensional variables--Reynolds, Re, and adimensional time. A perfect correspondence between scales is observed when the total addition time and the lineal mixing rate are maintained between scales instead. Re, i.e. the ratio between inertial and viscous forces, does not seem adequate to describe the system, as inertial forces are worthless due to the extremely high viscosity.

  5. Scale-up from batch to flow-through wet milling process for injectable depot formulation.

    PubMed

    Lehocký, Róbert; Pěček, Daniel; Štěpánek, František

    2016-12-01

    Injectable depot formulations are aimed at providing long-term sustained release of a drug into systemic circulation, thus reducing plasma level fluctuations and improving patient compliance. The particle size distribution of the formulation in the form of suspension is a key parameter that controls the release rate. In this work, the process of wet stirred media milling (ball milling) of a poorly water-soluble substance has been investigated with two main aims: (i) to determine the parametric sensitivity of milling kinetics; and (ii) to develop scale-up methodology for process transfer from batch to flow-through arrangement. Ball milling experiments were performed in two types of ball mills, a batch mill with a 30ml maximum working volume, and a flow-through mill with a 250ml maximum working volume. Milling parameters were investigated in detail by methodologies of QbD to map the parametric space. Specifically, the effects of ball size, ball fill level, and rpm on the particle breakage kinetics were systematically investigated at both mills, with an additional parameter (flow-rate) in the case of the flow-through mill. The breakage rate was found to follow power-law kinetics with respect to dimensionless time, with an asymptotic d50 particle size in the range of 200-300nm. In the case of the flow-through mill, the number of theoretical passes through the mill was found to be an important scale-up parameter.

  6. Biohydrogen production from microalgal biomass: energy requirement, CO2 emissions and scale-up scenarios.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana F; Ortigueira, Joana; Alves, Luís; Gouveia, Luísa; Moura, Patrícia; Silva, Carla

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a life cycle inventory of biohydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum through the fermentation of the whole Scenedesmus obliquus biomass. The main purpose of this work was to determine the energy consumption and CO2 emissions during the production of hydrogen. This was accomplished through the fermentation of the microalgal biomass cultivated in an outdoor raceway pond and the preparation of the inoculum and culture media. The scale-up scenarios are discussed aiming for a potential application to a fuel cell hybrid taxi fleet. The H2 yield obtained was 7.3 g H2/kg of S. obliquus dried biomass. The results show that the production of biohydrogen required 71-100 MJ/MJ(H2) and emitted about 5-6 kg CO2/MJ(H2). Other studies and production technologies were taken into account to discuss an eventual process scale-up. Increased production rates of microalgal biomass and biohydrogen are necessary for bioH2 to become competitive with conventional production pathways.

  7. Why did the scale-up of HIV treatment work? A case example from Malawi.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Makombe, Simon D; Libamba, Edwin; Schouten, Erik J

    2011-08-01

    The national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi is based on a public health approach, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful DOTS (directly observed treatment short course-the system used to successfully deliver antituberculosis treatment to people in some of the poorest countries of the world) tuberculosis control framework. During the first 6 years, the number of patients registered on treatment increased from 3000 to >350,000 in both the public and private sectors. The most important reasons for this success have been strong international and national leadership combined with adequate funds, a standardized approach to ART with practical guidelines, an approved national scale-up plan with clear, time-bound milestones; investment in an intensive program of training and accreditation of ART sites, quarterly supervision and monitoring of ART and operational research, rational drug forecasting and no stock-outs of drugs during the first few years, and involvement of the private sector. The looming challenges of human resources, guaranteed financial support, better but also more expensive ART regimens, use of electronic medical records to monitor response to therapy, and attention to HIV prevention need to be met head-on and solved if the momentum of the earlier years is to be maintained.

  8. A practical approach for the scale-up of roller compaction process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weixian; Sprockel, Omar L

    2016-09-01

    An alternative approach for the scale-up of ribbon formation during roller compaction was investigated, which required only one batch at the commercial scale to set the operational conditions. The scale-up of ribbon formation was based on a probability method. It was sufficient in describing the mechanism of ribbon formation at both scales. In this method, a statistical relationship between roller compaction parameters and ribbon attributes (thickness and density) was first defined with DoE using a pilot Alexanderwerk WP120 roller compactor. While the milling speed was included in the design, it has no practical effect on granule properties within the study range despite its statistical significance. The statistical relationship was then adapted to a commercial Alexanderwerk WP200 roller compactor with one experimental run. The experimental run served as a calibration of the statistical model parameters. The proposed transfer method was then confirmed by conducting a mapping study on the Alexanderwerk WP200 using a factorial DoE, which showed a match between the predictions and the verification experiments. The study demonstrates the applicability of the roller compaction transfer method using the statistical model from the development scale calibrated with one experiment point at the commercial scale.

  9. Scaling-up of complex whole-cell bioconversions in conventional and non-conventional media.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marco P C; de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-07-01

    The use of whole cells is becoming a more common approach in pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries in order to obtain pure compounds with fewer production steps, higher yields, and cleaner processes, as compared to those achieved with traditional strategies. Whole cells are often used as enzymes pools, in particular when multi-step reactions and/or co-factor regeneration are envisaged. Nonetheless, published information on the scale-up of such systems both in aqueous and in two-phase aqueous-organic systems is relatively scarce. The present work aims to evaluate suitable scale-up criteria in conventional and non-conventional medium for a whole-cell bioconversion that uses resting cells of Mycobacterium sp. NRRL B-3805 to cleave the side chain of beta-sitosterol, a poorly water-soluble substrate. The experiments were performed in 24-well microtiter plates and in 250 mL shaken flasks as orbital stirred systems, and in 300 mL stirred tanks as mechanically stirred systems. Results show that productivity yields were similar in all scales tested, when maintaining oxygen mass transfer coefficients constant in aqueous systems, or when maintaining constant volumetric power consumption in aqueous-organic two-phase systems.

  10. Data Selection for Fast Projection Techniques Applied to Adaptive Nulling: A Comparative Study of Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    point de vue d’annulation des brouilleurs, le dernier 6tant moins rapide mais donnant une meilleure annulation. En effet , ces algorithmes donnent un...techniques avec celui de la technique "sample matrix inversion ou SMI" pour trois scenarios diffdrents; ces trois derniers ddmontrent les effets du nombre de...eigenvector analysis, such as the MUSIC technique [2], are effective for both interference suppression and spectral estimation. These techniques yield

  11. Multidisciplinary Design Techniques Applied to Conceptual Aerospace Vehicle Design. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John Robert; Walberg, Gerald D.

    1993-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an emerging discipline within aerospace engineering. Its goal is to bring structure and efficiency to the complex design process associated with advanced aerospace launch vehicles. Aerospace vehicles generally require input from a variety of traditional aerospace disciplines - aerodynamics, structures, performance, etc. As such, traditional optimization methods cannot always be applied. Several multidisciplinary techniques and methods were proposed as potentially applicable to this class of design problem. Among the candidate options are calculus-based (or gradient-based) optimization schemes and parametric schemes based on design of experiments theory. A brief overview of several applicable multidisciplinary design optimization methods is included. Methods from the calculus-based class and the parametric class are reviewed, but the research application reported focuses on methods from the parametric class. A vehicle of current interest was chosen as a test application for this research. The rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle combines elements of rocket and airbreathing propulsion in an attempt to produce an attractive option for launching medium sized payloads into low earth orbit. The RBCC SSTO presents a particularly difficult problem for traditional one-variable-at-a-time optimization methods because of the lack of an adequate experience base and the highly coupled nature of the design variables. MDO, however, with it's structured approach to design, is well suited to this problem. The result of the application of Taguchi methods, central composite designs, and response surface methods to the design optimization of the RBCC SSTO are presented. Attention is given to the aspect of Taguchi methods that attempts to locate a 'robust' design - that is, a design that is least sensitive to uncontrollable influences on the design. Near-optimum minimum dry weight solutions are

  12. Image segmentation using common techniques and illumination applied to tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    1998-03-01

    This paper present the comparation and performance on no adaptive image segmentation techniques using illumination and adaptive image segmentation techniques. Results obtained on indoor plant reproduction by tissue culture, show the improve in time process, simplify the image segmentation process, experimental results are presented using common techniques in image processing and illumination, contrasted with adaptive image segmentation.

  13. Scale-up and evaluation of high solid ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is receiving significant attention as a potential process that enables fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and produces high yields of fermentable sugars suitable for the production of renewable fuels. However, successful optimization and scale up of IL pretreatment involves challenges, such as high solids loading, biomass handling and transfer, washing of pretreated solids and formation of inhibitors, which are not addressed during the development stages at the small scale in a laboratory environment. As a first in the research community, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, in collaboration with the Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit, a Department of Energy funded facility that supports academic and industrial entities in scaling their novel biofuels enabling technologies, have performed benchmark studies to identify key challenges associated with IL pretreatment using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and subsequent enzymatic saccharification beyond bench scale. Results Using switchgrass as the model feedstock, we have successfully executed 600-fold, relative to the bench scale (6 L vs 0.01 L), scale-up of IL pretreatment at 15% (w/w) biomass loading. Results show that IL pretreatment at 15% biomass generates a product containing 87.5% of glucan, 42.6% of xylan and only 22.8% of lignin relative to the starting material. The pretreated biomass is efficiently converted into monosaccharides during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at 10% loading over a 150-fold scale of operations (1.5 L vs 0.01 L) with 99.8% fermentable sugar conversion. The yield of glucose and xylose in the liquid streams were 94.8% and 62.2%, respectively, and the hydrolysate generated contains high titers of fermentable sugars (62.1 g/L of glucose and 5.4 g/L cellobiose). The overall glucan and xylan balance from pretreatment and saccharification were 95.0% and 77.1%, respectively. Enzymatic inhibition by [C2mim][OAc] at high solids

  14. Process engineering and scale-up of autotrophic Clostridium strain P11 syngas fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundiyana, Dimple Kumar Aiyanna

    Scope and Method of Study. Biomass gasification followed by fermentation of syngas to ethanol is a potential process to produce bioenergy. The process is currently being researched under laboratory- and pilot-scale in an effort to optimize the process conditions and make the process feasible for commercial production of ethanol and other biofuels such as butanol and propanol. The broad research objectives for the research were to improve ethanol yields during syngas fermentation and to design a economical fermentation process. The research included four statistically designed experimental studies in serum bottles, bench-scale and pilot-scale fermentors to screen alternate fermentation media components, to determine the effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and buffer on syngas fermentation, to determine the effect of key limiting nutrients of the acetyl-CoA pathway in a continuous series reactor design, and to scale-up the syngas fermentation in a 100-L pilot scale fermentor. Findings and Conclusions. The first experimental study identified cotton seed extract (CSE) as a feasible medium for Clostridium strain P11 fermentation. The study showed that CSE at 0.5 g L-1 can potentially replace all the standard Clostridium strain P11 fermentation media components while using a media buffer did not significantly improve the ethanol production when used in fermentation with CSE. Scale-up of the CSE fermentation in 2-L and 5-L stirred tank fermentors showed 25% increase in ethanol yield. The second experimental study showed that syngas fermentation at 32°C without buffer was associated with higher ethanol concentration and reduced lag time in switching to solventogenesis. Conducting fermentation at 40°C or by lowering incubation pH to 5.0 resulted in reduced cell growth and no production of ethanol or acetic acid. The third experiment studied the effect of three limiting nutrients, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 and CoCl2 on syngas fermentation. Results

  15. Application of a chromatography model with linear gradient elution experimental data to the rapid scale-up in ion-exchange process chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2007-08-24

    We applied the model described in our previous paper to the rapid scale-up in the ion exchange chromatography of proteins, in which linear flow velocity, column length and gradient slope were changed. We carried out linear gradient elution experiments, and obtained data for the peak salt concentration and peak width. From these data, the plate height (HETP) was calculated as a function of the mobile phase velocity and iso-resolution curve (the separation time and elution volume relationship for the same resolution) was calculated. The scale-up chromatography conditions were determined by the iso-resolution curve. The scale-up of the linear gradient elution from 5 to 100mL and 2.5L column sizes was performed both by the separation of beta-lactoglobulin A and beta-lactoglobulin B with anion-exchange chromatography and by the purification of a recombinant protein with cation-exchange chromatography. Resolution, recovery and purity were examined in order to verify the proposed method.

  16. Performance of a scaled-up Microbial Fuel Cell with iron reduction as the cathode reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Liu, Fei; van Rijnsoever, Lucas S.; Saakes, Michel; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    Scale-up studies of Microbial Fuel Cells are required before practical application comes into sight. We studied an MFC with a surface area of 0.5 m 2 and a volume of 5 L. Ferric iron (Fe 3+) was used as the electron acceptor to improve cathode performance. MFC performance increased in time as a combined result of microbial growth at the bio-anode, increase in iron concentration from 1 g L -1 to 6 g L -1, and increased activity of the iron oxidizers to regenerate ferric iron. Finally, a power density of 2.0 W m -2 (200 W m -3) was obtained. Analysis of internal resistances showed that anode resistance decreased from 109 to 7 mΩ m 2, while cathode resistance decreased from 939 to 85 mΩ m 2. The cathode was the main limiting factor, contributing to 58% of the total internal resistance. Maximum energy efficiency of the MFC was 41%.

  17. Elimination of blinding trachoma by 2020: a call for rapid scale-up and strengthening programmes.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Danny; Gebre, Teshome; Rono, Hillary

    2014-09-01

    Elimination of blinding trachoma is targeted for the year 2020, making scale-up extremely urgent. Preferred practices have been developed for mass drug administration and trichiasis surgery to assist new countries and districts. However, these need to be utilised on a broader scale to ensure quality output of programmes and the highest coverage possible of their implementation. Although in recent years there has been a significant increase in programmatic funding, there are still gaps. In addition, continued insecurity in several regions and outbreaks that require refocusing of staff threaten the goal. Close partnerships and collaboration enable the trachoma community to be well on track to reaching the goal, but it cannot be business as usual to achieve this.

  18. Scale-up of Lithium Aluminate Pellet Manufacturing with a Flowable Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Kurosky, Randal P.; Tonn, D.; Carty, W.

    2004-01-01

    Thin-walled, high-density lithium aluminate pellets are challenging to manufacture for nuclear reactor applications. The key to scale-up of production was the development of flowable, high density, lithium aluminate powder that permitted (1) automated isostatic pressing, (2) low compaction during pressing, (3) low shrinkage during firing, (4) elimination of chlorine-containing fumed alumina and (5) near-net shape forming. A triple spray drying process was developed that included: (I) a unique-feedstock blend cycle, (II) a post-calcination grinding cycle, and (III) a high-pH final cycle with high solids loading slurry that was spray dried into flowable high-density spheres with large, uniform diameters. Today, pellet manufacturing at a rate of more than 400,000 per year is possible.

  19. Evaluation of liquid-fed ceramic melter scale-up correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Koegler, S.S.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1988-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the parameters governing factors of scale for liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCMs) in order to design full-scale melters using smaller-scale melter data. Results of melter experiments conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) are presented for two feed compositions and five different liquid-fed ceramic melters. The melter performance data including nominal feed rate and glass melt rate are correlated as a function of melter surface area. Comparisons are made between the actual melt rate data and melt rates predicted by a cold cap heat transfer model. The heat transfer model could be used in scale-up calculations, but insufficient data are available on the cold cap characteristics. Experiments specifically designed to determine heat transfer parameters are needed to further develop the model. 17 refs.

  20. Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Gottfredson, Denise C; Cook, Thomas D; Gardner, Frances E M; Gorman-Smith, Deborah; Howe, George W; Sandler, Irwin N; Zafft, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    A decade ago, the Society of Prevention Research (SPR) endorsed a set of standards for evidence related to research on prevention interventions. These standards (Flay et al., Prevention Science 6:151-175, 2005) were intended in part to increase consistency in reviews of prevention research that often generated disparate lists of effective interventions due to the application of different standards for what was considered to be necessary to demonstrate effectiveness. In 2013, SPR's Board of Directors decided that the field has progressed sufficiently to warrant a review and, if necessary, publication of "the next generation" of standards of evidence. The Board convened a committee to review and update the standards. This article reports on the results of this committee's deliberations, summarizing changes made to the earlier standards and explaining the rationale for each change. The SPR Board of Directors endorses "The Standards of Evidence for Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Scale-up Research in Prevention Science: Next Generation."

  1. Scaling Up Chronic Disease Prevention Interventions in Lower- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Pagidipati, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases are increasingly becoming a health burden in lower-and middle-income countries, putting pressure on public health efforts to scale up interventions. This article reviews current efforts in interventions on a population and individual level. Population-level interventions include ongoing efforts to reduce smoking rates, reduce intake of salt and trans–fatty acids, and increase physical activity in increasingly sedentary populations. Individual-level interventions include control and treatment of risk factors for chronic diseases and secondary prevention. This review also discusses the barriers in interventions, particularly those specific to low- and middle-income countries. Continued discussion of proven cost-effective interventions for chronic diseases in the developing world will be useful for improving public health policy. PMID:23297660

  2. Single remote sensing image scale-up combining modulation transform function compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shixiang; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Nan; He, Hongyan; Jiang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing images usually need scale-up for visualization or representation, using only one original image. According to the performance of detective sensors, a new and more applicable method is proposed here. To enhance the high-frequency components, the modulation transform function compensation (MTFC) part focuses on how to adjust the spatial response before and after launch, under signal-to-noise ratio control. This largely reduces the ring phenomenon from incorrect point spread function guesses. Then a contour stencil prior manages to limit edge artifacts in the upscaled image after MTFC. An iterative backprojection operation with fast convergence is also utilized to bring about intensity and contour consistency. We finally present our analysis based on real images with parallel design for full speed. Compared with existing algorithms, the operator illustrates its potential to keep geometric features and extend the visual and quantitative quality for further analysis.

  3. Programme science research on medical male circumcision scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ronald H; Wawer, Maria J; Kigozi, Godfrey

    2013-08-01

    Three randomised trials demonstrate that voluntary medical male circumcision (MMC) reduces male HIV acquisition by 50-60%, and post-trial surveillance has shown that the effects are long lasting. Scale-up of services has been initiated in 14 high-priority sub-Saharan African countries with high rates of HIV and low prevalence of MMC. However, circumcision coverage in the region remains low. Challenges to MMC rollout include suboptimal demand among higher-risk men, the need to expand access and reduce costs of MMC through personnel task shifting and task sharing, assuring and maintaining a high quality of service provision, and the testing and introduction of non-surgical devices. In addition, early infant male circumcision has not been adequately evaluated in Africa. Here, we describe challenges to implementation and discuss the ongoing and future role of implementation and programme science in addressing such challenges.

  4. Scaling-up and ionic liquid-based extraction of pectinases from Aspergillus flavipes cultures.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Márquez, Vicente E; Martínez-Trujillo, M Aurora; Aguilar Osorio, Guillermo; Patiño, Faustino; Álvarez, María S; Rodríguez, Ana; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Deive, Francisco J

    2017-02-01

    The viability of the scaling-up of pectinases production by Aspergillus flavipes at 5L-bioreactor scale has been demonstrated by keeping constant the power input, and a drastic increase in the endo- and exopectinolytic enzyme production was recorded (7- and 40-fold, respectively). The main process variables were modelled by means of logistic and Gompertz equations. In order to overcome the limitations of the conventional downstream strategies, a novel extraction strategy was proposed on the basis of the adequate salting-out potential of two biocompatible cholinium-based ionic liquids (N1112OHCl and N1112OHH2PO4) in aqueous solutions of Tergitol, reaching more than 90% of extraction.

  5. Edge electrospinning: a facile needle-less approach to realize scaled up production of quality nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochinski, J. R.; Curtis, C.; Roman, M. P.; Clarke, L. I.; Wang, Q.; Thoppey, N. M.; Gorga, R. E.

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing unconfined polymer fluids (e.g., from solution or melt), edge electrospinning provides a straightforward approach for scaled up production of high quality nanofibers through the formation of many parallel jets. From simple geometries (using solution contained within a sharp-edged bowl or on a flat plate), jets form and spontaneously re-arrange on the fluid surface near the edge. Using appropriate control of the electric field induced feed rate, comparable per jet fabrication as traditional single-needle electrospinning can be realized, resulting in nanofibers with similar diameters, diameter distribution, and collected mat porosity. The presence of multiple jets proportionally enhances the production rate of the system, with minimal experimental complexity and without the possibility of clogging. Extending this needle-less approach to commercial polyethylene polymers, micron scale fibers can be melt electrospun using a similar apparatus. Support from National Science Foundation (CMMI-0800237).

  6. Processing parameters associated with scale-up of balloon film production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, D. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    A method is set forth for assessing strain-rate profiles that can be used to develop a scale-up theory for blown-film extrusion. Strain rates are evaluated by placing four ink dots on the stalk of an extruded bubble to follow the displacements of the dots as a function of time. The instantaneous Hencky strain is obtained with the displacement data and plotted for analysis. Specific attention is given to potential sources of error in the distance measurements and corrections for these complex bubble geometries. The method is shown to be effective for deriving strain-rate data related to different processing parameters for the production of balloon film. The strain rates can be compared to frostline height, blow-up ratio, and take-up ratio to optimize these processing variables.

  7. Scale up aspects of directional solidification and Czochralski silicon growth processes in traveling magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropka, Natasha; Ervik, Torunn; Czupalla, Matthias; Kiessling, Frank M.

    2016-10-01

    We performed 3D simulations of directional solidification (DS) and Czochralski (Cz) silicon growth processes in traveling magnetic fields (TMFs) and verified them with the experimental data that were available. Particularly, we studied silicon DS growth in real G1, G2 and G5 size setups and Cz growth in 6″ and 24″ crucibles in furnaces provided with KRISTMAG® heater magnet modules (HMMs). TMFs were used for a solid/liquid interface shaping and for a melt stirring. Based on our simulation findings, we discussed scale up challenges and proposed a method for safe upscaling. The method related all present driving forces using dimensionless numbers: Grashof (Gr), Stephan (Ste), Reynolds (Re), Shielding (S) and magnetic forcing number (F).

  8. Scale-up of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis laboratory services, Peru.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin; Ascencios, Luis; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Quispe, Neyda; Bonilla, Cesar; Blaya, Joaquin; Taylor, Allison; Contreras, Carmen; Cegielski, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Peruvian National Tuberculosis (TB) Program, the National Reference Laboratory (NRL), Socios en Salud, and US partners have worked to strengthen the national TB laboratory network to support treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. We review key lessons of this experience. The preparation phase involved establishing criteria for drug susceptibility testing (DST), selecting appropriate DST methods, projecting the quantity of DST and culture to ensure adequate supplies, creating biosafe laboratory facilities for DST, training laboratory personnel on methods, and validating DST methods at the NRL. Implementation involved training providers on DST indications, validating conventional and rapid first-line DST methods at district laboratories, and eliminating additional delays in specimen transport and result reporting. Monitoring included ongoing quality control and quality assurance procedures. Hurdles included logistics, coordinating with policy, competing interests, changing personnel, communications, and evaluation. Operational research guided laboratory scale-up and identified barriers to effective capacity building.

  9. Scale-up of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Laboratory Services, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Yagui, Martin; Ascencios, Luis; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Quispe, Neyda; Bonilla, Cesar; Blaya, Joaquin; Taylor, Allison; Contreras, Carmen; Cegielski, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Peruvian National Tuberculosis (TB) Program, the National Reference Laboratory (NRL), Socios en Salud, and US partners have worked to strengthen the national TB laboratory network to support treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. We review key lessons of this experience. The preparation phase involved establishing criteria for drug susceptibility testing (DST), selecting appropriate DST methods, projecting the quantity of DST and culture to ensure adequate supplies, creating biosafe laboratory facilities for DST, training laboratory personnel on methods, and validating DST methods at the NRL. Implementation involved training providers on DST indications, validating conventional and rapid first-line DST methods at district laboratories, and eliminating additional delays in specimen transport and result reporting. Monitoring included ongoing quality control and quality assurance procedures. Hurdles included logistics, coordinating with policy, competing interests, changing personnel, communications, and evaluation. Operational research guided laboratory scale-up and identified barriers to effective capacity building. PMID:18439349

  10. Drawdown of floating solids in stirred tanks: scale-up study using CFD modeling.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Yogesh; Falk, Rick; Graham, Lisa; Koganti, Venkat

    2011-10-14

    This work shows development of a scale up correlation using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations for floating solids drawdown operation in stirred tanks. Discrete phase modeling (DPM) simulations were used in conjunction with the lab scale experimental measurements to develop a semi-empirical correlation for the prediction of rate of drawdown of floating solid particles. The rate was correlated to average liquid velocity at the free liquid surface. Since, this correlation is based on a fundamental hydrodynamic parameter, velocity, rather than an operating parameters such as the impeller speed, it can be used for a variety of impeller types and tank geometries. The correlation was developed based on the data obtained from the 2L tank using four different tank designs and was validated against the data obtained from the 10L scale tank. The correlation was further extended to the pilot and the commercial scale tanks ranging from 40L to 4000L scale based solely on the CFD model.

  11. Teaching assistant-student interactions in a modified SCALE-UP classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeck, George; Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    In the spring term of 2010, Oregon State University (OSU) began using a SCALE-UP style classroom in the instruction of the introductory calculus-based physics series. Instruction in this classroom was conducted in weekly two-hour sessions facilitated by the primary professor and either two graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) or a graduate teaching assistant and an undergraduate learning assistant (LA). During the course of instruction, two of the eight tables in the room were audio and video recorded. We examine the practices of the GTAs in interacting with the students through both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these recordings. Quantitatively, significant differences are seen between the most experienced GTA and the rest. A major difference in confidence is also observed in the qualitative analysis of this GTA compared to a less experienced GTA.

  12. Scaling-up of membraneless microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for domestic wastewater treatment: Bottlenecks and limitations.

    PubMed

    Escapa, A; San-Martín, M I; Mateos, R; Morán, A

    2015-03-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) have the potential to become a sustainable domestic wastewater (dWW) treatment system. However, new scale-up experiences are required to gain knowledge of critical issues in MEC designs. In this study we assess the ability of two twin membraneless MEC units (that are part of a modular pilot-scale MEC) to treat dWW. Batch tests yielded COD removal efficiencies as high as 92%, with most of the hydrogen (>80% of the total production) being produced during the first 48h. During the continuous tests, MECs performance deteriorated significantly (energy consumption was relatively high and COD removal efficiencies fell below 10% in many cases), which was attributed to an inadequate configuration of the anodic chamber, insufficient mixing inside this chamber, inefficient hydrogen management on the cathode side and finally to dWW in itself. Some alternatives to the current design are suggested.

  13. Is the Scale Up of Malaria Intervention Coverage Also Achieving Equity?

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Richard W.; Eisele, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Methods Malaria in Africa is most severe in young children and pregnant women, particularly in rural and poor households. In many countries, malaria intervention coverage rates have increased as a result of scale up; but this may mask limited coverage in these highest-risk populations. Reports were reviewed from nationally representative surveys in African malaria-endemic countries from 2006 through 2008 to understand how reported intervention coverage rates reflect access by the most at-risk populations. Results Reports were available from 27 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs), Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICSs), and Malaria Indicator Surveys (MISs) during this interval with data on household intervention coverage by urban or rural setting, wealth quintile, and sex. Household ownership of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) varied from 5% to greater than 60%, and was equitable by urban/rural and wealth quintile status among 13 (52%) of 25 countries. Malaria treatment rates for febrile children under five years of age varied from less than 10% to greater than 70%, and while equitable coverage was achieved in 8 (30%) of 27 countries, rates were generally higher in urban and richest quintile households. Use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women varied from 2% to more than 60%, and again tended to be higher in urban and richest quintile households. Across all countries, there were no significant male/female inequalities seen for children sleeping under ITNs or receiving antimalarial treatment for febrile illness. Parasitemia and anemia rates from eight national surveys showed predominance in poor and rural populations. Conclusions/Significance Recent efforts to scale up malaria intervention coverage have achieved equity in some countries (especially with ITNs), but delivery methods in other countries are not addressing the most at-risk populations. As countries seek universal malaria intervention coverage, their delivery

  14. Supervision, monitoring and evaluation of nationwide scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Libamba, Edwin; Makombe, Simon; Mhango, Eustice; de Ascurra Teck, Olga; Limbambala, Eddie; Schouten, Erik J.; Harries, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the supervision, monitoring and evaluation strategies used to assess the delivery of antiretroviral therapy during nationwide scale-up of treatment in Malawi. METHODS: In the first quarter of 2005, the HIV Unit of the Ministry of Health and its partners (the Lighthouse Clinic; Médecins Sans Frontières-Belgium, Thyolo district; and WHO's Country Office) undertook structured supervision and monitoring of all public sector health facilities in Malawi delivering antiretroviral therapy. FINDINGS: Data monitoring showed that by the end of 2004, there were 13,183 patients (5274 (40%) male, 12 527 (95%) adults) who had ever started antiretroviral therapy. Of patients who had ever started, 82% (10 761/13,183) were alive and taking antiretrovirals; 8% (1026/13,183) were dead; 8% (1039/13,183) had been lost to follow up; <1% (106/13,183) had stopped treatment; and 2% (251/13,183) had transferred to another facility. Of those alive and on antiretrovirals, 98% (7098/7258) were ambulatory; 85% (6174/7258) were fit to work; 10% (456/4687) had significant side effects; and, based on pill counts, 96% (6824/7114) had taken their treatment correctly. Mistakes in the registration and monitoring of patients were identified and corrected. Drug stocks were checked, and one potential drug stock-out was averted. As a result of the supervisory visits, by the end of March 2005 recruitment of patients to facilities scheduled to start delivering antiretroviral therapy had increased. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates the importance of early supervision for sites that are starting to deliver antiretroviral therapy, and it shows the value of combining data collection with supervision. Making regular supervisory and monitoring visits to delivery sites are essential for tracking the national scale-up of delivery of antiretrovirals. PMID:16628306

  15. Scaling-up from species to ecosystems: How close can we get to actual decomposition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poca, María; Vaieretti, María Victoria; Cingolani, Ana María; Pérez-Harguindeguy, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Predicting global changes and their effects on ecosystem functioning has been a central issue of ecology during the last decades. Scaling-up from species characteristics to ecosystem processes is a common approach to achieve that goal. However, ecosystem processes are shaped by complex interactions between biotic and abiotic components, complicating their predictability. We evaluated how close we can get to ecosystem-level decomposition (i.e. in situ litter mixtures decomposition) based on aggregated functional traits (calculated as weighted averages of species litter quality and decomposability) in mountain grasslands patches of central Argentina. We found that aggregated functional traits were not significantly correlated to in situ decomposition; i.e. contrary to other works, in our system it is not possible to scale up from species characteristics to ecosystem-level decomposition. This pattern was consistent when litter quality and decomposability were weighted by either species standing biomass or by litter input. These two ways of aggregation were highly correlated, indicating that standing biomass was a good proxy of the contribution that species make to litter layer. Aggregated functional traits were strongly associated to litter mixtures decomposability (a proxy for community-level decomposition), indicating that there are no strong interactions among litters of the species decomposing together. However, litter mixtures decomposability was not correlated to in situ decomposition, showing that community-level and ecosystem-level decomposition were not related. We suggest that the soil environment generated by vegetation structure of the different grassland patches could be controlling in situ decomposition. The prediction of decomposition and nutrient cycling changes associated to land-use change calls for the consideration of variables which integrate different controls; i.e. not only species identity and abundance, but also climate and microclimate. In

  16. Manufacturing process scale-up of optical grade transparent spinel ceramic at ArmorLine Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilman, Joseph; Voyles, John; Nick, Joseph; Shaffer, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While transparent Spinel ceramic's mechanical and optical characteristics are ideal for many Ultraviolet (UV), visible, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR), and multispectral sensor window applications, commercial adoption of the material has been hampered because the material has historically been available in relatively small sizes (one square foot per window or less), low volumes, unreliable supply, and with unreliable quality. Recent efforts, most notably by Technology Assessment and Transfer (TA and T), have scaled-up manufacturing processes and demonstrated the capability to produce larger windows on the order of two square feet, but with limited output not suitable for production type programs. ArmorLine Corporation licensed the hot-pressed Spinel manufacturing know-how of TA and T in 2009 with the goal of building the world's first dedicated full-scale Spinel production facility, enabling the supply of a reliable and sufficient volume of large Transparent Armor and Optical Grade Spinel plates. With over $20 million of private investment by J.F. Lehman and Company, ArmorLine has installed and commissioned the largest vacuum hot press in the world, the largest high-temperature/high-pressure hot isostatic press in the world, and supporting manufacturing processes within 75,000 square feet of manufacturing space. ArmorLine's equipment is capable of producing window blanks as large as 50" x 30" and the facility is capable of producing substantial volumes of material with its Lean configuration and 24/7 operation. Initial production capability was achieved in 2012. ArmorLine will discuss the challenges that were encountered during scale-up of the manufacturing processes, ArmorLine Optical Grade Spinel optical performance, and provide an overview of the facility and its capabilities.

  17. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Peter; Makwana, Neel M; Tighe, Christopher J; Gruar, Robert I; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2016-02-08

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under standard synthetic conditions, either the cubic In2O3 phase, or a mixture of InO(OH) and In2O3 phases were observed in the as-synthesized materials. These materials were pressed into compacts and heat-treated in an inert atmosphere, and their electrical resistivities were then measured using the Van der Pauw method. Sn doping yielded resistivities of ∼ 10(-2) Ω cm for most samples with the lowest resistivity of 6.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm (exceptionally conductive for such pressed nanopowders) at a Sn concentration of 10 at %. Thereafter, the optimized lab-scale composition was scaled-up using a pilot-scale continuous hydrothermal synthesis process (at a rate of 100 g/hour by dry mass), and a comparable resistivity of 9.4 × 10(-3) Ω cm was obtained. The use of the synthesized TCO nanomaterials for thin film fabrication was finally demonstrated by deposition of a transparent, conductive film using a simple spin-coating process.

  18. Geriatric health policy in India: The need for scaling-up implementation

    PubMed Central

    Paul, N. Sherin Susan; Asirvatham, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    In an anticipation of the rising geriatric population in India, the Central government constituted the National Policy for Older Persons in 1999 to promote the health and welfare of senior citizens in India. A major strategy of this policy is to encourage families to take care of their older family members. The policy also encourages voluntary organizations to supplement the care provided by the family and provide care and protection to vulnerable elderly people. The implementation of this policy, particularly in the rural areas, has been negligible and calls for a scaling-up of programs to address the physical, psychological, and social needs of the poor. Due to breakdown of the joint family system and the migration of the younger generation to the towns and cities, the elderly parents in the villages are left to fend for themselves. Too old to work and with little or no source of income, the elders are struggling even to satisfy their basic needs. This article primarily focuses on the various facets of elderly care in India. As a fledgling nation in elderly care, we should take cues from other nations who have pioneered in this field and should constantly evolve to identify and face the various challenges that come up, especially from rural India. The Rural Unit for Health and Social Affairs Department of a well-known Medical College in South India has developed a “senior recreation day care” model which proves to be a useful replicable model to improve the quality of life and nutritional status of the elderly in the lower rungs of society. More than a decade since its inception, it is now the right time to assess the implementation of our geriatric health policy and scale-up programs so that the elderly in our country, irrespective of urban and rural, will have a dignified and good quality life. PMID:27843821

  19. Scale-up of diluted sulfuric acid hydrolysis for producing sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate (SBHH).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia L B; Rocha, George J M; Rodrigues, Durval; Filho, Hélcio J I; Felipe, Maria das Graças A; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2010-02-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was pretreated with diluted sulfuric acid to obtain sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate (SBHH). Experiments were conducted in laboratory and semi-pilot reactors to optimize the xylose recovery and to reduce the generation of sugar degradation products, as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The hydrolysis scale-up procedure was based on the H-Factor, that combines temperature and residence time and employs the Arrhenius equation to model the sulfuric acid concentration (100 mg(acid)/g(dm)) and activation energy (109 kJ/mol). This procedure allowed the mathematical estimation of the results through simulation of the conditions prevailing in the reactors with different designs. The SBHH obtained from different reactors but under the same H-Factor of 5.45+/-0.15 reached similar xylose yield (approximately 74%) and low concentration of sugar degradation products, as furfural (0.082 g/L) and HMF (0.0071 g/L). Also, the highest lignin degradation products (phenolic compounds) were rho-coumarilic acid (0.15 g/L) followed by ferulic acid (0.12 g/L) and gallic acid (0.035 g/L). The highest concentration of ions referred to S (3433.6 mg/L), Fe (554.4 mg/L), K (103.9 mg/L). The H-Factor could be used without dramatically altering the xylose and HMF/furfural levels. Therefore, we could assume that H-Factor was directly useful in the scale-up of the hemicellulosic hydrolysate production.

  20. Minnesota wood energy scale-up project 1994 establishment cost data

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Pierce, R.; Kroll, T.

    1996-03-18

    The Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project began in late 1993 with the first trees planted in the spring of 1994. The purpose of the project is to track and monitor economic costs of planting, maintaining and monitoring larger scale commercial plantings. For 15 years, smaller scale research plantings of hybrid poplar have been used to screen for promising, high-yielding poplar clones. In this project 1000 acres of hybrid poplar trees were planted on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land near Alexandria, Minnesota in 1994. The fourteen landowners involved re-contracted with the CRP for five-year extensions of their existing 10-year contracts. These extended contracts will expire in 2001, when the plantings are 7 years old. The end use for the trees planted in the Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project is undetermined. They will belong to the owner of the land on which they are planted. There are no current contracts in place for the wood these trees are projected to supply. The structure of the wood industry in the Minnesota has changed drastically over the past 5 years. Stumpage values for fiber have risen to more than $20 per cord in some areas raising the possibility that these trees could be used for fiber rather than energy. Several legislative mandates have forced the State of Minnesota to pursue renewable energy including biomass energy. These mandates, a potential need for an additional 1700 MW of power by 2008 by Northern States Power, and agricultural policies will all affect development of energy markets for wood produced much like agricultural crops. There has been a tremendous amount of local and international interest in the project. Contractual negotiations between area landowners, the CRP, a local Resource Conservation and Development District, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and others are currently underway for additional planting of 1000 acres in spring 1995.

  1. Computational psychotherapy research: scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions.

    PubMed

    Imel, Zac E; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-03-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment's active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required to "scale up" to larger evaluation tasks and "drill down" into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current article, we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, relational, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment-related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model-derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time. We conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice.

  2. Trans-National Scale-Up of Services in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Ilan; Sohal, Raman; Ginther, John; Hayden, Leigh; MacDonald, John A.; Mossman, Kathryn; Parikh, Himanshu; McGahan, Anita; Mitchell, Will; Bhattacharyya, Onil

    2014-01-01

    Background Scaling up innovative healthcare programs offers a means to improve access, quality, and health equity across multiple health areas. Despite large numbers of promising projects, little is known about successful efforts to scale up. This study examines trans-national scale, whereby a program operates in two or more countries. Trans-national scale is a distinct measure that reflects opportunities to replicate healthcare programs in multiple countries, thereby providing services to broader populations. Methods Based on the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI) database of nearly 1200 health programs, the study contrasts 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale with 1,068 single-country programs. Data was collected on the programs' health focus, service activity, legal status, and funding sources, as well as the programs' locations (rural v. urban emphasis), and founding year; differences are reported with statistical significance. Findings This analysis examines 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale (TNS) across multiple disease areas and activity types. Compared to 1,068 single-country programs, we find that trans-nationally scaled programs are more donor-reliant; more likely to focus on targeted health needs such as HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, or family planning rather than provide more comprehensive general care; and more likely to engage in activities that support healthcare services rather than provide direct clinical care. Conclusion This work, based on a large data set of health programs, reports on trans-national scale with comparison to single-country programs. The work is a step towards understanding when programs are able to replicate their services as they attempt to expand health services for the poor across countries and health areas. A subset of these programs should be the subject of case studies to understand factors that affect the scaling process, particularly seeking to identify mechanisms that lead to

  3. An update on operation experience and scale-up with CYMIC{reg_sign}

    SciTech Connect

    Kokko, A.; Alliston, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the operational experiences with the first full-scale CYMIC{reg_sign} demonstration plant, the scale-up principles of CYMIC{reg_sign}, and finally a large-scale CYMIC{reg_sign} case. Kvaerner Pulping`s new-generation circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, CYMIC{reg_sign} offers a multi-fuel combustion solution with low emissions, high efficiency and high availability. With the cyclone built inside the boiler furnace, its space requirements are extremely small. Due to the watercooled construction, the refractories are thin, minimizing the need for maintenance. The pilot testing with CYMIC{reg_sign} was successfully completed and with positive results in 1992. The next step was a CYMIC{reg_sign} scale-up and a full-scale demonstration project. The 32 MW{sub th} demonstration plant owned by VAPO Oy in the town of Lieksa, eastern Finland, is now in continuous operation. The CYMIC{reg_sign} has been further scaled by developing six standard cyclone sizes. The CYMIC{reg_sign}`s square furnace size can be varied and can be multiplied, offering a stepless capacity range from small Lieksa size units to utility boilers. The design of the CYMIC{reg_sign} process, including operation of the cyclone and the gas lock, has been verified. In addition, tests have been run measuring flue gas emissions and combustion efficiency. The most interesting results from these tests are discussed. A 185 MW{sub th} CYMIC{reg_sign} unit is now operating at the Rauma paper mill of Unite Paper Mills, Finland. The project began in November 1994 and the boiler started up in the summer of 1996. The design and the performance of this CYMIC{reg_sign} unit are presented.

  4. Benchmarks to measure readiness to integrate and scale up newborn survival interventions.

    PubMed

    Moran, Allisyn C; Kerber, Kate; Pfitzer, Anne; Morrissey, Claudia S; Marsh, David R; Oot, David A; Sitrin, Deborah; Guenther, Tanya; Gamache, Nathalie; Lawn, Joy E; Shiffman, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Neonatal mortality accounts for 40% of under-five child mortality. Evidence-based interventions exist, but attention to implementation is recent. Nationally representative coverage data for these neonatal interventions are limited; therefore proximal measures of progress toward scale would be valuable for tracking change among countries and over time. We describe the process of selecting a set of benchmarks to assess scale up readiness or the degree to which health systems and national programmes are prepared to deliver interventions for newborn survival. A prioritization and consensus-building process was co-ordinated by the Saving Newborn Lives programme of Save the Children, resulting in selection of 27 benchmarks. These benchmarks are categorized into agenda setting (e.g. having a national newborn survival needs assessment); policy formulation (e.g. the national essential drugs list includes injectable antibiotics at primary care level); and policy implementation (e.g. standards for care of sick newborns exist at district hospital level). Benchmark data were collected by in-country stakeholders teams who filled out a standard form and provided evidence to support each benchmark achieved. Results are presented for nine countries at three time points: 2000, 2005 and 2010. By 2010, substantial improvement was documented in all selected countries, with three countries achieving over 75% of the benchmarks and an additional five countries achieving over 50% of the benchmarks. Progress on benchmark achievement was accelerated after 2005. The policy process was similar in all countries, but did not proceed in a linear fashion. These benchmarks are a novel method to assess readiness to scale up, an important construct along the pathway to scale for newborn care. Similar exercises may also be applicable to other global health issues.

  5. Scaling up the 454 Titanium Library Construction and Pooling of Barcoded Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Phung, Wilson; Hack, Christopher; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2009-03-23

    We have been developing a high throughput 454 library construction process at the Joint Genome Institute to meet the needs of de novo sequencing a large number of microbial and eukaryote genomes, EST, and metagenome projects. We have been focusing efforts in three areas: (1) modifying the current process to allow the construction of 454 standard libraries on a 96-well format; (2) developing a robotic platform to perform the 454 library construction; and (3) designing molecular barcodes to allow pooling and sorting of many different samples. In the development of a high throughput process to scale up the number of libraries by adapting the process to a 96-well plate format, the key process change involves the replacement of gel electrophoresis for size selection with Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization (SPRI) beads. Although the standard deviation of the insert sizes increases, the overall quality sequence and distribution of the reads in the genome has not changed. The manual process of constructing 454 shotgun libraries on 96-well plates is a time-consuming, labor-intensive, and ergonomically hazardous process; we have been experimenting to program a BioMek robot to perform the library construction. This will not only enable library construction to be completed in a single day, but will also minimize any ergonomic risk. In addition, we have implemented a set of molecular barcodes (AKA Multiple Identifiers or MID) and a pooling process that allows us to sequence many targets simultaneously. Here we will present the testing of pooling a set of selected fosmids derived from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. By combining the robotic library construction process and the use of molecular barcodes, it is now possible to sequence hundreds of fosmids that represent a minimal tiling path of this genome. Here we present the progress and the challenges of developing these scaled-up processes.

  6. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Scaling Up the Non-Pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment for Treating Obstetric Hemorrhage: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Keely; Butrick, Elizabeth; Yamey, Gavin; Miller, Suellen

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstetric hemorrhage (OH), which includes hemorrhage from multiple etiologies during pregnancy, childbirth, or postpartum, is the leading cause of maternal mortality and accounts for one-quarter of global maternal deaths. The Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) is a first-aid device for obstetric hemorrhage that can be applied for post-partum/post miscarriage and for ectopic pregnancies to buy time for a woman to reach a health care facility for definitive treatment. Despite successful field trials, and endorsement by safe motherhood organizations and the World Health Organization (WHO), scale-up has been slow in some countries. This qualitative study explores contextual factors affecting uptake. Methods From March 2013 to April 2013, we conducted 13 key informant interviews across four countries with a large burden of maternal mortality that had achieved varying success in scaling up the NASG: Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. These key informants were health providers or program specialists working with the NASG. We applied a health policy analysis framework to organize the results. The framework has five domains: attributes of the intervention, attributes of the implementers, delivery strategy, attributes of the adopting community, the socio-political context, and the research context. Results The interviews from our study found that relevant facilitators for scale-up are the simplicity of the device, local and international champions, well-developed training sessions, recommendations by WHO and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and dissemination of NASG clinical trial results. Barriers to scaling up the NASG included limited health infrastructure, relatively high upfront cost of the NASG, initial resistance by providers and policy makers, lack of in-country champions or policy makers advocating for NASG implementation, inadequate return and exchange programs, and lack of political will. Conclusions There was a

  8. Integrating Cognitive Behavioral and Applied Behavior Techniques With Dysfunctional Family Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrish, I. J.

    Families experiencing severe conflict are often unable to effectively implement applied behavioral procedures due to interfering emotional responses (anger, blaming, anxiety and depression) and behavioral responses (yelling, crying and physical fighting), which often reduce effective implementation of applied behavioral procedures. Specific…

  9. Nanowire-organic thin film transistor integration and scale up towards developing sensor array for biomedical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashanth S.; Hankins, Phillip T.; Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    Exploratory research works have demonstrated the capability of conducting nanowire arrays in enhancing the sensitivity and selectivity of bio-electrodes in sensing applications. With the help of different surface manipulation techniques, a wide range of biomolecules have been successfully immobilized on these nanowires. Flexible organic electronics, thin film transistor (TFT) fabricated on flexible substrate, was a breakthrough that enabled development of logic circuits on flexible substrate. In many health monitoring scenarios, a series of biomarkers, physical properties and vital signals need to be observed. Since the nano-bio-electrodes are capable of measuring all or most of them, it has been aptly suggested that a series of electrode (array) on single substrate shall be an excellent point of care tool. This requires an efficient control system for signal acquisition and telemetry. An array of flexible TFTs has been designed that acts as active matrix for controlled switching of or scanning by the sensor array. This array is a scale up of the flexible organic TFT that has been fabricated and rigorously tested in previous studies. The integration of nanowire electrodes to the organic electronics was approached by growing nanowires on the same substrate as TFTs and fl ip chip packaging, where the nanowires and TFTs are made on separate substrates. As a proof of concept, its application has been explored in various multi-focal biomedical sensing applications, such as neural probes for monitoring neurite growth, dopamine, and neuron activity; myocardial ischemia for spatial monitoring of myocardium.

  10. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Melanie A; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2015-07-07

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up.

  11. Applying image transformation and classification techniques to airborne hyperspectral imagery for mapping Ashe juniper infestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Buchholz), in excessive coverage, reduces forage production, interferes with livestock management, and degrades watersheds and wildlife habitat in infested rangelands. The objective of this study was to apply minimum noise fraction (MNF) transformation and different cla...

  12. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana’s health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients’ access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today’s health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as “Kgonafalo.” Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  13. The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    How do you keep a classroom of 100 undergraduates actively learning? Can students practice communication and teamwork skills in a large class? How do you boost the performance of underrepresented groups? The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project has addressed these concerns. Because of their inclusion in a leading introductory physics textbook, project materials are used by more than 1/3 of all science, math, and engineering majors nationwide. The room design and pedagogy have been adopted at more than 100 leading institutions across the country. Physics, chemistry, math, astronomy, biology, engineering, earth sciences, and even literature classes are currently being taught this way. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. We promote active learning in a redesigned classroom for 100 students or more. (Of course, smaller classes can also benefit.) Class time is spent primarily on "tangibles" and "ponderables"--hands-on activities, simulations, and interesting questions. Nine students sit in three teams at round tables. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Hundreds of hours of classroom video and audio recordings, transcripts of numerous interviews and focus groups, data from conceptual learning assessments (using widely-recognized instruments in a pretest/posttest protocol), and collected portfolios of student work are part of our rigorous assessment effort. Our findings (based on data from over 16,000 students collected over five years as well as replications at adopting sites) can be summarized as the following: 1) Female failure rate is 1/5 of previous levels, even though more is demanded of students. 2) Minority failure rate is 1/4 that seen in traditionally taught courses. 3) At-risk students are more

  14. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana's health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients' access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today's health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as "Kgonafalo." Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  15. Scale-up of counter-current chromatography: demonstration of predictable isocratic and quasi-continuous operating modes from the test tube to pilot/process scale.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2009-12-11

    Predictable scale-up from test tube derived distribution ratios and analytical-scale sample loading optimisation is demonstrated using a model sample system of benzyl alcohol and p-cresol in a heptane:ethyl acetate:methanol:water phase system with the new 18 L Maxi counter-current chromatography centrifuge. The versatility of having a liquid stationary phase with its high loading capacity and flexible operating modes is demonstrated at two different scales by separating and concentrating target compounds using a mixture of caffeine, vanillin, naringenin and carvone using a quasi-continuous technique called intermittent counter-current extraction.

  16. Synchroton and Simulations Techniques Applied to Problems in Materials Science: Catalysts and Azul Maya Pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, R.

    2005-01-12

    Development of synchrotron techniques for the determination of the structure of disordered, amorphous and surface materials has exploded over the past twenty years due to the increasing availability of high flux synchrotron radiation and the continuing development of increasingly powerful synchrotron techniques. These techniques are available to materials scientists who are not necessarily synchrotron scientists through interaction with effective user communities that exist at synchrotrons such as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). In this article we review the application of multiple synchrotron characterization techniques to two classes of materials defined as ''surface compounds.'' One class of surface compounds are materials like MoS{sub 2-x}C{sub x} that are widely used petroleum catalysts used to improve the environmental properties of transportation fuels. These compounds may be viewed as ''sulfide supported carbides'' in their catalytically active states. The second class of ''surface compounds'' is the ''Maya Blue'' pigments that are based on technology created by the ancient Maya. These compounds are organic/inorganic ''surface complexes'' consisting of the dye indigo and palygorskite, a common clay. The identification of both surface compounds relies on the application of synchrotron techniques as described in this report.

  17. Applying data mining techniques to medical time series: an empirical case study in electroencephalography and stabilometry.

    PubMed

    Anguera, A; Barreiro, J M; Lara, J A; Lizcano, D

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the medical domain today is how to exploit the huge amount of data that this field generates. To do this, approaches are required that are capable of discovering knowledge that is useful for decision making in the medical field. Time series are data types that are common in the medical domain and require specialized analysis techniques and tools, especially if the information of interest to specialists is concentrated within particular time series regions, known as events. This research followed the steps specified by the so-called knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) process to discover knowledge from medical time series derived from stabilometric (396 series) and electroencephalographic (200) patient electronic health records (EHR). The view offered in the paper is based on the experience gathered as part of the VIIP project. Knowledge discovery in medical time series has a number of difficulties and implications that are highlighted by illustrating the application of several techniques that cover the entire KDD process through two case studies. This paper illustrates the application of different knowledge discovery techniques for the purposes of classification within the above domains. The accuracy of this application for the two classes considered in each case is 99.86% and 98.11% for epilepsy diagnosis in the electroencephalography (EEG) domain and 99.4% and 99.1% for early-age sports talent classification in the stabilometry domain. The KDD techniques achieve better results than other traditional neural network-based classification techniques.

  18. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  19. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  20. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  1. Reformulation linearization technique based branch-and-reduce approach applied to regional water supply system planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Fujun; Bayraksan, Güzin; Lansey, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    A regional water supply system design problem that determines pipe and pump design parameters and water flows over a multi-year planning horizon is considered. A non-convex nonlinear model is formulated and solved by a branch-and-reduce global optimization approach. The lower bounding problem is constructed via a three-pronged effort that involves transforming the space of certain decision variables, polyhedral outer approximations, and the Reformulation Linearization Technique (RLT). Range reduction techniques are employed systematically to speed up convergence. Computational results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm; in particular, the critical role range reduction techniques could play in RLT based branch-and-bound methods. Results also indicate using reclaimed water not only saves freshwater sources but is also a cost-effective non-potable water source in arid regions. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305215X.2015.1016508.

  2. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  3. Advanced statistics: applying statistical process control techniques to emergency medicine: a primer for providers.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Charles D; Griffen, David L

    2003-08-01

    Emergency medicine faces unique challenges in the effort to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Increased patient volumes, decreased emergency department (ED) supply, and an increased emphasis on the ED as a diagnostic center have contributed to poor customer satisfaction and process failures such as diversion/bypass. Statistical process control (SPC) techniques developed in industry offer an empirically based means to understand our work processes and manage by fact. Emphasizing that meaningful quality improvement can occur only when it is exercised by "front-line" providers, this primer presents robust yet accessible SPC concepts and techniques for use in today's ED.

  4. Monitoring gypsy moth defoliation by applying change detection techniques to Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. L.; Stauffer, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The overall objective of a research effort at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop and evaluate digital image processing techniques that will facilitate the assessment of the intensity and spatial distribution of forest insect damage in Northeastern U.S. forests using remotely sensed data from Landsats 1, 2 and C. Automated change detection techniques are presently being investigated as a method of isolating the areas of change in the forest canopy resulting from pest outbreaks. In order to follow the change detection approach, Landsat scene correction and overlay capabilities are utilized to provide multispectral/multitemporal image files of 'defoliation' and 'nondefoliation' forest stand conditions.

  5. National malaria control and scaling up for impact: the Zambia experience through 2006.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Richard W; Sipilanyambe, Naawa; Chimumbwa, John; Banda, James J; Mohamed, Abdirahman; Miller, John; Basu, Suprotik; Miti, Simon K; Campbell, Carlos C

    2008-07-01

    With its 2006-2011 National Malaria Strategic Plan, Zambia committed to control malaria at a national scale. This scale-up for impact approach was facilitated by sound business planning and financing in 2006 of approximately US$35 million. Compared with surveys in 2001 and 2004, a 2006 national survey of 14,681 persons in 2,999 households at the end of the transmission season showed substantial coverage increases for preventive interventions. Ownership and use rates of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) among vulnerable groups doubled, with 44% of households owning ITNs and 23% of children less than five years of age and 24% of pregnant women using them. Roll Back Malaria Abuja targets for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) were exceeded, with 62% of pregnant women receiving at least two doses of IPTp. As of 2006, Zambia is demonstrating substantial progress toward the national targets (80% population coverage rates for the interventions) and aspires to show that malaria need not be its leading health problem, and that malaria control is a sound national investment.

  6. Understanding Barriers to Scaling Up HIV-Assisted Partner Services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Marielle; Wamuti, Beatrice Muthoni; Owuor, Mercy; Bukusi, David; Maingi, Peter Mutiti; Otieno, Felix Abuna; Cherutich, Peter; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Farquhar, Carey

    2016-11-01

    Assisted partner services (APS) are more effective than passive referral in identifying new cases of HIV in many settings. Understanding the barriers to the uptake of APS in sub-Saharan Africa is important before its scale up. In this qualitative study, we explored client, community, and healthcare worker barriers to APS within a cluster randomized trial of APS in Kenya. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with clients who declined enrollment in the APS study and 9 focus group discussions with health advisors, HIV testing and counseling (HTC) counselors, and the general HTC client population. Two analysts coded the data using an open coding approach and identified major themes and subthemes. Many participants reported needing more time to process an HIV-positive result before providing partner information. Lack of trust in the HTC counselor led many to fear a breach of confidentiality, which exacerbated the fears of stigma in the community and relationship conflicts. The type of relationship affected the decision to provide partner information, and the lack of understanding of APS at the community level contributed to the discomfort in enrolling in the study. Establishing trust between the client and HTC counselor may increase uptake of APS in Kenya. A client's decision to provide partner information may depend on the type of relationship he or she is in, and alternative methods of disclosure may need to be offered to accommodate different contexts. Spreading awareness about APS in the community may make clients more comfortable providing partner information.

  7. Optimization and scale-up of a fluid bed tangential spray rotogranulation process.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, J; Dumont, H; Bertrand, F; Legros, R

    2007-04-20

    The production of pellets in the pharmaceutical industry generally involves multi-step processing: (1) mixing, (2) wet granulation, (3) spheronization and (4) drying. While extrusion-spheronization processes have been popular because of their simplicity, fluid-bed rotogranulation (FBRG) is now being considered as an alternative, since it offers the advantages of combining the different steps into one processing unit, thus reducing processing time and material handling. This work aimed at the development of a FBRG process for the production of pellets in a 4.5-l Glatt GCPG1 tangential spray rotoprocessor and its optimization using factorial design. The factors considered were: (1) rotor disc velocity, (2) gap air pressure, (3) air flow rate, (4) binder spray rate and (5) atomization pressure. The pellets were characterized for their physical properties by measuring size distribution, roundness and flow properties. The results indicated that: pellet mean particle size is negatively affected by air flow rate and rotor plate speed, while binder spray rate has a positive effect on size; pellet flow properties are enhanced by operating with increased air flow rate and worsened with increased binder spray rate. Multiple regression analysis enabled the identification of an optimal operating window for production of acceptable pellets. Scale-up of these operating conditions was tested in a 30-l Glatt GPCG15 FBRG.

  8. Image and spectral fidelity study of hyperspectral remote sensing image scaling up based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ni; Ma, Yi; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-08-01

    Wavelet transform is a kind of effective image-scale transformation method, which can achieve multi-scale transformation by distinguishing the low-frequency information and the high-frequency information. Hyperspectral remote sensing data combining image with spectrum has almost continuous spectrum that is the important premise of extracting hyperspectral image information, while scale transformation will inevitably lead to the change of image and spectra. Therefore, it is important to study the image and spectral fidelity after wavelet transform. In this paper, the Proba CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing image of Yellow River Estuary Wetland is used to investigate the image and spectral fidelity of image transformed by wavelet which remained the low-frequency information. The level 1-3 of up-scale images are obtained and then compared with the original. Then image and spectral fidelity is quantitatively analyzed. The results show that the image fidelity is slightly reduced by up-scale transformation, but near-infrared images have a larger distortion than other bands. With the increasing scaling up, the distortion of spectrum is more and more great, but spectral fidelity is overall well. For the typical wetland objects, Phragmites austrialis has the best spectral correlation, Spartina has a small spectra change, and aquaculture water spectral distortion is most remarkable.

  9. Context matters: Successes and challenges of intrapartum care scale-up in four districts of Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Tappis, Hannah; Koblinsky, Marge; Winch, Peter J; Turkmani, Sabera; Bartlett, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Reducing preventable maternal mortality and achieving Sustainable Development Goal targets for 2030 will require increased investment in improving access to quality health services in fragile and conflict-affected states. This study explores the conditions that affect availability and utilisation of intrapartum care services in four districts of Afghanistan where mortality studies were conducted in 2002 and 2011. Information on changes in each district was collected through interviews with community members; service providers; and district, provincial and national officials. This information was then triangulated with programme and policy documentation to identify factors that affect the coverage of safe delivery and emergency obstetric care services. Comparison of barriers to maternal health service coverage across the four districts highlights the complexities of national health policy planning and resource allocation in Afghanistan, and provides examples of the types of challenges that must be addressed to extend the reach of life-saving maternal health interventions to women in fragile and conflict-affected states. Findings suggest that improvements in service coverage must be measured at a sub-national level, and context-specific service delivery models may be needed to effectively scale up intrapartum care services in extremely remote or insecure settings.

  10. High speed electrospinning for scaled-up production of amorphous solid dispersion of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsombor K; Balogh, Attila; Démuth, Balázs; Pataki, Hajnalka; Vigh, Tamás; Szabó, Bence; Molnár, Kolos; Schmidt, Bence T; Horák, Péter; Marosi, György; Verreck, Geert; Van Assche, Ivo; Brewster, Marcus E

    2015-03-01

    High speed electrospinning (HSES), compatible with pharmaceutical industry, was used to demonstrate the viability of the preparation of drug-loaded polymer nanofibers with radically higher productivity than the known single-needle electrospinning (SNES) setup. Poorly water-soluble itraconazole (ITRA) was formulated with PVPVA64 matrix polymer using four different solvent-based methods such as HSES, SNES, spray drying (SD) and film casting (FC). The formulations were assessed in terms of improvement in the dissolution rate of ITRA (using a "tapped basket" dissolution configuration) and analysed by SEM, DSC and XRPD. Despite the significantly increased productivity of HSES, the obtained morphology was very similar to the SNES nanofibrous material. ITRA transformed into an amorphous form, according to the DSC and XRPD results, in most cases except the FC samples. The limited dissolution of crystalline ITRA could be highly improved: fast dissolution occurred (>90% within 10min) in the cases of both (the scaled-up and the single-needle) types of electrospun fibers, while the improvement in the dissolution rate of the spray-dried microspheres was significantly lower. Production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) with the HSES system proved to be flexibly scalable and easy to integrate into a continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing line, which opens new routes for the development of industrially relevant nanopharmaceuticals.

  11. Optimization and Scale-up of Inulin Extraction from Taraxacum kok-saghyz roots.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Thomas; Klemm, Andrea; Ziesse, Patrick; Harms, Karsten; Wach, Wolfgang; Rupp, Steffen; Hirth, Thomas; Zibek, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    The optimization and scale-up of inulin extraction from Taraxacum kok-saghyz Rodin was successfully performed. Evaluating solubility investigations, the extraction temperature was fixed at 85 degrees C. The inulin stability regarding degradation or hydrolysis could be confirmed by extraction in the presence of model inulin. Confirming stability at the given conditions the isolation procedure was transferred from a 1 L- to a 1 m3-reactor. The Reynolds number was selected as the relevant dimensionless number that has to remain constant in both scales. The stirrer speed in the large scale was adjusted to 3.25 rpm regarding a 300 rpm stirrer speed in the 1 L-scale and relevant physical and process engineering parameters. Assumptions were confirmed by approximately homologous extraction kinetics in both scales. Since T. kok-saghyz is in the focus of research due to its rubber content side-product isolation from residual biomass it is of great economic interest. Inulin is one of these additional side-products that can be isolated in high quantity (- 35% of dry mass) and with a high average degree of polymerization (15.5) in large scale with a purity of 77%.

  12. Scaling up the national methadone maintenance treatment program in China: achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenyuan; Hao, Yang; Sun, Xinhua; Gong, Xiuli; Li, Fang; Li, Jianhua; Rou, Keming; Sullivan, Sheena G; Wang, Changhe; Cao, Xiaobin; Luo, Wei; Wu, Zunyou

    2010-01-01

    China’s methadone maintenance treatment program was initiated in 2004 as a small pilot project in just eight sites. It has since expanded into a nationwide program encompassing more than 680 clinics covering 27 provinces and serving some 242 000 heroin users by the end of 2009. The agencies that were tasked with the program’s expansion have been confronted with many challenges, including high drop-out rates, poor cooperation between local governing authorities and poor service quality at the counter. In spite of these difficulties, ongoing evaluation has suggested reductions in heroin use, risky injection practices and, importantly, criminal behaviours among clients, which has thus provided the impetus for further expansion. Clinic services have been extended to offer clients a range of ancillary services, including HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C testing, information, education and communication, psychosocial support services and referrals for treatment of HIV, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases. Cooperation between health and public security officials has improved through regular meetings and dialogue. However, institutional capacity building is still needed to deliver sustainable and standardized services that will ultimately improve retention rates. This article documents the steps China made in overcoming the many barriers to success of its methadone program. These lessons might be useful for other countries in the region that are scaling-up their methadone programs. PMID:21113034

  13. Ensembl Genomes 2013: scaling up access to genome-wide data

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E.; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J.; Grabmueller, Christoph; Hughes, Daniel Seth Toney; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Langridge, Nicholas; McDowall, Mark D.; Maheswari, Uma; Maslen, Gareth; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Toneva, Iliana; Tuli, Mary Ann; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Derek; Youens-Clark, Ken; Monaco, Marcela K.; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Xuehong; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M.; Howe, Kevin Lee; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Staines, Daniel Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species. The project exploits and extends technologies for genome annotation, analysis and dissemination, developed in the context of the vertebrate-focused Ensembl project, and provides a complementary set of resources for non-vertebrate species through a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces. These provide access to data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, polymorphisms and comparative analysis. This article provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the addition of important new genomes (and related data sets) including crop plants, vectors of human disease and eukaryotic pathogens. In addition, the resource has scaled up its representation of bacterial genomes, and now includes the genomes of over 9000 bacteria. Specific extensions to the web and programmatic interfaces have been developed to support users in navigating these large data sets. Looking forward, analytic tools to allow targeted selection of data for visualization and download are likely to become increasingly important in future as the number of available genomes increases within all domains of life, and some of the challenges faced in representing bacterial data are likely to become commonplace for eukaryotes in future. PMID:24163254

  14. Time-resolved transglottal pressure measurements in a scaled up vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Rogers, Dylan; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Experimental measurements of flow through a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The simplified 10x scale vocal fold model from Krane, et al. (2007) was used to examine fundamental features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. Of particular interest was the temporal variation of transglottal pressure multiplied by the volume flow rate through the glottis throughout an oscillation cycle. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data have been presented in previous APS-DFD meetings. This talk will focus more on the relation between the flow and aeroacoustics associated with vocal fold oscillations. Supported by the NIH.

  15. Magnetic properties and scale-up of nanostructured cobalt carbide permanent magnetic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zamanpour, Mehdi Bennett, Steven; Taheri, Parisa; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-07

    Co{sub x}C magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 45 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of surfactants, reaction temperature, and reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub x}C, while tetraethylene glycol was employed as a reducing agent. The role of the ratios of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases in the admixture magnetic properties is discussed. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the Co{sub x}C nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  16. Magnetic properties and scale-up of nanostructured cobalt carbide permanent magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi; Bennett, Steven; Taheri, Parisa; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-01

    CoxC magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co2C and Co3C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 45 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of surfactants, reaction temperature, and reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of CoxC, while tetraethylene glycol was employed as a reducing agent. The role of the ratios of Co2C and Co3C phases in the admixture magnetic properties is discussed. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the CoxC nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  17. Multiphase flow modeling: A tool to aid in scale up of processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2010-10-01

    Multiphase flows are ubiquitous in chemical processing industries. Traditional approach has been to ignore fluid dynamical effects by invoking simplifying assumptions of homogeneity, but pay the price during scale-up of processes. The question that I address is ``Can Multiphase flow modeling come to our rescue in minimizing the need for pilot scale experiments?'' On the fundamental side, we have developed algorithms for direct numerical simulation of multiphase flows. For dispersed rigid particles as in suspension flows, sedimentation etc, we couple the Navier-Stokes equations with the rigid body dynamics in a rigorous fashion to track the particle motion in a fluid. For deformable bubbles/droplets dispersed in another fluid, we also track their motion in an Eulerian grid. The two classes of algorithms show great promise in attempting direct simulation of multiphase flows, from which we can extract statistically meaningful average behavior of suspensions or bubbly flows. On the other hand, there is an immediate need to study flow of complex fluids of industrial importance. Such cases include polymer blending processes, erosion in pipelines and process vessels and mass transfer in packed beds. In such studies we use volume averaged equations as the basis of flow models coupled with experimental validation of such predictions in an effort to develop scale invariant closure models that are needed as part of the volume averaged flow models.

  18. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1991-07-01

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew C. Morrison; Kenneth J. Bateman; Michael F. Simpson

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS Matthew C. Morrison, Kenneth J. Bateman, Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 The ceramic waste process is the intended method for disposing of waste salt electrolyte, which contains fission products from the fuel-processing electrorefiners (ER) at the INL. When mixed and processed with other materials, the waste salt can be stored in a durable ceramic waste form (CWF). The development of the CWF has recently progressed from small-scale testing and characterization to full-scale implementation and experimentation using surrogate materials in lieu of the ER electrolyte. Two full-scale (378 kg and 383 kg) CWF test runs have been successfully completed with final densities of 2.2 g/cm3 and 2.1 g/cm3, respectively. The purpose of the first CWF was to establish material preparation parameters. The emphasis of the second pre-qualification test run was to evaluate a preliminary multi-section CWF container design. Other considerations were to finalize material preparation parameters, measure the material height as it consolidates in the furnace, and identify when cracking occurs during the CWF cooldown process.

  20. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage.

  1. Scaling up the global nursing health workforce: contributions of an international organization.

    PubMed

    Rukholm, Ellen E; Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Talbot, Lise R; Bednash, Geraldine; Raines, Fay; Potempa, Kathleen; Nugent, Pauline; Clark, Dame Jill Macleod; Bernhauser, Sue; Parfitt, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In this paper key highlights of the scholarly work presented at the Toronto 2008 Global Alliance for Nursing Education & Scholarship (GANES) conference are summarized, challenges opportunities and issues facing nursing education globally arising from the conference discourse are outlined and initial steps are suggested as a way forward to a shared global view of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education and scholarship. This shared view arises from beginning understandings of the issues and opportunities we face globally starting with and building upon the lessons learned from the literature and from the experiences of nursing educators and nursing education organization locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. The theme of the groundbreaking GANES Toronto conference was "Educating the future nursing and health workforce: A global challenge". One hundred seventy delegates from 17 countries attended the event, with over 80 papers presented. A primary focus of GANES is the contribution of a strategic alliance of national nursing education organizations to contribute to nursing education leading practices and policy that address the scaling up of global nursing and health workforce. The founding members of GANES see a clear link between a strong educational infrastructure and strong scholarship activities in nursing and the ability of a society to be healthy and prosperous. Evidence presented at the recent GANES conference supports that belief. Through the strength of partnerships and other capacity-building efforts, member countries can support each other to address the global nursing education and health challenges while respecting the local issues.

  2. Scale-up synthesis of lipase-catalyzed palm esters in stirred-tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Keng, P S; Basri, M; Ariff, A B; Abdul Rahman, M B; Abdul Rahman, R N Z; Salleh, A B

    2008-09-01

    Lipase-catalyzed production of palm esters by alcoholysis of palm oil with oleyl alcohol in n-hexane was performed in 2L stirred-tank reactor (STR). Investigation on the performance of reactor operation was carried out in batch mode STR with single impeller mounted on the centrally located shaft. Rushton turbine (RT) impellers provide the highest reaction yield (95.8%) at lower agitation speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil (AL-H) and 2-bladed elephant ear (EE) impellers. Homogenous enzyme particles suspension was obtained at 250 rpm by using RT impeller. At higher impeller speed, the shear effect on the enzyme particles caused by agitation has decreased the reaction performance. Palm esters reaction mixture in STR follows Newtons' law due to the linear relation between the shear stress (tau) and shear rate (dupsilon/dy). High stability of Lipozyme RM IM was observed as shown by its ability to be repeatedly used to give high percentage yield (79%) of palm esters even after 15 cycles of reaction. The process was successfully scale-up to 75 L STR (50 L working volume) based on a constant impeller tip speed approach, which gave the yield of 97.2% after 5h reaction time.

  3. Stem Cell Spheroids and Ex Vivo Niche Modeling: Rationalization and Scaling-Up.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Isotta; Massai, Diana; Morbiducci, Umberto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Pesce, Maurizio; Messina, Elisa

    2017-03-13

    Improved protocols/devices for in vitro culture of 3D cell spheroids may provide essential cues for proper growth and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells (S/PCs) in their niche, allowing preservation of specific features, such as multi-lineage potential and paracrine activity. Several platforms have been employed to replicate these conditions and to generate S/PC spheroids for therapeutic applications. However, they incompletely reproduce the niche environment, with partial loss of its highly regulated network, with additional hurdles in the field of cardiac biology, due to debated resident S/PCs therapeutic potential and clinical translation. In this contribution, the essential niche conditions (metabolic, geometric, mechanical) that allow S/PCs maintenance/commitment will be discussed. In particular, we will focus on both existing bioreactor-based platforms for the culture of S/PC as spheroids, and on possible criteria for the scaling-up of niche-like spheroids, which could be envisaged as promising tools for personalized cardiac regenerative medicine, as well as for high-throughput drug screening.

  4. Methadone Maintenance Therapy in Vietnam: An Overview and Scaling-Up Plan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tam T. M.; Nguyen, Long T.; Pham, Manh D.; Vu, Hoang H.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Vietnam is among the countries with the highest rate of HIV transmission through injecting drug users. HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 20% and up to 50% in many provinces. An estimated number of drug users in the country by the end of 2011 were 171,000 in which the most common is heroin (85%). Detoxification at home, community, and in rehabilitation centers have been the main modalities for managing heroin addiction until Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) was piloted in 2008. Recent reports have demonstrated positive treatment outcomes. Incidence of HIV was found remarkably low among patients on MMT. Treatment has significantly improved the quality of life as well as stability for society. The government has granted the Ministry of Health (MoH) to expand Methadone treatment to at least 30 provinces to provide treatment for more than 80,000 drug users by 2015. The Vietnam Administration for HIV/AIDS Control (VAAC) and MOH have outlined the role and responsibility of key departments at the central and local levels in implementing and maintaining MMT treatment. This paper will describe the achievements of the MMT pilot program and the scaling-up plan as well as strategies to ensure quality and sustainability and to overcome the challenges in the coming years. PMID:23227351

  5. Public-private interactions on health in South Africa: opportunities for scaling up.

    PubMed

    Kula, Nothemba; Fryatt, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    South Africa has long recognized partnerships between the public and private sectors as a policy objective in health, but experience is still limited and poorly documented. The objectives of this article are to understand the factors that increase the likelihood of success of public-private interactions in South Africa, and identify and discuss opportunities for them to be scaled up. There is a strong legislative framework and a number of guidelines and tools that have been developed by the Treasury for managing partnerships. The review of literature confirmed the need for the state to have effective regulations in order to oversee quality and standards and to provide stewardship and oversight. The public sector requires sufficient capacity not only to manage relationships with the private sector but also to enable innovation and experimentation. Evaluation is an integral part of all interactions not only to learn from successes but also to identify any perverse incentives that may lead to unintended consequences. Four case studies show that the private for-profit sector is already engaged in a number of projects that are closely aligned to current health system reform priorities. Factors that increase the likelihood of interactions being successful include: increasing the government's capacity to manage public-private relationships; choosing public-private interactions that are strategically important to national goals; building a knowledge base on what works, where and why; moving from pilots to large scale initiatives; harnessing the contracting expertise in private providers; and encouraging innovation and learning.

  6. Destruction of nuclear organic waste by supercritical water oxidation. Scale-up of the process

    SciTech Connect

    Moussiere, S.; Roubaud, A.; Fournel, B.

    2007-07-01

    In order to design and then define appropriate dimensions for a supercritical oxidation reactor, a 2D and 3D simulation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the oxidation process has been performed. The solver used is a commercial code, Fluent 6.2. The turbulent flow field in the reactor, created by the stirrer is taken into account with a k-omega model and a swirl imposed to the fluid. In the 3D case the rotation of the stirrer can be modeled thanks to the sliding mesh model. The reactivity of the system is taken into account with a classical combustion model EDC. Comparisons with experimental temperature measurements validate the ability of the CFD modeling to simulate the supercritical water oxidation process. Simulation results provide us a view inside the reactor on the flow, temperature fields and the oxidation localization and development. Results indicate that the flow can be considered as piston-like, heat transfers are strongly enhanced by the stirring. Hence the scaling up of the reactor volume, to reach a treatment capacity of 1 Kg/h of pure organics, can be done regarding the necessary residence times and temperature distribution needed for a complete destruction of the organic matter. (authors)

  7. Scaling up the national methadone maintenance treatment program in China: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenyuan; Hao, Yang; Sun, Xinhua; Gong, Xiuli; Li, Fang; Li, Jianhua; Rou, Keming; Sullivan, Sheena G; Wang, Changhe; Cao, Xiaobin; Luo, Wei; Wu, Zunyou

    2010-12-01

    China's methadone maintenance treatment program was initiated in 2004 as a small pilot project in just eight sites. It has since expanded into a nationwide program encompassing more than 680 clinics covering 27 provinces and serving some 242 000 heroin users by the end of 2009. The agencies that were tasked with the program's expansion have been confronted with many challenges, including high drop-out rates, poor cooperation between local governing authorities and poor service quality at the counter. In spite of these difficulties, ongoing evaluation has suggested reductions in heroin use, risky injection practices and, importantly, criminal behaviours among clients, which has thus provided the impetus for further expansion. Clinic services have been extended to offer clients a range of ancillary services, including HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C testing, information, education and communication, psychosocial support services and referrals for treatment of HIV, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases. Cooperation between health and public security officials has improved through regular meetings and dialogue. However, institutional capacity building is still needed to deliver sustainable and standardized services that will ultimately improve retention rates. This article documents the steps China made in overcoming the many barriers to success of its methadone program. These lessons might be useful for other countries in the region that are scaling-up their methadone programs.

  8. Scale-up of biopesticide production processes using wastewater sludge as a raw material.

    PubMed

    Yezza, A; Tyagi, R D; Valèro, J R; Surampalli, R Y; Smith, J

    2004-12-01

    Studies were conducted on the production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-based biopesticides to ascertain the performance of the process in shake flasks, and in two geometrically similar fermentors (15 and 150 l) utilizing wastewater sludge as a raw material. The results showed that it was possible to achieve better oxygen transfer in the larger capacity fermentor. Viable cell counts increased by 38-55% in the bioreactor compared to shake flasks. As for spore counts, an increase of 25% was observed when changing from shake flask to fermentor experiments. Spore counts were unchanged in bench (15 l) and pilot scale (5.3-5.5 e(+08) cfu/ml; 150 l). An improvement of 30% in the entomotoxicity potential was obtained at pilot scale. Protease activity increased by two to four times at bench and pilot scale, respectively, compared to the maximum activity obtained in shake flasks. The maximum protease activity (4.1 IU/ml) was obtained in pilot scale due to better oxygen transfer. The Bt fermentation process using sludge as raw material was successfully scaled up and resulted in high productivity for toxin protein yield and a high protease activity.

  9. Interconnected, microporous hollow fibers for tissue engineering: commercially relevant, industry standard scale-up manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Stephen A; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-09-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the field of tissue engineering to create functional tissue using biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds that support cell growth, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production. However, many of these constructs are severely limited by poor nutrient diffusion throughout the tissue-engineered construct, resulting in cell death and tissue necrosis at the core. Nutrient transport can be improved by creation and use of scaffolds with hollow and microporous fibers, significantly improving permeability and nutrient diffusion. The purpose of this review is to highlight current technological advances in the fabrication of hollow fibers with interconnected pores throughout the fiber walls, with specific emphasis on developing hollow porous nonwoven fabrics for use as tissue engineering constructs via industry standard processing technologies: Spunbond processing and polymer melt extrusion. We outline current methodologies to create hollow and microporous scaffolds with the aim of translating that knowledge to the production of such fibers into nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds via spunbond technology, a commercially relevant and viable melt extrusion manufacturing approach that allows for facile scale-up.

  10. Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology scale up using cos-theta dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, F.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Carcagno, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets using shell-type dipole coils and the wind-and-react method. As a part of the first phase of technology development, Fermilab built and tested six 1 m long dipole model magnets and several dipole mirror configurations. The last three dipoles and two mirrors reached their design fields of 10-11 T. The technology scale up phase has started by building 2 m and 4 m dipole coils and testing them in a mirror configuration in which one of the two coils is replaced by a half-cylinder made of low carbon steel. This approach allows for shorter fabrication times and extensive instrumentation preserving almost the same level of magnetic field and Lorentz forces in the coils as in a complete dipole model magnet. This paper presents details on the 2 m (HFDM07) and 4 m long (HFDM08) Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole mirror magnet design and fabrication technology, as well as the magnet test results which are compared with 1 m long models.

  11. Scaling up the Hydrologic Effects of Forest Thinning in Semi-Arid Basins of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, H. A.; White, D. D.; Gupta, H. V.; Vivoni, E. R.; Sampson, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the effects of intensive forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins is critical to achieving water resources sustainability in the water limited Southwestern US, where disturbances to headwater catchment forests, can scale up to significant perturbations of the basin-scale water balance components. In northern Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of Ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. In this study, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI initiative on the hydrology of the Verde, Tonto and Salt rivers, which provide much of the water supply to the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Long-term (20 year) simulations conducted using the tRIBS physically based spatially distributed model reveal shifts in the spatio-temporal regimes, and in the triggering processes, of runoff and integrated discharge as a response to feasible forest thinning scenarios. Specifically, our analysis suggests that alterations to the interception, evapotranspiration, recharge and snow processes within the forested areas will result in changes to long term water yield, and to extreme (peak and low flow) values. The results are helping local and regional water managers and policy makers to better understand the potential consequences of intensive forest removal and thereby influence decision making related to land use and the management of water resources.

  12. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  13. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe3+ and Fe2+ mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40–90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  14. Linear Nitramine (DNDA-57): Synthesis, Scale-Up, Characterization, and Quantitative Estimation by GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Naik, N. H.; Gore, G. M.; Sikder, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dinitro-diaza-alkanes (DNDA-57) are linear nitramine plasticizers and find use in low-temperature sensitivity coefficient propellants. DNDA-57 is a mixture of 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazapentane (DNDA-5), 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazahexane (DNDA-6), and 3,5-dinitro-3,5-diazaheptane (DNDA-7) with percentage composition of 40 ± 5%, 44 ± 5% and 11 ± 2%, respectively. The synthesis process of DNDA-57 was established with slight modification of the reaction parameters to obtain good yield and the process was scaled up. The synthesized compound was thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic as well as thermal methods. The present study emphasizes gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) characterization by electron impact (EI) mode and chemical ionization (CI) mode to determine the fragmentation pattern. Further, the identified components were confirmed with general characterization. The study reveals that DNDA-5, DNDA-6, and DNDA-7 follow identical decomposition pattern. The friction and impact sensitivity study unveils the insensitive nature of DNDA-57.

  15. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  16. Reactive compatibilizer-tracer: A powerful tool for designing, scaling up and optimizing reactive blending processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-Yun; Feng, Lian-Fang; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer is developed to study reactive polymer blending processes in a twin screw extruder. It is summarized as follows. Fluorescent moieties such as anthracene are attached to a reactive compatibilizer so that the latter can be served both as a compatibilizer and a tracer. When evaluating its compatibilizing efficiency for a polymer blending system, unlike the polymer components of the blend which are continuously fed to the extruder, the reactive compatibilizer-tracer is added as a pulse. The concentration of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer in the polymer blend at the die exit is measured, in-line and in real time, using probes capable of detecting the signal of the emission of fluorescent moieties of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer. In the meantime, the corresponding size of the dispersed phase domains of the blend is determined off-line. These two pieces of information allow assessing the compatibilizing efficiency of a reactive compatibilizer in a much easier manner and using a much smaller amount of compatibilizer. Consequently, the concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer can help select most appropriate compatibilizers under real industrial polymer blending conditions as well as scaling up and/or optimizing them.

  17. A Proven, Industrial Magnetron Sputtering System With Excellent Expansion And Scale-Up Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D.

    1987-11-01

    Airco Solar Products began as a business unit of Airco Temescal in the early 1970's. The first large area magnetron sputtering deposition occurred in 1974, and the first large area magnetron sputtering system was built and operated under contract to Guardian Industries in Carleton, Michigan in 1977, and was later sold to Guardian. This system continues in three-shift production today. A smaller development system, designed for use in the architectural glass coating industry, was introduced in parallel with the large area coaters. There are now over seventeen of these systems, called the ILS-1600, in use or on order throughout the world. This is a proven, industrial-style development sputter deposition system and has an excellent field record in the areas of versatility and low maintenance requirements. Airco Solar Products has recently begun to market this system into other applications such as the photovoltaics industry, the flat panel display industry and other specialty industries. The features of this system such as overall design, expandability, process scale-up and available options will be discussed. Expanded versions of this system currently in the field will be reviewed, and future applications will be discussed.

  18. Scaling-up permafrost thermal measurements in western Alaska using an ecotype approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William L.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Torre Jorgenson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Permafrost temperatures are increasing in Alaska due to climate change and in some cases permafrost is thawing and degrading. In areas where degradation has already occurred the effects can be dramatic, resulting in changing ecosystems, carbon release, and damage to infrastructure. However, in many areas we lack baseline data, such as subsurface temperatures, needed to assess future changes and potential risk areas. Besides climate, the physical properties of the vegetation cover and subsurface material have a major influence on the thermal state of permafrost. These properties are often directly related to the type of ecosystem overlaying permafrost. In this paper we demonstrate that classifying the landscape into general ecotypes is an effective way to scale up permafrost thermal data collected from field monitoring sites. Additionally, we find that within some ecotypes the absence of a moss layer is indicative of the absence of near-surface permafrost. As a proof of concept, we used the ground temperature data collected from the field sites to recode an ecotype land cover map into a map of mean annual ground temperature ranges at 1 m depth based on analysis and clustering of observed thermal regimes. The map should be useful for decision making with respect to land use and understanding how the landscape might change under future climate scenarios.

  19. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, Margaret E.; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y.; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage. PMID:26934704

  20. Applying Gaming and Simulation Techniques to the Design of Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude-Parkins, Carolyn; Miller, Karen Hughes; Ferguson, Karen; Bauer, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Critical in virtually all educational arenas, gaming and simulation techniques and distance learning are major areas of interest in today's U.S. Army training. The U.S. Army Armor School at Ft. Knox, KY contracted with the University of Louisville and Northrop Grumman Mission Systems in 2003 to develop online training for Army Captains. They…

  1. A comparison of model-based and hyperbolic localization techniques as applied to marine mammal calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher O.; Porter, Michael B.

    2003-10-01

    A common technique for the passive acoustic localization of singing marine mammals is that of hyperbolic fixing. This technique assumes straight-line, constant wave speed acoustic propagation to associate travel time with range, but in some geometries, these assumptions can lead to localization errors. A new localization algorithm based on acoustic propagation models can account for waveguide and multipath effects, and it has successfully been tested against real acoustic data from three different environments (Hawaii, California, and Bahamas) and three different species (humpback, blue, and sperm whales). Accuracy of the model-based approach has been difficult to verify given the absence of concurrent visual and acoustic observations of the same animal. However, the model-based algorithm was recently exercised against a controlled source of known position broadcasting recorded whale sounds, and location estimates were then compared to hyperbolic techniques and true source position. In geometries where direct acoustic paths exist, both model-based and hyperbolic techniques perform equally well. However, in geometries where bathymetric and refractive effects are important, such as at long range, the model-based approach shows improved accuracy.

  2. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  3. The Use of Contingency Management Techniques--An Applied Classroom Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dianne Knotts; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes a Title I project whose purpose was "to determine if a series of three group and three individual instruction sessions with classroom teachers were adequate to train them in the use of basic behavioral modification techniques, by judging whether or not this instruction was evidenced by their management of children in the classroom."…

  4. Wavelet Techniques Applied to Modeling Transitional/Turbulent Flows in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation is an essential part of the design and development of jet engines for the aeropropulsion industry. Engineers concerned with calculating the flow in jet engine components, such as compressors and turbines, need simple engineering models that accurately describe the complex flow of air and gases and that allow them to quickly estimate loads, losses, temperatures, and other design parameters. In this ongoing collaborative project, advanced wavelet analysis techniques are being used to gain insight into the complex flow phenomena. These insights, which cannot be achieved by commonly used methods, are being used to develop innovative new flow models and to improve existing ones. Wavelet techniques are very suitable for analyzing the complex turbulent and transitional flows pervasive in jet engines. These flows are characterized by intermittency and a multitude of scales. Wavelet analysis results in information about these scales and their locations. The distribution of scales is equivalent to the frequency spectrum provided by commonly used Fourier analysis techniques; however, no localization information is provided by Fourier analysis. In addition, wavelet techniques allow conditional sampling analyses of the individual scales, which is not possible by Fourier methods.

  5. Note: A single specimen channel crack growth technique applied to brittle thin films on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Graham, S.; Pierron, O. N.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an external-load-assisted thin film channel crack growth technique to measure the subcritical crack growth properties of thin films (i.e., crack velocity, v, versus the strain energy release rate, G), and demonstrate it using 250-nm-thick SiNx films on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates. The main particularity of this technique is that it requires a polymer substrate to allow loading to large strains (in order to induce channel cracking) without substrate fracture. Its main advantages are to provide a full v-G curve with a single specimen while relying on a simple specimen preparation and straightforward crack growth characterization. Importantly, the technique can be employed for a much larger range of thin films compared to the residual-stress-driven, thin film channel crack growth tests, including ultrathin films and thin film with residual compressive stresses. The restrictions to a proper use of this technique, related to the (visco)plastic deformation of the substrate, are discussed.

  6. Time-Lapse Motion Picture Technique Applied to the Study of Geological Processes.

    PubMed

    Miller, R D; Crandell, D R

    1959-09-25

    Light-weight, battery-operated timers were built and coupled to 16-mm motion-picture cameras having apertures controlled by photoelectric cells. The cameras were placed adjacent to Emmons Glacier on Mount Rainier. The film obtained confirms the view that exterior time-lapse photography can be applied to the study of slow-acting geologic processes.

  7. Surface Composition of Mars: Results from a New Atmospheric Compensation Technique Applied to TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.; Ward, J.; Keim, E. R.; Hackwell, J. H.; McAfee, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Before TES (Thermal Emission Spectrometry) spectra can be used to model surface compositions, they must have a strong atmospheric compensation applied. We explore a very different atmospheric retrieval process, and compare results and implications for the derived surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Applied Statistics: From Bivariate through Multivariate Techniques [with CD-ROM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Rebecca M.

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a clear introduction to widely used topics in bivariate and multivariate statistics, including multiple regression, discriminant analysis, MANOVA, factor analysis, and binary logistic regression. The approach is applied and does not require formal mathematics; equations are accompanied by verbal explanations. Students are asked…

  9. Time-lapse motion picture technique applied to the study of geological processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Crandell, D.R.

    1959-01-01

    Light-weight, battery-operated timers were built and coupled to 16-mm motion-picture cameras having apertures controlled by photoelectric cells. The cameras were placed adjacent to Emmons Glacier on Mount Rainier. The film obtained confirms the view that exterior time-lapse photography can be applied to the study of slow-acting geologic processes.

  10. Modelling laser speckle photographs of decayed teeth by applying a digital image information technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Z.; da Silva, L. C.; da Silva, J. V. P.; Deana, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the application of a digital image model to assess early carious lesions on teeth. When decay is in its early stages, the lesions were illuminated with a laser and the laser speckle images were obtained. Due to the differences in the optical properties between healthy and carious tissue, both regions produced different scatter patterns. The digital image information technique allowed us to produce colour-coded 3D surface plots of the intensity information in the speckle images, where the height (on the z-axis) and the colour in the rendering correlate with the intensity of a pixel in the image. The quantitative changes in colour component density enhance the contrast between the decayed and sound tissue, and visualization of the carious lesions become significantly evident. Therefore, the proposed technique may be adopted in the early diagnosis of carious lesions.

  11. Cytochemical techniques and energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy applied to the study of parasitic protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Ulysses

    2001-01-01

    The study of parasitic protozoa plays a major role in cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology. Numerous cytochemical techniques have been developed in order to unequivocally identify the nature of subcellular compartments. Enzyme and immuno-cytochemistry allow the detection of, respectively, enzymatic activity products and antigens in particular sites within the cell. Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy permits the detection of specific elements within such compartments. These approaches are particularly useful for studies employing antimicrobial agents where cellular compartments may be destroyed or remarkably altered and thus hardly identified by standard methods of observation. In this regard cytochemical and spectroscopic techniques provide valuable data allowing the determination of the mechanisms of action of such compounds. PMID:12734583

  12. Detection of fibrinogen antigens with two latex techniques applied to urine concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Maria Benedetta; Semeraro, N.; Vermylen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Fibrinogen antigens were measured either with an agglutination inhibition method (using latex particles coated with fibrinogen; Diagen test) or with a direct agglutination technique (using latex particles coated with a mixture of anti-D and anti-E antibodies; Thrombo-Wellcotest). Both methods were compared with the tanned red cell haemagglutination inhibition immunoassay (TRCHII) during progressive degradation of fibrinogen with plasmin and using purified fibrinogen fragments or urine concentrates from chronic glomerulonephritis or transplanted patients. Due to the different sensitivity of the two latex techniques to fibrinogen and its plasmin derivatives, their combined use may be helpful to distinguish the nature of the fibrinogen-like material excreted in urine. PMID:4201501

  13. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S.; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5 years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26191037

  14. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5 years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  15. 3D-Laser-Scanning Technique Applied to Bulk Density Measurements of Apollo Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macke, R. J.; Kent, J. J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Britt, D. T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better interpret gravimetric data from orbiters such as GRAIL and LRO to understand the subsurface composition and structure of the lunar crust, it is import to have a reliable database of the density and porosity of lunar materials. To this end, we have been surveying these physical properties in both lunar meteorites and Apollo lunar samples. To measure porosity, both grain density and bulk density are required. For bulk density, our group has historically utilized sub-mm bead immersion techniques extensively, though several factors have made this technique problematic for our work with Apollo samples. Samples allocated for measurement are often smaller than optimal for the technique, leading to large error bars. Also, for some samples we were required to use pure alumina beads instead of our usual glass beads. The alumina beads were subject to undesirable static effects, producing unreliable results. Other investigators have tested the use of 3d laser scanners on meteorites for measuring bulk volumes. Early work, though promising, was plagued with difficulties including poor response on dark or reflective surfaces, difficulty reproducing sharp edges, and large processing time for producing shape models. Due to progress in technology, however, laser scanners have improved considerably in recent years. We tested this technique on 27 lunar samples in the Apollo collection using a scanner at NASA Johnson Space Center. We found it to be reliable and more precise than beads, with the added benefit that it involves no direct contact with the sample, enabling the study of particularly friable samples for which bead immersion is not possible

  16. A fast technique applied to the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes with 3D conducting structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinacci, Guglielmo Liu, Yueqiang

    2009-03-20

    This paper illustrates the development of a 'fast' technique for the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) in fusion devices with three-dimensional conducting structures, by means of the recently developed CarMa code. Thanks to its peculiar features, the computational cost scales almost linearly with the number of discrete unknowns. Some large scale problems are solved in configurations of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  17. Computer Vision Techniques Applied to Space Object Detect, Track, ID, Characterize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, B.

    2014-09-01

    Space-based object detection and tracking represents a fundamental step necessary for detailed analysis of space objects. Initial observations of a resident space object (RSO) may result from careful sensor tasking to observe an object with well understood dynamics, or measurements-of-opportunity on an object with poorly understood dynamics. Dim and eccentric objects present a particular challenge which requires more dynamic use of imaging systems. As a result of more stressing data acquisition strategies, advanced techniques for the accurate processing of both point and streaking sources are needed. This paper will focus on two key methods in computer vision used to determine interest points within imagery. The Harris Corner method and the method of Phase Congruency can be used to effectively extract static and streaking point sources and to indicate when apparent motion is present within an observation. The geometric inferences which can be made from the resulting detections will be discussed, including a method to evaluate the localization uncertainty of the extracted detections which is based on the computation of the Hessian of the detector response. Finally a technique which exploits the additional information found in detected streak endpoints to provide a better centroid in the presence of curved streaks is explained and additional applications for the presented techniques are discussed.

  18. Assessment of ground-based monitoring techniques applied to landslide investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Smith, A.; Chambers, J.; Dixon, N.; Dijkstra, T.; Haslam, E.; Meldrum, P.; Merritt, A.; Gunn, D.; Mackay, J.

    2016-01-01

    A landslide complex in the Whitby Mudstone Formation at Hollin Hill, North Yorkshire, UK is periodically re-activated in response to rainfall-induced pore-water pressure fluctuations. This paper compares long-term measurements (i.e., 2009-2014) obtained from a combination of monitoring techniques that have been employed together for the first time on an active landslide. The results highlight the relative performance of the different techniques, and can provide guidance for researchers and practitioners for selecting and installing appropriate monitoring techniques to assess unstable slopes. Particular attention is given to the spatial and temporal resolutions offered by the different approaches that include: Real Time Kinematic-GPS (RTK-GPS) monitoring of a ground surface marker array, conventional inclinometers, Shape Acceleration Arrays (SAA), tilt meters, active waveguides with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring, and piezometers. High spatial resolution information has allowed locating areas of stability and instability across a large slope. This has enabled identification of areas where further monitoring efforts should be focused. High temporal resolution information allowed the capture of 'S'-shaped slope displacement-time behaviour (i.e. phases of slope acceleration, deceleration and stability) in response to elevations in pore-water pressures. This study shows that a well-balanced suite of monitoring techniques that provides high temporal and spatial resolutions on both measurement and slope scale is necessary to fully understand failure and movement mechanisms of slopes. In the case of the Hollin Hill landslide it enabled detailed interpretation of the geomorphological processes governing landslide activity. It highlights the benefit of regularly surveying a network of GPS markers to determine areas for installation of movement monitoring techniques that offer higher resolution both temporally and spatially. The small sensitivity of tilt meter measurements

  19. Comparison of a Traditional Teaching Model to the Scale-Up Teaching Model in Undergraduate Biology: A Mixed Method Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mears, Samantha

    This project compared a SCALE-UP teaching model to a traditional teaching model. Traditional teaching is now considered a poor motivator for student performance and interests, and the SCALE-UP model was proposed to combat these problems. SCALE-UP classrooms are designed to encourage cooperative learning as well as other active learning methods. The study looked at teacher and student opinions of the two models to determine which one they preferred and why. The study also compared the students' grades between the two classes to see if there was a difference between test scores, as well as learning gains for pre-test to post-test. Student and teacher behaviors were also quantified based on categories of engagement in class. The purpose of this study was to support the literature on the idea of a viable and better option to traditional lecture in the form of the SCALE-UP model. Based on the results, students prefer and enjoy a SCALE-UP classroom more than a traditional lecture. The students also performed better and learn more when compared to the traditional lecture class.

  20. Excellence in Physics Education Award: SCALE-UP, Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) Project combines curricula and a specially-designed instructional space to enhance learning. SCALE-UP students practice communication and teamwork skills while performing activities that enhance their conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This can be done with small or large classes and has been implemented at more than 250 institutions. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. SCALE-UP classtime is spent primarily on ``tangibles'' and ``ponderables''--hands-on measurements/observations and interesting questions. There are also computer simulations (called ``visibles'') and hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit at tables designed to facilitate group interactions. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Impressive learning gains have been measured at institutions across the US and internationally. This talk describes today's students, how lecturing got started, what happens in a SCALE-UP classroom, and how the approach has spread. The SCALE-UP project has greatly benefitted from numerous Grants made by NSF and FIPSE to NCSU and other institutions.

  1. Evaluating Ecotypes as a means of Scaling-up Permafrost Thermal Measurements in Western Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    In many regions, permafrost temperatures are increasing due to climate change and in some cases permafrost is thawing and degrading. In areas where degradation has already occurred the effects can be dramatic, resulting in changing ecosystems, carbon release, and damage to infrastructure. Yet in many areas we lack baseline data, such as subsurface temperatures, needed to assess future changes and potential risk areas. Besides climate, the physical properties of the vegetation cover and subsurface material have a major influence on the thermal state of permafrost. These properties are often directly related to the type of ecosystem overlaying permafrost. Thus, classifying the landscape into general ecotypes might be an effective way to scale up permafrost thermal data. To evaluate using ecotypes as a way of scaling-up permafrost thermal data within a region we selected an area in Western Alaska, the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, which is on the boundary between continuous and discontinuous permafrost. This region was selected because previously an ecological land classification had been conducted and a very high-resolution ecotype map was generated. Using this information we selected 18 spatially distributed sites covering the most abundant ecotypes, where we are collecting low vertical resolution soil temperature data to a depth of 1.5 meters at most sites. At three additional core sites, we are collecting air temperature, snow depth, and high vertical resolution soil temperature to a depth of 3 meters. The sites were installed in the summers of 2011 and 2012; consequently, we have at least two years of data from all sites. Mean monthly and mean annual air temperature and snow depth for all three core sites are similar within the 2012-2014 period. Additionally, the average air temperature and snow depth from our three cores sites compares well with that of a nearby meteorological station for which long-term data is available. During the study period snow depth

  2. Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Robert Jerome

    2014-06-19

    Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ≈ 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoA’s for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing

  3. When does seed limitation matter for scaling up reforestation from patches to landscapes?

    PubMed

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Elliott, Stephen; Lichstein, Jeremy W

    2016-12-01

    Restoring forest to hundreds of millions of hectares of degraded land has become a centerpiece of international plans to sequester carbon and conserve biodiversity. Forest landscape restoration will require scaling up ecological knowledge of secondary succession from small-scale field studies to predict forest recovery rates in heterogeneous landscapes. However, ecological field studies reveal widely divergent times to forest recovery, in part due to landscape features that are difficult to replicate in empirical studies. Seed rain can determine reforestation rate and depends on landscape features that are beyond the scale of most field studies. We develop mathematical models to quantify how landscape configuration affects seed rain and forest regrowth in degraded patches. The models show how landscape features can alter the successional trajectories of otherwise identical patches, thus providing insight into why some empirical studies reveal a strong effect of seed rain on secondary succession, while others do not. We show that seed rain will strongly limit reforestation rate when patches are near a threshold for arrested succession, when positive feedbacks between tree canopy cover and seed rain occur during early succession, and when directed dispersal leads to between-patch interactions. In contrast, seed rain has weak effects on reforestation rate over a wide range of conditions, including when landscape-scale seed availability is either very high or very low. Our modeling framework incorporates growth and survival parameters that are commonly estimated in field studies of reforestation. We demonstrate how mathematical models can inform forest landscape restoration by allowing land managers to predict where natural regeneration will be sufficient to restore tree cover. Translating quantitative forecasts into spatially targeted interventions for forest landscape restoration could support target goals of restoring millions of hectares of degraded land and help

  4. Scale-up studies of the electrosynthesis of dinitrogen pentoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, J.E.; Quong, R.; Rigdon, L.P.; McGuire, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    The method for the electrosynthesis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} in nitric acid by anodic oxidation of N{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been scaled up to produce quantities of 15 to 50 kg of solution containing 20 to 30 weight percent. A two- or three-cell, divided, plate-and-frame electrolyzer operated in the bipolar mode was employed to test various combinations of candidate electrode coatings and separators, and to study the electrochemical characteristics of the process. Two sizes of electrolyzers were used, each having single-electrode areas of 0.096 and 0.25 m{sup 2}. The best performing anode/substrate materials were either Pt-Ir on niobium, or IrO{sub 2} on aluminum; the best cathode materials were Pt or Pt-Ir on niobium. The preferred cell separator is a hydrophilic, porous polytetrafluorene-ethylene diaphragm, but an FEP-polymer anion-exchange membrane is also satisfactory. Production of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} was achieved with chemical yields of 80 to 90% and current efficiencies of 50 to 70%. Maximum current densities were in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 A/cm{sup 2}. Cell voltages were 3 to 5 V and specific energies were 1.6 to 1.8 kWh/kg. In the electrolyzer catholyte, N{sub 2}O{sub 4} is generated at nearly theoretical yield, and could be recovered and recycled as an anolyte feedstock. The E{sup o{prime}} of the N{sub 2}O{sub 5}/N{sub 2}O{sub 4} couple in anhydrous nitric acid was estimated to be +1.66 {+-} 0.02 V vs. SHE.

  5. Scaled-up separation of cellobiohydrolase1 from a cellulase mixture by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Lane, Andrew N; Willing, Gerold A; Berson, R Eric

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose often involves cellulases produced by Trichoderma reesei, of which cellobiohydrolase1 (CBH1) is the most abundant (about 60% of total cellulases) and plays an important role in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A method for separating sufficient quantities from the bulk cellulase cocktail is highly desirable for many studies, such as those that aim to characterize binding and hydrolysis kinetics of CBH1. In this work, CBH1 was separated from other Spezyme CP cellulases by ion-exchange chromatography using an efficient modification of a smaller scale process. The ion-exchange column was connected to a vacuum manifold system to provide a steady flow through parallel columns and thus achieve scale-up for enzyme separation. With five 5-mL columns running in parallel, about 55 mg of CBH1 was separated from 145 mg of Spezyme CP in a single separation. Step elution was used to replace the continuous gradient used at smaller scale. The purified CBH1 was collected in the fraction eluted with a buffer containing 0.33 M salt and showed comparable purity and activity as the enzyme purified by a fast protein liquid chromatography system. The stability of separated CBH1 was studied for up to 2 days and good thermal stability was observed. Separated CBH1 also showed both high adsorption to bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with ~4 μmol/g maximum adsorption and a K(a) of 5.55 ± 2.34 μM(-1) , and good hydrolytic activity based on atomic force microscopy observations that show a reduction in fiber height.

  6. Computational Psychotherapy Research: Scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Zac E.; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment’s active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required in order to “scale up” to larger evaluation tasks and “drill down” into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current paper we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, content, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time, and we conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice. PMID:24866972

  7. Scaling Up Scientific Discovery in Sleep Medicine: The National Sleep Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Dennis A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Mueller, Remo; Kim, Matthew; Rueschman, Michael; Mobley, Daniel; Sahoo, Satya S.; Jayapandian, Catherine P.; Cui, Licong; Morrical, Michael G.; Surovec, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Redline, Susan

    2016-01-01

    . Scaling up scientific discovery in sleep medicine: the National Sleep Research Resource. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1151–1164. PMID:27070134

  8. Scaling up the evaluation of psychotherapy: evaluating motivational interviewing fidelity via statistical text classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions such as psychotherapy are leading, evidence-based practices for a variety of problems (e.g., substance abuse), but the evaluation of provider fidelity to behavioral interventions is limited by the need for human judgment. The current study evaluated the accuracy of statistical text classification in replicating human-based judgments of provider fidelity in one specific psychotherapy—motivational interviewing (MI). Method Participants (n = 148) came from five previously conducted randomized trials and were either primary care patients at a safety-net hospital or university students. To be eligible for the original studies, participants met criteria for either problematic drug or alcohol use. All participants received a type of brief motivational interview, an evidence-based intervention for alcohol and substance use disorders. The Motivational Interviewing Skills Code is a standard measure of MI provider fidelity based on human ratings that was used to evaluate all therapy sessions. A text classification approach called a labeled topic model was used to learn associations between human-based fidelity ratings and MI session transcripts. It was then used to generate codes for new sessions. The primary comparison was the accuracy of model-based codes with human-based codes. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses of model-based codes showed reasonably strong sensitivity and specificity with those from human raters (range of area under ROC curve (AUC) scores: 0.62 – 0.81; average AUC: 0.72). Agreement with human raters was evaluated based on talk turns as well as code tallies for an entire session. Generated codes had higher reliability with human codes for session tallies and also varied strongly by individual code. Conclusion To scale up the evaluation of behavioral interventions, technological solutions will be required. The current study demonstrated preliminary, encouraging findings regarding the utility

  9. Scaling up nutrition in fragile and conflict-affected states: the pivotal role of governance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sebastian A J; Perez-Ferrer, Carolina; Griffiths, Andrew; Brunner, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Acute and chronic undernutrition undermine conditions for health, stability and socioeconomic development across the developing world. Although fragile and conflict-affected states have some of the highest rates of undernutrition globally, their response to the multilateral 'Scaling Up Nutrition' (SUN) initiative in its first two-year period was ambivalent. The purpose of this research was to investigate factors affecting fragile and conflict-affected states' engagement with SUN, and to examine what differentiated those fragile states that joined SUN in its first phase from those that did not. Drawing on global databases (Unicef, World Bank, UNDP), and qualitative country case studies (Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra Leone, Pakistan and Yemen) we used bivariate logistic regressions and principal component analysis to assess social, economic and political factors across 41 fragile states looking for systematic differences between those that had signed up to SUN before March 2013 (n = 16), and those that had not (n = 25). While prevalence of malnutrition, health system functioning and level of citizen empowerment had little or no impact on a fragile state's likelihood of joining SUN, the quality of governance (QOG) strongly predicted accession. SUN-signatory fragile states scored systematically better on the World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) and the Worldwide Governance Indicators 'effectiveness of government' indices. We conclude that strengthening governance in fragile states may enhance their engagement with initiatives such as SUN, but also (recognising the potential for endogeneity), that the way aid is structured and delivered in fragile states may be an underlying determinant of whether and how governance in such contexts improves. The research demonstrates that more nuanced analysis of conditions within and among countries classed as 'fragile and conflict-affected' is both possible and necessary if aid

  10. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture.

  11. Scale-up model describing the impact of lubrication on tablet tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Moore, Francis

    2010-10-31

    Lubrication of 2:1 and 1:1 blends of microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate (DCP) with 0.33% or 1% magnesium stearate, as model free-flowing pharmaceutical formulations, was performed in rotary drum blenders. Blender process parameters examined in this study included type (Bin, V, and Turbula), volume (0.75-Quart to 200-L), fraction of headspace in the blender after the blend is loaded (30-70%), speed (6-202 rpm), and time (up to 225 min). Based on analysis of the experimental data, the following model for the impact of the lubrication process on tablet tensile strength at 0.85 solid fraction, TS(SF=0.85), was obtained, TS(SF=0.85)=TS(SF=0.85,0) [βexp(-γ×V(1/3)×F(headspace)×r)+(1-β)], where V is blender volume, F(headspace) is the headspace fraction, r is the number of revolutions (i.e. speed × time), TS(SF=0.85,0) is the initial tensile strength of the blend, β is the sensitivity of the blend to lubrication, and γ is the lubrication rate constant of the formulation. This model can be used to maintain tensile strength during scale-up, by ensuring that (V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(1)=(V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(2). The model also suggests that formulations with DCP are less sensitive to lubrication and more slowly lubricated than formulations with spray-dried lactose (i.e. smaller β and γ values).

  12. Scaling up the predator functional response in heterogeneous environment: when Holling type III can emerge?

    PubMed

    Cordoleani, Flora; Nerini, David; Morozov, Andrey; Gauduchon, Mathias; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-11-07

    Accurate parametrization of functional terms in model equations is of great importance for reproducing the dynamics of real food webs. Constructing models over large spatial and temporal scales using mathematical expressions obtained based on microcosm experiments can be erroneous. Here, using a generic spatial predator-prey model, we show that scaling up the microscale functional response of a predator can result in qualitative alterations of functional response on macroscales. In particular, a global functional response of sigmoid type (Holling type III) can emerge as a result of non-linear averaging of non-sigmoid local responses (Holling type I or II). We demonstrate that alteration between the local and the global response in the model is a result of the interplay between density-dependent dispersal of the predator across the habitat and heterogeneity of the environment. Using the method of aggregation of variables, we analytically derive the mathematical formulation of the global functional response as a function of the total amount of prey in the system, and reveal the key parameters which control the emergence of a Holling type III global response. We argue that this mechanism by which a global Holling type III emerges from a local Holling type II response has not been reported in the literature yet: in particular, Holling type III can emerge in the case of a fixed gradient of resource distribution across the habitat, which would be impossible in priorly suggested mechanisms. As a case study, we consider the interaction between phytoplankton and zooplankton grazers in the water column; and we show that the emergence of a Holling type III global response can allow for the efficient top-down regulation of primary producers and stabilization of planktonic ecosystems under eutrophic conditions.

  13. THE FERMI BUBBLES AS A SCALED-UP VERSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-09-20

    In this study, we treat Fermi bubbles as a scaled-up version of supernova remnants (SNRs). The bubbles are created through activities of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) or starbursts at the Galactic center (GC). Cosmic-rays (CRs) are accelerated at the forward shocks of the bubbles like SNRs, which means that we cannot decide whether the bubbles were created by the SMBH or starbursts from the radiation from the CRs. We follow the evolution of CR distribution by solving a diffusion-advection equation, considering the reduction of the diffusion coefficient by CR streaming. In this model, gamma rays are created through hadronic interaction between CR protons and the gas in the Galactic halo. In the GeV band, we can well reproduce the observed flat distribution of gamma-ray surface brightness because some amount of gas is left behind the shock. The edge of the bubbles is fairly sharp owing to the high gas density behind the shock and the reduction of the diffusion coefficient there. The latter also contributes the hard gamma-ray spectrum of the bubbles. We find that the CR acceleration at the shock began when the bubbles were small, and the time scale of the energy injection at the GC was much smaller than the age of the bubbles. We predict that if CRs are accelerated to the TeV regime, the apparent bubble size should be larger in the TeV band, which could be used to discriminate our hadronic model from other leptonic models. We also present neutrino fluxes.

  14. STANFORD IN-SITU HIGH RATE YBCO PROCESS: TRANSFER TO METAL TAPES AND PROCESS SCALE UP

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm R. Beasley; Robert H.Hammond

    2009-04-14

    Executive Summary The materials science understanding of high rate low cost processes for Coated Conductor will benefit the application to power utilities for low loss energy transportation and power generation as well for DOD applications. The research in this program investigated several materials processing approaches that are new and original, and are not being investigated elsewhere. This work added to the understanding of the material science of high rate PVD growth of HTSC YBCO assisted by a liquid phase. A new process discovered uses amorphous glassy precursors which can be made at high rate under flexible conditions of temperature and oxygen, and later brought to conditions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature for rapid conversion to YBCO superconductor. Good critical current densities were found, but further effort is needed to optimize the vortex pinning using known artificial inclusions. A new discovery of the physics and materials science of vortex pinning in the HTSC system using Sm in place of Y came at growth at unusually low oxygen pressure resulting in clusters of a low or non superconducting phase within the nominal high temperature phase. The driving force for this during growth is new physics, perhaps due to the low oxygen. This has the potential for high current in large magnetic fields at low cost, applicable to motors, generators and transformers. The technical demands of this project were the motivation for the development of instrumentation that could be essential to eventual process scale up. These include atomic absorption based on tunable diode lasers for remote monitoring and control of evaporation sources (developed under DARPA support), and the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectivity (FTIR) for aid in the synthesis of complex thin film materials (purchased by a DURIP-AFOSR grant).

  15. Interagency Collaborative Team Model for Capacity Building to Scale-Up Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hurlburt, Michael; Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle; Willging, Cathleen; Gunderson, Lara; Chaffin, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Background System-wide scale up of evidence-based practice (EBP) is a complex process. Yet, few strategic approaches exist to support EBP implementation and sustainment across a service system. Building on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) implementation framework, we developed and are testing the Interagency Collaborative Team (ICT) process model to implement an evidence-based child neglect intervention (i.e., SafeCare®) within a large children’s service system. The ICT model emphasizes the role of local agency collaborations in creating structural supports for successful implementation. Methods We describe the ICT model and present preliminary qualitative results from use of the implementation model in one large scale EBP implementation. Qualitative interviews were conducted to assess challenges in building system, organization, and home visitor collaboration and capacity to implement the EBP. Data collection and analysis centered on EBP implementation issues, as well as the experiences of home visitors under the ICT model. Results Six notable issues relating to implementation process emerged from participant interviews, including: (a) initial commitment and collaboration among stakeholders, (b) leadership, (c) communication, (d) practice fit with local context, (e) ongoing negotiation and problem solving, and (f) early successes. These issues highlight strengths and areas for development in the ICT model. Conclusions Use of the ICT model led to sustained and widespread use of SafeCare in one large county. Although some aspects of the implementation model may benefit from enhancement, qualitative findings suggest that the ICT process generates strong structural supports for implementation and creates conditions in which tensions between EBP structure and local contextual variations can be resolved in ways that support the expansion and maintenance of an EBP while preserving potential for public health benefit. PMID:27512239

  16. Scaling up multi-camera tracking for real-world deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Yogesh; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-10-01

    A user-assisted multi-camera tracking system employing several key novel methodologies has previously been shown to be highly effective in assisting human users in tracking targets of interest through industry-standard-LIDS multi-camera benchmark data.1 A prototype system was developed in order to test and evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. In this paper, we develop this system further in order to improve tracking accuracy and further facilitate scalability to arbitrary numbers of camera views across much larger spatial areas and different locations. Specifically, we describe the following three areas of improvement: (1) dynamic learning mechanisms apply user feedback in adapting internal models to improve performance over time; (2) modular design and hardware acceleration techniques are explored with a view to real-time performance, extensive configurability to leverage available hardware and scalability to larger datasets; and (3) re-design of the user interface for deployment as a secure asynchronous remote web-based service. We conduct an extensive evaluation of the system in terms of: (1) tracking performance; and (2) the speed of the system in computation and in usage over a network. We use a newly collected real-world dataset significantly more challenging than i-LIDS, which comprises six cameras covering two London Underground stations. We show that: (1) dynamic learning is effective; (2) the user-assisted paradigm retains its effectiveness with this significantly more challenging dataset; (3) large-scale deployment and real-time computation is feasible due to linear scalability; (4) context-aware user search strategies and external non-visual information can aid search convergence; and (5) storage and querying of meta-data is a bottleneck to be overcome.

  17. A novel digital image processing system for the transient liquid crystal technique applied for heat transfer and film cooling measurements.

    PubMed

    Vogel, G; Boelcs, A

    2001-05-01

    This paper is dedicated to the transient liquid crystal technique measurements for multiple view access by using a novel digital recording and image processing system. The transient liquid crystal technique is widely used for heat transfer investigations in turbomachinery. It has been applied in our laboratory in several test facilities such as a linear cascade for external film cooling measurements or on a ribbed squared duct for internal cooling measurements. The data analysis as well as the measurement equipment is described, with a special focus on the newly developed computerized image processing system suitable to capture the liquid crystal signal.

  18. Zero order and signal processing spectrophotometric techniques applied for resolving interference of metronidazole with ciprofloxacin in their pharmaceutical dosage form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Khalid A. M.; Nassar, Mohammed W. I.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Serag, Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Four rapid, simple, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods were used for the determination of ciprofloxacin in the presence of metronidazole as interference. The methods under study are area under the curve, simultaneous equation in addition to smart signal processing techniques of manipulating ratio spectra namely Savitsky-Golay filters and continuous wavelet transform. All the methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines where accuracy, precision and repeatability were found to be within the acceptable limits. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory prepared mixtures and assessed by applying the standard addition technique. So, they can therefore be used for the routine analysis of ciprofloxacin in quality-control laboratories.

  19. Enhanced nonlinear iterative techniques applied to a non-equilibrium plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    We study the application of enhanced nonlinear iterative methods to the steady-state solution of a system of two-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equations that describe the partially-ionized plasma flow in the boundary layer of a tokamak fusion reactor. This system of equations is characterized by multiple time and spatial scales, and contains highly anisotropic transport coefficients due to a strong imposed magnetic field. We use Newton`s method to linearize the nonlinear system of equations resulting from an implicit, finite volume discretization of the governing partial differential equations, on a staggered Cartesian mesh. The resulting linear systems are neither symmetric nor positive definite, and are poorly conditioned. Preconditioned Krylov iterative techniques are employed to solve these linear systems. We investigate both a modified and a matrix-free Newton-Krylov implementation, with the goal of reducing CPU cost associated with the numerical formation of the Jacobian. A combination of a damped iteration, one-way multigrid and a pseudo-transient continuation technique are used to enhance global nonlinear convergence and CPU efficiency. GMRES is employed as the Krylov method with Incomplete Lower-Upper(ILU) factorization preconditioning. The goal is to construct a combination of nonlinear and linear iterative techniques for this complex physical problem that optimizes trade-offs between robustness, CPU time, memory requirements, and code complexity. It is shown that a one-way multigrid implementation provides significant CPU savings for fine grid calculations. Performance comparisons of the modified Newton-Krylov and matrix-free Newton-Krylov algorithms will be presented.

  20. Multivariation calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers.

  1. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  2. Optimization techniques applied to passive measures for in-orbit spacecraft survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.; Helba, Michael J.; Hill, Janeil B.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide Space Station Freedom protective structures design insight through the coupling of design/material requirements, hypervelocity impact phenomenology, meteoroid and space debris environment sensitivities, optimization techniques and operations research strategies, and mission scenarios. The goals of the research are: (1) to develop a Monte Carlo simulation tool which will provide top level insight for Space Station protective structures designers; (2) to develop advanced shielding concepts relevant to Space Station Freedom using unique multiple bumper approaches; and (3) to investigate projectile shape effects on protective structures design.

  3. Micro-spectroscopic techniques applied to characterization of varnished archeological findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Ponterio, R.

    2000-04-01

    This work reports an analysis on terracotta varnished finding recovered in east Sicily area (Messina). We have performed FTIR micro-spectroscopy and electronic microscopy (SEM)measurements in order to recognize the elemental constituents of the varnished surfaces. Furthermore, for all the samples, a study on the bulk has been performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption. The analyzed samples consist of a number of pottery fragments belonging to archaic and classical ages, varnished in black and red colors. The obtained data furnished useful information about composition of decorated surfaces and bulk matrixes, about baking temperature, manufacture techniques and alteration mechanisms of findings due to the long burial.

  4. Maximum likelihood failure detection techniques applied to the shuttle orbiter reaction control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, J. C.; Deyst, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for on-board detection and identification of hard failures and leaks of the shuttle orbiter reaction control subsystem jets, during the orbital flight phase, is presented. The method uses gimbal angle and linear accelerometer measurements from the orbiter inertial measurement unit and requires no additional hardware. Extended Kalman filters with residual traps are employed for state estimation, and generalized likelihood ratio tests for jet failure identification. Rigid body simulation results indicate identification times of less than 2 seconds for hard jet failures and less than 70 seconds for jet leaks.

  5. Study of different filtering techniques applied to spectra from airborne gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Emilien; Gutierrez, Sebastien; Reboli, Anne; Menard, Stephanie; Nourreddine, Abdel-Mjid; Arbor, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    One of the features of spectra obtained by airborne gamma spectrometry is low counting statistics due to the short acquisition time (1 s) and the large source-detector distance (40 m). It leads to considerable uncertainty in radionuclide identification and determination of their respective activities from the windows method recommended by the IAEA, especially for low-level radioactivity. The present work compares the results obtained with filters in terms of errors of the filtered spectra with the window method and over the whole gamma energy range. The results are used to determine which filtering technique is the most suitable in combination with some method for total stripping of the spectrum. (authors)

  6. Sounding rocket thermal analysis techniques applied to GAS payloads. [Get Away Special payloads (STS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Simplified analytical techniques of sounding rocket programs are suggested as a means of bringing the cost of thermal analysis of the Get Away Special (GAS) payloads within acceptable bounds. Particular attention is given to two methods adapted from sounding rocket technology - a method in which the container and payload are assumed to be divided in half vertically by a thermal plane of symmetry, and a method which considers the container and its payload to be an analogous one-dimensional unit having the real or correct container top surface area for radiative heat transfer and a fictitious mass and geometry which model the average thermal effects.

  7. Full-field speckle correlation technique as applied to blood flow monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, M. A.; Agafonov, D. N.; Timoshina, P. A.; Shipovskaya, O. V.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Novikov, P. A.

    2011-03-01

    The results of experimental study of monitoring the microcirculation in tissue superficial layers of the internal organs at gastro-duodenal hemorrhage with the use of laser speckles contrast analysis technique are presented. The microcirculation monitoring was provided in the course of the laparotomy of rat abdominal cavity in the real time. Microscopic hemodynamics was analyzed for small intestine and stomach under different conditions (normal state, provoked ischemia, administration of vasodilative agents such as papaverine, lidocaine). The prospects and problems of internal monitoring of micro-vascular flow in clinical conditions are discussed.

  8. Pattern recognition techniques applied to acoustic detection of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor cooling defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, M.; Dubuisson, B.

    1983-08-01

    In the event of a partial or total blockage of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core subassembly, a boiling zone may be created. Acoustic signals from such a zone could provide a means of early detection of accident conditions. A three-step method, based on pattern recognition techniques, is described and used to analyze data from three experiments that simulate core cooling fault conditions. This method is shown to be capable of detecting the abnormal situation in each of the experiments analyzed.

  9. Positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of an HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, E. do; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Silva, T. F.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Fernandez-Varea, J. M.

    2013-05-06

    Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy of the large Ge crystal of an HPGe detector was performed using positrons from pair production of 6.13 MeV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. Two HPGe detectors facing opposite sides of the Ge crystal acting as target provided both coincidence and singles spectra. Changes in the shape of the annihilation peak were observed when the high voltage applied to the target detector was switched on or off, amounting to somewhat less than 20% when the areas of equivalent energy intervals in the corresponding normalized spectra are compared.

  10. A review of post-modern management techniques as currently applied to Turkish forestry.

    PubMed

    Dölarslan, Emre Sahin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of six post-modern management concepts as applied to Turkish forestry. Up to now, Turkish forestry has been constrained, both in terms of its operations and internal organization, by a highly bureaucratic system. The application of new thinking in forestry management, however, has recently resulted in new organizational and production concepts that promise to address problems specific to this Turkish industry and bring about positive changes. This paper will elucidate these specific issues and demonstrate how post-modern management thinking is influencing the administration and operational capacity of Turkish forestry within its current structure.

  11. Applying Reflective Middleware Techniques to Optimize a QoS-enabled CORBA Component Model Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Nanbor; Parameswaran, Kirthika; Kircher, Michael; Schmidt, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Although existing CORBA specifications, such as Real-time CORBA and CORBA Messaging, address many end-to-end quality-of service (QoS) properties, they do not define strategies for configuring these properties into applications flexibly, transparently, and adaptively. Therefore, application developers must make these configuration decisions manually and explicitly, which is tedious, error-prone, and open sub-optimal. Although the recently adopted CORBA Component Model (CCM) does define a standard configuration framework for packaging and deploying software components, conventional CCM implementations focus on functionality rather than adaptive quality-of-service, which makes them unsuitable for next-generation applications with demanding QoS requirements. This paper presents three contributions to the study of middleware for QoS-enabled component-based applications. It outlines rejective middleware techniques designed to adaptively (1) select optimal communication mechanisms, (2) manage QoS properties of CORBA components in their contain- ers, and (3) (re)con$gure selected component executors dynamically. Based on our ongoing research on CORBA and the CCM, we believe the application of rejective techniques to component middleware will provide a dynamically adaptive and (re)configurable framework for COTS software that is well-suited for the QoS demands of next-generation applications.

  12. Applying Reflective Middleware Techniques to Optimize a QoS-enabled CORBA Component Model Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Nanbor; Kircher, Michael; Schmidt, Douglas C.

    2000-01-01

    Although existing CORBA specifications, such as Real-time CORBA and CORBA Messaging, address many end-to-end quality-of-service (QoS) properties, they do not define strategies for configuring these properties into applications flexibly, transparently, and adaptively. Therefore, application developers must make these configuration decisions manually and explicitly, which is tedious, error-prone, and often sub-optimal. Although the recently adopted CORBA Component Model (CCM) does define a standard configuration frame-work for packaging and deploying software components, conventional CCM implementations focus on functionality rather than adaptive quality-of service, which makes them unsuitable for next-generation applications with demanding QoS requirements. This paper presents three contributions to the study of middleware for QoS-enabled component-based applications. It outlines reflective middleware techniques designed to adaptively: (1) select optimal communication mechanisms, (2) man- age QoS properties of CORBA components in their containers, and (3) (re)configure selected component executors dynamically. Based on our ongoing research on CORBA and the CCM, we believe the application of reflective techniques to component middleware will provide a dynamically adaptive and (re)configurable framework for COTS software that is well-suited for the QoS demands of next-generation applications.

  13. Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

  14. New seismic reflection techniques applied to gas recognition in the Rharb Basin, Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, H.; Dakki, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The Rharb basin in Morocco is a Tertiary foreland filled by clastic series during the Miocene and Pliocene. This terrigenous influx, derived from the prerif to the northeast and the Meseta to the south, is characterized by a sandy episode during much of the Messinian and the Tortonian. The sand deposits were probably related to the uplift and major erosion of a part of the prerif during the sliding of an olistostrome (prerif nappe). Although most of the wells drilled in the basin have encountered biogenic gas accumulations, the problem still facing exploration in the area is seismic resolution and thin-bed tuning analysis. Recent studies using high seismic resolution techniques have permitted the authors to gain a deep insight into the stratigraphy and depositional environment of the thin sand reservoirs and their fluid content. AVO stratigraphy, inversion of seismic traces into acoustic impedance traces and seismic attributes calculation, and computing provide a remarkable example of the possibilities of depicting the lateral and vertical evolution of reservoir facies and localizing biogenic gas accumulations. Out of five recent exploratory wells drilled based on this new technique, three encountered gas-bearing sands with economic potential. Fifty-three amplitude anomalies have been identified and await processing.

  15. Hyphenated GC-FTIR and GC-MS techniques applied in the analysis of bioactive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosav, Steluta; Paduraru, Nicoleta; Praisler, Mirela

    2014-08-01

    The drugs of abuse, which affect human nature and cause numerous crimes, have become a serious problem throughout the world. There are hundreds of amphetamine analogues on the black market. They consist of various alterations of the basic amphetamine molecular structure, which are yet not yet included in the lists of forbidden compounds although they retain or slightly modify the hallucinogenic effects of their parent compound. It is their important variety that makes their identification quite a challenge. A number of analytical procedures for the identification of amphetamines and their analogues have recently been reported. We are presenting the profile of the main hallucinogenic amphetamines obtained with the hyphenated techniques that are recommended for the identification of illicit amphetamines, i. e. gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC-FTIR). The infrared spectra of the analyzed hallucinogenic amphetamines present some absorption bands (1490 cm-1, 1440 cm-1, 1245 cm-1, 1050 cm-1 and 940 cm-1) that are very stable as position and shape, while their intensity depends of the side-chain substitution. The specific ionic fragment of the studied hallucinogenic compounds is the 3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl cation (m/e = 135) which has a small relative abundance (lesser than 20%). The complementarity of the above mentioned techniques for the identification of hallucinogenic compounds is discussed.

  16. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1998-01-01

    An overall goal of this research has been to enhance our understanding of the scientific principles necessary to develop advanced ultrasonic nondestructive techniques for the quantitative characterization of advanced composite structures. To this end, we have investigated a thin woven composite (5-harness biaxial weave). We have studied the effects that variations of the physical parameters of the experimental setup can have on the ultrasonic determination of the material properties for this thin composite. In particular, we have considered the variation of the nominal center frequency and the f-number of the transmitting transducer which in turn address issues such as focusing and beam spread of ultrasonic fields. This study has employed a planar, two-dimensional, receiving pseudo-array that has permitted investigation of the diffraction patterns of ultrasonic fields. Distortion of the ultrasonic field due to the spatial anisotropy of the thin composite has prompted investigation of the phenomenon of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. We have performed phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive analyses to provide a measure of the amount of phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver. The pursuit of robust measurements of received energy (i.e., those not susceptible to phase cancellation at the face of a finite-aperture, piezoelectric receiver) supports the development of robust techniques to determine material properties from measure ultrasonic parameters.

  17. A comparison of new, old and future densiometic techniques as applied to volcanologic study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, Matthew; Moreland, William; Dobson, Kate; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur; Fitton, Godfrey; Lee, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The density of any material imposes a primary control upon its potential or actual physical behaviour in relation to its surrounds. It follows that a thorough understanding of the physical behaviour of dynamic, multi-component systems, such as active volcanoes, requires knowledge of the density of each component. If we are to accurately predict the physical behaviour of synthesized or natural volcanic systems, quantitative densiometric measurements are vital. The theoretical density of melt, crystals and bubble phases may be calculated using composition, structure, temperature and pressure inputs. However, measuring the density of natural, non-ideal, poly-phase materials remains problematic, especially if phase specific measurement is important. Here we compare three methods; Archimedes principle, He-displacement pycnometry and X-ray micro computed tomography (XMT) and discuss the utility and drawbacks of each in the context of modern volcanologic study. We have measured tephra, ash and lava from the 934 AD Eldgjá eruption (Iceland), and the 2010 AD Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland), using each technique. These samples exhibit a range of particle sizes, phases and textures. We find that while the Archimedes method remains a useful, low-cost technique to generate whole-rock density data, relative precision is problematic at small particles sizes. Pycnometry offers a more precise whole-rock density value, at a comparable cost-per-sample. However, this technique is based upon the assumption pore spaces within the sample are equally available for gas exchange, which may or may not be the case. XMT produces 3D images, at resolutions from nm to tens of µm per voxel where X-ray attenuation is a qualitative measure of relative electron density, expressed as greyscale number/brightness (usually 16-bit). Phases and individual particles can be digitally segmented according to their greyscale and other characteristics. This represents a distinct advantage over both

  18. Optimization techniques applied to passive measures for in-orbit spacecraft survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.; Price, D. Marvin

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft designers have always been concerned about the effects of meteoroid impacts on mission safety. The engineering solution to this problem has generally been to erect a bumper or shield placed outboard from the spacecraft wall to disrupt/deflect the incoming projectiles. Spacecraft designers have a number of tools at their disposal to aid in the design process. These include hypervelocity impact testing, analytic impact predictors, and hydrodynamic codes. Analytic impact predictors generally provide the best quick-look estimate of design tradeoffs. The most complete way to determine the characteristics of an analytic impact predictor is through optimization of the protective structures design problem formulated with the predictor of interest. Space Station Freedom protective structures design insight is provided through the coupling of design/material requirements, hypervelocity impact phenomenology, meteoroid and space debris environment sensitivities, optimization techniques and operations research strategies, and mission scenarios. Major results are presented.

  19. Mass estimating techniques for earth-to-orbit transports with various configuration factors and technologies applied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, P. J.; Macconochie, I. O.

    1979-01-01

    A study of an array of advanced earth-to-orbit space transportation systems with a focus on mass properties and technology requirements is presented. Methods of estimating weights of these vehicles differ from those used for commercial and military aircraft; the new techniques emphasizing winged horizontal and vertical takeoff advanced systems are described utilizing the space shuttle subsystem data base for the weight estimating equations. The weight equations require information on mission profile, the structural materials, the thermal protection system, and the ascent propulsion system, allowing for the type of construction and various propellant tank shapes. The overall system weights are calculated using this information and incorporated into the Systems Engineering Mass Properties Computer Program.

  20. A study of universal modulation techniques applied to satellite data collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A universal modulation and frequency control system for use with data collection platform (DCP) transmitters is examined. The final design discussed can, under software/firmwave control, generate all of the specific digital data modulation formats currently used in the NASA satellite data collection service and can simultaneously synthesize the proper RF carrier frequencies employed. A novel technique for DCP time and frequency control is presented. The emissions of NBS radio station WWV/WWVH are received, detected, and finally decoded in microcomputer software to generate a highly accurate time base for the platform; with the assistance of external hardware, the microcomputer also directs the recalibration of all DCP oscillators to achieve very high frequency accuracies and low drift rates versus temperature, supply voltage, and time. The final programmable DCP design also employs direct microcomputer control of data reduction, formatting, transmitter switching, and system power management.

  1. A new technique for fractal analysis applied to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic signals.

    PubMed

    Bullmore, E; Brammer, M; Alarcon, G; Binnie, C

    1992-11-09

    Application of a new method of fractal analysis to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) signals is reported. 'Frameshift-Richardson' (FR) analysis involves estimation of fractal dimension (1 < FD < 2) of consecutive, overlapping 10-s epochs of digitised EEG data; it is suggested that this technique offers significant operational advantages over use of algorithms for FD estimation requiring preliminary reconstruction of EEG data in phase space. FR analysis was found to reduce substantially the volume of EEG data, without loss of diagnostically important information concerning onset, propagation and evolution of ictal EEG discharges. Arrhythmic EEG events were correlated with relatively increased FD; rhythmic EEG events with relatively decreased FD. It is proposed that development of this method may lead to: (i) enhanced definition and localisation of initial ictal changes in the EEG presumed due to multi-unit activity; and (ii) synoptic visualisation of long periods of EEG data.

  2. FTIR techniques applied to the detection of gelatine in paper artifacts: from macroscopic to microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouchon, Véronique; Pellizzi, Eleonora; Janssens, Koen

    2010-09-01

    In order to render paper hydrophobic for ink and thus adequate for writing, gelatine has been largely used. To this day, it is still employed in conservation workshops as an adhesive or a sizing agent, for instance, during the treatment of iron gall ink manuscripts. Various types and concentrations of gelatine are recommended, depending on the desired effect, but little information is available regarding to the physical distribution of gelatine in the paper. This aspect is however determinant for a better control of conservation treatments. In this work, we investigate the possibilities offered by FTIR microscopy for the measurement of the gelatine distribution in paper. Laboratory papers were preliminary treated with different types of gelatine and then embedded in a resin and cut in thin slices. Mapping techniques enable to compare the penetration of different types of gelatine in a semiquantitative way. The performance of conventional laboratory equipment and synchrotron radiation experimental setup are discussed.

  3. Study of different filtering techniques applied to spectra from airborne gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Emilien; Gutierrez, Sébastien; Arbor, Nicolas; Ménard, Stéphanie; Nourreddine, Abdel-Mjid

    2016-11-01

    One of the features of the spectra obtained by airborne gamma spectrometry is the low counting statistics due to a short acquisition time (1 s) and a large source-detector distance (40 m) which leads to large statistical fluctuations. These fluctuations bring large uncertainty in radionuclide identification and determination of their respective activities from the window method recommended by the IAEA, especially for low-level radioactivity. Different types of filter could be used on spectra in order to remove these statistical fluctuations. The present work compares the results obtained with filters in terms of errors over the whole gamma energy range of the filtered spectra with the window method. These results are used to determine which filtering technique is the most suitable in combination with some method for total stripping of the spectrum.

  4. Erasing the Milky Way: new cleaning technique applied to GBT intensity mapping data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Blake, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Anderson, C. J.; Chang, T.-C.; Li, Y.-C.; Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E.; Pen, U.-L.; Voytek, T. C.; Yadav, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first application of a new foreground removal pipeline to the current leading H I intensity mapping data set, obtained by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We study the 15- and 1-h-field data of the GBT observations previously presented in Mausui et al. and Switzer et al., covering about 41 deg2 at 0.6 < z < 1.0, for which cross-correlations may be measured with the galaxy distribution of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. In the presented pipeline, we subtract the Galactic foreground continuum and the point-source contamination using an independent component analysis technique (FASTICA), and develop a Fourier-based optimal estimator to compute the temperature power spectrum of the intensity maps and cross-correlation with the galaxy survey data. We show that FASTICA is a reliable tool to subtract diffuse and point-source emission through the non-Gaussian nature of their probability distributions. The temperature power spectra of the intensity maps are dominated by instrumental noise on small scales which FASTICA, as a conservative subtraction technique of non-Gaussian signals, cannot mitigate. However, we determine similar GBT-WiggleZ cross-correlation measurements to those obtained by the singular value decomposition (SVD) method, and confirm that foreground subtraction with FASTICA is robust against 21 cm signal loss, as seen by the converged amplitude of these cross-correlation measurements. We conclude that SVD and FASTICA are complementary methods to investigate the foregrounds and noise systematics present in intensity mapping data sets.

  5. Contrast cancellation technique applied to digital x-ray imaging using silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Lopez, J.; Sanabria, J. C.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Gombia, M.; Cabal, A.E.; Ceballos, C.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Taibi, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Giubellino, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Tomassi, E.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Swientek, K.

    2005-12-15

    Dual-energy mammographic imaging experimental tests have been performed using a compact dichromatic imaging system based on a conventional x-ray tube, a mosaic crystal, and a 384-strip silicon detector equipped with full-custom electronics with single photon counting capability. For simulating mammal tissue, a three-component phantom, made of Plexiglass, polyethylene, and water, has been used. Images have been collected with three different pairs of x-ray energies: 16-32 keV, 18-36 keV, and 20-40 keV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment has also been carried out using the MCNP-4C transport code. The Alvarez-Macovski algorithm has been applied both to experimental and simulated data to remove the contrast between two of the phantom materials so as to enhance the visibility of the third one.

  6. Inverting travel times with a triplication. [spline fitting technique applied to lunar seismic data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarosch, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    A method based on the use of constrained spline fits is used to overcome the difficulties arising when body-wave data in the form of T-delta are reduced to the tau-p form in the presence of cusps. In comparison with unconstrained spline fits, the method proposed here tends to produce much smoother models which lie approximately in the middle of the bounds produced by the extremal method. The method is noniterative and, therefore, computationally efficient. The method is applied to the lunar seismic data, where at least one triplication is presumed to occur in the P-wave travel-time curve. It is shown, however, that because of an insufficient number of data points for events close to the antipode of the center of the lunar network, the present analysis is not accurate enough to resolve the problem of a possible lunar core.

  7. Structure-selection techniques applied to continuous-time nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis A.; Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Maquet, Jean

    2001-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of choosing the multinomials that should compose a polynomial mathematical model starting from data. The mathematical representation used is a nonlinear differential equation of the polynomial type. Some approaches that have been used in the context of discrete-time models are adapted and applied to continuous-time models. Two examples are included to illustrate the main ideas. Models obtained with and without structure selection are compared using topological analysis. The main differences between structure-selected models and complete structure models are: (i) the former are more parsimonious than the latter, (ii) a predefined fixed-point configuration can be guaranteed for the former, and (iii) the former set of models produce attractors that are topologically closer to the original attractor than those produced by the complete structure models.

  8. Development of Maintenance Techniques of Railway Structures Applying Sensor and Information Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Seiji; Nihei, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Minegishi, Kuniyuki; Nakayama, Takashi; Sato, Norio

    Maintenance of railway structures is important. However, the expense and time for inspection of the structures are large. In addition, judgments of performance of the structures depend on experience and knowledge of inspector. Therefore we have applied sensor and information technologies in order to support inspection and to improve inspection and diagnosis technologies. In this paper, we have shown mechanisms of damage outbreak and performance of sensors for five kinds of structures. Furthermore we have suggested joint-translation-angle detection device, damage detection sensor, FBG (Fiber Bragg Grating) sensor, electric conductible paint and piezoelectric element as self-sensing sensors. In addition, as non-contact transmission system, we have adopted Zig-Bee radio, RF-ID tag and specified low-power radio. By the completion of those systems, inspection systems of structures which have depended on experience and knowledge of inspector will be extensively improved and precision and certainty for inspection and diagnosis technologies are will be ensured.

  9. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity).

  10. Key considerations in scaling up male circumcision in Tanzania: views of the urban residents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Francis, Joel M; Kakoko, Deodatus; Tarimo, Edith A M; Munseri, Patricia; Bakari, Muhammad; Sandstrom, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STI) including HIV. The WHO and UNAIDS recommend male circumcision as an additional intervention to prevent HIV infection. Tanzania is embarking on activities to scale up safe male circumcision for HIV prevention and other related health benefits. In line with this, it is crucial to assess views of the population using specific groups. This paper describes perceptions on male circumcision and strategies of enhancing uptake of male circumcision in urban Tanzania using members of the police force. This cross sectional survey was conducted among members of the police force in Dar es Salaam Tanzania from January 2010 to July 2010. The police officer serves as a source of the clinical trial participants in on-going phase I/II HIV vaccine trials. Three hundred and thirteen (313) police officers responded to a self-administered questionnaire that comprised of socio-demographic characteristics, reasons for not circumcising, perceptions regarding circumcision, methods of enhancing male circumcision, communication means and barriers to promote circumcision. This was followed by a physical examination to determine male circumcision status. The prevalence of circumcision was 96%. Most (69%) reported to have been circumcised in the hospital. The reported barriers to male circumcision among adults and children were: anticipation of pain, cost, fear to lose body parts, and lack of advice for adult's circumcision. Sensitization of parents who take children to the reproductive and child health services was recommended by most respondents as the appropriate strategy to promote male circumcision. The least recommended strategy was for the women to sensitize men. Use of radio programs and including male circumcision issues in school curricula as means of enhancing community sensitization regarding male circumcision were also highly recommended. Other recommendations include use of public media, seminars at

  11. Scaling up carbon storage in human-dominated heterogeneous landscapes in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, W.; Brown, D. G.; Kiger, S.; Nassauer, J. I.; Robinson, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Humans alter vegetation worldwide for a variety of purposes, including production of timber, food, fuelwood, and biofuels. While providing key social and economic benefits, these activities alter vegetation community composition, vertical structure, ecology, and biogeochemistry including carbon cycling. Joint outcomes at the landscape scale, such as ecological and social outcomes, arise over time through coupled social-ecological processes and feedbacks. We focused on measuring and modeling carbon storage in low-density (exurban) residential landscapes in southeastern Michigan, but our findings are relevant for human-dominated vegetation more broadly, particularly scaling up carbon storage in fragmented and spatially heterogeneous tree cover. We studied soil and vegetation carbon storage in 23, 1 km-scale landscapes that had been converted to low-density residential land from agricultural land or forest remnant patches in the last 50 years. The use of three hierarchical spatial scales was key. These included (1) distinct ecological zones at the sub-parcel scale, such as dense trees and shrubs, turfgrass, and turfgrass with sparse woody vegetation; (2) traditional land-cover categories at the sub-1-km scale such as tree cover and impervious surfaces; and (3) differences among four distinct neighborhood types, distinguished by parcel size, road access, and tree cover, at the sub-township to regional scale. Low-density residential land stored ca. 19,000 g C / m2 on average, which is much lower than that of individual old-growth forest patches in the region, but surprisingly similar to C storage in regionally-averaged second-growth forests. In residential land, the presence of large trees was important to C storage but interestingly, many large trees occurred outside of forest patches. Another important location for C storage in our exurban landscapes was soil to 1 m depth, which stored greater C than comparative forests in the region. This high soil C storage arose

  12. Long-Term Outcomes on Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large Scale-Up Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Seema T.; Chang, Charlotte A.; Eisen, Geoffrey; Jolayemi, Toyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While there has been a rapid global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programs over the past decade, there are limited data on long-term outcomes from large cohorts in resource-constrained settings. Our objective in this evaluation was to measure multiple outcomes during first-line antiretroviral therapy in a large treatment program in Nigeria. Methods We conducted a retrospective multi-site program evaluation of adult patients (age ≥15 years) initiating antiretroviral therapy between June 2004 and February 2012 in Nigeria. The baseline characteristics of patients were described and longitudinal analyses using primary endpoints of immunologic recovery, virologic rebound, treatment failure and long-term adherence patterns were conducted. Results Of 70,002 patients, 65.2% were female and median age was 35 (IQR: 29–41) years; 54.7% were started on a zidovudine-containing and 40% on a tenofovir-containing first-line regimen. Median CD4+ cell counts for the cohort started at 149 cells/mm3 (IQR: 78–220) and increased over duration of ART. Of the 70,002 patients, 1.8% were reported as having died, 30.1% were lost to follow-up, and 0.1% withdrew from treatment. Overall, of those patients retained and with viral load data, 85.4% achieved viral suppression, with 69.3% achieving suppression by month 6. Of 30,792 patients evaluated for virologic failure, 24.4% met criteria for failure and of 45,130 evaluated for immunologic failure, 34.0% met criteria for immunologic failure, with immunologic criteria poorly predicting virologic failure. In adjusted analyses, older age, ART regimen, lower CD4+ cell count, higher viral load, and inadequate adherence were all predictors of virologic failure. Predictors of immunologic failure differed slightly, with age no longer predictive, but female sex as protective; additionally, higher baseline CD4+ cell count was also predictive of failure. Evaluation of long-term adherence patterns revealed that the majority of patients

  13. Spatial Translation and Scaling Up of LID Practices in Deer Creek Watershed in East Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, Damien

    This study investigated two important aspects of hydrologic effects of low impact development (LID) practices at the watershed scale by (1) examining the potential benefits of scaling up of LID design, and (2) evaluating downstream effects of LID design and its spatial translation within a watershed. The Personal Computer Storm Water Management Model (PCSWMM) was used to model runoff reduction with the implementation of LID practices in Deer Creek watershed (DCW), Missouri. The model was calibrated from 2003 to 2007 (R2 = 0.58 and NSE = 0.57), and validated from 2008 to 2012 (R2 = 0.64 and NSE = 0.65) for daily direct runoff. Runoff simulated for the study period, 2003 to 2012 (NSE = 0.61; R2 = 0.63), was used as the baseline for comparison to LID scenarios. Using 1958 areal imagery to assign land cover, a predevelopment scenario was constructed and simulated to assess LID scenarios' ability to restore predevelopment hydrologic conditions. The baseline and all LID scenarios were simulated using 2006 National Land Cover Dataset. The watershed was divided in 117 subcatchments, which were clustered in six groups of approximately equal areas and two scaling concepts consisting of incremental scaling and spatial scaling were modelled. Incremental scaling was investigated using three LID practices (rain barrel, porous pavement, and rain garden). Each LID practice was simulated at four implementation levels (25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) in all subcatchments for the study period (2003 to 2012). Results showed an increased runoff reduction, ranging from 3% to 31%, with increased implementation level. Spatial scaling was investigated by increasing the spatial extent of LID practices using the subcatchment groups and all three LID practices (combined) implemented at 50% level. Results indicated that as the spatial extent of LID practices increased the runoff reduction at the outlet also increased, ranging from 3% to 19%. Spatial variability of LID implementation was examined by

  14. Teacher Teams and School Processes in Scaling-Up a Content Literacy Innovation in High Schools. Final Report: The Evaluation of the Scale-Up of Reading Apprenticeship through the Reading Apprenticeship Improving Secondary Education (RAISE) Project. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Zacamy, Jenna; Lazarev, Valeriy; Lin, Li; Jaciw, Andrew P.; Hegseth, Whitney

    2015-01-01

    We report on the scaling up of a high school content literacy framework, Reading Apprenticeship, over a period of four years as part of the independent evaluation of an Investing in Innovation grant from the U.S. Department of Education to WestEd's Strategic Literacy Institute (SLI). Our goal was to understand the school processes that support…

  15. Experiences in applying optimization techniques to configurations for the Control of Flexible Structures (COFS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.

    1989-01-01

    Optimization procedures are developed to systematically provide closely-spaced vibration frequencies. A general purpose finite-element program for eigenvalue and sensitivity analyses is combined with formal mathematical programming techniques. Results are presented for three studies. The first study uses a simple model to obtain a design with two pairs of closely-spaced frequencies. Two formulations are developed: an objective function-based formulation and constraint-based formulation for the frequency spacing. It is found that conflicting goals are handled better by a constraint-based formulation. The second study uses a detailed model to obtain a design with one pair of closely-spaced frequencies while satisfying requirements on local member frequencies and manufacturing tolerances. Two formulations are developed. Both the constraint-based and the objective function-based formulations perform reasonably well and converge to the same results. However, no feasible design solution exists which satisfies all design requirements for the choices of design variables and the upper and lower design variable values used. More design freedom is needed to achieve a fully satisfactory design. The third study is part of a redesign activity in which a detailed model is used.

  16. Machine Learning Techniques Applied to Sensor Data Correction in Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Matt K; Castello, Charles C; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since commercial and residential buildings account for nearly half of the United States' energy consumption, making them more energy-efficient is a vital part of the nation's overall energy strategy. Sensors play an important role in this research by collecting data needed to analyze performance of components, systems, and whole-buildings. Given this reliance on sensors, ensuring that sensor data are valid is a crucial problem. Solutions being researched are machine learning techniques, namely: artificial neural networks and Bayesian Networks. Types of data investigated in this study are: (1) temperature; (2) humidity; (3) refrigerator energy consumption; (4) heat pump liquid pressure; and (5) water flow. These data are taken from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) ZEBRAlliance research project which is composed of four single-family homes in Oak Ridge, TN. Results show that for the temperature, humidity, pressure, and flow sensors, data can mostly be predicted with root-mean-square error (RMSE) of less than 10% of the respective sensor's mean value. Results for the energy sensor are not as good; RMSE are centered about 100% of the mean value and are often well above 200%. Bayesian networks have RSME of less than 5% of the respective sensor's mean value, but took substantially longer to train.

  17. Quality evaluation of different fusion techniques applied on Worldview-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaiopoulos, Aristides; Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.

    2015-10-01

    In the current study a Worldview-2 image was used for fusion quality assessment. The bundle image was collected on July 2014 over Araxos area in Western Peloponnese. Worldview-2 is the first satellite that collects at the same time a panchromatic (Pan) image and 8 band multispectral (MS) image. The Pan data have a spatial resolution of 0.46m while the MS data have a spatial resolution of 1.84m. In contrary to the respective Pan band of Ikonos and Quickbird that range between 0.45 and 0.90 micrometers the Worldview Pan band is narrower and ranges between 0.45 and 0.8 micrometers. The MS bands include four conventional visible and near-infrared bands common to multispectral satellites like Ikonos Quickbird, Geoeye Landsat-7 etc., and four new bands. Thus, it is quite interesting to investigate the assessment of commonly used fusion algorithms with Worldview-2 data. Twelve fusion techniques and more especially the Ehlers, Gram-Schmidt, Color Normalized, High Pass Filter, Hyperspherical Color Space, Local Mean Matching (LMM), Local Mean and Variance Matching (LMVM), Modified IHS (ModIHS), Pansharp, Pansharp2, PCA and Wavelet were used for the fusion of Worldview-2 panchromatic and multispectral data. The optical result, the statistical parameters and different quality indexes such as ERGAS, Q and entropy difference were examined and the results are presented. The quality control was evaluated both in spectral and spatial domain.

  18. Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, L.; Doughty, D.; Mahmood, S.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Madden, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed understanding of rock structure and its influence on fluid entrapment, storage capacity, and flow behavior can improve the effective utilization and design of methods to increase the recovery of oil and gas from petroleum reservoirs. The dynamics of fluid flow and trapping phenomena in porous media was investigated. Miscible and immiscible displacement experiments in heterogeneous Berea and Shannon sandstone samples were monitored using X-ray computed tomography (CT scanning) to determine the effect of heterogeneities on fluid flow and trapping. The statistical analysis of pore and pore throat sizes in thin sections cut from these sandstone samples enabled the delineation of small-scale spatial distributions of porosity and permeability. Multiphase displacement experiments were conducted with micromodels constructed using thin slabs of the sandstones. The combination of the CT scanning, thin section, and micromodel techniques enables the investigation of how variations in pore characteristics influence fluid front advancement, fluid distributions, and fluid trapping. Plugs cut from the sandstone samples were investigated using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging permitting the visualization of oil, water or both within individual pores. The application of these insights will aid in the proper interpretation of relative permeability, capillary pressure, and electrical resistivity data obtained from whole core studies. 7 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Image restoration techniques as applied to Landsat MSS and TM data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, David

    1987-01-01

    Two factors are primarily responsible for the loss of image sharpness in processing digital Landsat images. The first factor is inherent in the data because the sensor's optics and electronics, along with other sensor elements, blur and smear the data. Digital image restoration can be used to reduce this degradation. The second factor, which further degrades by blurring or aliasing, is the resampling performed during geometric correction. An image restoration procedure, when used in place of typical resampled techniques, reduces sensor degradation without introducing the artifacts associated with resampling. The EROS Data Center (EDC) has implemented the restoration proceed for Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) and thematic mapper (TM) data. This capability, developed at the University of Arizona by Dr. Robert Schowengerdt and Lynette Wood, combines restoration and resampling in a single step to produce geometrically corrected MSS and TM imagery. As with resampling, restoration demands a tradeoff be made between aliasing, which occurs when attempting to extract maximum sharpness from an image, and blurring, which reduces the aliasing problem but sacrifices image sharpness. The restoration procedure used at EDC minimizes these artifacts by being adaptive, tailoring the tradeoff to be optimal for individual images.

  20. Comparison of motion correction techniques applied to functional near-infrared spectroscopy data from children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Su; Arredondo, Maria M.; Gomba, Megan; Confer, Nicole; DaSilva, Alexandre F.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Shalinsky, Mark; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    Motion artifacts are the most significant sources of noise in the context of pediatric brain imaging designs and data analyses, especially in applications of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), in which it can completely affect the quality of the data acquired. Different methods have been developed to correct motion artifacts in fNIRS data, but the relative effectiveness of these methods for data from child and infant subjects (which is often found to be significantly noisier than adult data) remains largely unexplored. The issue is further complicated by the heterogeneity of fNIRS data artifacts. We compared the efficacy of the six most prevalent motion artifact correction techniques with fNIRS data acquired from children participating in a language acquisition task, including wavelet, spline interpolation, principal component analysis, moving average (MA), correlation-based signal improvement, and combination of wavelet and MA. The evaluation of five predefined metrics suggests that the MA and wavelet methods yield the best outcomes. These findings elucidate the varied nature of fNIRS data artifacts and the efficacy of artifact correction methods with pediatric populations, as well as help inform both the theory and practice of optical brain imaging analysis.

  1. Correlation techniques as applied to pose estimation in space station docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, John M.; Juday, Richard D.; Monroe, Stanley E., Jr.

    2002-08-01

    The telerobotic assembly of space-station components has become the method of choice for the International Space Station (ISS) because it offers a safe alternative to the more hazardous option of space walks. The disadvantage of telerobotic assembly is that it does not necessarily provide for direct arbitrary views of mating interfaces for the teleoperator. Unless cameras are present very close to the interface positions, such views must be generated graphically, based on calculated pose relationships derived from images. To assist in this photogrammetric pose estimation, circular targets, or spots, of high contrast have been affixed on each connecting module at carefully surveyed positions. The appearance of a subset of spots must form a constellation of specific relative positions in the incoming image stream in order for the docking to proceed. Spot positions are expressed in terms of their apparent centroids in an image. The precision of centroid estimation is required to be as fine as 1/20th pixel, in some cases. This paper presents an approach to spot centroid estimation using cross correlation between spot images and synthetic spot models of precise centration. Techniques for obtaining sub-pixel accuracy and for shadow and lighting irregularity compensation are discussed.

  2. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  3. Hyperspectral imaging techniques applied to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Fabbri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    An anaerobic digestion process, finalized to biogas production, is characterized by different steps involving the variation of some chemical and physical parameters related to the presence of specific biomasses as: pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile solids, nitrate (NO3-) and phosphate (PO3-). A correct process characterization requires a periodical sampling of the organic mixture in the reactor and a further analysis of the samples by traditional chemical-physical methods. Such an approach is discontinuous, time-consuming and expensive. A new analytical approach based on hyperspectral imaging in the NIR field (1000 to 1700 nm) is investigated and critically evaluated, with reference to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process. The application of the proposed technique was addressed to identify and demonstrate the correlation existing, in terms of quality and reliability of the results, between "classical" chemical-physical parameters and spectral features of the digestate samples. Good results were obtained, ranging from a R2=0.68 and a RMSECV=12.83 mg/l for nitrate to a R2=0.90 and a RMSECV=5495.16 mg O2/l for COD. The proposed approach seems very useful in setting up innovative control strategies allowing for full, continuous control of the anaerobic digestion process.

  4. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  5. Applying satellite remote sensing technique in disastrous rainfall systems around Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gin-Rong; Chen, Kwan-Ru; Kuo, Tsung-Hua; Liu, Chian-Yi; Lin, Tang-Huang; Chen, Liang-De

    2016-05-01

    Many people in Asia regions have been suffering from disastrous rainfalls year by year. The rainfall from typhoons or tropical cyclones (TCs) is one of their key water supply sources, but from another perspective such TCs may also bring forth unexpected heavy rainfall, thereby causing flash floods, mudslides or other disasters. So far we cannot stop or change a TC route or intensity via present techniques. Instead, however we could significantly mitigate the possible heavy casualties and economic losses if we can earlier know a TC's formation and can estimate its rainfall amount and distribution more accurate before its landfalling. In light of these problems, this short article presents methods to detect a TC's formation as earlier and to delineate its rainfall potential pattern more accurate in advance. For this first part, the satellite-retrieved air-sea parameters are obtained and used to estimate the thermal and dynamic energy fields and variation over open oceans to delineate the high-possibility typhoon occurring ocean areas and cloud clusters. For the second part, an improved tropical rainfall potential (TRaP) model is proposed with better assumptions then the original TRaP for TC rainfall band rotations, rainfall amount estimation, and topographic effect correction, to obtain more accurate TC rainfall distributions, especially for hilly and mountainous areas, such as Taiwan.

  6. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  7. Blade Displacement Measurement Technique Applied to a Full-Scale Rotor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Olson, Lawrence E.; Romander, Ethan A.; Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    2012-01-01

    Blade displacement measurements using multi-camera photogrammetry were acquired during the full-scale wind tunnel test of the UH-60A Airloads rotor, conducted in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The objectives were to measure the blade displacement and deformation of the four rotor blades as they rotated through the entire rotor azimuth. These measurements are expected to provide a unique dataset to aid in the development and validation of rotorcraft prediction techniques. They are used to resolve the blade shape and position, including pitch, flap, lag and elastic deformation. Photogrammetric data encompass advance ratios from 0.15 to slowed rotor simulations of 1.0, thrust coefficient to rotor solidity ratios from 0.01 to 0.13, and rotor shaft angles from -10.0 to 8.0 degrees. An overview of the blade displacement measurement methodology and system development, descriptions of image processing, uncertainty considerations, preliminary results covering static and moderate advance ratio test conditions and future considerations are presented. Comparisons of experimental and computational results for a moderate advance ratio forward flight condition show good trend agreements, but also indicate significant mean discrepancies in lag and elastic twist. Blade displacement pitch measurements agree well with both the wind tunnel commanded and measured values.

  8. Morphological analysis of the flippers in the Franciscana dolphin, Pontoporia blainvillei, applying X-ray technique.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Daniela Laura; Panebianco, María Victoria; Negri, María Fernanda; Cappozzo, Humberto Luis

    2014-07-01

    Pectoral flippers of cetaceans function to provide stability and maneuverability during locomotion. Directional asymmetry (DA) is a common feature among odontocete cetaceans, as well as sexual dimorphism (SD). For the first time DA, allometry, physical maturity, and SD of the flipper skeleton--by X-ray technique--of Pontoporia blainvillei were analyzed. The number of carpals, metacarpals, phalanges, and morphometric characters from the humerus, radius, ulna, and digit two were studied in franciscana dolphins from Buenos Aires, Argentina. The number of visible epiphyses and their degree of fusion at the proximal and distal ends of the humerus, radius, and ulna were also analyzed. The flipper skeleton was symmetrical, showing a negative allometric trend, with similar growth patterns in both sexes with the exception of the width of the radius (P ≤ 0.01). SD was found on the number of phalanges of digit two (P ≤ 0.01), ulna and digit two lengths. Females showed a higher relative ulna length and shorter relative digit two length, and the opposite occurred in males (P ≤ 0.01). Epiphyseal fusion pattern proved to be a tool to determine dolphin's age; franciscana dolphins with a mature flipper were, at least, four years old. This study indicates that the flippers of franciscana dolphins are symmetrical; both sexes show a negative allometric trend; SD is observed in radius, ulna, and digit two; and flipper skeleton allows determine the age class of the dolphins.

  9. Modern Chemistry Techniques Applied to Metal Behavior and Chelation in Medical and Environmental Systems ? Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Andresen, B; Burastero, S R; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Chinn, S C; Coronado, P R; Gash, A E; Perkins, J; Sawvel, A M; Szechenyi, S C

    2005-02-03

    This report details the research and findings generated over the course of a 3-year research project funded by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Originally tasked with studying beryllium chemistry and chelation for the treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease and environmental remediation of beryllium-contaminated environments, this work has yielded results in beryllium and uranium solubility and speciation associated with toxicology; specific and effective chelation agents for beryllium, capable of lowering beryllium tissue burden and increasing urinary excretion in mice, and dissolution of beryllium contamination at LLNL Site 300; {sup 9}Be NMR studies previously unstudied at LLNL; secondary ionization mass spec (SIMS) imaging of beryllium in spleen and lung tissue; beryllium interactions with aerogel/GAC material for environmental cleanup. The results show that chelator development using modern chemical techniques such as chemical thermodynamic modeling, was successful in identifying and utilizing tried and tested beryllium chelators for use in medical and environmental scenarios. Additionally, a study of uranium speciation in simulated biological fluids identified uranium species present in urine, gastric juice, pancreatic fluid, airway surface fluid, simulated lung fluid, bile, saliva, plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid.

  10. Applying data fusion techniques for benthic habitat mapping and monitoring in a coral reef ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caiyun

    2015-06-01

    Accurate mapping and effective monitoring of benthic habitat in the Florida Keys are critical in developing management strategies for this valuable coral reef ecosystem. For this study, a framework was designed for automated benthic habitat mapping by combining multiple data sources (hyperspectral, aerial photography, and bathymetry data) and four contemporary imagery processing techniques (data fusion, Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA), machine learning, and ensemble analysis). In the framework, 1-m digital aerial photograph was first merged with 17-m hyperspectral imagery and 10-m bathymetry data using a pixel/feature-level fusion strategy. The fused dataset was then preclassified by three machine learning algorithms (Random Forest, Support Vector Machines, and k-Nearest Neighbor). Final object-based habitat maps were produced through ensemble analysis of outcomes from three classifiers. The framework was tested for classifying a group-level (3-class) and code-level (9-class) habitats in a portion of the Florida Keys. Informative and accurate habitat maps were achieved with an overall accuracy of 88.5% and 83.5% for the group-level and code-level classifications, respectively.

  11. A Novel Solution-Technique Applied to a Novel WAAS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has embarked on an historic task of modernizing and significantly improving the national air transportation system. One system that uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine aircraft navigational information is called the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS). This paper describes a reliability assessment of one candidate system architecture for the WAAS. A unique aspect of this study regards the modeling and solution of a candidate system that allows a novel cold sparing scheme. The cold spare is a WAAS communications satellite that is fabricated and launched after a predetermined number of orbiting satellite failures have occurred and after some stochastic fabrication time transpires. Because these satellites are complex systems with redundant components, they exhibit an increasing failure rate with a Weibull time to failure distribution. Moreover, the cold spare satellite build-time is Weibull and upon launch is considered to be a good-as-new system with an increasing failure rate and a Weibull time to failure distribution as well. The reliability model for this system is non-Markovian because three distinct system clocks are required: the time to failure of the orbiting satellites, the build time for the cold spare, and the time to failure for the launched spare satellite. A powerful dynamic fault tree modeling notation and Monte Carlo simulation technique with importance sampling are shown to arrive at a reliability prediction for a 10 year mission.

  12. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques Applied to the Quantitative Characterization of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1997-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our further development of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of anisotropic materials. We present images obtained from experimental measurements of ultrasonic diffraction patterns transmitted through water only and transmitted through water and a thin woven composite. All images of diffraction patterns have been included on the accompanying CD-ROM in the JPEG format and Adobe TM Portable Document Format (PDF), in addition to the inclusion of hardcopies of the images contained in this report. In our previous semi-annual Progress Report (NAG 1-1848, December, 1996), we proposed a simple model to simulate the effect of a thin woven composite on an insonifying ultrasonic pressure field. This initial approach provided an avenue to begin development of a robust measurement method for nondestructive evaluation of anisotropic materials. In this Progress Report, we extend that work by performing experimental measurements on a single layer of a five-harness biaxial woven composite to investigate how a thin, yet architecturally complex, material interacts with the insonifying ultrasonic field. In Section 2 of this Progress Report we describe the experimental arrangement and methods for data acquisition of the ultrasonic diffraction patterns upon transmission through a thin woven composite. We also briefly describe the thin composite specimen investigated. Section 3 details the analysis of the experimental data followed by the experimental results in Section 4. Finally, a discussion of the observations and conclusions is found in Section 5.

  13. Muscle stiffness estimation using a system identification technique applied to evoked mechanomyogram during cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Saito, Kaito; Shinjo, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a method to extract the evoked mechanomyogram (MMG) during cycling exercise and to clarify muscle stiffness at various cadences, workloads, and power. Ten young healthy male participants were instructed to pedal a cycle ergometer at cadences of 40 and 60 rpm. The loads were 4.9, 9.8, 14.7, and 19.6 N, respectively. One electrical stimulus per two pedal rotations was applied to the vastus lateralis muscle at a knee angle of 80° in the down phase. MMGs were measured using a capacitor microphone, and the MMGs were divided into stimulated and non-stimulated sequences. Each sequence was synchronously averaged. The synchronously averaged non-stimulated MMG was subtracted from the synchronously averaged stimulated MMG to extract an evoked MMG. The evoked MMG system was identified and the poles of the transfer function were calculated. The poles and mass of the vastus lateralis muscle were used to estimate muscle stiffness. Results showed that muscle stiffness was 186-626 N /m and proportional to the workloads and power. In conclusion, our method can be used to assess muscle stiffness proportional to the workload and power.

  14. A Study of Advanced Modern Control Techniques Applied to a Twin Rotor MIMO System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Andrew E.

    The twin rotor MIMO system (TRMS) is a helicopter-like system that is restricted to two degrees of freedom, pitch and yaw. It is a complicated nonlinear, coupled, MIMO system used for the verification of control methods and observers. There have been many methods successfully applied to the system ranging from simple proportional integral derivative (PID) controllers, to machine learning algorithms, nonlinear control methods and other less explored methods like deadbeat control and various optimal methodologies. This thesis details the design procedure for two different control methods. The first is a suboptimal tracking controller using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) with integral action. The second is the design of several adaptive sliding mode controller to provide robust tracking control of the TRMS. Once the design is complete the controllers are tested in simulation and their performance is compared against a PID controller experimentally. The performance of the controllers are also compared against other controllers in the literature. The ability of the sliding mode controllers (SMC) to suppress chattering is also be explored.

  15. Zoneless and Mixture techniques applied to the Integrated Brazilian PSHA using GEM-OpenQuake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirchiner, M.; Drouet, S.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of this work is to propose some variations to the classic Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) calculations, on one hand, applying the zoneless methodology to seismic source activity characterization and, on the other hand, using the gaussian mixture models to mix Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) models onto a mixed model. Our actual knowledge of the Brazilian intraplate seismicity does not allow us to identify the causative neotectonic active faults with confidence. This issue makes difficult the characterization of main seismic sources and the computation of the Gutenberg-Richter relation. Indeed seismic zonings made by different specialist could have big differences, while the zone less approach imposes a quantitative method to seismic source characterization, avoiding the subjective source zone definition. In addition, the low seismicity rate and the limited coverage in space and time of the seismic networks, do not offer enough observations to fit a confident GMPE to this region. In this case, our purpose was use a Gaussian Mixture Model to estimate a composed model from pre-existents well-fitted GMPE models which better describes the observed peak ground motion data. The other methodological evaluation is to use the OpenQuake engine (a Global Earthquake Model's initiative) for the hazard calculation. The logic tree input will allow us, in near future, to combine with weights, other hazard models from different specialists. We expect that these results will offer a new and solid basis to upgrade the brazilian civil engineering seismic rules.

  16. E-field-ratio telluric techniques applied to cavity detection for OSI operations

    SciTech Connect

    Didwall, E.M.; Wilt, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Verification of compliance to a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) may require an On-Site Inspection (OSI) of an area in the USSR where an underground nuclear test may have been conducted. As one of the possible technologies that may be applied by an OSI team, the E-field-ratio telluric method for cavity detection is examined. This method utilizes naturally occurring earth currents which are induced by ionospheric and tropospheric electromagnetic activity - no electric field source is provided by the user, thus reducing equipment requirements. Two test surveys were made at the Nevada Test Site. Underground cavities at these locations are expected to have lateral extents of the order of a few 10's of meters and depths less than 300 meters. Telluric measurements indicate that an electrically resistive anomaly exists where the cavity is expected. The anomaly associated with the cavity could be detected even when the survey line did not cross directly over the expected cavity location. Although these experiments do not define the limitations of the method, they do show strong evidence that cavities and chimney formations from an underground nuclear explosion can be detected. Specific goals for further research are suggested.

  17. Impurity Correction Techniques Applied to Existing Doping Measurements of Impurities in Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.; Sun, J. P.; Zhang, J. T.; Deng, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities represent the most significant source of uncertainty in most metal fixed points used for the realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There are a number of different methods for quantifying the effect of impurities on the freezing temperature of ITS-90 fixed points, many of which rely on an accurate knowledge of the liquidus slope in the limit of low concentration. A key method of determining the liquidus slope is to measure the freezing temperature of a fixed-point material as it is progressively doped with a known amount of impurity. Recently, a series of measurements of the freezing and melting temperature of `slim' Zn fixed-point cells doped with Ag, Fe, Ni, and Pb were presented. Here, additional measurements of the Zn-X system are presented using Ga as a dopant, and the data (Zn-Ag, Zn-Fe, Zn-Ni, Zn-Pb, and Zn-Ga) have been re-analyzed to demonstrate the use of a fitting method based on Scheil solidification which is applied to both melting and freezing curves. In addition, the utility of the Sum of Individual Estimates method is explored with these systems in the context of a recently enhanced database of liquidus slopes of impurities in Zn in the limit of low concentration.

  18. BiasMDP: Carrier lifetime characterization technique with applied bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Paul M.; Simon, Daniel K.; Mikolajick, Thomas; Dirnstorfer, Ingo

    2015-02-01

    A characterization method is presented, which determines fixed charge and interface defect densities in passivation layers. This method bases on a bias voltage applied to an electrode on top of the passivation layer. During a voltage sweep, the effective carrier lifetime is measured by means of microwave detected photoconductivity. When the external voltage compensates the electric field of the fixed charges, the lifetime drops to a minimum value. This minimum value correlates to the flat band voltage determined in reference impedance measurements. This correlation is measured on p-type silicon passivated by Al2O3 and Al2O3/HfO2 stacks with different fixed charge densities and layer thicknesses. Negative fixed charges with densities of 3.8 × 1012 cm-2 and 0.7 × 1012 cm-2 are determined for Al2O3 layers without and with an ultra-thin HfO2 interface, respectively. The voltage and illumination dependencies of the effective carrier lifetime are simulated with Shockley Read Hall surface recombination at continuous defects with parabolic capture cross section distributions for electrons and holes. The best match with the measured data is achieved with a very low interface defect density of 1 × 1010 eV-1 cm-2 for the Al2O3 sample with HfO2 interface.

  19. Numerical analysis of the voltage-clamp technique applied to frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M E; Sevcik, C; Parthe, V

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear cable equation was solved numerically by means of an implicit procedure. The correlation between end-plate length and fiber diameter was determined in frog (Rana pipiens) sartorius muscles stained with gold chloride (Löwit, 1875). The diameter of the fibers stained by the Löwit method was 80 (74-85) micron (median and its 95% confidence interval for 52 fibers), the length of the end plates in the same fibers was 382 (353-417) micron. The fibers simulated were 80 micron in diameter. To solve the equation the muscle fibers were represented by 500 segments 20 micron long, and the equation was solved in steps of 10 microseconds; a double exponential function was incorporated to the first seven segments to represent the neuromuscular junction. The potential of the first segment of the cable was set to the clamping level and the membrane potential of the remaining segments calculated. The current needed to hold the first segment was estimated by adding the current flowing through the first segment to the current flowing from it to the second segment. Our results indicate that the lack of space clamp in the point voltage-clamp studies of the frog neuromuscular junction introduces serious errors in the estimates of the end-plate conductance value, the kinetics of the conductance changes, and the reversal potential of the end-plate currents. The possibility of an efficient voltage-clamp technique is also explored. Our calculations suggest that the study of end-plate current and conductance is possible with little error if the end-plate potential is controlled at both ends of the synaptic area simultaneously. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6981435

  20. Techniques that Link Extreme Events to the Large Scale, Applied to California Heat Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotjahn, R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms how Californian Central Valley (CCV) summer extreme hot spells develop is very important since the events have major impacts on the economy and human safety. Results from a series of CCV heat wave studies will be presented, emphasizing the techniques used. Key larger scale elements are identified statistically that are also consistent with synoptic and dynamic understanding of what must be present during extreme heat. Beyond providing a clear synoptic explanation, these key elements have high predictability, in part because soil moisture has little annual variation in the heavily-irrigated CCV. In turn, the predictability naturally leads to an effective tool to assess climate model simulation of these heat waves in historical and future climate scenarios. (Does the model develop extreme heat for the correct reasons?) Further work identified that these large scale elements arise in two quite different ways: one from expansion southwestward of a pre-existing heat wave in southwest Canada, the other formed in place from parcels traversing the North Pacific. The pre-existing heat wave explains an early result showing correlation between heat waves in Sacramento California, and other locations along the US west coast, including distant Seattle Washington. CCV heat waves can be preceded by unusually strong tropical Indian Ocean and Indonesian convection, this partial link may occur through an Asian subtropical jet wave guide. Another link revealed by diagnostics is a middle and higher latitude source of wave activity in Siberia and East Asia that also leads to the development of the CCV heat wave. This talk will address as many of these results and the tools used to obtain them as is reasonable within the available time.