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Sample records for schistosoma japonicum chimeric

  1. Exposed proteins of the Schistosoma japonicum tegument.

    PubMed

    Mulvenna, Jason; Moertel, Luke; Jones, Malcolm K; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Lovas, Erica M; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Colgrave, Michelle; Jones, Alun; Loukas, Alex; McManus, Donald P

    2010-04-01

    The ability of the mammalian blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum to survive in the inhospitable environment of the mammalian bloodstream can be attributed, at least in part, to its host-exposed outer surface, called the tegument. The tegument is a dynamic organ and is involved in nutrition, immune evasion and modulation, excretion, osmoregulation and signal transduction. Given its importance for parasite survival, proteins exposed to the host at the surface of the tegument are ideal targets for the development of vaccines and drugs. By biotinylating live adult worms and using a combination of OFFGEL electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry 54 proteins were identified as putatively host-exposed in S. japonicum. These included glucose transport proteins, an amino permease, a leucine aminopeptidase and a range of transporters, heat shock proteins and novel immune-active proteins. Members of the tetraspanin protein family and a homologue of Sm 29, a tegument membrane protein from Schistosoma mansoni, both effective vaccine antigens in S. mansoni, were also identified. The fate of labelled surface proteins was monitored over time using electron microscopy and revealed that biotinylated proteins were rapidly internalised from the surface of the tegument and trafficked into the cytoplasmic bridges that connect the distal cytoplasm of the tegument to the underlying cell bodies. The results reported herein dramatically increase the number of S. japonicum proteins known to be exposed to the host and, hence, those of interest as therapeutic targets. The ability of the parasite to rapidly internalise proteins at its surface has implications for the development of vaccines and may explain how these parasites are able to avoid the host immune system for long periods of time. PMID:19853607

  2. [Expression and purification of recombinant Schistosoma japonicum paramyosin].

    PubMed

    Zhou, J C; Yi, X Y; Kalinna, B H; McManus, D P

    2000-04-28

    Paramyosin of Schistosoma japonicum was expressed at a high level in E. coli. The recombinant protein could be easily purified from bacteria lysate by fast protein liquid chromatography(FLPC) on a TALON resin column, due to the protein being expressed with a tag of six histidine residue fused to the N-terminus. The protein was completely soluble and could be eluted under non-denaturing condition using imidazole. To eliminate imidazole and residue of E. coli, the elution was further purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The purified protein will be used in water buffaloes in the study on protective immunity against Schistosoma japonicum.

  3. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  4. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes. PMID:27739459

  5. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-10-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes.

  6. Exploring molecular variation in Schistosoma japonicum in China

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neil D.; Chan, Kok-Gan; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Min Chong, Teik; Ee, Robson; Mohandas, Namitha; Koehler, Anson V.; Lim, Yan-Lue; Hofmann, Andreas; Jex, Aaron R.; Qian, Baozhen; Chilton, Neil B.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; McManus, Donald P.; Tan, Patrick; Webster, Bonnie L.; Rollinson, David; Gasser, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. The main disease-causing agents, Schistosoma japonicum, S. mansoni and S. haematobium, are blood flukes that have complex life cycles involving a snail intermediate host. In Asia, S. japonicum causes hepatointestinal disease (schistosomiasis japonica) and is challenging to control due to a broad distribution of its snail hosts and range of animal reservoir hosts. In China, extensive efforts have been underway to control this parasite, but genetic variability in S. japonicum populations could represent an obstacle to eliminating schistosomiasis japonica. Although a draft genome sequence is available for S. japonicum, there has been no previous study of molecular variation in this parasite on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we conducted the first deep genomic exploration of seven S. japonicum populations from mainland China, constructed phylogenies using mitochondrial and nuclear genomic data sets, and established considerable variation between some of the populations in genes inferred to be linked to key cellular processes and/or pathogen-host interactions. Based on the findings from this study, we propose that verifying intraspecific conservation in vaccine or drug target candidates is an important first step toward developing effective vaccines and chemotherapies against schistosomiasis. PMID:26621075

  7. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Mott, K E; Dixon, H; Carter, C E; Garcia, E; Ishii, A; Matsuda, H; Mitchell, G; Owhashi, M; Tanaka, H; Tsang, V C

    1987-01-01

    Six research laboratories in Australia, Japan, the Philippines and the USA participated in a collaborative evaluation of immunodiagnostic tests for Schistosoma japonicum infections. The serum bank consisted of 385 well-documented sera from Brazil, Kenya, Philippines, Republic of Korea and Europe. Twelve S. japonicum antigen/test system combinations were evaluated.Crude S. japonicum egg antigens showed the highest sensitivity and specificity. The defined or characterized antigens showed no advantage over the crude antigens. Quantitative seroreactivity of all S. japonicum antigens showed a positive correlation with faecal egg counts (log x + 1) in all age groups. The performance of the circumoval precipitin test was satisfactory within the same laboratory but with differences in the results between laboratories. A monoclonal antibody used in a competitive radioimmunoassay test system performed as well as the crude egg antigens.The high sensitivity of crude S. japonicum antigens now permits further evaluation for wide-scale use in public health laboratories of endemic areas to support control efforts. PMID:3111737

  8. Assessment of morbidity due to Schistosoma japonicum infection in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a historical assessment of morbidity due to the Schistosoma japonicum infection in China. Due to the socio-economic situation, which did not allow for a control program to be implemented until the early 1950s, morbidity was serious and mortality was high before this. Based on a few investigations and published papers, it can be said that the disease caused millions of deaths, and destroyed numerous families and villages. Since the 1950s, there has been a national control program, intensive control and prevention work has been carried out, and consequently the disease is being controlled. At present, both the prevalence and the morbidity of the disease have been decreasing substantially. The morbidity of the three phases of the disease is outlined in this paper. Comparatively higher morbidity is seen in the acute and advanced phases of the disease. The four major forms of advanced schistosomiasis i.e., ascites, megalosplenia, dwarfism, and colonic tumoroid proliferation, are outlined with their characteristic clinical presentations; their proportions are different during various periods of the national control program. Ectopic schistosomiasis and the relationship between the S. japonicum infection and colorectal cancer are also discussed. Post-transmission schistosomiasis is briefly discussed (which can happen even if the disease reaches the criteria of elimination, and the infection and transmission have stopped, but yet it still develops). The problem of mammalian reservoir hosts of S. japonicum makes the epidemiology and control of schistosomiasis in China even more complicated and arduous, and the control progress in animal reservoirs is briefly presented. PMID:24529186

  9. Molecular Differentiation of Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Limpanont, Yanin

    2013-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi is a chronic and debilitating helminthic disease still prevalent in several countries of Asia. Due to morphological similarities of cercariae and eggs of these 2 species, microscopic differentiation is difficult. High resolution melting (HRM) real-time PCR is developed as an alternative tool for the detection and differentiation of these 2 species. A primer pair was designed for targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to generate PCR products of 156 base pairs for both species. The melting points of S. japonicum and S. mekongi PCR products were 84.5±0.07℃ and 85.7±0.07℃, respectively. The method permits amplification from a single cercaria or an egg. The HRM real-time PCR is a rapid and simple tool for differentiation of S. japonicum and S. mekongi in the intermediate and final hosts. PMID:24516269

  10. Approaches to genotyping individual miracidia of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ning; Remais, Justin V; Brindley, Paul J; Qiu, Dong-Chuan; Carlton, Elizabeth J; Li, Rong-Zhi; Lei, Yang; Blair, David

    2013-12-01

    Molecular genetic tools are needed to address questions as to the source and dynamics of transmission of the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum in regions where human infections have reemerged, and to characterize infrapopulations in individual hosts. The life stage that interests us as a target for collecting genotypic data is the miracidium, a very small larval stage that consequently yields very little DNA for analysis. Here, we report the successful development of a multiplex format permitting genotyping of 17 microsatellite loci in four sequential multiplex reactions using a single miracidium held on a Whatman Classic FTA indicating card. This approach was successful after short storage periods, but after long storage (>4 years), considerable difficulty was encountered in multiplex genotyping, necessitating the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) methods. WGA applied to cards stored for long periods of time resulted in sufficient DNA for accurate and repeatable genotyping. Trials and tests of these methods, as well as application to some field-collected samples, are reported, along with the discussion of the potential insights to be gained from such techniques. These include recognition of sibships among miracidia from a single host, and inference of the minimum number of worm pairs that might be present in a host. PMID:24013341

  11. Studies on Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines*

    PubMed Central

    Pesigan, T. P.; Hairston, N. G.; Jauregui, J. J.; Garcia, E. G.; Santos, A. T.; Santos, B. C.; Besa, A. A.

    1958-01-01

    This study of the molluscan host (Oncomelania quadrasi) of bilharziasis in the Philippines is divided into two parts, the first dealing with the biology of the host and the second with the interrelationship between the host and Schistosoma japonicum. In the first part, the snail's distribution and habitat are considered in some detail, and then field and laboratory studies on its behaviour and activity are reported on. A section on the life history of O. quadrasi covers its growth, reproduction, egg-laying and survival. This is followed by a study of the population dynamics of the snail. In the second part, the laboratory procedures used for infecting snails and for obtaining cercariae are described, and the finding that more female than male snails are seen infected is discussed. A section is devoted to the effect of infection on the reproduction, growth and longevity of the snail, and an account is given of cercarial output, of the distribution of cercariae in a snail colony and of their presence downstream from snail colonies. The final section deals with natural fluctuations in snail infection rates, which appear to show a cycle related to rainfall. ImagesFIG. 27FIG. 35 PMID:13536804

  12. Schistosoma japonicum cystatin attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cheng, Weisheng; Pappoe, Faustina; Hu, Xiaodong; Wen, Huiqin; Luo, Qingli; Wang, Shushu; Deng, Fang; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yuanhong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant SjCystatin (rSjCystatin), a recombinant protein of Schistosoma japonicum cystatin, has been reported to have an effect on immunoregulation mediated by IL-10 induction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune inflammatory arthropathy, and recombinant immune-modulating drugs for RA treatment are under development. We aimed to study the putative immune regulation of rSjCystatin and its prophylactic/therapeutic effects on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice by inoculation with bovine collagen II (CII). rSjCystatin was administered prior or post development of CIA. The severity of CIA was assessed using established clinical and histopathological scoring systems. The incidence was also determined. The CII-specific antibodies in sera and cytokines in splenocyte culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and Tregs development in splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. The inflammatory mediators in the diseased joint were semiquantitated by qPCR. Prophylactic injection of rSjCystatin attenuated paw clinical scores, incidence, and histopathology scores of joints in CIA mice. The arthritis-alleviative effects were closely associated with the augmentation of IL-4, IL-10, and collagen-specific IgG1, and with the distinct reduction of IFN-γ, collagen-specific IgG2a, and the marked decrease of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α and RANKL. The data indicate that rSjCystatin may prevent cartilage destruction and inflammation of joints in CIA mice. The effects are related to the inhibitory modulation of Th1 and Th17 and upregulation of Tregs and Th2 via a shift of cytokines profiling from Th1 to Th2 response. PMID:27393379

  13. Schistosoma japonicum-like ova in liver and rectal biopsies of three cases in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kan, S K; Kay, R W; Thomas, I

    1979-03-01

    Three cases of schistosomiasis in 2 Filipinos and one Chinese in Sabah are reported. Diagnosis was based on incidental histological findings of Schistosoma japonicum-like ova in the liver and rectal biopsies. As these 3 patients are immigrants to Sabah, it is assumed that they are imported cases, and that Sabah has been free of the disease from 1970 to 1977.

  14. A specific indel marker for the Philippines Schistosoma japonicum revealed by analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Chen, Fen; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Blair, David; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, near-complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences for Schistosoma japonicum from different regions in the Philippines and Japan were amplified and sequenced. Comparisons among S. japonicum from the Philippines, Japan, and China revealed a geographically based length difference in mt genomes, but the mt genomic organization and gene arrangement were the same. Sequence differences among samples from the Philippines and all samples from the three endemic areas were 0.57-2.12 and 0.76-3.85 %, respectively. The most variable part of the mt genome was the non-coding region. In the coding portion of the genome, protein-coding genes varied more than rRNA genes and tRNAs. The near-complete mt genome sequences for Philippine specimens were identical in length (14,091 bp) which was 4 bp longer than those of S. japonicum samples from Japan and China. This indel provides a unique genetic marker for S. japonicum samples from the Philippines. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated amino acids of 12 protein-coding genes showed that samples of S. japonicum clustered according to their geographical origins. The identified mitochondrial indel marker will be useful for tracing the source of S. japonicum infection in humans and animals in Southeast Asia.

  15. MITOCHONDRIAL GENE SEQUENCES AMONG DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHICAL ISOLATES OF SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM IN YUNNAN PROVINCE, CHINA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xue-Mei; Li, Cui-Ying; Li, Mei; Zeng, Jin; Zheng, Su-Yue; Li, Fei

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate differentiate genetic differences among Schistosoma japonicum isolates from Dali Ancient City, Xizhou and Yongsheng County, Yunnan Province, China, mitochondrial col, cytb, nd1, nd6, and nd4l were PCR amplified and sequenced, revealing nucleotide difference(s) among these strains of 8, 1, 5, 4, and 0, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that S. japonicum from the three different geographical locations of Yunnan Province were clustered genetically together and were more similar to S. malayensis and S. mekongi than S. haematobium or S. mansoni. For intra-species differentiation purposes, Schistosoma mitochondrial col, nd1, and nd6 are better genetic markers than cytb and nd41. PMID:27405120

  16. Does multiple hosts mean multiple parasites? Population genetic structure of Schistosoma japonicum between definitive host species.

    PubMed

    Wang, T P; Shrivastava, J; Johansen, M V; Zhang, S Q; Wang, F F; Webster, J P

    2006-10-01

    Multi-host parasites, those capable of infecting more than one species of host, are responsible for the majority of all zoonotic, emerging or persistent human and animal diseases and are considered one of the major challenges for the biomedical sciences in the 21st century. We characterized the population structure of the multi-host parasite Schistosoma japonicum in relation to its definitive host species by genotyping miracidia collected from humans and domestic animals across five villages around the Yangtze River in Anhui Province, mainland China, using microsatellite markers. High levels of polymorphisms were observed and two main genetic clusters were identified which separated water buffalo, cattle and humans from goats, pigs, dogs and cats. We thereby believe that we present the first evidence of definitive host-based genetic variation in Schistosoma japonicum which has important epidemiological, evolutionary, medical and veterinary implications.

  17. Involvement of heat shock protein 47 in Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Quan; Tao, Ran; Li, Lan; Ma, Ke; Xu, Lei; Ai, Guo; Fan, Xiang-Xue; Jiao, Yun-Tao; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is associated with both liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previously, heat shock protein 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, was shown to play a critical role in the maturation of procollagen. However, less is known about the role of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated the expression of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced liver fibrosis and attempted to determine whether inhibition of heat shock protein 47 could have beneficial effects on fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that the expression of heat shock protein 47 was significantly increased in patients with Schistosoma-induced fibrosis, as well as in rodent models. Immunohistochemistry revealed heat shock protein 47-positive cells were found in the periphery of egg granulomas. Administration of heat shock protein 47-targeted short hairpin (sh)RNA remarkably reduced heat shock protein 47 expression and collagen deposition in NIH3T3 cells and liver tissue of S. japonicum-infected mice. Life-table analysis revealed a dose-dependent prolongation of survival rates with the treatment of heat shock protein 47-shRNA in murine fibrosis models. Moreover, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activity, splenomegaly, spleen weight index and portal hypertension were also measured, which showed improvement with the anti-fibrosis treatment. The fibrosis-related parameters assessed were expressions of Col1a1, Col3a1, TGF-β1, CTGF, IL-13, IL-17, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and PAI-1 in the liver. This study demonstrated that heat shock protein 47-targeted shRNA directly reduced collagen production of mouse liver fibrosis associated with S. japonicum. We conclude that heat shock protein 47 plays an essential role in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice and may be a potential target for ameliorating the hepatic fibrosis caused by this parasite. PMID:24295791

  18. Cloning and in vitro characterization of a Schistosoma japonicum aquaglyceroporin that functions in osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuzheng; Li, Wei; Lu, Wuguang; Xiong, Chunrong; Yang, Yang; Yan, Huaijiang; Liu, Kun Connie; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    As one of the three major human pathogens that cause schistosomiasis, Schistosoma japonicum is the only one that is endemic in China. Despite great progress on schistosomiasis control over the past 50 years in China, S. japonicum transmission still occurs in certain endemic regions, which causes significant public health problems and enormous economic losses. During different life stages, parasites are able to survive dramatic osmolality changes between its vector, fresh water, and mammal host. However, the molecular mechanism of parasite osmoregulation remains unknown. To address this challenging question, we report the first cloning of an S. japonicum aquaglyceroporin (SjAQP) from an isolate from Jiangsu province, China. Expressing SjAQP in Xenopus oocytes facilitated the permeation of water, glycerol, and urea. The water permeability of SjAQP was inhibited by 1 mM HgCl2, 3 mM tetraethylammonium, 1 mM ZnCl2, and 1 mM CuSO4. SjAQP was constitutively expressed throughout the S. japonicum life cycle, including in the egg, miracidia, cercaria, and adult stages. The highest expression was detected during the infective cercaria stage. Our results suggest that SjAQP plays a role in osmoregulation throughout the S. japonicum life cycle, especially during cercariae transformation, which enables parasites to survive osmotic challenges. PMID:27733755

  19. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  20. Correlation between hammerhead ribozyme-mediated eggshell protein gene cleavage and reproduction inhibition of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YU; ZHOU, YUELAN; YIN, WEIGUO; LI, YINGJU; YANG, QIULIN; GAO, YUAN; ZHANG, YUKUAI; YANG, YAOFEI; PENG, LI; XIAO, JIANHUA

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is an extremely harmful pathogen, which infects humans and causes severe public health problems. To date, no effective therapeutic drugs for this pathogen are available. In this study, we designed and constructed three hammerhead ribozymes targeting the eggshell protein gene of S. japonicum (SjESG). The cleavage activities of these three ribozymes were determined using cleavage experiments. The in vitro cleavage results showed that among the three synthesized ribozymes (Rz1, Rz2 and Rz3), Rz1 and Rz3 cleaved their target RNAs effectively. However, Rz2 did not cleave its target RNA detectably. The putative therapeutic roles of these three ribozymes to inhibit the reproduction of S. japonicum in mice were studied in vivo. Compared with the negative controls, Rz1 and Rz3 treatments resulted in increased levels of IFN-γ but decreased levels of IL-4 in mice. Rz2 affected levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 to degrees similar with those caused by the vector controls. In addition, Rz1 and Rz3 reduced the amounts of adult worms and eggs in the livers of mice more extensively than Rz2 and the vector controls. Altogether, these results suggest a correlation between the in vitro cleavage abilities of Rz1 and Rz3 and their roles in reproduction inhibition of S. japonicum. PMID:22246067

  1. Preliminary characterization and expression of Vasa-like gene in Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yujie; Hua, Mengqing; Shao, Yanjing; Huang, Wei; Liu, Miao; Ren, Cuiping; Ji, Yongsheng; Chen, Jianmin; Shen, Jijia

    2015-07-01

    The Vasa gene is a vital germline marker to study the origin and development of germ cells and gonads in many organisms. Until now, little information was available about the characteristics of the Vasa gene in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum). In this study, we cloned the open reading frame (ORF) of the S. japonicum Vasa-like gene (Sj-Vasa). The expression pattern and tissue localization of Sj-Vasa were also analyzed. Our results showed that Sj-Vasa shared the general feature of DEAD-box family member proteins. Sj-Vasa was transcribed and expressed throughout the S. japonicum life cycle with transcription exhibiting high levels at day 24 in both male and female worms, and the expression level in the female was always higher than that in the male. Sj-Vasa protein was localized in a variety of tissues of adult schistosomes, including the gonads (ovary, vitellarium, and testes), the subtegument, and some cells of the parenchyma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of preliminary characterization and expression of the Vasa-like gene that may play an important role in the development of the worm, especially in reproductive organs of S. japonicum. PMID:25899325

  2. A novel procedure for precise quantification of Schistosoma japonicum eggs in bovine feces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Gordon, Catherine A; Hu, Wei; McManus, Donald P; Chen, Hong-Gen; Gray, Darren J; Ju, Chuan; Zeng, Xiao-Jun; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Ge, Jun; Lan, Wei-Ming; Xie, Shu-Ying; Jiang, Wei-Sheng; Ross, Allen G; Acosta, Luz P; Olveda, Remigio; Feng, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis with a number of mammalian species acting as reservoir hosts, including water buffaloes which can contribute up to 75% to human transmission in the People's Republic of China. Determining prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma japonicum in mammalian hosts is important for calculating transmission rates and determining environmental contamination. A new procedure, the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation-digestion (FEA-SD) technique, for increased visualization of S. japonicum eggs in bovine feces, is described that is an effective technique for identifying and quantifying S. japonicum eggs in fecal samples from naturally infected Chinese water buffaloes and from carabao (water buffalo) in the Philippines. The procedure involves filtration, sedimentation, potassium hydroxide digestion and centrifugation steps prior to microscopy. Bulk debris, including the dense cellulosic material present in bovine feces, often obscures schistosome eggs with the result that prevalence and infection intensity based on direct visualization cannot be made accurately. This technique removes nearly 70% of debris from the fecal samples and renders the remaining debris translucent. It allows improved microscopic visualization of S. japonicum eggs and provides an accurate quantitative method for the estimation of infection in bovines and other ruminant reservoir hosts. We show that the FEA-SD technique could be of considerable value if applied as a surveillance tool for animal reservoirs of S. japonicum, particularly in areas with low to high infection intensity, or where, following control efforts, there is suspected elimination of schistosomiasis japonica.

  3. IL-33 Contributes to Schistosoma japonicum-induced Hepatic Pathology through Induction of M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Zhang, Qixian; Li, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zhen; Shen, Jia; Sun, Rui; Wei, Jie; Zhao, Jia; Wu, Xiaoying; Feng, Feng; Zhong, Shuping; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is involved in T helper (Th)2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma, but the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we investigated the role of IL-33 and its receptor ST2L in hepatic granuloma pathology induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection. We found that IL-33 induced the increased production of IL-5 and IL-13 from splenocytes and liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) of infected mice. The infected mice developed significantly higher number of ST2L-expressing cells in spleen and liver. Most of the ST2L-expressing cells in liver were F4/80+ macrophages, indicating the key role of macrophages in the response to IL-33. However, the liver MNCs in male-only worm infection had a poor response to IL-33, though elevated serum IL-33 was observed. ST2L+F4/80+ cells were lower in male-only worm infection than that of mixed infection. IL-33 and soluble egg antigen (SEA) upregulated ST2L expression on macrophages in vitro and ST2L-expressing macrophage displayed MHCII-CD11b+M2 phenotype. Macrophage deletion significantly attenuated IL-33-induced type 2 immunity and egg granuloma formation during S. japonicum infection. These data demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to hepatic granuloma pathology through induction of M2 macrophages during S. japonicum infection. PMID:27445267

  4. Murine hybridoma-derived antibodies producing circumoval precipitation (COP) reactions with eggs of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cruise, K M; Mitchell, G F; Tapalés, F P; Garcia, E G; Huang, S R

    1981-08-01

    Of 7 hybridomas which secrete immunoglobulins binding to crude extracts of Schistosoma japonicum adult worms and/or eggs in solid-phase radioimmunoassays (RIAs), 3 gave positive precipitation reactions in the circumoval precipitin test (COPT). The COPT is a simple and inexpensive immunodiagnostic test for schistosomiasis japonica which involves the incubation of a selected batch of S. japonicum eggs with sera from patients and examination for precipitates one or more days later. Using a competitive RIA with an egg antigen extract and a labelled COPT-positive hybridoma ascites fluid, PwF.41-1-3, the surprising observation was made that only one anti-egg antibody specificity appeared to be represented in the series of 3 antibodies (as ascites fluids). Using sera as inhibitors in the competitive RIA, inhibitory activity (presumably antibodies to the target antigenic determinant of PwF.41-1-3) was readily detected in sera from egg-immunized mice and was of relatively high titre in a strain of mouse (C57BL/6) which can be readily sensitized for large granuloma formation around entrapped eggs in the lungs. Negligible inhibitory activity was found in the sera from S. japonicum-infected patients, even with sera from patients with prominent hepatosplenomegaly. The availability of COPT-positive hybridoma antibodies should facilitate isolation of at least one S. japonicum egg antigen involved in COP reactions and perhaps induction of immunopathological immune responses at least in mice.

  5. Screening and identification of DNA aptamers toward Schistosoma japonicum eggs via SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yuqian; Qin, Zhiqiang; Duan, Minlan; Li, Shizhu; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lin, Wei; Li, Jianglin; Zhao, Zilong; Liu, Jing; Xiong, Dehui; Huang, Yi; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Chao; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major parasitic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Several million people all over the world are estimated to suffer from severe morbidity as a consequence of schistosomiasis. The worm’s eggs, which cause the symptoms of schistosomiasis, are generally used to diagnose the disease. In this study, we employed egg-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (egg-SELEX) and identified a panel of ssDNA aptamers specifically binding to eggs derived from S. japonicum. Among these, two aptamers LC6 and LC15 exhibited strong binding to and specific recognition of S. japonicum eggs, but not eggs from Fasciolopsis buski, Enterobius, Ascaris or Clonorchis sinensis. Furthermore, tissue imaging results revealed that LC15 could recognize S. japonicum eggs laid in liver tissues with a detection ratio of 80.5%. Collectively, therefore, we obtained useful aptamers specifically recognizing S. japonicum eggs, which will facilitate the development of an effective tool for both schistosomiasis diagnosis and drug delivery. PMID:27121794

  6. Co-dispersal of the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum and Homo sapiens in the Neolithic Age

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingbo; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Su, Jing; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P.; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Jin, Li; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of human infectious diseases is of considerable public health and biomedical interest. Little is known about the relationship between the distribution of ancient parasites and that of their human hosts. Schistosoma japonicum is one of the three major species of schistosome blood flukes causing the disease of schistosomiasis in humans. The parasite is prevalent in East and Southeast Asia, including the People’s Republic of China, the Philippines and Indonesia. We studied the co-expansion of S. japonicum and its human definitive host. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences showed that S. japonicum radiated from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River to the mountainous areas of China, Japan and Southeast Asia. In addition, the parasite experienced two population expansions during the Neolithic agriculture era, coinciding with human migration and population growth. The data indicate that the advent of rice planting likely played a key role in the spread of schistosomiasis in Asia. Moreover, the presence of different subspecies of Oncomelania hupensis intermediate host snails in different localities in Asia allowed S. japonicum to survive in new rice-planting areas, and concurrently drove the intraspecies divergence of the parasite. PMID:26686813

  7. Co-dispersal of the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum and Homo sapiens in the Neolithic Age.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Su, Jing; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Jin, Li; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of human infectious diseases is of considerable public health and biomedical interest. Little is known about the relationship between the distribution of ancient parasites and that of their human hosts. Schistosoma japonicum is one of the three major species of schistosome blood flukes causing the disease of schistosomiasis in humans. The parasite is prevalent in East and Southeast Asia, including the People's Republic of China, the Philippines and Indonesia. We studied the co-expansion of S. japonicum and its human definitive host. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences showed that S. japonicum radiated from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River to the mountainous areas of China, Japan and Southeast Asia. In addition, the parasite experienced two population expansions during the Neolithic agriculture era, coinciding with human migration and population growth. The data indicate that the advent of rice planting likely played a key role in the spread of schistosomiasis in Asia. Moreover, the presence of different subspecies of Oncomelania hupensis intermediate host snails in different localities in Asia allowed S. japonicum to survive in new rice-planting areas, and concurrently drove the intraspecies divergence of the parasite. PMID:26686813

  8. Prospects for development of a transmission blocking vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    McManus, D P

    2005-01-01

    Despite intensive long-term control programmes, schistosomiasis japonica remains a serious public health problem in China and the Philippines. The termination of mass praziquantel-treatment has seen a dramatic recent rebound in both its prevalence and associated morbidity. Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis but, despite complicating control efforts, this feature provides a practical method for attacking Schistosoma japonicum through development and deployment of a transmission blocking veterinary vaccine. A recently completed bovine drug intervention trial and mathematical modelling of the transmission of S. japonicum underpin the concept that such a vaccine, targeting water buffalo, would have major implications for future integrated schistosomiasis control in China. A major block to success is the low ceiling efficacy achieved with current vaccine molecules. To solve this challenge, an antigen discovery pipeline needs to be established for identification of new vaccine targets that induce greater potency than the current anti-S. japonicum candidate vaccines. Excretory-secretory products and molecules exposed on epithelial surfaces (including receptors) which interact directly with the host immune system warrant especial attention. Extensive schistosome genomics programmes currently underway coupled with new advances in proteomics and microarray technology provide an unparalleled opportunity to identify new molecules exploitable as vaccine targets. These will then need to be produced in quantity and rigorously tested first in the laboratory and then the field. If a transmission blocking veterinary vaccine developed for bovines can be put into practice in combination with other control strategies such as human chemotherapy, elimination of S. japonicum from China may be achievable.

  9. Studies on Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines*

    PubMed Central

    Pesigan, T. P.; Farooq, M.; Hairston, N. G.; Jauregui, J. J.; Garcia, E. G.; Santos, A. T.; Santos, B. C.; Besa, A. A.

    1958-01-01

    The geographical location and physical features of the island of Leyte in the Philippines, where bilharziasis is endemic and where the studies reported here were conducted, are described in the first part of this paper. An account is also given of the climate, soils, vegetation, population and rural structure, and public health of the island. The second part opens with a brief historical review of bilharziasis japonica in the Philippines up to 1953, when a control project was started. The objectives of this project, the areas selected, the census data and sampling used, and the techniques adopted are described. There follows a discussion of the prevalence of bilharziasis and its relationship to age, sex, occupation and environment; the prevalence of other common helminthic infections is also considered. In a section on the natural history and public health significance of bilharziasis, an approach to quantitative assessment of disease and disability and a method for evaluating the economic burden of bilharziasis are suggested. The incidence of disease in children of 5-9 years is reviewed in the same section. An analysis is made of possible strain differences of S. japonicum in Leyte, and the relative role of human and other animal hosts is assessed. The last section deals with the egg-laying habits of S. japonicum. ImagesFIG. 9FIG. 13FIG. 15FIG. 28 PMID:13536797

  10. The Schistosoma japonicum genome reveals features of host-parasite interplay

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Zheng, Huajun; Chen, Xiangyi; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Kai; Guo, Jing; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Bo; Huang, Wei; Jin, Ke; Tonghai, Dou; Hasegawa, Masami; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Tao, Lin; Cao, Zhiwei; Li, Yixue; Vinar, Tomas; Brejova, Brona; Brown, Dan; Li, Ming; Miller, David J.; Blair, David; Zhong, Yang; Chen, Zhu; Liu, Feng; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhi-Qin; Zhang, Qin-Hua; Song, Huai-Dong; Chen, Saijuan; Xu, Xuenian; Xu, Bing; Ju, Zhuan; Cheng, Yu; Brindley, Paul J.; McManus, Donald P.; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Lu, Gang; Ren, Shuangxi; Wang, Yuezhu; Gu, Wenyi; Kang, Hui; Chen, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyun; Chen, Shuting; Wang, Lijun; Yan, Jie; Wang, Biyun; Lv, Xinyan; Jin, Lei; Wang, Bofei; Pu, Shiyin; Zhang, Xianglin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Qiuping; Zhu, Genfeng; Wang, Jun; Yu, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanmin; Ning, Zemin; Beriman, Matthew; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Zhao, Guoping; Wang, Shengyue

    2013-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a parasitic flatworm that causes human schistosomiasis, a significant cause of morbidity in China and the Philippines. Here we present a draft genomic sequence for the worm, which is the first reported for any flatworm, indeed for the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The genome provides a global insight into the molecular architecture and host interaction of this complex metazoan pathogen, revealing that it can exploit host nutrients, neuroendocrine hormones and signaling pathways for growth, development and maturation. Having a complex nervous system and a well developed sensory system, S. japonicum can accept stimulation of the corresponding ligands as a physiological response to different environments, such as fresh water or the tissues of its intermediate and mammalian hosts. Numerous proteinases, including cercarial elastase, are implicated in mammalian skin penetration and haemoglobin degradation. The genomic information will serve as a valuable platform to facilitate development of new interventions for schistosomiasis control. PMID:19606140

  11. The Schistosoma japonicum genome reveals features of host-parasite interplay.

    PubMed

    2009-07-16

    Schistosoma japonicum is a parasitic flatworm that causes human schistosomiasis, which is a significant cause of morbidity in China and the Philippines. Here we present a draft genomic sequence for the worm. The genome provides a global insight into the molecular architecture and host interaction of this complex metazoan pathogen, revealing that it can exploit host nutrients, neuroendocrine hormones and signalling pathways for growth, development and maturation. Having a complex nervous system and a well-developed sensory system, S. japonicum can accept stimulation of the corresponding ligands as a physiological response to different environments, such as fresh water or the tissues of its intermediate and mammalian hosts. Numerous proteases, including cercarial elastase, are implicated in mammalian skin penetration and haemoglobin degradation. The genomic information will serve as a valuable platform to facilitate development of new interventions for schistosomiasis control. PMID:19606140

  12. Antischistosomal activity of N,N'-arylurea analogs against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Houzong; Liu, Fengyou; Chen, Jinglei; Li, Yan; Cui, Jinhao; Qiao, Chunhua

    2016-03-01

    Although the antischistosomal activities of N,N'-arylurea analogs were reported, systematic structure-activity relationships have not been conducted. In this Letter, we reported the design, synthesis and evaluation of 45 N,N'-arylurea analogs. Among these prepared compounds, 13 compounds were urea linker modified and 32 were N,N'-arylurea derivatives. The activity evaluation revealed 12 analogs exhibited IC50 values lower than 22.6μM, and 7 of them had IC50 less than 10μM against the juvenile Schistosoma japonicum in vitro. Their worm killing potency was even higher against adult worm. Unfortunately, low to moderate worm burden reduction of 0-33.4% was recorded after administration of a single oral dose of 200mg/kg or 400mg/kg to mice harboring S. japonicum.

  13. Schistosoma japonicum: an ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y E; Jiang, C F; Han, J J; Li, Y L; Ruppel, A

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease. PMID:2113005

  14. Schistosoma japonicum: An ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y.E.; Jiang, C.F.; Han, J.J.; Li, Y.L.; Ruppel, A. )

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease.

  15. Schistosoma japonicum: an ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y E; Jiang, C F; Han, J J; Li, Y L; Ruppel, A

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease.

  16. Field testing of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in cattle in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fuhui; Zhang, Yaobi; Lin, Jiaojiao; Zuo, Xin; Shen, Wei; Cai, Yiumin; Ye, Ping; Bickle, Quentin D; Taylor, Martin G

    2002-11-01

    Vaccines are needed to reduce the zoonotic reservoir of Schistosoma japonicum infection in bovines in China. We have developed two experimental DNA vaccines and have already shown these to be capable of inducing partial protection in water buffalo naturally exposed to the risk of S. japonicum infection in the field. We now report a similar field trial in cattle, the other major bovine reservoir host species in China. Groups of cattle were vaccinated with the VRSj28 vaccine or the VRSj23 vaccine, or, to test whether protection could be enhanced by combination vaccination, with both these DNA vaccines together. After vaccination, the cattle were exposed to natural infection in the field for a period of 54 days. Worm and egg counts carried out at the end of the experiment showed that each of the vaccine groups showed partial resistance, and that combined vaccination was not more effective than vaccination with the individual plasmids.

  17. Effects of Microtus fortis lymphocytes on Schistosoma japonicum in a bone marrow transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Xu, Yuxin; Lu, Weiyuan; Quan, Hong; Shen, Yujuan; Yuan, Zhongying; Zhang, Jing; Zang, Wei; He, Yongkang; Cao, Jianping

    2014-07-01

    Microtus fortis is a non-permissive host for Schistosoma japonicum. While M. fortis lymphocytes are known to provide natural resistance against S. japonicum, the specific mechanism remains unclear. A bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model was established using immunodeficient mice, either nude (experiment 1) or V(D)J recombination activation gene deficient mice (RAG-1(-/-)) (experiment 2) as recipients and M. fortis or C57BL/6 mice as donors. The growth and development of S. japonicum were evaluated in each group to assess the role of M. fortis lymphocytes in the response to infection. Lymphocyte ratios and S. japonicum-specific antibody production in transplanted groups increased significantly compared to those in non-transplanted group. Spleen indices and density of splenic lymphocytes in transplanted RAG-1(-/-) mice were higher than those in non-transplanted RAG-1(-/-) mice. No difference in the worm burden was observed among group A (transplants derived from M. fortis), B (transplants derived from C57BL/6 mouse) and C (non-transplanted mice), although worms in group A were shorter than those in other groups, except non-transplanted RAG-1(-/-) mice. Reproductive systems of worms in mice (nude or RAG-1(-/-)) transplanted from M. fortis were not as mature as those in mice (nude or RAG-1(-/-)) transplanted from C57BL/6 mouse and non-transplanted nude mice, but they were more mature than worms in non-transplanted RAG-1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the transplantation model using nude and RAG-1(-/-) mice was successfully established. The M. fortis lymphocytes did not appear to affect the S. japonicum worm burden, but they led to schistosome shortening and a significant reduction in parasite spawning. Thus, M. fortis cellular and humoral immunity provides a defense against schistosomes by negatively impacting the parasite growth and reproductive development.

  18. Studies on Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines*

    PubMed Central

    Pesigan, T. P.; Farooq, M.; Hairston, N. G.; Jauregui, J. J.; Garcia, E. G.; Santos, A. T.; Santos, B. C.; Besa, A. A.

    1958-01-01

    Among the measures used in attempts to control the snail host of S. japonicum in Leyte Province, Philippines, where the terrain is unsuited to the application of molluscicides, have been removal of vegetation in and around infested streams, drainage of water-logged areas, filling low-lying areas with earth or flooding them, and digging fishponds in sluggish streams. Each of these measures is described in detail. Experiments carried out in rice-fields, which harbour great numbers of snails, have shown that improvements in rice-growing methods will not only markedly reduce the snail population but also double the rice yield. A campaign to promote the use of pit latrines encountered the serious difficulty that such latrines were not acceptable to the people. However, there is evidence that use of pit latrines does bring about a reduction in snail infection rates. No single control measure is recommended for all snail habitats, the choice of method depending on local circumstances; in many areas a combination of methods proved advantageous. It is felt that mass treatment of infected persons would not be fully effective until transmission is more thoroughly under control. PMID:13585073

  19. Schistosoma japonicum-like infection in Phichit province, northern Thailand: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bunnag, T; Impand, P; Sornmani, S

    1986-06-01

    A case of human schistosomiasis from Phichit Province is presented. Schistosome eggs were found in the ileo-caecal mass of a 44-year old woman, native of Sak-Lek, Muang District. Histologic pictures revealed an early acute granulomatous lesion which consisted of predominantly eosinophils without multinucleated giant cells and fibrotic change suggesting a recent infection. On the basis of the shape and microscopic appearance of the eggs, they are smaller than those described previously for Schistosoma japonicum, probably those of S. mekongi, a related species. This is the third histologic-confirmed case of schistosomiasis in this locality. Addendum: At the time of the manuscript preparation, another case of schistosomiasis was diagnosed. A 55-year old man who lives entirely in the very close adjacent village to the present case was admitted to the Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok with chronic hepatosplenomegaly in January 1986. Amyloidosis was suspected and rectal biopsy revealed schistosome eggs, some contained miracidia with varying degrees of degeneration, some were empty and/or fragmented shells and were surrounded with fibrotic changes and chronic cellular infiltration (Fig. 5). They were identical to those of Schistosoma japonicum. Several fecal examinations, miracidium hatching and COPT yielded negative results. This finding showed significantly that all schistosomiasis cases reported from this locality, except the second one, were in the old age group of 40 and above. Further epidemiologic investigation is in progress to delineate this locality as a potential endemic area for this infection.

  20. Geographical distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infection in The Philippines: tools to support disease control and further elimination.

    PubMed

    Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J; Salamat, Maria Sonia; Leonardo, Lydia; Gray, Darren J; Carabin, Hélène; Halton, Kate; McManus, Donald P; Williams, Gail M; Rivera, Pilarita; Saniel, Ofelia; Hernandez, Leda; Yakob, Laith; McGarvey, Stephen; Clements, Archie

    2014-11-01

    Schistosoma japonicum infection is believed to be endemic in 28 of the 80 provinces of The Philippines and the most recent data on schistosomiasis prevalence have shown considerable variability between provinces. In order to increase the efficient allocation of parasitic disease control resources in the country, we aimed to describe the small-scale spatial variation in S. japonicum prevalence across The Philippines, quantify the role of the physical environment in driving the spatial variation of S. japonicum, and develop a predictive risk map of S. japonicum infection. Data on S. japonicum infection from 35,754 individuals across the country were geo-located at the barangay level and included in the analysis. The analysis was then stratified geographically for the regions of Luzon, the Visayas and Mindanao. Zero-inflated binomial Bayesian geostatistical models of S. japonicum prevalence were developed and diagnostic uncertainty was incorporated. Results of the analysis show that in the three regions, males and individuals aged ⩾20years had significantly higher prevalence of S. japonicum compared with females and children <5years. The role of the environmental variables differed between regions of The Philippines. Schistosoma japonicum infection was widespread in the Visayas whereas it was much more focal in Luzon and Mindanao. This analysis revealed significant spatial variation in the prevalence of S. japonicum infection in The Philippines. This suggests that a spatially targeted approach to schistosomiasis interventions, including mass drug administration, is warranted. When financially possible, additional schistosomiasis surveys should be prioritised for areas identified to be at high risk but which were under-represented in our dataset.

  1. Geographical distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infection in The Philippines: tools to support disease control and further elimination

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ricardo J Soares; Salamat, Maria Sonia; Leonardo, Lydia; Gray, Darren J; Carabin, Hélène; Halton, Kate; McManus, Donald P; Williams, Gail M; Rivera, Pilarita; Saniel, Ofelia; Hernandez, Leda; Yakob, Laith; McGarvey, Stephen; Clements, Archie

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum infection is believed to be endemic in 28 of the 80 provinces of The Philippines and the most recent data on schistosomiasis prevalence have shown considerable variability between provinces. In order to increase the efficient allocation of parasitic disease control resources in the country, we aimed to describe the small-scale spatial variation in S. japonicum prevalence across The Philippines, quantify the role of the physical environment in driving the spatial variation of S. japonicum, and develop a predictive risk map of S. japonicum infection. Data on S. japonicum infection from 35,754 individuals across the country were geolocated at the barangay level and included in the analysis. The analysis was then stratified geographically for the regions of Luzon, the Visayas and Mindanao. Zero-inflated binomial Bayesian geostatistical models of S. japonicum prevalence were developed and diagnostic uncertainty was incorporated. Results of the analysis show that in the three regions, males and individuals aged ≥ 20 years had significantly higher prevalence of S. japonicum compared with females and children < 5 years. The role of the environmental variables differed between regions of The Philippines. Schistosoma japonicum infection was widespread in the Visayas whereas it was much more focal in Luzon and Mindanao. This analysis revealed significant spatial variation in the prevalence of S. japonicum infection in The Philippines. This suggests that a spatially targeted approach to schistosomiasis interventions, including mass drug administration, is warranted. When financially possible, additional schistosomiasis surveys should be prioritized for areas identified to be at high risk but which were under-represented in our dataset. PMID:25128879

  2. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum and Fasciola gigantica in bovines from Northern Samar, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Catherine A; Acosta, Luz P; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Jiz, Mario; Olveda, Remigio M; Ross, Allen G; Gray, Darren J; Williams, Gail M; Harn, Donald; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P

    2015-02-01

    The cause of zoonotic schistosomiasis in the Philippines is Schistosoma japonicum, which infects up to 46 mammalian hosts, including humans and bovines. In China, water buffaloes have been identified as major reservoir hosts for schistosomiasis japonica, contributing up to 75% of human transmission. In the Philippines, water buffaloes (carabao; Bubalus bubalis carabanesis) have, historically, been considered unimportant reservoirs. We therefore revisited the possible role of bovines in schistosome transmission in the Philippines, using the recently described formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD) technique and a qPCR assay to examine fecal samples from 153 bovines (both carabao and cattle) from six barangays in Northern Samar. A high prevalence of S. japonicum was found using qPCR and FEA-SD in both cattle (87.50% and 77.08%, respectively) and carabao (80.00% and 55.24%, respectively). The average daily egg output for each bovine was calculated at 195,000. High prevalence and infection intensity of F. gigantica was also found in the bovines by qPCR and FEA-SD (95.33% and 96.00%, respectively). The identification of bovines as major reservoir hosts for S. japonicum transmission suggests that bovine treatment and/or vaccination, as one becomes available, should be included in any future control program that aims to reduce the disease burden due to schistosomiasis in the Philippines.

  3. Taurine drinking ameliorates hepatic granuloma and fibrosis in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan-Rong; Ni, Xian-Qiang; Huang, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2016-01-01

    In schistosomiasis, egg-induced hepatic granuloma formation is a cytokine-mediated, predominantly CD4+ Th2 immune response that can give rise to hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the main cause of increased morbidity and mortality in humans with schistosome infection. Taurine has various physiological functions and hepatoprotective properties as well as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. However, little is known about the role of taurine in schistosome egg-induced granuloma formation and fibrosis. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of taurine as preventative treatment for Schistosoma japonicum infection. Mice infected with S. japonicum cercariae were supplied with taurine drinking water (1% w/v) for 4 weeks starting at 4 weeks post-infection. Taurine supplementation significantly improved the liver pathologic findings, reduced the serum levels of aminotransferases and area of hepatic granuloma, and prevented fibrosis progression. In addition, taurine decreased the expression of the granulomatous and fibrogenic mediators transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1α and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker glucose-regulated protein 78. Thus, taurine can significantly attenuate S. japonicum egg-induced hepatic granuloma and fibrosis, which may depend in part on the downregulation of some relevant cytokine/chemokines and reducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. PMID:27054062

  4. Immunogenicity and immunolocalization of the 22.6 kDa antigen of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Auliff, A; Jones, M K; Yi, X; McManus, D P

    2000-08-01

    The 22.6 kDa tegumental-associated antigens of Schistosoma mansoni (Sm22.6) and Schistosoma japonicum (Sj22.6) are of recognized interest in schistosomiasis vaccine development, although no direct vaccination/challenge experiments using either Sm22.6 or Sj22.6 had been previously described. We report that Escherichia coli-expressed reSj22.6 failed to protect mice or water buffaloes against subsequent challenge with S. japonicum cercariae. This was despite the fact that specific IgG (buffaloes) and IgG and IgE (CBA mice) antibodies were generated against the 22.6 kDa molecule, observations consistent with some of our earlier findings. We could find no evidence from immunolocalization studies that Sj22.6 is expressed or exposed on the surface of the adult parasite since it appears to be restricted to the apical cytoplasm of the tegument and is not associated with the apical or basal membrane or any membrane-bound structures in the apical cytoplasm. Nevertheless, Sj22.6 must be released to the immune system during the course of infection because specific anti-Sj22.6 IgG antibodies were present in the sera of nonvaccinated but challenged mice. We conclude that it may be necessary to produce reSj22.6 in a more relevant expression system, such as baculovirus, to further establish its vaccine potential and that detailed immunochemical and immunolocalization studies of early developmental stages may be necessary to determine how Sj22.6 is released or shed in S. japonicum infections.

  5. Evaluation of recombinant fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase ELISA test for the diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shih-Yi; Lee, Kin-Mu; Tsaihong, John Chin; Cheng, Po-Ching; Fan, Ping-Chin

    2008-12-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA) is an ubiquitous enzyme essential for glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and the Calvin cycle. It has been demonstrated to induce immune responses and to be useful in the immunodiagnosis of malaria. In this study, FBPA was cloned from the adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum and tested as an antigen for the diagnosis of S. japonicum infection in water buffaloes. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed on the sera from 32 infected water buffaloes and 20 negative controls using the recombinant FBPA protein or soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) as an antigen. The OD cut-off values were determined to be 0.57 with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity for the FBPA ELISA and 1.13 with 93.8% specificity and 95.0% sensitivity for the SWAP ELISA. These findings indicate that the recombinant FBPA of S. japonicum should be an useful diagnostic tool for the detection of antibodies against S. japonicum.

  6. Repeated Schistosoma japonicum Infection Following Treatment in Two Cohorts: Evidence for Host Susceptibility to Helminthiasis?

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Elizabeth J.; Hubbard, Alan; Wang, Shuo; Spear, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of multinational efforts to reduce helminthiasis, we evaluated whether there exist high-risk subpopulations for helminth infection. Such individuals are not only at risk of morbidity, but may be important parasite reservoirs and appropriate targets for disease control interventions. Methods/Principal Findings We followed two longitudinal cohorts in Sichuan, China to determine whether there exist persistent human reservoirs for the water-borne helminth, Schistosoma japonicum, in areas where treatment is ongoing. Participants were tested for S. japonicum infection at enrollment and two follow-up points. All infections were promptly treated with praziquantel. We estimated the ratio of the observed to expected proportion of the population with two consecutive infections at follow-up. The expected proportion was estimated using a prevalence-based model and, as highly exposed individuals may be most likely to be repeatedly infected, a second model that accounted for exposure using a data adaptive, machine learning algorithm. Using the prevalence-based model, there were 1.5 and 5.8 times more individuals with two consecutive infections than expected in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.001 in both cohorts). When we accounted for exposure, the ratio was 1.3 (p = 0.013) and 2.1 (p<0.001) in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusions/Significance We found clustering of infections within a limited number of hosts that was not fully explained by host exposure. This suggests some hosts may be particularly susceptible to S. japonicum infection, or that uncured infections persist despite treatment. We propose an explanatory model that suggests that as cercarial exposure declines, so too does the size of the vulnerable subpopulation. In low-prevalence settings, interventions targeting individuals with a history of S. japonicum infection may efficiently advance disease control efforts. PMID:23505589

  7. Effect of ozonide OZ418 against Schistosoma japonicum harbored in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jian; Wang, Xiaofang; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L; Xiao, Shu-hua

    2014-09-01

    The in vitro and in vivo efficacies of ozonide carboxylic acid OZ418 against Schistosoma japonicum were investigated. For in vitro experiments, juvenile (14-day-old) and adult schistosomes were collected from mice infected with 80-100 S. japonicum cercariae for 14 and 35 days post-infection and the worms were maintained in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 supplemented by 10% calf serum. Against 35-day-old adult S. japonicum, OZ418 resulted in weakened worm motor activity, injury to the worm body, emergence of vacuoles along the worm surface, and death. A similar outcome was seen in 14-day-old juvenile S. japonicum exposed to OZ418. Ineffective concentrations (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL) of OZ418 also interacted with hemin to significantly increase the killing effect against adult schistosomes. The LC50 value of OZ418 against juvenile (14-day-old) and adult schistosomes were identical--16.2 μg/mL, whereas the corresponding LC95 values were 30.7 and 22.7 μg/mL, respectively. Treatment of adult and juvenile (14-day-old) S. japonicum-infected mice with single 200-400-mg/kg oral doses of OZ418 produced total worm burden reductions of 68.5-84.1 and 37.5-50.9%, respectively. Further study showed that in mice infected with various stages of schistosomes and treated with a single oral OZ418 400 mg/kg, poor efficacy was seen in the 3-h-old juvenile worm group, while 14-day-old and 21-day-old juvenile worm groups exhibited less efficacy with total worm burden reductions of 42.6-52.4%. On the other hand, similar and higher total worm burden reductions (64.2-76.0%) were seen in the 7-day-old juvenile worm group and 28-day-old as well as 35-day-old adult worm groups. Furthermore, the mean worm burden reductions of the 7-day-old juvenile worm group and 35-day-old adult worm group were statistically significantly higher than that of the 14-day-old or 21-day-old juvenile worm group (P < 0.01 or <0.05). These data suggest that OZ418 has promising efficacy against 7-day

  8. Multi-Host Transmission Dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in Samar Province, the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Steven; Carabin, Hélène; Bélisle, Patrick; Joseph, Lawrence; Tallo, Veronica; Balolong, Ernesto; Willingham, A. Lee; Fernandez, Tomas J; Gonzales, Ryan O'Neal; Olveda, Remigio; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2008-01-01

    Background Among the 6.7 million people living in areas of the Philippines where infection with Schistosoma japonicum is considered endemic, even within small geographical areas levels of infection vary considerably. In general, the ecological drivers of this variability are not well described. Unlike other schistosomes, S. japonicum is known to infect several mammalian hosts. However, the relative contribution of different hosts to the transmission cycle is not well understood. Here, we characterize the transmission dynamics of S. japonicum using data from an extensive field study and a mathematical transmission model. Methods and Findings In this study, stool samples were obtained from 5,623 humans and 5,899 potential nonhuman mammalian hosts in 50 villages in the Province of Samar, the Philippines. These data, with variable numbers of samples per individual, were adjusted for known specificities and sensitivities of the measurement techniques before being used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical transmission model, under the assumption that the dynamic transmission processes of infection and recovery were in a steady state in each village. The model was structured to allow variable rates of transmission from different mammals (humans, dogs, cats, pigs, domesticated water buffalo, and rats) to snails and from snails to mammals. First, we held transmission parameters constant for all villages and found that no combination of mammalian population size and prevalence of infectivity could explain the observed variability in prevalence of infection between villages. We then allowed either the underlying rate of transmission (a) from snails to mammals or (b) from mammals to snails to vary by village. Our data provided substantially more support for model structure (a) than for model structure (b). Fitted values for the village-level transmission intensity from snails to mammals appeared to be strongly spatially correlated, which is consistent with results from

  9. Prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection among animals in fifty villages of Samar province, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, T J; Tarafder, M R; Balolong, E; Joseph, L; Willingham, A L; Bélisle, P; Webster, J P; Olveda, R M; McGarvey, S T; Carabin, H

    2007-01-01

    In the Philippines, there is a need to understand the contribution of different domestic and wild animals in transmitting Schistosoma japonicum infection to humans better. The current study describes variation in animal S. japonicum prevalence across 50 endemic villages of Samar Province, the Philippines. A total of 50 villages were selected, 25 with predominantly rain-fed farms and 25 with some irrigation system. At least 35 cats, dogs, pigs, and water buffaloes each were randomly selected and 30 rat traps were set in each village. Fecal samples were collected for up to three consecutive days for each species. The Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory method (DBL method) was used to determine S. japonicum infection status. A hierarchical logistic regression model with clustering by village and with adjustment for measurement error of the DBL method was used to estimate the prevalence of infection per village and species. Stool samples were collected from 23.4% (1189), 28.6% (1274), 36.3% (1899), and 49.4% (873) of the censused dogs, cats, pigs, and water buffaloes, respectively, and from 663 rats. The adjusted prevalence of S. japonicum infection varied greatly across villages ranging from 1.6% (95% Bayesian Credible Interval: 0.1%-10.2%) to 86.3% (65.9%-97.8%) for dogs, from 0.1% (0%-2.1%) to 21.7% (4.7%-51.2%) for cats, from 0.01% (0.0%%-1.0%) to 18.4% (7.1%-34.7%) for pigs, from less than 0.1% (0.0%-1.2%) to 72.5% (46.0%-97.4%) for water buffaloes, and from 0.7% (0.0%-9.0%) to 95.4% (77.2%-99.9%) for rats. This is the most comprehensive study of animal S. japonicum infection conducted to date. Our results show that, unlike what has been reported in China, very few water buffaloes were infected whereas rats and dogs show high prevalence proportions of infection. This, combined with significant village-to-village variation in prevalence of S. japonicum infection, suggest possible different transmission dynamics of the infection in the Province of Samar in the

  10. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection in Carabao from Samar Province, the Philippines: implications for transmission and control.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Catherine A; Acosta, Luz P; Gray, Darren J; Olveda, Remigo M; Jarilla, Blanca; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Ross, Allen G; McManus, Donald P

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is endemic in the Philippines, China and Indonesia, and infects more than 40 mammalian host species, all of which can act as reservoirs of infection. In China, water buffaloes have been shown to be major reservoirs of human infection. However, in the Philippines, carabao have not been considered important reservoir hosts for S. japonicum due to the low prevalence and infection intensities reported, the only exception being a qPCR-based study indicating 51% of carabao were S. japonicum-positive. However, the low prevalence found for the same animals when using conventional copro-parasitological techniques means that there is still confusion about the role of carabao in the transmission of schistosomiasis japonicum. To address this inconsistency, and to shed light on the potential role of carabao in the transmission of S. japonicum in the Philippines, we undertook a pilot survey, collecting fecal samples from animals in Western Samar Province and we used a combination of molecular and copro-parasitological techniques to determine the prevalence and intensity of S. japonicum. We found a high prevalence of S. japonicum in the carabao using a validated real-time PCR (qPCR) and a copro-parasitological tool, the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD) technique. A much lower prevalence of S. japonicum was recorded for the same fecal samples using conventional PCR, the Kato-Katz technique and miracidial hatching. These results suggest that, due to their low diagnostic sensitivity, traditional copro-parasitological techniques underestimate infection in carabao. The use of FEA-SD and qPCR provides a more accurate diagnosis. Based on these findings, the role of bovines in the transmission of S. japonicum appears to be more important in the Philippines than previously recognized, and this may have significant implications for the future control of schistosomiasis there, particularly as, in contrast with previous surveys, we found an unprecedented

  11. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection in water buffaloes in the Philippines assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Wei; Qin, Yuan-Fang; Chu, Kai; Meng, Rui; Liu, Yun; McGarvey, Stephen T; Olveda, Remigio; Acosta, Luz; Ji, Min-Jun; Fernandez, Tomas; Friedman, Jennifer F; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-04-01

    Difficulty in controlling human Schistosoma japonicum infection is partly attributed to the presence of non-human definitive hosts. Water buffaloes are a major reservoir for transmission of S. japonicum to humans in China. However, in the Philippines, reports based on microscopic examination of buffalo stool identified a low prevalence of S. japonicum, and mathematical models using these data concluded that water buffaloes are not a major reservoir for transmission of S. japonicum to humans. We collected stool from 81 buffaloes in Macanip, Leyte, the Philippines, and assayed for S. japonicum infection by the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique, the Kato-Katz technique, miracidia hatching, and a highly validated real-time polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence defined by each assay was 3.7%, 3.7%, 0%, and 51.5% respectively. Our results demonstrate that microscopic-based techniques dramatically underestimate the prevalence of S. japonicum infection in water buffaloes in the Philippines and warrant reexamination of the role of bovines in transmission of S. japonicum to humans in the Philippines.

  12. Delayed tail loss during the invasion of mouse skin by cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Fang, Zheng-Ming; Lei, Jia-Hui; Guan, Fei; Liu, Wen-Qi; Bartlett, Ann; Whitfield, Phil; Li, Yong-Long

    2012-02-01

    A traditional assumption is that schistosome cercariae lose their tails at the onset of penetration. It has, however, recently been demonstrated that, for Schistosoma mansoni, cercarial tails were not invariably being shed as penetration took place and a high proportion of tails entered human skin under experimental conditions. This phenomenon was termed delayed tail loss (DTL). In this paper, we report that DTL also happens with S. japonicum cercariae during penetration of mouse skin. It occurred at all cercarial densities tested, from as few as 10 cercariae/2·25 cm(2) of mouse skin up to 200 cercariae. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that there was a density-dependent increase in DTL as cercarial densities increased. No such density-dependent enhancement was shown for percentage attachment over the same cercarial density range.

  13. China's new strategy to block Schistosoma japonicum transmission: experiences and impact beyond schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-De; Guo, Jia-Gang; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Hong-Gen; Wang, Tian-Ping; Zhu, Shao-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Hai; Steinmann, Peter; Yang, Guo-Jing; Wang, Shi-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Dao; Wang, Li-Ying; Hao, Yang; Bergquist, Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2009-12-01

    Despite sustained efforts for its control made over the past 50+ years, the re-emergence of schistosomiasis in China was noted around the turn of the new millennium. Consequently, a new integrated strategy was proposed to stop the contamination of schistosome eggs to the environment, which emphasizes health education, access to clean water and adequate sanitation, mechanization of agriculture and fencing of water buffaloes, along with chemotherapy. Validation of this integrated control strategy in four pilot counties in the provinces of Anhui, Hubei, Hunan and Jiangxi revealed significant reductions in the rate of Schistosoma japonicum infection in humans and intermediate host snails. Importantly, this strategy showed an impact on diseases beyond schistosomiasis, signified by concomitant reductions in the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections. In view of China's new integrated strategy for transmission control of schistosomiasis showing an ancillary benefit on other helminthic diseases, we encourage others to investigate the scope and limits of integrated control of neglected tropical diseases.

  14. Factors influencing the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum in the mountains of Sichuan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Spear, Robert C; Seto, Edmund; Liang, Song; Birkner, Merrill; Hubbard, Alan; Qiu, Dongchuan; Yang, Changhong; Zhong, Bo; Xu, Fashen; Gu, Xueguang; Davis, George M

    2004-01-01

    Twenty villages in the Anning River Valley of southwestern Sichuan China were surveyed for Schistosoma japonicum infections in humans and domestic animals. Also surveyed were human water contact patterns, snail populations, cercarial risk in irrigation systems, and agricultural land use. Few animals were infected, while village prevalence of infection in humans ranged from 3% to 68% and average village eggs per gram of stool ranged from 0 to 110. Except for occupation and education, individual characteristics were not strong determinants of infection intensity within a village. Differences in human infection intensity between these villages are strongly associated with crop type, with low-intensity villages principally growing rice, in contrast to villages devoting more land to vegetables and tobacco. Cercarial risk in village irrigation systems is associated with snail density and human infection intensity through the use of manure-based fertilizer. Some of the agricultural and environmental factors associated with infection risk can be quantified using remote sensing technology.

  15. Laboratory and field evaluation of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in sheep and water buffalo in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, F; Zhang, Y; Ye, P; Lin, J; Cai, Y; Shen, W; Bickle, Q D; Taylor, M G

    2001-11-12

    Vaccines are needed to control zoonotic Schistosoma japonicum infection and several vaccine candidates have now been identified. Two of these (Sj28GST and Sj23) have shown particular promise in sheep when injected with Freund's adjuvants. The objective of the present work was to find a vaccine formulation which may have potential for widespread use in the field. DNA vaccine formulations of these antigens were produced and tested first in sheep under laboratory conditions and then in both the laboratory and the field in water buffalo. In both host species partial protection as evidenced by a reduction in parasite counts in vaccinated compared with control animals was induced by both vaccines, and in water buffalo the vaccines were shown to be partially protective in the field as well as in the laboratory. These results suggest that the two DNA vaccines tested here may have potential for large-scale field use.

  16. Local Antiglycan Antibody Responses to Skin Stage and Migratory Schistosomula of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Kies, Christiaan L; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Meeusen, Els N T; Hokke, Cornelis H; van Diepen, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease affecting over 230 million people worldwide. Although effective drug treatment is available, reinfections are common, and development of immunity is slow. Most antibodies raised during schistosome infection are directed against glycans, some of which are thought to be protective. Developing schistosomula are considered most vulnerable to immune attack, and better understanding of local antibody responses raised against glycans expressed by this life stage might reveal possible glycan vaccine candidates for future vaccine research. We used antibody-secreting cell (ASC) probes to characterize local antiglycan antibody responses against migrating Schistosoma japonicum schistosomula in different tissues of rats. Analysis by shotgun Schistosoma glycan microarray resulted in the identification of antiglycan antibody response patterns that reflected the migratory pathway of schistosomula. Antibodies raised by skin lymph node (LN) ASC probes mainly targeted N-glycans with terminal mannose residues, Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc) and Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX). Also, responses to antigenic and schistosome-specific glycosphingolipid (GSL) glycans containing highly fucosylated GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcβ1)n stretches that are believed to be present at the parasite's surface constitutively upon transformation were found. Antibody targets recognized by lung LN ASC probes were mainly N-glycans presenting GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN) and GlcNAc motifs. Surprisingly, antibodies against highly antigenic multifucosylated motifs of GSL glycans were not observed in lung LN ASC probes, indicating that these antigens are not expressed in lung stage schistosomula or are not appropriately exposed to induce immune responses locally. The local antiglycan responses observed in this study highlight the stage- and tissue-specific expression of antigenic parasite glycans and provide insights into glycan targets possibly involved in resistance to S. japonicum infection

  17. Transcriptome Bioinformatical Analysis of Vertebrate Stages of Schistosoma japonicum Reveals Alternative Splicing Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinye; Xu, Xindong; Lu, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuanbin; Pan, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a molecular process that contributes greatly to the diversification of proteome and to gene functions. Understanding the mechanisms of stage-specific alternative splicing can provide a better understanding of the development of eukaryotes and the functions of different genes. Schistosoma japonicum is an infectious blood-dwelling trematode with a complex lifecycle that causes the tropical disease schistosomiasis. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptome of Schistosoma japonicum to discover alternative splicing events in this parasite, by applying RNA-seq to cDNA library of adults and schistosomula. Results were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. We found 11,623 alternative splicing events among 7,099 protein encoding genes and average proportion of alternative splicing events per gene was 42.14%. We showed that exon skip is the most common type of alternative splicing events as found in high eukaryotes, whereas intron retention is the least common alternative splicing type. According to intron boundary analysis, the parasite possesses same intron boundaries as other organisms, namely the classic “GT-AG” rule. And in alternative spliced introns or exons, this rule is less strict. And we have attempted to detect alternative splicing events in genes encoding proteins with signal peptides and transmembrane helices, suggesting that alternative splicing could change subcellular locations of specific gene products. Our results indicate that alternative splicing is prevalent in this parasitic worm, and that the worm is close to its hosts. The revealed secretome involved in alternative splicing implies new perspective into understanding interaction between the parasite and its host. PMID:26407301

  18. Local Antiglycan Antibody Responses to Skin Stage and Migratory Schistosomula of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Cornelis H.; Kies, Christiaan L.; McWilliam, Hamish E. G.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease affecting over 230 million people worldwide. Although effective drug treatment is available, reinfections are common, and development of immunity is slow. Most antibodies raised during schistosome infection are directed against glycans, some of which are thought to be protective. Developing schistosomula are considered most vulnerable to immune attack, and better understanding of local antibody responses raised against glycans expressed by this life stage might reveal possible glycan vaccine candidates for future vaccine research. We used antibody-secreting cell (ASC) probes to characterize local antiglycan antibody responses against migrating Schistosoma japonicum schistosomula in different tissues of rats. Analysis by shotgun Schistosoma glycan microarray resulted in the identification of antiglycan antibody response patterns that reflected the migratory pathway of schistosomula. Antibodies raised by skin lymph node (LN) ASC probes mainly targeted N-glycans with terminal mannose residues, Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc) and Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX). Also, responses to antigenic and schistosome-specific glycosphingolipid (GSL) glycans containing highly fucosylated GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcβ1)n stretches that are believed to be present at the parasite's surface constitutively upon transformation were found. Antibody targets recognized by lung LN ASC probes were mainly N-glycans presenting GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN) and GlcNAc motifs. Surprisingly, antibodies against highly antigenic multifucosylated motifs of GSL glycans were not observed in lung LN ASC probes, indicating that these antigens are not expressed in lung stage schistosomula or are not appropriately exposed to induce immune responses locally. The local antiglycan responses observed in this study highlight the stage- and tissue-specific expression of antigenic parasite glycans and provide insights into glycan targets possibly involved in resistance to S. japonicum infection

  19. Quantitative aspects of the epidemiology of Schistosoma japonicum infection in a rural community of Luzon, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    In a rural community on the island of Luzon, Philippines, the overall prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection, based on stool examination performed by both a new modified quantitative thick smear and the merthiolate-iodine-formaldehyde concentration (MIFC) technique, was 49.5% in a total study population of 755 persons. Peak prevalence was observed in the 15-19-year age group, then decreased gradually. Although the total egg output was highest in the 15-19-year age group, individuals with high egg counts were found among all age groups. The prevalence and intensity of infection were higher in men than in women except in the 45-54-year age group. A small proportion (4.1%) of the study population (age range 6-53 years) excreted 50% of the eggs counted in this study. Liver and spleen enlargement were significantly associated with S. japonicum infection in all age groups. The frequency of a past history of dysentery and marked liver enlargement (≥ 5 cm) increased in parallel with increasing egg counts. Clustering of individuals with high egg counts in households was observed, but there was no correlation between geographical proximity of residence to potential transmission sites and household infection rates. An effective control strategy would be based on treatment of all infected persons in this endemic area rather than only a selected age group. PMID:6969135

  20. Inhibitory effects and analysis of RNA interference on thioredoxin glutathione reductase expression in Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanhui; Fu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Min; Han, Hongxiao; Lu, Ke; Yang, Jianmei; Li, Xiangrui; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2014-08-01

    Schistosomes infect around 280 million people worldwide. The worms survive in the veins of the final host, where thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) activity helps the parasites to survive in the aerobic environment. In the present study, we synthesized 4 small interfering RNAs (siRNA S1, S2, S3, and S4) targeting the Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) TGR gene and used them to knockdown the TGR gene. The knockdown effects of the siRNAs on SjTGR, and the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity of SjTGR, were evaluated in vitro. The results of transfection with the siRNAs via the soaking method in vitro were confirmed by flow cytometry. S2 siRNA at a final concentration of 200 nM partially inhibited the expression of SjTGR at both the transcript and protein levels in vitro. TrxR-activity was lower in worms in the S2 siRNA-treated group compared with the control groups. Further analysis revealed that purified recombinant SjTGR could remove oxygen free radicals but not H(2)O(2) directly, which may explain the incomplete effects of RNA interference on SjTGR. The results of this study indicate that SjTGR may play an important role in the clearance of oxygen free radicals and protection of S. japonicum parasites against oxidative damage.

  1. Tim-3 induces Th2-biased immunity and alternative macrophage activation during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK1.1(+) cells, and CD11b(+) cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8(+) T cells or CD11b(+) cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b(+) cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection.

  2. Screening Diagnostic Candidates for Schistosomiasis from Tegument Proteins of Adult Schistosoma japonicum Using an Immunoproteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Fu, Zhiqiang; Li, Changjian; Han, Yanhui; Cao, Xiaodan; Han, Hongxiao; Liu, Yantao; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the world’s most prevalent zoonotic diseases and a serious worldwide public health problem. Since the tegument (TG) of Schistosoma japonicum is in direct contact with the host and induces a host immune response against infection, the identification of immune response target molecules in the schistosome TG is crucial for screening diagnostic antigens for this disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, an immunoproteomics approach used TG proteins as screening antigens to identify potential diagnostic molecules of S. japonicum. Ten spots corresponding to six proteins were identified that immunoreacted with sera from S. japonicum-infected rabbits but not sera from uninfected rabbits and their specific IgG antibody levels declined quickly after praziquantel treatment. Recombinant phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) and UV excision repair protein RAD23 homolog B (RAD23) proteins were expressed and their diagnostic potential for schistosomiasis was evaluated and compared with schistosome soluble egg antigen (SEA) using ELISA. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity and low crossreactivity when rSjPGM-ELISA and rSjRAD23-ELISA were used to detect water buffalo schistosomiasis. Moreover, antibodies to rSjPGM and rSjRAD23 might be short-lived since they declined quickly after chemotherapy. Conclusion/Significance Therefore, the two schistosome TG proteins SjPGM and SjRAD23 were identified as potential diagnostic markers for the disease. The two recombinant proteins might have the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of drug treatments and for distinguishing between current and past infection. PMID:25706299

  3. Origin of a novel protein-coding gene family with similar signal sequence in Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evolution of novel protein-coding genes is the bedrock of adaptive evolution. Recently, we identified six protein-coding genes with similar signal sequence from Schistosoma japonicum egg stage mRNA using signal sequence trap (SST). To find the mechanism underlying the origination of these genes with similar core promoter regions and signal sequence, we adopted an integrated approach utilizing whole genome, transcriptome and proteome database BLAST queries, other bioinformatics tools, and molecular analyses. Results Our data, in combination with database analyses showed evidences of expression of these genes both at the mRNA and protein levels exclusively in all developmental stages of S. japonicum. The signal sequence motif was identified in 27 distinct S. japonicum UniGene entries with multiple mRNA transcripts, and in 34 genome contigs distributed within 18 scaffolds with evidence of genome-wide dispersion. No homolog of these genes or similar domain was found in deposited data from any other organism. We observed preponderance of flanking repetitive elements (REs), albeit partial copies, especially of the RTE-like and Perere class at either side of the duplication source locus. The role of REs as major mediators of DNA-level recombination leading to dispersive duplication is discussed with evidence from our analyses. We also identified a stepwise pathway towards functional selection in evolving genes by alternative splicing. Equally, the possible transcription models of some protein-coding representatives of the duplicons are presented with evidence of expression in vitro. Conclusion Our findings contribute to the accumulating evidence of the role of REs in the generation of evolutionary novelties in organisms’ genomes. PMID:22716200

  4. Cloning, expression and characterization of protein disulfide isomerase of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Wu, Miaoli; Wang, Xinzhuo; Guo, Xiaoyong; Li, Changjian; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2014-11-01

    The excretory/secretory (ES) proteins of schistosomes play important roles in modulating host immune systems and are regarded as potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an essential enzyme that is involved in disulfide bond formation and rearrangement. In the present study, SjPDI, a 52.8 kDa protein previously identified in a proteomics analysis as one of the ES proteins of Schistosoma japonicum, was cloned and characterized. Western blot analysis showed that recombinant SjPDI (rSjPDI) was recognized by serum from rabbits vaccinated with schistosome worm antigen. Worm protein extracts and ES protein extracts from S. japonicum could react with anti-rSjPDI mouse serum. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that SjPDI was expressed at all developmental stages tested, and a high expression level was detected in 42-day-old male worms. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that SjPDI was mainly distributed on the tegument and parenchyma of S. japonicum worms. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that rSjPDI could induce a high level of rSjPDI-specific IgG antibodies. The biological activity of purified rSjPDI was confirmed by isomerization and antioxidative activity assays. The 35.32%, 26.19% reduction in the worm burden and 33.17%, 31.7% lower liver egg count were obtained in mice vaccinated with rSjPDI compared with the blank control group in two independent trials. Our preliminary results suggest that rSjPDI plays an important role in the development of the schistosome and is a potential vaccine candidate for schistosomiasis.

  5. Characterization and expression of a novel cystatin gene from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    He, Baohua; Cai, Guobin; Ni, Yonghui; Li, Ying; Zong, Hongying; He, Li

    2011-08-01

    Cystatins are a family of cysteine protease inhibitors that play a crucial role in the immune evasion from their host and in the adaptation to host defence. Here, we isolated a full-length cDNA sequence inferred to encode a novel cystatin gene from a blood fluke, Schistosoma japonicum. The cDNA, designated SjCystatin, comprised an open reading frame (ORF) of 306 bp, and encoded 101 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 11.3 kDa. This predicted protein shared a significant degree of sequence identity with the type I cystatin (stefin) of Schistosoma mansoni and Homo sapiens. These proteins exhibited a typical cystatin topology, including the absence of disulfide bonds and three conserved catalytic motifs, Gly at the N-terminus (Gly(6)), Gln-X-Val-X-Gly motif (Q(49)VVAG(53)) and an LP pair at the C-terminus (L(76)P(77)). The SjCystatin gene spanned 376 bp and contained three exons. The positions of two introns were conserved between the cystatin genes of trematodes and their vertebrate hosts. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed the transcription of SjCystatin in the egg, schistosomula and adult stages of S. japonicum. The encoding ORF region was cloned into pET-28a (+) prokaryotic expression vector. After purification, the recombinant protein SjCystatin (recSjCystatin), expressed in Escherichia coli, was used to immunize animals and produce its specific polyclonal antibody. Western blot analysis revealed that the native SjCystatin was expressed in the egg and adult stages. The enzyme activity assay of the recSjCystatin showed that it inhibited the proteolytic activity of papain. SjCystatin protein was mainly localized on the miracidium within eggs. Immunohistochemistry revealed that SjCystatin mainly localized in the epithelial cells lining the gut as well as the tegument on the surface of adult worms. The conserved genomic DNA structure among cystatin homologues of trematode and their vertebrate host emphasized the characteristics

  6. Characterization and expression of a novel cystatin gene from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    He, Baohua; Cai, Guobin; Ni, Yonghui; Li, Ying; Zong, Hongying; He, Li

    2011-08-01

    Cystatins are a family of cysteine protease inhibitors that play a crucial role in the immune evasion from their host and in the adaptation to host defence. Here, we isolated a full-length cDNA sequence inferred to encode a novel cystatin gene from a blood fluke, Schistosoma japonicum. The cDNA, designated SjCystatin, comprised an open reading frame (ORF) of 306 bp, and encoded 101 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 11.3 kDa. This predicted protein shared a significant degree of sequence identity with the type I cystatin (stefin) of Schistosoma mansoni and Homo sapiens. These proteins exhibited a typical cystatin topology, including the absence of disulfide bonds and three conserved catalytic motifs, Gly at the N-terminus (Gly(6)), Gln-X-Val-X-Gly motif (Q(49)VVAG(53)) and an LP pair at the C-terminus (L(76)P(77)). The SjCystatin gene spanned 376 bp and contained three exons. The positions of two introns were conserved between the cystatin genes of trematodes and their vertebrate hosts. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed the transcription of SjCystatin in the egg, schistosomula and adult stages of S. japonicum. The encoding ORF region was cloned into pET-28a (+) prokaryotic expression vector. After purification, the recombinant protein SjCystatin (recSjCystatin), expressed in Escherichia coli, was used to immunize animals and produce its specific polyclonal antibody. Western blot analysis revealed that the native SjCystatin was expressed in the egg and adult stages. The enzyme activity assay of the recSjCystatin showed that it inhibited the proteolytic activity of papain. SjCystatin protein was mainly localized on the miracidium within eggs. Immunohistochemistry revealed that SjCystatin mainly localized in the epithelial cells lining the gut as well as the tegument on the surface of adult worms. The conserved genomic DNA structure among cystatin homologues of trematode and their vertebrate host emphasized the characteristics

  7. Field evaluation of a PCR test for Schistosoma japonicum egg detection in low-prevalence regions of China.

    PubMed

    Fung, Mai S; Xiao, Ning; Wang, Shuo; Carlton, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    Sensitive Schistosoma japonicum detection methods are needed to progress from schistosomiasis control to elimination. The sensitivity of the Kato-Katz thick smear and miracidium hatching tests decrease with infection intensity and serological tests cannot always identify current infections. We evaluated a fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect S. japonicum infection in 106 humans and 8 bovines in China. PCR was highly sensitive, detecting S. japonicum DNA at 0.5 eggs/g of stool. Comparing PCR examination of a single stool sample to the miracidium hatching test using three consecutive stool samples, more humans were hatching test positive (20%) than PCR positive (15%). However, two individuals were PCR positive in a village where no infections were detected by coprological methods. The sensitivity of PCR makes it a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnostics and screening, although egg shedding variability and stool sample size present challenges for any detection method in low-transmission areas. PMID:23109374

  8. Field Evaluation of a PCR Test for Schistosoma japonicum Egg Detection in Low-Prevalence Regions of China

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Mai S.; Xiao, Ning; Wang, Shuo; Carlton, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive Schistosoma japonicum detection methods are needed to progress from schistosomiasis control to elimination. The sensitivity of the Kato-Katz thick smear and miracidium hatching tests decrease with infection intensity and serological tests cannot always identify current infections. We evaluated a fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect S. japonicum infection in 106 humans and 8 bovines in China. PCR was highly sensitive, detecting S. japonicum DNA at 0.5 eggs/g of stool. Comparing PCR examination of a single stool sample to the miracidium hatching test using three consecutive stool samples, more humans were hatching test positive (20%) than PCR positive (15%). However, two individuals were PCR positive in a village where no infections were detected by coprological methods. The sensitivity of PCR makes it a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnostics and screening, although egg shedding variability and stool sample size present challenges for any detection method in low-transmission areas. PMID:23109374

  9. An IL-13 Promoter Polymorphism Associated with Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Chen, Qian; Zhao, Jianping; Rafaels, Nicholas; Mathias, Priyanka; Liang, Huifang; Potee, Joseph; Campbell, Monica; Zhang, Bixiang; Gao, Li; Georas, Steve N.; Vercelli, Donata; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether two polymorphisms in the gene encoding IL13 previously associated with Schistosoma hematobium (S. hematobium) and S. mansoni infection are associated with S. japonicum infection. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1800925 (IL13/-1112C>T) and rs20541 (IL13R130Q) were genotyped in 947 unrelated individuals (307 chronically infected, 339 late-stage with liver fibrosis, 301 uninfected controls) from a schistosomiasis-endemic area of Hubei province in China. Regression models were used to evaluate allelic and haplotypic associations with chronic and late-stage schistosomiasis adjusted for non-genetic covariates. Expression of IL-13 was measured in S. japonicun-infected liver fibrosis tissue and normal liver tissue from uninfected controls by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The role of rs1800925 in IL-13 transcription was further determined by Luciferase report assay using the recombinant PGL4.17-rs180092 plasmid. We found SNP rs1800925T was associated with late-stage schistosomiasis caused by S. japonicum but not chronic schistosomiasis (OR = 1.39, 95%CI = 1.02–1.91, p = 0.03) and uninfected controls (OR = 1.49, 95%CI = 1.03–2.13, p = 0.03). Moreover, the haplotype rs1800925T-rs20541C increased the risk of disease progression to late-stage schistosomiasis (OR = 1.46, p = 0.035), whereas haplotype rs1800925C-rs20541A showed a protective role against development of late-stage schistosomiasis (F = 0.188, OR = 0.61, p = 0.002). Furthermore, S. japonicum-induced fibrotic liver tissue had higher IL13 expression than normal liver tissue. Plasmid PGL4.17-rs1800925T showed a stronger relative luciferase activity than Plasmid PGL4.17-rs1800925C in 293FT, QSG-7701 and HL-7702 cell lines. In conclusion, the functional IL13 polymorphism, rs1800925T, previously associated with risk of schistosomiasis, also contributes to risk of late-stage schistosomiasis caused by S. japonicum. PMID:26258681

  10. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rachel J.; Toth, Istvan; Liang, Jiening; Mangat, Amanjot; McManus, Donald P.; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs) have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs) may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10) and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22) with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR) may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8) and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18) at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3), derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15) derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value) stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates. PMID:27441998

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a HSP70 gene from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Linlin; Lv, Zhiyue; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Qixian; Zheng, Huanqin; Wu, Zhongdao

    2012-05-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is the pathogen responsible for schistosomiasis japonica, one of the major infectious diseases targeted for prevention nationally in China. Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) following stress plays a very important biological role in many organisms including S. japonicum. Among the HSP family, the 70-kDa HSPs are most responsible for intracellular chaperone and extracellular immunoregulatory functions. Based on the published sequences in GenBank/EMBL (AF044412.1), open reading frame belonging to HSP70 protein corresponds to a full-length cDNA containing an open reading frame of 1,947 bp encoded of 648 amino acids was identified as HSP70 from schistosome. In this study, the coding region that we named rSj648/hsp70 was amplified from S. japonicum adult worm cDNA library, and the recombinant protein was expressed in vector pET32a(+) and purified using a Ni-NTA purification system. The target protein rSj648/hsp70 was determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometer after thrombin digestion and dialysis. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis confirmed that Sj648/hsp70 could be expressed in the eggs, normal cercariae, ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae (UVAC), and adult worms of S. japonicum. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that Sj648/hsp70 was expressed significantly higher in eggs than that in cercariae and adult worms, and the expression in UVAC was higher than that in normal cercariae. A thermotolerance assay showed that rSj648/hsp70 could protect Escherichia coli cells from heat damage. The detection of specific antibody levels by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that mice immunized with rSj648/hsp70 induced higher level of specific anti-rSj648/hsp70 IgG1 compared with those vaccinated with adjuvant alone, indicating that rSj648/hsp70 was able to elicit Th2-type bias immune response. Our results suggest that Sj648/hsp70 might be an

  12. Comparative Phylogenetic Studies on Schistosoma japonicum and Its Snail Intermediate Host Oncomelania hupensis: Origins, Dispersal and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Stephen W.; Ibaraki, Motomu; Saitoh, Yasuhide; Nihei, Naoko; Janies, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosoma japonicum causes major public health problems in China and the Philippines; this parasite, which is transmitted by freshwater snails of the species Oncomelania hupensis, causes the disease intestinal schistosomiasis in humans and cattle. Researchers working on Schistosoma in Africa have described the relationship between the parasites and their snail intermediate hosts as coevolved or even as an evolutionary arms race. In the present study this hypothesis of coevolution is evaluated for S. japonicum and O. hupensis. The origins and radiation of the snails and the parasite across China, and the taxonomic validity of the sub-species of O. hupensis, are also assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings The findings provide no evidence for coevolution between S. japonicum and O. hupensis, and the phylogeographical analysis suggests a heterochronous radiation of the parasites and snails in response to different palaeogeographical and climatic triggers. The results are consistent with a hypothesis of East to West colonisation of China by Oncomelania with a re-invasion of Japan by O. hupensis from China. The Taiwan population of S. japonicum appears to be recently established in comparison with mainland Chinese populations. Conclusions/Significance The snail and parasite populations of the western mountain region of China (Yunnan and Sichuan) appear to have been isolated from Southeast Asian populations since the Pleistocene; this has implications for road and rail links being constructed in the region, which will breach biogeographical barriers between China and Southeast Asia. The results also have implications for the spread of S. japonicum. In the absence of coevolution, the parasite may more readily colonise new snail populations to which it is not locally adapted, or even new intermediate host species; this can facilitate its dispersal into new areas. Additional work is required to assess further the risk of spread of S. japonicum. PMID:26230619

  13. Cloning and characterization of a bone morphogenetic protein homologue of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Zhao, Qin-ping; Ye, Qing; Xiong, Tao; Tang, Chun-lian; Dong, Hui-fen; Jiang, Ming-sen

    2013-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are known to play an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis in many vertebrates and invertebrates through the TGF-β signaling pathway. Although the TGF-β signaling pathway exists in schistosomes, BMP homologue, a ligand of TGF-β in Schistosoma japonicum, has not yet been identified. In this study, a BMP homologue of S. japonicum was cloned and characterized. The full length SjBMP cDNA is 3,020 bp and encodes 928 amino acids, which include a TGF-β superfamily conserved domain at the C-terminus. BLAST analysis showed that, SjBMP has 68%, 51% and 43% homology with BMP from Schistosoma mansoni, Schmidtea mediterranea and Dugesia japonica at the amino acid level, respectively. According to data from real-time PCR, SjBMP was expressed in lung-stage schistosomula, 21-day liver-stage schistosomula, 50-day adult worms (the male and female), and eggs. The PCR data also indicated that, there was a ≈ 27- and ≈ 37-fold increase of SjBMP transcripts in the lung-stage schistosomula and eggs, respectively, and that there was relatively more SjBMP transcript in the adult male worm than in the adult female, in which the hepatic schistosomula was set as the calibrator for calculation. In situ hybridization based on FITC-labeled specific antisense oligonucleotide probes showed that SjBMP mRNA localized to the ovary of female worms and the integument and epithelium of female and male worms. After treatment with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at a concentration of 8 × 10(-2) μg/ml, which was added to the culture medium every other day for a week, the level of SjBMP mRNA in the cultured adult mixed-sex S. japonicum decreased at a range of ≈ 25-98% within 7 days compared with the level of SjBMP mRNA in the blank control group. On the 2nd day, the number of eggs produced per pair of worms decreased 28.7%, and the percent of normal eggs also decreased (12.7% vs. 4.3%) in the SjBMP ds

  14. Exosome-like vesicles derived by Schistosoma japonicum adult worms mediates M1 type immune- activity of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Li, Zhitao; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoying; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released into the extracellular space upon fusion of the multi-vesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane, while initial studies described that the role of exosomes was a reticulocyte cargo-disposal mechanism allowing remodeling of the plasma membrane during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes. Recent studies indicate that exosomes are secreted by most cells and pathogens and play an important role in intercellular signaling and exert regulatory function by carrying bioactive molecules. As numerous pathogens, adult worm of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) reside in mesenteric veins of definitive host including man and mammal animals. It was reported that the worms or the eggs also have specialized secretion systems to export effector proteins or other molecules into host target cells. However, the mechanisms involved remained unclear. This study investigated the isolation of the exosome-like vesicles secreted by S. japonicum adult worms and its immune activity on microphage in vitro. In this report, we identified exosome-based secretion as a new mechanism for protein secretion by S. japonicum. Electron microscopy tomography revealed the previously unidentified ultrastructural detail of exosome-like vesicles with high resolution; they were found to be typical spherical shape and to have a diverse population that varies in size of 30-100 nm. Exosome-like vesicles isolated from S. japonicum contained a significantly different protein compared with debris pelleted and the apoptosis body. We also demonstrate that macrophages were preferentially differentiated into the M1 subtype while being treated with S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles. This study reveals there are exosome-like vesicles derived by S. japonicum adult worms, and the exosome-like vesicles can mediate M1-type immune- activity of macrophage.

  15. Intake of Erythrocytes Required for Reproductive Development of Female Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jipeng; Wang, Shuqi; Liu, Xiufeng; Xu, Bin; Chai, Riyi; Zhou, Pan; Ju, Chuan; Sun, Jun; Brindley, Paul J; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The reproductive development and maturation of female schistosomes are crucial since their released eggs are responsible for the host immunopathology and transmission of schistosomiasis. However, little is known about the nutrients required by female Schistosoma japonicum during its sexual maturation. We evaluated the promoting effect of several nutrients (calf serum, red blood cells (RBCs), ATP and hypoxanthine) on the reproductive development of pre-adult females at 18 days post infection (dpi) from mixed infections and at 50 dpi from unisexual infections of laboratory mice in basic medium RPMI-1640. We found RBCs, rather than other nutrients, promoted the female sexual maturation and egg production with significant morphological changes. In 27% of females (18 dpi) from mixed infections that paired with males in vitro on day 14, vitelline glands could be positively stained by Fast Blue B; and in 35% of females (50 dpi) from unisexual infections on day 21, mature vitelline cells were observed. Infertile eggs were detected among both groups. To analyze which component of mouse RBCs possesses the stimulating effect, RBCs were fractionated and included in media. However, the RBC fractions failed to stimulate development of the female reproductive organs. In addition, bovine hemoglobin hydrolysate, digested by neutral protease, was found to exhibit the promoting activity instead of untreated bovine hemoglobin. The other protein hydrolysate, lactalbumin hydrolysate, exhibited a similar effect with bovine hemoglobin hydrolysate. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we found the expression levels of four reproduction-related genes were significantly stimulated by RBCs. These data indicate that RBCs provide essential nutrients for the sexual maturation of female S. japonicum and that the protein component of RBCs appeared to constitute the key nutrient. These findings would improve laboratory culture of pre-adult schistosomes to adult worms in medium with well-defined components

  16. Characterization and expression of the Schistosoma japonicum thioredoxin peroxidase-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang; Han, Yanhui; Fu, Zhiqiang; Han, Hongxiao; Qiu, Chunhui; Zhang, Min; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Yaojun; Li, Xiangrui; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2013-02-01

    We analyzed proteins that were differentially expressed by 10-day-old schistosomula from 3 different hosts and determined that a functional thioredoxin peroxidase-2 gene has an important antioxidant role in Schistosoma japonicum , which we investigated further. A full-length cDNA encoding the S. japonicum thioredoxin peroxidase-2 (SjTPx-2) had an open reading frame of 681 bp that encoded 226 amino acids with a signal peptide of 24 amino acids. A cDNA encoding SjTPx-2 without the signal peptide sequence was isolated from 42-day-old schistosome cDNAs. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that SjTPx-2 was upregulated in 7- and 13-day-old schistosomes, while the expression level in females was around 2-fold higher than that in male worms at 42 days. SjTPx was subcloned into pET28a(+) and expressed as both inclusion bodies and supernatant in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Western blotting showed that the recombinant SjTPx-2 (rSjTPx-2) was immunogenic. The purified recombinant protein could form disulfide-bonded dimers and it had peroxidase activity in vitro. An immunoprotection experiment in BALB/c mice showed that vaccination with recombinant SjTPx-2 could induce 31.2% and 34.0% reductions in the numbers of worms and eggs in the liver, respectively. This study suggests that SjTPx-2 may be an important antioxidative enzyme in scavenging ROS, and it may be a potential vaccine candidate or new drug target for schistosomiasis. PMID:22924918

  17. Disease transmission models for public health decision-making: designing intervention strategies for Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Seto, Edmund Y W; Carlton, Elizabeth J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of infectious disease transmission modelling is often to understand the factors that are responsible for the persistence of transmission, the dynamics of the infection process and how best to control transmission. As such, there should be great potential to use mathematical models to routinely plan and evaluate disease control programs. In reality, there are many challenges that have precluded the practical use of disease models in this regard. One challenge relates to the mathematical complexity of the models, which has made it difficult for field workers and health officials to understand and use them. Another challenge is that, despite their mathematical complexity, models typically do not have sufficient structural complexity to consider many of the site-specific epidemiologic and disease control details that the practicing health official routinely considers. Moreover, most modelling studies have not been sufficiently explicit or exemplary in explaining how field data may be incorporated into the models to impact public health decision-making. In this chapter, we start with a classic model of schistosomiasis transmission and relate its key properties to the more detailed model of Schistosoma japonicum model presented in chapter by Remais and chapter by Spear and Hubbard. We then discuss how various controls (e.g., chemotherapy, snail control and sanitation) may be evaluated via the detailed model. We then demonstrate in a practical manner, using S. japonicum data from China, how field data may be incorporated to inform the practice of disease control. Finally, we present a new model structure that considers how heterogeneous populations are interconnected, which has particular relevance to understanding disease control and emergence in today's highly mobile world.

  18. Profiles of Small Non-Coding RNAs in Schistosoma japonicum during Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Pengfei; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Haiying; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jianwei; Jin, Qi; Wang, Heng; Chen, Qijun

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene regulation mechanism along the life cycle of the genus Schistosoma is complex. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are essential post transcriptional gene regulation elements that affect gene expression and mRNA stability. Preliminary studies indicated that sncRNAs in schistosomal parasites are generated through different pathways, which are developmentally regulated. However, the data of sncRNAs of schistosomal parasites are still fragmental and a complete expression profile of sncRNAs during the parasite development requires a deep investigation. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed high-throughput genome-wide transcriptome analytic techniques to explore the dynamic expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) of Schistosoma japonicum covering the free-living cercarial stage and all stages in the definitive host. This led us to analyze over 70 million clean reads represented both high and low abundance of the small RNA population. Patterns of differential expression of miRNAs and endo-siRNAs were observed. MiRNAs was twice more than endo-siRNAs in cercariae, but gradually decreased along with the development of the parasite. Both small RNA types were presented in equal aboudance in lung-stage schistosomula, while endo-siRNAs accumulated to 6 times more than miRNAs in adult female worms and hepatic eggs. Further, miRNAs were found mainly derived from genes located in the intergenic regions, while endo-siRNAs were mainly generated from transposable elements (TEs). The expression pattern of TE-siRNAs, as well as the pseudogene-derived siRNAs clustered in mRNAs of cytoskeletal proteins, stress proteins, enzymes related to energy metabolism also revealed distinction throughout different developmental stages. Natural antisense transcripts (NATs)-related siRNAs accounted for minor proportion of the endo-siRNAs which were dominantly expressed in cercariae. Conclusions/Significance Our results represented a comprehensive

  19. Assessment of the diagnostic efficacy of enolase as an indication of active infection of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Xiao, Di; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Shuang; Yin, Xuren; Wang, Jie; Ke, Xuedan; Yu, Chuanxin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a common zoonoses affecting humans. The atypical clinical symptoms, low morbidity, and low degree of infection impede diagnosis and assessment of epidemics. Detecting circulating antigens from adult worms in patients' body fluids should be diagnostically superior to examining eggs in feces. Herein, the excretory-secretory proteins of adult worms were analyzed by using 2-D protein electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The Schistosoma japonicum enolase (Sj enolase) was identified as the most abundant excretory-secretory antigen. Purified recombinant Sj enolase was prepared, and specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were raised against it. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay (sandwich ELISA) was established that used the monoclonal antibody as a capture antibody and the polyclonal antibody as a detection antibody. The linear detection range was 0.7-1000 ng/ml (minimum 700 pg/ml). Sj enolase could be detected in the sera of infected rabbits and disappeared rapidly postpraziquantel treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of this sandwich ELISA to detect field serum samples of schistosomiasis were 84.61 and 95.83 %, respectively. The cross-reaction rates for clonorchiasis and paragonimiasis were 3.33 and 5 %, respectively. This ELISA assay was used to test 45 matching sera of schistosomiasis patients before treatment and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months posttreatment. Among the sera, 88.89 % were positive before treatment. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postpraziquantel treatment, 93.33, 97.78, 100, and 100 % tested negative, respectively. Therefore, Sj enolase can be used to indicate active Schistosoma infection, and detecting serum Sj enolase is important for diagnosis and evaluating treatment effect. PMID:26420425

  20. Mefloquine in combination with hemin causes severe damage to adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Qiao, Chunhua; Xue, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore the interaction of mefloquine with hemin against adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, the 50% and 95% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC95) of mefloquine and hemin against schistosomes, some factors, such as other iron providing agents, iron chelaters, zinc protoporphyrin-IX, and biological relevant reductants, that might impact on antischistosomal activity induced by interaction of mefloquine with hemin, and preliminary analysis of chemical interaction of both compounds were undertaken. The LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine and hemin alone against schistosomes were determined to be 6.5μg/ml and 7.8μg/ml as well as 232μg/ml and 355μg/ml, respectively. The LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine in the presence of hemin 100μg/ml was 0.24μg/ml and 0.59μg/ml, respectively. On the other hand the LC50 and LC95 of hemin in the presence of mefloquine 1μg/ml was 23.2μg/ml and 77.2μg/ml, respectively. Meanwhile, mefloquine/hemin combinations showed potential synergistic effects against adult S. japonicum, with combination index (CI) values <1. Apart from hemin, zinc protoporphyrin-IX, and other iron providing agents such as ferrous sulfate and ferriammonium sulfate combined with mefloquine exhibited no toxic effect against schistosomes. On the other hand, addition of iron chelators (deferiprone, desferrioxamine mesylate, or 2,2'-bipyridine) to the medium containing mefloquine-hemin resulted in no protective effect on the worms. Furthermore, biological reductants like glutathione, vitamine C or cysteine showed no apparent worm protection effect from toxic mefloquine-hemin even at higher concentrations (242.3-614.6μg/ml, i.e., 6.4-17.8-fold higher than the concentration of hemin). Chemical interaction of mefloquine with hemin was studied in 40% DMSO-Tris buffer solution. Both UV-Vis spectrum and mass spectrum demonstrated the strong interaction of mefloquine with hemin, which resulted in a reduction of hemin color and emergence of an adduct formed by mefloquine

  1. Characterisation of a secretory serine protease inhibitor (SjB6) from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteins belonging to the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily play essential physiological roles in many organisms. In pathogens, serpins are thought to have evolved specifically to limit host immune responses by interfering with the host immune-stimulatory signals. Serpins are less well characterised in parasitic helminths, although some are thought to be involved in mechanisms associated with host immune modulation. In this study, we cloned and partially characterised a secretory serpin from Schistosoma japonicum termed SjB6, these findings provide the basis for possible functional roles. Methods SjB6 gene was identified through database mining of our previously published microarray data, cloned and detailed sequence and structural analysis and comparative modelling carried out using various bioinformatics and proteomics tools. Gene transcriptional profiling was determined by real-time PCR and the expression of native protein determined by immunoblotting. An immunological profile of the recombinant protein produced in insect cells was determined by ELISA. Results SjB6 contains an open reading frame of 1160 base pairs that encodes a protein of 387 amino acid residues. Detailed sequence analysis, comparative modelling and structural-based alignment revealed that SjB6 contains the essential structural motifs and consensus secondary structures typical of inhibitory serpins. The presence of an N-terminal signal sequence indicated that SjB6 is a secretory protein. Real-time data indicated that SjB6 is expressed exclusively in the intra-mammalian stage of the parasite life cycle with its highest expression levels in the egg stage (p < 0.0001). The native protein is approximately 60 kDa in size and recombinant SjB6 (rSjB6) was recognised strongly by sera from rats experimentally infected with S. japonicum. Conclusions The significantly high expression of SjB6 in schistosome eggs, when compared to other life cycle stages, suggests a possible

  2. Expression and characterization of a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase gene in Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; He, Yuan; He, L I; Zong, Hongying; Cai, Guobin

    2015-11-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx, GPx4) is a major antioxidant enzyme, which plays unique roles in the protection of cells against oxidative stress by catalysing reduction of lipid hydroperoxides. We isolated and characterized a full-length cDNA sequence encoding GPx gene from a blood fluke, Schistosoma japonicum (designated SjGPx), which contained an in-frame TGA codon for selenocysteine (Sec) and a concurrent Sec insertion sequence in its 3'-untranslated region. Protein encoded by SjGPx demonstrated a primary structure characteristic to the PHGPx family, including preservation of catalytic domains and absence of the subunit interaction domains. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed that the SjGPx was mainly expressed in the female adults and eggs. RNA interference approach was employed to investigate the effects of knockdown of SjGPx. SjGPx expression level was significantly reduced on the 5th day post-RNAi. Significantly reduction in GPx enzyme activities, as well as obvious changes in morphology of intrauterine eggs followed the reduction in SjGPx transcript level. We observed a 63·04% reduction in GPx activity and the eggs severely deformed. Our results revealed that SjGPx protein might be involved in the provision of enzyme activity during egg production. PMID:26283515

  3. Studies on Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines. 2. The molluscan host.

    PubMed

    PESIGAN, T P; HAIRSTON, N G; JAUREGUI, J J; GARCIA, E G; SANTOS, A T; SANTOS, B C; BESA, A A

    1958-01-01

    This study of the molluscan host (Oncomelania quadrasi) of bilharziasis in the Philippines is divided into two parts, the first dealing with the biology of the host and the second with the interrelationship between the host and Schistosoma japonicum.In the first part, the snail's distribution and habitat are considered in some detail, and then field and laboratory studies on its behaviour and activity are reported on. A section on the life history of O. quadrasi covers its growth, reproduction, egg-laying and survival. This is followed by a study of the population dynamics of the snail.In the second part, the laboratory procedures used for infecting snails and for obtaining cercariae are described, and the finding that more female than male snails are seen infected is discussed. A section is devoted to the effect of infection on the reproduction, growth and longevity of the snail, and an account is given of cercarial output, of the distribution of cercariae in a snail colony and of their presence downstream from snail colonies. The final section deals with natural fluctuations in snail infection rates, which appear to show a cycle related to rainfall.

  4. Population Genetics of Schistosoma japonicum within the Philippines Suggest High Levels of Transmission between Humans and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, James W.; Carabin, Hélène; Balolong, Ernesto; Tallo, Veronica; Shrivastava, Jaya; Lu, Da-Bing; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Olveda, Remigio; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Webster, Joanne P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Schistosoma japonicum, which remains a major public health problem in the Philippines and mainland China, is the only schistosome species for which zoonotic transmission is considered important. While bovines are suspected as the main zoonotic reservoir in parts of China, the relative contributions of various non-human mammals to S. japonicum transmission in the Philippines remain to be determined. We examined the population genetics of S. japonicum in the Philippines in order to elucidate transmission patterns across host species and geographic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings S. japonicum miracidia (hatched from eggs within fecal samples) from humans, dogs, pigs and rats, and cercariae shed from snail-intermediate hosts, were collected across two geographic areas of Samar Province. Individual isolates were then genotyped using seven multiplexed microsatellite loci. Wright's FST values and phylogenetic trees calculated for parasite populations suggest a high frequency of parasite gene-flow across definitive host species, particularly between dogs and humans. Parasite genetic differentiation between areas was not evident at the definitive host level, possibly suggesting frequent import and export of infections between villages, although there was some evidence of geographic structuring at the snail–intermediate host level. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest very high levels of transmission across host species, and indicate that the role of dogs should be considered when planning control programs. Furthermore, a regional approach to treatment programs is recommended where human migration is extensive. PMID:19030225

  5. Epidemiology of Schistosoma japonicum in China: morbidity and strategies for control in the Dongting Lake region.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Sleigh, A C; Ross, A G; Williams, G M; Tanner, M; McManus, D P

    2000-03-01

    Dongting Lake, covering a very large surface water area of 2691km(2), is located in Hunan Province in the southern part of the People's Republic of China. It is the second-largest freshwater lake in China and plays an important role in regulating the amount of water in the Yangtze River, China's longest river. The annual water level of the lake changes by as much as 15m, rising in summer and falling in winter. Asian schistosomiasis has been endemic in the Dongting Lake region for centuries and it has had a devastating effect on the public health of the local people. After a difficult struggle for more than four decades, a concerted programme, supported by the World Bank Loan and instigated in 1992, has resulted in remarkable progress in the control of the disease in many endemic areas of the region. However, the great challenge remains to consolidate and maintain the achievements made to date. The Schistosoma japonicum intermediate host (Oncomelania hupensis hupensis) snail habitats are huge, estimated at 1768km(2) in 1996; these are increasing at a rate of 34.7km(2) annually due to high silt deposition from the Yangtze River itself and from the connecting rivers in Hunan province, and construction of embankments in the Dongting Lake region. It is anticipated that the construction of the Three Gorges Super Dam, the largest engineering project ever undertaken, will substantially extend the range of the snail habitats and increase the number of new schistosomiasis cases. In many areas, human re-infections with S. japonicum after drug (praziquantel) treatment remain unacceptably high (up to 20% of those treated are re-infected annually) due to occupational (mainly fishing) water contact. This paper reviews the history and the current status of schistosomiasis control in the lake region, it explores the epidemiological factors which influence the prevalence of the infection and the disease it causes, and it provides insight into future approaches to control which might

  6. A potential screening factor for accumulation of cholesteyl ester transfer protein deficiency in East Asia: Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2014-04-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-deficiency manifests a unique plasma lipoprotein profile without other apparent symptoms. It is highly common in East Asia while rather rare anywhere else. A potential environmental screening factor(s) may therefore contribute to this eccentric distribution, such as its selective advantage against a regional illness, most likely an infectious disease, in relation to plasma lipoproteins. Blood flukes use the host plasma lipoproteins as nutrient sources through the lipoprotein receptor-like systems. Its Asian-specific species, Schistosoma (S) japonicum, which has been endemic in East Asia, takes up cholesteryl ester (CE) from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) for the embryonation of their eggs to miracidia, a critical step of the hepatic pathogenesis of this parasite, but poorly from HDL of CETP-deficiency. CD36-related protein (CD36RP) was cloned from the adults and the eggs of S. japonicum, with 1880-bp encoding 506 amino-acid residues exhibiting the CD36 domains and two transmembrane regions. Its extracellular domain selectively bound human HDL but neither LDL nor CETP-deficiency HDL, and the antibody against the extracellular domain suppressed the selective HDL-CE uptake and embryonation of the eggs. When infected with S. japonicum, wild-type mice developed less hepatic granulomatosis than CETP-transgenic mice by the ectopic egg embryonation. CD36RP is thus a candidate receptor of S. japonicum to facilitate uptake of HDL-CE necessary for egg embryonation. Abnormal HDL caused by CETP-deficiency retards this process and thereby protects the patients from development of hepatic lesions. S. japonicum infection is a potential screening factor for high prevalence of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:24388961

  7. Schistosoma japonicum in Samar, the Philippines: infection in dogs and rats as a possible risk factor for human infection.

    PubMed

    Carabin, H; McGARVEY, S T; Sahlu, I; Tarafder, M R; Joseph, L; DE Andrade, B B; Balolong, E; Olveda, R

    2015-06-01

    The role that animals play in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans in the Philippines remains uncertain and prior studies have not included several species, adjustment for misclassification error and clustering, or used a cohort design. A cohort study of 2468 people providing stool samples at 12 months following praziquantel treatment in 50 villages of Western Samar, the Philippines, was conducted. Stool samples from dogs, cats, rats, and water buffaloes were collected at baseline (2003-2004) and follow-up (2005). Latent-class hierarchical Bayesian log-binomial models adjusting for misclassification errors in diagnostic tests were used. The village-level baseline and follow-up prevalences of cat, dog, and rat S. japonicum infection were associated with the 12-month cumulative incidence of human S. japonicum infection, with similar magnitude and precision of effect, but correlation between infection levels made it difficult to divide their respective effects. The cumulative incidence ratios associated with a 1% increase in the prevalence of infection in dogs at baseline and in rats at follow-up were 1·04 [95% Bayesian credible interval (BCI) 1·02-1·07] and 1·02 (95% BCI 1·01-1·04), respectively, when both species were entered in the model. Dogs appear to play a role in human schistosomiasis infection while rats could be used as schistosomiasis sentinels.

  8. Effect of photoperiod change on chronobiology of cercarial emergence of Schistosoma japonicum derived from hilly and marshy regions of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-Rong; Zhu, Yuan-Jian; Ge, Qing-Peng; Yang, Meng-Jia; Huang, Ji-Lei; Huang, Wen-Qiao; Zhuge, Hong-Xiang; Lu, Da-Bing

    2015-12-01

    The chronobiology of cercarial emergence appeared to be a genetically controlled behavior, adapted to definitive host species, for schistosome. However, a few physiological and ecological factors, for example the change of photoperiod, were reported to affect the rhythmic emergence of cercariae. Therefore, the effect of photoperiod change on cercarial emergence of two Schistosoma japonicum isolates, the hilly and the marshland, was investigated. Four shedding experiments each under a different photoperiod were conducted. Under a natural photoperiod, two distinct shedding modes, one from the hilly region and one from the marshland, were observed. Under a reversed photoperiod, the regular pattern (i.e. under a natural photoperiod) of S. japonicum cercarial emergence was reversed for the marshland isolate and disappeared for the hilly isolate. With an input of a 2 h darkness from 7am to 9am, the cercarial emergence peak were delayed for the two isolates; whereas with an input of a 2 h darkness from 5pm to 7pm, neither effect on the cercarial emergence rhythm was observed. The total cercariae emerged for both parasite isolates varied with a different photoperiod. The results indicate that the change of photoperiod could affect the chronobiology of S japonicum cercarial emergence.

  9. Suppression of the Insulin Receptors in Adult Schistosoma japonicum Impacts on Parasite Growth and Development: Further Evidence of Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    You, Hong; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Cai, Pengfei; Mou, Rong; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Fang, Guofu; Villinger, Francois; McManus, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    To further investigate the importance of insulin signaling in the growth, development, sexual maturation and egg production of adult schistosomes, we have focused attention on the insulin receptors (SjIRs) of Schistosoma japonicum, which we have previously cloned and partially characterised. We now show, by Biolayer Interferometry, that human insulin can bind the L1 subdomain (insulin binding domain) of recombinant (r)SjIR1 and rSjIR2 (designated SjLD1 and SjLD2) produced using the Drosophila S2 protein expression system. We have then used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down the expression of the SjIRs in adult S. japonicum in vitro and show that, in addition to their reduced transcription, the transcript levels of other important downstream genes within the insulin pathway, associated with glucose metabolism and schistosome fecundity, were also impacted substantially. Further, a significant decrease in glucose uptake was observed in the SjIR-knockdown worms compared with luciferase controls. In vaccine/challenge experiments, we found that rSjLD1 and rSjLD2 depressed female growth, intestinal granuloma density and faecal egg production in S. japonicum in mice presented with a low dose challenge infection. These data re-emphasize the potential of the SjIRs as veterinary transmission blocking vaccine candidates against zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica in China and the Philippines. PMID:25961574

  10. Schistosoma japonicum: Tsunagi/Y14 protein plays a critical role in the development of the reproductive organs and eggs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Wei-Na; Huang, Da-Ke; Jia, Xue-Mei; Gui, Li; Liu, Miao; Shen, Ji-Jia

    2013-10-01

    Tsunagi/Y14 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein that is required for the maintenance of oogenesis and the masculinization of the germ-line in many animal models. We speculated that Tsunagi/Y14 might also regulate reproductive organ development in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum, Sj). Sj Tsunagi/Y14 and control double-stranded RNAs were introduced into schistosomula by electroporation respectively. These transfected schistosomula were cultured in vitro for 1, 3 or 5 days. The mRNA and protein levels of the target gene in the cultured schistosomula were significantly suppressed compared with those of the control group. Furthermore, BALB/c mice were infected with the transfected schistosomula for 6 weeks and were sacrificed to harvest the adult worms. We found that the silencing of Sj Tsunagi/Y14 led to defects in reproductive organs development in both male and female worms. Moreover, it also affected the size, quantity and activity of the eggs in the mice liver. Our findings indicated that Tsunagi/Y14 plays a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and eggs in S. japonicum.

  11. Schistosoma japonicum in Samar, the Philippines: infection in dogs and rats as a possible risk factor for human infection.

    PubMed

    Carabin, H; McGARVEY, S T; Sahlu, I; Tarafder, M R; Joseph, L; DE Andrade, B B; Balolong, E; Olveda, R

    2015-06-01

    The role that animals play in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans in the Philippines remains uncertain and prior studies have not included several species, adjustment for misclassification error and clustering, or used a cohort design. A cohort study of 2468 people providing stool samples at 12 months following praziquantel treatment in 50 villages of Western Samar, the Philippines, was conducted. Stool samples from dogs, cats, rats, and water buffaloes were collected at baseline (2003-2004) and follow-up (2005). Latent-class hierarchical Bayesian log-binomial models adjusting for misclassification errors in diagnostic tests were used. The village-level baseline and follow-up prevalences of cat, dog, and rat S. japonicum infection were associated with the 12-month cumulative incidence of human S. japonicum infection, with similar magnitude and precision of effect, but correlation between infection levels made it difficult to divide their respective effects. The cumulative incidence ratios associated with a 1% increase in the prevalence of infection in dogs at baseline and in rats at follow-up were 1·04 [95% Bayesian credible interval (BCI) 1·02-1·07] and 1·02 (95% BCI 1·01-1·04), respectively, when both species were entered in the model. Dogs appear to play a role in human schistosomiasis infection while rats could be used as schistosomiasis sentinels. PMID:25274409

  12. Genetic variation between Schistosoma japonicum lineages from lake and mountainous regions in China revealed by resequencing whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhong; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Schistosomiasis japonica is endemic in mainland China along the Yangtze River, typically distributed in two geographical categories of lake and mountainous regions. Study on schistosome genetic diversity is of interest in respect of understanding parasite biology and transmission, and formulating control strategy. Certain genetic variations may be associated with adaptations to different ecological habitats. The aim of this study is to gain insight into Schistosoma japonicum genetic variation, evolutionary origin and associated causes of different geographic lineages through examining homozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) based on resequenced genome data. We collected S. japonicum samples from four sites, three in the lake regions (LR) of mid-east (Guichi and Tonglin in Anhui province, Laogang in Hunan province) and one in mountainous region (MR) (Xichang in Sichuan province) of south-west of China, resequenced their genomes using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, and made use of the available database of S. japonicum draft genomic sequence as a reference in genome mapping. A total of 14,575 SNPs from 2059 genes were identified in the four lineages. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed significant genetic variation exhibited between the different geographical lineages, and further revealed that the MR Xichang lineage is phylogenetically closer to LR Guich lineage than to other two LR lineages, and the MR lineage might be evolved from LR lineages. More than two thirds of detected SNPs were nonsynonymous; functional annotation of the SNP-containing genes showed that they are involved mainly in biological processes such as signaling and response to stimuli. Notably, unique nonsynonymous SNP variations were detected in 66 genes of MR lineage, inferring possible genetic adaption to mountainous ecological condition. PMID:27207135

  13. An “In-Depth” Description of the Small Non-coding RNA Population of Schistosoma japonicum Schistosomulum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Luo, Rong; Xu, Xindong; Jiang, Yanyan; Zhang, Qingfeng; Pan, Weiqing

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of schistosomiasis, which afflicts more than 200 million people yearly in tropical regions of South America, Asia and Africa. A promising approach to the control of this and many other diseases involves the application of our understanding of small non-coding RNA function to the design of safe and effective means of treatment. In a previous study, we identified five conserved miRNAs from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum. Here, we applied Illumina Solexa high-throughput sequencing methods (deep sequencing) to investigate the small RNAs expressed in S. japonicum schistosomulum (3 weeks post-infection). This has allowed us to examine over four million sequence reads including both frequently and infrequently represented members of the RNA population. Thus we have identified 20 conserved miRNA families that have orthologs in well-studied model organisms and 16 miRNA that appear to be specific to Schistosoma. We have also observed minor amounts of heterogeneity in both 3′ and 5′ terminal positions of some miRNA as well as RNA fragments resulting from the processing of miRNA precursor. An investigation of the genomic arrangement of the 36 identified miRNA revealed that seven were tightly linked in two clusters. We also identified members of the small RNA population whose structure indicates that they are part of an endogenously derived RNA silencing pathway, as evidenced by their extensive complementarities with retrotransposon and retrovirus-related Pol polyprotein from transposon. PMID:20161724

  14. New Insight into the Antifibrotic Effects of Praziquantel on Mice in Infection with Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yue-Jin; Luo, Jie; Yuan, Quan; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Ya-Ping; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Ai-Ling; Ren, Yong-Ya; Sun, Ke-Yi; Sun, Yan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Zhao-Song

    2011-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting more than 200 million people in the world. Although chemotherapy targeting on killing schistosomes is one of the main strategies in the disease control, there are few effective ways of dealing with liver fibrosis caused by the parasite infection in the chronic and advanced stages of schistosomiasis. For this reason, new strategies and prospective drugs, which exert antifibrotic effects, are urgently required. Methods and Findings The antifibrotic effects of praziquantel were assessed in the murine models of schistosomiasis japonica. Murine fibrosis models were established by cutaneous infection with 14±2 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. Then, the mice of both chronic (8 weeks post-infection) and advanced (15 weeks post-infection) schistosomiasis were treated by gavage of praziquantel (250 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days) to eliminate worms, and followed by praziquantel anti-fibrosis treatment (300 mg/kg, twice daily for 30 days). The fibrosis-related parameters assessed were areas of collagen deposition, content of hydroxyproline and mRNA expressions of Col1α1, Col3α1, α-SMA, TGF-β, MMP9, TIMP1, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ of liver. Spleen weight index, alanine aminotransferase activity and liver portal venous pressure were also measured. The results showed that anti-fibrosis treatment improved liver fibrosis, splenomegaly, hepatic function, as well as liver portal hypertension. In order to confirm the anti-fibrotic properties of praziquantel, we established a CCL4-induced model and revealed that CCL4-induced liver fibrosis was inhibited by PZQ treatment for 30 days. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of praziquantel on mouse primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). It is indicated that mRNA expressions of Col1α1, Col3α1, α-SMA, TGF-β, MMP9 and TIMP1 of HSCs were all inhibited after praziquantel anti-parasite treatments. Conclusions The significant amelioration of hepatic fibrosis by praziquantel

  15. Analysis of egg granuloma formation in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice treated with antibodies to interleukin-5 and gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, A W; Xu, Y H; Sher, A; Macedonia, J G

    1991-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice were treated with antibodies to interleukin-5 (IL-5) or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) from week 3 or 4 to week 10 of infection. Neither antibody affected egg production by the parasite, and neither had a consistent effect on the secretion of IFN-gamma or IL-5 cell-related cytokines by spleen cells from infected mice. Mice treated with antibody to murine IL-5 had only rare eosinophils in hepatic circumoval granulomas. Granulomas around single eggs were reduced in volume by a third, but hepatic fibrosis was unaffected. Treatment with antibody to murine IFN-gamma also reduced the size of granulomas and also did not affect hepatic fibrosis, which was measured as hydroxyproline. Our results, taken together with the studies of others, indicate that a complex interaction of cytokines affects granuloma size and that the size and fibrosis of granulomas are to some extent regulated independently. PMID:1834572

  16. Possible effects of the Three Gorges dam on the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum on the Jiang Han plain, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, X J; Wei, F H; Yang, X X; Dai, Y H; Yu, G Y; Chen, L Y; Su, Z M

    2000-06-01

    The Three Gorges dam, under construction on the Yangtze River in China, might affect the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum on the Jiang Han plain, which is downstream of the dam. To study this possibility, the prevalence of schistosomiasis was investigated in relation to a range of malacological, hydrological and meteorological factors. The general water level in the Yangzte over a year had a marked effect on the distribution of the intermediate host (Oncomelania hupensis) and the prevalence of human schistosomiasis in that year. Disease prevalence showed significant correlations with the density of the snail hosts, the level of the water table, annual rainfall, yearly evaporation, and altitude. Once the dam is complete, the flow of water downstream will probably be maintained at a level between those currently occurring in flood and dry weather, and this may have implications for schistosome transmission. Systematic monitoring is necessary to investigate the impact of the environmental changes brought about by the dam on transmission.

  17. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a type II cystatin from Schistosoma japonicum, which could regulate macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Liu, Ju; Yue, Yuan; Chen, Wei; Song, Man; Zhan, Ximei; Wu, Zhongkai

    2014-11-01

    Cystatin play an important role in parasite immune evasion. It is involved in many immune responses processes regulations such as inhibiting antigen presentation, modifying cytokines production and macrophage polarization. In recent years, more and more cystatins were used in treating some inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammation bowel diseases; however, cystatins from Schistosoma japonicum were rarely studied. In the present study, we have cloned a cystatin from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum, named as SjCystatin, and its sequence shares conserved domains with other type II family cystatins. It was further verified by enzyme inhibition assays. SjCystatin retained its inhibitory activity under a wide range of pH values and temperatures, can maintain its inhibitory activity at pH 6.5-7.5 and 37 °C, respectively. Then, we investigated the effects of SjCystatin on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7. Results showed that SjCystatin inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide production in a dose-dependent manner. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production began to be inhibited at least 6 h after SjCystatin stimulation. SjCystatin significantly increased IL-10 production at 6 h after stimulation and its effect on IL-10 production diminished quickly. These results imply that SjCystatin can induce M2 macrophage polarization and can be expected to serve as a potential drug source for the medication of inflammatory disorders like other cystatins.

  18. A growing degree-days based time-series analysis for prediction of Schistosoma japonicum transmission in Jiangsu province, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Gemperli, Armin; Vounatsou, Penelope; Tanner, Marcel; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Utzinger, Jürg

    2006-09-01

    It has been suggested that global warming may alter the frequency and transmission dynamics of vector-borne diseases. To test this claim for schistosomiasis, we conducted a time-series analysis from 1972-2002 for 39 of the 70 counties of Jiangsu province, eastern China, where Schistosoma japonicum is partially endemic. We used a modeling approach to estimate the annual growing degree-days (AGDD), employing a lower temperature threshold of 15.3 degrees C. Our final model included both temporal and spatial components, the former consisting of second order polynomials in time plus a seasonality component, whereas the spatial trend was formed by second order polynomials of the coordinates plus the thin-plate smoothing splines. We found that temperature increased over the past 30 years in all observing stations. There were distinct temporal trends with seasonality and periodicities of 12, 6, and 3 months, whereas only marginal spatial variation was observed. The predicted AGDDs for 2006 and 2003 showed increases for the entire Jiangsu province, with the AGDDs difference between these two time points exhibiting an increase from north to south. Our data suggest that changes in temperature will alter the extent and level of schistosomiasis transmission, which is relevant for the control of S. japonicum in a future warmer China.

  19. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of schistosomula and adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Hongxiao; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-14

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum and adult worm are two stages of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum and excretory/secretory proteins (ESPs) play a major role in host-parasite interactions. In this study, iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS was used to investigate the proteome of ESPs obtained from schistosomula and adult worms of S. japonicum, and 298 differential ESPs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of differential ESPs in the two developmental stages showed that 161 ESPs upregulated in schistosomula were associated with stress responses, carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation, whereas ESPs upregulated in adult worms were mainly related to immunoregulation and purine metabolism. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), two differential proteins identified in this study, were expressed. Further studies showed that rSjHSP70 and rSjTPx stimulated macrophages expressing high levels of the anti-inflammatory factors TGF-β, IL-10 and Arg-1, and suppressed the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS in LPS-induced macrophages. This study provides new insights into the survival and development of schistosomes in the final host and helps identify vaccine candidates or new diagnostic reagents for schistosomiasis.

  20. Multiple near-identical genotypes of Schistosoma japonicum can occur in snails and have implications for population-genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Hu, Wei; Mo, Xiaojin; Wang, Shengyue; Brindley, Paul J; McManus, Donald P; Davis, George M; Feng, Zheng; Blair, David

    2008-12-01

    We genotyped (using 16 or 17 microsatellite loci) numerous adult Schistosoma japonicum raised in rabbits exposed to pooled cercariae from small numbers of naturally infected snails from several localities in China. As expected, duplicate multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) were found among these worms. Additionally, many more MLGs, often near-identical, were found than snails used as sources of cercariae. Explanations for these results include (i) genotyping errors, (ii) development within each infected snail of multiple sibling miracidia and (iii) somatic mutation producing genetically varied cercariae from a single miracidium. To control for genotyping errors we re-analysed samples from many individual worms, including repeating the initial PCR. Explanations invoking the development of multiple sibling miracidia within a single snail are not likely to be correct because almost all duplicate MLGs fell within same-sex clusters in a principal coordinates analysis. We would expect both sexes to be represented in a multi-miracidium infection. In addition, we exposed several snails to infection by a single miracidium. One such snail, via an experimentally infected mouse, yielded 48 adult worms. The presence of at least nine near-identical MLGs among these worms was confirmed by re-genotyping. We regard somatic mutation as the most likely explanation for our results. The implications of multiple MLGs for population-genetic studies in S. japonicum are discussed. PMID:18590733

  1. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Regulation of Ovary Development in the Pathogenic Blood Fluke Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Peng, Jinbiao; Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Liu, Juntao; Lin, Jiaojiao; Jin, Youxin; Davis, Richard E.; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes, blood flukes, are an important global public health concern. Paired adult female schistosomes produce large numbers of eggs that are primarily responsible for the disease pathology and critical for dissemination. Consequently, understanding schistosome sexual maturation and egg production may open novel perspectives for intervening with these processes to prevent clinical symptoms and to interrupt the life-cycle of these blood-flukes. microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of many biological processes including development, cell proliferation, metabolism, and signal transduction. Here, we report on the identification of Schistosoma japonicum miRNAs using small RNA deep sequencing in the key stages of male-female pairing, gametogenesis, and egg production. We identified 38 miRNAs, including 10 previously unknown miRNAs. Eighteen of the miRNAs were differentially expressed between male and female schistosomes and during different stages of sexual maturation. We identified 30 potential target genes for 16 of the S. japonicum miRNAs using antibody-based pull-down assays and bioinformatic analyses. We further validated some of these target genes using either in vitro luciferase assays or in vivo miRNA suppression experiments. Notably, suppression of the female enriched miRNAs bantam and miR-31 led to morphological alteration of ovaries in female schistosomes. These findings uncover key roles for specific miRNAs in schistosome sexual maturation and egg production. PMID:26871705

  2. Epidemiological and morbidity assessment of Schistosoma japonicum infection in a migrant fisherman community, the Dongting Lake region, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; He, Y K; Zeng, Q R; McManus, D P

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the epidemiology and morbidity related to Schistosoma japonicum infection by both parasitological (Kato-Katz method and miracidium hatching test) and ultrasound examination in a migrant fisherman community (n = 106) from the Dongting Lake region in China in 2001. A prevalence of 69.8% and a mean infection intensity of 66.5 eggs per gram (epg) were recorded for this group. Males had a higher level of infection (77%) and intensity (92.2 epg) compared with females (58% and 28.6 epg, respectively). Subjects aged 11-20 years had the highest prevalence of infection (91%) and the heaviest infection intensity (85.3 epg) among all age groups. Twenty-six percent of the subjects had not been treated previously for schistosomiasis. Parenchymal fibrosis (> or = stage II) detected by ultrasound and spleen enlargement (or splenectomy) occurred in 37% and 9% of subjects, respectively. Portal vein dilation was detected in 18% subjects, and 58% (11/19) of those patients with portal vein enlargement were shown to have parenchymal fibrosis (> or = stage II). These results indicate that S. japonicum infection and related morbidity in mobile fisherman is still unacceptably high despite the fact that China has implemented a Schistosomiasis Control Project financed by a World Bank Loan for a period of 8 years since 1992. Clearly, new approaches for schistosomiasis control, especially in communities like these mobile fishermen, should be explored.

  3. Variable maturation and oviposition by female Schistosoma japonicum in mice: the effects of irradiation of the host prior to infection

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, A.W.; Duvall, R.H.

    1987-11-01

    The maturation of female Schistosoma japonicum was found to vary greatly within each of two Philippine strains of this parasite and some females did not contain uterine eggs 7 to 15 weeks after infection while others contained numerous eggs before the fifth week of infection. It was found that female worms containing less than 20 uterine eggs contributed little to the accumulation of eggs in the tissues of infected mice. Such worms also generally appeared to be immature. The variable rate of maturation of worms is likely to have profound effects on the immune reactions of mice as well as on the pathologic response to infection. Systematic delay in oviposition was serendipitously found in worms from mice which had been irradiated for other purposes prior to exposure to S. japonicum, and from the fourth to the sixth week after infection egg production by worms in irradiated mice lagged well behind that in intact mice. Seven to 10 weeks after infection these worms were laying normal numbers of eggs, as judged by egg passage per worm pair in the feces and the accumulation of eggs in the tissues. S. mansoni developed normally in irradiated mice.

  4. Treatment and reinfection of water buffaloes and cattle infected with Schistosoma japonicum in Yangtze River Valley, Anhui province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianping; Zhang, Shiqing; Wu, Weidou; Zhang, Gonghua; Lu, Dabinga; Ornbjerg, Niels; Johansen, Maria V

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of praziquantel treatment of Schistosoma japonicum infections in cattle and water buffaloes and to assess the natural rate of reinfection after treatment. The studies were conducted on 2 islands in the Yangtze River, Anhui province, China, from March 2003 to January 2004. The efficacy of praziquantel was 97% when applied orally wrapped in tree leaves at the recommended doses. The efficacy was measured using a miracidium hatching technique on fecal samples collected 20 days after treatment. The treatment did not give rise to any major side effects. Reinfection after treatment was high and occurred throughout the year in both cattle and water buffaloes. Age-related resistance was only observed in water buffaloes. It is concluded that although praziquantel is highly effective against S. japonicum in cattle and water buffaloes, a single annual treatment strategy does not effectively control transmission. New strategies for integrated control of animal schistosomiasis are needed to control schistosomiasis transmission more effectively in farm areas of China.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum infection in buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region and suggestions on local treatment schemes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ming; Yu, Hua; Shi, Yao-Jun; Li, Hao; He, Liang; Li, Jian-Xi; Dong, Chang-Hua; Xie, Qiao; Jin, Ya-Mei; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiao-Jiao

    2013-11-15

    Schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public health problem and the Poyang Lake region in Jiangxi province is one of the worst affected endemic areas. Buffaloes play a major role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans. The aim of the present study was to increase understanding of the epidemic characteristics of schistosomiasis japonica in water buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region, after achieving the national mid-term goal, and to provide a basis for further interventions. The baseline prevalence in two villages in the Poyang Lake region in May 2010 was compared with respect to usage, sex and age in the total study population. Seasonal dynamics from May 2010 to May 2011 were observed in a natural village in the studied area. The baseline prevalence of infection in both villages (Caohui and Gaozhou) was 4.94% in May 2010. The prevalence in buffalo younger than 12 months was 12.82% in Caohui and 15.11% in Gaozhou, which was significantly higher than that found in those aged 13-24 months and older than 24 months. Of the 28 infected buffaloes, 82.14% (23) were younger than 12 months. The flow of seasonal dynamics showed that S. japonicum infection buffaloes were found from May to July and from November to January of the following year. This survey suggested that it is necessary to conduct two mass treatments (especially for young animals) in late March or early April and November, with an additional treatment of positive animals in July or June.

  6. Ultrastructural observation and gene expression profiling of Schistosoma japonicum derived from two natural reservoir hosts, water buffalo and yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Feng, Xingang; Fu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Chunxiu; Hong, Yang; Shi, Yaojun; Zhang, Min; Liu, Jinming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-01-01

    Water buffalo and yellow cattle are the two of the most important natural reservoir hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in endemic areas of China, although their susceptibility differs, with water buffalo being less conducive to the growth and development of S. japonicum. Results from the current study show that the general morphology and ultrastructure of adult schistosomes derived from the two hosts also differed. Using high-throughput microarray technology, we also compared the gene expression profiles of adult schistosomes derived from the two hosts. We identified genes that were differentially expressed in worms from the two natural hosts. Further analysis revealed that genes associated with protein kinase and phosphatase, the stimulus response, and lipid and nucleotide metabolism were overexpressed, whereas genes associated with reproduction, anatomical structure morphogenesis and multifunctional motif were underexpressed in schistosomes from water buffalo. These differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in nucleotide, energy, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, transcription, transport and signaling pathway. This suggests that they are key molecules affecting the survival and development of schistosomes in different natural host species. The results of this study add to current understanding of the interplay between parasites and their natural hosts, and provide valuable information for the screening of vaccine candidates or new drug targets against schistosomiasis in the natural reservoir hosts in endemic areas.

  7. Transmission of Schistosoma japonicum by humans and domestic animals in the Yangtze River valley, Anhui province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Ping; Vang Johansen, Maria; Zhang, Shi-Qing; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wu, Wei-Duo; Zhang, Gong-Hua; Pan, Xin-Ping; Ju, Yang; Ørnbjerg, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the relative contribution to transmission of Schistosoma japonicum by humans and domestic animals in two villages in the Yangtze River valley in Anhui province, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the prevalence and intensity of S. japonicum in humans, cattle, water buffaloes, horses, pigs, goats, dogs and cats. Additionally, for each host species the number of individuals and the mean faecal excretion per day was determined. Results showed that both prevalence and intensity of infection varied significantly between species and between the two villages and neither of the variables gave an adequate picture of the potential transmission. Total daily egg excretion was significantly higher in Chenqiao village compared with Guanghui village. Whereas humans were the main contributors to transmission of schistosomiasis in Guanghui village (80.4%), water buffaloes accounted for nearly 90% and goats for more than 5% of the transmission in Chenqiao village. Hence, the present study suggests that schistosomiasis transmission might vary significantly within Chinese farm districts and successful control should rely on prior transmission index determinations on major potential contributors rather than routine data of prevalence and intensity of infection. Further studies should determine the value of adding other transmission variables like egg hatchability and faecal deposition habits.

  8. Characterization of Schistosoma japonicum estrogen-related receptor beta like 1 and immunogenicity analysis of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiujuan; Zhao, Bin; Hong, Yang; Li, Xuezheng; Peng, Jinbiao; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Fei; Shi, Yaojun; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-07-01

    The estrogen-related receptor beta like 1 (EsRRBL1) is a sex hormone receptor. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of the EsRRBL1 gene from Schistosoma japonicum (SjEsRRBL1). Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that SjEsRRBL1 was highly expressed in 14-, 18-, 23- and 28-days-old schistosomes at the transcriptional and protein levels, when the schistosomes were undergoing early development of reproductive organs, male and female coupling, and egg-laying. qPCR also showed that schistosomula isolated from a S. japonicum-susceptible mouse host had 3- to 4-fold higher expression of SjEsRRBL1 than that from the S. japonicum non-permissive Microtus fortis host or the non-susceptible rat host. Moreover, SjEsRRBL1 expression was 2-fold higher in schistosomula from female mice than that from male mice. Western blot analysis revealed that rSjEsRRBL1 had good antigenicity. After immunization of BALB/c mice with recombinant (r)SjEsRRBL1, partial and significantly protective efficacy was observed in two independent trials (30.84% and 30.70% worm reduction; 35.39% and 35.61% liver eggs reduction), as compared with the blank control group. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that mice vaccinated with rSjEsRRBL1 produced increased levels of specific IgG, IFN-γ and IL-4, but a reduced IgG1/IgG2a ratio, as compared to the adjuvant control group and the blank control group, suggesting that rSjEsRRBL1 vaccination could induce a mixed Th1/Th2 response. The results suggested that SjEsRRBL1 might be a critical regulator of schistosome development and represent a promising vaccine target for schistosomiasis. PMID:22626519

  9. The Up-Regulation of Ribosomal Proteins Further Regulates Protein Expression Profile in Female Schistosoma japonicum after Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Li, Chen; Wang, Suwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairing of Schistosoma males and females leads to and maintains female sexual maturation. However, the mechanism by which pairing facilitates sexual maturation of females is not clear. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ribosomal proteins have regulatory rather than constitutive roles in protein translation. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the effect of ribosome regulation on female sex maturation, Solexa and iTRAQ techniques were used to analyze the relationship between ribosomal gene or protein expression and sexual development of Schistosoma females. In the present study, considerably higher number of ribosomal genes or proteins were found to be differentially expressed in paired 23-day-old females. Moreover, mature female-specific proteins associated with egg production, such as ferritin-1 heavy chain and superoxide dismutase, were selectively highly expressed in paired females, rather than higher level of protein synthesis of all transcripts compared with those in unpaired 23-day-old females. Furthermore, other developmental stages were utilized to investigate different expression pattern of ribosomal proteins in females by analysing 18-day-old female schistosomula from single- or double-sex infections to determine the relationship between ribosomal protein expression pattern and development. Results showed that undeveloped 18-day-old females from single- and double-sex infections, as well as 23-day-old unpaired females, possessed similar ribosomal protein expression patterns, which were distinct from those in 23-day-old paired females. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the pairing of females and males triggers a specialized ribosomal protein expression profile which further regulates the protein profile for sexual maturation in Schistosoma japonicum, based on its gene expression profile. PMID:26070205

  10. Synthesis, Bioactivity Evaluation, and Toxicity Assessment of Novel Salicylanilide Ester Derivatives as Cercaricides against Schistosoma japonicum and Molluscicides against Oncomelania hupensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weisi; Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Yufen; Li, Shizhu

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel salicylanilide ester derivatives were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for cercaricidal potential against Schistosoma japonicum and molluscicidal potential against Oncomelania hupensis. Four derivatives exhibited remarkable cercaricidal activity superior to that of niclosamide. Among them, the most active compound, 4-chloro-2-((2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)carbamoyl)phenyl 4-methoxybenzoate (compound 4c), showed a marked minimum effective cercaricidal concentration as low as 0.43 μM and significant molluscicidal activity, with a 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of 0.206 g/m2. Particularly, compound 4c displayed 88-fold decreased fish toxicity on Danio rerio and 44-fold reduced cytotoxicity on human kidney HEK293 cells in comparison with the toxicity of niclosamide. The results indicated that 4c could serve as a promising drug candidate, with environmental safety properties, against Schistosoma japonicum at transmission stages. The preliminary molecular mechanism of target compounds in Schistosoma japonicum cercariae was also investigated. Salicylanilide ester derivatives exhibited an inhibitory effect on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) but no effect on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and a strong and significant correlation between NOS inhibitory efficacy and cercaricidal activity was observed. In addition, 4c could downregulate the expression of NOS in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that NOS was probably one of the drug targets of salicylanilide esters. PMID:26503661

  11. Field transmission intensity of Schistosoma japonicum measured by basic reproduction ratio from modified Barbour’s model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica, caused by infection with Schistosoma japonicum, is still recognized as a major public health problem in the Peoples’ Republic of China. Mathematical modelling of schistosomiasis transmission has been undertaken in order to assess and project the effects of various control strategies for elimination of the disease. Seasonal fluctuations in transmission may have the potential to impact on the population dynamics of schistosomiasis, yet no model of S. japonicum has considered such effects. In this paper, we characterize the transmission dynamics of S. japonicum using a modified version of Barbour’s model to account for seasonal variation (SV), and investigate the effectiveness of the control strategy adopted in Liaonan village of Xingzi county, Jiangxi Province. Methods We use mathematical tools for stability analysis of periodic systems and derive expressions for the basic reproduction ratio of S. japonicum in humans; we parameterise such expressions with surveillance data to investigate the conditions for persistence or elimination of the disease in the study village. We perform numerical simulations and parametric sensitivity analysis to understand local transmission conditions and compare values of the basic reproductive ratio with and without seasonal fluctuations. Results The explicit formula of the basic reproduction ratio for the SV-modified Barbour’s model is derived. Results show that the value of the basic reproduction ratio, R0, of Liaonan village, Xingzi county is located between 1.064 and 1.066 (very close to 1), for schistosomiasis transmission during 2006 to 2010, after intensification of control efforts. Conclusions Our modified version of the Barbour model to account for seasonal fluctuations in transmission has the potential to provide better estimations of infection risk than previous models. Ignoring seasonality tends to underestimate R0 values albeit only marginally. In the absence of simultaneous R0

  12. Comparative characterization of microRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum schistosomula from Wistar rats and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongxiao; Peng, Jinbiao; Hong, Yang; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Zhu, Chuangang; Zhao, Qiuhua; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-07-01

    More than 40 kinds of mammals in China are known to be naturally infected with Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) (Peng et al. Parasitol Res 106:967-76, 2010). Compared with permissive BALB/c mice, rats are less susceptible to S. japonicum infection and are considered to provide an unsuitable microenvironment for parasite growth and development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), via the regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, may be responsible for developmental differences between schistosomula in these two rodent hosts. Solexa deep-sequencing technology was used to identify differentially expressed miRNAs from schistosomula isolated from Wistar rats and BALB/c mice 10 days post-infection. The deep-sequencing analysis revealed that nearly 40 % of raw reads (10.37 and 10.84 million reads in schistosomula isolated from Wistar rats and BALB/c mice, respectively) can be mapped to selected mirs in miRBase or in species-specific genomes. Further analysis revealed that several miRNAs were differentially expressed in schistosomula isolated from these two rodents; 18 were downregulated (by <2-fold) and 23 were up-regulated (>2-fold) (expression levels in rats compare with those in mice). Additionally, three novel miRNAs were primarily predicted and identified. Among the 41 differentially expressed miRNAs, 4 miRNAs had been identified with specific functions in schistosome development or host-parasite interaction, such as sexual maturation (sja-miR-1, sja-miR-7-5p), embryo development (sja-miR-36-3p) in schistosome, and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis (sja-bantam). Then, the target genes were mapped, filtered, and correlated with a set of genes that were differentially expressed genes in schistosomula isolated from mice and rats, which we identified in a S. japonicum oligonucleotide microarray analysis in a previous study. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the predicted target genes of 13 differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that they

  13. A potential impact of climate change and water resource development on the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, G J; Vounatsou, P; Zhou, X N; Tanner, M; Utzinger, J

    2005-03-01

    There is growing consensus among climate modellers that the unusual global warming observed in the last decades of the 20th century is primarily forced by human activities, namely greenhouse gas increases in the atmosphere. Global warming will trigger alterations in physical and biological systems, including shifts in the spatio-temporal distribution of disease vectors, but the nature and extent of these changes are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential impact of climate change and water resource development on the distribution of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma japonicum. We employed two 30-year composite datasets comprising average monthly temperatures collected at 623 observing stations throughout China, spanning the periods 1961-1990 and 1971-2000. Temperature changes were assessed spatially between the 1960s and 1990s for January, as this is the critical month for survival of O. hupensis. Our database shows that January temperatures increased at 590 stations (94.7%), and that China's average January temperature in the 1990s was 0.96 degrees C higher than 30 years earlier. The historical 0-1 degrees C January isotherm, which was considered the approximate northern limit of S. japonicum transmission, has shifted from 33 degrees 15' N to 33 degrees 41' N, expanding the potential transmission area by 41,335 km2. This translates to an additional 20.7 million people at risk of schistosomiasis. Two lakes are located in this new transmission area that form part of the proposed South-North water transfer project. Climate change, coupled with water resource developments in China, may pose additional challenges for the control of schistosomiasis.

  14. Impact of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project on the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Dai, J R; Liang, Y S; Huang, Y X; Coles, G C

    2009-01-01

    The South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP) is currently the key, national, water-conservation project in China, designed to optimise the use of water resources and relieve the water shortages in the north of the country. As one of the main water intakes for the project, that of the Eastern Route Scheme (ERS), is a breeding site for Oncomelania hupensis (the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum), there is concern that the snail may be carried far to the north, in the water passing through the project. To see if they could survive and breed to the north of their current range in China, O. hupensis were collected in marshland near Nanjing City and transferred to cages, on the banks of fish ponds, in the cities of Zhenjiang (in Jiangsu province, at 32 degrees 10'N), Xuzhou (in the same province but at a latitude of 34 degrees 23'N) and Jining (in Shandong province, at 35 degrees 23'N). Except over the first 6 months in Xuzhou, the snails moved north of their natural distribution did not survive and reproduce as well as those in Zhenjiang, and all those transferred to Jining died out within 1 year. Although the snail populations in Xuzhou survived for 7-8 years and retained their infectivity to S. japonicum, histological and histochemical studies revealed abnormalities in the reproductive organs of these snails. It is concluded that, unless global warming significantly increases the minimum winter temperatures in northern China, the SNWDP is unlikely to result in the northward spread of schistosomiasis japonica.

  15. Schistosoma japonicum egg specific protein SjE16.7 recruits neutrophils and induces inflammatory hepatic granuloma initiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenyun; Chen, Qing; Fang, Yan; Wu, Jianhua; Han, Yanyan; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yang; Chu, Min; Feng, Yan; Tan, Linping; Guo, Xiaokui; Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhaojun

    2014-02-01

    Neutrophils are known to play a major role in the egg granulomatous lesions caused by Schistosoma japonicum, but the precise mechanism by which eggs recruit or active neutrophil is unknown. Here we report S. japonicum egg specific EF-hand protein-SjE16.7 is a potent neutrophil recruiter and initiates the egg associated inflammatory granuloma in schistosomiasis. We show that the expression of SjE16.7 at level of both mRNA and protein is restricted to the egg stage. It locates in the miracidium and subshell area of the egg and can be secreted by the egg. The antigenic properties of SjE16.7 strongly suggest a role for SjE16.7 as an egg-derived molecule involved in host-parasite interactions. To study SjE16.7 functions in vivo, we challenged murine air pouch with recombinant SjE16.7. The results showed SjE16.7 trigged more inflammatory cell infiltration than vehicle or control protein. Using peritoneal exudate neutrophils from mice, we found that SjE16.7 significantly induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, and the observed phenotypes were associated with enhanced Rac GTPase activation in SjE16.7 treated cells. Finally, in vivo hepatic granuloma formation model showed SjE16.7 coupled beads recruited more inflammatory cell infiltration than control beads. Our findings suggest SjE16.7 is an important pathogenic factor derived from egg. By recruiting neutrophils and inducing local inflammation, SjE16.7 facilitates eggs to be excreted through gut tissues and also initiates pathology in the liver; therefore SjE16.7 is a possible target for the prevention and treatment of schistosomiasis. PMID:24551263

  16. Genetic variability among Schistosoma japonicum isolates from the Philippines, Japan and China revealed by sequence analysis of three mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fen; Li, Juan; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-02-01

    The present study examined sequence variability in the mitochondrial (mt) protein-coding genes cytochrome b (cytb), NADH dehydrogenase subunits 2 and 6 (nad2 and nad6) among 24 isolates of Schistosoma japonicum from different endemic regions in the Philippines, Japan and China. The complete cytb, nad2 and nad6 genes were amplified and sequenced separately from individual schistosome. Sequence variations for isolates from the Philippines were 0-0.5% for cytb, 0-0.6% for nad2, and 0-0.9% for nad6. Variation was 0-0.5%, 0.1-0.8%, 0-0.7% for corresponding genes for schistosome samples from mainland China. For worms in Japan, genetic variations were 0-0.2%, 0.1-0.2% and 0 for the three genes, respectively. Sequence variations were 0-1.0%, 0-1.8% and 0-1.1% for cytb, nad2 and nad6, respectively, among schistosome isolates from different geographical strains in the Philippines, Japan and China. Of the three countries, lowest sequence variations were found between isolates from mainland China and the Philippines and highest were detected between Japan and the Philippines in three mtDNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the combined sequences of cytb, nad2 and nad6 revealed that all isolates in the Philippines clustered together sistered to samples from Yunnan and Zhejiang provinces in China, while isolates from Yamanashi in Japan were in a solitary clade. These results demonstrated the usefulness of the combined three mtDNA sequences for studying genetic diversity and population structure among S. japonicum isolates from the Philippines, China and Japan.

  17. Application of recombinant Sjc26GST for serodiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection in water buffalo (Bos buffelus).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Tsaihong, John Chin; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2007-12-25

    Schistosomiasis japonica is currently the most serious parasitic disease in mainland China and it is estimated that several million people are infected. Furthermore, it is also responsible for the deaths of many domestic animals. In order to establish an effective diagnostic method, the gene encoding Sjc26GST was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with His-tag. The purified reSjc26GST was used as an antigen for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and for immunoblotting detection of Schistosoma japonicum antibodies in water buffaloes. Our results showed that mean OD values of specific serum IgG antibodies from egg-positive buffaloes were 3.37-fold higher than what was found in egg-negative buffaloes from non-endemic areas. The data also showed the OD value of the endemic egg-negative group reached as high as 1.69 times as that found in non-endemic areas. The positivity rate of egg-positive buffaloes was 100%, but was 30.3% in the endemic egg-negative group. Infected bovine antisera also recognized reSjc26GST, a 27kDa protein as determined by Western blot. These results suggest that the recombinant GST expressed in E. coli should be an effective diagnostic reagent for detection of antibody against S. japonicum in buffaloes. Due to straightforward production, excellent sensitivity and high specificity, the reSjc26GST described in this study can be considered as a candidate protein for immunological diagnosis of bovine schistosomiasis. Developing reSjc26GST, with its potential diagnostic values, will be useful for diagnosis and surveillance of schistosomiasis in controlling the spread of this parasitic disease in domestic animals.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the

  19. Field assessment of recombinant Schistosoma japonicum 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase in Chinese water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    He, Y K; Liu, S X; Zhang, X Y; Song, G C; Luo, X S; Li, Y S; Xu, Y X; Yu, X L; Li, Y; Hou, X Y; McManus, D P

    2003-09-01

    We have shown previously that anti-fecundity immunity can be induced experimentally against recombinant 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase (reSjc26GST) in Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus), important reservoir hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in China. In the field study described here, we immunized buffaloes with reSjc26GST to induce protective immunity against S. japonicum and to evaluate its effectiveness in controlling schistosomiasis japonica. We selected two villages as test and control groups in inside-embankment areas endemic for schistosomiasis japonica. The buffaloes in the test village were vaccinated with reSjc26GST, whereas those in the control village were not. The indicators of the effect of the vaccine included the generation of specific IgG antibodies in the vaccinated buffaloes, changes in the prevalence and infection intensity in buffaloes and village children, changes in the density of infected snails, and changes in the infectivity of water bodies (assessed by sentinel mice) in transmission areas adjacent to both villages. Twenty months after vaccination, the infection rate of buffaloes in the test village was decreased by 60.4% (from an initial prevalence of 13.5% to 5.4%), and 67.9% when compared with that in the control village (initial prevalence of 16.7%). However, the infection rate in village children remained unchanged. The density of infected snails decreased by 71.4%, from 0.0049/0.11 m2 to 0.0014/0.11m2 in the high transmission area outside the embankment in the test village. There was no change in the infectivity of the water body transmission areas between the test and control villages. The levels of specific antibodies to reSjc26GST showed a continuous increase after vaccination. These results indicate that protective immunity was induced and maintained in buffaloes after vaccination with reSjc26GST. The vaccine could thus play a significant role in reducing S. japonicum transmission caused by water buffaloes in the Lake region

  20. Cross-sectional associations between intensity of animal and human infection with Schistosoma japonicum in Western Samar province, Philippines.

    PubMed Central

    McGarvey, Stephen T.; Carabin, Hélène; Balolong, Ernesto; Bélisle, Patrick; Fernandez, Tomas; Joseph, Lawrence; Tallo, Veronica; Gonzales, Ryan; Tarafder, Mushfiqur R.; Alday, Portia; Willingham, Arve Lee; Olveda, Remigio

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between the intensity of animal infection with Schistosoma japonicum and human infection in Western Samar province, the Philippines. METHODS: We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 1425 households in 50 villages. Stool samples were collected on each of 1-3 days from 5623 humans, 1275 cats, 1189 dogs, 1899 pigs, 663 rats and 873 water buffalo. Intensity of infection with S. japonicum was measured by the number of eggs per gram (EPG). Egg counts were done using the Kato-Katz method. We used a Bayesian hierarchical cumulative logit model, with adjustments for age, sex, occupation and measurement error. FINDINGS: The adjusted proportions of humans lightly infected (classified as 1-100 EPG) was 17.7% (95% Bayesian credible interval = 15.3-20.2%); the proportion classified as at least moderately infected (>100 EPG) was 3.2% (2.2-4.6%). The crude parasitological results for animals indicated that 37 cats (2.9%), 228 dogs (19.2%), 39 pigs (2.1%), 199 rats (30.0%) and 28 water buffalo (3.2%) were infected. In univariate analyses the odds ratios corresponding to a unit increase in the mean number of EPG at the village-level in dogs was 1.05 (1.01-1.09), in cats 1.35 (1.02-1.78), in pigs 1.16 (0.24- 5.18) and in rats 1.00 (1.00-1.01). Mean EPG values in cats, dogs, pigs and rats were correlated with one another. This confounding made interpreting the odds ratios difficult, but the odds ratios for dogs and cats were more consistent. CONCLUSION: S. japonicum is endemic in areas of the Philippines despite implementation of control programmes. This may be due to the association of infections in dogs and cats with human infections. Infection control in dogs and cats is challenging, and there is a need to develop new methods to control transmission across all species. PMID:16799728

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase gene from a blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; He, Yuan; He, Li; Zong, Hong-Ying; Cai, Guo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) is a major antioxidant enzyme and plays critical roles in the protection of cells against oxidative stress by catalysing reduction of lipid hydroperoxides. A full-length cDNA sequence corresponding to GPx gene from Schistosoma japonicum (designated SjGPx) was isolated and characterized. SjGPx contained an in-frame TGA codon for selenocysteine (Sec) and a concurrent Sec insertion sequence in its 3'-untranslated region. Protein encoded by SjGPx demonstrated a primary structure characteristic to the PHGPx family, including preservation of catalytic domains and absence of the subunit interaction domains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the SjGPx was highly related to the other PHGPx-related members, and clustered into the trematode subclade II. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting showed that the SjGPx was mainly expressed in the female adults and eggs. RNA interference was employed to investigate the effects of knockdown of SjGPx. SjGPx expression level was significantly reduced on the 5th day post-RNAi. We observed a 53.86% reduction in total GPx activity and the eggs severely deformed. Oxidative stimulation of viable worms with H2O2 or paraquat resulted in 1.6- to 2.1-fold induction of the GPx activity. Our results revealed that the SjGPx protein is selenium-dependent PHGPx, which might actively participate in the detoxification of oxidative damage during egg production. PMID:26484892

  2. 3-Oxoacyl-ACP Reductase from Schistosoma japonicum: Integrated In Silico-In Vitro Strategy for Discovering Antischistosomal Lead Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Dyer, Dave; Wang, Jipeng; Wang, Shuqi; Du, Xiaofeng; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Haobing; Wang, Xiaoning; Hu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic worms and more than 200 million people are infected worldwide. The emergence of resistance to the most commonly used drug, praziquantel (PZQ), makes the development of novel drugs an urgent task. 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (OAR), a key enzyme involved in the fatty acid synthesis pathway, has been identified as a potential drug target against many pathogenic organisms. However, no research on Schistosoma japonicum OAR (SjOAR) has been reported. The characterization of the SjOAR protein will provide new strategies for screening antischistosomal drugs that target SjOAR. Methodology/Principal Findings After cloning the SjOAR gene, recombinant SjOAR protein was purified and assayed for enzymatic activity. The tertiary structure of SjOAR was obtained by homology modeling and 27 inhibitor candidates were identified from 14,400 compounds through molecular docking based on the structure. All of these compounds were confirmed to be able to bind to the SjOAR protein by BIAcore analysis. Two compounds exhibited strong antischistosomal activity and inhibitory effects on the enzymatic activity of SjOAR. In contrast, these two compounds showed relatively low toxicity towards host cells. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here shows the feasibility of isolation of new antischistosomal compounds using a combination of virtual screening and experimental validation. Based on this strategy, we successfully identified 2 compounds that target SjOAR with strong antischistosomal activity but relatively low cytotoxicity to host cells. PMID:23762275

  3. Schistosoma japonicum soluble egg antigens activate naive B cells to produce antibodies: definition of parasite mechanisms of immune deviation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, T; Watanabe, T; Saito, S; Araki, Y; Sendo, F

    1993-01-01

    This study analysed the effect of Schistosoma japonicum egg antigens (SEA) on the activation of lymphocytes from naive mice. T cells were found to be unaffected by SEA. B cells, however, were activated by SEA without participation of adherent cells such as macrophages. B-cell activating factor(s) in SEA were distributed into a fraction of M(r) 120,000 and a fraction of M(r) 650,000 by gel filtration. However, a fraction of M(r) 120,000 demonstrated the presence of a limited number of components by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under non-denaturing conditions. These activating factor(s) were destroyed by peroxidase oxidation, heat treatment, chymotrypsin and trypsin digestion. These results indicate that the B-cell activating factor(s) in SEA contain both carbohydrate and protein. IgM antibodies were detected in the culture supernatant of SEA-activated B cells after 48 hr in culture, but IgG antibodies were undetected in culture. These antibodies did not react with SEA but reacted with sheep, horse, mouse red blood cells, carbonic anhydrase and autoantigens in myelinated nerve fibres of cerebrum as well as luminal surface and parietal cells of the stomach of naive mice. Thus our data demonstrated that SEA directly stimulates naive B cells to produce antibodies against heterophile and autologous antigens. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8344698

  4. Recombinant paramyosin (rec-Sj-97) tested for immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    McManus, D P; Wong, J Y; Zhou, J; Cai, C; Zeng, Q; Smyth, D; Li, Y; Kalinna, B H; Duke, M J; Yi, X

    2001-12-12

    A primary vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis is paramyosin (pmy), a myofibrillar protein found exclusively in invertebrates. Here we report the results of vaccine trials against the Asian schistosome undertaken on inbred and outbred mice and water buffaloes using a bacterially expressed and purified form of Schistosoma japonicum pmy (rec-Sj-97). Vaccination of the mice resulted in high levels of specific anti-pmy IgG antibodies when compared with adjuvant controls and significant reduction in worm burdens and in liver eggs. Furthermore, a significant reduction in liver eggs was recorded in two of the three water buffalo vaccine trials undertaken and, in all three trials, high levels of specific anti-pmy IgG antibodies were generated. There was no evidence of any toxic effects and the vaccine preparations and Quil A adjuvant were clearly well tolerated. The development of a vaccine intended for livestock animals such as bovines would be beneficial in two ways; directly by blocking transmission of schistosomiasis to humans and economically by contributing to healthier livestock. We are encouraged by the consistent efficacy in the mouse and the buffalo vaccine trials that resulted in a significant decrease in liver eggs. Indeed, predictions from mathematical models indicate that an egg reduction effect of 42-45% in buffaloes would be sufficient when combined with human treatment to control schistosomiasis japonica in the marshes and lakes along the middle and upper reaches of the Yangtze River, the most highly endemic areas for the disease in China.

  5. SjE16.7 activates macrophages and promotes Schistosoma japonicum egg-induced granuloma development.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Wu, Chenyun; Chen, Qing; Wu, Jianhua; Yang, Yang; Guo, Xiaokui; Chen, Guangjie; Wang, Zhaojun

    2015-09-01

    SjE16.7 is an egg-specific protein from Schistosoma japonicum that recruits neutrophils and initiates an inflammatory granuloma response in host tissue. However, since macrophages are known to be important regulators of egg granuloma formation we investigated the effect of SjE16.7 on this cell type. Here we report that SjE16.7 is a potent macrophage activator, inducing macrophage chemotaxis and stimulating cytokine production. Treatment of murine primary macrophages with SjE16.7 resulted in upregulation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-α), as well as phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Moreover, SjE16.7 treatment increased MHC Class II expression on the surface of macrophages. Importantly, in vivo blockade of SjE16.7 significantly reduced egg-induced pathology, as a result of decreased leucocyte infiltration and reduced granuloma size. Our results suggest that SjE16.7 is an important pathogenic factor and a potential treatment target for this disease.

  6. Exploring the Contribution of Host Susceptibility to Epidemiological Patterns of Schistosoma japonicum Infection Using an Individual-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Spear, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the analysis of epidemiological data suggesting variability in individual susceptibility to infection by Schistosoma japonicum among rural villagers who reside in Sichuan Province of southwestern China. By supplementing the data used in the earlier analysis from other studies we have reported from this region, we presented improved estimates of cercarial exposure, which in turn, result in stronger evidence of susceptibility. This analysis was conducted using an individual-based mathematical model (IBM) whose use was motivated by the nature and extent of field data from the low-transmission environments exemplified by one of our datasets and typical of the current situation in most endemic areas of China. In addition to individual susceptibility and water contact, the model includes stochastic aspects of cercarial exposure as well as of diagnostic procedures, the latter being particularly relevant to the low-transmission environment. The simulation studies show that, to produce key aspects of the epidemiological findings, the distribution of susceptibility ranges over several orders of magnitude and is highly right skewed. We found no compelling evidence that the distribution of susceptibility differed between the two populations that underlie both the epidemiological and simulation results. PMID:25870427

  7. The Differential Expression of Immune Genes between Water Buffalo and Yellow Cattle Determines Species-Specific Susceptibility to Schistosoma japonicum Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Yang; Wu, Haiwei; Jin, Yamei; Zhu, Chuangang; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Shi, Yaojun; Yuan, Chunxiu; Cheng, Guofeng; Feng, Xingang; Liu, Jinming; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    Water buffalo are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection than yellow cattle. The factors that affect such differences in susceptibility remain unknown. A Bos taurus genome-wide gene chip was used to analyze gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood of water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection with S. japonicum. This study showed that most of the identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection were involved in immune-related processes, and the expression level of immune genes was lower in water buffalo. The unique DEGs (390) in yellow cattle were mainly associated with inflammation pathways, while the unique DEGs (2,114) in water buffalo were mainly associated with immune-related factors. The 83 common DEGs may be the essential response genes during S. japonicum infection, the highest two gene ontology (GO) functions were associated with the regulation of fibrinolysis. The pathway enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs constituted similar immune-related pathways pre- and post-infection between the two hosts. This first analysis of the transcriptional profiles of natural hosts has enabled us to gain new insights into the mechanisms that govern their susceptibility or resistance to S. japonicum infections.

  8. CD36-related protein in Schistosoma japonicum: candidate mediator of selective cholesteryl ester uptake from high-density lipoprotein for egg maturation.

    PubMed

    Okumura-Noji, Kuniko; Miura, Yutaka; Lu, Rui; Asai, Kiyofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Brindley, Paul J; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    Familial cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) deficiency is more common in some East Asian populations than elsewhere, suggesting the possibility of a selective advantage of this genetic defect against regional infectious diseases. Historically, infection with the Asian blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum has been endemic in these regions, including Japan. We previously reported that eggs of S. japonicum require cholesteryl ester uptake from normal high-density lipoprotein (HDL) but not from CETP-deficient HDL for their maturation to miracidia, a critical step of the hepatic pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. Herein we show that cholesteryl ester uptake is selective from HDL, and identified CD36-related protein (CD36RP) as a candidate to mediate the reaction. CD36RP was cloned from the adult and the egg developmental stages of S. japonicum, with 1880 bp encoding 506 amino acid residues exhibiting the CD36 domains and two transmembrane regions. Using antibodies against recombinant peptides representing the potential extracellular domains of CD36RP, Western blotting detected a protein with a molecular mass of 82 kDa in the particulate fraction of the adult parasite cells, which was reduced to 62 kDa after N-glycanase treatment. The extracellular domain peptide bound human HDL, as established by immunoblots following nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. Antibodies against the extracellular domain suppressed HDL cholesteryl ester uptake and maturation of the eggs in vitro. CD36RP is a candidate receptor on eggs of S. japonicum that facilitates uptake of HDL cholesteryl ester necessary for egg embryonation and maturation.

  9. Detection of early and single infections of Schistosoma japonicum in the intermediate host snail, Oncomelania hupensis, by PCR and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Takashi; Furushima-Shimogawara, Rieko; Ohmae, Hiroshi; Wang, Tian-Ping; Lu, Shaohong; Chen, Rui; Wen, Liyong; Ohta, Nobuo

    2010-09-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the specific primer set amplifying 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of Schistosoma japonicum was able to detect genomic DNA of S. japonicum, but not S. mansoni, at 100 fg. This procedure enabled us to detect the DNA from a single miracidium and a snail infected with one miracidium at just 1 day after infection. We compared these results with those from loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeting 28S rDNA and found similar results. The LAMP could amplify the specific DNA from a group of 100 normal snails mixed with one infected snail A PCR screening of infected snails from endemic regions in Anhui Province revealed schistosomal DNA even in snails found negative by microscopy. PCR and LAMP show promise for monitoring the early infection rate in snails, and they may be useful for predicting the risk of infection in the endemic places. PMID:20810818

  10. Immune responses result in misdiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum by immunodiagnosis kits in egg-positive patients living in a low schistosomiasis transmission area of China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent field surveys, we failed to detect the presence of specific antibody against Schistosoma japonicum in some egg-positive patients by commonly used immunodiagnostic kits. To find out whether low levels of specific antibody truly exist among egg-positive individuals and elucidate the underlying immune mechanisms, we carried out a cross-sectional epidemiologic study in a S. japonicum low transmission endemic area of Poyang Lake region, China and compared the humoral and cellular immune characteristics between S. japonicum high and low antibody responders. Methods Kato–Katz thick smear assay was used to determine the schistosomiasis status of 3,384 participants residing in two Poyang Lake region villages, Jiangxi, China. Among the 142 stool egg-positive participants, we identified low and high S. japonicum antibody responders with soluble egg antigen (SEA) and adult worm antigen (AWA) specific IgG levels by adopting ROC curve analysis. To compare the humoral and cellular immune responses between high and low S. japonicum antibody responders, serum specific antibody levels as well as the percentage of T lymphocyte subpopulation in PMBC, and cell stimulated cytokines (IFN- gamma and interlukin-10) were detected. Results Eight S. japonicum egg-positive participants were defined as low antibody responders. Although the percentage of CD3+T cells in low responders was slightly higher and the percentage of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells were lower than those in high responders, the differences between the two groups were not significant (P > 0.05). AWA -stimulated interlukin-10 level was significantly higher in high responders, while other cytokines did not show differences between two groups. For antibody profiles, except AWA specific IgA, significant differences of each antibody isotype between low and high responders were detected (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study confirmed that there are S

  11. A specific PCR assay for the identification and differentiation of Schistosoma japonicum geographical isolates in mainland China based on analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Hui; Li, Juan; Song, Hui-Qun; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Fen; Lin, Rui-Qing; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Weng, Ya-Biao; Hu, Min; Zou, Feng-Cai; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, near-complete mt genome sequences for eight representative Schistosoma japonicum samples from seven endemic provinces in mainland China were analyzed. Sequence differences among the eight mt genomes of S. japonicum samples were 0.20-2.51%. Variation in protein-coding genes was greater than that in rRNA genes. The mt DNA sequences of S. japonicum samples from south-western (SW) China were 2 bp [position 11727-11728 within tRNA-Cys, microsatellite (AG) indel] longer than those of the parasites from the lower Yangtze/Zhejiang areas. Representative DNA sequencing confirmed that such (AG) indel could be exploited for identification and differentiation of S. japonicum populations in SW China's Yunnan and Sichuan province which have two (AG) repeats from those in all remaining endemic provinces along the Yangtze River below the Three Gorges regions or close to the east coast of China (e.g., Zhejiang) which have only one (AG) repeat. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated amino acids of 12 protein-coding genes also showed that samples from SW China (Sichuan and Yunnan provinces), above the Three Gorges Dam, formed a distinct cluster. Based on this indel polymorphism, a pair of specific primers was designed and used to develop a specific-PCR polyacrylamide gel detection assay. There was an obvious length difference in the amplified PCR products between S. japonicum samples from the two endemic types. The specific-PCR assay allowed the specific identification of S. japonicum, with no amplicons being amplified from other closely related trematodes, and the minimum amount of DNA detectable was 0.05 ng. This approach is inexpensive, easy to perform and the whole detection process can be completed within 4h. Examination of 81 S. japonicum samples from SW China's Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, and 264 samples from the lower Yangtze provinces (Hubei, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Anhui and Hunan) and from Zhejiang validated the value of the specific PCR assay and

  12. Comparison of apoptosis between adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum from susceptible (BALB/c mice) and less-susceptible (Wistar rats) hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Xiaoyong; Hong, Yang; Han, Hongxiao; Cao, Xiaodan; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Min; Wu, Miaoli; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Zhao, Zhixin; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-10-30

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health concern in China. BALB/c mice are susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection, whereas the Wistar rats are less susceptible. Apoptosis phenomenon was observed in 42d adult worms of S. japonicum from both rats and mice at the morphologic, DNA, cellular, and gene levels by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorometric terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, fluorescein isothiocyanate-annexin-V/propidium iodide staining flow cytometry (FCM) analysis, and real-time PCR. The results showed that the apoptotic state in worms from two different susceptible hosts was diverse. Several classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and lunate marginalization, splitting of the nucleoli, nuclear shrinkage and apoptotic body formation were observed by TEM. TUNEL analysis showed that there were much more apoptosis spots in adult worms from rats than those from mice. Statistical analysis revealed that the degree of apoptosis and percentage of necrotic cells in adult worms from Wistar rats were significantly greater (P<0.01) than those from BALB/c mice by flow cytometry. A total of 15 apoptosis-associated genes including the major components of an intrinsic cell-death pathway were identified from S. japonicum in this study, suggested that a similar apoptosis pathway might occur in S. japonicum. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of most of the tested apoptosis-associated genes, except CASP7, were significantly higher or at the similar level in adult worms from Wistar rats, as compared to those from BALB/c mice. The results obtained in this study collectively demonstrated that differential development of adult S. japonicum in less-susceptible rats and susceptible mice was significantly associated with apoptosis in the worm, and provided valuable information to guide further investigations of the mechanisms governing

  13. Comparison of apoptosis between adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum from susceptible (BALB/c mice) and less-susceptible (Wistar rats) hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Xiaoyong; Hong, Yang; Han, Hongxiao; Cao, Xiaodan; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Min; Wu, Miaoli; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Zhao, Zhixin; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-10-30

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health concern in China. BALB/c mice are susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection, whereas the Wistar rats are less susceptible. Apoptosis phenomenon was observed in 42d adult worms of S. japonicum from both rats and mice at the morphologic, DNA, cellular, and gene levels by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorometric terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, fluorescein isothiocyanate-annexin-V/propidium iodide staining flow cytometry (FCM) analysis, and real-time PCR. The results showed that the apoptotic state in worms from two different susceptible hosts was diverse. Several classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and lunate marginalization, splitting of the nucleoli, nuclear shrinkage and apoptotic body formation were observed by TEM. TUNEL analysis showed that there were much more apoptosis spots in adult worms from rats than those from mice. Statistical analysis revealed that the degree of apoptosis and percentage of necrotic cells in adult worms from Wistar rats were significantly greater (P<0.01) than those from BALB/c mice by flow cytometry. A total of 15 apoptosis-associated genes including the major components of an intrinsic cell-death pathway were identified from S. japonicum in this study, suggested that a similar apoptosis pathway might occur in S. japonicum. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of most of the tested apoptosis-associated genes, except CASP7, were significantly higher or at the similar level in adult worms from Wistar rats, as compared to those from BALB/c mice. The results obtained in this study collectively demonstrated that differential development of adult S. japonicum in less-susceptible rats and susceptible mice was significantly associated with apoptosis in the worm, and provided valuable information to guide further investigations of the mechanisms governing

  14. Using the local immune response from the natural buffalo host to generate an antibody fragment library that binds the early larval stages of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; Driguez, Patrick; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Ilag, Leodevico L; Gladman, Simon; Li, Yuesheng; Piedrafita, David; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Antibodies isolated from the local draining inguinal lymph node of field exposed-water buffaloes following challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae showed high reactivity towards S. japonicum antigen preparations and bound specifically to formaldehyde-fixed S. japonicum schistosomules. Using this specific local immune response we produced a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain libraries from the same lymph nodes. Removal of phage that cross reacted with epitopes on adult parasites yielded a single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library that specifically bound to whole formaldehyde-fixed and live S. japonicum schistosomules. DNA sequencing indicated clear enrichment of the single-chain antibody Fv domain library for buffalo B-cell complementarity determining regions post-selection for schistosomule binding. This study also revealed that long heavy chain complementarity determining regions appear to be an important factor when selecting for antibody binding fragments against schistosomule proteins. The selected single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage were used to probe a schistosome-specific protein microarray, which resulted in the recognition of many proteins expressed across all schistosome life-cycle stages. Following absorption to adult worms, the single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library showed significantly reduced binding to most proteins, whilst two proteins (NCBI GenBank accession numbers AY915878 and AY815196) showed increased binding. We have thus developed a unique set of host derived single-chain antibody Fv domains comprising buffalo B-cell variable regions that specifically bind to early S. japonicum life-stages.

  15. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies.

  16. Performance of a dipstick dye immunoassay for rapid screening of Schistosoma japonicum infection in areas of low endemicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The dipstick dye immunoassay (DDIA), recently commercially available in the People's Republic of China (P.R. China), is a rapid and simple test to detect human antibodies against Schistosoma Japonicum. Its performance and utility for screening schistosome infection in low endemic areas is little known. We therefore carried out a cross-sectional survey in seven villages with low endemicity of schistosomiasis in P.R. China and assessed the performance and utility of DDIA for diagnosis of schistosomiasis. Stool samples were collected and examined by the Kato-Katz method and the miracidium hatching technique. Serum samples, separated from whole blood of participants, were tested by DDIA. Results 6285 individuals aged 6-65 years old participated in this study, with a prevalence of schistosomiasis of 4.20%. Using stool examination as a gold reference standard, DDIA performed with a high overall sensitivity of 91.29% (95% CI: 87.89-94.69%) and also a high negative predictive value, with a mean value of 99.29% (95% CI: 98.99-99.58%). The specificity of DDIA was only moderate (53.08%, 95% CI: 51.82-54.34%). Multivariate analysis indicated that age, occupation and history of schistosome infection were significantly associated with the false positive results of DDIA. Conclusions DDIA is a sensitive, rapid, simple and portable diagnostic assay and can be used as a primary approach for screening schistosome infection in areas of low endemicity. However, more sensitive and specific confirmatory assays need to be developed and combined with DDIA for targeting chemotherapy accurately. PMID:21599944

  17. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies. PMID:25973009

  18. Further studies on mefloquine and praziquantel alone or interaction of both drugs against Schistosoma japonicum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Xue, Jian; Zhang, Hao-bing

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to further understand and analyze the interaction of mefloquine with praziquantel against adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro. Mice infected with S. japonicum cercariae for 35-37 days were sacrificed, and adult schistosomes were collected by perfusion. Schistosomes were placed to each of 12 wells of a Falcon plate and maintained in RPMI 1640 supplemented by 10% calf serum. For determination of 50% and 95% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC95) of the two drugs in vitro, schistosomes were exposed to mefloquine at concentrations of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10 μg/mL or praziquantel at concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 10, and 30 μg/mL. The plate was incubated at 37°C in 95% air + 5% CO₂ for 72 h. According to the half-life of oral mefloquine and praziquantel in mice, mefloquine combined with praziquantel simultaneously, mefloquine administered within 1 h after praziquantel and praziquantel administered within 17 h after mefloquine were used to evaluate the effect of mefloquine in combination with praziquantel against S. japonicum in vitro. The results showed that the LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine calculated by the Bliss method were 6.17 μg/mL (95% confidence limits, 5.84-6.517 μg/mL) and 8.703 μg/mL (95% confidence limits, 7.632-9.797 μg/mL), respectively. As to praziquantel, no worm death was seen when schistosomes were exposed to praziquantel at concentrations of 0.005-0.2 μg/mL for 72 h. While in the worms exposed to praziquantel 1, 10, and 30 μg/mL, strong spasmodic contractions of the worm body and vesiculation along the worm surface were observed, but 48-75% of the schistosomes survived the exposure in 72-h incubation. Meanwhile, the number of dead worms that emerged in each group was not proportion to the increasing concentrations. Therefore, it is not appropriate to calculate the LC50 and LC95 of praziquantel. For evaluation of the interaction with the two drugs, praziquantel 0.1 or 0.2

  19. Enhancement of Protective Efficacy through Adenoviral Vectored Vaccine Priming and Protein Boosting Strategy Encoding Triosephosphate Isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. Conclusions/Significance The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China. PMID:25793406

  20. Deep sequencing-based identification of pathogen-specific microRNAs in the plasma of rabbits infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guofeng; Luo, Rong; Hu, Chao; Cao, Jie; Jin, Youxin

    2013-12-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have received considerable attention as a novel class of biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and as signalling molecules in mediating intercellular communication. Schistosomes, the causative agents of schistosomiasis, live in the blood vessels of a mammalian host in the adult stage. In the present study, we characterized schistosome-specific small RNA populations in the plasma of rabbits infected with Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) using a deep sequencing method and then identified five schistosome-specific miRNAs, including four known miRNAs (Bantam, miR-3479, miR-10 and miR-3096), and one novel miRNA (miR-0001, miRBase ID: sja-miR-8185). Four of the five schistosome-specific miRNAs were also detected by real-time RT-PCR in the plasma of S. japonicum-infected mice. In addition, our study indicated that schistosome Argonaute 2/3 may be an excretory-secretory (ES) protein. In summary, our findings are expected to provide useful information for further development of novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and also for deeper understanding of the mechanism of host-parasite interaction.

  1. Schistosoma japonicum egg antigen up-regulates fibrogenesis and inhibits proliferation in primary hepatic stellate cells in a concentration-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Mi; Lu, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Shu-Juan; Tang, Wang-Xian

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different concentrations of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg antigen on fibrogenesis and apoptosis in primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: A mouse model of schistosomiasis-associated liver fibrosis (SSLF) was established by infecting mice with schistosomal cercaria via the abdomen. HSCs were isolated from SSLF mice by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, and their identity was confirmed by immunofluorescence double staining of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin. The growth inhibitory effect and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of S. japonicum egg antigen for primary HSCs (24 h) were determined using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The expression levels of α-SMA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMOL/LP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in HSCs in response to different concentrations of S. japonicum egg antigen were detected by Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The levels of phospho-P38 (P-P38), phospho-Jun N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and phospho-Akt (P-AKT) in HSCs were detected by Western blotting. RESULTS: An SSLF mouse model was established, and primary HSCs were successfully isolated and cultured. S. japonicum egg antigen inhibited HSC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of the S. japonicum egg antigen was 244.53 ± 35.26 μg/mL. S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced α-SMA expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and enhanced TIMP-1 expression at the mRNA level in HSCs (P < 0.05), whereas the expression of MMOL/LP-9 was attenuated at both the mRNA and protein levels in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). A high concentration of S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced P-P38, P-JNK and P-AKT activation (P < 0.05). The changes in α-SMA and MMOL/LP-9 expression induced by S. japonicum egg antigen were closely correlated with P-P38 and P-JNK activation (P < 0.05). The attenuation of MMOL/LP-9

  2. The Schistosoma japonicum self-cure phenomenon in water buffaloes: potential impact on the control and elimination of schistosomiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-Sheng; McManus, Donald P; Lin, Dan-Dan; Williams, Gail M; Harn, Donald A; Ross, Allen G; Feng, Zheng; Gray, Darren J

    2014-03-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica, caused by Schistosoma japonicum, is an important zoonotic disease in China, the Philippines and small pockets of Indonesia. In addition to infecting people, S. japonicum can infect over 40 species of wild and domestic animals which have varying impacts on human infection. It is now generally accepted that bovines, particularly water buffaloes, are the major reservoir for human infection in China as they are naturally infected with schistosomes and deposit more eggs into the environment than humans or any other animal host. This complicates control efforts and the economic burden associated with schistosomiasis morbidity and mortality has taken its toll on both human and livestock populations. Over the last 50years, the schistosomiasis control program in China has made great strides in reducing prevalence and morbidity, and the Chinese authorities now aim to eliminate the disease nationwide in the next decade. Current Chinese control strategies place particular importance on interventions targeting bovines including: praziquantel treatment, barrier farming to prevent grazing in transmission areas, their replacement with mechanized tractors and possible bovine vaccination. A number of studies have shown that in the period following S. japonicum infection, the worm burden drops sharply in water buffaloes and some other animal hosts such as pigs. This is due to a self-cure phenomenon whereby there is parasite clearance by both immune and non-immune factors. Here we review studies investigating the self-cure effect, paying particular attention to S. japonicum infection in water buffaloes, and discuss its potential impact on the future schistosomiasis control and elimination efforts in China. Further understanding of the mechanism of self-cure in water buffaloes could be important for future schistosome vaccine design and delivery.

  3. Control Efficacy of Annual Community-Wide Treatment against Schistosoma japonicum in China: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing; Lu, Da-Bing; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Su-Rong; Zhuge, Hong-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds Human schistosomiasis is caused by schistosome, with annual loss of over 70 million disability adjusted life years in the world. China is endemic with Schistosoma japonicum and large-scale chemotherapy with praziquantel has become the mainstay of control in China since 1990s. However, the control effects of mass treatment in the field have been uneven. Moreover, mass treatment has come into a wide use in other countries with limited health resources. Therefore, a better understanding of the control effect of mass treatment is in an urgent need. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature to investigate the control efficiency of annual community-wide treatment (ACWT, treatment to an entire community without any preliminary screening) with a single dose of PZQ (40 mg kg−1 bodyweight) against schistosome in humans in China. Three Chinese literature databases, including China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang and Chinese Scientific Journal Databases, and the PubMed were searched. Pooled prevalence ratios (prevalence after to before treatment) were used to assess effect. Our protocol is available on PROSPERO (No. CRD42013003628). Results 22 articles were included. Meta-analyses on data from 18 studies on one round of ACWT, 17 studies on two consecutive rounds and 6 studies on three consecutive rounds were performed. The results showed control effects of ACWT plus other measures were statistically significant, with prevalence ratios being 0.38 (0.31, 0.46) for one round, 0.28 (0.22, 0.35) for two rounds and 0.22 (0.10, 0.46) for three rounds. When ACWT was performed alone or with health education only, the values for one and two rounds were 0.389 (0.307, 0.492) and 0.348 (0.300, 0.403), respectively. Conclusions The control effect of ACWT alone or with other measures is significant and increases with the number of rounds. Such program is recommended in high endemic areas and the criteria yet merit further assessment. PMID:24223819

  4. Measuring exposure to Schistosoma japonicum in China. III. Activity diaries, snail and human infection, transmission ecology and options for control.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Sleigh, A C; Williams, G M; Ross, A G; Forsyth, S J; Tanner, M; McManus, D P

    2000-05-31

    We used activity diaries and snail detection to relate water contact and Schistosoma japonicum infection among a cohort of 178 residents on two islands in the Dongting Lake, China. Water exposure to each of 12 mapped water zones around the islands was calculated (m(2) min/day) for each subject. Infected Oncomelania hupensis hupensis snails in this area are focal and were found in only five of the 12 zones, with the highest rate being 5.7%. Thirty-one subjects (17%) were re-infected with a mean intensity of 63.2 epg. Mean water contact was 7.9 m(2) min/day; 98% of water exposure was due to economic activity and only 2% due to swimming or bathing, washing and other necessities of daily life. Males had more exposure and infection than females (P<0.05). Infected subjects had more exposure (10.2 m(2) min/day) than those not infected (7.44 m(2) min/day) (P<0.05). Compared with uninfected subjects, those infected had 2.9 times more exposure in infected-snail zones (P<0.01). Also, human infection intensity (epg) correlated well with exposure to infected snail zones (r=0.552, P<0.01). People <20 years old had the highest re-infection (21.4%) and intensity (3.77 epg). Median exposure for 20-49-year-olds (9.00 m(2) min/day) was nearly double that of those aged <20 or >50 years old (5.5 m(2) min/day). We conclude that map-referenced water contact and snail evaluation boosts accuracy of activity-diary measurements in large transmission foci for the Asian schistosome. Protecting against faecal contamination of snail inhabited sites, and against occupational exposure for island residents, should be a priority of future research. Potential strategies for migrating buffaloes and families living on visiting fishing boats are explored.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of 15 New Microsatellite Markers in Oncomelania hupensis, the Snail Intermediate Host of Schistosoma japonicum in Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shizhu; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Yingjun; Liu, Qin; Yang, Pin; Zhou, Xiaonong

    2012-01-01

    Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, which plays a key role during the transmission of schistosomiasis. It is mainly found in the Yangtze River valley and mountains or hills in southwest China. In this paper, we described 15 new microsatellite makers in O. hupensis. Polymorphism of each locus was assessed in 80 individuals from four wild populations (n = 20 per population). The number of alleles per locus ranged from 6 to 29, with an average of 15.8. The observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosities varied from 0.397 to 0.851 and from 0.696 to 0.948, respectively. These microsatellite markers will be useful for population genetic studies and genome mapping in O. hupensis. PMID:22754335

  6. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of Sex-Biased Expressed Genes Reveals Discrete Biological and Physiological Features of Male and Female Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pengfei; Liu, Shuai; Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P; Chen, Qijun

    2016-04-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic and debilitating disease caused by blood flukes (digenetic trematodes) of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are sexually dimorphic and exhibit dramatic morphological changes during a complex lifecycle which requires subtle gene regulatory mechanisms to fulfil these complex biological processes. In the current study, a 41,982 features custom DNA microarray, which represents the most comprehensive probe coverage for any schistosome transcriptome study, was designed based on public domain and local databases to explore differential gene expression in S. japonicum. We found that approximately 1/10 of the total annotated genes in the S. japonicum genome are differentially expressed between adult males and females. In general, genes associated with the cytoskeleton, and motor and neuronal activities were readily expressed in male adult worms, whereas genes involved in amino acid metabolism, nucleotide biosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, glycosylation, cell cycle processes, DNA synthesis and genome fidelity and stability were enriched in females. Further, miRNAs target sites within these gene sets were predicted, which provides a scenario whereby the miRNAs potentially regulate these sex-biased expressed genes. The study significantly expands the expressional and regulatory characteristics of gender-biased expressed genes in schistosomes with high accuracy. The data provide a better appreciation of the biological and physiological features of male and female schistosome parasites, which may lead to novel vaccine targets and the development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27128440

  7. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of Sex-Biased Expressed Genes Reveals Discrete Biological and Physiological Features of Male and Female Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; McManus, Donald P.; Chen, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic and debilitating disease caused by blood flukes (digenetic trematodes) of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are sexually dimorphic and exhibit dramatic morphological changes during a complex lifecycle which requires subtle gene regulatory mechanisms to fulfil these complex biological processes. In the current study, a 41,982 features custom DNA microarray, which represents the most comprehensive probe coverage for any schistosome transcriptome study, was designed based on public domain and local databases to explore differential gene expression in S. japonicum. We found that approximately 1/10 of the total annotated genes in the S. japonicum genome are differentially expressed between adult males and females. In general, genes associated with the cytoskeleton, and motor and neuronal activities were readily expressed in male adult worms, whereas genes involved in amino acid metabolism, nucleotide biosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, glycosylation, cell cycle processes, DNA synthesis and genome fidelity and stability were enriched in females. Further, miRNAs target sites within these gene sets were predicted, which provides a scenario whereby the miRNAs potentially regulate these sex-biased expressed genes. The study significantly expands the expressional and regulatory characteristics of gender-biased expressed genes in schistosomes with high accuracy. The data provide a better appreciation of the biological and physiological features of male and female schistosome parasites, which may lead to novel vaccine targets and the development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27128440

  8. Prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection of Oncomelania quadrasi snail colonies in 50 irrigated and rain-fed villages of Samar Province, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Henry; Carabin, Hélène; Balolong, Don; Tallo, Veronica L; Olveda, Remigio; Yuan, M; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2008-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey of Oncomelania quadrasi, the intermediate host for Schistosoma japonicum, was conducted between 2004 and 2005 in 50 villages of the Province of Samar, the Philippines. The villages were classified as rain-fed (25) or with some man-made irrigation system (25). The primary objective was to identify all snail colony sites in the 50 villages and to compare snail population density and S. japonicum infection prevalence between the two types of villages. The presence of snail colonies was surveyed along streams, springs, various canals and swampy areas or grass land. A total of 198 colony sites were identified out of the 845 sites surveyed. Of these, a sufficient number of O. quadrasi snails were identified to measure density and infection in 147 sites. Density of O. quadrasi was remarkably uniform across habitats and there were no significant differences across habitats and between village type. The prevalence of infected snails showed more variability among habitats. Indeed, there was an interaction between the type of habitat and the type of village with irrigated villages being associated with a prevalence proportion ratio of 5.76 (1.31, 25.42) as compared to rain-fed villages among streams and springs. No such association was found among other habitats. The results suggest that once a suitable habitat exists, O. quadrasi populations establish and reach a plateau density. These results are discussed in light of possible ecological measures of control. PMID:18207119

  9. Prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection of Oncomelania quadrasi snail colonies in 50 irrigated and rain-fed villages of Samar Province, the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Henry; Carabin, Hélène; Balolong, Don; Tallo, Veronica L; Olveda, Remigio; Yuan, M; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of Oncomelania quadrasi, the intermediate host for Schistosoma japonicum, was conducted between 2004 and 2005 in 50 villages of the Province of Samar, the Philippines. The villages were classified as rain-fed (25) or with some man-made irrigation system (25). The primary objective was to identify all snail colony sites in the 50 villages and to compare snail population density and S. japonicum infection prevalence between the two types of villages. The presence of snail colonies was surveyed along streams, springs, various canals and swampy areas or grass land. A total of 198 colony sites were identified out of the 845 sites surveyed. Of these, a sufficient number of O. quadrasi snails were identified to measure density and infection in 147 sites. Density of O. quadrasi was remarkably uniform across habitats and there were no significant differences across habitats and between village type. The prevalence of infected snails showed more variability among habitats. Indeed, there was an interaction between the type of habitat and the type of village with irrigated villages being associated with a prevalence proportion ratio of 5.76 (1.31, 25.42) as compared to rain-fed villages among streams and springs. No such association was found among other habitats. The results suggest that once a suitable habitat exists, O. quadrasi populations establish and reach a plateau density. These results are discussed in light of possible ecological measures of control. PMID:18207119

  10. Schistosoma japonicum-infected hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) used as a model in experimental chemotherapy with praziquantel, artemether, and OZ compounds.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Mei, Jing-yan; Jiao, Pei-ying

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the antischistosomal properties of artemether, praziquantel, and ozonide (OZ) compounds (synthetic trioxolanes, secondary ozonides) in hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) model. A total of 230 male hamsters infected each with 100 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae were used in the study. Groups of five to ten hamsters were treated orally with artemether, praziquantel, and OZ78 or OZ277 7-35 days post-infection at single doses of 50, 100, 150, or 200 mg/kg. Untreated but infected hamsters in each batch of test served as the control. All treated hamsters were sacrificed 4 weeks post-treatment for collection of residual worms using perfusion technique. Nonparametric method (Mann-Whitney test) was used to analyze the data. In groups of five hamsters treated with artemether 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days post-infection at single doses of 150 and 200 mg/kg, the difference of mean worm burden between each treated group and control group was statistically significant (P<0.01). Apart from individual group, no difference in mean worm burden between each two groups of them was seen (P>0.05). Further test with various single doses of 50-200 mg/kg confirmed the similar susceptibility of 7-day-old juvenile and 35-day-old adult schistosomes to artemether. After administration of praziquantel 100 mg/kg to groups of five hamsters 7, 21, and 35 days post-infection, higher worm burden reduction of 95.5% was seen in the group with 35-day-old adult schistosomes while in the groups with 7- and 21-day-old juvenile schistosomes, poor efficacy was seen with mean worm burden reductions of 36.6% and 35.6%. In the same batch of hamster treated with praziquantel 200 mg/kg, the moderate effect of the drug against 7- and 21-day-old worms was seen, but their mean worm burden was significantly higher than that of the group with adult schistosomes. In comparison of artemether and praziquantel against various stages of schistosomes, the results further

  11. Comparison of the vaccine efficacy of gamma-irradiated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae with the defined antigen Sj62(IrV-5) in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bickle, Q D; Bøgh, H O; Johansen, M V; Zhang, Y

    2001-09-12

    Development of a vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum which can protect both man and the domestic animal zoonotic reservoirs of infection would be an invaluable tool in attempts to control this infection in those areas in which conventional control methods have failed to break transmission. The pig is a natural host of S. japonicum and because of its anatomical and immunological similarities to humans, it is a potentially valuable host for studies on S. japonicum in particular and schistosomes in general. Radiation-attenuated cercariae are highly effective in inducing immunity in experimental schistosomosis and there are promising reports of partial protection against schistosomes with recombinant-derived individual antigens. In the present study we have set out to establish a protocol for inducing protection with gamma-irradiated cercariae in pigs and to assess the protective capacity of recombinant and naked DNA formulations of Sj62, a 62kDa region of S. japonicum myosin. The corresponding S. mansoni version or Sj62, recombinant IrV-5, has previously been implicated in irradiated vaccine immunity in S. mansoni infections and has been shown to induce high levels of immunity in a variety of hosts. Groups of pigs were immunised three times at 2-week intervals with 2000 cercariae irradiated at 20krad, with Sj62 as a recombinant (rSj62) incorporated in Freund's adjuvant, a micellar preparation, or as a naked DNA construct. Vaccination with irradiated cercariae did not induce significant anti-Sj62 antibody but following intramuscular challenge with 2000 cercariae, the vaccinated pigs showed >95% resistance as assessed by reduced faecal egg output, worm tissue egg burdens and also reduced septal fibrosis. Immunisation with each of the Sj62 formulations induced significant anti-Sj62 antibody responses, the highest titre (>12,800) being with the Freund's preparation but none of the Sj62-immunised groups showed significant resistance to challenge. The data suggest that Sj

  12. Cloning, molecular characterization of a 13-kDa antigen from Schistosoma japonicum, Sj13, a putative salivary diagnosis candidate for Schistosomiasis japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-ping; Wu, Zhong-dao; Yang, Lin-lin; Sun, Xi; You, Xu; Yu, Xin-bing; Hu, Wei; Zheng, Huan-qin; Lv, Zhi-yue

    2009-10-01

    Saliva has been suggested as an easily accessible and a noninvasive diagnostic alternative for detection of antibodies. To identify and characterize Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) antigens that are recognized by saliva of infected host, we have used a pool of saliva from infected patients to immunoscreen an egg cDNA library of S. japonicum. The open reading frame of the isolated two clones encodes same protein of 116 amino acids exhibiting 100% identity to an amino acid sequence (AY222893) of S. japonicum in NCBInr database. The protein encoded is inferred a secretory protein with a molecular mass of 13 kDa (Sj13) and shares no homology to any entries in the NCBInr database, demonstrating that Sj13 might be a schistosome-specific protein. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunolocalization analysis revealed Sj13 could be detected in cercaria, adult, and egg and was localized to forehead and tegument of cercaria, cell body ("cytons") of adult worm, egg shell, and epidermal plate of miracidium. Furthermore, Sj13 showed a good antigenicity when reacted with saliva or serum from schistosomiasis patients. The recombinant Sj13 (rSj13) expressed and purified from Escherichia coli was applied to detect its specific salivary antibody for schistosomiasis diagnosis by an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Preliminary laboratory test of 116 subjects, 40 with parasitologically proven S. japonicumm infection, 46 with other infectious diseases, and 30 negative controls exhibited 92.50% sensitivity with saliva/rSj13 and 95.00% with serum/SWAP (P > 0.05). The specificity of the ELISA using saliva/rSj13 was 92.11% versus 85.53% with serum/SWAP (P < 0.05). No direct correlations of anti-Sj13 IgG levels with egg counts in stool were observed in saliva detection. These results suggest that Sj13 specific salivary antibody detection may be useful as an antigen for the salivary diagnosis of schistosomiasis japonica and

  13. DNA Detection of Schistosoma japonicum: Diagnostic Validity of a LAMP Assay for Low-Intensity Infection and Effects of Chemotherapy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Wang, Yan-Yan; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Hui-Qin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; He, Yong-Kang; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis has decreased significantly in prevalence and intensity of infection in China, thus more accurate and sensitive methods are desperately needed for the further control of schistosomiasis. The present work aimed to assess the utility of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of light intensity infection or false-negative patients and patients post-treatment, targeting the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 of Schistosoma japonicum. Methodology/ Principal Findings LAMP was first assessed in rabbits with low intensity infection (EPG<10). Then 110 patient sera from Hunan Province, China, and 47 sera after treatment by praziquantel were used to evaluate the diagnostic validity of LAMP. Meanwhile, 42 sera from healthy individuals in a non-endemic area, and 60 sera from "healthy” residents who were identified as being negative for feces examination and immuno-methods in an endemic area were also examined. The results showed that LAMP could detect S. japonicum DNA in sera from rabbits at 3rd day post-infection. Following administration of praziquantel, the S. japonicum DNA in rabbit sera became negative at 10 weeks post-treatment. Of 110 sera from patients, LAMP showed 95.5% sensitivity, and even for 41 patients with less than 10 EPG, the sensitivity of LAMP still reached to 95.1%. For 47 patients after treatment, the negative conversion rate of S. japonicum DNA in patient sera increased from 23.4%, 61.7% to 83.0% at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months post-treatment, respectively. No false-positive result was obtained for 42 human sera from non-endemic area, while for the 60 “healthy” individuals from endemic area, 10 (16.7%) individuals were positive by LAMP, which suggested that these individuals might be false-negative patients. Conclusions/ Significance The present study demonstrated that the LAMP assay is sensitive, specific, and affordable, which would help reduce schistosomiasis transmission through targeted

  14. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica.

  15. Field evaluation of a rapid, visually-read colloidal dye immunofiltration assay for Schistosoma japonicum for screening in areas of low transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Tianping; Ye, Hongzhuan; Qiang, Guangxiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of a recently developed rapid test--a colloidal dye immunofiltration assay (CDIFA)--used by health workers in field settings to identify villagers infected with Schistosoma japonicum. METHODS: Health workers in the field used CDIFA to test samples from 1553 villagers in two areas of low endemicity and an area where S. japonicum was not endemic in Anhui, China. All the samples were then tested in the laboratory by laboratory staff using a standard parasitological method (Kato-Katz), an indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA), and CDIFA. The results of CDIFA performed by health workers were compared with those obtained by Kato-Katz and IHA. FINDINGS: Concordance between the results of CDIFA performed in field settings and in the laboratory was high (kappa index, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.97). When Kato-Katz was used as the reference test, the overall sensitivity and specificity of CDIFA were 98.5% and 83.6%, respectively in the two villages in areas of low endemicity, while the specificity was 99.8% in the nonendemic village. Compared with IHA, the overall specificity and sensitivity of CDIFA were greater than 99% and 96%, respectively. With the combination of Kato-Katz and IHA as the reference standard, CDIFA had a sensitivity of 95.8% and a specificity of 99.5%, and an accuracy of 98.6% in the two areas of low endemicity. CONCLUSION: CDIFA is a specific, sensitive, and reliable test that can be used for rapid screening for schistosomiasis by health workers in field settings. PMID:16175827

  16. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  17. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42–44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  18. The protective effect of a Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa plasmid DNA vaccine in pigs is enhanced with IL-12.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinchang; Ren, Jiangong; Da'dara, Akram; Harn, Donald; Xu, Ming; Si, Jin; Yu, Chuanxin; Liang, Yousheng; Ye, Ping; Yin, Xuren; He, Wei; Xu, Yongliang; Cao, Guoqun; Hua, Wanquan

    2004-11-15

    The schistosome integral membrane protein Sm/Sj23 was initially shown to induce protection in mice as a synthetic peptide vaccine and further, as a plasmid DNA vaccine to induce protection in mice, sheep and water buffalo. In this study we asked if we could induce protection against challenge infection in pigs against Schistosoma japonicum by vaccinating them with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the S. japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa membrane protein. Further, we asked if we could enhance protective efficacy of this vaccine by the addition of IL-12. We compared vaccination with SjC23 plasmid DNA alone or with IL-12 plasmid DNA in pigs. Pigs were immunized three times at three weekly intervals. Thirty Chinese Songjang native pigs were divided into three groups. In group A, each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA by intramuscular (i.m.) injection in both buttocks. In group B each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA, and 500 microg of each of pcDNA3.1-p35 and 500 microg of pcDNA3.1-p40 DNA by i.m. injection. In group C each pig was immunized with 500 microg of pcDNA3.1 as the control. Thirty days post-vaccination, pigs were challenged with S. japonicum cercariae and adult and egg burdens and granuloma size determined 45 days post-challenge. The results showed that worm reduction rates in SjC23 group compared with control group were 29.2% and in the SjC23 + IL-12 group reduced 58.6%. Similarly the female worm reduction rates were 50.8 and 58.8%, the hepatic egg reduction rates were 48.2 and 56.4%, and the mean square measure reduction rates of hepatic egg granulomas were 48.6 and 44.4%, the mean diameter reduction rates of granulomas were 27.6 and 22.8% in pigs vaccinated with SjC23 or SjC23 + IL-12 compared to plasmid vaccinated pigs, respectively. Analysis of sera from pigs vaccinated with SjC23 showed that 4 of 10 pigs had anti-Sj23 antibody responses; with 5 of 10 pigs positive for anti-Sj23 in the SjC23+IL-12 group. These

  19. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  20. Soluble egg antigens of Schistosoma japonicum induce senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Ke; Zhu, Dandan; Huang, Caiqun; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Recent findings suggest that senescence of activated HSCs might limit the development of liver fibrosis. Based on previously observed anti-fibrotic effects of soluble egg antigens from Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, we hypothesized that SEA might play a crucial role in alleviating liver fibrosis through promoting senescence of activated HSCs. We show here that SEA inhibited expression of α-SMA and pro-collagen I and promoted senescence of activated HSCs in vitro. In addition, SEA induced an increased expression of P-p53 and p21. Knockdown of p53 inhibited the expression of p21 and failed to induce senescence of activated-HSCs. Phosphorylated STAT3 was elevated upon SEA stimulation, while loss of STAT3 decreased the level of p53 and senescence of HSCs. Results from immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that SOCS3 might be involved in the SEA-induced senescence in HSCs through its interaction with p53. This study demonstrates the potential capacity of SEA in restricting liver fibrosis through promoting senescence in HSCs. Furthermore, a novel STAT3-p53-p21 pathway might participate in the observed SEA-mediated senescence of HSCs. Our results suggest that SEA might carry potential therapeutic effects of restraining liver fibrosis through promoting senescence. PMID:27489164

  1. Impact of changing water levels and weather on Oncomelania hupensis hupensis populations, the snail host of Schistosoma japonicum, downstream of the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Seto, Edmund Y W; Wu, Weiping; Liu, Hong-Yun; Chen, Hong-Gen; Hubbard, Alan; Holt, Ashley; Davis, George M

    2008-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that dams impact riverine ecosystems and human diseases. Poyang Lake, one of the largest schistosomiasis endemic environments in China, will change due to the construction of the Yangtze River Three Gorges Dam. We assess changes in Oncomelania hupensis hupensis, the snail host for Schistosoma japonicum, in response to changing water levels and weather from 1998 to 2002. In the 5 years following the major flooding of Poyang Lake in 1998, seasonal water levels have gradually decreased, concomitant with decreases in mean and variance of fall snail densities. Nonlinear relationships suggest that the highest spring density is associated with current, 2-, and 3-month prior temperatures of 18 degrees, 9.1 degrees, and 5.8 degrees C, while the highest fall density is associated with 2- and 3-month prior water levels of 17 and 18 m, respectively. This suggests that lower, more stable water levels downstream of the dam may result in a reduction in mean fall densities and their variance. However, additional data are needed to determine whether snail populations that are typically destroyed by seasonal floods may live longer in more stable environments created by the dam.

  2. Egg antigen p40 of Schistosoma japonicum promotes senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinling; Xu, Tianhua; Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Caiqun; Lyu, Lei; Hu, Bin; Sun, Wei; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious disease that is characterized by the excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are a major source of ECM and serve as a key regulator in liver fibrogenesis. Inactivation of HSCs is essential for liver fibrotic regression. The present study explores the underlying mechanisms of Schistosoma japonicum egg antigen p40 (Sjp40) promoting senescence in HSCs and antifibrosis. For the first time we report that Sjp40 inhibits the activation and proliferation of an immortalized human HSC line (LX-2 cells) and promotes cellular senescence and cell cycle arrest. Sjp40 through action on the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway triggered cellular senescence, while knockdown of p53 or STAT3 partly restored cell senescence. In addition, Sjp40-induced cellular senescence caused LX-2 cells to be more sensitive to a human NK cell line (YT cells). Together these findings provide novel insights into the mechanism of antifibrosis and may have implications for the development of antifibrosis therapies. PMID:27468691

  3. Soluble egg antigens of Schistosoma japonicum induce senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells by activation of the STAT3/p53/p21 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Ke; Zhu, Dandan; Huang, Caiqun; Duan, Yinong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Recent findings suggest that senescence of activated HSCs might limit the development of liver fibrosis. Based on previously observed anti-fibrotic effects of soluble egg antigens from Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, we hypothesized that SEA might play a crucial role in alleviating liver fibrosis through promoting senescence of activated HSCs. We show here that SEA inhibited expression of α-SMA and pro-collagen I and promoted senescence of activated HSCs in vitro. In addition, SEA induced an increased expression of P-p53 and p21. Knockdown of p53 inhibited the expression of p21 and failed to induce senescence of activated-HSCs. Phosphorylated STAT3 was elevated upon SEA stimulation, while loss of STAT3 decreased the level of p53 and senescence of HSCs. Results from immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that SOCS3 might be involved in the SEA-induced senescence in HSCs through its interaction with p53. This study demonstrates the potential capacity of SEA in restricting liver fibrosis through promoting senescence in HSCs. Furthermore, a novel STAT3-p53-p21 pathway might participate in the observed SEA-mediated senescence of HSCs. Our results suggest that SEA might carry potential therapeutic effects of restraining liver fibrosis through promoting senescence. PMID:27489164

  4. Anti-fecundity immunity to Schistosoma japonicum induced in Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus) after vaccination with recombinant 26 kDa glutathione-S-transferase (reSjc26GST).

    PubMed

    Shuxian, L; Yongkang, H; Guangchen, S; Xing-song, L; Yuxin, X; McManus, D P

    1997-04-01

    We have shown previously that immunisation of mice and pigs with recombinant 26 kDa GST (reSjc26GST) induces a pronounced anti-fecundity effect after experimental infection with Chinese Schistosoma japonicum. We report here that anti-fecundity immunity can also be induced against reSjc26GST in Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus), important reservoir hosts for S. japonicum in China. Anti-Sjc26GST antibodies were produced in immunised buffaloes and, following challenge with S. japonicum cercariae, a 22.3% reduction in worm numbers was evident in vaccinated when compared with control animals. The anti-fecundity effect was characterised by a significant decrease in faecal egg output and eggs deposited in host tissues with those in the liver and intestine being reduced by about 50%. In addition to the anti-fecundity effect, reSjc26GST reduced by nearly 40% the egg-hatching capacity of S. japonicum eggs into viable miracidia. In terms of vaccination strategy, these effects would combine to diminish pathology in animals immunised with reSjc26GST and reduce transmission of schistosomiasis japonica.

  5. The South-to-North Water Diversion Project: effect of the water diversion pattern on transmission of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP) is the largest national water conservancy project in China. However, the Eastern Route Project (ERP) of SNWDP will refer to the habitats of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of some factors relating to the water diversion pattern on the spread north of O. hupensis and transmission of S. japonicum. Methods Marked snails were attached to the floating debris, and then placed on the water surface, the passage of snails through water pumps was observed. Some marked living adult snails were placed under water in the 5 spots, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days later, their survival and transfer under water were investigated. 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 juvenile snails, with a male: female ratio of about 1, were caged, 1 year later, their reproductions were calculated. Results The snails attached on the floating debris at 100-, 50- and 20-cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the big pump (with a diameter of 80 cm), could be absorbed into the pumps, with passing rates of 2.45%, 3.93% and 43.46%, respectively, compared with 72.07% and 91.00% for the snails at 20 cm and 10 cm-distance from the inlet pipe of the small pump (with a diameter of 20 cm). A total of 36,600 marked living snails were put into 5 ponds and ditches, with the water depths of 1-1.6 m, 15-120 days later, no marked ones were found along the ponds and ditches or in the straw packages. The juvenile snails did not reproduce until their density reached up to 8 snails (ratio of male: female of 1)/0.16 m2. Conclusions During the construction of ERP of SNWDP, the risk of northward spread of schistosomiasis japonica will be decreased or eliminated as long as long-term reliable interventions for snail control are implemented. PMID:22433070

  6. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of intensity of infection with Schistosoma japonicum in 50 irrigated and rain-fed villages in Samar Province, the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Tarafder, Mushfiqur R; Balolong, Ernesto; Carabin, Hélène; Bélisle, Patrick; Tallo, Veronica; Joseph, Lawrence; Alday, Portia; Gonzales, Ryan O'Neil; Riley, Steven; Olveda, Remigio; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have described heterogeneity in Schistosoma japonicum infection intensity, and none were done in Philippines. The purpose of this report is to describe the village-to-village variation in the prevalence of two levels of infection intensity across 50 villages of Samar Province, the Philippines. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 25 rain-fed and 25 irrigated villages endemic for S. japonicum between August 2003 and November 2004. Villages were selected based on irrigation and farming criteria. A maximum of 35 eligible households were selected per village. Each participant was asked to provide stool samples on three consecutive days. All those who provided at least one stool sample were included in the analysis. A Bayesian three category outcome hierarchical cumulative logit regression model with adjustment for age, sex, occupation and measurement error of the Kato-Katz technique was used for analysis. Results A total of 1427 households and 6917 individuals agreed to participate in the study. A total of 5624 (81.3%) participants provided at least one stool sample. The prevalences of those lightly and at least moderately infected varied from 0% (95% Bayesian credible interval (BCI): 0%–3.1%) to 45.2% (95% BCI: 36.5%–53.9%) and 0% to 23.0% (95% BCI: 16.4%–31.2%) from village-to-village, respectively. Using the 0–7 year old group as a reference category, the highest odds ratio (OR) among males and females were that of being aged 17–40-year old (OR = 8.76; 95% BCI: 6.03–12.47) and 11–16-year old (OR = 8.59; 95% BCI: 4.74–14.28), respectively. People who did not work on a rice farm had a lower prevalence of infection than those working full time on a rice farm. The OR for irrigated villages compared to rain-fed villages was 1.41 (95% BCI: 0.50–3.21). Discussion We found very important village-to-village variation in prevalence of infection intensity. This variation is probably due to village-level variables other

  7. Evidence That Rhesus Macaques Self-Cure from a Schistosoma japonicum Infection by Disrupting Worm Esophageal Function: A New Route to an Effective Vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Yu-Xin; Vance, Gill; Wang, Yun; Lv, Long-Bao; van Dam, Govert J.; Cao, Jian-Ping; Wilson, R. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhesus macaques are unusual among schistosome hosts, self-curing from an established infection and thereafter manifesting solid immunity against a challenge, an ideal model for vaccine development. Previously, the immunological basis of self-cure was confirmed; surviving worms had ceased feeding but how immunological pressure achieved this was unclear. The schistosome esophagus is not simply a conduit for blood but plays a central role in its processing. Secretions from the anterior and posterior esophageal glands mix with incoming blood causing erythrocyte lysis and tethering and killing of leucocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analysed the self-cure process in rhesus macaques infected with Schistosoma japonicum. Faecal egg output and circulating antigen levels were used to chart the establishment of a mature worm population and its subsequent demise. The physiological stress of surviving females at perfusion was especially evident from their pale, shrunken appearance, while changes in the structure and function of the esophagus were observed in both sexes. In the anterior region electron microscopy revealed that the vesicle secretory process was disrupted, the tips of lining corrugations being swollen by greatly enlarged vesicles and the putative sites of vesicle release obscured by intense deposits of IgG. The lumen of the posterior esophagus in starving worms was occluded by cellular debris and the lining cytoplasmic plates were closely adherent, also potentially preventing secretion. Seven proteins secreted by the posterior gland were identified and IgG responses were detected to some or all of them. Intrinsic rhesus IgG colocalized with secreted SjMEGs 4.1, 8.2, 9, 11 and VAL-7 on cryosections, suggesting they are potential targets for disruption of function. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that rhesus macaques self-cure by blocking esophagus function with antibody; the protein products of the glands provide a new class of

  8. Comparison of the miracidium hatching test and modified Kato-Katz method for detecting Schistosoma japonicum in low prevalence areas of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Qing; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Rong; Cao, Chun-Li; Bao, Zi-Ping; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Li-Juan; Xu, Xiao-Lin; Feng, Zheng; Guo, Jia-Gang

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) infection in low prevalence areas of the People's Republic of China is challenging due to the sensitivity of the detection methods, leading to an underestimation of the disease burden. We compared the sensitivities of the miracidium hatching test (MHT) with the modified Kato-Katz method (KK) and the combination of the two methods (KK-MHT) to detect Sj infection in low prevalence areas of China. The stool samples of 3,853 residents from 8 villages with a light to moderate prevalence (0-23%) of Sj infection were examined by KK, MHT and KK-MHT. The findings were inconsistent. The KK-MHT conbination gave more positives than either the KK or MHT alone. Using the KK-MHT, we determined the missed rates with the KK (mR(K)) and MHT (mR(H)) to be 30.1% and 10.2%, respectively. At light prevalence sites (infection rate < 10%) the mR(K) was 60.6%, significantly higher than the mR(K) of 22.3% found at moderate prevalence sites (10-23%). However, the mR(H) at the light and moderate prevalence sites were 11.54% and 9.90%, respectively (p > 0.05). The combination KK-MHT had the best sensitivity in low Sj prevalence areas in China and the KK method alone was the least sensitive. Using KK alone as a screening method will result in an underestimation of Sj infection disease burden. PMID:24964649

  9. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P; Ilag, Leodevico L; Meeusen, Els N T; Veer, Michael J de

    2015-12-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11-12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test. PMID:26684756

  10. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  11. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Christopher G.; McWilliam, Hamish E. G.; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P.; Ilag, Leodevico L.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; de Veer, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11–12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test. PMID:26684756

  12. Generation of a Novel Bacteriophage Library Displaying scFv Antibody Fragments from the Natural Buffalo Host to Identify Antigens from Adult Schistosoma japonicum for Diagnostic Development.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Christopher G; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P; Ilag, Leodevico L; Meeusen, Els N T; Veer, Michael J de

    2015-12-01

    The development of effective diagnostic tools will be essential in the continuing fight to reduce schistosome infection; however, the diagnostic tests available to date are generally laborious and difficult to implement in current parasite control strategies. We generated a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain (scFv) phage display libraries from the portal lymph node of field exposed water buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, 11-12 days post challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae. The selected scFv-phages showed clear enrichment towards adult schistosomes and excretory-secretory (ES) proteins by immunofluorescence, ELISA and western blot analysis. The enriched libraries were used to probe a schistosome specific protein microarray resulting in the recognition of a number of proteins, five of which were specific to schistosomes, with RNA expression predominantly in the adult life-stage based on interrogation of schistosome expressed sequence tags (EST). As the libraries were enriched by panning against ES products, these antigens may be excreted or secreted into the host vasculature and hence may make good targets for a diagnostic assay. Further selection of the scFv library against infected mouse sera identified five soluble scFv clones that could selectively recognise soluble whole adult preparations (SWAP) relative to an irrelevant protein control (ovalbumin). Furthermore, two of the identified scFv clones also selectively recognised SWAP proteins when spiked into naïve mouse sera. These host B-cell derived scFvs that specifically bind to schistosome protein preparations will be valuable reagents for further development of a cost effective point-of-care diagnostic test.

  13. The effect of a combined approach to schistosomiasis control on the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum in Xingzi of Poyang Lake area, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Q; Zhang, S; Yuan, H; Liu, Z; Zhao, G; Brinkmann, U

    1996-09-01

    The impact of a combined approach to schistosomiasis control from 1987 to 1989 and mass chemotherapy from 1992 to 1994 was studied in a rural community in Xingzi county in the northwest corner of Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province, China. Humans, cattle, buffalo and pigs were known potential reservoirs of Schistosoma japonicum. Transmission occurs during water contact on and around seasonally flooded marshes that are used for grazing, the harvesting of grass and fishing. Humans and livestock underwent yearly selective mass chemotherapy, and snails were eliminated through ploughing and compacting of the marshland in the spring of 1988. Transmission was monitored through the determination of annual re-infection rates in samples of the human population, the annual examination of piles of feces from animals and humans in the marshland, the annual collection and examination of intermediate snail hosts, and the exposure to potentially polluted water and subsequent examination of sentinel mice. Schistosomiasis prevalence among humans and animals declined sharply as soon as mass chemotherapy was implemented. Snail density decreased even before mollusc control was started, possibly indicating a high variability of this indicator. The infection rates of snails and sentinel mice reached zero after a single application of mollusc control. The results underline the importance of single infected water buffalo for the transmission of schistosomiasis. Since the impact stopped for two years (1990-1991), the schistosomiasis prevalence rose quickly. Mass chemotherapy was an effective means to curb the prevalence of schistosomiasis in this area, but the effects were only maintained for one or two years in the marsh zone.

  14. Compatibility of Schistosoma japonicum from the hilly region and Oncomelania hupensis hupensis from the marshland region within Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Zhong; Lu, Da-Bing; Guo, Cheng-Xiang; Li, Ying; Gao, Yuan-Meng; Bian, Chao-Rong; Su, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Schistosome japonicum remains one main public concern in China. This is exemplified in the hilly region in Anhui Province, where rodents have served as reservoirs for the parasite and no effective intervention could target such wild animals. The closer relationship between the hilly region and the near marshland induces the worry of spread of the hill parasite to the marshland region. Therefore, the level of snail-parasite compatibility between the hill parasite and snail populations from the Yangtze River valley was investigated. The results of this study demonstrated that both the hill (Shitai, Anhui) and the marshland (Wuxi, Jiangsu) strains of parasite were more infective to the marshland strains of snail (Zongyang and Hexian, Anhui) than to the hill strain of snail (Shitai, Anhui). When snails were individually exposed to one single miracidium, the longest prepatent period for cercarial development was observed in the combination of Shitai schistosome/Shitai snail. A nocturnal cercarial emergence pattern was observed for the hill parasite, either harbored in the hill or the marshland strain of snails. The results suggested a high compatibility between the marshland strains of snail and both the hill and the marshland strains of parasite. This would have practical implications. Moreover, the fact of the lower compatible relationship between the hill parasite and its local intermediate hosts warranted more studies.

  15. Compatibility of Schistosoma japonicum from the hilly region and Oncomelania hupensis hupensis from the marshland region within Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Zhong; Lu, Da-Bing; Guo, Cheng-Xiang; Li, Ying; Gao, Yuan-Meng; Bian, Chao-Rong; Su, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Schistosome japonicum remains one main public concern in China. This is exemplified in the hilly region in Anhui Province, where rodents have served as reservoirs for the parasite and no effective intervention could target such wild animals. The closer relationship between the hilly region and the near marshland induces the worry of spread of the hill parasite to the marshland region. Therefore, the level of snail-parasite compatibility between the hill parasite and snail populations from the Yangtze River valley was investigated. The results of this study demonstrated that both the hill (Shitai, Anhui) and the marshland (Wuxi, Jiangsu) strains of parasite were more infective to the marshland strains of snail (Zongyang and Hexian, Anhui) than to the hill strain of snail (Shitai, Anhui). When snails were individually exposed to one single miracidium, the longest prepatent period for cercarial development was observed in the combination of Shitai schistosome/Shitai snail. A nocturnal cercarial emergence pattern was observed for the hill parasite, either harbored in the hill or the marshland strain of snails. The results suggested a high compatibility between the marshland strains of snail and both the hill and the marshland strains of parasite. This would have practical implications. Moreover, the fact of the lower compatible relationship between the hill parasite and its local intermediate hosts warranted more studies. PMID:25199558

  16. Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix-Metalloprotease–1 Predicts Risk of Hepatic Fibrosis in Human Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiwei; PondTor, Sunthorn; Coutinho, Hannah; Acosta, Luz; Jiz, Mario; Olveda, Remigio; Cheng, Ling; White, Eric S.; Jarilla, Blanca; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Friedman, Jennifer F.; Kurtis, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Schistosomes infect 200 million individuals annually and cause significant hepatic fibrosis in up to 20%. Little is known regarding the mechanisms of schistosome-associated hepatic fibrosis in humans, and few biomarkers for risk of fibrosis have been identified. Methods. We treated 611 Schistosoma japonicum–infected Filipinos with praziquantel (PZQ) and performed ultrasound to quantify hepatic fibrosis at baseline and 12 months after PZQ treatment. We developed a multiplexed assay (FibroPlex) that quantifies predictors and effect modifiers of fibrosis. We measured FibroPlex analytes produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with schistosome egg antigen 4 weeks after PZQ treatment and related these levels to risk of fibrosis 1 year after PZQ treatment. Results. After adjusting for potential confounders, including baseline grade of fibrosis, individuals with detectable tissue inhibitor of matrix-metalloprotease–1 (TIMP-1) had a 3.5-fold greater risk of fibrosis 1 year after PZQ treatment, compared with individuals with undetectable levels (odds ratio, 3.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.41–8.43; P = .007). Discussion Because TIMP-1 inhibits most matrix metalloproteases, which are responsible for collagen degradation, these data suggest that schistosome-associated hepatic fibrosis results, in part, from excessive inhibition of collagen remodeling. These data further suggest that TIMP-1 is a promising biomarker for assessing risk of hepatic fibrosis in schistosomiasis and, potentially, other infectious and noninfectious causes of liver disease. PMID:21199883

  17. Exogenous bone morphogenetic protein-7 reduces hepatic fibrosis in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice via transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Lin; Peng, Jie; Li, Qing-Fu; Yang, Min; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antifibrotic effects of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) on Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-induced hepatic fibrosis in BALB/C mice. METHODS: Sixty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three groups, including a control group (group A, n = 20), model group (group B, n = 20) and BMP-7 treated group (group C, n = 20). The mice in group B and group C were abdominally infected with S. japonicum cercariae to induce a schistosomal hepatic fibrosis model. The mice in group C were administered human recombinant BMP-7. Liver samples were extracted from mice sacrificed at 9 and 15 wk after modeling. Hepatic histopathological changes were assessed using Masson’s staining. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) and Smad7 protein levels and localization were measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and their mRNA expressions were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: The schistosomal hepatic fibrosis mouse model was successfully established, as the livers of mice in group B and group C showed varying degrees of typical schistosomal hepatopathologic changes such as egg granuloma and collagen deposition. The degree of collagen deposition in group C was higher than that in group A (week 9: 22.95 ± 6.66 vs 2.02 ± 0.76; week 15: 12.84 ± 4.36 vs 1.74 ± 0.80; P < 0.05), but significantly lower than that in group B (week 9: 22.95 ± 6.66 vs 34.43 ± 6.96; week 15: 12.84 ± 4.36 vs 18.90 ± 5.07; P < 0.05) at both time points. According to immunohistochemistry data, the expressions of α-SMA, TGF-β1 and pSmad2/3 protein in group C were higher than those in group A (α-SMA: week 9: 21.24 ± 5.73 vs 0.33 ± 0.20; week 15: 12.42 ± 4.88 vs 0.34 ± 0.27; TGF-β1: week 9: 37.00 ± 13.74 vs 3.73 ± 2.14; week 15: 16.71 ± 9.80 vs 3.08 ± 2.35; pSmad2/3: week 9: 12.92 ± 4.81 vs 0.83 ± 0.48; week 15: 7.87 ± 4

  18. The expression of molecule CD28 and CD38 on CD4⁺/CD8⁺ T lymphocytes in thymus and spleen elicited by Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice model.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Ji, Peng-yu; Song, Lan-gui; Lei, Jun-xia; Lv, Zhi-yue; Wu, Zhong-dao; Shao, Xiao; Sun, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by human schistosomes such as Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is considered as an immune-related disease. It was demonstrated that specific cytokine antibodies' response elicited by S. japonicum infection was gradually downregulated with the progress of the disease, resulting in a Th1/Th2 polarization and suppression of immune response. CD28 (cluster of differentiation 28) is one of the proteins expressed on T cells that provide co-stimulatory signals required for T cell activation and survival, and CD38 is an activating marker of T lymphocyte with high expression in many acute or chronic infections. The immune signature of CD28null T cells in the peripheral circulation associates with chronic inflammation in many diseases, such as HIV and CMV infection. In the thymus, CD28 expression on developing thymocytes appears to play a role for their selection, and it synergizes with CD38 to induce apoptosis of DP (double-positive) thymocytes. Few reports about CD28 and CD38 have been published in schistosomiasis. Here, we investigated the dynamic patterns of the expression of molecules CD28 and CD38 on CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes of the thymus and spleen in mice model with S. japonicum infection. Our data indicated that at an early period of infection, the frequency of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cell in the spleen decreased significantly, but higher at chronic infection than that in control. However, it demonstrated an increasing trend in the thymus with the progression of infection. The frequency of CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells increased from acute infection in the thymus, while from chronic infection in the spleen. The expression of CD38 on CD8(+) T cells began to increase at 4 weeks post infection both in the thymus and spleen; its elevated expression on CD4(+) T cells emerged at 6 weeks post infection in the thymus and at 10 weeks post infection in the spleen. Praziquantel (PZQ) treatment could partially restore the frequency of CD28(+) T cell of CD4(+) T

  19. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  20. Estimating sensitivity and specificity of a faecal examination method for Schistosoma japonicum infection in cats, dogs, water buffaloes, pigs, and rats in Western Samar and Sorsogon Provinces, The Philippines.

    PubMed

    Carabin, H; Balolong, E; Joseph, L; McGarvey, S T; Johansen, M V; Fernandez, T; Willingham, A L; Olveda, R

    2005-12-01

    Schistosoma japonicum causes a chronic parasitic disease, which persists as a major public health concern in The Philippines, the People's Republic of China and Indonesia. This infection is unique among helminthic zoonoses because it can infect humans and more than 40 other mammals. The objective of this study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique in cats, dogs, pigs, water buffaloes and rats in the Philippines. Faecal samples from each animal were collected on up to five occasions on five consecutive days in four villages of Sorsogon and Western Samar Provinces between January and July 2003. The faecal samples were analysed with the filtration and sedimentation Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique. Sensitivity and specificity of one, two, three, four, and five faecal samples were estimated using a Bayesian latent class approach. A total of 59, 43, 74, and 80% of the censored cats, dogs, pigs, and water buffaloes in the four villages were sampled, respectively. For all species, the sensitivity estimates when using the results of only 1 day of sampling were less than 80%. However, the sensitivity improved to at least 96% in all species when three or more faecal samples were collected on three separate days. The specificity was estimated to be above 92% across all species, even if just a single sample is used. The prevalences and 95% credible intervals of S. japonicum, adjusted for imperfect sensitivity and specificity, in cats, dogs, pigs, rats, and water buffaloes were 11.9% (6.8-18.3%), 19.9% (15.1-25.2%), 2.9% (1.1-5.2%), 31.3% (18.3-45.6%) and 6.3% (2.1-12.6%), respectively. Our results suggest that the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory technique is valid for the detection of infection with S. japonicum in animals, and that sensitivity estimates are excellent when faecal samples are collected on at least three different days. Monitoring S. japonicum infection in animal reservoirs with a valid test could

  1. B-cell epitopes recognized by Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus) on the 22 kDa tegumental membrane-associated antigen (Sj-22) of the Asiatic bloodfluke, Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Waine, G J; Zeng, Q; Zeng, X; Yi, X; McManus, D P

    1999-01-01

    The 22.6 kDa tegumental membrane-associated antigen of schistosomes is of recognized importance in immunity to schistosomiasis. In China, bovines are known to play an important role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum. Ten buffaloes (Bos buffelus) were vaccinated with a recombinant form (reSj-22) of the S. japonicum 22.6 kDa tegumental antigen (Sj-22) and the sera were used to identify and map possible linear B-cell epitopes on this molecule using a series of 18 overlapping synthetic peptides (P1-P18). Sera from all of the ten vaccinated buffaloes reacted strongly with Sj-22 in western blots and in ELISA, while sera from a further ten adjuvant (Quil A) control buffaloes did not. Four peptides (P3, P8, P9 and P10) were predominantly recognized by at least 90% of the buffalo sera. This pattern of recognition is similar to that obtained in a previous study we undertook in mice immunized with the same antigen whereby peptides 3, 8, 9 and 10 were recognized by over 80% of CBA strain mice. The peptide most frequently recognized by mice (peptide 6), and mapping to an EF-hand calcium binding domain, was recognized by six of the ten vaccinated buffaloes. The major difference between buffaloes and mice occurred with peptide 1 which was recognized very frequently by all three strains of mice tested but was only weakly recognized by three of the ten buffaloes. This study provides a valuable reference for further study on the immunity stimulated by the 22.6 kDa tegumental antigen in the murine model and a natural bovine host of Schistosomiasis japonica.

  2. Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding SEA (Sea-urchin Sperm Protein, Enterokinase and Agrin)-Domain Proteins with Lectin-Like and Heme-Binding Properties from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Yu, Chuanxin; Wakao, Masahiro; Suda, Yasuo; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin)-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (KD = 1.605×10−6 M) and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. Conclusions The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation), and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted. PMID:24416467

  3. Myeloradiculitis: a rare event in schistosoma infection.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, D; Hofmann, C; Sudeck, H; Burchard, G-D; Moser, A

    2006-12-01

    Schistosomiasis a parasitic disease caused by trematodes is widely distributed in (sub-)tropical countries. Depending on the species the infection manifests clinically as gastrointestinal (preferentially Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum) or urinary (preferentially S. haematobium) disorders. Here we present an uncommon case of myeloradiculitis leading to bladder palsy and sensory loss at the lower limbs. PMID:17180592

  4. Comparative evaluation of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium alkaline phosphatase antigenicity by the alkaline phosphatase immunoassay (APIA).

    PubMed

    Cesari, I M; Ballén, D E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, A; Pointier, J-P; Kombila, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Théron, A

    2014-04-01

    To know if alkaline phosphatase (AP) from schistosomes other than Schistosoma mansoni can be used as diagnostic marker for schistosomiasis in alkaline phosphatase immunocapture assay (APIA), we comparatively tested n-butanol extracts of adult worm membranes from a Venezuelan (JL) strain of S. mansoni (Ven/AWBE/Sm); a Cameroonian (EDEN) strain of Schistosoma intercalatum (Cam/AWBE/Si) and a Yemeni strain of Schistosoma haematobium (Yem/AWBE/Sh). APIA was evaluated with sera of patients from Venezuela, Senegal, and Gabon infected with S. mansoni, from Gabon infected with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium, from Chine infected with Schistosoma japonicum and from Cambodian patients infected with Schistosoma mekongi. Results indicate that 92.5% (37/40) of Venezuela sera, 75% (15/20) of Senegal sera, 39.5% (17/43) of S. haematobium sera, and 19.2% (5/26) S. intercalatum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm preparation. APIA with the Cam/AWBE/Si preparation showed that 53.8% of S. intercalatum-positive sera had anti-AP antibodies, and 51.2% S. haematobium-positive sera cross-immunocapturing the S. intercalatum AP. APIA performed with Yem/AWBE/Sh showed that 55.8% S. haematobium sera were positive. Only two out of nine S. japonicum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm and Cam/AWBE/Si, and no reaction was observed with Cambodian S. mekongi-positive sera. AP activity was shown to be present in all the schistosome species/strains studied. The use of APIA as a tool to explore the APs antigenicity and the presence of Schistosoma sp. infections through the detection of anti-Schistosoma sp. AP antibodies in a host, allowed us to demonstrate the antigenicity of APs of S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, and S. haematobium.

  5. DNA Vaccine Encoding the Chimeric Form of Schistosoma mansoni Sm-TSP2 and Sm29 Confers Partial Protection against Challenge Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves de Assis, Natan Raimundo; Batistoni de Morais, Suellen; Figueiredo, Bárbara Castro Pimentel; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; de Almeida, Leonardo Augusto; da Silva Pinheiro, Carina; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important parasitic disease worldwide that affects more than 207 million people in 76 countries and causes approximately 250,000 deaths per year. The best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization combined with drug treatment. Due to the ability of DNA vaccines to generate humoral and cellular immune responses, such vaccines are considered a promising approach against schistosomiasis. Sm29 and tetraspanin-2 (Sm-TSP2) are two proteins that are located in the S. mansoni tegument of adult worms and schistosomula and induce high levels of protection through recombinant protein immunization. In this study, we transfected BHK-21 cells with plasmids encoding Sm29, Sm-TSP2 or a chimera containing both genes. Using RT-PCR analysis and western blot, we confirmed that the DNA vaccine constructs were transcribed and translated, respectively, in BHK-21 cells. After immunization of mice, we evaluated the reduction in worm burden. We observed worm burden reductions of 17-22%, 22%, 31-32% and 24-32% in animals immunized with the pUMVC3/Sm29, pUMVC3/SmTSP-2, pUMVC3/Chimera and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 plasmids, respectively. We evaluated the humoral response elicited by DNA vaccines, and animals immunized with pUMVC3/Sm29 and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 showed higher titers of anti-Sm29 antibodies. The cytokine profile produced by the spleen cells of immunized mice was then evaluated. We observed higher production of Th1 cytokines, such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, in vaccinated mice and no significant production of IL-4 and IL-5. The DNA vaccines tested in this study showed the ability to generate a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, probably through the production of Th1 cytokines. However, future strategies aiming to optimize the protective response induced by a chimeric DNA construct need to be developed. PMID:25942636

  6. DNA Vaccine Encoding the Chimeric Form of Schistosoma mansoni Sm-TSP2 and Sm29 Confers Partial Protection against Challenge Infection.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Assis, Natan Raimundo; Batistoni de Morais, Suellen; Figueiredo, Bárbara Castro Pimentel; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; de Almeida, Leonardo Augusto; da Silva Pinheiro, Carina; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important parasitic disease worldwide that affects more than 207 million people in 76 countries and causes approximately 250,000 deaths per year. The best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization combined with drug treatment. Due to the ability of DNA vaccines to generate humoral and cellular immune responses, such vaccines are considered a promising approach against schistosomiasis. Sm29 and tetraspanin-2 (Sm-TSP2) are two proteins that are located in the S. mansoni tegument of adult worms and schistosomula and induce high levels of protection through recombinant protein immunization. In this study, we transfected BHK-21 cells with plasmids encoding Sm29, Sm-TSP2 or a chimera containing both genes. Using RT-PCR analysis and western blot, we confirmed that the DNA vaccine constructs were transcribed and translated, respectively, in BHK-21 cells. After immunization of mice, we evaluated the reduction in worm burden. We observed worm burden reductions of 17-22%, 22%, 31-32% and 24-32% in animals immunized with the pUMVC3/Sm29, pUMVC3/SmTSP-2, pUMVC3/Chimera and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 plasmids, respectively. We evaluated the humoral response elicited by DNA vaccines, and animals immunized with pUMVC3/Sm29 and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 showed higher titers of anti-Sm29 antibodies. The cytokine profile produced by the spleen cells of immunized mice was then evaluated. We observed higher production of Th1 cytokines, such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, in vaccinated mice and no significant production of IL-4 and IL-5. The DNA vaccines tested in this study showed the ability to generate a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, probably through the production of Th1 cytokines. However, future strategies aiming to optimize the protective response induced by a chimeric DNA construct need to be developed.

  7. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  8. The affinity of magnetic microspheres for Schistosoma eggs.

    PubMed

    Candido, Renata R F; Favero, Vivian; Duke, Mary; Karl, Stephan; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Woodward, Robert C; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Jones, Malcolm K; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic disease of humans, with two species primarily causing the intestinal infection: Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Traditionally, diagnosis of schistosomiasis is achieved through direct visualisation of eggs in faeces using techniques that lack the sensitivity required to detect all infections, especially in areas of low endemicity. A recently developed method termed Helmintex™ is a very sensitive technique for detection of Schistosoma eggs and exhibits 100% sensitivity at 1.3 eggs per gram of faeces, enough to detect even low-level infections. The Helminthex™ method is based on the interaction of magnetic microspheres and schistosome eggs. Further understanding the underlying egg-microsphere interactions would enable a targeted optimisation of egg-particle binding and may thus enable a significant improvement of the Helmintex™ method and diagnostic sensitivity in areas with low infection rates. We investigated the magnetic properties of S. mansoni and S. japonicum eggs and their interactions with microspheres with different magnetic properties and surface functionalization. Eggs of both species exhibited higher binding affinity to the magnetic microspheres than the non-magnetic microspheres. Binding efficiency was further enhanced if the particles were coated with streptavidin. Schistosoma japonicum eggs bound more microspheres compared with S. mansoni. However, distinct differences within eggs of each species were also observed when the distribution of the number of microspheres bound per egg was modelled with double Poisson distributions. Using this approach, both S. japonicum and S. mansoni eggs fell into two groups, one having greater affinity for magnetic microspheres than the other, indicating that not all eggs of a species exhibit the same binding affinity. Our observations suggest that interaction between the microspheres and eggs is more likely to be related to surface charge-based electrostatic

  9. Molecular characterization of S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles reveals their regulatory roles in parasite-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lihui; Liu, Juntao; Dao, Jinwei; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Gu, Huiming; Liu, Jinming; Feng, Xingang; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Secreted extracellular vesicles play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Increased knowledge of schistosome extracellular vesicles could provide insights into schistosome-host interactions and enable the development of novel intervention strategies to inhibit parasitic processes and lessen disease transmission. Here, we describe biochemical characterization of Schistosoma japonicum exosome-like vesicles (S. japonicum EVs). A total of 403 proteins were identified in S. japonicum EVs, and bioinformatics analyses indicated that these proteins were mainly involved in binding, catalytic activity, and translation regulatory activity. Next, we characterized the population of small RNAs associated with S. japonicum EVs. Further studies demonstrated that mammalian cells could internalize S. japonicum EVs and transfer their cargo miRNAs to recipient cells. Additionally, we found that a specific miRNA, likely originating from a final host, ocu-miR-191–5p, is also associated with S. japonicum EVs. Overall, our findings demonstrate that S. japonicum EVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis via a mechanism involving the transfer of their cargo miRNAs to hosts. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of schistosome-host interactions. PMID:27172881

  10. Clinical significance of chimerism.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2009-05-15

    Twins have been previously classified as either monozygotic or dizygotic. In recent years, fascinating, non-traditional mechanisms of twinning have been uncovered. We define chimerism versus mosaicism, touch on chimerism in the animal world, and explain timing of chimerism in humans. In addition, we discuss when to suspect chimerism in patients, and how to proceed with diagnostic evaluation and confirmation.

  11. Complex chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

  12. GdCl3 Attenuates Schistosomiasis japonicum Egg-Induced Granulomatosis Accompanied by Decreased Macrophage Infiltration in Murine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shengsheng; Lu, Qiang; Xu, Yuanhong; Wang, Xiaonan; Shen, Jilong; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Early-stage hepatic granuloma and advanced-stage fibrosis are important characteristics of schistosomiasis. The direct consequences of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) in egg-induced granuloma formation have not been reported, although GdCl3 is known to block the macrophages. In present study, mice were infected with 15 Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) cercariae and treated with GdCl3 (10 mg/kg body weight) twice weekly from day 21 to day 42 post-infection during the onset of egg-laying towards early granuloma formation. Histochemical staining showed that repeated injection of GdCl3 decreased macrophages infiltration in liver of mice infected with S. japonicum. Macrophage depletion by GdCl3 during the initial phase attenuated liver pathological injury characterized by smaller granuloma size and decreased immune inflammation as well as less fibrogenesis. In addition, IL-13Rα2 expression was reduced by GdCl3 in liver of mice infected with S. japonicum. The results suggest that GdCl3 depleted macrophages, which attenuated helminth infected immune responses involving with IL-13Rα2 signal. These findings would highlight a therapeutic potential via manipulating IL-13Rα2+ macrophage in schistosomiasis. PMID:26317423

  13. Enhancing Soybean Rhizosphere Colonization by Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, A. K. Maqbul; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to seek means to increase the colonization of the rhizosphere of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merrill) by Rhizobium japonicum. For this purpose, a strain of R. japonicum that was resistant to benomyl, streptomycin, and erythromycin was used. The numbers of R. japonicum rose quickly in the first 2 days after soybean seeds were planted in soil and then rapidly fell. The decline was slower if the seeds were coated with benomyl. This fungicide reduced the numbers of bacteria and protozoa in the rhizosphere, but the effect became less or disappeared as the plants grew. In sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms, the numbers of R. japonicum were usually lower if protozoa were present than if they were absent. Nodulation and plant yield were increased by the addition of benomyl to soybean seeds sown in sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms. The addition of streptomycin and erythromycin to soil stimulated the growth of R. japonicum but inhibited other bacteria in the presence or absence of soybeans. The data indicate that colonization can be increased by the use of antimicrobial agents and R. japonicum strains resistant to those inhibitors. PMID:16346616

  14. Quo vadis chimerism?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although immunity in multicellular organisms is efficient in dealing with alien agents, it may fail for allogeneic chimerism. Natural chimerism is widely documented in nature, distributed in at least ten phyla of protists, invertebrates and plants, vertebrates and mammals, including humans; it is an important ecological/evolutionary tool manipulating metazoans' life history portraits. Instead of purging allogeneic nascent selfish cells, a ‘double edged sword’ chimerism emerges, displaying environmental dictated costs and benefits for the genotypes involved. Benefits include the development of synergistic complementation, the increase of genetic variability, the assurance of mate location, improved size-dependent ecological qualities (growth rates, reproduction, survivorship, competition, environmental tolerance) and more. Costs include the threat of somatic and germ cell parasitism, developmental instability, death, diseases, autoimmunity, sexual sterility and organ malformations, which develop as well in mammalian natural chimerism, including humans. Because of its importance, medical sciences should study and harness natural chimerism properties for clinical purposes. PMID:21547028

  15. Quo vadis chimerism?

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    Although immunity in multicellular organisms is efficient in dealing with alien agents, it may fail for allogeneic chimerism. Natural chimerism is widely documented in nature, distributed in at least ten phyla of protists, invertebrates and plants, vertebrates and mammals, including humans; it is an important ecological/evolutionary tool manipulating metazoans' life history portraits. Instead of purging allogeneic nascent selfish cells, a 'double edged sword' chimerism emerges, displaying environmental dictated costs and benefits for the genotypes involved. Benefits include the development of synergistic complementation, the increase of genetic variability, the assurance of mate location, improved size-dependent ecological qualities (growth rates, reproduction, survivorship, competition, environmental tolerance) and more. Costs include the threat of somatic and germ cell parasitism, developmental instability, death, diseases, autoimmunity, sexual sterility and organ malformations, which develop as well in mammalian natural chimerism, including humans. Because of its importance, medical sciences should study and harness natural chimerism properties for clinical purposes.

  16. Transdermal evaporation delivery system of praziquantel for schistosomiasis japonicum chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Xinsheng; Fang, Yan; Wang, Yi; Duan, Cunzheng; Yao, Baoan

    2011-07-01

    A transdermal evaporation delivery system (TEDS) of praziquantel (PZQ) was developed by selecting ethylene glycol monophenyl ether as a nonvolatile component solvent and ethanol as a volatile component solvent to control efficiently the transmission and morbidity of the global schistosomiasis, providing a convenient administration system of PZQ for both humans and domestic animals. The solubility of PZQ in TEDS was more than 400 mg/mL when the ethanol concentration was 50% (w/w) in the solvent mixture at 32 °C, enabling to adapt requirements for the treatment of schistosomiasis. The highest serum drug concentration reached 35.93 µg/mL after transdermal administration of TEDS of PZQ in rabbits, being 6.3-fold higher than that after oral administration at the same dose. The TEDS of PZQ achieved treatment efficacy with the worm reduction of 100% when it was applied in the experimental treatment of Schistosoma japonicum in rabbits. The TEDS of PZQ that provides passive and nonocclusive delivery, having the inexpensive cost, low skin irritation rates, and precise dose of administration, should find application in the transmission control and chemotherapy of global schistosomiasis.

  17. Protoporphyrin formation in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Keithly, J H; Nadler, K D

    1983-01-01

    The obligately aerobic soybean root nodule bacterium Rhizobium japonicum produces large amounts of heme (iron protoporphyrin) only under low oxygen tensions, such as exist in the symbiotic root nodule. Aerobically incubated suspensions of both laboratory-cultured and symbiotic bacteria (bacteroids) metabolize delta-aminolevulinic acid to uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, and protoporphyrin. Under anaerobic conditions, suspensions of laboratory-cultured bacteria form greatly reduced amounts of protoporphyrin from delta-aminolevulinic acid, whereas protoporphyrin formation by bacteroid suspensions is unaffected by anaerobiosis, suggesting that bacteroids form protoporphyrin under anaerobic conditions more readily than do free-living bacteria. Oxygen is the major terminal electron acceptor for coproporphyrinogen oxidation in cell-free extracts of both bacteroids and free-living bacteria. In the absence of oxygen, ATP, NADP, Mg2+, and L-methionine are required for protoporphyrin formation in vitro. In the presence of these supplements, coproporphyrinogenase activity under anaerobic conditions is 5 to 10% of that observed under aerobic conditions. Two mechanisms for coproporphyrinogen oxidation exist in R. japonicum: an oxygen-dependent process and an anaerobic oxidation in which electrons are transferred to NADP. The significance of these findings with regard to heme biosynthesis in the microaerophilic soybean root nodule is discussed. PMID:6841317

  18. Omega-1 knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni eggs by lentivirus transduction reduces granuloma size in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jana; Young, Neil D.; Every, Alison L.; Pagel, Charles N.; Schnoeller, Corinna; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.; Gasser, Robin B.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of the most important neglected tropical diseases worldwide, is caused by flatworms (blood flukes or schistosomes) that live in the bloodstream of humans. The hepatointestinal form of this debilitating disease results from a chronic infection with Schistosoma mansoni or Schistosoma japonicum. No vaccine is available to prevent schistosomiasis, and treatment relies predominantly on the use of a single drug, praziquantel. In spite of considerable research effort over the years, very little is known about the complex in vivo events that lead to granuloma formation and other pathological changes during infection. Here we use, for the first time, a lentivirus-based transduction system to deliver microRNA-adapted short hairpin RNAs (shRNAmirs) into the parasite to silence and explore selected protein-encoding genes of S. mansoni implicated in the disease process. This gene-silencing system has potential to be used for functional genomic–phenomic studies of a range of socioeconomically important pathogens. PMID:25400038

  19. Recovery of Schistosoma haematobium ovum from Labeo rohita: first report from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, M M; Nazir, M M; Lashari, M H; Akhtar, S; Khosa, M A; Aziz, M; Zahid, H; Ali, S; Muneeb, M; Malik, A; Haider, S; Zafar, Z

    2015-09-01

    Schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia, is a parasitic disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma that can infect humans and animals. S. mansoni, S. japonicum, and S. mekongi all causes intestinal schistosomiasis except S. haematobium that causes urinary schistosomiasis. It is only specie which effects urinary system, it can affect liver, heart, lungs also but very rarely. Schistosoma haematobium is endemic to over 50 countries in Africa and the Middle East and Western Asia and may be fatal in HIV positive people. A number of reports from the African countries like Nigeria have been reported. A few cases are reported but in Pakistan it has never been reported before in native people. It is first time reported in Pakistan in the intestine of Rahu (Labeo rohita). The purpose of this study is to elaborate the approach of zoonotic agent by various other routes including the commonly available fish.

  20. Field evaluation of a test for praziquantel resistance in Schistosoma sp.

    PubMed

    Kenworthy, J D; Ye, P; Wu, G C; Yu, H; Shi, Y J; Li, H; Coles, G C

    2003-04-01

    A simple rapid test for detecting praziquantel resistance in Schistosoma sp., involving change in shape of miracidia on exposure to praziquantel, was evaluated in China. Tests on miracidia hatched from eggs collected from naturally infected goats were run in a field laboratory in Jiangxi Province and a research laboratory in Shanghai. The mean values in the two laboratories were not significantly different, but the variation between individual samples in the two laboratories suggests that a delineating dose will be required for routine diagnosis of resistance. Confirmation that resistance would have been detected in Schistosoma japonicum must await the isolation of a resistant isolate. The tests suggested that the infection in the goats was susceptible to praziquantel as did chemotherapy of water buffaloes with 25mg/kg. This gave a 95% cure rate on the first treatment and 100% with a second treatment, similar to that found previously in human patients.

  1. Chemotaxis of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to soybean exudates.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, W M; Hattermann, D R; Stacey, G

    1991-01-01

    The chemotactic response of Bradyrhizobium japonicum toward soybean seed and root exudates was examined. Assays using various isoflavones and fractionated exudate indicated that isoflavones are not the principal attractants in exudates. Likewise, induction of nod genes with isoflavones or seed exudate before assay did not enhance chemotaxis. Screening of numerous compounds revealed that only dicarboxylic acids and the amino acids glutamate and aspartate were strong attractants. The presence of glutamate, aspartate, and dicarboxylic acids in appreciable concentrations in soybean seed and root exudates indicates that these compounds likely represent natural chemoattractants for B. japonicum. PMID:1768137

  2. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics. PMID:26458840

  3. Adult Schistosoma mansoni express cathepsin L proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Dalton, J P; Clough, K A; Kilbane, C L; Harrop, S A; Hole, N; Brindley, P J

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the deduced amino acid sequence of a novel cathepsin L proteinase from Schistosoma mansoni, and describes cathepsin L-like activity in extracts of adult schistosomes. Using consensus primers specific for cysteine proteinases, gene fragments were amplified from adult S. mansoni cDNA by PCR and cloned. One of these fragments showed marked identity to Sm31, the cathepsin B cysteine proteinase of adult S. mansoni, whereas another differed from Sm31 and was employed as a probe to isolate two cDNAs from an adult S. mansoni gene library. Together these cDNAs encoded a novel preprocathepsin L of 319 amino acids; this zymogen is predicted to be processed in vivo into a mature, active cathepsin L proteinase of 215 amino acids. Closest homologies were with cathepsins L from rat, mouse, and chicken (46-47% identity). Southern hybridization analysis suggested that only one or a few copies of the gene was present per genome, demonstrated that its locus was distinct from that of Sm31, and that a homologous sequence was present in Schistosoma japonicum. Because these results indicated that schistosomes expressed a cathepsin L proteinase, extracts of adult S. mansoni were examined for acidic, cysteine proteinase activity. Based on rates of cleavage of peptidyl substrates employed to discriminate between classes of cysteine proteinases, namely cathepsin L (Z-phe-arg-AMC), cathepsin B (Z-arg-arg-AMC) and cathepsin H (Bz-arg-AMC), the extracts were found to contain vigorous cathepsin L-like activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Resistance to niclosamide in Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum: should we be worried?

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, You-Zi; Wang, Wei; Xing, Yun-Tian; Qu, Guo-Li; Liang, You-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    As the currently only available molluscicide, niclosamide has been widely used for snail control for over 2 decades in China. There is therefore a concern about the emergence of niclosamide-resistant snail populations following repeated, extensive use of the chemical. The purpose of this study was to investigate the likelihood of niclosamide resistance in Oncomelania hupensis in China. Active adult O. hupensis snails derived from 20 counties of 10 schistosomiasis-endemic provinces of China, of 10 snails in each drug concentration, were immersed in solutions of 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.063, 0.032, 0.016 and 0.008 mg L-1 of a 50% wettable powder of niclosamide ethanolamine salt (WPN) for 24 and 48 h at 25 °C, and the median lethal concentration (LC50) was estimated. Then, the 24- and 48-h WPN LC50 values were compared with those determined in the same sampling sites in 2002. The results indicated that the 24- and 48-h WPN LC50 values for O. hupensis were not significantly different from those determined in 2002 (P = 0.202 and 0.796, respectively). It is concluded that the current sensitivity of O. hupensis to niclosamide has not changed after more than 2 decades of repeated, extensive application in the main endemic foci of China, and there is no evidence of resistance to niclosamide detected in O. hupensis.

  5. Multiple antibiotic resistance in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cole, M A; Elkan, G H

    1979-05-01

    A total of 48 strains of the soil bacterium Rhizobium japonicum were screened for their response to several widely used antibiotics. Over 60% of the strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, polymyxin B, and erythromycin, and 47% or more of the strains were resistant to neomycin and penicillin G, when tested by disk assay procedures. The most common grouping of resistances in strains was simultaneous resistance to tetracycline, penicillin G, neomycin, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin (25% of all strains tested). The occurrence of multiple drug resistance in a soil bacterium that is not a vertebrate pathogen suggests that chemotherapeutic use of antibiotics is not required for the development of multiple drug resistance. PMID:485137

  6. Schistosoma hematobium-associated glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Seck, S. M.; Sarr, M. L.; Dial, M. C.; Ka, E. F.

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is the second most devastating tropical parasitic disease worldwide and is responsible for many urological complications. However, glomerular injury is a rare complication mainly described with Schistosoma mansoni. We report a case of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) associated with Schistosoma hematobium infection in a young Senegalese boy living in a rural area. Clinical presentation was with steroid-resistant with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy showed type 1 MPGN with the presence of S. hematobium eggs surrounded by a gigantocellular granuloma. Despite therapy with antihelminthic and immunosuppressive drugs, evolution was characterized by progression to end-stage renal disease over 1 year. More efforts should be made on the prevention and early detection of schistosomiasis among at-risk populations. PMID:21886983

  7. Toward Measuring Schistosoma Response to Praziquantel Treatment with Appropriate Descriptors of Egg Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Olliaro, Piero L.; Vaillant, Michel; Diawara, Aïssatou; Coulibaly, Jean T.; Garba, Amadou; Keiser, Jennifer; King, Charles H.; Knopp, Stefanie; Landouré, Aly; N’Goran, Eliézer K.; Raso, Giovanna; Scherrer, Alexandra U.; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Stete, Katarina; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Utzinger, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Background The control of schistosomiasis emphasizes preventive chemotherapy with praziquantel, which aims at decreasing infection intensity and thus morbidity in individuals, as well as transmission in communities. Standardizing methods to assess treatment efficacy is important to compare trial outcomes across settings, and to monitor program effectiveness consistently. We compared customary methods and looked at possible complementary approaches in order to derive suggestions for standardizing outcome measures. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed data from 24 studies conducted at African, Asian, and Latin American sites, enrolling overall 4,740 individuals infected with Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium, or S. japonicum, and treated with praziquantel at doses of 40–80 mg/kg. We found that group-based arithmetic and geometric means can be used interchangeably to express egg reduction rates (ERR) only if treatment efficacy is high (>95%). For lower levels of efficacy, ERR estimates are higher with geometric than arithmetic means. Using the distribution of individual responses in egg excretion, 6.3%, 1.7% and 4.3% of the subjects treated for S. haematobium, S. japonicum and S. mansoni infection, respectively, had no reduction in their egg counts (ERR = 0). The 5th, 10th, and 25th centiles of the subjects treated for S. haematobium had individual ERRs of 0%, 49.3%, and 96.5%; the corresponding values for S. japonicum were 75%, 99%, and 99%; and for S. mansoni 18.2%, 65.3%, and 99.8%. Using a single rather than quadruplicate Kato-Katz thick smear excluded 19% of S. mansoni-infected individuals. Whilst the effect on estimating ERR was negligible by individual studies, ERR estimates by arithmetic means were 8% lower with a single measurement. Conclusions/Significance Arithmetic mean calculations of Schistosoma ERR are more sensitive and therefore more appropriate to monitor drug performance than geometric means. However, neither are satisfactory to identify

  8. Citrate as a siderophore in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Guerinot, M L; Meidl, E J; Plessner, O

    1990-01-01

    Under iron-limiting conditions, many bacteria secrete ferric iron-specific ligands, generically termed siderophores, to aid in the sequestering and transport of iron. One strain of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, 61A152, was shown to produce a siderophore when 20 B. japonicum strains were screened with all six chemical assays commonly used to detect such production. Production by strain 61A152 was detected via the chrome azurol S assay, a general test for siderophores which is independent of siderophore structure. The iron-chelating compound was neither a catechol nor a hydroxamate and was ninhydrin negative. It was determined to be citric acid via a combination of thin-layer chromatography and high-voltage paper electrophoresis; this identification was verified by a specific enzymatic assay for citric acid. The inverse correlation which was observed between citric acid release and the iron content of the medium suggested that ferric citrate could serve as an iron source. This was confirmed via growth and transport assays. Exogenously added ferric citrate could be used to overcome iron starvation, and iron-deficient cells actively transported radiolabeled ferric citrate. These results, taken together, indicate a role for ferric citrate in the iron nutrition of this strain, which has been shown to be an efficient nitrogen-fixing strain on a variety of soybean cultivars. PMID:2140566

  9. Aromatic compounds from the liverwort Conocephalum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Guo, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, Li-Ning; Ji, Mei; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Two undescribed dimeric ArC2 derivatives, cis- and trans-1,2-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)cyclobutane (1 and 2), one new monoterpenes esters, 2alpha,5beta-dihydroxybornane-2-cis-cinnamate (3), along with eight known compounds, 2alpha,5beta-dihydroxybornane-2-trans-cinnamate (4), perrottetin E (5), isoriccardin C (6), marchantin A (7), marchantin E (8), marchantin C (9), and isomarchantin C (10) were isolated from the liverwort Conocephalum japonicum. All the structures were established by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The isolated compounds 3-10 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against the human KB cell line with IC50 values ranging from 16.5 to 50.2 microM.

  10. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  11. A newly-identified lineage of Schistosoma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jess A T; DeJong, Randall J; Kazibwe, Francis; Mkoji, Gerald M; Loker, Eric S

    2003-08-01

    Because of their role in causing schistosomiasis, flukes of the genus Schistosoma are the best known of all digeneans. The genus has traditionally been divided into four familiar species groups. Here we report on three poorly known species of Schistosoma, one of which, Schistosoma hippopotami, is known from the hippopotamus, one of which is provisionally identified as Schistosoma edwardiense, another hippo parasite, and a third that has not previously been described. All were collected from freshwater snails obtained from Lake Edward, western Uganda, the type locality for both known hippo schistosomes. The three different kinds of schistosome cercariae differ from one another in size, and all are readily differentiated by their long tail stems from the cercariae of human-infecting species. Furthermore, each was recovered from a different genus of snail host, Biomphalaria sudanica, Bulinus truncatus or Ceratophallus natalensis. Molecular analysis, based on 8350 bases of combined nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, groups these three long tail-stem cercariae into a well supported clade that does not associate with any of the recognised species groups. The placement of this clade, basal to all African species plus several Asian species, suggests that there has been an ancient association between Schistosoma and hippos. This new African Schistosoma clade advocates the need for further modification of the traditional species group-based classification. Two of the four species groups are paraphyletic. It also suggests that Schistosoma has been remarkably plastic with respect to adapting to snail hosts-three distantly related genera of planorbid snails have been exploited by worms within a single clade. Finally, it adds a new layer of complexity to deciphering the origins of Schistosoma, often considered to be African but recently challenged as being Asian. In the late Cenozoic the distribution of hippo species straddled both Africa and Asia and they may have provided a means

  12. Evaluation of the anthelmintic effects of artesunate against experimental Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice using different treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Shaohong, Lu; Kumagai, Takashi; Qinghua, Ai; Xiaolan, Yan; Ohmae, Hiroshi; Yabu, Yoshisada; Siwen, Li; Liyong, Wen; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Ohta, Nobuo

    2006-03-01

    The therapeutic effects of artesunate against experimental Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice were analyzed. Previous studies showed that artesunate is highly effective against S. japonicum infection, but the action of this drug against S. mansoni remained uncovered. The present study examines the optical conditions for artesunate against S. mansoni and evaluates the effects of inhibiting the sexual maturation of adult worms. Mice infected with S. mansoni were orally administered with artesunate according to different schedules. Four consecutive administrations of 300 mg/kg of artesunate at 2-week intervals conferred almost total protection without the development of pathological lesions in the liver. The significant reduction in the number of eggs produced by surviving worms and the status of egg maturation suggested that artesunate inhibits sexual maturation. Electron microscopy revealed that artesunate caused morphological damage, especially on the worm tegument. Artesunate was also very effective in iron-deficient mice. Furthermore, the efficacy of artesunate was equal to or better than that of artemether against S. japonicum infection. Considering that artemether is more toxic, artesunate is currently one of the most efficient drugs against immature S. mansoni.

  13. Enzyme analysis of Schistosoma haematobium*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. A.; Ross, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported of enzyme analyses, by isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels, of adult Schistosoma haematobium worms derived from 22 isolates originating from 13 countries. Polymorphisms have been identified in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM) systems. Certain forms appear to be restricted in their geographical distribution and their occurrence outside their usual areas suggests human population movements resulting in mixing of parasite strains. The possible implications of minor variations in some PGM patterns and the apparent absence of heteropolymer fractions in presumed G6PD heterozygotes are discussed. The use of the technique to detect natural multiple miracidial infections in snails is reported and discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6222843

  14. Rapid competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a monoclonal antibody reacting with a 15-kilodalton tegumental antigen of Schistosoma mansoni for serodiagnosis of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, A J; Piuvezam, M R; de Moura, H; Maddison, S; Peralta, J M

    1993-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) for antibody detection was developed by using a monoclonal antibody which reacts with a 15-kDa tegumental antigen of the adult worm of Schistosoma mansoni. This monoclonal antibody was not able to react with antigens of Schistosoma japonicum or Schistosoma haematobium in enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) and indirect immunofluorescence tests. The assay was performed in a period of 1 h using an adult worm crude extract antigen. To evaluate the CELISA, a total of 73 serum samples was analyzed: 35 were from S. mansoni-infected patients, 23 were from individuals with parasitic infections other than schistosomiasis, and 14 were from healthy individuals. All serum samples from healthy individuals and from patients infected with other parasites were negative, as were two (6%) samples from patients infected with S. mansoni. EITB analysis showed that 32 of 33 CELISA-positive samples were positive in the EITB but with different patterns of reactivity. A 15-kDa protein reacted with 60% of serum samples, and a 60-kDa protein showed the highest level of reactivity (85%). The two samples from patients infected with S. mansoni that were negative in the CELISA reacted with 70-, 60-, 50-, 47-, and 38-kDa proteins. One sample, positive in CELISA, did not react with proteins of the antigenic extract. Images PMID:8408548

  15. Defensive function of pigment granules in Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Miyake, A; Harumoto, T; Salvi, B; Rivola, V

    1990-06-29

    The defensive function of pigment granules in the red heterotrichous ciliate Blepharisma japonicum was studied by comparing normally-pigmented red cells, albino mutant cells and light-bleached cells (a phenocopy of the albino mutant) as prey for a carnivorous ciliate Dileptus margaritifer. Albino and bleached cells were eaten more readily than red cells by dilepti. Under certain conditions, dilepti were killed by red cells, but not by albino and light-bleached cells. The cell-free fluid of red cells, but not of albino and bleached cells, was toxic to dilepti. We conclude that one of the functions of pigment granules in B. japonicum is defense against predators. The offense-defense interaction between D. margaritifer and B. japonicum is, therefore, mediated by their extrusomes, toxicysts in the former and pigment granules in the latter. Other extrusomes of unknown function might also participate in offense-defense cell-cell interaction in protists.

  16. A link between arabinose utilization and oxalotrophy in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marion; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Ahrens, Christian H; Omasits, Ulrich; Schneider, Kathrin; Danza, Francesco; Padhi, Barnali; Murset, Valérie; Braissant, Olivier; Vorholt, Julia A; Hennecke, Hauke; Pessi, Gabriella

    2014-04-01

    Rhizobia have a versatile catabolism that allows them to compete successfully with other microorganisms for nutrients in the soil and in the rhizosphere of their respective host plants. In this study, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 was found to be able to utilize oxalate as the sole carbon source. A proteome analysis of cells grown in minimal medium containing arabinose suggested that oxalate oxidation extends the arabinose degradation branch via glycolaldehyde. A mutant of the key pathway genes oxc (for oxalyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase) and frc (for formyl-coenzyme A transferase) was constructed and shown to be (i) impaired in growth on arabinose and (ii) unable to grow on oxalate. Oxalate was detected in roots and, at elevated levels, in root nodules of four different B. japonicum host plants. Mixed-inoculation experiments with wild-type and oxc-frc mutant cells revealed that oxalotrophy might be a beneficial trait of B. japonicum at some stage during legume root nodule colonization.

  17. RNA interference targeting leucine aminopeptidase blocks hatching of Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Gabriel; Morales, Maria E; Alrefaei, Yousef N; Cancela, Martín; Castillo, Estela; Dalton, John P; Tort, José F; Brindley, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Schistosoma mansoni leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is thought to play a central role in hatching of the miracidium from the schistosome egg. We identified two discrete LAPs genes in the S. mansoni genome, and their orthologs in S. japonicum. The similarities in sequence and exon/intron structure of the two genes, LAP1 and LAP2, suggest that they arose by gene duplication and that this occurred before separation of the mansoni and japonicum lineages. The SmLAP1 and SmLAP2 genes have different expression patterns in diverse stages of the cycle; whereas both are equally expressed in the blood dwelling stages (schistosomules and adult), SmLAP2 expression was higher in free living larval (miracidia) and in parasitic intra-snail (sporocysts) stages. We investigated the role of each enzyme in hatching of schistosome eggs and the early stages of schistosome development by RNA interference (RNAi). Using RNAi, we observed marked and specific reduction of mRNAs, along with a loss of exopeptidase activity in soluble parasite extracts against the diagnostic substrate l-leucine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin hydroxide. Strikingly, knockdown of either SmLAP1 or SmLAP2, or both together, was accompanied by >or=80% inhibition of hatching of schistosome eggs showing that both enzymes are important to the escape of miracidia from the egg. The methods employed here refine the utility of RNAi for functional genomics studies in helminth parasites and confirm these can be used to identify potential drug targets, in this case schistosome aminopeptidases. PMID:19463860

  18. Generation of Chimeric Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Ramsey, Cathy; Ma, Hong; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2011-01-01

    Summary Totipotent cells in early embryos are progenitors of all stem cells and are capable of developing into a whole organism, including extraembryonic tissues such as placenta. Pluripotent cells in the inner cell mass (ICM) are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into any cell type of a body except extraembryonic tissues. The ability to contribute to chimeric animals upon reintroduction into host embryos is the key feature of murine totipotent and pluripotent cells. Here, we demonstrate that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolated ICMs fail to incorporate into host embryos and develop into chimeras. However, chimeric offspring were produced following aggregation of totipotent cells of the 4-cell embryos. These results provide insights into the species-specific nature of primate embryos and suggest that a chimera assay using pluripotent cells may not be feasible. PMID:22225614

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of a putative PA28γ proteasome activator orthologue in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Cláudia Sossai; Morais, Enyara Rezende; Magalhães, Lizandra G.; Machado, Carla Botelho; Moreira, Érika Bueno de Carvalho; Teixeira, Felipe Roberti; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Yoshino, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    PA28γ is a proteasome activator involved in the regulation of the cellular proliferation, differentiation and growth. In the present study, we identified and characterized a cDNA from Schistosoma mansoni exhibiting significant homology to PA28γ of diverse taxa ranging from mammals (including humans) to simple invertebrates. Designated SmPA28γ, this transcript has a 753 bp predicted ORF encoding a protein of 250 amino acid residues. Alignment of SmPA28γ with multiple PA28γ orthologues revealed an average similarity of ~40% among the investigated organisms, and 90% similarity with PA28γ from Schistosoma japonicum. In addition, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a close linkage between SmPA28γ to its sister group that contains well-characterized PA28γ sequences from Drosophila spp., as well as sharing the same branch with PA28γ from S. japonicum. Gene expression profiling of SmPA28γ using real-time quantitative PCR revealed elevated steady-state transcript levels in the eggs, miracidia and paired adult worms compared to other stages. In parallel with gene expression profiles, an affinity-purified anti-SmPA28γ antibody produced against recombinant protein exhibited strongest reactivity in Western blot analyses to endogenous SmPA28γ from miracidia, sporocysts and paired adult worms. Given its known regulatory function in other organisms, we hypothesized that the high level of SmPA28γ transcript and protein in these stages may be correlated with an important role of the PA28γ in the cellular growth and/or development of this parasite. To address this hypothesis, miracidia were transformed in vitro to sporocysts in the presence of SmPA28γ double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and cultivated for 4 days, after which time steady-state transcript and protein levels, and phenotypic changes were evaluated. SmPA28γ dsRNA treatment resulted in gene and protein knockdown of ~60% and ~80%, respectively, which were correlated with a significant decrease in larval length

  20. Chimerism and tolerance in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Starzl, Thomas E

    2004-10-01

    Studies in experimental models (1953-1956) demonstrated that acquired donor-specific allotolerance in immunologically immature or irradiated animals is strongly associated with donor leukocyte chimerism. Bone marrow transplantation in immune-deficient or cytoablated human recipients was a logical extension (1968). In contrast, clinical (1959) and then experimental organ transplantation was systematically accomplished in the apparent absence of leukocyte chimerism. Consequently, it was assumed for many years that success with organ and bone marrow transplantation involved fundamentally different mechanisms. With the discovery in 1992 of small numbers of donor leukocytes in the tissues or blood of long-surviving organ recipients (microchimerism), we concluded that organ engraftment was a form of leukocyte chimerism-dependent partial tolerance. In this initially controversial paradigm, alloengraftment after both kinds of transplantation is the product of a double immune reaction in which responses, each to the other, of coexisting donor and recipient immune systems results in variable reciprocal clonal exhaustion, followed by peripheral clonal deletion. It was proposed with Rolf Zinkernagel that the individual alloresponses are the equivalent of the MHC-restricted T cell recognition of, and host response to, intracellular parasites and that the mechanisms of immune responsiveness, or nonresponsiveness, are governed by the migration and localization of the respective antigens. Elucidation of the mechanisms of nonresponsiveness (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) and their regulation removed much of the historical mystique of transplantation. The insight was then applied to improve the timing and dosage of immunosuppression of current human transplant recipients.

  1. Transient mixed chimerism for allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Oura, Tetsu; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    Mixed chimerism discovered in Freemartin cattle by Ray Owen 70 years ago paved the way for research on immune tolerance. Since his discovery, significant progress has been made in the effort to induce allograft tolerance via mixed chimerism in various murine models. However, induction of persistent mixed chimerism has proved to be extremely difficult in major histocompatibility complex mismatched humans. Chimerism induced in humans tends to either disappear or convert to full donor chimerism, depending on the intensity of the conditioning regimen. Nevertheless, our studies in both NHPs and humans have clearly demonstrated that renal allograft tolerance can be induced by transient mixed chimerism. Our studies have shown that solid organ allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism 1) requires induction of multilineage hematologic chimerism, 2) depends on peripheral regulatory mechanisms, rather than thymic deletion, for long-term maintenance, 3) is organ specific (kidney and lung but not heart allograft tolerance are feasible). A major advantage of tolerance induction via transient mixed chimerism is exclusion of the risk of graft-versus-host disease. Our ongoing studies are directed toward improving the consistency of tolerance induction, reducing the morbidity of the conditioning regimen, substituting clinically available agents, such as Belatacept for the now unavailable anti-CD2 monoclonal antibody, and extending the protocol to recipients of deceased donor allografts.

  2. Chimerism analysis following nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lion, Thomas; Watzinger, Franz

    2006-01-01

    Molecular monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism has become a routine diagnostic approach in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Chimerism testing permits the documentation and surveillance of engraftment and facilitates early detection of impending graft rejection. In patients transplanted for treatment of malignant hematological disorders, monitoring of chimerism can provide an early indication of incipient disease relapse. The investigation of chimerism has therefore become an indispensable tool for the management of patients during the posttransplant period. Growing use of nonmyeloablative conditioning, which is associated with prolonged duration of mixed hematopoietic chimerism, has further increased the clinical importance of chimerism analysis. At present, the most commonly used technical approaches to the investigation of chimerism include microsatellite analysis by polymerase chain reaction and, in the gender-mismatched transplant setting, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of sex chromosomes. The investigation of chimerism within specific leukocyte subsets isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow samples by flow-sorting or magnetic bead-based techniques provides more specific information on processes underlying the dynamics of donor/recipient chimerism. Moreover, cell subset-specific analysis permits the assessment of impending complications at a significantly higher sensitivity, thus providing a basis for earlier treatment decisions.

  3. Organic Acid Metabolism by Isolated Rhizobium japonicum Bacteroids

    PubMed Central

    Stovall, Iris; Cole, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids isolated from soybean (Glycine max L.) nodules oxidized 14C-labeled succinate, pyruvate, and acetate in a manner consistent with operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a partial glyoxylate cycle. Substrate carbon was incorporated into all major cellular components (cell wall + membrane, nucleic acids, and protein). PMID:16660386

  4. [Content of rare earth elements in wild Hypericum japonicum Thunb].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Lin; Rui, Yu-Kui; Tian, Zhi-Huan

    2009-06-01

    Rare earth elements are important nutritional elements for human health, and today more and more attention has been paid to the effective components in Chinese traditional medicine, especially to rare earth elements. Fifteen rare earth elements in wild hypericum japonicum Thunb were analyzed by the methods of ICP-MS. The results showed that the concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Tm, Lu and Y ranged from 6 ng x g(-1) x DW to 14 522 ng x g(-1) x DW, and among them the concentrations of La, Ce and Nd were higher than 2 000 ng x g(-1) x DW. Compared with the concentration of rare earth elements in rice, corn, wheat and barley, the total concentration of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb was much higher, which could be the mechanism of curative effect of hypericum japonicum Thunb on liverish diseases. The character of elements and the content of rare earth elements in soil should be responsible for the difference, but the distributive mechanism of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb should be further studied.

  5. Bradyrhizobium japonicum Survival in and Soybean Inoculation with Fluid Gels.

    PubMed

    Jawson, M D; Franzluebbers, A J; Berg, R K

    1989-03-01

    The utilization of gels, which are used for fluid drilling of seeds, as carriers of Bradyrhizobium japonicum for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) inoculation was studied. Gels of various chemical composition (magnesium silicate, potassium acrylate-acrylamide, grafted starch, and hydroxyethyl cellulose) were used, although the hydroxyethyl cellulose gels were more extensively investigated. Gel inocula were prepared by mixing gel powder with liquid cultures of B. japonicum (2% [wt/vol]). The population of B. japonicum USDA 110 did not change in each gel type during 8 days of incubation at 28 degrees C. These fluid gels were prepared with late-exponential-growth-phase cells that were washed and suspended in physiological saline. Mid-exponential-growth-phase B. japonicum USDA 110, 123, and 138 grew in cellulose gels prepared with yeast extract-mannitol broth as well as or better than in yeast extract-mannitol broth alone for the first 10 days at 28 degrees C. Populations in these cellulose gels after 35 days were as large as when the gels had originally been prepared, and survival occurred for at least 70 days. Soybeans grown in sand in the greenhouse had greater nodule numbers, nodule weights, and top weights with gel inoculants compared with a peat inoculant. In soil containing 10 indigenous B. japonicum per g of soil, inoculation resulted in increased soybean nodule numbers, nodule weights, and top weights, but only nodule numbers were greater with gel than with peat inoculation. The gel-treated seeds carried 10 to 10 more bacteria per seed (10 to 10) than did the peat-treated seeds. PMID:16347870

  6. Mechanism of anemia in Schistosoma mansoni-infected school children in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Butler, Sara E; Muok, Erick M; Montgomery, Susan P; Odhiambo, Keziah; Mwinzi, Pauline M N; Secor, W Evan; Karanja, Diana M S

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the mechanism of anemia associated with Schistosoma mansoni infection might provide useful information on how treatment programs are implemented to minimize schistosomiasis-associated morbidity and maximize treatment impact. We used a cross-sectional study with serum samples from 206 Kenyan school children to determine the mechanisms in S. mansoni-associated anemia. Serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor levels were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results suggest that S. mansoni-infected persons are more likely (odds ratio = 3.68, 95% confidence interval = 1.33-10.1) to have levels of serum ferritin (> 100 ng/mL) that are associated with anemia of inflammation (AI) than S. mansoni-uninfected children. Our results suggest that AI is the most common form of anemia in S. mansoni infections. In contrast, the mechanism of anemia in S. mansoni-uninfected children was iron deficiency. Moreover, the prevalence of AI in the study participants demonstrated a significant trend with S. mansoni infection intensity (P < 0.001). Our results are consistent with those observed in S. japonicum-associated anemia.

  7. A thermal denaturation study of macronuclear chromatin in Blepharisma japonicum (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Heterotrichida).

    PubMed

    Salvini, M; Dalle Lucche, T; Durante, M

    1997-08-15

    The macronuclear chromatin of the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum, in two starvation states, was studied by thermal denaturation analysis. The behaviour of B. japonicum chromatin, native and reconstituted with Tetrahymena pyriformis H1 histone, was analysed. The data obtained are consistent with the hypothesis that B. japonicum macronuclear chromatin contains a H1-like peptide associated with the linker DNA, although this peptide is reduced in amount and/or chromatin stabilising ability when compared to Tetrahymena macronuclear H1.

  8. Antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of extracts from Cirsium japonicum roots

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Heo, Seong-Il

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the antioxidant activity of methanol (MeOH) and water extracts from roots of Cirsium japonicum in vitro. MeOH extract showed a stronger free radical scavenging activity than water extract. However, both of extracts showed a concentration dependent hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, reducing power and metal chelating ability. MeOH extract had greater phenolic and flavonoid contents than water extract. The antidiabetic activity of these two extracts was evaluated by the α-glucosidase inhibition assay. The water extract showed a considerable α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. To our knowledge, this may be the first time to report the antioxidant and antidiabetic activities in Cirsium japonicum roots. PMID:20016726

  9. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  10. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections....

  11. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections....

  12. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections....

  13. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections....

  14. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections....

  15. Effects of culture age on symbiotic infectivity of Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvaneswari, T.V.; Mills, K.K.; Crist, D.K.; Evans, W.R.; Bauer, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    The infectivity of the soybean symbiont Rhizobium japonicum changed two- to fivefold with culture age for strains 110 ARS, 138 Str Spc, and 123 Spc, whereas culture age had relatively little effect on the infectivity of strains 83 Str and 61A76 Str. Infectivity was measured by determining the number of nodules which developed on soybean primary roots in the zone which contained developing and preemergent root hairs at the time of inoculation. Root cells in this region of the host root are susceptible to Rhizobium infection, but this susceptibility is lost during acropetal development and maturation of the root cells within a period of 4 to 6 h. Profiles of nodulation frequency at different locations on the root were not affected by the age of the R. japonicum cultures, indicating that culture age affected the efficiency of Rhizobium infection rather than how soon infections were initiated after inoculation. Inoculum dose-response experiments also indicated that culture age affected the efficiency of infection. Two strains, 61A76 Str and 83 Str, were relatively inefficient at all culture ages, particularly at low inoculum doses. Changes in infectivity with culture age were reasonably well correlated with changes in the proportion of cells in a culture capable of binding soybean lectin. Suspensions of R. japonicum in water were found to retain their viability and infectivity. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Exposure versus Susceptibility as Alternative Bases for New Approaches to Surveillance for Schistosoma japonicum in Low Transmission Environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Spear, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Currently, schistosomiasis in China provides an excellent example of many of the challenges of moving from low transmission to the elimination of transmission for infectious diseases generally. In response to the surveillance dimension of these challenges, we here explore two strategic approaches to inform priorities for the development of improved methods addressed specifically to schistosomiasis in the low transmission environment. We utilize an individually-based model and the exposure data used earlier to explore surveillance strategies, one focused on exposure assessment and the second on our estimates of variability in individual susceptibility in the practical context of the current situation in China and the theoretical context of the behavior of transmission dynamics near the zero state. Our findings suggest that individual susceptibility is the major single determinant of infection intensity in both the low and medium risk environments. We conclude that there is considerable motivation to search for a biomarker of susceptibility to infection in humans, but that there would also be value in a method for monitoring surface waters for the free-swimming forms of the parasite in endemic or formerly endemic environments as an early warning of infection risk. PMID:26942912

  17. Exposure versus Susceptibility as Alternative Bases for New Approaches to Surveillance for Schistosoma japonicum in Low Transmission Environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Spear, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Currently, schistosomiasis in China provides an excellent example of many of the challenges of moving from low transmission to the elimination of transmission for infectious diseases generally. In response to the surveillance dimension of these challenges, we here explore two strategic approaches to inform priorities for the development of improved methods addressed specifically to schistosomiasis in the low transmission environment. We utilize an individually-based model and the exposure data used earlier to explore surveillance strategies, one focused on exposure assessment and the second on our estimates of variability in individual susceptibility in the practical context of the current situation in China and the theoretical context of the behavior of transmission dynamics near the zero state. Our findings suggest that individual susceptibility is the major single determinant of infection intensity in both the low and medium risk environments. We conclude that there is considerable motivation to search for a biomarker of susceptibility to infection in humans, but that there would also be value in a method for monitoring surface waters for the free-swimming forms of the parasite in endemic or formerly endemic environments as an early warning of infection risk.

  18. Local immune responses of the Chinese water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, against Schistosoma japonicum larvae: crucial insights for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Piedrafita, David; Li, Yuesheng; Zheng, Mao; He, Yongkang; Yu, Xinling; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T

    2013-01-01

    Asian schistosomiasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease infecting up to a million people and threatening tens of millions more. Control of this disease is hindered by the animal reservoirs of the parasite, in particular the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), which is responsible for significant levels of human transmission. A transmission-blocking vaccine administered to buffaloes is a realistic option which would aid in the control of schistosomiasis. This will however require a better understanding of the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in naturally exposed buffaloes, particularly the immune response to migrating schistosome larvae, which are the likely targets of an anti-schistosome vaccine. To address this need we investigated the immune response at the major sites of larval migration, the skin and the lungs, in previously exposed and re-challenged water buffaloes. In the skin, a strong allergic-type inflammatory response occurred, characterised by leukocyte and eosinophil infiltration including the formation of granulocytic abscesses. Additionally at the local skin site, interleukin-5 transcript levels were elevated, while interleukin-10 levels decreased. In the skin-draining lymph node (LN) a predominant type-2 profile was seen in stimulated cells, while in contrast a type-1 profile was detected in the lung draining LN, and these responses occurred consecutively, reflecting the timing of parasite migration. The intense type-2 immune response at the site of cercarial penetration is significantly different to that seen in naive and permissive animal models such as mice, and suggests a possible mechanism for immunity. Preliminary data also suggest a reduced and delayed immune response occurred in buffaloes given high cercarial challenge doses compared with moderate infections, particularly in the skin. This study offers a deeper understanding into the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in a natural host, which may aid in the future design of more effective vaccines.

  19. Exposure versus Susceptibility as Alternative Bases for New Approaches to Surveillance for Schistosoma japonicum in Low Transmission Environments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Spear, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, schistosomiasis in China provides an excellent example of many of the challenges of moving from low transmission to the elimination of transmission for infectious diseases generally. In response to the surveillance dimension of these challenges, we here explore two strategic approaches to inform priorities for the development of improved methods addressed specifically to schistosomiasis in the low transmission environment. We utilize an individually-based model and the exposure data used earlier to explore surveillance strategies, one focused on exposure assessment and the second on our estimates of variability in individual susceptibility in the practical context of the current situation in China and the theoretical context of the behavior of transmission dynamics near the zero state. Our findings suggest that individual susceptibility is the major single determinant of infection intensity in both the low and medium risk environments. We conclude that there is considerable motivation to search for a biomarker of susceptibility to infection in humans, but that there would also be value in a method for monitoring surface waters for the free-swimming forms of the parasite in endemic or formerly endemic environments as an early warning of infection risk. PMID:26942912

  20. Chimerism and xenotransplantation. New concepts.

    PubMed

    Starzl, T E; Rao, A S; Murase, N; Demetris, A J; Thomson, A; Fung, J J

    1999-02-01

    In both transplant and infectious circumstances, the immune response is governed by migration and localization of the antigen. If the antigenic epitopes of transgenic xenografts are sufficiently altered to avoid evoking the destructive force of innate immunity, the mechanisms of engraftment should be the same as those that permit the chimerism-dependent immunologic confrontation and resolution that is the basis of allograft acceptance. In addition to "humanizing" the epitopes, one of the unanswered questions is whether the species restriction of complement described in 1994 by Valdivia and colleagues also necessitates the introduction of human complement regulatory genes in animal donors. Because the liver is the principal or sole source of most complement components, the complement quickly is transformed to that of the donor after hepatic transplantation. Thus, the need for complementary regulatory transgenes may vary according to the kind of xenograft used. Much evidence shows that physiologically important peptides produced by xenografts (e.g., insulin, clotting factors, and enzymes) are incorporated into the metabolic machinery of the recipient body. To the extent that this is not true, xenotransplantation could result in the production of diseases that are analogous to inborn errors of metabolism. In the climate of pessimism that followed the failures of baboon to human liver xenotransplantation in 1992-1993, it seemed inconceivable that the use of even more discordant donors, such as the pig, could ever be seriously entertained; however, this preceded insight into the xenogeneic and allogeneic barriers that has brought transplantation infectious immunity to common ground. With this new insight and the increasing ease of producing transgenic donors, the goal of clinical xenotransplantation may not be so distant.

  1. SmCL3, a Gastrodermal Cysteine Protease of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, Jan; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Sajid, Mohammed; Braschi, Simon; Delcroix, Melaine; Schneider, Eric L.; McKerrow, Wilson H.; Bahgat, Mahmoud; Hansell, Elizabeth; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Craik, Charles S.; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma are platyhelminth parasites that infect 200 million people worldwide. Digestion of nutrients from the host bloodstream is essential for parasite development and reproduction. A network of proteolytic enzymes (proteases) facilitates hydrolysis of host hemoglobin and serum proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified a new cathepsin L termed SmCL3 using PCR strategies based on S. mansoni EST sequence data. An ortholog is present in Schistosoma japonicum. SmCL3 was heterologously expressed as an active enzyme in the yeast, Pichia pastoris. Recombinant SmCL3 has a broad pH activity range against peptidyl substrates and is inhibited by Clan CA protease inhibitors. Consistent with a function in degrading host proteins, SmCL3 hydrolyzes serum albumin and hemoglobin, is localized to the adult gastrodermis, and is expressed mainly in those life stages infecting the mammalian host. The predominant form of SmCL3 in the parasite exists as a zymogen, which is unusual for proteases. This zymogen includes an unusually long prodomain with alpha helical secondary structure motifs. The striking specificity of SmCL3 for amino acids with large aromatic side chains (Trp and Tyr) at the P2 substrate position, as determined with positional scanning-synthetic combinatorial library, is consistent with a molecular model that shows a large and deep S2 pocket. A sequence similarity network (SSN) view clusters SmCL3 and other cathepsins L in accordance with previous large-scale phylogenetic analyses that identify six super kingdoms. Conclusions/Significance SmCL3 is a gut-associated cathepsin L that may contribute to the network of proteases involved in degrading host blood proteins as nutrients. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibits some unusual sequence and biophysical features that may result in additional functions. The visualization of network inter-relationships among cathepsins L suggests that these enzymes are suitable

  2. Induction of tolerance through mixed chimerism.

    PubMed

    Sachs, David H; Kawai, Tatsuo; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    "Mixed chimerism" refers to a state in which the lymphohematopoietic system of the recipient of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells comprises a mixture of host and donor cells. This state is usually attained through either bone marrow or mobilized peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Although numerous treatment regimens have led to transplantation tolerance in mice, the induction of mixed chimerism is currently the only treatment modality that has been successfully extended to large animals and to the clinic. Here we describe and compare the use of mixed chimerism to establish transplantation tolerance in mice, pigs, monkeys, and in the clinic. We also attempt to correlate the mechanisms involved in achieving tolerance with the nature of the tolerance that has resulted in each case.

  3. Praziquantel inhibits Schistosoma mansoni attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, S P; Noel, F

    1990-01-01

    Male adult Schistosoma mansoni worms were placed in a glass dish containing Tyrode solution and observed for 15 min after addition of praziquantel (0.01 to 1 microM). Praziquantel promoted a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of sucker-mediated attachment of the worm. Attachment inhibition was correlated with shortening of the parasite. We propose that the rapid and total inhibition of worm attachment observed in vitro with 1 microM praziquantel indicates that therapeutic concentrations of this drug should promote a rapid hepatic shift, in vivo, which may facilitate host tissue reaction. PMID:2101049

  4. Composition of the Capsular and Extracellular Polysaccharides of Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Andrew J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the capsular and extracellular polysaccharides of two strains of Rhizobium japonicum (311b 138 and 110) have been determined and correlated as a function of culture age with the ability of the bacteria from which they were obtained to bind soybean seed lectin. Each of the polysaccharides contains approximately constant amounts of mannosyl, glucosyl, and galacturonosyl residues in a molar ratio of 1:2:1. In addition they contain variable amounts of galactosyl and 4-O-methyl galactosyl residues. The total of galactose plus 4-O-methyl galactose, however, is constant and equivalent to the amount of mannose, indicating that the 4-O-methyl galactose residues arise by methylation of galactose residues in the polysaccharides. In both strains the proportion of galactose to methyl galactose is considerably greater in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do bind lectin than in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do not bind lectin. In addition to the changes in polysaccharide composition, there is a reduction of about 50% in the percentage of cells which are encapsulated as the cultures mature from early to late log phase. Since only capsulated cells bind lectin, the combination of the change in capsular composition and loss of encapsulation is probably sufficient to account for the loss of lectin binding capacity during growth of cultures of Rhizobium japonicum 311b 138 and 110. Images PMID:16661379

  5. Physiology of ex planta nitrogenase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Keister, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-nine wild-type strains of Rhizobium japonicum have been studied for their ability to synthesize nitrogenase ex planta in defined liquid media under microaerobic conditions. Twenty-one produced more than trace amounts of acetylene reduction activity, but only a few of these yielded high activity. The oxygen response curves were similar for most of the nitrogenase-positive strains. The strains derepressible for activity had several phenotypic characteristics different from non-derepressible strains. These included slower growth and lower oxygen consumption under microaerobic conditions and lower extracellular polysaccharide production. Extracellular polysaccharide production during growth on gluconate in every nitrogenase-positive strain assayed was lower under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions than the non-depressible strains. These phenotypic characteristics may be representative of a genotype of a subspecies of R. japonicum. These studies were done in part to enlarge the base number of strains available for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of nitrogen fixation. (35 Refs.)

  6. [Historical aspects of the risk factors of Schistosoma intercalatum schistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Jusot, J F; Simarro, P; De Muynck, A

    1996-01-01

    Bilharziosis is a considerable public health problem. It is caused by many species of schistosoma, four of which have wide geographical distribution: Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium, S. japonicum and S. intercalatum. The recently discovered S. intercalatum is limited to central and west Africa. Its spread is progressive and its pathogenicity is not completely known. S. intercalatum bilharziosis is usually manifested in the form of dysentery. The physiopathologic explanation of this clinical manifestation is less clear. Immunopathologically, the formation of an inflammatory granuloma constitutes the origin of its symptoms. This is due to many biological factors including delayed hypersensitivity reactions. All cellular immunity changes will facilitate the appearance of symptoms. Our aim has been to show the importance of malnutrition as a pathogenic factor of S. intercalatum bilharziosis. The initial research hypothesis was as follows: malnutrition plays a role in the evolution of a patient from an asymptomatic state of infection to a symptomatic state of illness. We carried out the study in the suburbs of Bata, in Equatorial Guinea. The inhabitants of Ncolombong, essentially rural immigrants, comprised our study population. Following their consent, we recruited individuals less than 45 years of age who had not taken praziquantel during the last 12 months. We included a total of 297 patients. Our study was a case-control, matching on sex and age. A case was defined as an infected patient with acute or chronic diarrhea occurring within the last month' preceding the stool sample analysis. All cases were retained after exhaustive screening of the study population. Each case (group 1) was matched with one or several asymptomatic infected patients (group 2) and two or several asymptomatic noninfected patients chosen at random (group 3). The definition of malnutrition was as follows: weight/height < or = 90% for children less than 15 years of age or weight/height < or

  7. Schistosoma mattheei--an ovum containing twin miracidia.

    PubMed

    Van Rensburg, L J; Van Wyk, J A

    2003-03-01

    A large Schistosoma mettheei ovum containing two miracidia was recovered from a squash preparation of the liver of an experimentally infected hamster. When observed, the miracidia were motile and facing in opposite directions.

  8. Role of Pili (Fimbriae) in Attachment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to Soybean Roots †

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1986-01-01

    Pili (fimbriae) were observed on cells of each of the five strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and the one strain of Rhizobium trifolii examined. Pili on B. japonicum were about 4 nm in diameter and polarly expressed. Piliated cells were estimated by transmission electron microscopy and hydrophobic attachment to polystyrene to constitute only a small percentage of the total population. The proportion of piliated cells in these populations was dependent on culture age in some strains. Piliated B. japonicum cells were selectively and quantitatively removed from suspension when cultures were incubated with either soybean roots or hydrophobic plastic surfaces, indicating that pili were involved in the attachment of the bacteria to these surfaces. Pili from B. japonicum 110 ARS were purified and found to have a subunit molecular weight of approximately 21,000. Treatment of B. japonicum suspensions with antiserum against the isolated pili reduced attachment to soybean roots by about 90% and nodulation by about 80%. Pili appear to be important mediators of attachment of B. japonicum to soybean roots under the conditions examined. Images PMID:16347100

  9. Role of pili (fimbriae) in attachment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to soybean roots

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, S.J.; Bauer, W.D.

    1986-07-01

    Pili (fimbriae) were observed on cells of each of the five strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and the one strain of Rhizobium trifolii examined. Pili on B. japonicum were about 4 nm in diameter and polarly expressed. Piliated cells were estimated by transmission electron microscopy and hydrophobic attachment to polystyrene to constitute only a small percentage of the total population. The proportion of piliated cells in these populations was dependent on culture age in some strains. Piliated B. japonicum cells were selectively and quantitatively removed from suspension when cultures were incubated with either soybean roots or hydrophobic plastic surfaces, indicating that pili were involved in the attachment of the bacteria to these surfaces. Pili from B. japonicum 110 ARS were purified and found to have a subunit molecular weight of approximately 21,000. Treatment of B. japonicum suspensions with antiserum against the isolated pili reduced attachment to soybean roots by about 90% and nodulation by about 80%. Pili appear to be important mediators of attachment of B. japonicum to soybean roots under the conditions examined.

  10. [Translation termination factor of eRFI of the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum recognizes all three stop codons].

    PubMed

    Eliseev, B D; Alkalaeva, E Z; Kriuchkova, P N; Lekomtsev, S A; Wang, Wei; Liang, Ai-hua; Frolova, L Iu

    2011-01-01

    We have determined the type of stop codon specificity of Blepharisma japonicum translation termination factor eRF1 in an in vitro reconstituted eukaryotic translation system and in in vivo assay (the dual reporter system). We have shown that B. japonicum eRF1 retained specificity towards all three stop codons although efficiency of peptydyl-tRNA hydrolysis in the presence of UGA is reduced in an in vitro assay. We suggest that since the heterotrich B. japonicum represents the earliest diverged lineage on phylogenetic tree of ciliates, B. japonicum has the universal genetic code as ancestor group for all ciliates.

  11. Identification of possible phosducins in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, Hanna; Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Stanislaw

    2004-06-01

    Examination of ciliate Blepharisma japonicum whole cell lysates with an antibody against phosphoserine and in vivo labeling of cells with radioactive phosphate revealed that the photophobic response in the ciliate is accompanied by a rapid dephosphorylation of a 28 kDa protein and an enhanced phosphorylation of a 46 kDa protein. Analysis with antibodies raised against rat phosducin or human phosducin-like proteins, identified one major protein of a molecular weight of 28 kDa, and two protein bands of 40 kDa and 93 kDa. While the identified ciliate phosducin is phosphorylated in a light-dependent manner, both phosducin-like proteins exhibit no detectable dependence of phosphorylation upon illumination. An immunoprecipitation assay also showed that the ciliate phosducin is indeed phosphorylated on a serine residue and exists in a phosphorylated form in darkness and that its dephosphorylation occurs in light. Immunocytochemical experiments showed that protozoan phosducin and phosducin-like proteins are localized almost uniformly within the cytoplasm of cells adapted to darkness. Cell exposure to light caused a pronounced displacement of the cell phosducin to the vicinity of the plasma membrane; however, no translocation of phosducin-like proteins was observed upon cell illumination. The obtained results are the first demonstration of the presence and morphological localization of a possible phosducin and phosducin-like proteins in ciliate protists. Phosducin and phosducin-like proteins were found to bind and sequester the betagamma-subunits of G-proteins with implications for regulation of G-protein-mediated signaling pathways in various eukaryotic cells. The findings presented in this study suggest that the identified phosphoproteins in photosensitive Blepharisma japonicum may also participate in the regulation of the efficiency of sensory transduction, resulting in the motile photophobic response in this cell.

  12. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Schistosoma mansoni Egg Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Califf, Lindsay L.; Xu, Tao; Hernandez, Hector J.; Stadecker, Miguel J.; Yates, John R.; Williams, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a largely neglected, global health problem. The morbid pathology of the disease stems from the host's inflammatory response to parasite eggs trapped in host tissues. Long term host/parasite survival is dependent upon the successful modulation of the acute pathological response, which is induced by egg antigens. In this study, using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology, we identified the Schistosoma mansoni egg secretome consisting of 188 proteins. Notably we identified proteins involved in redox balance, molecular chaperoning and protein folding, development and signaling, scavenging and metabolic pathways, immune response modulation, and 32 novel, previously uncharacterized schistosome proteins. We localized a subset of previously-characterized schistosome proteins identified in egg secretions in this study, to the surface of live S. mansoni eggs using the circumoval precipitin reaction. The identification of proteins actively secreted by live schistosome eggs provides important new information for understanding immune modulation and the pathology of schistosomiasis. PMID:17644200

  14. A chemokinetic response in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.

    PubMed

    Shiff, C J; Graczyk, T K

    1994-12-01

    Schistosoma mansoni cercariae have been shown to aggregate in the presence of glass slides treated with clear nail varnish and linoleic acid. In choice chambers cercariae move toward the stimulant, but this behavior is not seen when linoleic acid is omitted. After 30-45 min, the cercariae were concentrated near the end of the choice-chamber containing the linoleic acid slide. When the cercariae were added in the center of the choice chamber, they formed a diffuse cloud that dispersed slowly in both directions in the absence of linoleic acid. Cercariae aggregating in the vicinity of a stimulant surface are not immediately stimulated to commence penetration; this appears to be time and dose related. PMID:7799158

  15. Intermediate hosts of Schistosoma in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mandahl-Barth, G.

    1960-01-01

    Dr Mandahl-Barth's monograph on the intermediate hosts of Schistosoma in Africa, published by the World Health Organization in 1958, attempted to clarify the complicated subject of the taxonomy of Biomphalaria and Bulinus—the snail vectors of bilharziasis in Africa. The classification of these vectors, however, is still far from being cut-and-dried, and each fresh fact unearthed must be regarded as a potential challenge to its validity. Since the publication of the monograph a great deal of further material has been submitted to the WHO Snail Identification Centre at Charlottenlund, Denmark. The additional information collected, together with some amendments to the earlier data, is presented in this supplementary contribution to the monograph. ImagesPLATE IPLATE II PMID:14420527

  16. Erythronium japonicum attenuates histopathological lung abnormalities in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    SEO, JI-HYE; BANG, MI-AE; KIM, GYEYEOP; CHO, SEUNG SIK; PARK, DAE-HUN

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung condition that can induce mucus hypersecretion and pulmonary obstruction and may even cause death, particularly in children and older individuals. Erythronium japonicum (E. japonicum) is a traditional herb used in Korea and East Asian countries that has been found to exert free radical scavenging activity and anti-proliferative effects in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-asthmatic effects of an extract of E. japonicum in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA and aluminum hydroxide hydrate on days 1 and 8 and then received the following treatments on days 21 to 25: i) control (no treatment), ii) sterilized tap water (given orally), iii) 1 mg/kg/day dexamethasone (administered orally), iv) 60 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract, and v) 600 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract. On the same days, all the mice except those in the control group were challenged 1 h later with nebulized 5% OVA for 30 min. We found that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced increase in the number of white blood cells and decreased the IgE level in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained from the mice. Histopathological analysis of the lung tissues revealed that E. japonicum attenuated the asthma-related morphological changes in the mouse lung tissue, including the increased secretion of mucus in the bronchioles, eosinophil infiltration around the bronchioles and vessels, and goblet cell and epithelial cell hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced proliferation of T helper cells (CD4+) and B cells (CD19+) in the mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, treatment with E. japonicum extract modulated the expression of both T helper 2 cell-related factors [GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5

  17. Chimeric Measles Viruses with a Foreign Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Spielhofer, Pius; Bächi, Thomas; Fehr, Thomas; Christiansen, Gudrun; Cattaneo, Roberto; Kaelin, Karin; Billeter, Martin A.; Naim, Hussein Y.

    1998-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are both members of the Mononegavirales but are only distantly related. We generated two genetically stable chimeric viruses. In MGV, the reading frames of the MV envelope glycoproteins H and F were substituted by a single reading frame encoding the VSV G glycoprotein; MG/FV is similar but encodes a G/F hybrid in which the VSV G cytoplasmic tail was replaced by that of MV F. In contrast to MG/FV, MGV virions do not contain the MV matrix (M) protein. This demonstrates that virus assembly is possible in the absence of M; conversely, the cytoplasmic domain of F allows incorporation of M and enhances assembly. The formation of chimeric viruses was substantially delayed and the titers obtained were reduced about 50-fold in comparison to standard MV. In the novel chimeras, transcription and replication are mediated by the MV ribonucleoproteins but the envelope glycoproteins dictate the host range. Mice immunized with the chimeric viruses were protected against lethal doses of wild-type VSV. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct MV variants bearing a variety of different envelopes for use as vaccines or for gene therapeutic purposes. PMID:9499071

  18. Manufacture of diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T Y; Markert, C L

    1980-01-01

    Tetraploid mouse embryos were produced by cytochalasin B treatment. These embryos usually die before completion of embryonic development and are abnormal morphologically and physiologically. The tetraploid embryos can be rescued to develop to maturity by aggregating them with normal diploid embryos to produce diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice. The diploid/tetraploid chimeric embryos are frequently abnormal: the larger the proportion of tetraploid cells, the greater the abnormality. By karyotype analysis and by the use of appropriate pigment cell markers, we have demonstrated that two of our surviving chimeras are in fact diploid/tetraploid chimeras. One surviving chimera is retarded in growth and displays neurological abnormalities. The coat color chimerism suggests that this chimera is about 50% tetraploid. Another chimera with about 10% tetraploid pigment cells in the coat is only slightly retarded in growth and is a fertile male. Tetraploid cells are distributed in many, if not all, tissues of embryos but evidently are physiologically inadequate to support completely normal development and function in the absence of substantial numbers of normal diploid cells. Images PMID:6934528

  19. Anti-Schistosoma IgG responses in Schistosoma haematobium single and concomitant infection with malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Morenikeji, Olajumoke A; Adeleye, Olumide; Omoruyi, Ewean C; Oyeyemi, Oyetunde T

    2016-03-01

    Areas prone to schistosomiasis are also at risk of malaria transmission. The interaction between the causal agents of the two diseases could modulate immune responses tailored toward protecting or aggravating morbidity dynamics and impair Schistosoma diagnostic precision. This study aimed at assessing the effect of Plasmodium spp. in concomitant infection with Schistosoma haematobium in modulation of anti-Schistosoma IgG antibodies. The school-based cross-sectional study recruited a total of 322 children screened for S. haematobium and Plasmodium spp. Levels of IgG against S. haematobium-soluble egg antigen (SEA) in single S. haematobium/malaria parasites infection and co-infection of the two parasites in schoolchildren were determined. Data were analyzed using χ(2), Fisher's exact test, and Tukey's multiple comparison test analyses. The prevalence of single infection by S. haematobium, Plasmodium spp., and concurrent infection due to the two pathogens was 27.7, 41.0, and 9.3%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Anti-Schistosoma IgG production during co-infection of the two pathogens (1.950 ± 0.742 AU) was significantly higher than the value recorded for single malaria parasites' infection (1.402 ± 0.670 AU) (p < 0.01) but not in S. haematobium infection (1.591 ± 0.604 AU) (p > 0.05). The anti-Schistosoma IgG production in co-infection status was however dependent on the intensity of Plasmodium spp. with individuals having high intensity of malaria parasites recording lower anti-Schistosoma IgG. This study has implication for diagnosis of schistosomiasis where anti-Schistosoma IgG is used as an indicator of infection. Efforts should be made to control the two infections simultaneously in order not to undermine the efforts targeted toward the control of one.

  20. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis.

  1. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-Mediated Transformation of the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Juliane K.; Yoshida, Satoko; Ito, Masaki; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Background Plants within the Orobanchaceae are an agriculturally important group of parasites that attack economically important crops to obtain water and nutrients from their hosts. Despite their agricultural importance, molecular mechanisms of the parasitism are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed transient and stable transformation systems for Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative parasitic plant in the Orobanchaceae. The transformation protocol was established by a combination of sonication and acetosyringone treatments using the hairy-root-inducing bacterium, Agrobacterium rhizogenes and young seedlings. Transgenic hairy roots of P. japonicum were obtained from cotyledons 2 to 3 weeks after A. rhizogenes inoculation. The presence and the expression of transgenes in P. japonicum were verified by genomic PCR, Southern blot and RT-PCR methods. Transgenic roots derived from A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation were able to develop haustoria on rice and maize roots. Transgenic roots also formed apparently competent haustoria in response to 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ), a haustorium-inducing chemical. Using this system, we introduced a reporter gene with a Cyclin B1 promoter into P. japonicum, and visualized cell division during haustorium formation. Conclusions We provide an easy and efficient method for hairy-root transformation of P. japonicum. Transgenic marker analysis revealed that cell divisions during haustorium development occur 24 h after DMBQ treatment. The protocols described here will allow functional analysis of genes involved in plant parasitism. PMID:21991355

  2. Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki revisited: Domestication study and antioxidant properties of its basidiocarps and mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wee-Cheat; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Phan, Chia-Wei; Tan, Yee-Shin; Raman, Jegadeesh; Anuar, Azliza Mad; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom cultivation benefits humankind as it deliberately encourages wild mushrooms to be commercially propagated while recycling agricultural wastes. Ganoderma neo-japonicum is a rare polypore mushroom found growing on decaying Schizostachyum brachycladium (a tropical bamboo) clumps in Malaysia. The Malaysian indigenous tribes including the Temuans and Temiars use the basidiocarps of G. neo-japonicum to treat various ailments including diabetes. In this study, the domestication of G. neo-japonicum in artificial logs of different agricultural residues was investigated. Sawdust promoted the mycelia spawn colonisation in the shortest period of 38 ± 0.5 days. However, only sawdust and bamboo dust supported the primodia formation. Complex medium supported mycelium growth in submerged cultures and 27.11 ± 0.43 g/L of mycelia was obtained after 2 weeks of cultivation at 28 °C and 200 rpm. Antioxidant potential in mushroom may be influenced by different cultivation and extraction methods. The different extracts from the wild and cultivated basidiocarps as well as mycelia were then tested for their antioxidant properties. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of mycelia and basidiocarps tested had varying levels of antioxidant activities. To conclude, domestication of wild G. neo-japonicum using agroresidues may ensure a continuous supply of G. neo-japonicum for its medicinal use while ensuring the conservation of this rare species. PMID:26213331

  3. Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki revisited: Domestication study and antioxidant properties of its basidiocarps and mycelia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wee-Cheat; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Phan, Chia-Wei; Tan, Yee-Shin; Raman, Jegadeesh; Anuar, Azliza Mad; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-07-27

    Mushroom cultivation benefits humankind as it deliberately encourages wild mushrooms to be commercially propagated while recycling agricultural wastes. Ganoderma neo-japonicum is a rare polypore mushroom found growing on decaying Schizostachyum brachycladium (a tropical bamboo) clumps in Malaysia. The Malaysian indigenous tribes including the Temuans and Temiars use the basidiocarps of G. neo-japonicum to treat various ailments including diabetes. In this study, the domestication of G. neo-japonicum in artificial logs of different agricultural residues was investigated. Sawdust promoted the mycelia spawn colonisation in the shortest period of 38 ± 0.5 days. However, only sawdust and bamboo dust supported the primodia formation. Complex medium supported mycelium growth in submerged cultures and 27.11 ± 0.43 g/L of mycelia was obtained after 2 weeks of cultivation at 28 °C and 200 rpm. Antioxidant potential in mushroom may be influenced by different cultivation and extraction methods. The different extracts from the wild and cultivated basidiocarps as well as mycelia were then tested for their antioxidant properties. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of mycelia and basidiocarps tested had varying levels of antioxidant activities. To conclude, domestication of wild G. neo-japonicum using agroresidues may ensure a continuous supply of G. neo-japonicum for its medicinal use while ensuring the conservation of this rare species.

  4. Alterations of ciliate phosducin phosphorylation in Blepharisma japonicum cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Hanna; Fabczak, Stanisław

    2005-05-13

    We have previously reported that motile photophobic response in ciliate Blepharisma japonicum correlates with dephosphorylation of a cytosolic 28 kDa phosphoprotein (PP28) exhibiting properties similar to those of phosducin. Here we demonstrate in in vivo phosphorylation assay that the light-elicited dephosphorylation of the PP28 is significantly modified by cell incubation with substances known to modulate protein phosphatase and kinase activities. Immunoblot analyses showed that incubation of ciliates with okadaic acid and calyculin A, potent inhibitors of type 1 or 2A protein phosphatases, distinctly increased phosphorylation of PP28 in dark-adapted cells and markedly weakened dephosphorylation of the ciliate phosducin following cell illumination. An enhancement of PP28 phosphorylation was also observed in dark-adapted ciliates exposed to 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP, slowly hydrolysable cyclic nucleotide analogs and 3-isobutyryl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a non-specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) inhibitor. Only slight changes in light-evoked dephosphorylation levels of PP28 were observed in cells treated with the cyclic nucleotide analogs and IBMX. Incubation of ciliates with H 89 or KT 5823, highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), respectively, decreased PP28 phosphorylation levels in dark-adapted cells, whereas the extent of light-evoked dephosphorylation of the phosphoprotein was only slightly influenced. Cell treatment with higher Ca2+ concentration together with ionophore A23187 in culture medium resulted in marked increase in PP28 phosphorylation levels, while quite an opposite effect was observed in cells exposed to Ca2+ chelators, EGTA or BAPTA/AM as well as calmodulin antagonists, such as trifluoperazine (TFP), W-7 or calmidazolium. Light-dependent dephosphorylation was not considerably affected by these treatments. The experimental findings presented here suggest that an

  5. Transfer of R factors to and between genetically marked sublines of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, L D

    1979-05-01

    Plasmids R1822 and pRD1 of the P-1 incompatibility group, for which Rhizobium japonicum had not previously been shown to serve as host, were introduced into a strain of R. japonicum. Acquisition of R68 and R68.45 plasmids by this Rhizobium was equivocal. Transfer of R1822 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and of pRD1 from Escherichia coli to R. japonicum was unambiguous, because the exconjugants subsequently cotransferred the three R-factor resistance determinants (kanamycin, tetracycline, and penicillin) between genetically marked sublines of strain I-110. Under optimal conditions the transfer of R1822 and pRD1 occurred at frequencies of approximately 10(-3) in plate matings of strains bearing as many as five dissimilar genetic markers. In matings with R1822 on membrane filters, recombinants were formed at incidences as high as 4%. PMID:114109

  6. H4 histone in the macronucleus of Blepharisma japonicum (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Heterotrichida).

    PubMed

    Salvini, M; Bini, E; Santucci, A; Batistoni, R

    1997-04-01

    Two clones, obtained by polymerase chain reaction from macronuclear DNA of the unicellular ciliated protist Blepharisma japonicum, were isolated and sequenced. They correspond to fragments of two different putative H4 histone genes. The existence of multiple H4 histone genes was also suggested by Southern blot hybridisation experiments employing one of the obtained clones as a probe. Two B. japonicum H4 protein fragments, which were directly sequenced, show differences in the amino acid sequences too. The comparison of the obtained B. japonicum H4 partial amino acid sequences with each other, and with H4 from other ciliates and from representative microbial and multicellular organisms, highlights the larger histone heterogeneity of lower eukaryotes compared to that observed in higher organisms. PMID:9103980

  7. H4 histone in the macronucleus of Blepharisma japonicum (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Heterotrichida).

    PubMed

    Salvini, M; Bini, E; Santucci, A; Batistoni, R

    1997-04-01

    Two clones, obtained by polymerase chain reaction from macronuclear DNA of the unicellular ciliated protist Blepharisma japonicum, were isolated and sequenced. They correspond to fragments of two different putative H4 histone genes. The existence of multiple H4 histone genes was also suggested by Southern blot hybridisation experiments employing one of the obtained clones as a probe. Two B. japonicum H4 protein fragments, which were directly sequenced, show differences in the amino acid sequences too. The comparison of the obtained B. japonicum H4 partial amino acid sequences with each other, and with H4 from other ciliates and from representative microbial and multicellular organisms, highlights the larger histone heterogeneity of lower eukaryotes compared to that observed in higher organisms.

  8. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yumi; Izuno, Ayako; Isagi, Yuji; Kurosawa, Takahide; Kaneko, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Twenty-six microsatellite markers were developed for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae) to estimate the clonal diversity and genetic structure of the remaining populations in Japan. Methods and Results: Microsatellite loci of C. japonicum were isolated using Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing. The primer sets were tested on 55 ramets sampled from two populations in Japan. Sixteen loci showed polymorphism in at least one population, with two to five alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities for the two populations ranged from 0.00 to 0.92 and 0.00 to 0.71, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers developed here provide a useful tool to analyze clonal structure and sexual regeneration status and will help to manage the remaining genetic variation within C. japonicum. PMID:26949576

  9. Developmental anatomy of the reproductive shoot in Hydrobryum japonicum (Podostemaceae).

    PubMed

    Katayama, Natsu; Koi, Satoshi; Kato, Masahiro

    2008-07-01

    Podostemaceae are unusual aquatic angiosperms adapting to extreme habitats, i.e., rapids and waterfalls, and have unique morphologies. We investigated the developmental anatomy of reproductive shoots scattered on crustose roots of Hydrobryum japonicum by scanning electron microscopy and using semi-thin serial sections. Two developmental patterns were observed: bracts arise either continuously from an area of meristematic cells that has produced leaves, or within differentiated root ground tissue beneath, and internal to, leaf base scars after an interruption. In both patterns, the bract primordia arise endogenously at the base of youngest bracts in the absence of shoot apical meristem, involving vacuolated-cell detachment to each bract separately. The different transition patterns of reproductive shoot development may be caused by different stages of parental vegetative shoots. The floral meristem arises between the two youngest bracts, and is similarly accompanied by cell degeneration. In contrast, the floral organs, including the spathella, arise exogenously from the meristem. Bract development, like vegetative leaf development, is unique to this podostemad, while floral-organ development is conserved. PMID:18506393

  10. Developmental anatomy of the reproductive shoot in Hydrobryum japonicum (Podostemaceae).

    PubMed

    Katayama, Natsu; Koi, Satoshi; Kato, Masahiro

    2008-07-01

    Podostemaceae are unusual aquatic angiosperms adapting to extreme habitats, i.e., rapids and waterfalls, and have unique morphologies. We investigated the developmental anatomy of reproductive shoots scattered on crustose roots of Hydrobryum japonicum by scanning electron microscopy and using semi-thin serial sections. Two developmental patterns were observed: bracts arise either continuously from an area of meristematic cells that has produced leaves, or within differentiated root ground tissue beneath, and internal to, leaf base scars after an interruption. In both patterns, the bract primordia arise endogenously at the base of youngest bracts in the absence of shoot apical meristem, involving vacuolated-cell detachment to each bract separately. The different transition patterns of reproductive shoot development may be caused by different stages of parental vegetative shoots. The floral meristem arises between the two youngest bracts, and is similarly accompanied by cell degeneration. In contrast, the floral organs, including the spathella, arise exogenously from the meristem. Bract development, like vegetative leaf development, is unique to this podostemad, while floral-organ development is conserved.

  11. Isolation of a cytochrome aa3 gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    O'Brian, Mark R.; Maier, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Bradyhizobium japonicum strain LO501 is a Tn5-induced mutant that does not express the terminal oxidase cytochrome aa3 (cytochrome-c oxidase, EC 1.9.3.1). Two and one-half kilobase pairs of LO501 genomic DNA that flanks the transposon was isolated and used as a hybridization probe to obtain the wild-type gene from a cosmid library. Two subcloned fragments from two of the isolated cosmids were ligated into broad host range vectors, and restriction maps of these fragments were generated. The resultant plasmids, pCA1 and pBL33, each contained DNA homologous to that mutated in strain LO501. The two plasmids were each introduced into strain LO501 by conjugal transfer, and it was found that pCA1, but not pBL33, complemented the oxidase mutant. The transconjugant strain LO501[pCA1] expressed wild-type levels of cytochrome aa3, as discerned spectrophotometrically, and had restored N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase activity. Furthermore, the frequency of complementation of LO501 cells that received pCA1 by conjugation was 1.0, demonstrating that pCA1 complemented the mutant in trans. The results show that pCA1 contains the entire wild-type gene that was mutated in strain LO501, and this gene is required for cytochrome aa3 expression. Images PMID:16593835

  12. Double paths of macronucleus differentiation at conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Miyake, A; Rivola, V; Harumoto, T

    1991-06-21

    Nuclear phenomena at conjugation of the multimicronucleate ciliate Blepharisma japonicum were investigated by using fluorescence microscopy. Several hours after cells united in pairs, micronuclei differentiated into meiotic micronuclei and "somatomicronuclei". Meiotic micro-nuclei participated in conventional sexual processes producing new micro- and macronuclei through meiosis, karyogamy and postkaryogamic mitoses. On the other hand, somatomicronuclei participated in characteristic asexual processes in which each micronucleus differentiated into a macronucleus without undergoing any nuclear division and karyogamy. These two paths of macronucleus differentiation, one sexual and the other asexual, proceeded side by side in each cell, but eventually one path dominated the other. The sexual path regularly dominated in crossing conjugation which was induced by mixing clones of complementary mating types I and II. However, if macronuclear anlagen in the sexual path were removed, the asexual path took over to form macronuclei, indicating that the asexual path serves as a reserve path of macronucleus formation. The asexual path regularly dominated in intraclonal conjugation of high-frequency selfers, suggesting that it functions in reducing the genetic effect of inbreeding. These findings not only clarify nuclear phenomena at conjugation in Blepharisma, but also provide a new opportunity for the study of macronucleus differentiation.

  13. Analysis of the secretome of the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Jana; Zehner, Susanne; Göttfert, Michael; Patschkowski, Thomas

    2009-03-10

    Proteins from the supernatant of Bradyrhizobium japonicum were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and stained with Coomassie. This revealed more than 100 protein spots. Sixty-eight proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Thirty-five are predicted to contain an N-terminal signal peptide characteristic for proteins transported by the general secretory pathway. Most of these appear to be substrate-binding proteins of the ABC transporter family. Ten proteins were categorized as unclassified conserved or hypothetical. None of the proteins has similarity to proteins transported by a type I secretion system or to autotransporters. Three of the proteins might be located in the outer membrane. The addition of genistein led to changes in the spot pattern of three flagellar proteins and resulted in the identification of the nodulation outer protein Pgl. Moreover, the application of shot-gun mass spectrometry resulted in the first-time identification of NopB, NopH and NopT, which were present only after genistein induction. Replacing genistein with daidzein or coumestrol reduced the amount of the type III-secreted protein GunA2. PMID:19095018

  14. Protein phosphorylation in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, D.B.; Emerich, D.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids in vivo and in cultures in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of in vivo-labeled phosphoproteins of bacteroids and of cultured cells showed differences in both the pattern and intensity of labeling. In cultured cells, comparison of the labeling patterns and intensities of in vivo- and in vitro-labeled phosphoproteins showed a number of similarities; however, several phosphoproteins were found only after one of the two labeling conditions. The labeling intensity was time dependent in both in vivo and in vitro assays and was dependent on the presence of magnesium in in vitro assays. Differences in the rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were noted for a number of proteins. The level of incorporation of {sup 32}P into protein was only 2% or less of the total phosphate accumulated during the in vivo labeling period. Several isolation and sample preparation procedures resulted in differences in labeling patterns. Phosphatase inhibitors and several potential metabolic effectors had negligible effects on the phosphorylation pattern. There were no significant changes in the phosphorylation patterns of cells cultured on mannitol, acetate, and succinate, although the intensity of the labeling did vary with the carbon source.

  15. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni Miracidium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Rotgans, Bronwyn A; Strong, April; Liang, Di; Ni, Guoying; Limpanont, Yanin; Ramasoota, Pongrama; McManus, Donald P; Cummins, Scott F

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive control efforts, schistosomiasis continues to be a major public health problem in developing nations in the tropics and sub-tropics. The miracidium, along with the cercaria, both of which are water-borne and free-living, are the only two stages in the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni which are involved in host invasion. Miracidia penetrate intermediate host snails and develop into sporocysts, which lead to cercariae that can infect humans. Infection of the snail host by the miracidium represents an ideal point at which to interrupt the parasite's life-cycle. This research focuses on an analysis of the miracidium proteome, including those proteins that are secreted. We have identified a repertoire of proteins in the S. mansoni miracidium at 2 hours post-hatch, including proteases, venom allergen-like proteins, receptors and HSP70, which might play roles in snail-parasite interplay. Proteins involved in energy production and conservation were prevalent, as were proteins predicted to be associated with defence. This study also provides a strong foundation for further understanding the roles that neurohormones play in host-seeking by schistosomes, with the potential for development of novel anthelmintics that interfere with its various life-cycle stages. PMID:26799066

  17. Proteomic Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni Miracidium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Rotgans, Bronwyn A.; Strong, April; Liang, Di; Ni, Guoying; Limpanont, Yanin; Ramasoota, Pongrama; McManus, Donald P.; Cummins, Scott F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive control efforts, schistosomiasis continues to be a major public health problem in developing nations in the tropics and sub-tropics. The miracidium, along with the cercaria, both of which are water-borne and free-living, are the only two stages in the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni which are involved in host invasion. Miracidia penetrate intermediate host snails and develop into sporocysts, which lead to cercariae that can infect humans. Infection of the snail host by the miracidium represents an ideal point at which to interrupt the parasite’s life-cycle. This research focuses on an analysis of the miracidium proteome, including those proteins that are secreted. We have identified a repertoire of proteins in the S. mansoni miracidium at 2 hours post-hatch, including proteases, venom allergen-like proteins, receptors and HSP70, which might play roles in snail-parasite interplay. Proteins involved in energy production and conservation were prevalent, as were proteins predicted to be associated with defence. This study also provides a strong foundation for further understanding the roles that neurohormones play in host-seeking by schistosomes, with the potential for development of novel anthelmintics that interfere with its various life-cycle stages. PMID:26799066

  18. Chimerism in monochorionic dizygotic twins: case study and review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kristen; Chmait, Ramen H; Vanderbilt, Douglas; Wu, Samuel; Randolph, Linda

    2013-07-01

    Chimerism occurs when an organism contains cells derived from more than one distinct zygote. We focus on monochorionic dizygotic twin blood chimerism, and particularly twin-twin transfusion syndrome in such pregnancies. For years, researchers have understood chimerism to be a common phenomenon in cattle. Although, this review will not delve deeply into animal chimerism, an understanding of chimerism in the animal world can provide clues regarding health implications for human chimeras. This report serves two purposes: an update and assessment of the twins we reported previously in 2010 [Assaf et al., 2010] and a review on dizygotic monochorionic chimeric twins. First, our updated assessment of the twins shows no identifiable regression of Müllerian sex derivatives in the female, and normal neurodevelopment was documented in both. Our research has suggested several key points; one that blood chimerism persists from fetal life to at least age two years. Second, chimerism in humans is not as rare as previously thought, although it has been studied only recently. Third, assisted reproductive technologies appear to increase the risk of monochorionic dizygotic twin pregnancies.

  19. Complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuri L; Yura, Kei; Shindo, Miyuki; Kusakabe, Rie; Hayashi, Keiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Lampreys are eel-like jawless fishes evolutionarily positioned between invertebrates and vertebrates, and have been used as model organisms to explore vertebrate evolution. In this study we determined the complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the Japanese river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum, using next-generation sequencers. The sequence was 16,272 bp in length. The gene content and order were identical to those of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, which has been the reference among lamprey species. However, the sequence similarity was less than 90%, suggesting the need for the whole-genome sequencing of L. japonicum.

  20. Efficient Ligation of the Schistosoma Hammerhead Ribozyme †

    PubMed Central

    Canny, Marella D.; Jucker, Fiona M.; Pardi, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni is the best characterized of the natural hammerhead ribozymes. Biophysical, biochemical, and structural studies have shown that the formation of the loop-loop tertiary interaction between stems I and II alters the global folding, cleavage kinetics, and conformation of the catalytic core of this hammerhead, leading to a ribozyme that is readily cleaved under physiological conditions. This study investigates the ligation kinetics and the internal equilibrium between cleavage and ligation for the Schistosoma hammerhead. Single turnover kinetic studies on a construct where the ribozyme cleaves and ligates substrate(s) in trans showed up to 23% ligation when starting from fully cleaved products. This was achieved by a ~2,000-fold increase in the rate of ligation compared to a minimal hammerhead without the loop-loop tertiary interaction, yielding an internal equilibrium that ranges from 2–3 at physiological Mg2+ ion concentrations (0.1 –1 mM). Thus, the natural Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme is almost as efficient at ligation as it is at cleavage. The results here are consistent with a model where formation of the loop-loop tertiary interaction leads to a higher population of catalytically active molecules, and where formation of this tertiary interaction has a much larger effect on the ligation than the cleavage activity of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. PMID:17319693

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Arachidonic Acid against Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium▿

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Aboueldahab, Marwa; Tallima, Hatem; Salah, Mohamed; Mahana, Noha; Fawzi, Samia; Mohamed, Shadia H.; Fahmy, Omar M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of arachidonic acid (ARA) for treatment of schistosomiasis is an entirely novel approach based on a breakthrough discovery in schistosome biology revealing that activation of parasite tegument-bound neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) by unsaturated fatty acids, such as ARA, induces exposure of parasite surface membrane antigens to antibody binding and eventual attrition of developing schistosomula and adult worms. Here, we demonstrate that 5 mM ARA leads to irreversible killing of ex vivo 1-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-week-old Schistosoma mansoni and 9-, 10-, and 12-week-old Schistosoma haematobium worms within 3 to 4 h, depending on the parasite age, even when the worms were maintained in up to 50% fetal calf serum. ARA-mediated worm attrition was prevented by nSMase inhibitors, such as CaCl2 and GW4869. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that ARA-mediated worm killing was associated with spine destruction, membrane blebbing, and disorganization of the apical membrane structure. ARA-mediated S. mansoni and S. haematobium worm attrition was reproduced in vivo in a series of 6 independent experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, indicating that ARA in a pure form (Sigma) or included in infant formula (Nestle) consistently led to 40 to 80% decrease in the total worm burden. Arachidonic acid is already marketed for human use in the United States and Canada for proper development of newborns and muscle growth of athletes; thus, ARA has potential as a safe and cost-effective addition to antischistosomal therapy. PMID:20479203

  2. In vitro and in vivo activities of arachidonic acid against Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    El Ridi, Rashika; Aboueldahab, Marwa; Tallima, Hatem; Salah, Mohamed; Mahana, Noha; Fawzi, Samia; Mohamed, Shadia H; Fahmy, Omar M

    2010-08-01

    The development of arachidonic acid (ARA) for treatment of schistosomiasis is an entirely novel approach based on a breakthrough discovery in schistosome biology revealing that activation of parasite tegument-bound neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) by unsaturated fatty acids, such as ARA, induces exposure of parasite surface membrane antigens to antibody binding and eventual attrition of developing schistosomula and adult worms. Here, we demonstrate that 5 mM ARA leads to irreversible killing of ex vivo 1-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-week-old Schistosoma mansoni and 9-, 10-, and 12-week-old Schistosoma haematobium worms within 3 to 4 h, depending on the parasite age, even when the worms were maintained in up to 50% fetal calf serum. ARA-mediated worm attrition was prevented by nSMase inhibitors, such as CaCl(2) and GW4869. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that ARA-mediated worm killing was associated with spine destruction, membrane blebbing, and disorganization of the apical membrane structure. ARA-mediated S. mansoni and S. haematobium worm attrition was reproduced in vivo in a series of 6 independent experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, indicating that ARA in a pure form (Sigma) or included in infant formula (Nestle) consistently led to 40 to 80% decrease in the total worm burden. Arachidonic acid is already marketed for human use in the United States and Canada for proper development of newborns and muscle growth of athletes; thus, ARA has potential as a safe and cost-effective addition to antischistosomal therapy. PMID:20479203

  3. DNA copy number changes in Schistosoma-associated and non-Schistosoma-associated bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Rifai, W; Kamel, D; Larramendy, M L; Shoman, S; Gad, Y; Baithun, S; El-Awady, M; Eissa, S; Khaled, H; Soloneski, S; Sheaff, M; Knuutila, S

    2000-03-01

    DNA copy number changes were investigated in 69 samples of schistosoma-associated (SA) and non-schistosoma-associated (NSA) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). DNA copy number changes were detected in 47 tumors. SA tumors had more changes than NSA tumors (mean, 7 vs. 4), whereas the number of changes in SCC and TCC tumors was similar. SA tumors displayed more gains than losses (1.7:1), whereas NSA tumors showed an equal number of gains and losses. Changes that were observed at similar frequencies in SCC and TCC, irrespective of the schistosomal status, included gains and high-level amplifications at 1q, 8q, and 20q and losses in 9p and 13q. These changes may be involved in a common pathway for bladder tumor development and progression independent of schistosomal status or histological subtype. Losses in 3p and gains at 5p were seen only in SCC (P < 0.01) and losses in 5q were more frequent in SA-SCC than in other tumors (P < 0.05). However, changes that were more frequent in TCC than those in SCC included gains at 17q (P < 0.01) and losses in 4q (P < 0.05) and 6q (P < 0.01). Gains and high-level amplifications at 5p were seen only in SA-SCC (P < 0. 01), whereas gains and high-level amplifications with minimal common overlapping regions at 11q13 were more frequently seen both in SA-SCC and SA-TCC tumors (P < 0.01). In addition to the above mentioned alterations, several other changes were also seen at lower frequencies. The variations in the DNA copy number changes observed in TCC, SCC, SA, and NSA bladder carcinomas suggest that these tumors have different genetic pathways. PMID:10702404

  4. Enhanced attachment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to soybean through reduced root colonization of internally seedborne microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, N W; Karr, D B; Kremer, R J; Emerich, D W

    2000-07-01

    Internally seedborne microorganisms are those surviving common surface sterilization procedures. Such microbes often colonize the radicle surface of a germinating soybean (Glycine max) seed, introducing an undefined parameter into studies on attachment and infection by Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Bacterial isolates from surface-sterilized soybean seed, cv. Williams 82 and cv. Maverick, used in our studies, were identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter, Aeromonas sp., Bacillus spp., Chryseomonas luteola, Flavimonas oryzihabitans, and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Growth of these microbes during seed germination was reduced by treating germinating seeds with 500 micrograms/mL penicillin G. The effects of this antibiotic on seedling development and on B. japonicum 2143 attachment, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation are reported here. Penicillin G treatment of seeds did not reduce seed germination or root tip growth, or affect seedling development. No differences in nodulation kinetics, nitrogen fixation onset or rates were observed. However, the number of B. japonicum attached to treated intact seedlings was enhanced 200-325%, demonstrating that other root-colonizing bacteria can interfere with rhizobial attachment. Penicillin G treatment of soybean seedlings can be used to reduce the root colonizing microbes, which introduce an undefined parameter into studies of attachment of B. japonicum to the soybean root, without affecting plant development.

  5. Isolation of genes (nif/hup cosmids) involved in hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hom, S S; Graham, L A; Maier, R J

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant cosmids containing a Rhizobium japonicum gene involved in both hydrogenase (Hup) and nitrogenase (Nif) activities were isolated. An R. japonicum gene bank utilizing broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 was conjugated into Hup- Nif- R. japonicum strain SR139. Transconjugants containing the nif/hup cosmid were identified by their resistance to tetracycline (Tcr) and ability to grow chemoautotrophically (Aut+) with hydrogen. All Tcr Aut+ transconjugants possessed high levels of H2 uptake activity, as determined amperometrically. Moreover, all Hup+ transconjugants tested possessed the ability to reduce acetylene (Nif+) in soybean nodules. Cosmid DNAs from 19 Hup+ transconjugants were transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. When the cosmids were restricted with EcoRI, 15 of the 19 cosmids had a restriction pattern with 13.2-, 4.0-, 3.0-, and 2.5-kilobase DNA fragments. Six E. coli transformants containing the nif/hup cosmids were conjugated with strain SR139. All strain SR139 transconjugants were Hup+ Nif+. Moreover, one nif/hup cosmid was transferred to 15 other R. japonicum Hup- mutants. Hup+ transconjugants of six of the Hup- mutants appeared at a frequency of 1.0, whereas the transconjugants of the other nine mutants remained Hup-. These results indicate that the nif/hup gene cosmids contain a gene involved in both nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities and at least one and perhaps other hup genes which are exclusively involved in H2 uptake activity.

  6. Plant recognition of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nod factors. Final report, September 15, 1992--March 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, G.

    1998-01-01

    This grant had three objectives: (1) isolate and identify the unique nod factor metabolites made by different wild-type B. japonicum strains; (2) investigate the biological activity of these unique nod factors, especially as it relates to host range; and (3) initiate studies to define the mechanism of plant recognition of the nod factors. This report summarizes the results of this research.

  7. Strain-Specific Inhibition of nod Gene Induction in Bradyrhizobium japonicum by Flavonoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kosslak, Renee M.; Joshi, Rita S.; Bowen, Benjamin A.; Paaren, Herbert E.; Appelbaum, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    A broad-host-range plasmid, pEA2-21, containing a Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodABC'-'lacZ translational fusion was used to identify strain-specific inhibitors of the genes required for soybean nodulation, the common nod genes. The responses of type strains of B. japonicum serogroups USDA 110, USDA 123, USDA 127, USDA 129, USDA 122, and USDA 138 to nod gene inhibitors were compared. Few compounds inhibited nod gene expression in B. japonicum USDA 110. In contrast, nod gene expression in strains belonging to several other serogroups was inhibited by most of the flavonoids tested. However, the application of two of these strain-specific compounds, chrysin and naringenin, had little effect on the pattern of competition between indigenous and inoculum strains of B. japonicum in greenhouse and field trials. Preliminary studies with radiolabeled chrysin and naringenin suggest that the different responses to nod gene inhibitors may be partly due to the degree to which plant flavonoids can be metabolized by each strain. PMID:16348186

  8. A genetic locus essential for formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C R; Chelm, B K

    1987-01-01

    A genetic locus essential for the formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was isolated by complementation of ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with a cosmid gene library of B. japonicum DNA. Three related cosmids containing 18.7 kilobase pairs of B. japonicum DNA in common were identified as being able to restore formate-dependent growth capability to mutants lacking either ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase or both ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activities. To further localize the complementing gene(s), a series of four deletions spanning a total of 16.1 kilobase pairs were introduced into the B. japonicum chromosome. Each resulting deletion mutant lacked formate dehydrogenase activity and lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and immunologically detectable protein. Three of the four also lacked phosphoribulokinase activity. Two other mutants in which the deletion-bearing recombinant plasmid had integrated into the chromosome also lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and protein and phosphoribulokinase activities. The genetic locus defined by these mutants could contain the structural genes for these enzymes or a regulatory gene(s) controlling their expression or both. Images PMID:3036781

  9. 5'-Methyl-cytosine in the macronuclear DNA of Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Salvini, M; Durante, M; Citti, L; Nobili, R

    1984-12-15

    Brief report on the presence of 5'-methyl-cytosine as a minor base (0.56%) in the macronuclear DNA of the ciliate protozoan Blepharisma japonicum. The evidence comes from electrophoresis of macronuclear DNA digested by appropriate restriction endonucleases and high-performance liquid chromatography.

  10. Chimerism of buccal membrane cells in a monochorionic dizygotic twin.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Seiko; Hosoi, Kenichiro; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Hoshina, Hiroaki; Yan, Kunimasa; Saji, Hiroh; Oka, Akira

    2014-04-01

    No monochorionic dizygotic twins (MCDZTs) with cellular chimerism involving cells other than blood cells have been reported in the literature to date. Here we report a probable first case of MCDZTs with buccal cell chimerism. A 32-year-old woman conceived twins by in vitro fertilization by using 2 cryopreserved blastocysts that were transferred into her uterus. An ultrasound scan at 8 weeks' gestation showed signs indicative of monochorionic twins. A healthy boy and a healthy girl were born, showing no sexual ambiguity. Cytogenetic analyses and microsatellite studies demonstrated chimerism in blood cells of both twins. Notably, repeated fluorescence in situ hybridization and microsatellite studies revealed chimerism in buccal cells obtained from 1 of the twins. Although the mechanism through which buccal cell chimerism was generated remains to be elucidated, ectopic differentiation of chimeric hematopoietic cells that migrated to the buccal membrane or the cellular transfer between the 2 embryos at the early stage of development might be responsible for the phenomenon. This hypothesis raises an interesting issue regarding embryonic development and cellular differentiation into organs during fetal development. Given the possibility of cryptic chimerism in various organs including gonadal tissues in MCDZTs, close observation will be required to determine whether complications develop in the course of the patients' growth.

  11. Bioactivity of miltefosine against aquatic stages of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium and their snail hosts, supported by scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Miltefosine, which is the first oral drug licensed for the treatment of leishmaniasis, was recently reported to be a promising lead compound for the synthesis of novel antischistosomal derivatives with potent activity in vivo against different developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni. In this paper an in vitro study was carried out to investigate whether it has a biocidal activity against the aquatic stages of Schistosoma mansoni and its snail intermediate host, Biomphalaria alexandrina , thus being also a molluscicide. Additionally, to see whether miltefosine can have a broad spectrum antischistosomal activity, a similar in vitro study was carried out on the adult stage of Schistosoma haematobium, the second major human species, its larval stages and snail intermediate host, Bulinus truncutes. This was checked by scanning electron microscopy. Results Miltefosine proved to have in vitro ovicidal, schistolarvicidal and lethal activity on adult worms of both Schistosoma species and has considerable molluscicidal activity on their snail hosts. Scanning electron microscopy revealed several morphological changes on the different stages of the parasite and on the soft body of the snail, which further strengthens the current evidence of miltefosine's activity. This is the first report of mollusicidal activity of miltefosine and its in vitro schistosomicidal activity against S.haematobium. Conclusions This study highlights miltefosine not only as a potential promising lead compound for the synthesis of novel broad spectrum schistosomicidal derivatives, but also for molluscicidals. PMID:21569375

  12. Schistosoma Weinland, 1858 from Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758 in the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Pitchford, R J; Visser, P S

    1981-12-01

    Adults of Schistosoma edwardiense Thurston, 1964, were recovered from Hippopotamus amphibius in the Kruger National Park. Small round to oval Schistosoma margrebowiei-like eggs, presumed to be those of S. edwardiense, were found fairly frequently in the faeces of infected hippopotami together with a few Schistosoma haematobium-like eggs the identity of which remains uncertain. Biomphalaria sp., exposed to the droppings of infected hippopotami, shed cercariae thought to be those of S. edwardiense. No evidence of schistosoma adults was found at necropsy in rodents exposed to these cercariae. The parasite appears to be host specific to the hippopotamus. Arguments, based on biological and anatomical characteristics are put forward regarding Schistosoma hippopotami Thurston, 1963 as synonymous with Schistosoma mansoni.

  13. Bone marrow-derived cells migrate to the liver and contribute to the generation of different cell types in chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Carine Machado; Solano de Freitas Souza, Bruno; Andrade de Oliveira, Sheilla; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Barreto, Elton Sá; Neto, Hélio Almeida; Ribeiro dos Santos, Ricardo; Pereira Soares, Milena Botelho

    2015-12-01

    The main pathogenic event caused by Schistosoma mansoni infection is characterized by a granulomatous inflammatory reaction around parasite eggs and fibrosis in the liver. We have previously shown that transplantation of bone marrow cells (BMC) promotes a reduction in liver fibrosis in chronically S. mansoni-infected mice. Here we investigated the presence and phenotype of bone marrow-derived cells in livers of S. mansoni-infected mice. During the chronic phase of infection, C57BL/6 mice had an increased number of circulating mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells in the peripheral blood when compared to uninfected controls. In order to investigate the fate of BMC in the liver, we generated bone marrow chimeric mice by transplanting BMC from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice into lethally irradiated wild-type C57BL/6 mice. S. mansoni-infected chimeric mice did not demonstrate increased mortality and developed similar liver histopathological features, when compared to wild-type S. mansoni-infected mice. GFP(+) bone marrow-derived cells were found in the liver parenchyma, particularly in periportal regions. CD45(+)GFP(+) cells were found in the granulomas. Flow cytometry analysis of digested liver tissue characterized GFP(+) cells as lymphocytes, myeloid cells and stem cells. GFP(+) cells were also found in areas of collagen deposition, although rare GFP(+) cells expressed the myofibroblast cell marker α-SMA. Additionally GFP(+) endothelial cells (co-stained with von Willebrand factor) were frequently observed, while BMC-derived hepatocytes (GFP(+) albumin(+) cells) were sparsely found in the liver of chimeric mice chronically infected with S. mansoni. In conclusion, BMC are recruited to the liver during chronic experimental infection with S. mansoni and contribute to the generation of different cell types involved, not only in disease pathogenesis, but possibly in liver regeneration and repair.

  14. Complex chimerism: pregnancy after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kimberly K; Petroff, Margaret G; Coscia, Lisa A; Armenti, Vincent T; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant.

  15. De novo transcriptome assembly of a fern, Lygodium japonicum, and a web resource database, Ljtrans DB.

    PubMed

    Aya, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tanaka, Junmu; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Suzuki, Takayuki; Yano, Kenji; Takano, Tomoyuki; Yano, Kentaro; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    During plant evolution, ferns originally evolved as a major vascular plant with a distinctive life cycle in which the haploid and diploid generations are completely separated. However, the low level of genetic resources has limited studies of their physiological events, as well as hindering research on the evolutionary history of land plants. In this study, to identify a comprehensive catalog of transcripts and characterize their expression traits in the fern Lygodium japonicum, nine different RNA samples isolated from prothalli, trophophylls, rhizomes and sporophylls were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX and Illumina HiSeq sequencers. The hybrid assembly of the high-quality 454 GS-FLX and Illumina HiSeq reads generated a set of 37,830 isoforms with an average length of 1,444 bp. Using four open reading frame (ORF) predictors, 38,142 representative ORFs were identified from a total of 37,830 transcript isoforms and 95 contigs, which were annotated by searching against several public databases. Furthermore, an orthoMCL analysis using the protein sequences of L. japonicum and five model plants revealed various sets of lineage-specific genes, including those detected among land plant lineages and those detected in only L. japonicum. We have also examined the expression patterns of all contigs/isoforms, along with the life cycle of L. japonicum, and identified the tissue-specific transcripts using statistical expression analyses. Finally, we developed a public web resource, the L. japonicum transcriptome database at http://bioinf.mind.meiji.ac.jp/kanikusa/, which provides important opportunities to accelerate molecular research in ferns.

  16. Does inversion abolish the left chimeric face processing advantage?

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen H; Harvey, Monika

    2005-12-19

    Experiments using chimeric stimuli have shown that the right hemisphere is more influential in processing facial information. Here, again, we found clear evidence that study participants used the information from the left side of the face to inform their gender decisions when chimeric male/female, female/male stimuli were presented. Most interestingly though, this effect was not only present for upright faces but also for inverted (flipped) faces (although the effect was significantly reduced). We propose that the chimeric bias effects found here argue against the idea that inversion destroys the right hemisphere superiority for faces. If this was indeed the case, flipping the chimeric faces should have resulted in a loss of the left face bias. This was not the case. PMID:16317340

  17. Stable mixed chimerism and tolerance to human organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Strober, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Tolerance to combined kidney and hematopoietic cell transplant has been achieved in humans after establishment of mixed chimerism allowing for the withdrawal of immunosuppressive drugs. The seminal contributions of Ray Owen provided the scientific basis for the human protocol.

  18. Chimerism testing by quantitative PCR using Indel markers.

    PubMed

    Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Gaidulis, Laima; Senitzer, David

    2013-01-01

    Engraftment monitoring is critical for patients after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Complete donor chimerism is the goal; therefore, early detection of rejection and relapse is crucial for guiding the patient post HSCT treatment. Quantitative PCR for chimerism testing has been reported to be highly sensitive. In this chapter we discuss the quantitative PCR (qPCR) method using 34 Indel (Insertion and Deletion) genetic markers spread over 20 different chromosomes.

  19. Lack of glyphosate resistance gene transfer from Roundup Ready soybean to Bradyrhizobium japonicum under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Laura Arango; Opelt, Katja; Wagner, Tobias; Mattes, Elke; Bieber, Evi; Hatley, Elwood O; Roth, Greg; Sanjuán, Juan; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Sandermann, Heinrich; Hartmann, Anton; Ernst, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A field study was conducted at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center to determine the effect of transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean in combination with herbicide (Roundup) application on its endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum. DNA of bacteroids from isolated nodules was analysed for the presence of the transgenic 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) DNA sequence using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To further assess the likelihood that the EPSPS gene may be transferred from the Roundup Ready (RR) soybean to B. japonicum, we have examined the natural transformation efficiency of B. japonicum strain 110spc4. Analyses of nodules showed the presence of the transgenic EPSPS DNA sequence. In bacteroids that were isolated from nodules of transgenic soybean plants and then cultivated in the presence of glyphosate this sequence could not be detected. This indicates that no stable horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the EPSPS gene had occurred under field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, no natural transformation was detected in B. japonicum strain 110spc4 in the presence of various amounts of recombinant plasmid DNA. Our results indicate that no natural competence state exists in B. japonicum 110spc4. Results from field and laboratory studies indicate the lack of functional transfer of the CP4-EPSPS gene from glyphosate-tolerant soybean treated with glyphosate to root-associated B. japonicum.

  20. Lack of glyphosate resistance gene transfer from Roundup Ready soybean to Bradyrhizobium japonicum under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Laura Arango; Opelt, Katja; Wagner, Tobias; Mattes, Elke; Bieber, Evi; Hatley, Elwood O; Roth, Greg; Sanjuán, Juan; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Sandermann, Heinrich; Hartmann, Anton; Ernst, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A field study was conducted at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center to determine the effect of transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean in combination with herbicide (Roundup) application on its endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum. DNA of bacteroids from isolated nodules was analysed for the presence of the transgenic 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) DNA sequence using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To further assess the likelihood that the EPSPS gene may be transferred from the Roundup Ready (RR) soybean to B. japonicum, we have examined the natural transformation efficiency of B. japonicum strain 110spc4. Analyses of nodules showed the presence of the transgenic EPSPS DNA sequence. In bacteroids that were isolated from nodules of transgenic soybean plants and then cultivated in the presence of glyphosate this sequence could not be detected. This indicates that no stable horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of the EPSPS gene had occurred under field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, no natural transformation was detected in B. japonicum strain 110spc4 in the presence of various amounts of recombinant plasmid DNA. Our results indicate that no natural competence state exists in B. japonicum 110spc4. Results from field and laboratory studies indicate the lack of functional transfer of the CP4-EPSPS gene from glyphosate-tolerant soybean treated with glyphosate to root-associated B. japonicum. PMID:22351985

  1. Quantification of mixed chimerism allows early therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Merzoni, Jóice; Ewald, Gisele Menezes; Paz, Alessandra Aparecida; Daudt, Liane Esteves; Jobim, Luiz Fernando Job

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome; however, it requires a long post-transplantation follow-up. A 53-year-old woman with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome underwent related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in July 2006. Three months after transplantation, a comparative short tandem repeat analysis between donor and recipient revealed full chimerism, indicating complete, healthy bone marrow reconstitution. Three years and ten months after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient developed leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Another short tandem repeat analysis was carried out which showed mixed chimerism (52.62%), indicating relapsed disease. A donor lymphocyte infusion was administered. The purpose of donor lymphocyte infusion is to induce a graft-versus-leukemia effect; in fact, this donor's lymphocyte infusion induced full chimerism. Successive short tandem repeat analyses were performed as part of post-transplantation follow-up, and in July 2010, one such analysis again showed mixed chimerism (64.25%). Based on this finding, a second donor lymphocyte infusion was administered, but failed to eradicate the disease. In September 2011, the patient presented with relapsed disease, and a second related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed. Subsequent short tandem repeat analyses revealed full chimerism, indicating complete bone marrow reconstitution. We conclude that quantitative detection of mixed chimerism is an important diagnostic tool that can guide early therapeutic intervention. PMID:25305171

  2. T-and B-lymphocyte chimerism in the marmoset.

    PubMed Central

    Niblack, G D; Kateley, J R; Gengozian, N

    1977-01-01

    Marmosets are natural blood chimeras, this condition resulting from the high frequency of fraternal twinning and the consistent development of placental vasular anastomoses between the two embryos. Identification of chimerism by sex-chromosome analysis of cultured blood lymphocytes provided a means of determining the proportion of chimerism among T and B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were enriched for T or B cells by filtration through a nylon column (yields greater than 95 per cent T-cells) or inactivation of T lymphocytes by treatment with a goat anti-marmoset thymocyte antiserum in the presence of complement (yeilds greater than 95 per cent B cells). Mitogenic stimulation of these separated, enriched cell populations yielded metaphase plates which could be scored for percentage male and female cells. Tests on five different blood chimeras showed the T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism to be the same. Stimulation of blood lymphocytes with cells from another species of marmoset in a mixed lymphocyte culture test revealed the chimeric T-cell response (i.e., host and co-twin cells) to be similar to that obtained with a mitogenic lectin. The demonstration of equivalent T- and B-cell chimerism in these animals suggests derivation of these cells from a common stem cell pool and the response of both T-cell populations to an antigenic stimulus in proportions similar to their percentage chimerism suggests complete immunologic tolerance exists in this species for co-twin histocompatibility antigens. PMID:139360

  3. SchistoDB: a Schistosoma mansoni genome resource

    PubMed Central

    Zerlotini, Adhemar; Heiges, Mark; Wang, Haiming; Moraes, Romulo L. V.; Dominitini, Anderson J.; Ruiz, Jerônimo C.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2009-01-01

    SchistoDB (http://schistoDB.net/) is a genomic database for the parasitic organism Schistosoma mansoni, one of the major causative agents of schistosomiasis worldwide. It currently incorporates sequences and annotation for S. mansoni in a single user-friendly database. Several genomic scale analyses are available as well as ESTs, oligonucleotides, metabolic pathways and drugs. In this article, we describe the data sets and its analyses, how to query the database and tools available in the website. PMID:18842636

  4. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  5. Immunolocalization of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium antigens reacting with their Egyptian snail vectors.

    PubMed

    El-Dafrawy, Shadia M; Mohamed, Amira H; Hammam, Olfat A; Rabia, Ibrahim

    2007-12-01

    The reaction of the haemolymph and the tissue of infected intermediate hosts, Biomphalaria alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus to Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium antigens were investigated using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. A new technique, Agarose cell block was used in collection of haemolymph which helped in collecting plenty of well formed cells in comparison to the ordinary one using the cytospin. Collected haemolymph and prepared tissues of uninfected and infected B. alexandria and B. truncatus were fixed and then reacted with anti-S. mansoni and anti-S. haematobium IgG polyclonal antibodies. The haemolymph and tissue of infected B. alexandrina and B. truncatus gave a positive peroxidase reaction represented by a brown colour. In haemolymph, the positive peroxidase reaction was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of the amoebocytes. In the tissue, it was detected in epithelial cells lining the tubules, male cells in the lumen of the tubules and in female oogonia cells along the periphery of the tubules. The similarity in the strength and distribution of positive reaction in B. alexandrina and B. truncates was observed as compared to control. Thus, the immunoperoxidase technique proved to be an effective indicator for the schistosome-antigen in the snails. PMID:18383803

  6. The EuroChimerism concept for a standardized approach to chimerism analysis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lion, T; Watzinger, F; Preuner, S; Kreyenberg, H; Tilanus, M; de Weger, R; van Loon, J; de Vries, L; Cavé, H; Acquaviva, C; Lawler, M; Crampe, M; Serra, A; Saglio, B; Colnaghi, F; Biondi, A; van Dongen, J J M; van der Burg, M; Gonzalez, M; Alcoceba, M; Barbany, G; Hermanson, M; Roosnek, E; Steward, C; Harvey, J; Frommlet, F; Bader, P

    2012-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is becoming an increasingly important approach to treatment of different malignant and non-malignant disorders. There is thus growing demand for diagnostic assays permitting the surveillance of donor/recipient chimerism posttransplant. Current techniques are heterogeneous, rendering uniform evaluation and comparison of diagnostic results between centers difficult. Leading laboratories from 10 European countries have therefore performed a collaborative study supported by a European grant, the EuroChimerism Concerted Action, with the aim to develop a standardized diagnostic methodology for the detection and monitoring of chimerism in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Following extensive analysis of a large set of microsatellite/short tandem repeat (STR) loci, the EuroChimerism (EUC) panel comprising 13 STR markers was established with the aim to optimally meet the specific requirements of quantitative chimerism analysis. Based on highly stringent selection criteria, the EUC panel provides multiple informative markers in any transplant setting. The standardized STR-PCR tests permit detection of donor- or recipient-derived cells at a sensitivity ranging between 0.8 and 1.6%. Moreover, the EUC assay facilitates accurate and reproducible quantification of donor and recipient hematopoietic cells. Wide use of the European-harmonized protocol for chimerism analysis presented will provide a basis for optimal diagnostic support and timely treatment decisions.

  7. A drug-based intervention study on the importance of buffaloes for human Schistosoma japonicum infection around Poyang Lake, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiagang; Li, Yuesheng; Gray, Darren; Ning, An; Hu, Guanghan; Chen, Honggen; Davis, George M; Sleigh, Adrian C; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P; Williams, Gail M

    2006-02-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis of major public health importance in southern China. We undertook a drug intervention to test the hypothesis that buffalo are major reservoirs for human infection in the marshlands/lake areas, where one million people are infected. We compared human and buffalo infection rates and intensity in an intervention village (Jishan), where humans and buffalo were treated with praziquantel, and a control village (Hexi), where only humans were treated, in the Poyang Lake region. Over the four-year study, human incidence in Jishan decreased but increased in Hexi. Adjustment of incidence by age, sex, water exposure, year, and village further confirmed the decreased human infection in Jishan. Chemotherapy for buffaloes resulted in a decrease in buffalo infection rates in Jishan, which coincided with the reduction in human infection rates there in the last two years of the study. Mathematical modeling predicted that buffalo are responsible for 75% of human transmission in Jishan.

  8. Parallel evolution of chimeric fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Corbin D; Begun, David J

    2005-08-01

    To understand how novel functions arise, we must identify common patterns and mechanisms shaping the evolution of new genes. Here, we take advantage of data from three Drosophila genes, jingwei, Adh-Finnegan, and Adh-Twain, to find evolutionary patterns and mechanisms governing the evolution of new genes. All three of these genes are independently derived from Adh, which enabled us to use the extensive literature on Adh in Drosophila to guide our analyses. We discovered a fundamental similarity in the temporal, spatial, and types of amino acid changes that occurred. All three genes underwent rapid adaptive amino acid evolution shortly after they were formed, followed by later quiescence and functional constraint. These genes also show striking parallels in which amino acids change in the Adh region. We showed that these early changes tend to occur at amino acid residues that seldom, if ever, evolve in Drosophila Adh. Changes at these slowly evolving sites are usually associated with loss of function or hypomorphic mutations in Drosophila melanogaster. Our data indicate that shifting away from ancestral functions may be a critical step early in the evolution of chimeric fusion genes. We suggest that the patterns we observed are both general and predictive.

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David M; Singh, Nathan; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2014-01-01

    Improved outcomes for patients with cancer hinge on the development of new targeted therapies with acceptable short-term and long-term toxicity. Progress in basic, preclinical, and clinical arenas spanning cellular immunology, synthetic biology, and cell-processing technologies has paved the way for clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor-based therapies. This new form of targeted immunotherapy merges the exquisite targeting specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the potent cytotoxicity and long-term persistence provided by cytotoxic T cells. Although this field is still in its infancy, clinical trials have already shown clinically significant antitumor activity in neuroblastoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B cell lymphoma, and trials targeting a variety of other adult and pediatric malignancies are under way. Ongoing work is focused on identifying optimal tumor targets and on elucidating and manipulating both cell- and host-associated factors to support expansion and persistence of the genetically engineered cells in vivo. The potential to target essentially any tumor-associated cell-surface antigen for which a monoclonal antibody can be made opens up an entirely new arena for targeted therapy of cancer.

  10. Cerebral Schistosomiasis Due to Schistosoma haematobium Confirmed by PCR Analysis of Brain Specimen▿

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Kentaro; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Kumagai, Takashi; Maeda, Takuya; Osada, Yoshio; Ohta, Nobuo; Koga, Michiko; Nakamura, Hitomi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Fujii, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The case of a 25-year-old Japanese male who had cerebral schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium is reported here. Although serum antibody tests showed a cross-reaction with other helminths and no ova were excreted in urine or feces, the existence of Schistosoma haematobium in the brain was confirmed by PCR analysis. PMID:21849689

  11. Sensory perception and transduction of UV-B radiation by the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lenci, F; Checcucci, G; Ghetti, F; Gioffrè, D; Sgarbossa, A

    1997-07-19

    A key question to answer studying the biological effects of ultraviolet radiation on planktonic micro-organisms is whether they can perceive UV-B radiation as a sensory signal, likewise they do with visible light. We have faced this problem performing an individual-cell analysis of Blepharisma japonicum photomotile responses to UV-B stimuli. Our results on spectral responsiveness and on the effects of a photoresponse inhibitor indicate that B. japonicum is capable to perceive and transduce UV-B radiation as an environmental sensory stimulus, which it escapes from gathering in shadowed areas. Similar UV-B avoidance motile reactions could serve as a behavioural defence mechanism contributing to avoid harmful overexposure to UV-B.

  12. Effects of pesticide seed treatments on Rhizobium japonicum and its symbiotic relationship with soybean.

    PubMed

    Tu, C M

    1977-08-01

    Seventeen Rhizobium japonicum cultures isolated from soybean nodules induced formation of nodules on taproots of soybean plants. All isolates reduced acetylene to ethylene to different extents in vitro. Paper disc assay indicated that two insecticides, lindane (gamma-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane), chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate), and a fungicide, thiram (tetramethylthiuram disulphide) individually or in combination caused significant inhibition of the growth of R. japonicum No. 16. The effects of insecticide-fungicide seed treatments on the nitrogenase activity of soybean plants in nitrogen-fixing capacity, weights of leaves, stems, and nodules were determined. Thiram, singly or in combination with lindane and/or chlorpyrifos, significantly delayed growth of the plants and affected the activity of nitrogenase in the fixation of nitrogen 3 weeks after treatments. No drastic effect of any of the pesticide treatments on soybean plant growth was observed after 8 weeks.

  13. Engineering bacterial microcompartment shells: chimeric shell proteins and chimeric carboxysome shells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fei; Sutter, Markus; Bernstein, Susan L; Kinney, James N; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-04-17

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles composed entirely of protein. Depending on the enzymes they encapsulate, BMCs function in either inorganic carbon fixation (carboxysomes) or organic carbon utilization (metabolosomes). The hallmark feature of all BMCs is a selectively permeable shell formed by multiple paralogous proteins, each proposed to confer specific flux characteristics. Gene clusters encoding diverse BMCs are distributed broadly across bacterial phyla, providing a rich variety of building blocks with a predicted range of permeability properties. In theory, shell permeability can be engineered by modifying residues flanking the pores (symmetry axes) of hexameric shell proteins or by combining shell proteins from different types of BMCs into chimeric shells. We undertook both approaches to altering shell properties using the carboxysome as a model system. There are two types of carboxysomes, α and β. In both, the predominant shell protein(s) contain a single copy of the BMC domain (pfam00936), but they are significantly different in primary structure. Indeed, phylogenetic analysis shows that the two types of carboxysome shell proteins are more similar to their counterparts in metabolosomes than to each other. We solved high resolution crystal structures of the major shell proteins, CsoS1 and CcmK2, and the presumed minor shell protein CcmK4, representing both types of cyanobacterial carboxysomes and then tested the interchangeability. The in vivo study presented here confirms that both engineering pores to mimic those of other shell proteins and the construction of chimeric shells is feasible.

  14. Flavonol tetraglycosides and other constituents from leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum (Leguminosae) and related taxa.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Stoneham, Charlotte A; Veitch, Nigel C

    2007-05-01

    Two flavonol tetraglycosides comprising a trisaccharide at C-3 and a monosaccharide at C-7 were isolated from the leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum (L.) Schott and characterised as the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosides of quercetin and kaempferol. The 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside of kaempferol, the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranosides of kaempferol and quercetin and the 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-galactopyranoside of kaempferol were also obtained from this species for the first time. Some or all of these flavonol tetra- and triglycosides were detected in 17 of 18 specimens of S. japonicum examined from living and herbarium material, although the most abundant flavonoid in the leaves was generally quercetin 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)-beta-glucopyranoside (rutin). The triglycosides, but not the tetraglycosides, were detected in herbarium specimens of Styphnolobium burseroides M. Sousa, Rudd & Medrano and Styphnolobium monteviridis M. Sousa & Rudd, but specimens of Styphnolobium affine (Torrey & A. Gray) Walp. contained a different profile of flavonol glycosides. The flavonol tetra- and triglycosides of S. japonicum were also present in leaves of Cladrastis kentukea (Dum. Cours.) Rudd, a representative of a genus placed close to Styphnolobium in current molecular phylogenies. An additional constituent obtained from leaves of Styphnolobium japonicum was identified as the maltol derivative, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one 3-O-(4'-O-p-coumaroyl-6'-O-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl))-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:17462679

  15. Transmissible Resistance to Penicillin G, Neomycin, and Chloramphenicol in Rhizobium japonicum1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael A.; Elkan, Gerald H.

    1973-01-01

    The genetic basis for resistance to a number of antibiotics was examined in Rhizobium japonicum. Resistance to penicillin G, neomycin, and chloramphenicol appears to be mediated by an extrachromosomal element similar to that found in the Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance to these antibiotics was eliminated from cells by treatment with acridine orange, and resistance to all three antibiotics could be transferred en bloc to Agrobacterium tumefaciens under conditions excluding transformation or transduction as possible genetic mechanisms. PMID:4491197

  16. Regulation of the fixA gene and fixBC operon in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, M; Hennecke, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcriptional start site of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixBC operon was identified by nuclease S1 mapping. It was located approximately 700 base pairs upstream of fixB and was preceded by a promoter sequence that showed strong homology to the B. japonicum fixA promoter and thus to the general nif consensus promoter sequence. Further transcript mapping experiments revealed that fixA and fixBC transcription in B. japonicum strictly depended on the presence of the regulatory gene nifA and on low oxygen partial pressure. Consistent with these data, chromosomally integrated fixA- and fixB-lacZ fusions expressed beta-galactosidase activity only in the wild type but not in a nifA mutant and only under microaerobic but not aerobic growth conditions. The presence of nifA accounted for a 19-fold and 44-fold activation of the fixA and fixB promoters, respectively. These results show that the fixA and fixBC genes are regulated in a way similar to that of the nitrogenase genes nifH and nifDK. A very peculiar finding was that the fixA and fixB promoters, when they were located on plasmids, could hardly be activated by the NifA protein, irrespective of whether this was tested in Escherichia coli or B. japonicum backgrounds. This is in clear contrast to the situation with nifH and nifD promoters. Images PMID:3343218

  17. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  18. Ecology of Indigenous Soil Rhizobia: Response of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to Readily Available Substrates †

    PubMed Central

    Viteri, Silvio E.; Schmidt, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of indigenous Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 and serogroups 110 and 138 were studied after various sugars were added to their soil habitat. Loam soil with approximately 104 cells of each group per g of soil were amended every 3 days with 0.1% glucose, sucrose, arabinose, xylose, or galactose. Enumerations of the populations were made every 12 days by immunofluorescence assay. Each B. japonicum population in the sugar-treated soils increased by about 1 log during the first 12 days, to a maximum of about 106 cells by day 36 or 48, irrespective of the sugar added. Maximum growth rates were similar for each group and occurred during the 12-day incubation period. The most rapid growth was in response to arabinose, with a mean generation time of about 3.0 days. Other mean doubling times were 4.0 days with glucose and galactose treatments, 4.5 days with xylose treatment, and 5.4 days with sucrose amendment. These data provide the first direct evidence that indigenous soil rhizobia can compete successfully with other soil bacteria for readily available substrates in soil in the absence of host legume roots or other rhizospheres. The growth rates in soil of the specific B. japonicum populations studied were nearly the same with a given sugar treatment but varied considerably with different sugars. The mean generation times of 3 to 5 days are among the first reported growth rates for heterotrophic bacteria in natural soil. PMID:16347412

  19. Bradyrhizobium japonicum cytochrome c550 is required for nitrate respiration but not for symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Bott, M; Thöny-Meyer, L; Loferer, H; Rossbach, S; Tully, R E; Keister, D; Appleby, C A; Hennecke, H

    1995-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum possesses three soluble c-type cytochromes, c550, c552, and c555. The genes for cytochromes c552 (cycB) and c555 (cycC) were characterized previously. Here we report the cloning, sequencing, and mutational analysis of the cytochrome c550 gene (cycA). A B. japonicum mutant with an insertion in cycA failed to synthesize a 12-kDa c-type cytochrome. This protein was detectable in the cycA mutant complemented with cloned cycA, which proves that it is the cycA gene product. The cycA mutant, a cycB-cycC double mutant, and a cycA-cycB-cycC triple mutant elicited N2-fixing root nodules on soybean (Nod+ Fix+ phenotype); hence, none of these three cytochromes c is essential for respiration supporting symbiotic N2 fixation. However, cytochrome c550, in contrast to cytochromes c552 and c555, was shown to be essential for anaerobic growth of B. japonicum, using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:7721713

  20. Basis for the competitiveness of rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-07-30

    These studies were concerned with the determination of the characteristics of the soybean symbiont R. japonicum that are crucial to the inoculum competitiveness of one strain of the bacterium over other strains with respect to nodule formation. Our work has been focused on the initial infection events, such as attachment, which precede the development of a fully functional nodule because it is these primary events which determine the success or failure of a particular rhizobia to initiate infections. Experiments concerned with the attachment of R. japonicum to soybean roots have indicated that both soybean symbiotic and non-symbiotic species of rhizobia attach comparably well to soybean roots. There was no evidence of attachment mediated by soybean lectin, as previously claimed, but evidence was obtained for attachment mediated by pili on the Rhizobium cells. It was also found that the efficiency of infection varied substantially with culture age for certain strains while with other strains the efficiency of infection remained approximately constant during growth. We have utilized these observations to investigate the relationship between the efficiency of infection and competitiveness. An unexpected outcome of these studies was the finding that R. japonicum, and other slow-growing Rhizobium species, maintain both viability and symbiotic infectivity over prolonged periods of storage at ambient temperatures when suspended in water. The simplicity and cost-effectiveness of this storage procedure may provide an alternative method to the current practices employed in inoculum preparation. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Fate of Nodule-Specific Polysaccharide Produced by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Bacteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, J. G.; Peters, N. K.; Salminen, S. O.; Pladys, D.; Zhaohua, P.

    1995-01-01

    A polysaccharide produced by Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids in nodules (NPS) on soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots is different in composition and structure from the extracellular polysaccharide produced in culture by this organism. Isogenic strains either capable or incapable of NPS synthesis supported similar rates of plant growth and nitrogenase activity, indicating that polysaccharide deposition was not detrimental. The possibility that NPS may have some protective or nutritional role for bacteroids was considered. Analysis of disintegrating nodules over periods of 1 to 3 months indicated greater recovery of viable bacteria from NPS+ nodules prior to the breakdown of NPS. During and after the breakdown of NPS, the decline in viable bacteria was similar for NPS+ and NPS- strains. Bacteroid destruction in senescing nodules may be accelerated by exposure to proteolytic enzymes in host cytoplasm; however, highly purified NPS had no significant effect on the in vitro activity of partially purified proteases, so protection of bacteroids via this mechanism is unlikely. B. japonicum USDA 438 did not utilize NPS as a carbon source for growth in liquid culture. In vitro assays of NPS depolymerase activity in cultured bacteria and bacteroids were negative using a variety of strains, all of which contained extracellular polysaccharide depolymerase. It seems highly unlikely that B. japonicum can utilize the polysaccharide it synthesizes in nodules, and NPS breakdown in senescing nodules is probably caused by saprophytic fungi. PMID:12228408

  2. Steroid metabolism in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Leen; Van Eenoo, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Pozo, Oscar J; Van Renterghem, Pieter; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are considered to be doping agents and are prohibited in sports. Their metabolism needs to be elucidated to allow for urinary detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Steroid metabolism was assessed using uPA(+/+) SCID mice with humanized livers (chimeric mice). This study presents the results of 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (19-norAD) administration to these in vivo mice. As in humans, 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone are the major detectable metabolites of 19-norAD in the urine of chimeric mice.A summary is given of the metabolic pathways found in chimeric mice after administration of three model steroid compounds (methandienone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione). From these studies we can conclude that all major metabolic pathways for anabolic steroids in humans are present in the chimeric mouse. It is hoped that, in future, this promising chimeric mouse model might assist the discovery of new and possible longer detectable metabolites of (designer) steroids. PMID:20355169

  3. Assessment of chimerism in epithelial cancers in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Christophe; Ratajczak, Philippe; Vérine, Jérôme; Elbouchtaoui, Morad; Plassa, François; Legrès, Luc; Ferreira, Irmine; Sandid, Wissam; Varna, Mariana; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Janin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is now the most severe complication in the long term in transplant recipients. As most solid-organ or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantations are allogeneic, chimerism studies can be performed on cancers occurring in recipients. We summarize here the different methods used to study chimerism in cancers developing in allogeneic-transplant recipients, analyze their respective advantages and report the main results obtained from these studies. Chimerism analyses of cancers in transplant recipients require methods suited to tissue samples. In the case of gender-mismatched transplantation, the XY chromosomes can be explored using fluorescent in situ hybridization on whole-tissue sections or Y-sequence-specific PCR after the laser microdissection of tumor cells. For cancers occurring after gender-matched transplantation, laser microdissection of tumor cells enables studies of microsatellite markers and high-resolution melting analysis of mitochondrial DNA on genes with marked polymorphism, provided these are different in the donor and the recipient. The results of different studies address the cancers that develop in both recipients and in transplants. The presence of chimeric cells in these two types of cancer implies an exchange of progenitor/stem-cells between transplant and recipient, and the plasticity of these progenitor/stem-cells contributes to epithelial cancers. The presence of chimeric cells in concomitant cancers and preneoplastic lesions implies that the oncogenesis of these cancers progresses through a multistep process.

  4. Effect of reverse chimerism on rejection in clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bolado, Pedro; Landin, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Chimerism may enable allografts to survive when immunosuppressive therapy is administered at low levels or is even absent. Reverse chimerism (RC) is focused on intragraft chimerism that repopulates the allograft with cells of recipient origin. We aimed to identify and analyze current clinical evidence on RC and the presence of endothelial RC and tissue-specific RC. A total of 33 clinical reports on cardiac, kidney, liver, and lung transplants published between 1972 and 2012 that focused on RC were included in a systematic review. Liver allografts presented with the highest percentage of endothelial RC and lung allografts by far the lowest. Tissue-specific RC was present in most of the recipients, but at very low levels. There were also cardiac and kidney allografts with chimerism, but the functionality of the cells of recipient origin was questionable. We were unable to determine whether RC was a trigger for or a result of acute rejection. Further clinical research should focus on outcomes to evaluate the clinical relevance of this form of chimerism in transplantation.

  5. Mixed chimerism and split tolerance: mechanisms and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Al-Adra, David P; Anderson, Colin C

    2011-01-01

    Establishing hematopoietic mixed chimerism can lead to donor-specific tolerance to transplanted organs and may eliminate the need for long-term immunosuppressive therapy, while also preventing chronic rejection. In this review, we discuss central and peripheral mechanisms of chimerism induced tolerance. However, even in the long-lasting presence of a donor organ or donor hematopoietic cells, some allogeneic tissues from the same donor can be rejected; a phenomenon known as split tolerance. With the current goal of creating mixed chimeras using clinically feasible amounts of donor bone marrow and with minimal conditioning, split tolerance may become more prevalent and its mechanisms need to be explored. Some predisposing factors that may increase the likelihood of split tolerance are immunogenicity of the graft, certain donor-recipient combinations, prior sensitization, location and type of graft and minimal conditioning chimerism induction protocols. Additionally, split tolerance may occur due to a differential susceptibility of various types of tissues to rejection. The mechanisms involved in a tissue's differential susceptibility to rejection include the presence of polymorphic tissue-specific antigens and variable sensitivity to indirect pathway effector mechanisms. Finally, we review the clinical attempts at allograft tolerance through the induction of chimerism; studies that are revealing the complex relationship between chimerism and tolerance. This relationship often displays split tolerance, and further research into its mechanisms is warranted.

  6. Porcine induced pluripotent stem cells produce chimeric offspring.

    PubMed

    West, Franklin D; Terlouw, Steve L; Kwon, Dae Jin; Mumaw, Jennifer L; Dhara, Sujoy K; Hasneen, Kowser; Dobrinsky, John R; Stice, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Ethical and moral issues rule out the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in chimera studies that would determine the full extent of their reprogrammed state, instead relying on less rigorous assays such as teratoma formation and differentiated cell types. To date, only mouse iPSC lines are known to be truly pluripotent. However, initial mouse iPSC lines failed to form chimeric offspring, but did generate teratomas and differentiated embryoid bodies, and thus these specific iPSC lines were not completely reprogrammed or truly pluripotent. Therefore, there is a need to address whether the reprogramming factors and process used eventually to generate chimeric mice are universal and sufficient to generate reprogrammed iPSC that contribute to chimeric offspring in additional species. Here we show that porcine mesenchymal stem cells transduced with 6 human reprogramming factors (POU5F1, SOX2, NANOG, KLF4, LIN28, and C-MYC) injected into preimplantation-stage embryos contributed to multiple tissue types spanning all 3 germ layers in 8 of 10 fetuses. The chimerism rate was high, 85.3% or 29 of 34 live offspring were chimeras based on skin and tail biopsies harvested from 2- to 5-day-old pigs. The creation of pluripotent porcine iPSCs capable of generating chimeric offspring introduces numerous opportunities to study the facets significantly affecting cell therapies, genetic engineering, and other aspects of stem cell and developmental biology.

  7. Synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes specific for the receptor of blepharismone, a mating-inducing pheromone of the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Uruma, Yoshiyuki; Sugiura, Mayumi; Harumoto, Terue; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Iio, Hideo

    2007-02-15

    Blepharismone (gamone 2) is a mating-inducing pheromone of the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum. N-Pyrenylbutyryl-blepharismone and N-biphenylacetyl-blepharismone, which are fluorescent derivatives of blepharismone, were synthesized as molecular probes for the gamone 2 receptor. Further, we proved that they have inhibitory activities against the blepharismone-induced monotypic pairing of B. japonicum.

  8. Facilitating cells: Translation of hematopoietic chimerism to achieve clinical tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ildstad, Suzanne T; Leventhal, Joseph; Wen, Yujie; Yolcu, Esma

    2015-04-01

    For over 50 y the association between hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance has been recognized. This originated with the brilliant observation by Dr. Ray Owen that freemartin cattle twins that shared a common placental blood supply were red blood cell chimeras, which led to the discovery that hematopoietic chimerism resulted in actively acquired tolerance. This was first confirmed in neonatal mice by Medawar et al. and subsequently in adult rodents. Fifty years later this concept has been successfully translated to solid organ transplant recipients in the clinic. The field is new, but cell-based therapies are being used with increasing frequency to induce tolerance and immunomodulation. The future is bright. This review focuses on chimerism and tolerance: past, present and prospects for the future.

  9. Symptotic detection of chimerism: Y does it matter?

    PubMed

    Geck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Microchimerism (MC), transplacental acquisition of allogeneic cells from the mother (maternofetal MC) or from the fetus (fetomaternal MC) has been in the focus of research recently. Amplicons using Y-chromosome specific SRY and DYS14 sequences have been used as markers to trace cells from a male fetus in the mother. The sensitivity of these markers in formaldehyde fixed paraffin embedded samples, however, is less than optimal. To study chimerism in breast cancer we took advantage of the evolutionary history of the Y chromosome and designed amplicons on gene repeats to generate additive PCR signals. The increased sensitivity detected high incidence of male chimerism in normal breast tissues. We also showed correlation with protection from cancer with unique quantitative biology. Accumulating data from biology and medicine indicate that natural chimerism is astonishingly frequent and may affect human conditions. We hypothesize that it has significant evolutionary ramifications as well.

  10. Chimerism in the immunohematology laboratory in the molecular biology era.

    PubMed

    Bluth, Martin H; Reid, Marion E; Manny, Noga

    2007-04-01

    Dual or multiple cell populations, induced by chimeras, have been the subject of many studies. This long-standing fascination with chimeras has revealed a good deal of knowledge about human inheritance. Although historically most chimeras were caused by natural events, certain current medical intervention therapies are increasing the number of situations that can lead to a mixed cell population, that is, the chimeric condition, in humans. Medical therapies such as transfusion, stem cell transplantation, kidney transplantation, and artificial insemination induce temporary and sometimes permanent chimeras. Such natural or therapeutically induced presentations of chimerism can present challenging issues to the clinical immunohematology laboratory with regard to interpretation of results and subsequent patient management. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of these chimeric states and hypothesize how testing DNA from various tissues can cause apparent discrepancies between phenotype and genotype results.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptors: driving immunology towards synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-08-01

    The advent of second generation chimeric antigen receptors and the CD19 paradigm have ushered a new therapeutic modality in oncology. In contrast to earlier forms of adoptive cell therapy, which were based on the isolation and expansion of naturally occurring T cells, CAR therapy is based on the design and manufacture of engineered T cells with optimized properties. A new armamentarium, comprising not only CARs but also chimeric costimulatory receptors, chimeric cytokine receptors, inhibitory receptors and synthetic Notch receptors, expressed in naïve, central memory or stem cell-like memory T cells, is being developed for clinical use in a wide range of cancers. Immunological principles are thus finding a new purpose thanks to advances in genetic engineering, synthetic biology and cell manufacturing sciences. PMID:27372731

  12. Chimeric antigen receptors: driving immunology towards synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-08-01

    The advent of second generation chimeric antigen receptors and the CD19 paradigm have ushered a new therapeutic modality in oncology. In contrast to earlier forms of adoptive cell therapy, which were based on the isolation and expansion of naturally occurring T cells, CAR therapy is based on the design and manufacture of engineered T cells with optimized properties. A new armamentarium, comprising not only CARs but also chimeric costimulatory receptors, chimeric cytokine receptors, inhibitory receptors and synthetic Notch receptors, expressed in naïve, central memory or stem cell-like memory T cells, is being developed for clinical use in a wide range of cancers. Immunological principles are thus finding a new purpose thanks to advances in genetic engineering, synthetic biology and cell manufacturing sciences.

  13. Soybean Metabolites Regulated in Root Hairs in Response to the Symbiotic Bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, Laurent; Lei, Zhentian; Libault, Marc; Findley, Seth; Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Stacey, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Nodulation of soybean (Glycine max) root hairs by the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a complex process coordinated by the mutual exchange of diffusible signal molecules. A metabolomic study was performed to identify small molecules produced in roots and root hairs during the rhizobial infection process. Metabolites extracted from roots and root hairs mock inoculated or inoculated with B. japonicum were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry. These combined approaches identified 2,610 metabolites in root hairs. Of these, 166 were significantly regulated in response to B. japonicum inoculation, including various (iso)flavonoids, amino acids, fatty acids, carboxylic acids, and various carbohydrates. Trehalose was among the most strongly induced metabolites produced following inoculation. Subsequent metabolomic analyses of root hairs inoculated with a B. japonicum mutant defective in the trehalose synthase, trehalose 6-phosphate synthase, and maltooligosyltrehalose synthase genes showed that the trehalose detected in the inoculated root hairs was primarily of bacterial origin. Since trehalose is generally considered an osmoprotectant, these data suggest that B. japonicum likely experiences osmotic stress during the infection process, either on the root hair surface or within the infection thread. PMID:20534735

  14. Functional characterization of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum modA and modB genes involved in molybdenum transport.

    PubMed

    Delgado, María J; Tresierra-Ayala, Alvaro; Talbi, Chouhra; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2006-01-01

    A modABC gene cluster that encodes an ABC-type, high-affinity molybdate transporter from Bradyrhizobium japonicum has been isolated and characterized. B. japonicum modA and modB mutant strains were unable to grow aerobically or anaerobically with nitrate as nitrogen source or as respiratory substrate, respectively, and lacked nitrate reductase activity. The nitrogen-fixing ability of the mod mutants in symbiotic association with soybean plants grown in a Mo-deficient mineral solution was severely impaired. Addition of molybdate to the bacterial growth medium or to the plant mineral solution fully restored the wild-type phenotype. Because the amount of molybdate required for suppression of the mutant phenotype either under free-living or under symbiotic conditions was dependent on sulphate concentration, it is likely that a sulphate transporter is also involved in Mo uptake in B. japonicum. The promoter region of the modABC genes has been characterized by primer extension. Reverse transcription and expression of a transcriptional fusion, P(modA)-lacZ, was detected only in a B. japonicum modA mutant grown in a medium without molybdate supplementation. These findings indicate that transcription of the B. japonicum modABC genes is repressed by molybdate.

  15. Overproduction of Ristomycin A by Activation of a Silent Gene Cluster in Amycolatopsis japonicum MG417-CF17

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Marius; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas; Jochim, Angelika; Wolf, Felix; Muenzer, Patrick; Borst, Oliver; Gross, Harald; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria within the last decades is one reason for the urgent need for new antibacterial agents. A strategy to discover new anti-infective compounds is the evaluation of the genetic capacity of secondary metabolite producers and the activation of cryptic gene clusters (genome mining). One genus known for its potential to synthesize medically important products is Amycolatopsis. However, Amycolatopsis japonicum does not produce an antibiotic under standard laboratory conditions. In contrast to most Amycolatopsis strains, A. japonicum is genetically tractable with different methods. In order to activate a possible silent glycopeptide cluster, we introduced a gene encoding the transcriptional activator of balhimycin biosynthesis, the bbr gene from Amycolatopsis balhimycina (bbrAba), into A. japonicum. This resulted in the production of an antibiotically active compound. Following whole-genome sequencing of A. japonicum, 29 cryptic gene clusters were identified by genome mining. One of these gene clusters is a putative glycopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster. Using bioinformatic tools, ristomycin (syn. ristocetin), a type III glycopeptide, which has antibacterial activity and which is used for the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome, was deduced as a possible product of the gene cluster. Chemical analyses by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed the in silico prediction that the recombinant A. japonicum/pRM4-bbrAba synthesizes ristomycin A. PMID:25114137

  16. Schistosoma spindale infection in a captive jackal (Canis aureus).

    PubMed

    Vimalraj, P G; Latchumikanthan, A

    2015-03-01

    This report is based on the findings from a captive jackal (Canis aureus) housed in Amirthi Zoological Park, Javadu Hills, Vellore. The animal was reported to be dull, depressed and also had diarrhea. Fecal samples were collected in 10 % formalin and subjected to direct and sedimentation method of faecal examination and was examined for endoparasitic infection. Surprisingly, fecal examination revealed two spindle shaped eggs having terminal spine with a size of 250μ by 60μ. The eggs were identified as belonging to Schistosoma spindale and as per the standard keys (Soulsby 1982). PMID:25698875

  17. The species of the genus Bulinus, intermediate hosts of Schistosoma*

    PubMed Central

    Mandahl-Barth, G.

    1965-01-01

    The conditions of snail life in African inland waters favour the evolution of microgeographical races while hindering the formation of new species, and the distinctions between many of the bulinid intermediate hosts of Schistosoma are consequently blurred. In this paper the author comments on the distinguishing characters that have been established for the known Bulinus species and subspecies and summarizes the present knowledge of their distribution and importance as intermediate hosts. His work is based on the examination of over 1540 snail samples received at the WHO Snail Identification Centre in Charlottenlund, Denmark. PMID:5294263

  18. Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J A; Dejong, R J; Snyder, S D; Mkoji, G M; Loker, E S

    2001-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most abundant infectious agents of humankind. Its widespread distribution is permitted by the broad geographic range of susceptible species of the freshwater snail genus Biomphalaria that serve as obligatory hosts for its larval stages. Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that Schistosoma originated in Asia, and that a pulmonate-transmitted progenitor colonized Africa and gave rise to both terminal-spined and lateral-spined egg species groups, the latter containing S. mansoni. Schistosoma mansoni likely appeared only after the trans-Atlantic dispersal of Biomphalaria from the Neotropics to Africa, an event that, based on the present African fossil record, occurred only 2-5 million years ago. This parasite became abundant in tropical Africa and then entered the New World with the slave trade. It prospered in the Neotropics because a remarkably susceptible and productive host, B. glabrata, was widely distributed there. Indeed, a snail similar to B. glabrata may have given rise to the African species of Biomphalaria. Schistosoma mansoni has since spread into other Neotropical Biomphalaria species and mammalian hosts. The distribution of S. mansoni is in a state of flux. In Egypt, S. mansoni has nearly completely replaced S. haematobium in the Nile Delta, and has spread to other regions of the country. A susceptible host snail, B. straminea, has been introduced into Asia and there is evidence of S. mansoni transmission in Nepal. Dam and barrage construction has lead to an epidemic of S. mansoni in Senegal, and the parasite continues its spread in Brazil. Because of competition with introduced aquatic species and environmental changes, B. glabrata and consequently S. mansoni have become less abundant on the Caribbean islands. Control of S. mansoni using praziquantel and oxamniquine has reduced global prevalence but control is difficult to sustain, and S. mansoni can develop tolerance/resistance to praziquantel, raising concerns about

  19. Schistosoma mansoni-like infection in Phayao Province, Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Attawibool, S; Bunnag, T; Thirachandra, S; Sinthuprama, K; Sornmani, S

    1983-12-01

    Schistosome ova were found in the serosa of colon mass of a 65-year old Thai woman from Dokkhumtai District, Phayao Province. On the basis of the shape and microscopic appearance of the ova, they probably belonged to those of Schistosoma mansoni complex. In follow-up study, no ova were found by faecal examinations and rectal biopsy. There are evidences suggesting the presence of two distinct mammalian strains in Thailand: Orientobilhorzia harinasutai, a schistosome of water buffalo in Southern region and Tricula bollingi schistosome, a rodent schistosome in Northern region. This case is believed to be the first human schistosome infection with mammalian strain of S. mansoni complex in Thailand.

  20. Cloning of a developmentally regulated tegument antigen of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Stein, L D; David, J R

    1986-09-01

    We have cloned a gene encoding a 22.6 kDa antigen from a Schistosoma mansoni cDNA library. Northern blots indicate that transcription of this antigen occurs in adults and sporocysts but not in cercariae, eggs or in newly-transformed schistosomula. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting with specific antisera indicate that the antigen is not detectable in the newly transformed schistosomulum but appears within 24 h of schistosomulum transformation. Indirect immunofluorescence of adult worms shows this protein to be located in the tegument.

  1. [Reinfection with Schistosoma haematobium and mansoni despite repeated praziquantel office treatment in Niger, Mali].

    PubMed

    Dabo, A; Doucoure, B; Koita, O; Diallo, M; Kouriba, B; Klinkert, M Q; Doumbia, S; Doumbo, O

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of reinfection by Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni after repeated treatment with praziquantel (40 mg/kg body weight, single dose) was studied in a cohort of schoolchildren living in an endemic area. A total of 214 urine and 220 stool samples were collected and examined at three different times, i.e., February 1989, July 1989 and February 1990. Mass chemotherapy was administered at the beginning of study (February 89). Treatment was repeated in children with positive tests at each subsequent sampling. Prevalence rates were 55.1 p. 100, 3.7 p. 100, and 35.0 p. 100 for Schistosoma haematobium and 62.7 p. 100, 46.3 p. 100 and 73.1 p. 100 for Schistosoma mansoni in February 1989, July 1989 and February 1990 respectively (p < 0.001). From July 1989 to February 1990, reinfection was observed in 84.5 p. 100 of children by Schistosoma haematobium versus 57.8 p. 100 by Schistosoma mansoni. The risk of reinfection by Schistosoma haematobium was higher in children between the ages of 7 and 10 years than in children between the ages of 11 and 15 years (p < 0.001), The incidence of intense Schistosoma haematobium egg excretion rose from 0 p. 100 in July 1989 to 6.0 p. 100 in February 1990. The incidence of intense Schistosoma mansoni excretion in February 1990 was 4.5 p. 100. The reinfection rate at 7 months was over 50 p. 100 for both parasite species despite repeated treatment. This finding demonstrates that additional measures such as proper sanitation and vector control are needed to control human schistosomiasis in irrigated rice paddies.

  2. Serodiagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infections in an endemic area of Burkina Faso: performance of several immunological tests with different parasite antigens.

    PubMed

    Sorgho, Hermann; Bahgat, Mahmoud; Poda, Jean-Noel; Song, Wenjian; Kirsten, Christa; Doenhoff, Michael J; Zongo, Issaka; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Ruppel, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The performance of indirect haemagglutination assays (IHA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT) were compared with 450 sera from a Schistosoma mansoni-endemic area in Burkina Faso. All participants in this survey provided at least one sample each of stool, urine and serum. From those with an egg-negative Kato-Katz thick smear, a second stool sample was examined. IHA was based on either extracts of adult S. mansoni worms (SmIHA) or S. japonicum egg antigen (SjIHA). For ELISA, three antigen preparations were used, namely: (i) soluble S. mansoni adult worm antigens (SWAP); (ii) soluble S. mansoni egg antigens (SEA); and (iii) a cationic exchange fraction of S. mansoni eggs (CEF6). IFAT was performed with S. mansoni male worm sections. Among the egg-excretors, the sensitivity of ELISA was high and egg antigens performed slightly better (SEA, 96%; CEF6, 97%) than worm antigen (94%). Sensitivity of IHA was satisfactory with homologous (Sm, >85%), but not heterologous (Sj, 56%) parasite antigen. In IFAT, the parenchyma-associated fluorescence showed high sensitivity (95%), but gut-associated fluorescence, which is known to be a sensitive diagnostic marker for schistosome-infected European travelers, was observed only in 76% of a sub-sample of 100 of the endemic sera. Among sera from egg-negative individuals, many gave positive reactions in several or all of the tests employed. These reactions (formally "false positive") are considered to represent true infections, since chemotherapy had not yet been delivered to this population. For the purpose of further surveys in Burkina Faso or other resource-poor settings, we suggest IHA as an accurate diagnostic test and propose to further improve its performance by including egg rather than worm antigens.

  3. Use of repetitive sequences and the polymerase chain reaction technique to classify genetically related Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 strains

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, A.K.; Sadowsky, M.J. MSU-DOE Plant Research Lab., East Lansing, MI ); Schneider, M.; Bruijn, F.J. de Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1993-06-01

    Bacteria of the genus Bradyrhizobium are slow-growing, gram-negative, heterotrophic and have the ability to form root nodules on several leguminous plants. In the upper midwest USA, members of B. japonicum serocluster 123 are the dominant indigenous competitors for the nodulation of soybeans. However, the current serological divisions fail to adequately reflect the genetic and phenotypic diversity among member isolates. This article describes the use of REP and ERIC PCR fingerprinting and RFLP analysis using a hyperreiterated DNA probe to classiby serologically related and genetically similar B. japonicum serocluster 123 strains. In addition the comparison of 15 serologically distinct B. japonicum and Bradyrhizobia spp. strains by using REP and ERIC PCR fingerprint analysis is presented. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Nasr, Nabil A.; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays. PMID:26193254

  5. Sex-discordant monochorionic twins with blood and tissue chimerism.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Buritica, David; Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Mikhail, Fady M; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2015-04-01

    We report on a pair of normally conceived monochorionic/dizygotic (MC/DZ) sex discordant twins. The comparison of blood and skin genotypes revealed that the chimerism was also present in the skin. We conjecture about the developmental origins of this case.

  6. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  7. THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RECENT ISOLATES OF Schistosoma mansoni TO PRAZIQUANTEL

    PubMed Central

    MENDONÇA, Adriana Maria B.; FEITOSA, Ana Paula S.; VERAS, Dyana L.; MATOS-ROCHA, Thiago J.; CAVALCANTI, Marília G. dos Santos; BARBOSA, Constança Clara G. S.; BRAYNER, Fábio A.; ALVES, Luiz C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma and its control is dependent on a single drug, praziquantel (PZQ), but concerns over PZQ resistance have renewed interest in evaluating the in vitro susceptibility of recent isolates of Schistosoma mansoni to PZQ in comparison with well-established strains in the laboratory. Material and methods: The in vitro activity of PZQ (6.5-0.003 µg/mL) was evaluated in terms of mortality, reduced motor activity and ultrastructural alterations against S. mansoni. Results: After 3 h of incubation, PZQ, at 6.5 µg/mL, caused 100% mortality of all adult worms in the three types of recent isolates, while PZQ was inactive at concentrations of 0.08-0.003 µg/mL after 3 h of incubation. The results show that the SLM and Sotave isolates basically presented the same pattern of susceptibility, differing only in the concentration of 6.5 µg/mL, where deaths occurred from the range of 1.5 h in Sotave and just in the 3 h range of SLM. Additionally, this article presents ultrastructural evidence of rapid severe PZQ-induced surface membrane damage in S. mansoni after treatment with the drug, such as disintegration, sloughing, and erosion of the surface. Conclusion: According to these results, PZQ is very effective to induce tegument destruction of recent isolates of S. mansoni. PMID:26910445

  8. MJD and OTU deubiquitinating enzymes in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Roberta Verciano; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Costa, Marcela Pereira; Passos, Liana Konovaloff Jannotti; Borges, William de Castro; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitination and deubiquitination of proteins can alter diverse cellular processes, such as proteolysis, trafficking, subcellular localisation, DNA repair, apoptosis and signal transduction. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are responsible for removing ubiquitin from their target proteins. Previous reports have shown the presence of two subfamilies of DUBs in Schistosoma mansoni: Ub carboxyl-terminal hydrolase (UCH) and Ub-specific protease (USP). In this study, we analysed the ovarian tumour (OTU) and Machado-Joseph disease protein domain (MJD) proteases found in the Schistosoma mansoni genome database. An in silico analysis identified two different MJD subfamily members, SmAtaxin-3 and SmJosephin, and five distinct OTU proteases, SmOTU1, SmOTU3, SmOTU5a, SmOTU6b and SmOtubain. The phylogenetic analysis showed the evolutionary conservation of these proteins. Furthermore, the 3D structures confirmed the similarity of these proteins with human proteins. In addition, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and observed distinct expression profiles for all of the investigated transcripts between the cercariae, schistosomula and adult worm stages. Taken together, our data suggest that MJD and OTU subfamily members contribute to regulating the activity of the Ub-proteasome system during the life cycle of this parasite. PMID:25924794

  9. Survival and Competitiveness of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Strains 20 Years after Introduction into Field Locations in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Narożna, Dorota; Pudełko, Krzysztof; Króliczak, Joanna; Golińska, Barbara; Sugawara, Masayuki; Mądrzak, Cezary J.

    2015-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that there are no indigenous strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum forming nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with soybean plants in arable field soils in Poland. However, bacteria currently classified within this species are present (together with Bradyrhizobium canariense) as indigenous populations of strains specific for nodulation of legumes in the Genisteae tribe. These rhizobia, infecting legumes such as lupins, are well established in Polish soils. The studies described here were based on soybean nodulation field experiments, established at the Poznań University of Life Sciences Experiment Station in Gorzyń, Poland, and initiated in the spring of 1994. Long-term research was then conducted in order to study the relation between B. japonicum USDA 110 and USDA 123, introduced together into the same location, where no soybean rhizobia were earlier detected, and nodulation and competitive success were followed over time. Here we report the extra-long-term saprophytic survival of B. japonicum strains nodulating soybeans that were introduced as inoculants 20 years earlier and where soybeans were not grown for the next 17 years. The strains remained viable and symbiotically competent, and molecular and immunochemical methods showed that the strains were undistinguishable from the original inoculum strains USDA 110 and USDA 123. We also show that the strains had balanced numbers and their mobility in soil was low. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the extra-long-term persistence of soybean-nodulating strains introduced into Polish soils and the first analyzing the long-term competitive relations of USDA 110 and USDA 123 after the two strains, neither of which was native, were introduced into the environment almost 2 decades ago. PMID:26048934

  10. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  11. Toward minimal conditioning protocols for allogeneic chimerism in tolerance resistant recipients.

    PubMed

    Al-Adra, David P; Anderson, Colin C

    2013-01-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach toward generating donor-specific immunological tolerance. However, chimerism induction can be toxic; therefore, there is an effort to develop non-myeloablative, minimal intensity protocols that can generate chimerism without the toxic side effects. Recently, with the goal of creating a minimalistic chimerism induction protocol in the tolerance resistant non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, we identified pre-existing T cells as cells that resist fully allogeneic chimerism. With monoclonals targeting NOD T cells, we showed that long-term chimerism and tolerance toward donor islets could be established. However, this promising new protocol relied on the administration of a single dose of anti-CD40 ligand, which is not clinically applicable. In refining protocols to move even closer to clinical utility, we report here initial success at generating fully allogeneic mixed chimerism in NOD mice by adding cyclophosphamide to the conditioning regimen in place of anti-CD40 ligand antibodies.

  12. Asymmetrical cell division in Blepharisma japonicum: difference between daughter cells in mating-type expression.

    PubMed

    Miyake, A; Harumoto, T

    1990-09-01

    In cell division of high-frequency-selfers in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum, daughter cells are different in mating-type expression. The anterior daughter cell is mating type I. The posterior daughter cell is mating type II at first and then changes to mating type I after about 24 h. The anteroposterior polarity of predivision cells appears to correlate with the asymmetrical cell division. This work introduces a unicellular organism about the size of microscopic metazoa as a model system for the study of asymmetrical cell division, which is particularly important in developmental processes.

  13. Development of microsatellite markers for the semi-natural grassland herb Veronicastrum japonicum (Plantaginaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Naoyuki; Izuno, Ayako; Arima, Kurumi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Veronicastrum japonicum (Plantaginaceae) grows in grasslands on Honshu Island, Japan, and is threatened by habitat loss because of rapid land development over recent decades. For the genetic characterization of the remaining populations, microsatellite markers were developed. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed using next-generation sequencing. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 24 (mean 7.7), and the expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.35 to 0.94 (mean 0.68). Conclusions: These markers can be used for genetic studies in conservation, such as the evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure. PMID:26949575

  14. Gynecological Manifestations, Histopathological Findings, and Schistosoma-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Results Among Women With Schistosoma haematobium Infection: A Cross-sectional Study in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Jourdan, Peter Mark; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Ramarokoto, Charles Emile; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Ravaoalimalala, Vololomboahangy Elisabeth; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; Feldmeier, Hermann; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding; van Lieshout, Lisette; Roald, Borghild; Leutscher, Peter; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke

    2015-01-01

    Background. The pathophysiology of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) is only partially understood. This study aims to describe the histopathological findings, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results, and gynecological manifestations of FGS in women with different intensities of Schistosoma haematobium infection. Methods. Women aged 15–35 years living in an S. haematobium-endemic area in Madagascar underwent pelvic and colposcopic examinations. Small biopsy specimens were obtained from lesions and examined histopathologically. Schistosoma PCR was done on urine, biopsy, cervicovaginal lavage, and genital mucosal surface specimens. Results. Sandy patches and rubbery papules were found in 41 of 118 women (35%). Rubbery papules reflected an intense cellular immune reaction dominated by eosinophils, epithelial erosion, and viable ova. There was a significant decrease in the prevalence of rubbery papules with age, even after adjustment for urinary ova excretion. The sandy patches with grains showed moderate cellular immune reaction and ova (viable and/or calcified). They were most prevalent in cases with low-intensity urinary S. haematobium infection. Forty-two percent of women with Schistosoma-negative urine specimens had at least 1 genital specimen test positive for Schistosoma by PCR. Conclusions. The results indicate a diversity of lesions caused by S. haematobium and a dynamic evolution of the genital lesions. Schistosoma PCR may give an indication of the diagnosis. PMID:25725656

  15. Cross-species protection: Schistosoma mansoni Sm-p80 vaccine confers protection against Schistosoma haematobium in hamsters and baboons.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Torben, Workineh; Alam, Mayeen U; Le, Loc; Damian, Raymond T; Wolf, Roman F; White, Gary L; Carey, David W; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-03-01

    The ability of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen, Sm-p80, to provide cross-species protection against Schistosoma haematobium challenge was evaluated in hamster and baboon models. Pronounced reduction in worm burden (48%) and in tissue egg load (64%) was observed in hamsters vaccinated with recombinant Sm-p80 admixed with glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE). Similarly, in baboons, the Sm-p80/GLA-SE vaccine produced a 25% reduction in S. haematobium adult worms and decreased the egg load in the urinary bladder by 64%. A 40% and 53% reduction in fecal and urine egg output, respectively, was observed in vaccinated baboons. A balanced pro-inflammatory (Th17 and Th1) and Th2 type of response was generated after vaccination and appears indicative of augmented prophylactic efficacy. These data on cross-species protection coupled with the prophylactic, therapeutic and antifecundity efficacy against the homologous parasite, S. mansoni, reinforces Sm-p80 as a promising vaccine candidate. It is currently being prepared for GMP-compliant manufacture and for further pre-clinical development leading to human clinical trials. These results solidify the expectation that the Sm-p80 vaccine will provide relief for both the intestinal and the urinary schistosomiasis and thus will be greatly beneficial in reducing the overall burden of schistosomiasis.

  16. Orientobilharzia Dutt & Srivastava, 1955 (Trematoda: Schistosomatidae), a junior synonym of Schistosoma Weinland, 1858.

    PubMed

    Aldhoun, Jitka A; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2012-06-01

    In the last few decades, phylogenetic studies of the family Schistosomatidae based on molecular markers have revealed that members of the genus Orientobilharzia Dutt & Srivastava, 1955 belong within Schistosoma Weinland, 1858. In this study, the original descriptions and redescriptions of Orientobilharzia species and related revisions are reviewed, and it is confirmed that the morphological characters correspond with the results of the molecular studies. The two genera differ only in the number of testes; however, this character varies to a large extent within particular genera of the subfamily Schistosomatinae and cannot be used to justify the separation of Orientobilharzia from Schistosoma. Also, we have verified claims suggesting the synonymy of certain species of Orientobilharzia; the four valid species of this genus are transferred to Schistosoma and two new synonymies are formally presented. The following nomenclatural changes are made: Schistosoma Weinland, 1858 [syn. Orientobilharzia Dutt & Srivastava, 1955 (syn. nov.)]; Schistosoma bomfordi Montgomery, 1906 (comb. restit.); S. turkestanicum Skrjabin, 1913 (comb. restit.) [syns Ori. turkestanica var. tuberculata (Bhalerao, 1932) (syn. nov.) and Ori. cheni Hsü & Yang, 1957 (syn. nov.)]; S. dattai (Dutt & Srivastava, 1952) n. comb.; and S. harinasutai (Kruatrachue, Bhaibulaya & Harinasuta, 1965) n. comb. The generic diagnosis of Schistosoma is amended and a revised key to the subfamily Schistosomatinae Stiles & Hassall, 1898 is presented.

  17. Lactate as a Novel Quantitative Measure of Viability in Schistosoma mansoni Drug Sensitivity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie; Zöphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. PMID:25487803

  18. Effect of two AMF life strategies on the tripartite symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and soybean.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Pedro M; Deaville, Deanna; Goss, Michael J

    2006-05-01

    This study is the first in assessing the effect of soil disturbance on the contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) with different life-history strategies to the tripartite symbiosis with soybeans and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (Kirchner) Jordan. We hypothesized that Gigaspora margarita Becker and Hall would be more affected by soil disturbance than Glomus clarum Nicol. and Schenck, and consequently, the tripartite symbiosis would develop more rapidly and lead to greater N(2) fixation in the presence of the latter. Soil pasteurization allowed the establishment of treatments with individual AMF species and soil disturbance enabled the development of contrasting root colonization potentials. In contrast, the colonization potential of B. japonicum was kept the same in all treatments. Soil disturbance significantly reduced root colonization by both AMF, with Gi. margarita being considerably more affected than G. clarum. Furthermore, the tripartite symbiosis progressed faster with G. clarum, and at 10 days after plant emergence, there was 30% more nodules when G. clarum was present compared to that when the bacterial symbiont alone was present. At flowering, the absence of soil disturbance stimulated N(2) fixation by 17% in mycorrhizal plants. However, this response was similar for both AMF.

  19. Mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from soils by Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Manabu; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Shimomura, Yumi; Morimoto, Sho; Tago, Kanako; Wang, Yong; Hayakawa, Chihiro; Uetake, Yusuke; Sánchez, Cristina; Eda, Shima; Hayatsu, Masahito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2013-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas that is also capable of destroying the ozone layer. Agricultural soil is the largest source of N2O (ref. ). Soybean is a globally important leguminous crop, and hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) that can also produce N2O (ref. ). In agricultural soil, N2O is emitted from fertilizer and soil nitrogen. In soybean ecosystems, N2O is also emitted from the degradation of the root nodules. Organic nitrogen inside the nodules is mineralized to NH4+, followed by nitrification and denitrification that produce N2O. N2O is then emitted into the atmosphere or is further reduced to N2 by N2O reductase (N2OR), which is encoded by the nosZ gene. Pure culture and vermiculite pot experiments showed lower N2O emission by nosZ+ strains and nosZ++ strains (mutants with increased N2OR activity) of Bradyrhizobium japonicum than by nosZ- strains. A pot experiment using soil confirmed these results. Although enhancing N2OR activity has been suggested as a N2O mitigation option, this has never been tested in the field. Here, we show that post-harvest N2O emission from soybean ecosystems due to degradation of nodules can be mitigated by inoculation of nosZ+ and non-genetically modified organism nosZ++ strains of B. japonicum at a field scale.

  20. Intra- and interspecies transfer and expression of Rhizobium japonicum hydrogen uptake genes and autotrophic growth capability

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Grant R.; Cantrell, Michael A.; Hanus, F. Joe; Russell, Sterling A.; Haddad, Karen R.; Evans, Harold J.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmids containing hydrogen uptake genes have previously been isolated in this laboratory. Four new cosmids that contain additional hup gene(s) have now been identified by conjugal transfer of a Rhizobium japonicum 122DES gene bank into a Tn5-generated Hup- mutant and screening for the acquisition of Hup activity. The newly isolated cosmids, pHU50-pHU53, contain part of the previously isolated pHU1 but extend as far as 20 kilobases beyond its border. pHU52 complements five of six Hup- mutants and confers activity on several Hup- wild-type R. japonicum strains in the free-living state and where tested in nodules. Transconjugants obtained from interspecies transfer of pHU52 to Rhizobium meliloti 102F28, 102F32, and 102F51 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 showed hydrogen-dependent methyleneblue reduction, performed the oxyhydrogen reaction, and showed hydrogen-dependent autotrophic growth by virtue of the introduced genes. The identity of the presumptive transconjugants was confirmed by antibiotic-resistance profiles and by plant nodulation tests. Images PMID:16578786

  1. Differentiation of Cirsium japonicum and C. setosum by TLC and HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ganzera, Markus; Pöcher, Astrid; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    The Chinese Pharmacopoeia indicates the use of field thistle (Cirsium setosum) and Japanese field thistle (C. japonicum) in the treatment of bleeding and inflammation. In the absence of an analytical method for the differentiation and analysis of these two species, TLC and HPLC-MS methods have been developed for this purpose. Both species could be readily distinguished by their flavonoid pattern as revealed by TLC on silica gel layers eluted with ethyl acetate:formic acid:acetic acid:water. The quantitative determination of four flavonoids, namely hispidulin-7-neohesperidoside, linarin, pectolinarin and luteolin, was possible using HPLC. Their optimum separation was achieved on a C12 column eluted with water and 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid in acetonitrile. HPLC-MS experiments were performed to confirm peak identity. In samples of C. japonicum, pectolinarin was the major flavonoid (0.32-2.00%), followed by linarin, hispidulin-7-neohesperidoside and luteolin; the total flavonoid content varied from 0.81 to 3.67%. In C. setosum only one flavonoid (linarin; 1.36-2.83%) was assignable. The HPLC method was validated for linearity, limit of detection (< or = 1.7 ng on-column), peak purity, repeatability (< or = 2.3%) and accuracy (recovery rates of spiked samples were between 99.2 and 101.6%).

  2. Molecular identification and genetic variation of varieties of Styphnolobium japonicum (Fabaceae) using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Sun, R X; Zhang, C H; Zheng, Y Q; Zong, Y C; Yu, X D; Huang, P

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-four Styphnolobium japonicum varieties were analyzed using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers, to investigate genetic variation and test the effectiveness of SRAP markers in DNA fingerprint establishment. Twelve primer pairs were selected from 120 primer combinations for their reproducibility and high polymorphism. We found a total of 430 amplified fragments, of which 415 fragments were considered polymorphic with an average of 34.58 polymorphic fragments for each primer combination. The percentage of polymorphic fragments was 96.60%, and four primer pairs showed 100% polymorphism. Moreover, simple matched coefficients ranged between 0.68 and 0.89, with an average of 0.785, indicating that the genetic variation among varieties was relatively low. This could be because of the narrow genetic basis of the selected breeding material. Based on the similarity coefficient value of 0.76, the varieties were divided into four major groups. In addition, abundant and clear SRAP fingerprints were obtained and could be used to establish DNA fingerprints. In the DNA fingerprints, each variety had its unique pattern that could be easily distinguished from others. The results demonstrated that 34 varieties of S. japonicum had a relatively narrow genetic variation. Hence, a broadening of the genetic basis of breeding material is necessary. We conclude that establishment of DNA fingerprint is feasible by means of SRAP markers. PMID:27173318

  3. Strain selection for improvement of Bradyrhizobium japonicum competitiveness for nodulation of soybean.

    PubMed

    Althabegoiti, María Julia; López-García, Silvina L; Piccinetti, Carlos; Mongiardini, Elías J; Pérez-Giménez, Julieta; Quelas, Juan Ignacio; Perticari, Alejandro; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2008-05-01

    A Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110-derived strain able to produce wider halos in soft-agar medium than its parental strain was obtained by recurrent selection. It was more chemotactic than the wild type towards mannitol and three amino acids. When cultured in minimal medium with mannitol as a single carbon-source, it had one thick subpolar flagellum as the wild type, plus several other flagella that were thinner and sinusoidal. Root adsorption and infectivity in liquid media were 50-100% higher for the selected strain, but root colonization in water-unsaturated vermiculite was similar to the wild type. A field experiment was then carried out in a soil with a naturalized population of 1.8 x 10(5) soybean-nodulating rhizobia g of soil(-1). Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains were inoculated either on the soybean seeds or in the sowing furrows. Nodule occupation was doubled when the strains were inoculated in the sowing furrows with respect to seed inoculation (significant with P<0.05). On comparing strains, nodule occupation with seed inoculation was 6% or 10% for the wild type or selected strains, respectively, without a statistically significant difference, while when inoculated in the sowing furrows, nodule occupation increased to 12% and 22%, respectively (differences significant with P<0.05). PMID:18336548

  4. Allelopathy of the invasive plant Bidens frondosa on the seed germination of Geum japonicum var. chinense.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Hassani, D; Cheng, Z W; Wang, C Y; Wu, J

    2014-01-01

    Five gradient concentrations (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 g/mL) of leaching liquors from the roots, stems, and leaves of the invasive plant Bidens frondosa were used as conditioning fluid to examine its influence on seed germination conditions of the native plant Geum japonicum var. chinense in Huangshan. All leaching liquors of organs suppressed the seed germination of Geum japonicum var. chinense and reduced the final germination percentage and rate, and increased the germination inhibition rate, with a bimodal dependence on concentration. The leaching liquor inhibited the seed germination significantly at the concentration of 0.02 g/mL respectively. The seed germination was also inhibited as the concentration reached to 0.04 g/mL and beyond. Hence the allelopathic effects of the organs were significantly enhanced respectively. This phenomenon represented the presence of allelopathy substances in the root, stem and leaf of Bidens frondosa. PMID:25511044

  5. Chemical control of interstrain competition for soybean nodulation by Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, S; Kollmeyer, W D; Stacey, G

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has shown that a significant limitation to the agricultural use of improved rhizobial inoculant strains is competition from the indigenous soil population. In this work, we sought to test whether chemical inhibitors of flavonoid-induced nod gene expression in Bradyrhizobium japonicum could be identified and utilized to affect interstrain competition for nodulation of soybeans. Approximately 1,000 structural and functional analogs of the known, natural inducers of nod gene expression were tested on six strains of B. japonicum containing a nodY-lacZ fusion. We successfully identified effective inhibitors of nodY expression. The addition of the inhibitor 7-hydroxy-5-methylflavone significantly inhibited nodulation by a sensitive strain and could be used to effectively manipulate the competition between strains for soybean nodulation. However, this work also uncovered significant limitations for the practical use of this methodology. For example, despite the almost universal induction response to the identified natural inducers, there was a wide variability among strains in their response to any specific inhibitor. Given this unexpected variability, the cost of registration of an agronomic chemical, and the potential for the development of resistant field populations, it is unlikely that chemical inhibitors can be successfully applied to a field situation. PMID:1892378

  6. (Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  7. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  8. An integrated biochemical system for nitrate assimilation and nitric oxide detoxification in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Juan J; Salas, Ana; Torres, María J; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Richardson, David J; Gates, Andrew J; Delgado, María J

    2016-02-01

    Rhizobia are recognized to establish N2-fixing symbiotic interactions with legume plants. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the symbiont of soybeans, can denitrify and grow under free-living conditions with nitrate (NO3 (-)) or nitrite (NO2 (-)) as sole nitrogen source. Unlike related bacteria that assimilate NO3 (-), genes encoding the assimilatory NO3 (-) reductase (nasC) and NO2 (-) reductase (nirA) in B. japonicum are located at distinct chromosomal loci. The nasC gene is located with genes encoding an ABC-type NO3 (-) transporter, a major facilitator family NO3 (-)/NO2 (-) transporter (NarK), flavoprotein (Flp) and single-domain haemoglobin (termed Bjgb). However, nirA clusters with genes for a NO3 (-)/NO2 (-)-responsive regulator (NasS-NasT). In the present study, we demonstrate NasC and NirA are both key for NO3 (-) assimilation and that growth with NO3 (-), but not NO2 (-) requires flp, implying Flp may function as electron donor to NasC. In addition, bjgb and flp encode a nitric oxide (NO) detoxification system that functions to mitigate cytotoxic NO formed as a by-product of NO3 (-) assimilation. Additional experiments reveal NasT is required for NO3 (-)-responsive expression of the narK-bjgb-flp-nasC transcriptional unit and the nirA gene and that NasS is also involved in the regulatory control of this novel bipartite assimilatory NO3 (-)/NO2 (-) reductase pathway.

  9. Cercarial emergence pattern of Schistosoma haematobium from Libreville, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mintsa-Nguéma, Rodrigue; Moné, Hélène; Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Mengué-Ngou-Milama, Krystina; Kombila, Maryvonne; Mouahid, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Although schistosomiasis has been a public health issue in Gabon for nearly a century, little is known about its current transmission dynamics. We analyzed the chronobiology of 137 cercarial emission profiles of Schistosoma haematobium from Libreville, the capital of Gabon, located in an open area for schistosomiasis. We found that 88% of the cercariae were shed between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. and that the average pattern was of circadian type, with the average peak at 1 p.m., and representing 27% of the total number of cercariae of the day. The rhythms of emergence may be associated with environmental pressures on the parasite, especially those related to their definitive hosts.

  10. Interaction of Schistosoma mansoni Sporocysts and Hemocytes of Biomphalaria

    PubMed Central

    Negrão-Corrêa, D.; Mattos, A. C. A.; Pereira, C. A. J.; Martins-Souza, R. L.; Coelho, P. M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Human infection by Schistosoma mansoni affects more than 100 million people worldwide, most often in populations of developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The transmission of S. mansoni in human populations depends on the presence of some species of Biomphalaria that act as an intermediate host. The compatibility between S. mansoni and its intermediate host is influenced by behavioral, physiological, and genetical factors of the mollusc and the parasite. The susceptibility level of the mollusc has been attributed to the capacity of internal defense system (IDS)—hemocytes and soluble components of the hemolymph—to recognize and destroy the parasite, and this will be the center of interest of this paper. The schistosome-resistant Biomphalaria can be an alternative strategy for the control of schistosomiasis. PMID:22811885

  11. High Genetic Variability of Schistosoma haematobium in Mali and Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeh, Charles; Yin, Mingbo; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Bin; Sacko, Moussa; Feng, Zheng; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium is one of the most prevalent parasitic flatworms, infecting over 112 million people in Africa. However, little is known about the genetic diversity of natural S. haematobium populations from the human host because of the inaccessible location of adult worms in the host. We used 4 microsatellite loci to genotype individually pooled S. haematobium eggs directly from each patient sampled at 4 endemic locations in Africa. We found that the average allele number of individuals from Mali was significantly higher than that from Nigeria. In addition, no significant difference in allelic composition was detected among the populations within Nigeria; however, the allelic composition was significantly different between Mali and Nigeria populations. This study demonstrated a high level of genetic variability of S. haematobium in the populations from Mali and Nigeria, the 2 major African endemic countries, suggesting that geographical population differentiation may occur in the regions. PMID:25748721

  12. Cercarial emergence pattern of Schistosoma haematobium from Libreville, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mintsa-Nguéma, Rodrigue; Moné, Hélène; Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Mengué-Ngou-Milama, Krystina; Kombila, Maryvonne; Mouahid, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Although schistosomiasis has been a public health issue in Gabon for nearly a century, little is known about its current transmission dynamics. We analyzed the chronobiology of 137 cercarial emission profiles of Schistosoma haematobium from Libreville, the capital of Gabon, located in an open area for schistosomiasis. We found that 88% of the cercariae were shed between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. and that the average pattern was of circadian type, with the average peak at 1 p.m., and representing 27% of the total number of cercariae of the day. The rhythms of emergence may be associated with environmental pressures on the parasite, especially those related to their definitive hosts. PMID:24502943

  13. Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni by transplantation of APO Biomphalaria tenagophila.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, L; Caldeira, R L; Carvalho, O S; Vidigal, T H D A; Jannotti-Passos, L K; Coelho, P M Z

    2006-05-01

    Transplantation of the haematopoietic organ from Biomphalaria tenagophila (Taim strain, RS, Brazil), resistant to Schistosoma mansoni, to a highly susceptible strain (Cabo Frio, RJ, Brazil) of the same species, showed in the recipient snails resistance against the trematode, when a successful transplant occurred. The success of transplantation could be confirmed by a typical molecular marker of the Taim strain in haemocytes of the recipients (350 bp detected by PCR-RFLP). The recipient snails which did not present the donor marker in haemocytes (unsuccessful transplantation) were infected with the parasite. The use of an atoxic modelling clay for closing the hole in the transplantation site reduced significantly the mortality caused by bleeding after transplantation procedures. PMID:16629706

  14. Toxic effects of chromium on Schistosoma haematobium miracidia

    SciTech Connect

    Wolmarans, C.T.; Yssel, E.; Hamilton-Attwell, V.L.

    1988-12-01

    Various heavy metals have recently been evaluated as molluscicides for freshwater snails, which act as intermediate hosts of trematode parasites of medical or veterinary importance. Very little information, however, is available on heavy metals that may be suitable to eliminate the parasites as such. Suitable compounds should also inhibit the penetration ability of parasites as well as stunt the development of those who do not penetrate their hosts. In the light of these requirements, the present study evaluated the effect of chromium on the miracidia of Schistosoma haematobium, which causes urinary bilharzia. Attention was mainly focused on (1) the chromium concentration which resulted in 100% mortality (2) the effect of chromium on the external and internal morphology of the miracidia, and (3) the ability of the miracidia to form sporocytes in vitro and in vivo and to penetrate their intermediate host snail, Bulinus africanus.

  15. Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni by transplantation of APO Biomphalaria tenagophila.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, L; Caldeira, R L; Carvalho, O S; Vidigal, T H D A; Jannotti-Passos, L K; Coelho, P M Z

    2006-05-01

    Transplantation of the haematopoietic organ from Biomphalaria tenagophila (Taim strain, RS, Brazil), resistant to Schistosoma mansoni, to a highly susceptible strain (Cabo Frio, RJ, Brazil) of the same species, showed in the recipient snails resistance against the trematode, when a successful transplant occurred. The success of transplantation could be confirmed by a typical molecular marker of the Taim strain in haemocytes of the recipients (350 bp detected by PCR-RFLP). The recipient snails which did not present the donor marker in haemocytes (unsuccessful transplantation) were infected with the parasite. The use of an atoxic modelling clay for closing the hole in the transplantation site reduced significantly the mortality caused by bleeding after transplantation procedures.

  16. Long-Term Effects of Metal-Rich Sewage Sludge Application on Soil Populations of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kinkle, B K; Angle, J S; Keyser, H H

    1987-02-01

    The application of sewage sludge to land may increase the concentration of heavy metals in soil. Of considerable concern is the effect of heavy metals on soil microorganisms, especially those involved in the biocycling of elements important to soil productivity. Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a soil bacterium involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Glycine max, the common soybean. To examine the effect of metal-rich sludge application on B. japonicum, the MICs for Pb, Cu, Al, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Hg were determined in minimal media by using laboratory reference strains representing 11 common serogroups of B. japonicum. Marked differences were found among the B. japonicum strains for sensitivity to Cu, Cd, Zn, and Ni. Strain USDA 123 was most sensitive to these metals, whereas strain USDA 122 was most resistant. In field studies, a silt loam soil amended 11 years ago with 0, 56, or 112 Mg of digested sludge per ha was examined for total numbers of B. japonicum by using the most probable number method. Nodule isolates from soybean nodules grown on this soil were serologically typed, and their metal sensitivity was determined. The number of soybean rhizobia in the sludge-amended soils was found to increase with increasing rates of sludge. Soybean rhizobia strains from 11 serogroups were identified in the soils; however, no differences in serogroup distribution or proportion of resistant strains were found between the soils. Thus, the application of heavy metal-containing sewage sludge did not have a long-term detrimental effect on soil rhizobial numbers, nor did it result in a shift in nodule serogroup distribution.

  17. Long-Term Effects of Metal-Rich Sewage Sludge Application on Soil Populations of Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Kinkle, B. K.; Angle, J. S.; Keyser, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    The application of sewage sludge to land may increase the concentration of heavy metals in soil. Of considerable concern is the effect of heavy metals on soil microorganisms, especially those involved in the biocycling of elements important to soil productivity. Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a soil bacterium involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Glycine max, the common soybean. To examine the effect of metal-rich sludge application on B. japonicum, the MICs for Pb, Cu, Al, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Hg were determined in minimal media by using laboratory reference strains representing 11 common serogroups of B. japonicum. Marked differences were found among the B. japonicum strains for sensitivity to Cu, Cd, Zn, and Ni. Strain USDA 123 was most sensitive to these metals, whereas strain USDA 122 was most resistant. In field studies, a silt loam soil amended 11 years ago with 0, 56, or 112 Mg of digested sludge per ha was examined for total numbers of B. japonicum by using the most probable number method. Nodule isolates from soybean nodules grown on this soil were serologically typed, and their metal sensitivity was determined. The number of soybean rhizobia in the sludge-amended soils was found to increase with increasing rates of sludge. Soybean rhizobia strains from 11 serogroups were identified in the soils; however, no differences in serogroup distribution or proportion of resistant strains were found between the soils. Thus, the application of heavy metal-containing sewage sludge did not have a long-term detrimental effect on soil rhizobial numbers, nor did it result in a shift in nodule serogroup distribution. PMID:16347281

  18. Effects of Cu on the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Hara, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Kiminori

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between Cu and Cu-hyperaccumulator lichens is important for their application in monitoring and assessing heavy metal pollution. We investigated the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum at several Cu-polluted and control sites in Japan, and found the lichen to be widely distributed. Its concentrations of Cu, chlorophylls, and secondary metabolites, chlorophyll-related indices, and absorption spectra were measured, and we observed negative effects of Cu on these concentrations and indices. For highly Cu-polluted samples (>100ppm dry weight), however, we found significant linear correlations between Cu and chlorophyll concentrations. This can be considered as the response of the photobiont in S. japonicum to Cu stress. In highly Cu-polluted samples the chlorophyll-related indices and concentration of total secondary metabolites were almost constant regardless of Cu concentration. This suggests that the increase in chlorophyll concentration with the increase in Cu concentration enhances photosynthetic productivity per unit biomass, which will allow the production of extra structure and energy for maintaining the chlorophyll-related indices under Cu stress. The relationship between the increase in chlorophyll concentration of S. japonicum and the decrease in secondary metabolite concentration of the lichen can be explained by considering the balance of carbohydrates in the lichen. We found that a spectral index A372-A394 can be a useful index of the concentrations of Cu and total secondary metabolites in S. japonicum. These findings show the adjustment of the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in S. japonicum to Cu stress, and provide a better understanding of the relationship between Cu and the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen.

  19. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  20. Chimeric Plantibody Passively Protects Mice against Aerosolized Ricin Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Whaley, Kevin J.; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H.; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  1. Chimeric plantibody passively protects mice against aerosolized ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin J; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  2. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design. PMID:19559111

  3. Chimeric Protein Complexes in Hybrid Species Generate Novel Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowska, Elzbieta M.; Naseeb, Samina; Knight, David; Delneri, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization between species is an important mechanism for the origin of novel lineages and adaptation to new environments. Increased allelic variation and modification of the transcriptional network are the two recognized forces currently deemed to be responsible for the phenotypic properties seen in hybrids. However, since the majority of the biological functions in a cell are carried out by protein complexes, inter-specific protein assemblies therefore represent another important source of natural variation upon which evolutionary forces can act. Here we studied the composition of six protein complexes in two different Saccharomyces “sensu stricto” hybrids, to understand whether chimeric interactions can be freely formed in the cell in spite of species-specific co-evolutionary forces, and whether the different types of complexes cause a change in hybrid fitness. The protein assemblies were isolated from the hybrids via affinity chromatography and identified via mass spectrometry. We found evidence of spontaneous chimericity for four of the six protein assemblies tested and we showed that different types of complexes can cause a variety of phenotypes in selected environments. In the case of TRP2/TRP3 complex, the effect of such chimeric formation resulted in the fitness advantage of the hybrid in an environment lacking tryptophan, while only one type of parental combination of the MBF complex allowed the hybrid to grow under respiratory conditions. These phenotypes were dependent on both genetic and environmental backgrounds. This study provides empirical evidence that chimeric protein complexes can freely assemble in cells and reveals a new mechanism to generate phenotypic novelty and plasticity in hybrids to complement the genomic innovation resulting from gene duplication. The ability to exchange orthologous members has also important implications for the adaptation and subsequent genome evolution of the hybrids in terms of pattern of gene loss. PMID

  4. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  5. Construction of chimeric vaccinia viruses by molecular cloning and packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiflinger, F; Dorner, F; Falkner, F G

    1992-01-01

    Foreign DNA was inserted into unique restriction endonuclease cleavage sites (Sma I or Not I) of the 200,000-base-pair vaccinia virus genome by direct molecular cloning. The modified vaccinia virus DNA was packaged in fowlpox virus-infected avian cells, and chimeric vaccinia virus was isolated from mammalian cells not supporting the growth of the fowlpox helper virus. In contrast to the classical "in vivo" recombination technique, chimeric viruses with inserts in both possible orientations and families of chimeras with multiple inserts were obtained. The different genomic configurations of chimeric viruses provide a broader basis for screening of optimal viruses. In addition to packaging in avian cells, a second packaging procedure for vaccinia DNA, based on the abortive infection of mammalian cells with the fowlpox helper virus, was developed. This procedure permits simultaneous packaging and host-range selection for the packaged virus. The cloning/packaging procedure allows the direct insertion of foreign DNA without the need for plasmids having flanking regions homologous to viral nonessential regions and is independent of inefficient in vivo recombination events. By direct cloning and packaging, about 5-10% of the total vaccinia virus yield consisted of chimeras. The procedure is, therefore, a useful tool in molecular virology. Images PMID:1438247

  6. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    PubMed

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development.

  7. Systemic chimerism in human female recipients of male livers.

    PubMed

    Starzl, T E; Demetris, A J; Trucco, M; Ramos, H; Zeevi, A; Rudert, W A; Kocova, M; Ricordi, C; Ildstad, S; Murase, N

    1992-10-10

    We have previously reported data from clinical and laboratory animal observations which suggest that organ tolerance after transplantation depends on a state of balanced lymphodendritic cell chimerism between the host and donor graft. We have sought further evidence to support this hypothesis by investigating HLA-mismatched liver allograft recipients. 9 of 9 female recipients of livers from male donors had chimerism in their allografts and extrahepatic tissues, according to in-situ hybridisation and molecular techniques 10 to 19 years posttransplantation. In 8 women with good graft function, evidence of the Y chromosome was found in the blood (6/8), skin (8/8), and lymph nodes (7/8). A ninth patient whose transplant failed after 12 years from recurrent chronic viral hepatitis had chimerism in her lymph nodes, skin, jejunum, and aorta at the time of retransplantation. Although cell migration is thought to take place after all types of transplantation, the large population of migratory cells in, and the extent of their seeding from, hepatic grafts may explain the privileged tolerogenicity of the liver compared with other organs.

  8. Defense function of pigment granules in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum against two predatory protists, Amoeba proteus (Rhizopodea) and Climacostomum virens (Ciliata).

    PubMed

    Terazima, Masayo Noda; Harumoto, Terue

    2004-08-01

    The defense function of pigment granules in the red ciliate Blepharisma japonicum against two predatory protists, Amoeba proteus and Climacostomum virens, was investigated by (1) comparing normally-pigmented and albino mutant cells of B. japonicum as the prey of these predators and (2) comparing resistance of the predators to blepharismin, the toxic pigment contained in the pigment granules of B. japonicum. Normally pigmented cells which contained more blepharismin than albino cells were less vulnerable to A. proteus than albino cells, but not to C. virens. C. virens was more resistant than A. proteus to the lethal effect of blepharismin. The results indicate that pigment granules of B. japonicum function as defense organelles against A. proteus but not against C. virens and suggest that successful defense against a predator depends on the susceptibility of the predator to blepharismin.

  9. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  10. Chimeric Filoviruses for Identification and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ilinykh, Philipp A.; Shen, Xiaoli; Flyak, Andrew I.; Kuzmina, Natalia; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent experiments suggest that some glycoprotein (GP)-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can protect experimental animals against the filovirus Ebola virus (EBOV). There is a need for isolation of MAbs capable of neutralizing multiple filoviruses. Antibody neutralization assays for filoviruses frequently use surrogate systems such as the rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSV), lentiviruses or gammaretroviruses with their envelope proteins replaced with EBOV GP or pseudotyped with EBOV GP. It is optimal for both screening and in-depth characterization of newly identified neutralizing MAbs to generate recombinant filoviruses that express a reporter fluorescent protein in order to more easily monitor and quantify the infection. Our study showed that unlike neutralization-sensitive chimeric VSV, authentic filoviruses are highly resistant to neutralization by MAbs. We used reverse genetics techniques to replace EBOV GP with its counterpart from the heterologous filoviruses Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Sudan virus, and even Marburg virus and Lloviu virus, which belong to the heterologous genera in the filovirus family. This work resulted in generation of multiple chimeric filoviruses, demonstrating the ability of filoviruses to tolerate swapping of the envelope protein. The sensitivity of chimeric filoviruses to neutralizing MAbs was similar to that of authentic biologically derived filoviruses with the same GP. Moreover, disabling the expression of the secreted GP (sGP) resulted in an increased susceptibility of an engineered virus to the BDBV52 MAb isolated from a BDBV survivor, suggesting a role for sGP in evasion of antibody neutralization in the context of a human filovirus infection. IMPORTANCE The study demonstrated that chimeric rhabdoviruses in which G protein is replaced with filovirus GP, widely used as surrogate targets for characterization of filovirus neutralizing antibodies, do not accurately predict the ability of antibodies to

  11. Lassa-Vesicular Stomatitis Chimeric Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N.; Cepko, Connie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. IMPORTANCE Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We

  12. Immigration control in the vertebrate body with special reference to chimerism.

    PubMed

    Davies, Anthony J S

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of chimerism is reviewed against an understanding of adaptive immunity in vertebrates. It is shown that chimerism can be regarded as a ubiquitous condition and this suggests that monophylesis has played little part in evolution. It is suggested that the adaptive immune response has a special role in facilitating the development of chimerism and that the consensus view of adaptive immunity as a rejection mechanism should be revised.

  13. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated the effects of two fusion tags, that is, thioredoxin (Trx) and 6x-His tags, and various expression conditions, on the expression of p28-NRC chimeric protein. Materials and Methods: In order to express the chimeric protein with only 6x-His tag, pET28 expression plasmid was used. Cloning in pET32 expression plasmid was performed to add both Trx and 6x-His tags to the chimeric protein. Expression of the chimeric protein with both plasmids was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis following optimization of expression conditions and host strains. Results: Expression of the chimeric protein in pET28a was performed. However, expression yield of the chimeric protein was low. Optimization of culture conditions and host strains led to reasonable expression yield of the toxic chimeric protein in pET32a vector. In cases of both plasmids, approximately 10 kDa deviation of the apparent molecular weight from the theoretical one was seen in SDS-PAGE of purified chimeric proteins. Conclusions: The study leads to proper expression and purification yield of p28-NRC chimeric protein with Trx tag following optimizing culture conditions and host strains. PMID:27169101

  14. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  15. Characterization of a chimeric enzyme comprising feruloyl esterase and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Takuya; Mochizuki, Keiji; Kisara, Hiroe; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Fushinobu, Shinya; Murayama, Tetsuya; Shiono, Yoshihito

    2010-03-01

    We engineered a chimeric enzyme (AwFaeA-CBM42) comprising of type-A feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus awamori (AwFaeA) and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module (AkCBM42) from glycoside hydrolase family 54 alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase of Aspergillus kawachii. The chimeric enzyme was successfully produced in Pichia pastoris and accumulated in the culture broth. The purified chimeric enzyme had an apparent relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 53,000. The chimeric enzyme binds to arabinoxylan; this indicates that the AkCBM42 in AwFaeA-CBM42 binds to arabinofuranose side chain moiety of arabinoxylan. The thermostability of the chimeric enzyme was greater than that of AwFaeA. No significant difference of the specific activity toward methyl ferulate was observed between the AwFaeA and chimeric enzyme, but the release of ferulic acid from insoluble arabinoxylan by the chimeric enzyme was approximately 4-fold higher than that achieved by AwFaeA alone. In addition, the chimeric enzyme and xylanase acted synergistically for the degradation of arabinoxylan. In conclusion, the findings of our study demonstrated that the components of the AwFaeA-CBM42 chimeric enzyme act synergistically to bring about the degradation of complex substrates and that the family 42 carbohydrate-binding module has potential for application in the degradation of polysaccharides.

  16. Detection of impending graft rejection and relapse by lineage-specific chimerism analysis.

    PubMed

    Lion, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of hematopoietic chimerism has become part of the routine diagnostic program in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Chimerism testing permits early prediction and documentation of successful engraftment, and facilitates early detection of impending graft rejection. In patients transplanted for treatment of malignant hematological disorders, monitoring of chimerism can provide an early indication of incipient disease relapse. The investigation of chimerism has therefore become an indispensable tool for the management of patients during the posttransplant period. Growing use of nonmyeloablative conditioning, which is associated with prolonged duration of mixed hematopoietic chimerism, has further increased the clinical importance of chimerism analysis. At present, the most commonly used technical approach to the investigation of chimerism is microsatellite analysis by PCR. The investigation of chimerism within specific leukocyte subsets isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow samples by flow-sorting or magnetic beads-based techniques provides more specific information on processes underlying the dynamics of donor/recipient chimerism. Moreover, cell subset-specific analysis permits the assessment of impending complications at a significantly higher sensitivity, thus providing a basis for earlier treatment decisions.

  17. Post-transplant monitoring of chimerism by lineage-specific analysis.

    PubMed

    Preuner, Sandra; Lion, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of hematopoietic chimerism is an important part of the routine diagnostic program in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Chimerism testing permits early prediction and documentation of successful engraftment and facilitates early risk assessment of impending graft rejection. In patients transplanted for treatment of malignant hematologic disorders, monitoring of chimerism can provide an early indication of incipient disease relapse. The investigation of chimerism has therefore become an indispensable tool for the management of patients during the post-transplant period. Increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning, which is associated with prolonged duration of mixed hematopoietic chimerism, has further increased the clinical importance of chimerism analysis. At present, the most commonly used technical approach to the investigation of chimerism is microsatellite analysis by polymerase chain reaction. The investigation of chimerism within specific leukocyte subsets isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow samples by flow sorting- or magnetic bead-based techniques provides more specific information on processes underlying the dynamics of donor/recipient chimerism. Moreover, cell subset-specific analysis permits the assessment of impending complications at a significantly higher sensitivity, thus providing a basis for earlier treatment decisions.

  18. Metal-specific control of gene expression mediated by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur is determined by the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Hohle, Thomas H; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur are manganese- and iron-responsive transcriptional regulators, respectively, that belong to the same protein family. Here, we show that neither Mur nor Fur discriminate between Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in vitro nor is there a metal preference for conferral of DNA-binding activity on the purified proteins. When expressed in E. coli, B. japonicum Mur responded to iron, but not manganese, as determined by in vivo promoter occupancy and transcriptional repression activity. Moreover, E. coli Fur activity was manganese-dependent in B. japonicum. Total and chelatable iron levels were higher in E. coli than in B. japonicum under identical growth conditions, and Mur responded to iron in a B. japonicum iron export mutant that accumulated high levels of the metal. However, elevated manganese content in E. coli did not confer activity on Fur or Mur, suggesting a regulatory pool of manganese in B. japonicum that is absent in E. coli. We conclude that the metal selectivity of Mur and Fur depends on the cellular context in which they function, not on intrinsic properties of the proteins. Also, the novel iron sensing mechanism found in the rhizobia may be an evolutionary adaptation to the cellular manganese status.

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of Crinum asiaticum Linne var. japonicum extract and its application as a cosmeceutical ingredient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Heui; Kim, Ki Ho; Han, Chang Sung; Park, Sun Hee; Yang, Hong Chul; Lee, Bang Yong; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, Young-Sil; Kim, Jong-Heon; Lee, Nam Ho

    2008-01-01

    Crinum asiaticum Linne var. japonicum has long been used as a rheumatic remedy, as an anti-pyretic and as an anti-ulcer treatment, and for the alleviation of local pain and fever in Korea and Malaysia. In order to investigate the possibility of Crinum asiaticum Linne var. japonicum extract as a cosmetic ingredient, we measured its anti-inflammatory effect by its inhibition of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) and the release of PGE2, IL-6, and IL-8. We also measured its anti-allergic effect by its inhibition of beta-hexosamidase release. An HPLC experiment after extraction with 95% EtOH at pH 3.5 showed that Crinum asiaticum Linne var. japonicum was mainly composed of lycorine (up to 1%), a well-known immunosuppressor. The content of lycorine varied, depending on the type of plant tissue analyzed and the extraction method. In an anti-inflammatory assay for inhibition of nitric oxide formation on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, the ethanol extract of Crinum asiaticum showed an inhibitory activity of NO production in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 58.5 microg/ml). Additional study by RT-PCR demonstrated that the extract of Crinum asiaticum significantly suppressed the expression of the iNOS gene. Moreover, the extract of Crinum asiaticum did not show any cytotoxicity, but did show a cell proliferation effect against LPS (a 10 approximately 60% increase in cell viability). In an assay to determine inhibition of the H2O2-activated release of PGE2, IL-6, and IL-8 in human normal fibroblast cell lines, the release of PGE2 and IL-6 was almost completely inhibited above concentrations of 0.05% and 1%, respectively. Moreover, the release of IL-8 was completely inhibited over the entire range of concentration (>0.0025%). In order to investigate the skin-sensitizing potentials of the extract of Crinum asiaticum, a human clinical test was performed after repeated epicutaneous 48-h applications under an occlusive patch (RIPT). The

  20. [Effect of plant growth regulators on physiological activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum ].

    PubMed

    Leonova, N O; Tytova, L V; Tantsiurenko, O V; Antypchuk, A F

    2005-01-01

    Influence of plant growth regulators Ivin, Emistim C, Eney and Agrostimulin on the biomass production and exopolymers synthesis of soybean nodule bacteria, which have contrasting symbiotic properties, and glutamine synthetase activity of their cell-free extracts were studied. It was shown that the processes of the biomass and exopolymers accumulation had an opposite direction. Of all preparations only Ivin and Agrostimulin intensificol growth activity of the microorganisms under study. The level of glutamine synthetase activity and this enzymatic reaction specificity to the bivalent metal ions were determined by the special features of Bradyrhizobium strains and nature of the plant growth regulators. Only in the presence of Eney the increase of glutamine synthetase activity of both cultures of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was established.

  1. Transposon Mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Altered in Attachment to Host Roots †

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Malik, Nasir S. A.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1987-01-01

    Transposon mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 ARS were produced and screened for changes in attachment ability. Mutant CFK4 produced twice as many piliated cells, attached in 2.5-fold-higher numbers to soybean root segments, and colonized roots in about 2-fold-higher numbers than did the parental strain, 110 ARS. Mutants CFK35 and CFK38 were reduced in their attachment about 2-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively. This corresponded to reductions in piliated cells in their populations, reduced reaction with anti-pilus antiserum, and reduced hydrophobic attachment. Mutants CFK4 and CFK38 nodulated soybeans at about the same level as the parent strain, but CFK35 induced only pseudonodules. Two-dimensional gel analyses of the proteins from the mutants showed relatively few changes in proteins. PMID:16347421

  2. (Basis for the competitiveness of Rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean). Progress report, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Those characteristics of Rhizobium cells that are most crucial in determining their competitive success when inoculated onto seed in the field are sought. Initial studies of Rhizobium attachment to root surfaces revealed that only a small subpopulation of the cells in an R. japonicum culture are capable of firmly attaching to soybean roots. The size of the attachment-competent subpopulation depends on strain and culture age. Attachment of rhizobia to roots was found to be linearly proportional to the bacterial concentration. The rate of attachment is constant under our conditions for approximately 60 min, then rapidly levels off to approximately zero. Once attached to the root surface, Rhizobium cells seldom spontaneously detach. Rhizobia of several different species all attached comparably well to soybean roots. Attachment of various Rhizobium species to the root hairs of soybean seedlings likewise showed no evidence of host specificity or selectivity. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Identification and cloning of Bradyrhizobium japonicum genes expressed strain selectively in soil and rhizosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, A A; Keister, D L

    1992-01-01

    The growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and USDA 438 in soil extract-supplemented medium led to transcription of a large amount of DNA not expressed in basal medium. Strain USDA 438 was more competitive for the nodulation of soybean than strain USDA 110. To identify and isolate DNA regions which were expressed specifically in strain USDA 438 but not in strain USDA 110 in response to soil extract or soybean root exudate, we developed a subtractive RNA hybridization procedure. Several cosmid clones which showed strain-specific gene expression were isolated from a USDA 438 gene library. Two clones enhanced competitive nodulation when mobilized to USDA 110. The method described may be useful for identifying genes expressed in response to environmental stimuli or genes expressed differently in related microbial strains. Images PMID:1377899

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Antiangiogenic Activity of Crowberry (Empetrum nigrum var. japonicum).

    PubMed

    Bae, Hong-Sook; Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Da Hye; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Jun, Mira; Kim, Oh-Yoen; Kim, Sun Wook; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon

    2016-04-01

    Crowberry, Empetrum nigrum var. japonicum, is widely used in folk medicine and grows naturally in Korea. Although some constituents and biological activity of Korean crowberry have been examined, there is little detailed information available. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol extracts of crowberry (EECB) on the inhibition of angiogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo. The effects of EECB were tested on in vitro models of angiogenesis, that is, tube formation and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). EECB exhibited significant inhibitory effects on tube formation of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, crowberry significantly suppressed the proliferation of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, strong antiangiogenic activity of EECB samples was observed in the in vivo assay using chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). These results indicate that crowberry may have potential applications in the prevention and treatment of angiogenesis-dependent human diseases. PMID:27396205

  5. Copper Starvation-inducible Protein for Cytochrome Oxidase Biogenesis in Bradyrhizobium japonicum*

    PubMed Central

    Serventi, Fabio; Youard, Zeb Andrew; Murset, Valérie; Huwiler, Simona; Bühler, Doris; Richter, Miriam; Luchsinger, Ronny; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Brogioli, Robert; Niederer, Martina; Hennecke, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    Microarray analysis of Bradyrhizobium japonicum grown under copper limitation uncovered five genes named pcuABCDE, which are co-transcribed and co-regulated as an operon. The predicted gene products are periplasmic proteins (PcuA, PcuC, and PcuD), a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor (PcuB), and a cytoplasmic membrane-integral protein (PcuE). Homologs of PcuC and PcuE had been discovered in other bacteria, namely PCuAC and YcnJ, where they play a role in cytochrome oxidase biogenesis and copper transport, respectively. Deletion of the pcuABCDE operon led to a pleiotropic phenotype, including defects in the aa3-type cytochrome oxidase, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and anoxic nitrate respiration. Complementation analyses revealed that, under our assay conditions, the tested functions depended only on the pcuC gene and not on pcuA, pcuB, pcuD, or pcuE. The B. japonicum genome harbors a second pcuC-like gene (blr7088), which, however, did not functionally replace the mutated pcuC. The PcuC protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to bind Cu(I) with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry. The replacement of His79, Met90, His113, and Met115 by alanine perturbed copper binding. This corroborates the previously purported role of this protein as a periplasmic copper chaperone for the formation of the CuA center on the aa3-type cytochrome oxidase. In addition, we provide evidence that PcuC and the copper chaperone ScoI are important for the symbiotically essential, CuA-free cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase specifically in endosymbiotic bacteroids of soybean root nodules, which could explain the symbiosis-defective phenotype of the pcuC and scoI mutants. PMID:23012364

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  7. Host Plant Effects on Nodulation and Competitiveness of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum Serotype Strains Constituting Serocluster 123

    PubMed Central

    Cregan, P. B.; Keyser, H. H.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Strains in Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 are the major indigenous competitors for nodulation in a large portion of the soybean production area of the United States. Serocluster 123 is defined by the serotype strains USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129. The objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the ability of two soybean genotypes, PI 377578 and PI 417566, to restrict the nodulation and reduce the competitiveness of serotype strains USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129 in favor of the highly effective strain CB1809 and to determine how these soybean genotypes alter the competitive relationships among the three serotype strains in the serocluster. The soybean genotypes PI 377578 and PI 417566 along with the commonly grown cultivar Williams were planted in soil essentially free of soybean rhizobia and inoculated with single-strain treatments of USDA 123, USDA 127, USDA 129, or CB1809 and six dual-strain competition treatments of USDA 123, USDA 127, or USDA 129 versus CB1809, USDA 123 versus USDA 127, USDA 123 versus USDA 129, and USDA 127 versus USDA 129. PI 377578 severely reduced the nodulation and competitiveness of USDA 123 and USDA 127, while PI 417566 similarly affected the nodulation and competitiveness of USDA 129. Thus, the two soybean genotypes can reduce the nodulation and competitiveness of each of the three serocluster 123 serotype strains. Our results indicate that host control of restricted nodulation and reduced competitiveness is quite specific and effectively discriminates between B. japonicum strains which are serologically related. PMID:16348029

  8. An integrated biochemical system for nitrate assimilation and nitric oxide detoxification in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Juan J.; Salas, Ana; Torres, María J.; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Richardson, David J.; Gates, Andrew J.; Delgado, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia are recognized to establish N2-fixing symbiotic interactions with legume plants. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the symbiont of soybeans, can denitrify and grow under free-living conditions with nitrate (NO3−) or nitrite (NO2−) as sole nitrogen source. Unlike related bacteria that assimilate NO3−, genes encoding the assimilatory NO3− reductase (nasC) and NO2− reductase (nirA) in B. japonicum are located at distinct chromosomal loci. The nasC gene is located with genes encoding an ABC-type NO3− transporter, a major facilitator family NO3−/NO2− transporter (NarK), flavoprotein (Flp) and single-domain haemoglobin (termed Bjgb). However, nirA clusters with genes for a NO3−/NO2−-responsive regulator (NasS-NasT). In the present study, we demonstrate NasC and NirA are both key for NO3− assimilation and that growth with NO3−, but not NO2− requires flp, implying Flp may function as electron donor to NasC. In addition, bjgb and flp encode a nitric oxide (NO) detoxification system that functions to mitigate cytotoxic NO formed as a by-product of NO3− assimilation. Additional experiments reveal NasT is required for NO3−-responsive expression of the narK-bjgb-flp-nasC transcriptional unit and the nirA gene and that NasS is also involved in the regulatory control of this novel bipartite assimilatory NO3−/NO2− reductase pathway. PMID:26564204

  9. Reflections on the unique tolerogenicity of bone marrow, the enigma of chimerism and clinical tolerance.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of acquired immunological tolerance, chimerism has always been associated with tolerance. There is, however, a frequent dichotomy between chimerism and tolerance. Many experimental strategies that produce chimerism do not induce tolerance. In addition, some types of chimerism frequently occur after solid organ transplantation, but rarely result in tolerance. In experimental models of transient lymphocyte depletion with antilymphocyte serum, bone marrow cells exhibit a unique ability to induce allograft tolerance that is superior to that of other lymphoid cells. This tolerance can be augmented with standard immunosuppressive agents used in clinical transplantation. There are currently four ongoing clinical trials of tolerance induction to renal allografts that employ various protocols of non-myeloablative conditioning and donor bone marrow infusion. All four trials have been remarkably successful in achieving short- and moderate-term duration tolerance with minimal morbidity and complications. Persistent tolerance (total drug withdrawal) has been achieved in recipients with durable substantial chimerism. Durable tolerance has also been achieved in recipients who have lost chimerism before or after drug withdrawal has been initiated, as well as in recipients in whom only transient (less than three weeks) or no chimerism at all has been achieved. Although chimeric recipients have rejected grafts during drug withdrawal, durable chimerism is thus far the most positive biomarker for likely successful tolerance induction. At present, there is no proof that chimerism causes tolerance per se; the data are also consistent with another etiological mechanism that causes tolerance and thereby permits chimerism to persist. The current experimental protocols for tolerance induction are safe. More transplant programs should consider doing clinical tolerance research.

  10. Chimeras taking shape: Potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  11. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk provide control over structural and morphological details because it can be self-assembled through diverse processing methods including film casting and fiber electrospinning. Biosilica nanostructures in diatoms are formed in aqueous ambient conditions at neutral pH and low temperatures. The R5 peptide derived from the silaffin protein of Cylindrotheca fusiformis induces and regulates silica precipitation in the chimeric protein designs under similar ambient conditions. Whereas mineralization reactions performed in the presence of R5 peptide alone form silica particles with a size distribution of 0.5–10 μm in diameter, reactions performed in the presence of the new fusion proteins generate nanocomposite materials containing silica particles with a narrower size distribution of 0.5–2 μm in diameter. Furthermore, we demonstrate that composite morphology and structure could be regulated by controlling processing conditions to produce films and fibers. These results suggest that the chimeric protein provides new options for processing and control over silica particle sizes, important benefits for biomedical and specialty materials, particularly in light of the all aqueous processing and the nanocomposite features of these new materials. PMID:16769898

  12. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    PubMed

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development. PMID:11337752

  13. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2008-09-15

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available endonuclease sites, leading to limitations in the choice of the site of fusion between two genes and problems in maintaining protein secondary structure. We have developed a cloning strategy to get around these disadvantages that is based on a single round of PCR amplification followed by antibiotic-resistant gene complementation. PMID:18555003

  14. Clinical strategy for induction of transplantation tolerance through mixed chimerism.

    PubMed

    Cosimi, A Benedict; Sachs, David H; Sykes, Megan; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Following the demonstration that transplant tolerance could be induced in non-human primate recipients treated with non-myeloablative conditioning that resulted in only transient chimerism, we began in 1998 to evaluate this approach first in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), secondary to multiple myeloma (MM). A total of 10 patients with ESRD and MM have been treated with this initial protocol. Only 2 recipients developed evidence of reversible renal allograft rejection after stopping immunosuppression. Long-term (up to 14 years) operational renal allograft tolerance has been observed in all 10 patients, even in those with transient hematopoietic chimerism. Control of the MM has been less complete, as recurrent disease developed in five of these patients, three of whom expired. Nevertheless, in view of the essentially 100% 3-5 year mortality typically expected with alternative treatments for this challenging population, it has been suggested that combined kidney and donor bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT) following non-myeloablative conditioning should become the standard therapy for patients with ESRD secondary to MM (27). These encouraging results, as well as the acceptable morbidity observed in cancer patients receiving non-myeloablative human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched bone marrow transplantation in our center, led us to next evaluate CKBMT in 10 patients of HLA-mismatched transplants. All 10 subjects developed transient chimerism and in seven of these, immunosuppression was successfully discontinued. Four subjects continue to be immunosuppression free for periods of 4.5-11 years, while in three, reinstitution of immunosuppression was advised or accomplished after 5-8 years due to recurrence of original disease or chronic antibody mediated rejection. Donor-specific antibodies were frequently detectable in the earlier recipients. In contrast, no donor-specific antibodies were detected after immunosuppression was discontinued in the last

  15. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2008-09-15

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available endonuclease sites, leading to limitations in the choice of the site of fusion between two genes and problems in maintaining protein secondary structure. We have developed a cloning strategy to get around these disadvantages that is based on a single round of PCR amplification followed by antibiotic-resistant gene complementation.

  16. Chimerism in cattle through microsurgical aggregation of morulae.

    PubMed

    Brem, G; Tenhumberg, H; Kräußlich, H

    1984-11-01

    A cattle chimera was produced by combining four halves of two parent embryos of different breeds (Brown-Swiss x Braunvieh plus Holstein-Friesian x Holstein-Friesian) in one zona pellucida. Parent embryos in the 32-cell morula stage were recovered non-surgically, were bisected, and the combined four halves were transferred non-surgically to recipient heifers. Chimerism of coat colour was used as evidence. Combining of only two half embryos from different parents resulted in five pregnancies carried to term but none of the calves born was a chimera.

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  18. Determination of Hydrogenase in Free-living Cultures of Rhizobium japonicum and Energy Efficiency of Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo T.

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive tritium exchange assay was applied to the Rhizobium system for measuring the expression of uptake hydrogenase in free-living cultures of Rhizobium japonicum. Hydrogenase was detected about 45 hours after inoculation of cultures maintained under microaerophilic conditions (about 0.1% O2). The tritium exchange assay was used to screen a variety of different strains of R. japonicum (including major production strains) with the findings that about 30% of the strains expressed hydrogenase activity with identical results being observed using an alternative assay based on uptake of H2. The relative efficiency of intact soybean nodules inoculated with 10 different rhizobial strains gave results identical to those obtained using free-living cultures. The tritium exchange assay provides an easy, quick, and accurate assessment of H2 uptake efficiency of intact nodules. PMID:16660568

  19. Flavonol tetraglycosides from fruits of Styphnolobium japonicum (Leguminosae) and the authentication of Fructus Sophorae and Flos Sophorae.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Veitch, Nigel C; Boalch, Martha E; Lewis, Gwilym P; Leon, Christine J; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2009-04-01

    The dried fruits and seeds of Styphnolobium japonicum (L.) Schott (syn. Sophora japonica L.) are used in traditional Chinese medicine and known as Fructus Sophorae or Huai Jiao. The major flavonoids in these fruits and seeds were studied by LC-MS and other spectroscopic techniques to aid the chemical authentication of Fructus Sophorae. Among the flavonoids were two previously unreported kaempferol glycosides: kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)-beta-galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside and kaempferol 3-O-beta-xylopyranosyl(1-->3)-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)[beta-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)]-beta-glucopyranoside, the structures of which were determined by NMR. Two further tetraglycosides were identified for the first time in S. japonicum as kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-glucopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside and kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranosyl(1-->2)[alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->6)]-beta-galactopyranoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside; the latter was the main flavonoid in mature seeds. The chromatographic profiles of 27 recorded flavonoids were relatively consistent among fruits of similar ages collected from five trees of S. japonicum, and those of maturing unripe and ripe fruits were similar to a market sample of Fructus Sophorae, and thus provide useful markers for authentication of this herbal ingredient. The flower buds (Huai Mi) and flowers (Huai Hua) of S. japonicum (collectively Flos Sophorae) contained rutin as the main flavonoid and lacked the flavone glycosides that were present in flower buds and flowers of Sophora flavescens Ait., reported to be occasional substitutes for Flos Sophorae. The single major flavonoid in fruits of S. flavescens was determined as 3'-hydroxydaidzein. PMID:19447452

  20. Quantitative chimerism: an independent acute leukemia prognosis indicator following allogeneic hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Qin, X-Y; Li, G-X; Qin, Y-Z; Wang, Y; Wang, F-R; Liu, D-H; Xu, L-P; Chen, H; Han, W; Wang, J-Z; Zhang, X-H; Li, J-L; Li, L-D; Liu, K-Y; Huang, X-J

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluates the prognostic significance of quantitative chimerism to monitor minimal residual disease and predict relapse in acute leukemia (AL) patients following allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). The quantitative chimerism levels of 129 AL patients were measured using RQ-PCR based on 29 sequence polymorphisms. Receiver-operating characteristic curve indicated that the optimal cutoff point to predict an inevitable relapse was 1.0%, which results in 100.0% sensitivity and 79.6% specificity.The relapse rate of patients with chimerism >1.0% at 2 years was 55.0%, whereas that for patients with chimerism <1.0% was 0%(P=0.000). Quantitative chimerism >1.00% indicated a higher probability of relapse. Cox multivariate analysis indicated that quantitative chimerism >1.00% was associated with lower disease-free survival (hazard ratio (HR)=10.825; 95% confidence interval (CI) =4.704-24.912, P=0.000) and lower OS (HR=8.681; 95% CI=3.728-20.212, P=0.000). Patients (24/47 with quantitative chimerism >1.00%) who received preemptive modified DLI immunotherapy had significantly lower relapse rate (37.5%) than those (n=9) who did not (100%; P=0.001). Thus, quantitative chimerism is an independent prognostic factor that predicts clinical outcomes after HSCT and provides a guide for suitable interventions.

  1. Double umbilical cord blood transplantation: relevance of persistent mixed-unit chimerism.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Hasan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2015-04-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) was developed as a strategy to circumvent the cell dose limitation of single UCBT with a concomitant potential benefit of lowering the rate of leukemia relapse. Sustained hematopoiesis after double UCBT usually is derived from a single donor unit, as only a few patients have been reported to display stable mixed-unit chimerism for varying periods of time. Explanations for the 1 unit dominance, predictors for identifying unit superiority, and persistence of long-term mixed-unit chimerism remain elusive. Review of published literature revealed only 11 of 280 patients (4%) with mixed-unit chimerism for at least 1 year after transplantation, with 3 patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Mixed-unit chimerism was more likely if both units were closely HLA matched to each other. Outcome data for patients with stable mixed-unit chimerism, for the most part, were scarcely reported. Analysis of the small sample size revealed a potential advantage of stable mixed-unit chimerism on enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect; however, definitive conclusions cannot be made on the effect of mixed-unit chimerism on the rates of graft-versus-host disease. Therefore, gathering outcome data prospectively in larger clinical series will help answer the question of whether stable mixed-unit chimerism is either beneficial and, therefore, should be strived for, detrimental and, thus, needs to be eliminated, or if it is of no clinical consequence.

  2. Frontiers of stem cell transplantation monitoring: capturing graft dynamics through routine longitudinal chimerism analysis.

    PubMed

    Kristt, Don; Stein, Jerry; Klein, Tirza

    2007-03-01

    Quantitative chimerism testing has become an indispensable tool for following the course and success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants. In this paper, we describe the current laboratory approach to quantitative chimerism testing based on an analysis of short tandem repeats, and explain why performing this analysis longitudinally is important and feasible. Longitudinal analysis focuses on relative changes appearing in the course of sequential samples, and as such exploits the ultimate potential of this intrinsically semi-quantitative platform. Such an analysis is more informative than single static values, less likely to be confused with platform artifacts, and is individualized to the particular patient. It is particularly useful with non-myeloablative conditioning, where mixed chimerism is common. When longitudinal chimerism analysis is performed on lineage-specific subpopulations, the sensitivity, specificity and mechanistic implications of the data are augmented. Importantly, longitudinal monitoring is a routinely feasible laboratory option because multiplex STR-PCR kits are available commercially, and modern software can be used to perform computation, reliability testing, and longitudinal tracking in a rapid, easy to use format. The ChimerTrack application, a shareware program developed in our laboratory for this purpose, produces a report that automatically summarizes and illustrates the quantitative temporal course of the patient's chimeric status. Such a longitudinal perspective enhances the value of quantitative chimerism monitoring for decisions regarding immunomodulatory post-transplant therapy. This information also provides unique insights into the biological dynamics of engraftment underlying the fluctuations in the temporal course of a patient's chimeric status.

  3. Schistosoma mansoni larvicidal activity of murine bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, F A; White-Ziegler, C A; Ball, J E; Niemann, G M

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated the ability of cells obtained from both normal and immune mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BACs) to kill Schistosoma mansoni larvae in vitro. In cultures with mechanically derived schistosomules, high levels of larvicidal activity were displayed by BACs from both normal and irradiated cercaria-immunized C57BL/6 mice. Based on effector-to-target-cell ratios, BAC-mediated killing was two- to threefold more efficient than killing mediated by macrophage-rich cell populations obtained from the peritoneal cavity. BACs from normal A/J mice were essentially as larvicidal as normal C57BL/6 cells. However, BACs from a strain of mouse (P/J) with a known macrophage defect possessed negligible larvicidal activity. Macrophages made up 85 to 95% of BACs from all three strains tested. In contrast to cells of the IC-21 macrophage cell line, B6 BACs did not show enhanced killing activity when preincubated with lymphokine-containing supernatants. Lung schistosomules harvested 10 days after cercarial penetration were refractory to BAC-mediated killing. PMID:2254018

  4. Schistosoma mansoni larvicidal activity of murine bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, F A; White-Ziegler, C A; Ball, J E; Niemann, G M

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of cells obtained from both normal and immune mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BACs) to kill Schistosoma mansoni larvae in vitro. In cultures with mechanically derived schistosomules, high levels of larvicidal activity were displayed by BACs from both normal and irradiated cercaria-immunized C57BL/6 mice. Based on effector-to-target-cell ratios, BAC-mediated killing was two- to threefold more efficient than killing mediated by macrophage-rich cell populations obtained from the peritoneal cavity. BACs from normal A/J mice were essentially as larvicidal as normal C57BL/6 cells. However, BACs from a strain of mouse (P/J) with a known macrophage defect possessed negligible larvicidal activity. Macrophages made up 85 to 95% of BACs from all three strains tested. In contrast to cells of the IC-21 macrophage cell line, B6 BACs did not show enhanced killing activity when preincubated with lymphokine-containing supernatants. Lung schistosomules harvested 10 days after cercarial penetration were refractory to BAC-mediated killing. PMID:2254018

  5. Evaluation of "Myrrh extract" against Schistosoma mansoni: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Ahmed M A; El Ebiary, Faika H; Ibrahim, Suzi H; Saleh, Hanan A A; Khalil, Hazem H M

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of myrrh extract on different developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Sixty albino mice were used and divided into three main groups: GI (control group), GII (infected group) and GIII (infected-treated group). The last group was further divided into 3 subgroups where the drug was administered in a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight for 5 days starting on the 1st day PI for IIIA, on the 21st day PI for IIIB and on the 45th day PI for IIIC. A morphometric study was performed for the mean number and perimeter of granulomas. In GII, typical bilharzial granulomas were frequently encountered in the portal tracts with numerous eosinophils, collagen fiber deposition and reticular fiber condensation. Hepatocytes revealed vacuolation, nuclear affection and depletion of glycogen. In GIII, granulomas were less frequently observed with apparent decrease of eosinophils. The maximum effect of the drug was observed in SGs IIIB and IIIC as detected by significant decrease in the mean number and size of granulomas, paucity of eosinophils, decreased fibrosis and reticular fibers and the restoration of the glycogen content in the hepatocytes. The present data proved that myrrh has a valuable schistosomicidal effect against different stages of S. mansoni. This chemotherapeutic effect was more evident when the drug was given to infected mice on the 21st as well as on the 45th day PI. PMID:20503602

  6. Brazilian studies on the genetics of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Rosana; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2009-01-01

    The parasite Schistosoma is known to exhibit variations among species, strains and genera, such as, the levels of infectivity, pathogenicity and immunogenicity. These factors may differ among parasite populations according to the local epidemiological conditions. Diversity observed in S. mansoni from different geographical regions or within individuals of the same region can be determined by differences in the genotype of each parasite strain. However, until recently, finding adequate genetic markers to investigate infectivity or other epidemiological characteristics of a transmission area proved difficult. Several studies have been conducted to evaluate the genetic variability of S. mansoni, using different techniques. Intraspecific variability was observed in morphological characters, isoenzyme studies, mtDNA, ribosomal gene probes, RAPD and microsatellites. The sequencing of the S. mansoni genome was the most important achievement concerning genetic approaches to the study of this parasite and may improve the development of drugs, vaccines and diagnostics of schistosomiasis. The knowledge of the genetic structure of schistosome populations in relation to epidemiological data and host variability is essential for the understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and the design of control strategies. PMID:18831955

  7. Isothermal Microcalorimetry To Study Drugs against Schistosoma mansoni▿

    PubMed Central

    Manneck, Theresia; Braissant, Olivier; Haggenmüller, Yolanda; Keiser, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Alternative antischistosomal drugs are required since praziquantel is virtually the only drug available for treatment and morbidity control of schistosomiasis. Manual microscopic reading is the current “gold standard” to assess the in vitro antischistosomal properties of test drugs; however, it is labor-intensive, subjective, and difficult to standardize. Hence, there is a need to develop novel tools for antischistosomal drug discovery. The in vitro effects of praziquantel, oxamniquine, artesunate, and mefloquine on metabolic activity and parasite motility of Schistosoma mansoni (newly transformed schistosomula [NTS] and 49-day-old adult worms) were studied using isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Results were compared to morphological readouts of viability. Results obtained for the four drugs tested with phenotypic evaluation by microscopy and IMC showed a good correlation, but IMC also identified drug effects that were not visible by microscopic evaluation, and IMC precisely determined the onset of action of the test drugs. Similar sensitivities on NTS and adult schistosomes were observed for praziquantel and mefloquine, while slight differences in the drug susceptibilities of the two developmental stages were noted with oxamniquine and artesunate. IMC is a useful tool for antischistosomal drug discovery that should be further validated. In addition, our data support the use of NTS in in vitro antischistosomal drug assays. PMID:21270220

  8. Efficient genotyping of Schistosoma mansoni miracidia following whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Valentim, Claudia L L; LoVerde, Philip T; Anderson, Timothy J C; Criscione, Charles D

    2009-07-01

    Small parasites and larval stages pose a problem for molecular analyses because limited amounts of DNA template are available. Isothermal methods for faithfully copying DNA have the potential to revolutionize studies of such organisms. We evaluated the fidelity of multiple displacement amplification (MDA) for amplifying DNA extracted from a single miracidium of Schistosoma mansoni. To do this we genotyped DNA extracted from 28 F1 miracidia following MDA using 56 microsatellite markers. Because these miracidia were obtained from a cross between a male and female worm of known genotypes, we were able to predict the alleles present in the progeny and quantify the genotyping error rate. We found just 8/1568 genotypes deviated from Mendelian expectations. Furthermore, because 1 of these resulted from a genuine mutation, the error rate due to MDA is 7/1568 (0.45%). We conclude that many hundreds of microsatellites or other genetic markers can be accurately genotyped from a single miracidium using this method, greatly expanding the scope of population genetic, epidemiological and evolutionary studies on this parasite. PMID:19428677

  9. Uncovering Notch pathway in the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Lizandra G; Morais, Enyara R; Machado, Carla B; Gomes, Matheus S; Cabral, Fernanda J; Souza, Julia M; Soares, Cláudia S; Sá, Renata G; Castro-Borges, William; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2016-10-01

    Several signaling molecules that govern development in higher animals have been identified in the parasite Schistosoma mansoni, including the transforming growth factor β, protein tyrosine kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, among others. The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling mechanism which is involved in a wide variety of developmental processes including embryogenesis and oogenesis in worms and flies. Here we aimed to provide the molecular reconstitution of the Notch pathway in S. mansoni using the available transcriptome and genome databases. Our results also revealed the presence of the transcripts coded for SmNotch, SmSu(H), SmHes, and the gamma-secretase complex (SmNicastrin, SmAph-1, and SmPen-2), throughout all the life stages analyzed. Besides, it was observed that the viability and separation of adult worm pairs were not affected by treatment with N-[N(3,5)-difluorophenacetyl)-L-Alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), a Notch pathway inhibitor. Moreover, DAPT treatment decreased the production of phenotypically normal eggs and arrested their development in culture. Our results also showed a significant decrease in SmHes transcript levels in both adult worms and eggs treated with DAPT. These results provide, for the first time, functional validation of the Notch pathway in S. mansoni and suggest its involvement in parasite oogenesis and embryogenesis. Given the complexity of the Notch pathway, further experiments shall highlight the full repertoire of Notch-mediated cellular processes throughout the S. mansoni life cycle.

  10. Pedigree analysis of Czech Holstein calves with schistosoma reflexum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosoma reflexum (SR) is congenital syndrome briefly characterized by visceral eventration, severe dorsoflexion and ankylosis of the spine and arthrogryposis. A genetic etiology has been proposed, but conclusive evidence has not yet been provided. Methods Pedigree analysis was carried out in 29 cases of SR in Czech Holsteins and Holstein crosses. Genetic relationship was evaluated and inbreeding coefficients calculated. Pedigrees of 15 Czech Holsteins fathering non-SR affected calves were used for comparison. Results Twenty-one cases occurred in one pedigree founded by three sires while three SR calves occurred in another pedigree with a common grandfather. The sex ratio between affected males and females was 11:6. Affected calves shared common ancestors different from those shared by the unaffected calves. The inbreeding coefficient in the SR affected calves was not increased compared to unaffected calves. Conclusions The findings are consistent with SR being inherited autosomal recessively. Further studies are however needed to confirm this and therefore a breeding trial is recommended where a suspected heterozygous sire is mated to closely related females. PMID:22472123

  11. Compatibility of Schistosoma mansoni Cameroon and Biomphalaria pfeifferi Senegal.

    PubMed

    Southgate, V R; Tchuenté, L A; Théron, A; Jourdane, J; Ly, A; Moncrieff, C B; Gryseels, B

    2000-11-01

    The vectorial capacity of Biomphalaria pfeifferi from Ndiangue, Senegal, was investigated with an allopatric isolate of Schistosoma mansoni from Nkolbisson, Cameroon. The snail infection rate after exposure to a single miracidium per snail (MD1) was 56. 3 %, and 91.6%, for snails exposed to 5 miracidia per snail (MD5). The minimum pre-patent period was 21 days. The mean total cercarial production for the MDI group was 18,511 cercariae per snail, and 9757 cercariae for the MD5 group. The maximum production of cercariae for 1 day was 4892 observed in a snail from the MDI group at day 43 post-infection. The mean longevity of snails was higher in group MD1 (88 days p.i.) than in group MD5 (65 days p.i.). The chronobiological emergence pattern revealed a circadian rhythm with one shedding peak at mid-day. Comparisons are made with the vectorial capacity of the sympatric combination of B. pfeifferi Senegal/S. mansoni Senegal.

  12. Schistosoma mansoni miracidial behavior: an assay system for chemostimulation.

    PubMed

    Sponholtz, G M; Short, R B

    1975-04-01

    A new system for evaluating the responses of miracidia to chemostimulants is described. The apparatus consists of a translucent plastic block with a center well and a hole in the edge leading to the well. One end of a glass tube, covered with a dialysis membrane, was inserted into the hole. Experimental solutions to be tested were put into the tube and Schistosoma mansoni miracidial behavior was observed in the well on the other side of the permeable membrane. Miracidia were released near the membrane; those which contacted the membrane were scored as to whether they returned (contact with return) or did not return (contact without return) before leaving the field of view. Materials eliciting significantly more contact with return responses than did controls were considered to be stimulatory. In this assay system, snail (Biomphalaria glabrata) conditioned water elicited 75% contact with return as compared to 8% for well water control (P less than 0.05). Tracings from motion pictures showed swimming behavior of miracidia toward snail-conditioned water to be different from behavior toward well water controls. This system permits generation of dilution response curves for chemicals and provides generally quantitative results.

  13. Cheminformatics Models for Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sonam; Jamal, Salma; Open Source Drug Discovery Consortium

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasite Schistosoma mansoni and affects over 200 million annually. There is an urgent need to discover novel therapeutic options to control the disease with the recent emergence of drug resistance. The multifunctional protein, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), an essential enzyme for the survival of the pathogen in the redox environment has been actively explored as a potential drug target. The recent availability of small-molecule screening datasets against this target provides a unique opportunity to learn molecular properties and apply computational models for discovery of activities in large molecular libraries. Such a prioritisation approach could have the potential to reduce the cost of failures in lead discovery. A supervised learning approach was employed to develop a cost sensitive classification model to evaluate the biological activity of the molecules. Random forest was identified to be the best classifier among all the classifiers with an accuracy of around 80 percent. Independent analysis using a maximally occurring substructure analysis revealed 10 highly enriched scaffolds in the actives dataset and their docking against was also performed. We show that a combined approach of machine learning and other cheminformatics approaches such as substructure comparison and molecular docking is efficient to prioritise molecules from large molecular datasets. PMID:25629082

  14. Schistosoma mansoni secretes a chemokine binding protein with antiinflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip; Fallon, Rosie E; Mangan, Niamh E; Walsh, Caitriona M; Saraiva, Margarida; Sayers, Jon R; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Alcami, Antonio; Fallon, Padraic G

    2005-11-21

    The coevolution of humans and infectious agents has exerted selective pressure on the immune system to control potentially lethal infections. Correspondingly, pathogens have evolved with various strategies to modulate and circumvent the host's innate and adaptive immune response. Schistosoma species are helminth parasites with genes that have been selected to modulate the host to tolerate chronic worm infections, often for decades, without overt morbidity. The modulation of immunity by schistosomes has been shown to prevent a range of immune-mediated diseases, including allergies and autoimmunity. Individual immune-modulating schistosome molecules have, therefore, therapeutic potential as selective manipulators of the immune system to prevent unrelated diseases. Here we show that S. mansoni eggs secrete a protein into host tissues that binds certain chemokines and inhibits their interaction with host chemokine receptors and their biological activity. The purified recombinant S. mansoni chemokine binding protein (smCKBP) suppressed inflammation in several disease models. smCKBP is unrelated to host proteins and is the first described chemokine binding protein encoded by a pathogenic human parasite and may have potential as an antiinflammatory agent.

  15. Conservation and developmental expression of ubiquitin isopeptidases in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Roberta Verciano; Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; de Oliveira, Victor Fernandes; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Passos, Liana Konovaloff Jannotti; Borges, William de Castro; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Several genes related to the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway, including those coding for proteasome subunits and conjugation enzymes, are differentially expressed during the Schistosoma mansoni life cycle. Although deubiquitinating enzymes have been reported to be negative regulators of protein ubiquitination and shown to play an important role in Ub-dependent processes, little is known about their role in S. mansoni . In this study, we analysed the Ub carboxyl-terminal hydrolase (UCHs) proteins found in the database of the parasite’s genome. An in silico ana- lysis (GeneDB and MEROPS) identified three different UCH family members in the genome, Sm UCH-L3, Sm UCH-L5 and Sm BAP-1 and a phylogenetic analysis confirmed the evolutionary conservation of the proteins. We performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and observed a differential expression profile for all of the investigated transcripts between the cercariae and adult worm stages. These results were corroborated by low rates of Z-Arg-Leu-Arg-Gly-Gly-AMC hydrolysis in a crude extract obtained from cercariae in parallel with high Ub conjugate levels in the same extracts. We suggest that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the cercaria and early schistosomulum stages is related to a decrease in 26S proteasome activity. Taken together, our data suggest that UCH family members contribute to regulating the activity of the Ub-proteasome system during the life cycle of this parasite. PMID:24271000

  16. Characterisation of the COP9 signalosome in Schistosoma mansoni parasites.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Roberta V; de Gomes, Matheus S; Jannotti-Passos, Liana K; Borges, William C; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2013-06-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is an eight-subunit complex found in all eukaryotes and shares structural features with both the 26S proteasome 'lid' and translation factor eIF3. Recent data have demonstrated that the CSN is a regulator of the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome system (UPS). CSN controls substrate ubiquitination by cullin-RING Ub ligases, a step which determines substrate specificity of the UPS. Here, we reconstructed the CSN complex in Schistosoma mansoni and identified eight homologous components. Among these homologues, five subunits were predicted with their full-length sequences. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the evolutionary conservation and the architecture of CSN, as well as the 26S proteasome 'lid'. We performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to detect the expression of the SmCSN transcripts. The Smcsn1, Smcsn2, Smcsn3, Smcsn4, Smcsn5, Smcsn6, Smcsn7 and Smcsn8 genes were up-regulated in adult worms compared to cercariae, and the expression levels were similar to that of in vitro cultivated schistosomula. Taken together, these results suggest that the CSN complex may be important during cercariae, schistosome and adult worm development and might explain, at least in part, the differences among UPSs during the parasite life cycle. PMID:23519425

  17. Conservation and developmental expression of ubiquitin isopeptidases in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Roberta Verciano; Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Oliveira, Victor Fernandes de; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Passos, Liana Konovaloff Jannotti; Borges, William de Castro; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Several genes related to the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway, including those coding for proteasome subunits and conjugation enzymes, are differentially expressed during the Schistosoma mansoni life cycle. Although deubiquitinating enzymes have been reported to be negative regulators of protein ubiquitination and shown to play an important role in Ub-dependent processes, little is known about their role in S. mansoni . In this study, we analysed the Ub carboxyl-terminal hydrolase (UCHs) proteins found in the database of the parasite's genome. An in silico ana- lysis (GeneDB and MEROPS) identified three different UCH family members in the genome, Sm UCH-L3, Sm UCH-L5 and Sm BAP-1 and a phylogenetic analysis confirmed the evolutionary conservation of the proteins. We performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and observed a differential expression profile for all of the investigated transcripts between the cercariae and adult worm stages. These results were corroborated by low rates of Z-Arg-Leu-Arg-Gly-Gly-AMC hydrolysis in a crude extract obtained from cercariae in parallel with high Ub conjugate levels in the same extracts. We suggest that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the cercaria and early schistosomulum stages is related to a decrease in 26S proteasome activity. Taken together, our data suggest that UCH family members contribute to regulating the activity of the Ub-proteasome system during the life cycle of this parasite. PMID:24271000

  18. Preliminary analysis of miRNA pathway in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Matheus S; Cabral, Fernanda J; Jannotti-Passos, Liana K; Carvalho, Omar; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Baba, Elio H; Sá, Renata G

    2009-03-01

    RNA silencing refers to a series of nuclear and cytoplasmatic processes involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression or post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), either by sequence-specific mRNA degradation or by translational arrest. The best characterized small RNAs are microRNAs (miRNAs), which predominantly perform gene silencing through post-transcriptional mechanisms. In this work we used bioinformatic approaches to identify the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni sequences that are similar to enzymes involved in the post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by miRNA pathway. We used amino acid sequences of well-known proteins involved in the miRNA pathway against S. mansoni genome and transcriptome databases identifying a total of 13 putative proteins in the parasite. In addition, the transcript levels of SmDicer1 and SmAgo2/3/4 were identified by qRT-PCR using cercariae, adult worms, eggs and in vitro cultivated schistosomula. Our results showed that the SmDicer1 and SmAgo2/3/4 are differentially expressed during schistosomula development, suggesting that the miRNA pathway is regulated at the transcript level and therefore may control gene expression during the life cycle of S. mansoni.

  19. Mannosyl transferase activity in homogenates of adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Rumjanek, F D; Smithers, S R

    1978-08-01

    Homogenates of adult Schistosoma mansoni contain enzymes which are capable of transferring [14C]mannose from GDP[U-14C]mannose to a lipid acceptor which migrates as a single peak on a silica gel thin-layer plate. This lipid may belong to the class of polyprenol monophosphates which are intermediate elements in the glycosylation of nascent proteins. The schistosome mannosyl transferase activity is associated with membranous particles and is dependent on the presence of Mn2+. However, other divalent metals such as Mg2+ or Ca2+ can, in decreasing order of efficiency, replace Mn2+. When UDP[U-14C]glucose was incubated with the homogenates in the same conditions, relatively little label was transferred to the lipid acceptor. Live worms incubated in a medium containing GDP[U-14C]mannose seem to incorporate the label preferentially on the tegument and on adjacent subtegumental structures. By adding foetal calf serum to the medium, incorporation of the label can be stimulated.

  20. The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Berriman, Matthew; Haas, Brian J.; LoVerde, Philip T.; Wilson, R. Alan; Dillon, Gary P.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Andrade, Luiza F.; Ashton, Peter D.; Aslett, Martin A.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.; Blandin, Gaelle; Caffrey, Conor R.; Coghlan, Avril; Coulson, Richard; Day, Tim A.; Delcher, Art; DeMarco, Ricardo; Djikeng, Appoliniare; Eyre, Tina; Gamble, John A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Gu, Yong; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hirai, Hirohisha; Hirai, Yuriko; Houston, Robin; Ivens, Alasdair; Johnston, David A.; Lacerda, Daniela; Macedo, Camila D.; McVeigh, Paul; Ning, Zemin; Oliveira, Guilherme; Overington, John P.; Parkhill, Julian; Pertea, Mihaela; Pierce, Raymond J.; Protasio, Anna V.; Quail, Michael A.; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle; Rogers, Jane; Sajid, Mohammed; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stanke, Mario; Tivey, Adrian R.; White, Owen; Williams, David L.; Wortman, Jennifer; Wu, Wenjie; Zamanian, Mostafa; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Barrell, Barclay G.; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2009-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. We report here analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and novel families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternate splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, while the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases, provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and novel targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints while a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease. PMID:19606141

  1. Ultra-low-cost urine filtration for Schistosoma haematobium diagnosis: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Ephraim, Richard K D; Duah, Evans; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2014-09-01

    Simple, efficient, and cost-effective strategies are needed for urine sample preparation in the field diagnosis of infection with Schistosoma haematobium. In this proof-of-concept study, we evaluated inexpensive and widely available paper products (paper towels, school workbook paper, and newspaper) to gravity-filter urine containing 60 eggs/mL of Schistosoma haematobium. Eggs were reliably visualized by light microscopy by using single-ply paper towels as urine filters. This filtration method has broad applicability in clinical and public health settings in resource-constrained environments.

  2. Ultra-low-cost urine filtration for Schistosoma haematobium diagnosis: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Ephraim, Richard K D; Duah, Evans; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2014-09-01

    Simple, efficient, and cost-effective strategies are needed for urine sample preparation in the field diagnosis of infection with Schistosoma haematobium. In this proof-of-concept study, we evaluated inexpensive and widely available paper products (paper towels, school workbook paper, and newspaper) to gravity-filter urine containing 60 eggs/mL of Schistosoma haematobium. Eggs were reliably visualized by light microscopy by using single-ply paper towels as urine filters. This filtration method has broad applicability in clinical and public health settings in resource-constrained environments. PMID:24980496

  3. Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum enhances the organic and fatty acids content of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís R; Pereira, Maria J; Azevedo, Jessica; Mulas, Rebeca; Velazquez, Encarna; González-Andrés, Fernando; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-15

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is one of the most important food crops for human and animal consumption, providing oil and protein at relatively low cost. The least expensive source of nitrogen for soybean is the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by the symbiotic association with soil bacteria, belonging mainly to the genus Bradyrhizobium. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the inoculation of G. max with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on the metabolite profile and antioxidant potential of its seeds. Phenolic compounds, sterols, triterpenes, organic acids, fatty acids and volatiles profiles were characterised by different chromatographic techniques. The antioxidant activity was evaluated against DPPH, superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Inoculation with B. japonicum induced changes in the profiles of primary and secondary metabolites of G. max seeds, without affecting their antioxidant capacity. The increase of organic and fatty acids and volatiles suggest a positive effect of the inoculation process. These findings indicate that the inoculation with nodulating B. japonicum is a beneficial agricultural practice, increasing the content of bioactive metabolites in G. max seeds owing to the establishment of symbiosis between plant and microorganism, with direct effects on seed quality.

  4. Practical Application of Methanol-Mediated Mutualistic Symbiosis between Methylobacterium Species and a Roof Greening Moss, Racomitrium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Takai, Yuichiro; Suzukawa, Ikko; Akita, Motomu; Murase, Haruhiko; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    Bryophytes, or mosses, are considered the most maintenance-free materials for roof greening. Racomitrium species are most often used due to their high tolerance to desiccation. Because they grow slowly, a technology for forcing their growth is desired. We succeeded in the efficient production of R. japonicum in liquid culture. The structure of the microbial community is crucial to stabilize the culture. A culture-independent technique revealed that the cultures contain methylotrophic bacteria. Using yeast cells that fluoresce in the presence of methanol, methanol emission from the moss was confirmed, suggesting that it is an important carbon and energy source for the bacteria. We isolated Methylobacterium species from the liquid culture and studied their characteristics. The isolates were able to strongly promote the growth of some mosses including R. japonicum and seed plants, but the plant-microbe combination was important, since growth promotion was not uniform across species. One of the isolates, strain 22A, was cultivated with R. japonicum in liquid culture and in a field experiment, resulting in strong growth promotion. Mutualistic symbiosis can thus be utilized for industrial moss production. PMID:22479445

  5. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  6. Variation in the Frequency and Extent of Hybridization between Leucosceptrum japonicum and L. stellipilum (Lamiaceae) in the Central Japanese Mainland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Maki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the frequency and extent of hybridization among mixed populations located in the same contact zone provide natural laboratories for the study of extrinsic reproductive isolation maintaining species integrity. In this study, we examined the pattern of hybridization between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum among mixed populations in different localities of a contact zone. The genetic structures from three sympatric populations and six mixed populations in the hybrid zone, and five reference populations far from the contact zone, were characterized using 10 neutral nuclear microsatellite markers. Evidence from genetic distance-based clustering analysis, the frequency distribution of admixture proportion values, and the hybrid category assignment approaches indicated that the frequency and extent of hybridization varied considerably among populations in the contact zone between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. One likely explanation is that variation in exogenous (ecological) selection among populations might contribute to differences in frequency and extent of hybridization. The present study will facilitate future research exploring the evolution of reproductive isolation between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. PMID:25738505

  7. Central nervous system of Chaetoderma japonicum (Caudofoveata, Aplacophora): implications for diversified ganglionic plans in early molluscan evolution.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Sasaki, Takenori; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The organization of the central nervous system of an "aplacophoran" mollusc, Chaetoderma japonicum, is described as a means to understand a primitive condition in highly diversified molluscan animals. This histological and immunocytochemical study revealed that C. japonicum still retains a conservative molluscan tetra-neural plan similar to those of neomenioids, polyplacophorans, and tryblidiids. However, the ventral and lateral nerve cords of C. japonicum are obviously ganglionated to various degrees, and the cerebral cord-like ganglia display a lobular structure. The putative chemosensory networks are developed, being composed of sensory cells of the oral shield, eight precerebral ganglia, and eight neuropil compartments that form distinct masses of neurites. In the cerebral cord-like ganglia, three anterior, posterior, and dorsal lobes are distinguished with well-fasciculated tracts in their neuropils. Most neuronal somata are uniform in size, and no small globuli-like cell clusters are found; however, localized serotonin-like immunoreactivity and acetylated tubulin-containing tracts suggest the presence of functional subdivisions. These complicated morphological features may be adaptive structures related to the specialized foraminiferan food in muddy bottoms. Based on a comparative scheme in basal molluscan groups, we characterize an independent evolutionary process for the unique characters of the central nervous systems of chaetoderms.

  8. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  9. Variation in the frequency and extent of hybridization between Leucosceptrum japonicum and L. stellipilum (Lamiaceae) in the Central Japanese Mainland.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Maki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the frequency and extent of hybridization among mixed populations located in the same contact zone provide natural laboratories for the study of extrinsic reproductive isolation maintaining species integrity. In this study, we examined the pattern of hybridization between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum among mixed populations in different localities of a contact zone. The genetic structures from three sympatric populations and six mixed populations in the hybrid zone, and five reference populations far from the contact zone, were characterized using 10 neutral nuclear microsatellite markers. Evidence from genetic distance-based clustering analysis, the frequency distribution of admixture proportion values, and the hybrid category assignment approaches indicated that the frequency and extent of hybridization varied considerably among populations in the contact zone between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. One likely explanation is that variation in exogenous (ecological) selection among populations might contribute to differences in frequency and extent of hybridization. The present study will facilitate future research exploring the evolution of reproductive isolation between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. PMID:25738505

  10. Photosensory transduction in ciliates. IV. Modulation of the photomovement response of Blepharisma japonicum by cGMP.

    PubMed

    Fabczak, H; Tao, N; Fabczak, S; Song, P S

    1993-05-01

    The effect of various modulators of cytoplasmic guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) level on the step-up photophobic responses in Blepharisma japonicum has been investigated to clarify the possible role of cGMP in the mechanism of photosensory signal transduction. Membrane-permeable analogs of cGMP, 8-bromo-guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or dibutyryl cGMP, caused a marked dose-dependent prolongation of the latency for the photophobic response, resulting in inhibition of the photophobic response in Blepharisma japonicum. A similar effect was observed when cells were treated with 3'-isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and pertussis toxin, a G-protein activity modulator. The G-protein activator, fluoroaluminate, and 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY 83583), an agent which effectively lowers the cytoplasmic cGMP level, significantly enhanced the photoresponsiveness of these ciliates to visible light stimuli. These results suggest that cellular cGMP serves as a signal modulator in the photophobic response of Blepharisma japonicum.

  11. Mixed chimerism to induce tolerance for solid organ transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wren, S.M.; Nalesnik, M.; Hronakes, M.L.; Oh, E.; Ildstad, S.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Chimerism, or the coexistence of tissue elements from more than one genetically different strain or species in an organism, is the only experimental state that results in the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Transplantation of a mixture of T-cell-depleted syngeneic (host-type) plus T-cell-depleted allogeneic (donor) bone marrow into a normal adult recipient mouse (A + B----A) results in mixed allogeneic chimerism. Recipient mice exhibit donor-specific transplantation tolerance, yet have full immunocompetence to recognize and respond to third-party transplantation antigens. After complete hematolymphopoietic repopulation at 28 days, animals accept a donor-specific skin graft but reject major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus-disparate third-party grafts. We now report that permanent graft acceptance can also be achieved when the graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, grafts were viable and had only minimal inflammatory changes. This model may have potential future clinical application for the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance.

  12. A protective chimeric antibody to tick-borne encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Baykov, Ivan K; Matveev, Andrey L; Stronin, Oleg V; Ryzhikov, Alexander B; Matveev, Leonid E; Kasakin, Marat F; Richter, Vladimir A; Tikunova, Nina V

    2014-06-17

    The efficiency of several mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) glycoprotein E in post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed, and mAb14D5 was shown to be the most active of all those studied. It was proven that the hybridoma cell line 14D5 produced one immunoglobulin H chain and two L chains. They were used to construct chimeric antibodies ch14D5a and ch14D5b, the affinity constants of which were 2.6 × 10(10)M(-1) and 1.0 × 10(7)M(-1), respectively, according to the SPR-based ProteOn biosensor assay. The neutralization index (IC50) of ch14D5a was 0.04 μg/ml in the focus reduction neutralization test. In in vivo experiments, ch14D5a at a dose of 10 μg/mouse resulted in a 100% survival of the mice infected with 240 LD50 of TBEV. This chimeric antibody is promising for further development of prevention and therapeutic drugs against TBEV. PMID:24837772

  13. Donor Chimerism Early after Reduced-intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Predicts Relapse and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L.; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill-defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T-cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM). 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid; 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18-74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched) and median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6-120.7) were evaluated. In multivariable analysis total donor cell and T-cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism <90% was associated with increased relapse (HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.83-3.51, p<0.0001), impaired PFS (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.53-2.65, p<0.0001) and worse OS (1.50, 95% CI 1.11-2.04, p=0.009), but not NRM (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.44-2.27, p=0.33). There was no additional utility of incorporating sustained D30-D100 total donor cell chimerism, or T-cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts that may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. PMID:24907627

  14. Small Open Reading Frames, Non-Coding RNAs and Repetitive Elements in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Julia; Tsoy, Olga V.; Thalmann, Sebastian; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Small open reading frames (sORFs) and genes for non-coding RNAs are poorly investigated components of most genomes. Our analysis of 1391 ORFs recently annotated in the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 revealed that 78% of them contain less than 80 codons. Twenty-one of these sORFs are conserved in or outside Alphaproteobacteria and most of them are similar to genes found in transposable elements, in line with their broad distribution. Stabilizing selection was demonstrated for sORFs with proteomic evidence and bll1319_ISGA which is conserved at the nucleotide level in 16 alphaproteobacterial species, 79 species from other taxa and 49 other Proteobacteria. Further we used Northern blot hybridization to validate ten small RNAs (BjsR1 to BjsR10) belonging to new RNA families. We found that BjsR1 and BjsR3 have homologs outside the genus Bradyrhizobium, and BjsR5, BjsR6, BjsR7, and BjsR10 have up to four imperfect copies in Bradyrhizobium genomes. BjsR8, BjsR9, and BjsR10 are present exclusively in nodules, while the other sRNAs are also expressed in liquid cultures. We also found that the level of BjsR4 decreases after exposure to tellurite and iron, and this down-regulation contributes to survival under high iron conditions. Analysis of additional small RNAs overlapping with 3’-UTRs revealed two new repetitive elements named Br-REP1 and Br-REP2. These REP elements may play roles in the genomic plasticity and gene regulation and could be useful for strain identification by PCR-fingerprinting. Furthermore, we studied two potential toxin genes in the symbiotic island and confirmed toxicity of the yhaV homolog bll1687 but not of the newly annotated higB homolog blr0229_ISGA in E. coli. Finally, we revealed transcription interference resulting in an antisense RNA complementary to blr1853, a gene induced in symbiosis. The presented results expand our knowledge on sORFs, non-coding RNAs and repetitive elements in B. japonicum and related bacteria. PMID

  15. Primary photoprocesses involved in the sensory protein for the photophobic response of Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Brazard, Johanna; Ley, Christian; Lacombat, Fabien; Plaza, Pascal; Martin, Monique M; Checcucci, Giovanni; Lenci, Francesco

    2008-11-27

    We present new femtosecond transient-absorption and picosecond fluorescence experiments performed on OBIP, the oxyblepharismin-binding protein believed to trigger the photophobic response of the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum. The formerly identified heterogeneity of the sample is confirmed and rationalized in terms of two independent populations, called rOBIP and nrOBIP. The rOBIP population undergoes a fast photocycle restoring the initial ground state in less than 500 ps. Intermolecular electron transfer followed by electron recombination is identified as the excited-state decay route. The experimental results support the coexistence of the oxyblepharismin (OxyBP) radical cation signature with a stimulated-emission signal at all times of the evolution of the transient-absorption spectra. This observation is interpreted by an equilibrium being reached between the locally excited state and a charge-transfer state on the ground of a theory developed by Mataga and co-workers to explain the fluorescence quenching of aromatic hydrogen-bonded donor-acceptor pairs in nonpolar solvents. OxyBP is supposed to bind to an as yet unknown electron acceptor by a hydrogen-bond (HB) and the coordinate along which forward and backward electron transfer proceed is assumed to be the shift of the HB proton. The observed kinetic isotope effect supports this interpretation. Protein relaxation is finally proposed to accompany the whole process and give rise to the highly multiexponential observed dynamics. As previously reported, the fast photocycle of rOBIP can be interpreted as an efficient sunscreen mechanism that protects Blepharisma japonicum from continuous irradiation. The nrOBIP population, the transient-absorption of which strongly reminds that of free OxyBP in solution, might be proposed to actually trigger the photophobic response of the organism through excited-state deprotonation of the chromophore occurring in the nanosecond regime. Additional femtosecond transient

  16. Epidemiological studies on Schistosoma bovis in Iringa Region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kassuku, A; Christensen, N O; Monrad, J; Nansen, P; Knudsen, J

    1986-06-01

    Various aspects of the epidemiology of Schistosoma bovis were studied over a one-year period in Iringa Region, Tanzania. An abattoir survey revealed an overall prevalence rate of 30.8% in cattle and 3.8% in goats in the area, and field studies on two dairy farms both providing good opportunities for schistosome transmission provided information concerning the transmission ecology of S. bovis in relation to different types of grazing and water supply. The traditional management system on one farm with a large number of cattle utilizing a limited water resource highly suitable for sustaining populations of the snail host Bulinus africanus resulted in intensive transmission as evidenced by uptake of massive infections in calves and development of resistance to S. bovis challenge in dairy cows. On another farm, appropriate management comprising watering of cattle at a B. africanus-free pond provided the background for less intensive transmission in that transmission risk was confined to occasional contact with water contact sites of secondary importance. Besides, the transmission pattern as regards intensity and seasonality was affected markedly by the geographical and seasonal distribution of the host snail B. africanus. Thus, transmission in canals and temporary ponds was limited mainly to the dry season and the end of the rainy season, respectively, while transmission in permanent ponds occurred intermittently throughout at least most of the year. It is concluded that prevention of severe loss of productivity in domestic ruminants due to schistosome infections should be possible using strategic management procedures provided that essential information is available concerning the pattern of transmission in the particular area. PMID:2874712

  17. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  18. The proteome of the insoluble Schistosoma mansoni eggshell skeleton.

    PubMed

    Dewalick, Saskia; Bexkens, Michiel L; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wu, Ya-Ping; Smit, Cornelis H; Hokke, Cornelis H; de Groot, Philip G; Heck, Albert J R; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2011-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, the majority of symptoms of the disease is caused by the eggs that are trapped in the liver. These eggs elicit an immune reaction that leads to the formation of granulomas. The eggshell, which is a rigid insoluble structure built from cross-linked proteins, is the site of direct interaction between the egg and the immune system. However, the exact protein composition of the insoluble eggshell was previously unknown. To identify the proteins of the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni we performed LC-MS/MS analysis, immunostaining and amino acid analysis on eggshell fragments. For this, eggshell protein skeleton was prepared by thoroughly cleaning eggshells in a four-step stripping procedure of increasing strength including urea and SDS to remove all material that is not covalently linked to the eggshell itself, but is part of the inside of the egg, such as Reynold's layer, von Lichtenberg's envelope and the miracidium. We identified 45 proteins of which the majority are non-structural proteins and non-specific for eggs, but are house-keeping proteins that are present in large quantities in worms and miracidia. Some of these proteins are known to be immunogenic, such as HSP70, GST and enolase. In addition, a number of schistosome-specific proteins with unknown function and no homology to any known annotated protein were found to be incorporated in the eggshell. Schistosome-specific glycoconjugates were also shown to be present on the eggshell protein skeleton. This study also confirmed that the putative eggshell protein p14 contributes largely to the eggshell. Together, these results give new insights into eggshell composition as well as eggshell formation. Those proteins that are present at the site and time of eggshell formation are incorporated in the cross-linked eggshell and this cross-linking does no longer occur when the miracidium starts secreting proteins. PMID:21236260

  19. Natural infection of wild rodents by Schistosoma mansoni. Parasitological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues e Silva, R; Machado e Silva, J R; Faerstein, N F; Lenzi, H L; Rey, L

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of the role of rodents as natural hosts of Schistosoma mansoni was studied at the Pamparrão Valley, Sumidouro, RJ, with monthly captures and examination of the animals. Twenty-three Nectomys squamipes and 9 Akodon arviculoides with a schistosomal infection rate of 56.5% and 22.2% respectively eliminated a great majority of viable eggs. With a strain isolated from one of the naturally infected N. squamipes, we infected 75% of simpatric Biomphalaria glabrata and in 100% of albino Mus musculus mice. The adult worms, isolated from N. squamipes after perfusion were located mainly in the liver (91.5%) and the mesenteric veins (8.5%). The male/female proportion was of 2:1. The eggs were distributed on small intestine segments (proximal, medial and distal portions) and the large intestine without any significant differences in egg concentration of these segments. In A. arviculoides, the few eggs eliminated by the stools were viable and there was little egg retention on intestinal segments. Considering the ease to complete S. mansoni biological cycle in the Nectomys/Biomphalaria/Nectomys system under laboratory conditions, probably the same is likely to occur in natural conditions. In support to this hypothesis there are also the facts that human mansonic schistosomiasis has a very low prevalence in Sumidouro and endemicity among the rodents has not changed even after repeated treatments of the local patients. Based on our experiments, we conclude that N. squamipes has become a natural host of S. mansoni and possibly may participate in keeping the cycle of schistosomiasis transmission at Pamparrão Valley. PMID:1343794

  20. Characterization of the phytochelatin synthase of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ray, Debalina; Williams, David L

    2011-05-01

    Treatment for schistosomiasis, which is responsible for more than 280,000 deaths annually, depends exclusively on the use of praziquantel. Millions of people are treated annually with praziquantel and drug resistant parasites are likely to evolve. In order to identify novel drug targets the Schistosoma mansoni sequence databases were queried for proteins involved in glutathione metabolism. One potential target identified was phytochelatin synthase (PCS). Phytochelatins are oligopeptides synthesized enzymatically from glutathione by PCS that sequester toxic heavy metals in many organisms. However, humans do not have a PCS gene and do not synthesize phytochelatins. In this study we have characterized the PCS of S. mansoni (SmPCS). The conserved catalytic triad of cysteine-histidine-aspartate found in PCS proteins and cysteine proteases is also found in SmPCS, as are several cysteine residues thought to be involved in heavy metal binding and enzyme activation. The SmPCS open reading frame is considerably extended at both the N- and C-termini compared to PCS from other organisms. Multiple PCS transcripts are produced from the single encoded gene by alternative splicing, resulting in both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic protein variants. Expression of SmPCS in yeast increased cadmium tolerance from less than 50 µM to more than 1,000 µM. We confirmed the function of SmPCS by identifying PCs in yeast cell extracts using HPLC-mass spectrometry. SmPCS was found to be expressed in all mammalian stages of worm development investigated. Increases in SmPCS expression were seen in ex vivo worms cultured in the presence of iron, copper, cadmium, or zinc. Collectively, these results indicate that SmPCS plays an important role in schistosome response to heavy metals and that PCS is a potential drug target for schistosomiasis treatment. This is the first characterization of a PCS from a parasitic organism. PMID:21629724

  1. Cross-reactivity of Schistosoma mansoni-Fasciola gigantica influenced by saponins.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, Amany Sayed; Shaker, Kamel H; Gaber, Hanaa M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola gigantica cross-reactivity between adult worms and egg homogenates of the parasites. Immunoprophylactic effects of crude Schistosoma mansoni worms and egg antigens mixed with or without saponins extracted from Atriplex nummularia were studied followed by challenge with 80 cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Our results showed that post 1st immunization with schistosome egg antigens (SEA) there was a significant change (P approximately 0.05) in the IgM levels against Fasciola egg homogenate (FgEH) without saponins. Post 2nd immunization with SEA mixed with saponins the levels of IgM increased significantly (P approximately 0.05) against Fasciola worm homogenate (FgWH) as compared with a non-immunized group. Post 2nd immunization the level of IgG was significantly elevated (P approximately 0.05) by SEA mixed with saponins against FgWH. Post 2nd immunizations with SEA mixed with saponins showed a significant change (P approximately 0.05) in IgG levels against FgEH. These results clearly demonstrated that there is a cross-reactivity between Schistosoma mansoni eggs and Fasciola gigantica worms and eggs. Saponins were found to be immunostimulatory adjuvants in our study. PMID:19526726

  2. The continued introduction of intermediate host snails to Schistosoma mansoni into Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, David S.; Mulvey, Margaret; Yipp, May W.

    1985-01-01

    The South American planorbid snail Biomphalaria straminea, an intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, was first introduced into Hong Kong with tropical aquarium plants or fish around 1970. Genetic data indicate that a second introduction occurred in 1981-82. PMID:3930083

  3. Screening for Schistosoma mansoni and Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Among Brazilian Immigrants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Alison B.; McCormick, Danny; Cohen, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of schistosomiasis and strongyloidiasis among Brazilian immigrants in the United States is unknown. We performed a retrospective chart review of serologic screening of asymptomatic Brazilian immigrants during routine physicals. Of 208 eligible patients, 189 were screened: 27.7% (n = 52) had elevated Schistosoma antibodies and 5.8% (n = 11) had elevated Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies. PMID:26034754

  4. Immunization of baboons with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Dean, D.A.; Hall, J.E.

    1981-06-26

    Studies on the efficacy of a vaccine against schistosomiasis in young baboons (Papio anubis) disclosed that immunization with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation induced significant protection against subsequent infection with normal, viable S. mansoni cercariae. Such immunization resulted in reduced worm burdens (70%) and egg excretion rates (82%). These results support immunization as a potential method for schistosomiasis control.

  5. Immunization of Baboons with Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M.; Minard, P.; Dean, D.A.; Hall, J.E.

    1981-06-01

    Studies on the efficacy of a vaccine against schistosomiasis in young baboons (Papio anubis) disclosed that immunization with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation induced significant protection against subsequent infection with normal, viable S. mansoni cercariae. Such immunization resulted in reduced worm burdens (70 percent) and egg excretion rates (82 percent). These results support immunization as a potential method for schistosomiasis control.

  6. Myeloradicular Form of Neuroschistosomiasis in a Six-Year-Old Boy Infected With Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Salgado, João Victor; Salgado, Izabel Athayde da Silva Cruz; Braga Júnior, Leônidas Lopes; Serra, Silane Calland Marques; Barros, Verbena Maria de Carvalho; Silva, Maria José Alves; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2015-12-01

    Neuroschistosomiasis is a severe disease caused by the presence of Schistosoma eggs and/or adult worms in the central nervous system. Schistosomal transverse myelitis represents a rare clinical form with nonspecific clinical findings, and it is thus underdiagnosed, especially in children. In this report, we describe a 6-year-old patient with the myeloradicular form of neuroschistosomiasis. PMID:26780026

  7. A technical application of quantitative next generation sequencing for chimerism evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Aloisio, Michelangelo; Licastro, Danilo; Caenazzo, Luciana; Torboli, Valentina; D'eustacchio, Angela; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Athanasakis, Emmanouil

    2016-01-01

    At present, the most common genetic diagnostic method for chimerism evaluation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is microsatellite analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The main objective was to establish, through repeated analysis over time, if a complete chimerism was present, or if the mixed chimerism was stable, increasing or decreasing over time. Considering the recent introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical diagnostics, a detailed study evaluating an NGS protocol was conducted, coupled with a custom bioinformatics pipeline, for chimerism quantification. Based on the technology of Ion AmpliSeq, a 44-amplicon custom chimerism panel was designed, and a custom bioinformatics pipeline dedicated to the genotyping and quantification of NGS data was coded. The custom chimerism panel allowed identification of an average of 16 informative recipient alleles. The limit of detection of the protocol was fixed at 1% due to the NGS background (<1%). The protocol followed the standard Ion AmpliSeq library preparation and Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine guidelines. Overall, the present study added to the scientific literature, identifying novel technical details for a possible future application of NGS for chimerism quantification. PMID:27499173

  8. Characterization of hemopoietic stem cell chimerism in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Francescutti, L.H.; Gambel, P.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-07-01

    The authors have previously described a model for bone marrow transplantation that involves preparation of the host with monoclonal antibody against class I or class II antigens instead of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. This allows engraftment and subsequent repopulation of the host by donor tissue. They have previously reported on chimerism in the peripheral blood of P1----(P1 X P2)F1 animals. In this report, the authors describe the examination of the bone marrow and spleen stem cell chimerism of these antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras, by determining, with an isozyme assay, the phenotype of methylcellulose colonies grown from stem cells. They have found a correlation between peripheral blood chimerism and the stem cell constitution of both spleen and bone marrow. The peripheral blood chimerism also correlates with the level of chimerism in macrophages derived from peritoneal exudate cells. These findings indicate that assaying the peripheral blood of such chimeras provides an excellent indication of the degree of chimerism at the stem cell level and stands in sharp contrast to the level of chimerism in certain lymphoid compartments.

  9. Increasing chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with longer survival time.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaowen; Alatrash, Gheath; Ning, Jing; Jakher, Haroon; Stafford, Patricia; Zope, Madhushree; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Jones, Roy B; Champlin, Richard E; Thall, Peter F; Andersson, Borje S

    2014-08-01

    Donor chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is commonly used to predict overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Because chimerism is observed at 1 or more times after allo-SCT and not at baseline, if chimerism is in fact associated with OS or DFS, then the occurrence of either disease progression or death informatively censors (terminates) the observed chimerism process. This violates the assumptions underlying standard statistical regression methods for survival analysis, which may lead to biased conclusions. To assess the association between the longitudinal post-allo-SCT donor chimerism process and OS or DFS, we analyzed data from 195 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 157) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 38) who achieved complete remission after allo-SCT following a reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen of fludarabine/intravenous busulfan. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 1.1 to 105 months). Fitted joint longitudinal-survival time models showed that a binary indicator of complete (100%) donor chimerism and increasing percent of donor T cells were significantly associated with longer OS, whereas decreasing percent of donor T cells was highly significantly associated with shorter OS. Our analyses illustrate the usefulness of modeling repeated post-allo-SCT chimerism measurements as individual longitudinal processes jointly with OS and DFS to estimate their relationships.

  10. A technical application of quantitative next generation sequencing for chimerism evaluation.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Michelangelo; Licastro, Danilo; Caenazzo, Luciana; Torboli, Valentina; D'Eustacchio, Angela; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Athanasakis, Emmanouil

    2016-10-01

    At present, the most common genetic diagnostic method for chimerism evaluation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is microsatellite analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The main objective was to establish, through repeated analysis over time, if a complete chimerism was present, or if the mixed chimerism was stable, increasing or decreasing over time. Considering the recent introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical diagnostics, a detailed study evaluating an NGS protocol was conducted, coupled with a custom bioinformatics pipeline, for chimerism quantification. Based on the technology of Ion AmpliSeq, a 44‑amplicon custom chimerism panel was designed, and a custom bioinformatics pipeline dedicated to the genotyping and quantification of NGS data was coded. The custom chimerism panel allowed identification of an average of 16 informative recipient alleles. The limit of detection of the protocol was fixed at 1% due to the NGS background (<1%). The protocol followed the standard Ion AmpliSeq library preparation and Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine guidelines. Overall, the present study added to the scientific literature, identifying novel technical details for a possible future application of NGS for chimerism quantification.

  11. A technical application of quantitative next generation sequencing for chimerism evaluation.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Michelangelo; Licastro, Danilo; Caenazzo, Luciana; Torboli, Valentina; D'Eustacchio, Angela; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Athanasakis, Emmanouil

    2016-10-01

    At present, the most common genetic diagnostic method for chimerism evaluation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is microsatellite analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The main objective was to establish, through repeated analysis over time, if a complete chimerism was present, or if the mixed chimerism was stable, increasing or decreasing over time. Considering the recent introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical diagnostics, a detailed study evaluating an NGS protocol was conducted, coupled with a custom bioinformatics pipeline, for chimerism quantification. Based on the technology of Ion AmpliSeq, a 44‑amplicon custom chimerism panel was designed, and a custom bioinformatics pipeline dedicated to the genotyping and quantification of NGS data was coded. The custom chimerism panel allowed identification of an average of 16 informative recipient alleles. The limit of detection of the protocol was fixed at 1% due to the NGS background (<1%). The protocol followed the standard Ion AmpliSeq library preparation and Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine guidelines. Overall, the present study added to the scientific literature, identifying novel technical details for a possible future application of NGS for chimerism quantification. PMID:27499173

  12. Feasibility study of preemptive withdrawal of immunosuppression based on chimerism testing in children undergoing myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horn, B; Soni, S; Khan, S; Petrovic, A; Breslin, N; Cowan, M; Pelle-Day, G; Cooperstein, E; Baxter-Lowe, L-A

    2009-03-01

    An increasing percentage of autologous cells (increasing chimerism) in the whole blood (WB) chimerism test following allogeneic transplant is related to a very high risk of relapse. Preemptive immunotherapy may decrease the risk of relapse in some patients. Our prospective multi-institutional study evaluated the feasibility of longitudinal chimerism testing in a central laboratory, compared WB, CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineage chimerism in patients with a variety of hematologic malignancies, and evaluated the feasibility of fast withdrawal of immunosuppression based on WB chimerism results. Centralized chimerism testing was feasible and showed low interassay variability. Increasing mixed chimerism (MC) in WB was not useful as a predictor of relapse in our study. The presence of full donor chimerism in WB, CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineages on all measurements was related to a significantly lower risk of relapse than the presence of MC in either subset (11 vs 71%, respectively; P=0.03). Increasing host chimerism in leukemia-specific lineage heralds relapse, but it was not detected early enough to allow immunotherapy. Further studies correlating lineage-specific chimerism and minimal residual disease are required. The goal of preemptive immunotherapy should be to achieve full donor chimerism in WB in CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineages.

  13. Digital PCR to assess hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Tanja; Böhme, Manja U; Kröger, Nicolaus; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a crucial method to evaluate donor-cell engraftment. Whereas sensitivity of classical approaches for chimerism monitoring is limited to ≥1%, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based techniques readily detect one patient cell in >1,000 donor cells, thus facilitating application of chimerism assessment as a surrogate for minimal residual disease. However, due to methodologic specificities, qPCR combines its high sensitivity with limited resolution power in the state of mixed chimerism (e.g., >10% patient cells). Our aim was to overcome this limitation by employing a further development of qPCR, namely digital PCR (dPCR), for chimerism analysis. For proof-of-principle, we established more than 10 dPCR assays detecting Indel polymorphisms or Y-chromosome sequences and tested them on artificial cell mixtures and patient samples. Employing artificial cell mixtures, we found that dPCR allows exact quantification of chimerism over several orders of magnitude. Digital PCR results proved to be highly reproducible (deviation <5%), particularly in the "difficult" range of mixed chimerism. Excellent performance of the new assays was confirmed by analysis of multiple retrospective blood samples from patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, in comparison with established qPCR (14 patients) and short-tandem repeat PCR (4 patients) techniques. Finally, dPCR is easy to perform, needs only small amounts of DNA for chimerism assessment (65 ng corresponds to a sensitivity of approximately 0.03%), and does not require the use of standard curves and replicate analysis. In conclusion, dPCR represents a very promising method for routine chimerism monitoring.

  14. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  15. Hypomelanosis of Ito: a manifestation of mosaicism or chimerism.

    PubMed Central

    Donnai, D; Read, A P; McKeown, C; Andrews, T

    1988-01-01

    We describe three patients with the cutaneous manifestations of hypomelanosis of Ito. Two, with unusual abnormalities of their toes, had a mixture of diploid and triploid cells in cultured skin fibroblasts. The published clinical descriptions of hypomelanosis of Ito and diploid-triploid mosaicism are reviewed. Chromosome heteromorphisms, HLA types, and DNA fingerprints were studied in an attempt to elucidate the origin of the disease in our patients. We conclude that hypomelanosis of Ito is a manifestation of a heterogeneous group of disorders, the common factor being the presence of two genetically different cell lines. It can result from chromosomal mosaicism or chimerism, from a postzygotic mutation, or from X inactivation. The risk of recurrence is negligible if the proband is a male; if the proband is female the risk is also low but an X linked mutation must be considered. Images PMID:3236362

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  18. The pharmacology of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    van der Stegen, Sjoukje J C; Hamieh, Mohamad; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) retarget and reprogramme T cells to augment their antitumour efficacy. The combined activating and co-stimulatory domains incorporated in these CARs critically determine the function, differentiation, metabolism and persistence of engineered T cells. CD19-targeted CARs that incorporate CD28 or 4-1BB signalling domains are the best known to date. Both have shown remarkable complete remission rates in patients with refractory B cell malignancies. Recent data indicate that CD28-based CARs direct a brisk proliferative response and boost effector functions, whereas 4-1BB-based CARs induce a more progressive T cell accumulation that may compensate for less immediate potency. These distinct kinetic features can be exploited to further develop CAR-based T cell therapies for a variety of cancers. A new field of immunopharmacology is emerging.

  19. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  20. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthro