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Sample records for school child intervention

  1. School Intervention for the Neuromuscularly Handicapped Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Colin D.; Porter, Patricia

    1983-01-01

    Difficulties encountered in school by 35 neuromuscularly handicapped children, (5 to 18 years old) were assessed, and methods of alleviating problems were developed. (SEW) Journal Availability: The C. V. Mosby Company, 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141.

  2. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  3. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  4. Effects of Parent and Child Pre-Intervention Characteristics on Child Skill Acquisition during a School Readiness Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Erin T. B.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    200 preschool children in Head Start (55% girls; 20% Hispanic, 25% African-American, 55% European American; M age = 4.80 years old) participated in a randomized-controlled trial of a home visiting intervention designed to promote their emergent literacy skills (the Research-based Developmentally Informed parent [REDI-P] program). This study explored concurrent changes in levels of parent support and child literacy skills that occurred over the course of the intervention, and examined the impact of pre-intervention parent support and child literacy skills as potential moderators of parent and child outcomes. Cross-lagged structural equation models and follow-up analyses indicated that intervention had the strongest impact on child literacy skills when parents were high on support at the pre-intervention assessment. Conversely, the REDI-Parent program promoted the greatest gains in parent support when parents entered the program with low levels. These findings suggest that families may benefit from home visit school readiness interventions in different ways: child skill acquisition may be greatest when parents are initially high in support, whereas parenting may improve most when parents are initially low in support. PMID:27279678

  5. CRISES INTERVENTION IN PRESCHOOL AND EARLY SCHOOL YEARS. THE SUMTER CHILD STUDY PROJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEWTON, M.R.; AND OTHERS

    GOALS WERE DEVELOPED TO BE CARRIED OUT OVER A 5-YEAR PERIOD. FIRST, CHILDREN WOULD BE EVALUATED IN THE SPRING, PRIOR TO SCHOOL ENTRY IN THE FALL, AND A PREDICTION OF THEIR ABILITY TO COPE WITH SCHOOL WOULD BE MADE. THE STAFF WOULD MAKE APPROPRIATE INTERVENTIONS DESIGNED TO HELP THE CHILD DURING THE EARLY SCHOOL YEARS, EFFECTIVENESS WOULD BE…

  6. Efficacy of a Latino mother-child communication intervention in elementary schools.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Diane B; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Children of Latino immigrants in the United States encounter ecological stressors that heighten their risk for depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and problems in school. Studies have shown that affirming parent-child communication is protective of child depressive symptoms and accompanying problems. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of an adapted mother-child communication intervention for Latino immigrant mothers and their fourth- to sixth-grade children delivered after school. The intervention, Family Communication ("Comunicación Familiar"), was delivered at children's elementary schools in six sessions lasting 2 hr each. Significant improvements were found in children's reports of problem-solving communication, with their mother and mothers' reports of reduced family conflict. Strengths of the intervention are improved mother-child communication, acquisition of communication skills that can transfer to relationships within the classroom, and a design that allows delivery by nurses or other professional members of the school support team.

  7. Efficacy of a Latino Mother–Child Communication Intervention in Elementary Schools

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Diane B.; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Children of Latino immigrants in the United States encounter ecological stressors that heighten their risk for depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and problems in school. Studies have shown that affirming parent–child communication is protective of child depressive symptoms and accompanying problems. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of an adapted mother–child communication intervention for Latino immigrant mothers and their fourth- to sixth-grade children delivered after school. The intervention, Family Communication (“Comunicación Familiar”), was delivered at children’s elementary schools in six sessions lasting 2 hr each. Significant improvements were found in children’s reports of problem-solving communication, with their mother and mothers’ reports of reduced family conflict. Strengths of the intervention are improved mother–child communication, acquisition of communication skills that can transfer to relationships within the classroom, and a design that allows delivery by nurses or other professional members of the school support team. PMID:24643757

  8. A Systematised Review of Primary School Whole Class Child Obesity Interventions: Effectiveness, Characteristics, and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Frank B.; Kilgore, Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. A systematised review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of school-based interventions that focus on changing dietary intake and physical activity levels to reduce childhood obesity. Methods. Multiple databases were searched for randomised and nonrandomised interventions from 2007 to 2016 in full-time elementary schools, which were delivered to the whole class, included dietary and physical activity components, involved both sexes, were written in English, and used body mass index (BMI) as an outcome. Results. The database search produced 8,866 titles from which 78 were deemed relevant and assessed for inclusion resulting in 15 studies meeting all inclusion criteria. From these 15 studies, 9 yielded a reduction or stabilisation in BMI or BMI z-score in the entire intervention group and/or subgroups. Programmes lasting between 6 and 12 months that involve multiple environmental, educational, and physical strategies appear to be most likely to result in BMI or BMI z-score improvement. Moderators most likely influencing an improvement in BMI included increased physical activity, decreased sugar sweetened beverages intake, and increased fruit intake. Conclusions. School-based interventions may be an effective means for child obesity prevention. The identification of consistent elements used in school-based interventions that have demonstrated effectiveness may aid in preventing child obesity. PMID:27668254

  9. School Psychology and School-Based Child and Family Interventions in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Wan Har; Lee, Boon Ooi; Tan, Soo Yin; Wong, Shyh Shin; Yeo, Lay See

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the range of primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions based on the Singapore Education Ministry-developed whole-school framework for pupil management and support. At the preventive level, a range of school-wide programmes are implemented to provide learning, emotional, and behavioural support for…

  10. School Psychology and School-Based Child and Family Interventions in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Wan Har; Lee, Boon Ooi; Tan, Soo Yin; Wong, Shyh Shin; Yeo, Lay See

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the range of primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions based on the Singapore Education Ministry-developed whole-school framework for pupil management and support. At the preventive level, a range of school-wide programmes are implemented to provide learning, emotional, and behavioural support for…

  11. The Role of the Elementary School Guidance Counselor in the Intervention/Prevention of Physical Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Karen

    This paper considers the role of the elementary school counselor in addressing the problem of physical child abuse from a family systems perspective. The body of the paper falls into three distinct sections: (1) the evolution of the definition of child abuse and neglect including a brief history of this phenomenon; (2) models of intervention, with…

  12. The Role of the Elementary School Guidance Counselor in the Intervention/Prevention of Physical Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Karen

    This paper considers the role of the elementary school counselor in addressing the problem of physical child abuse from a family systems perspective. The body of the paper falls into three distinct sections: (1) the evolution of the definition of child abuse and neglect including a brief history of this phenomenon; (2) models of intervention, with…

  13. Child and Adolescent Suicidal Behavior: School-Based Prevention, Assessment, and Intervention. Practical Intervention in the Schools Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting a crucial need, this book distills the best current knowledge on child and adolescent suicide prevention into comprehensive guidelines for school-based practitioners. The author draws on extensive research and clinical experience to provide best-practice recommendations for developing schoolwide prevention programs, conducting risk…

  14. Child and Adolescent Suicidal Behavior: School-Based Prevention, Assessment, and Intervention. Practical Intervention in the Schools Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting a crucial need, this book distills the best current knowledge on child and adolescent suicide prevention into comprehensive guidelines for school-based practitioners. The author draws on extensive research and clinical experience to provide best-practice recommendations for developing schoolwide prevention programs, conducting risk…

  15. Interventions to Improve Asthma Management of the School-Age Child.

    PubMed

    Friend, Mary; Morrison, Amber

    2015-06-01

    Improvement of medication adherence in the school-age child can lead to improvement in quality of life, decreased morbidity, and a potential decreased risk of deferred academic, social, and emotional development. The objective of this article is to review barriers to asthma medication adherence and identify evidence-based techniques that improve medication management of the asthmatic child 5 to 12 years of age. A literature review was performed and articles were obtained through database searches within Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and PubMed. Research indicates that barriers to the adherence of medication regimens required for asthmatic children include poor understanding of the medication regimen, substandard education on symptom recognition and environmental triggers, rejection of the diagnosis, and a lack of support or understanding within the community. Researched techniques aimed to improve medication management in 5- to 12-year-olds include: computer-based education; workshops for parents, teachers, and children; incorporation of asthma education into classroom lessons; use of case managers; the introduction of a nurse practitioner in the school to provide care, including medication prescriptions for the asthmatic child; and assessment and evaluation of environmental and emotional triggers in the home and school. Collaboration of current data may help lead to a successful interventional model that can improve asthma management in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Parent-Child Home Numeracy Intervention and the Mathematics Scores of First Grade Students in Urban Catholic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle-Lore, Millicent D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a parent-child home numeracy intervention on the mathematics scores of first grade students attending urban, Catholic schools. The participants included 60 parents (29 Black; 2 Asian; 1 Latino; 26 White; and 2 other) from two urban, Catholic schools. Parents, randomly assigned to the experimental group,…

  17. The School Counselors' Ideas on Features, Determinant and Intervention on Child Negligence and Abuse Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    It is sad to know that many of the child negligence and child abuse cases, which are being frequently encountered in the society today, still remains unknown. This perhaps is due to lack of information on the part of the administrators, school counselors and other related bodies in the management of such cases. In this study, 50 school counselors…

  18. School-Based Early Intervention and Later Child Maltreatment in the Chicago Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Robertson, Dylan L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the effects of participation in the Title I Child-Parent Centers on substantiated reports of child maltreatment for 1,408 children. Found that 913 preschool participants had significantly lower rates of court petitions of maltreatment by age 17 than 495 children who participated in alternative kindergarten interventions. Four- to…

  19. Effect of a School-Based Water Intervention on Child Body Mass Index and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Leardo, Michele; Aneja, Siddhartha; Elbel, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Decreasing the amount of caloric beverages consumed and simultaneously increasing water consumption is important to promoting child health and decreasing the prevalence of childhood obesity. To estimate the impact of water jets (electrically cooled, large clear jugs with a push lever for fast dispensing) on standardized body mass index, overweight, and obesity in elementary school and middle school students. Milk purchases were explored as a potential mechanism for weight outcomes. This quasi-experimental study used a school-level database of cafeteria equipment deliveries between the 2008-2009 and 2012-2013 and included a sample of 1227 New York, New York, public elementary schools and middle schools and the 1,065,562 students within those schools. Installation of water jets in schools. Individual body mass index (BMI) was calculated for all students in the sample using annual student-level height and weight measurements collected as part of New York's FITNESSGRAM initiative. Age- and sex-specific growth charts produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to categorize students as overweight and obese. The hypothesis that water jets would be associated with decreased standardized BMI, overweight, and obesity was tested using a difference-in-difference strategy, comparing outcomes for treated and nontreated students before and after the introduction of a water jet. This study included 1 065 562 students within New York City public elementary schools and middle schools. There was a significant effect of water jets on standardized BMI, such that the adoption of water jets was associated with a 0.025 (95% CI, -0.038 to -0.011) reduction of standardized BMI for boys and a 0.022 (95% CI, -0.035 to -0.008) reduction of standardized BMI for girls (P < .01). There was also a significant effect on being overweight. Water jets were associated with a 0.9 percentage point reduction (95% CI, 0.015-0.003) in the likelihood of being overweight for boys

  20. Child characteristics associated with outcome for children with autism in a school-based behavioral intervention.

    PubMed

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E; Kerns, Connor M; Xie, Ming; Marcus, Steven C; Mandell, David S

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the extent to which clinical and demographic characteristics predicted outcome for children with autism spectrum disorder. Participants included 152 students with autism spectrum disorder in 53 kindergarten-through-second-grade autism support classrooms in a large urban public school district. Associations between child characteristics (including age, language ability, autism severity, social skills, adaptive behavior, co-occurring psychological symptoms, and restrictive and repetitive behavior) and outcome, as measured by changes in cognitive ability following one academic year of an intervention standardized across the sample were evaluated using linear regression with random effects for classroom. While several scales and subscales had statistically significant bivariate associations with outcome, in adjusted analysis, only age and the presence of symptoms associated with social anxiety, such as social avoidance and social fearfulness, as measured through the Child Symptom Inventory-4, were associated with differences in outcome. The findings regarding the role of social anxiety are new and have important implications for treatment. Disentangling the construct of social anxiety to differentiate between social fearfulness and social motivation has important implications for shifting the focus of early treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder.

  1. Efficacy of a Latino Mother-Child Communication Intervention in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Diane B.; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Children of Latino immigrants in the United States encounter ecological stressors that heighten their risk for depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and problems in school. Studies have shown that affirming parent-child communication is protective of child depressive symptoms and accompanying problems. The purpose of this study was to…

  2. School-Based Interventions with Child and Adolescent Victims of Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Carol; Christenberry, Nola J.

    The harmful effects of sexual abuse on children are no longer debatable, yet adequate legal action and protective services often are not provided for child and adolescent victims. With the rate of confirmed child sexual abuse victims escalating to more than 350,000 cases per year, the role of schools in meeting the specific needs of these children…

  3. Efficacy of a Latino Mother-Child Communication Intervention in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Diane B.; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Children of Latino immigrants in the United States encounter ecological stressors that heighten their risk for depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and problems in school. Studies have shown that affirming parent-child communication is protective of child depressive symptoms and accompanying problems. The purpose of this study was to…

  4. Caring School Community[TM] (Formerly, the Child Development Project). What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Caring School Community[TM]" ("CSC") is a modified version of a program formerly known as the "Child Development Project." The program aims to promote core values, prosocial behavior, and a schoolwide feeling of community. The program consists of four elements originally developed for the "Child Development…

  5. Effect of a School-Based Water Intervention on Child Body Mass Index and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Leardo, Michele; Aneja, Siddhartha; Elbel, Brian

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Decreasing the amount of caloric beverages consumed and simultaneously increasing water consumption is important to promoting child health and decreasing the prevalence of childhood obesity. OBJECTIVE To estimate the impact of water jets (electrically cooled, large clear jugs with a push lever for fast dispensing) on standardized body mass index, overweight, and obesity in elementary school and middle school students. Milk purchases were explored as a potential mechanism for weight outcomes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This quasi-experimental study used a school-level database of cafeteria equipment deliveries between the 2008-2009 and 2012-2013 and included a sample of 1227 New York, New York, public elementary schools and middle schools and the 1 065 562 students within those schools. INTERVENTION Installation of water jets in schools. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Individual body mass index (BMI) was calculated for all students in the sample using annual student-level height and weight measurements collected as part of New York’s FITNESSGRAM initiative. Age- and sex-specific growth charts produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to categorize students as overweight and obese. The hypothesis that water jets would be associated with decreased standardized BMI, overweight, and obesity was tested using a difference-in-difference strategy, comparing outcomes for treated and nontreated students before and after the introduction of a water jet. RESULTS This study included 1 065 562 students within New York City public elementary schools and middle schools. There was a significant effect of water jets on standardized BMI, such that the adoption of water jets was associated with a 0.025 (95% CI, −0.038 to −0.011) reduction of standardized BMI for boys and a 0.022 (95% CI, −0.035 to −0.008) reduction of standardized BMI for girls (P < .01). There was also a significant effect on being overweight. Water jets were

  6. Challenges to obtaining parental permission for child participation in a school-based waterpipe tobacco smoking prevention intervention in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Nakkash, Rima T; Al Mulla, Ahmad; Torossian, Lena; Karhily, Roubina; Shuayb, Lama; Mahfoud, Ziyad R; Janahi, Ibrahim; Al Ansari, Al Anoud; Afifi, Rema A

    2014-09-30

    Involving children in research studies requires obtaining parental permission. A school-based intervention to delay/prevent waterpipe use for 7th and 8th graders in Qatar was developed, and parental permission requested. Fifty three percent (2308/4314) of the parents returned permission forms; of those 19.5% of the total (840/4314) granted permission. This paper describes the challenges to obtaining parental permission. No research to date has described such challenges in the Arab world. A random sample of 40 schools in Doha, Qatar was selected for inclusion in the original intervention. Permission forms were distributed to parents for approval of their child's participation. The permission forms requested that parents indicate their reasons for non-permission if they declined. These were categorized into themes. In order to understand reasons for non-permission, interviews with parents were conducted. Phone numbers of parents were requested from the school administration; 12 of the 40 schools (30%) agreed to provide the contact information. A random sample of 28 parents from 12 schools was interviewed to reach data saturation. Thematic analysis was used to analyze their responses. Reasons for non-permission documented in both the forms and interviews included: poor timing; lack of interest; the child not wanting to participate; and the child living in a smoke-free environment. Interviews provided information on important topics to include in the consent forms, parents' decision-making processes regarding their child's participation, and considerations for communicating with parents. Many parents also indicated that this was the first time they had been asked to give an informed consent for their child's participation in a study. Results indicate that more attention needs to be given to the informed parental consent process. Researchers should consider enhancing both the methods of communicating information as well the specific information provided. Before

  7. Caring School Community[TM] (Formerly, The Child Development Project). Revised. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Caring School Community"[TM] ("CSC") is a modified version of a program formerly known as the "Child Development Project" ("CDP"). The "CSC" program has been recently revised to eliminate some elements of the "CDP" that were shown in evaluation studies to be inconsistently or poorly…

  8. Exploring the longitudinal association between interventions to support the transition to secondary school and child anxiety.

    PubMed

    Neal, S; Rice, F; Ng-Knight, T; Riglin, L; Frederickson, N

    2016-07-01

    School transition at around 11-years of age can be anxiety-provoking for children, particularly those with special educational needs (SEN). The present study adopted a longitudinal design to consider how existing transition strategies, categorized into cognitive, behavioral or systemic approaches, were associated with post-transition anxiety amongst 532 typically developing children and 89 children with SEN. Multiple regression analysis indicated that amongst typically developing pupils, systemic interventions were associated with lower school anxiety but not generalized anxiety, when controlling for prior anxiety. Results for children with SEN differed significantly, as illustrated by a Group × Intervention type interaction. Specifically, systemic strategies were associated with lower school anxiety amongst typically developing children and higher school anxiety amongst children with SEN. These findings highlight strategies that schools may find useful in supporting typically developing children over the transition period, whilst suggesting that children with SEN might need a more personalized approach.

  9. School Counseling Prevention and Intervention for Child Witnesses of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.; Saponara, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Children who witness intimate partner violence (IPV) often suffer a range of physical, behavioral, emotional, and familial consequences (Holt, Buckley, & Whelan, 2008). School counselors may be in a key position to implement prevention programs around this issue, identify children who have witnessed IPV, and to engage in intervention efforts.…

  10. Systematic review of universal resilience interventions targeting child and adolescent mental health in the school setting: review protocol.

    PubMed

    Dray, Julia; Bowman, Jenny; Wolfenden, Luke; Campbell, Elizabeth; Freund, Megan; Hodder, Rebecca; Wiggers, John

    2015-12-29

    base for the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions and in doing so provide an opportunity to better inform the development of interventions to potentially prevent mental health problems in child and adolescent populations. PROSPERO CRD42015025908.

  11. Child disaster mental health interventions, part II

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L.; Newman, Elana; Varma, Vandana; Noffsinger, Mary A.; Shaw, Jon A.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on the timing of child disaster mental health intervention delivery, the settings for intervention delivery, the expertise of providers, and therapeutic approaches. Studies have been conducted on interventions delivered during all phases of disaster management from pre event through many months post event. Many interventions were administered in schools which offer access to large numbers of children. Providers included mental health professionals and school personnel. Studies described individual and group interventions, some with parent involvement. The next generation of interventions and studies should be based on an empirical analysis of a number of key areas. PMID:26295009

  12. [Apropos of preventive ophthalmologic interventions in the child population of compulsory school age. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    Cruciani, F; Mastromarino, A; Latini, M; Paganelli, G; Rocca, M; Fiore, F; Melino, G

    1993-05-01

    The results are reported of work carried out during the last five years by the Center of Social Ophthalmology, director Prof. G. Scuderi, which is part of the II Division of the Ophthalmologic Clinic of Rome University "La Sapienza" with the object of trying out together with territorial units a model of preventive intervention acting as a filter for specialized university facilities. In other words, already existing facilities and medical personnel were to be used and trained for specific methods and techniques. From 1985 through 1990, 787 children selected by ophthalmologic screening by school doctors among the compulsory school population of the RM 3 and 5 districts were seen and submitted to periodic checks. This cohort included children aged 5 to 14 without significant differences in sex distribution and with prevalence of the 8 to 10 year olds. Each subject was submitted to complete eye examination including refractometry and orthoptics, color vision, biomicroscopic and ophthalmoscopic examination. The principal findings show that about 36% of subjects examined have a natural vision of 11/10 while the high percentage of ametropia observed was mainly represented by astigmatism and hypermetropy, albeit of minor intensity. Strabismus was found in 2.79% and implied marked visual deficit that was often refractory to any type of treatment. In addition, the prevalence was determined of other abnormalities concerning eye motility, color vision and pathologies involving anterior segment and eyeground. In their conclusion, the authors stress the rarity of organic ocular pathology in children (mostly represented by inflammatory changes of the adnexes and conjunctiva) whereas amblyopia was one of the main causes of visual deficit in children. They stress the importance of early therapeutic intervention in order to allow complete visual rehabilitation. The results of the clinical model for prevention were excellent so that it can even be proposed for large scale

  13. Evaluation of a preventive intervention for child anxiety in two randomized attention-control school trials.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lynn D; Laye-Gindhu, Aviva; Liu, Yan; March, John S; Thordarson, Dana S; Garland, E Jane

    2011-05-01

    The present research examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) based intervention program, FRIENDS, for children from grades 4 to 6, using random assignment at the school-level and an attention-control design in two longitudinal studies. The first study targeted children with anxiety symptoms (N=191, mean age=10.1) as screened with self, parent, and teacher-reports; the second study took a universal approach with full classrooms of children participating (N=253, mean age=9.8). The results showed no intervention effect in both studies, with children's anxiety symptoms decreasing over time regardless of whether they were in the story-reading (attention control) or FRIENDS condition. The findings also indicated that girls reported a higher level of anxiety than boys and children in higher grades reported lower anxiety relative to younger children in both studies. In addition, similar patterns were found using a subgroup of children with high-anxiety symptoms from both studies.

  14. School Refuser Child Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroobant, Emma; Jones, Alison

    2006-01-01

    "School refuser" is an always-already negative child identity. The term is used to categorize children or adolescents who appear to dislike and fear school (or aspects of school) and persistently refuse to attend or attend very unwillingly. Given that school attendance is generally considered a necessary social good, regular and anxious…

  15. Child Centred Approach to Climate Change and Health Adaptation through Schools in Bangladesh: A Cluster Randomised Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Md Iqbal; Rahman, Md Bayzidur; Smith, Wayne; Lusha, Mirza Afreen Fatima; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. People are getting educated at different levels on how to deal with potential impacts. One such educational mode was the preparation of a school manual, for high school students on climate change and health protection endorsed by the National Curriculum and Textbook Board, which is based on a 2008 World Health Organization manual. The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of the manual in increasing the knowledge level of the school children about climate change and health adaptation. This cluster randomized intervention trial involved 60 schools throughout Bangladesh, with 3293 secondary school students participating. School upazilas (sub-districts) were randomised into intervention and control groups, and two schools from each upazila were randomly selected. All year seven students from both groups of schools sat for a pre-test of 30 short questions of binary response. A total of 1515 students from 30 intervention schools received the intervention through classroom training based on the school manual and 1778 students of the 30 control schools did not get the manual but a leaflet on climate change and health issues. Six months later, a post-intervention test of the same questionnaire used in the pre-test was performed at both intervention and control schools. The pre and post test scores were analysed along with the demographic data by using random effects model. None of the various school level and student level variables were significantly different between the control and intervention group. However, the intervention group had a 17.42% (95% CI: 14.45 to 20.38, P = <0.001) higher score in the post-test after adjusting for pre-test score and other covariates in a multi-level linear regression model. These results suggest that school-based intervention for climate change and health adaptation is effective for increasing the knowledge level of school children on this topic.

  16. Two Counseling Interventions to Reduce Teacher-Child Relationship Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Dee C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a study investigating the impact of two school counseling interventions, child-centered play therapy (CCPT) and teacher consultation, on teacher-child relationship stress. CCPT and teacher consultation were conducted with 93 (pre-kindergarten to fifth grade) elementary school students across three elementary schools deemed…

  17. Two Counseling Interventions to Reduce Teacher-Child Relationship Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Dee C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a study investigating the impact of two school counseling interventions, child-centered play therapy (CCPT) and teacher consultation, on teacher-child relationship stress. CCPT and teacher consultation were conducted with 93 (pre-kindergarten to fifth grade) elementary school students across three elementary schools deemed…

  18. Child Abuse Intervention: Prescriptive Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuchter, Arnold

    Written from a criminal justice perspective, the report on child abuse intervention provides a model system that emphasizes prompt medical treatment for the child and due process for both parents and children. The authors recommend that court action take the form of a civil proceeding whenever possible. Part I provides a framework for the…

  19. School Phobia: The Importance of Prompt Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnanly, Eileen

    1986-01-01

    The importance of prompt treatment of the school phobic child, and the need for good communication among those concerned, are addressed in this article. The manifestation of school phobia is described and intervention methods are reviewed. (Author/MT)

  20. Cluster randomised trial of a school-community child health promotion and obesity prevention intervention: findings from the evaluation of fun 'n healthy in Moreland!

    PubMed

    Waters, Elizabeth; Gibbs, Lisa; Tadic, Maryanne; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Magarey, Anthea; Okely, Anthony D; de Silva, Andrea; Armit, Christine; Green, Julie; O'Connor, Thea; Johnson, Britt; Swinburn, Boyd; Carpenter, Lauren; Moore, Graham; Littlecott, Hannah; Gold, Lisa

    2017-08-03

    Multi-level, longer-term obesity prevention interventions that focus on inequalities are scarce. Fun 'n healthy in Moreland! aimed to improve child adiposity, school policies and environments, parent engagement, health behaviours and child wellbeing. All children from primary schools in an inner urban, culturally diverse and economically disadvantaged area in Victoria, Australia were eligible for participation. The intervention, fun 'n healthy in Moreland!, used a Health Promoting Schools Framework and provided schools with evidence, school research data and part time support from a Community Development Worker to develop health promoting strategies. Comparison schools continued as normal. Participants were not blinded to intervention status. The primary outcome was change in adiposity. Repeated cross-sectional design with nested longitudinal subsample. Students from twenty-four primary schools (clusters) were randomised (aged 5-12 years at baseline). 1426 students from 12 intervention schools and 1539 students from 10 comparison schools consented to follow up measurements. Despite increased prevalence of healthy weight across all schools, after 3.5 years of intervention there was no statistically significant difference between trial arms in BMI z score post-intervention (Mean (sd): Intervention 0.68(1.16); Comparison: 0.72(1.12); Adjusted mean difference (AMD): -0.05, CI: -0.19 to 0.08, p = 0.44). Children from intervention schools consumed more daily fruit serves (AMD: 0.19, CI:0.00 to 0.37, p = 0.10), were more likely to have water (AOR: 1.71, CI:1.05 to 2.78, p = 0.03) and vegetables (AOR: 1.23, CI: 0.99 to 1.55, p = 0.07), and less likely to have fruit juice/cordial (AOR: 0.58, CI:0.36 to 0.93, p = 0.02) in school lunch compared to children in comparison schools. More intervention schools (8/11) had healthy eating and physical activity policies compared with comparison schools (2/9). Principals and schools highly valued the approach as a catalyst

  1. Effectiveness of a Parent-Child Home Numeracy Intervention on Urban Catholic School First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lore, Millicent D.; Wang, Aubrey H.; Buckley, M. Toni

    2016-01-01

    Catholic social teaching affirms the primary role of parents in their children's education, as well as the importance of forging a positive home-school partnership. The purpose of this article is to provide empirical evidence for further cultivating a collaborative, home-school relationship aimed at improving the mathematics performance of…

  2. Child Centred Approach to Climate Change and Health Adaptation through Schools in Bangladesh: A Cluster Randomised Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Md Iqbal; Rahman, Md Bayzidur; Smith, Wayne; Lusha, Mirza Afreen Fatima; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-01-01

    Background Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. People are getting educated at different levels on how to deal with potential impacts. One such educational mode was the preparation of a school manual, for high school students on climate change and health protection endorsed by the National Curriculum and Textbook Board, which is based on a 2008 World Health Organization manual. The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of the manual in increasing the knowledge level of the school children about climate change and health adaptation. Methods This cluster randomized intervention trial involved 60 schools throughout Bangladesh, with 3293 secondary school students participating. School upazilas (sub-districts) were randomised into intervention and control groups, and two schools from each upazila were randomly selected. All year seven students from both groups of schools sat for a pre-test of 30 short questions of binary response. A total of 1515 students from 30 intervention schools received the intervention through classroom training based on the school manual and 1778 students of the 30 control schools did not get the manual but a leaflet on climate change and health issues. Six months later, a post-intervention test of the same questionnaire used in the pre-test was performed at both intervention and control schools. The pre and post test scores were analysed along with the demographic data by using random effects model. Results None of the various school level and student level variables were significantly different between the control and intervention group. However, the intervention group had a 17.42% (95% CI: 14.45 to 20.38, P = <0.001) higher score in the post-test after adjusting for pre-test score and other covariates in a multi-level linear regression model. Conclusions These results suggest that school-based intervention for climate change and health adaptation is effective for increasing the knowledge level

  3. Newham's Every Child a Sports Person (NECaSP): A Summative Process Evaluation of a School- and Community- Based Intervention in East London, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Curry, Whitney B; Dagkas, Symeon; Wilson, Marcia

    2016-10-01

    The Newman's Every Child a Sports Person (NECaSP) intervention aspires to increase sport and physical activity (PA) participation among young people in the United Kingdom. The aims of this article are to report on a summative process evaluation of the NECaSP and make recommendations for future interventions. Seventeen schools provided data from students aged 11 to 13 years (n = 1226), parents (n = 192), and teachers (n = 14) via direct observation and questionnaires. Means, SDs, and percentages were calculated for sociodemographic data. Qualitative data were analyzed via directed content analysis and main themes identified. Findings indicate further administrative, educational, and financial support will help facilitate the success of the program in improving PA outcomes for young people and of other similar intervention programs globally. Data highlighted the need to engage parents to increase the likelihood of intervention success. One main strength of this study is the mixed-methods nature of the process evaluation. It is recommended that future school-based interventions that bridge sports clubs and formal curriculum provision should consider a broader approach to the delivery of programs throughout the academic year, school week, and school day. Finally, changes in the school curriculum can be successful once all parties are involved (community, school, families).

  4. Child Characteristics Associated with Outcome for Children with Autism in a School-Based Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E.; Kerns, Connor M.; Xie, Ming; Marcus, Steven C.; Mandell, David S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which clinical and demographic characteristics predicted outcome for children with autism spectrum disorder. Participants included 152 students with autism spectrum disorder in 53 kindergarten-through-second-grade autism support classrooms in a large urban public school district. Associations between child…

  5. The Academic Skills Workshop: A Parent/Child Group Intervention To Stop School Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Ross; Gastineau, Jerrel

    Many children needlessly fail in public school. They have adequate intelligence and academic aptitude, but they do no complete and turn in work. Their self-esteem plummets and they do not seem capable of recovery without adult help. The Academic Skills Workshop (ASW) is a model program for educators who believe in the ability of parents to help…

  6. Child Characteristics Associated with Outcome for Children with Autism in a School-Based Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E.; Kerns, Connor M.; Xie, Ming; Marcus, Steven C.; Mandell, David S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which clinical and demographic characteristics predicted outcome for children with autism spectrum disorder. Participants included 152 students with autism spectrum disorder in 53 kindergarten-through-second-grade autism support classrooms in a large urban public school district. Associations between child…

  7. Making evidence-based decisions about child language intervention in schools.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Sandra Laing; Gillam, Ronald B

    2006-10-01

    The results of recent survey studies suggest that speech-language pathologists base most of their clinical decisions on information they were taught during their graduate programs, their clinical experience, and the opinions of colleagues (T. Wolf & J. Balderson, 2005; R. Zipoli & M. Kennedy, 2005). This is contrary to the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP), in which clinical decisions arise from the integration of scientific evidence, clinician experience, and client needs. Our field's interest in EBP is relatively young. Currently, there are no published committee-derived EBP guidelines for providing language intervention services for children with language disorders. Until national or international organizations publish recommendations from EBP guideline writing panels, clinicians will need to make personal evidence-based decisions with relatively little assistance from outside sources. The purpose of this article is to summarize a seven-step process for making local EBP decisions. The authors provide information about a method for forming clinical questions, finding relevant scientific studies, and evaluating those studies that requires relatively little time and few external resources. The authors also provide a system for integrating scientific evidence with their own expertise and training within the context of their employment settings. Finally, an example is provided to show clinicians how to use the evidence-based decision-making process to answer a clinical question about clinical methods for improving grammatical morphology in children with speech-language impairment. It is possible for clinicians to make time- and resource-efficient evidence-based decisions that integrate scientific evidence, clinical expertise, and student-parent preferences.

  8. A systems relations model for Tier 2 early intervention child mental health services with schools: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Marc; Gardner-Elahi, Catherine; Day, Crispin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, policy initiatives have aimed at the provision of more comprehensive Child and Adolescent Mental Health care. These presented a series of new challenges in organising and delivering Tier 2 child mental health services, particularly in schools. This exploratory study aimed to examine and clarify the service model underpinning a Tier 2 child mental health service offering school-based mental health work. Using semi-structured interviews, clinician descriptions of operational experiences were gathered. These were analysed using grounded theory methods. Analysis was validated by respondents at two stages. A pathway for casework emerged that included a systemic consultative function, as part of an overall three-function service model, which required: (1) activity as a member of the multi-agency system; (2) activity to improve the system working around a particular child; and (3) activity to universally develop a Tier 1 workforce confident in supporting children at risk of or experiencing mental health problems. The study challenged the perception of such a service serving solely a Tier 2 function, the requisite workforce to deliver the service model, and could give service providers a rationale for negotiating service models that include an explicit focus on improving the children's environments.

  9. Developing parent involvement in a school-based child obesity prevention intervention: a qualitative study and process evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kipping, R R; Jago, R; Lawlor, D A

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of parent involvement in school-based obesity prevention interventions. A qualitative study with parents of children aged 9-10 years was conducted to identify possible methods to involve them in a school-based obesity prevention intervention, followed by a process evaluation of homework and school newsletters to involve parents. Qualitative study: parents supported the use of homework and school newsletters to involve them and overcome the main barriers of their work and time. Process evaluation: Ten homeworks and inserts for the school newsletter about the obesity prevention intervention were developed and delivered. The majority of homeworks were given out (73%), completed by children (84%) and recalled by parents (60-68%). The majority of homeworks were enjoyed by parents and children. All the schools put information about the project in the newsletter and this was recalled by parents. Most parents felt the homeworks were a practical way of involving them. Homeworks are routinely given to children and provide a means of engaging potentially all parents if parental support is required. Homeworks which are novel, fun and involve activities and social contact are enjoyed by parents and children and may increase awareness of healthy diet and physical activity.

  10. Intervention-Based School Psychology Services: Training for Child-Level Accountability; Preparing for Program-Level Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Mike; Barnett, David W.

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluated the outcomes of a school psychology training practicum by replicating intervention-based service delivery procedures established in prior research. The key components include describing a service delivery model, teaching the model, deriving practice guidelines that fit the model, supporting trainees in carrying out the…

  11. Essential interventions for child health.

    PubMed

    Lassi, Zohra S; Mallick, Dania; Das, Jai K; Mal, Lekho; Salam, Rehana A; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    Child health is a growing concern at the global level, as infectious diseases and preventable conditions claim hundreds of lives of children under the age of five in low-income countries. Approximately 7.6 million children under five years of age died in 2011, calculating to about 19,000 children each day and almost 800 every hour. About 80 percent of the world's under-five deaths in 2011 occurred in only 25 countries, and about half in only five countries: India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan and China. The implications and burden of such statistics are huge and will have dire consequences if they are not corrected promptly. This paper reviews essential interventions for improving child health, which if implemented properly and according to guidelines have been found to improve child health outcomes, as well as reduce morbidity and mortality rates. It also includes caregivers and delivery strategies for each intervention. Interventions that have been associated with a decrease in mortality and disease rates include exclusive breastfeeding, complementary feeding strategies, routine immunizations and vaccinations for children, preventative zinc supplementation in children, and vitamin A supplementation in vitamin A deficient populations.

  12. Essential interventions for child health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Child health is a growing concern at the global level, as infectious diseases and preventable conditions claim hundreds of lives of children under the age of five in low-income countries. Approximately 7.6 million children under five years of age died in 2011, calculating to about 19 000 children each day and almost 800 every hour. About 80 percent of the world’s under-five deaths in 2011 occurred in only 25 countries, and about half in only five countries: India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan and China. The implications and burden of such statistics are huge and will have dire consequences if they are not corrected promptly. This paper reviews essential interventions for improving child health, which if implemented properly and according to guidelines have been found to improve child health outcomes, as well as reduce morbidity and mortality rates. It also includes caregivers and delivery strategies for each intervention. Interventions that have been associated with a decrease in mortality and disease rates include exclusive breastfeeding, complementary feeding strategies, routine immunizations and vaccinations for children, preventative zinc supplementation in children, and vitamin A supplementation in vitamin A deficient populations. PMID:25177974

  13. Peer Abuse as Child Abuse and Indications for Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, Jean B.

    2005-01-01

    Peer abuse in the form of bullying is now recognised as an endemic feature of school life and in terms of impact, outcomes and intervention requirements can be equated with other forms of child abuse. It is argued in the light of data presented here that the parallels between peer abuse and more generally accepted forms of child abuse must be…

  14. Legal interventions for child victims.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Debra

    2003-04-01

    Many commentators have expressed concern over the plight of children in the nation's court system, fearing that child victim/witnesses might suffer significant trauma. In efforts to alleviate this presumed trauma, new laws were passed and traditional procedures were modified. This paper synthesizes available research addressing 2 questions pertaining to the mental health needs of child victims: (1) To what extent are children traumatized by their involvement in the justice system, and (2) What interventions are effective in reducing children's trauma? The review concludes that most children can testify without suffering long-term adverse effects. It also identifies elements of the justice system that appear to heighten stress for children. Finally, it suggests several strategies that might be effective in alleviating that stress.

  15. Everyday Child Language Learning Early Intervention Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Raab, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    The language intervention model developed and evaluated at the Center on Everyday Child Language Learning (CECLL) is described. The model includes 4 components: interest-based child learning opportunities, the everyday family and community activities that are sources of interest-based child learning, the methods for increasing child participation…

  16. Everyday Child Language Learning Early Intervention Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Raab, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    The language intervention model developed and evaluated at the Center on Everyday Child Language Learning (CECLL) is described. The model includes 4 components: interest-based child learning opportunities, the everyday family and community activities that are sources of interest-based child learning, the methods for increasing child participation…

  17. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role…

  18. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role…

  19. Crisis Intervention: Facilitating Parental Acceptance of a Child's Handicap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormerod, Judith J.; Huebner, E. Scott

    1988-01-01

    Discusses various adjustment reactions displayed by some parents in the process of crisis resolution when they are informed by school psychologists that their child is handicapped. Presents implications for the school psychologist's role with parents of exceptional children within a crisis intervention framework. (Author/ABL)

  20. Intervention effects on dietary intake among children by maternal education level: results of the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Britt W; von Kappelgaard, Lene M; Nielsen, Birgit M; Husby, Ida; Bugge, Anna; El-Naaman, Bianca; Andersen, Lars B; Trolle, Ellen; Heitmann, Berit L

    2015-03-28

    Dietary intake among Danish children, in general, does not comply with the official recommendations. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the 3-year effect of a multi-component school-based intervention on nutrient intake in children, and to examine whether an intervention effect depended on maternal education level. A total of 307 children (intervention group: n 184; comparison group: n 123) were included in the present study. All had information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention (mean age 6·8 and 9·5 years for intervention and comparison groups, respectively) assessed by a 7-d food record. Analyses were conducted based on the daily intake of macronutrients (energy percentage (E%)), fatty acids (E%), added sugar (E%) and dietary fibre (g/d and g/MJ). Analyses were stratified by maternal education level into three categories. Changes in nutrient intake were observed in the intervention group, mainly among children of mothers with a short education ( < 10 years). Here, intake of dietary fibre increased (β = 2·1 g/d, 95 % CI 0·5, 3·6, P= 0·01). Intake of protein tended to increase (β = 0·6 E%, 95 % CI -0·01, 1·2, P= 0·05), while intake of fat (β = -1·7 E%, 95 % CI -3·8, 0·3, P= 0·09) and SFA (β = -0·9, 95 % CI -2·0, 0·2, P= 0·10) tended to decrease. Also, a significant intervention effect was observed on the intake of SFA among children of mothers with a long education (β = -0·8, 95 % CI -1·5, -0·03, P= 0·04). This multi-component school-based intervention resulted in changes in the dietary intake, particularly among children of mothers with a short education. As the dietary intake of this subgroup generally differs most from the recommendations, the results of the present study are particularly encouraging.

  1. Encouraging healthy beverage intake in child care and school settings.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha I; Cabana, Michael D

    2010-12-01

    Inappropriate intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juice, and whole milk is associated with obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. As numerous children spend many hours in schools and child care, these settings provide a potential means for general pediatricians to reach children and their parents with interventions to encourage intake of guideline-recommended beverages. This review describes the beverages currently offered within child care facilities and schools and summarizes school and child care-based interventions and policies to encourage healthy beverage intake. The major sources of beverages available in schools and child care include beverages provided through federal programs, competitive beverages (e.g., beverages for purchase through vending machines), water from drinking fountains, and beverages brought into facilities. Policies governing the types of beverages available in schools and child care settings have increased, but still vary in scope and jurisdiction. Although there are no child care-based interventions that exclusively target beverage intake, there are examples of school-based interventions to encourage healthy beverage consumption. Although interventions and policies to encourage healthy beverage intake in schools and child care are increasing, there is a need for additional research, programs, and policies to guide beverage availability and intake in these settings.

  2. The Effects of Child Maltreatment on Learning Disabilities and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the increase in the rate and intensity of child maltreatment, defines the types of maltreatment (physical, sexual, psychological and neglect), their possible effects on learning, and school interventions that can assist the children with learning disabilities. The need for a structured classroom environment is emphasized.…

  3. Child-Centered Reading Intervention: See, Talk, Dictate, Read, Write!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Muhammet; Demirtas, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Poor reading achievement of children in elementary schools has been one of the major concerns in education. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a child-centered reading intervention in eliminating the reading problems of a student with poor reading achievement. The research was conducted with a student having difficulty in…

  4. School Interventions for Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.; Derr, Tami F.

    1987-01-01

    The scope and incidence of school-based aggression, specifically physical and verbal assault, are noted. Interventions discussed include: contingency management (reinforcement, ignoring, response cost, timeout, peer procedures, and aversive consequences) and self-management procedures (social skills training, problem-solving training, and…

  5. Child neglect: assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Neglect is often a neglected form of child maltreatment even though it is the most common and deadliest form of child maltreatment. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) will most likely encounter neglected children in their practice. It is crucial that PNPs recognize child neglect in a timely manner and intervene appropriately. This continuing education article will help PNPs understand and respond to child neglect. Neglect will be defined and risk factors will be discussed. Children who are neglected can experience serious and lifelong consequences. The medical assessment and plan of care for children with concerns of suspected neglect will be discussed.

  6. School interventions after the Joplin tornado.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Robert K; Abramson, David

    2014-04-01

    To qualitatively describe interventions by schools to meet children's needs after the May 2011 Joplin, Missouri tornado. Qualitative exploratory study conducted six months after the tornado. Key informant interviews with school staff (teachers, psychologists, guidance counselor, nurse, principal), public health official, and physicians. After the tornado, school staff immediately worked to contact every enrolled child to provide assistance and coordinate recovery services. Despite severe damage to half of the city's schools, the decision was made to reopen schools at the earliest possible time to provide a safe, reassuring environment and additional services. An expanded summer school session emphasized child safety and emotional wellbeing. The 2011-2012 school year began on time, less than three months after the disaster, using temporary facilities. Displaced children were bused to their usual schools regardless of their new temporary residence locations. In just-in-time training sessions, teachers developed strategies to support students and staff experiencing anxiety or depression. Certified counselors conducted school-based, small-group counseling for students. Selective referrals were made to community mental health providers for children with greatest needs. Evidence from Joplin adds to a small body of empirical experience demonstrating the important contribution of schools to postdisaster community recovery. Despite timely and proactive services, many families and children struggled after the tornado. Improvements in the effectiveness of postdisaster interventions at schools will follow from future scientific evidence on optimal approaches.

  7. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of Child-Focused Psychiatric Consultation and a School Systems-Focused Intervention to Reduce Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Dill, Edward J.; Little, Todd D.; Sargent, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: While school-based anti-bullying programs are widely used, there have been few controlled trials of effectiveness. This study compared the effect of manualized School Psychiatric Consultation (SPC), CAPSLE (a systems and mentalization focused whole school intervention), and treatment-as-usual (TAU) in reducing aggression and…

  8. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of Child-Focused Psychiatric Consultation and a School Systems-Focused Intervention to Reduce Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Dill, Edward J.; Little, Todd D.; Sargent, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: While school-based anti-bullying programs are widely used, there have been few controlled trials of effectiveness. This study compared the effect of manualized School Psychiatric Consultation (SPC), CAPSLE (a systems and mentalization focused whole school intervention), and treatment-as-usual (TAU) in reducing aggression and…

  9. Child Disaster Mental Health Interventions: Therapy Components

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L.; Nitiéma, Pascal; Noffsinger, Mary A.; Varma, Vandana; Nelson, Summer D.; Newman, Elana

    2015-01-01

    Children face innumerable challenges following exposure to disasters. To address trauma sequelae, researchers and clinicians have developed a variety of mental health interventions. While the overall effectiveness of multiple interventions has been examined, few studies have focused on the individual components of these interventions. As a preliminary step to advancing intervention development and research, this literature review identifies and describes nine common components that comprise child disaster mental health interventions. This review concluded that future research should clearly define the constituent components included in available interventions. This will require that future studies dismantle interventions to examine the effectiveness of specific components and identify common therapeutic elements. Issues related to populations studied (eg, disaster exposure, demographic and cultural influences) and to intervention delivery (eg, timing and optimal sequencing of components) also warrant attention. PMID:25225954

  10. School age child development (image)

    MedlinePlus

    School age child development is a range from 6 to 12 years of age. During this time period observable differences in height, weight, and build of children may be prominent. The language skills ... continue to grow and many behavior changes occur as they try ...

  11. The Child-Centered School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The function of the child-centered school is to facilitate learning so that learners become the workers and teachers become collaborative learning enhancers. Four curriculum strands (self-readiness-competence-inquiry) are woven into a learning model that integrates learning styles, curriculum structure and subject-matter organization,…

  12. The Effect of Early Intervention and Pre-School Stimulus on the Development of the Down's Syndrome Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, L. M.; Ludlow, Joyce R.

    1979-01-01

    The findings showed that the stimulated group scored higher on both the intelligence and the developmental tests, particularly on personal-social and speech development. In addition, school placement at the age of five years suggested that the experimental Ss were more easily integrated into the normal community. (Author/DLS)

  13. Improving School Outcomes for Children Affected by Parental HIV/AIDS: Evaluation of the ChildCARE Intervention at 6-, 12-, and 18-Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, JiaJia; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Children affected by parental HIV/AIDS are at-risk for poor school outcomes including reduced attendance, lower grades, and lower school satisfaction compared to unaffected peers. Resilience-based interventions offer promise to improve functioning across a number of domains. A four-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted with 790 children…

  14. Child Mortality in the School Setting. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that data on children's deaths in school should be recorded, analyzed and reported at the local, state and national level. The systematic review of data on child deaths is necessary to drive interventions and policies that will decrease mortality from injuries, violence, acute…

  15. Early Intervention Methods for Child Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.

    A longitudinal study was made of a prevention-oriented early intervention program intended to help parents who had insufficient and inappropriate childrearing abilities. The program was designed for young parents with fewer than 5 years of childrearing experience; participants were referred from a child protection agency following investigation of…

  16. Child disaster mental health interventions, part I

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L.; Newman, Elana; Varma, Vandana; Nitiéma, Pascal; Shaw, Jon A.; Chrisman, Allan K.; Noffsinger, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    This review of child disaster mental health intervention studies describes the techniques used in the interventions and the outcomes addressed, and it provides a preliminary evaluation of the field. The interventions reviewed here used a variety of strategies such as cognitive behavioral approaches, exposure and narrative techniques, relaxation, coping skill development, social support, psychoeducation, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and debriefing. A diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or posttraumatic stress reactions were the most commonly addressed outcomes although other reactions such as depression, anxiety, behavior problems, fear, and/or traumatic grief also were examined. Recommendations for future research are outlined. PMID:25914863

  17. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role in obesity interventions. Building on a previous study, this study examines a refined health messaging (Let's Go 5-2-1-0) program delivered to fourth and fifth graders (n = 72) by a school nurse with reinforcement on-site health coaching by senior nursing students. Two nursing schools and two elementary schools participated. Measures of PA, body mass index percentile, and self-reported health habits were collected at baseline (School A, September 2009 and School B, January 2010) and end of year (April 2010 for both schools). Findings included statistically significant increases in PA levels and improvements in child-reported health habits. School nurses can influence obesity prevention. Further research on adoption of school nurse-led obesity interventions is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Household shocks, child labor, and child schooling: evidence from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, William F; Bohara, Alok K

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the National Survey of Standards of Living conducted in Guatemala in 2000, this article tests the hypothesis that Guatemalan households use child labor and reduce child schooling to cope with household shocks. First, the authors use factor analysis to estimate the latent household propensity to natural disasters and socioeconomic shocks. Then, they estimate bivariate probit models to identify the determinants of child labor and schooling, including household propensity to natural disasters and socioeconomic shocks. Results suggest that households use child labor to cope with natural disasters and socioeconomic shocks. In contrast, the authors found no evidence that suggests that households reduce child schooling to cope with shocks. Findings also indicate that poor households are more likely to use child labor and schooling reduction as strategies to cope with socioeconomic shocks.

  19. School Nurses Avoid Addressing Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engh Kraft, Lisbet; Rahm, GullBritt; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-01-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a global public health problem with major consequences for the individual child and society. An earlier Swedish study showed that the school nurses did not initially talk about nor mention CSA as one form of child abuse. For the child to receive adequate support, the disclosure is a precondition and is dependent on an…

  20. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  1. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  2. Interventions to reduce school bullying.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Ananiadou, Katerina; Cowie, Helen

    2003-10-01

    In the last 2 decades, school bullying has become a topic of public concern and research around the world. This has led to action to reduce the problem. We review interventions targeted at the school level (for example, whole school policy, classroom climate, peer support, school tribunal, and playground improvement), at the class level (for example, curriculum work), and at the individual level (for example, working with specific pupils). Effectiveness of interventions has been sporadically assessed. We review several systematically evaluated, large-scale, school-based intervention programs. Their effectiveness has varied, and we consider reasons for this. We suggest ways to improve the evaluation and comparability of studies, as well as the effectiveness of future interventions.

  3. Teacher-Reported Effects of the Playing-2-Gether Intervention on Child Externalising Problem Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the teacher-perceived effect of a school-based intervention (i.e. Playing-2-gether) targeting teacher-child interactions to reduce externalising problem behaviour (EPB) amongst preschoolers. Boys with the highest score for EPB in the classroom and their teacher participated in the study. Teacher-child dyads…

  4. Teacher-Reported Effects of the Playing-2-Gether Intervention on Child Externalising Problem Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the teacher-perceived effect of a school-based intervention (i.e. Playing-2-gether) targeting teacher-child interactions to reduce externalising problem behaviour (EPB) amongst preschoolers. Boys with the highest score for EPB in the classroom and their teacher participated in the study. Teacher-child dyads…

  5. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  6. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  7. Intervention with the Selectively Mute Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porjes, Michelle D.

    1992-01-01

    Defines selective mutism as describing children who actively choose to speak to few people in selected environments, noting it is most commonly used to describe nonverbal behavior in school setting. Reviews literature from psychoanalytic and learning theory approaches. Presents intervention strategies used with two selectively mute first graders.…

  8. Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child and Parent Distress during Venipuncture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated behavioral intervention to control child distress during invasive cancer treatment. Children (n=23) requiring physical restraint to complete venipuncture were alternately assigned to behavioral intervention or attention control condition. Observed child distress, parent-rated child distress, and parent ratings of own distress were…

  9. Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child and Parent Distress during Venipuncture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated behavioral intervention to control child distress during invasive cancer treatment. Children (n=23) requiring physical restraint to complete venipuncture were alternately assigned to behavioral intervention or attention control condition. Observed child distress, parent-rated child distress, and parent ratings of own distress were…

  10. School-Based Child Care. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Each year, half a million teenagers become mothers in the United States. School-based child care programs are a positive way for educational institutions to encourage young mothers to return to or stay in school, prepare for employment, and acquire accurate information about child development and appropriate parenting practices. Nationwide,…

  11. Child Participation in Family-School Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maleš, Dubravka; Kuševic, Barbara; Širanovic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the cooperation between families and schools from the perspective of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989). Given that the principal purpose of the cooperation between families and schools is children's well-being, it is reasonable to expect the child's participation in situations of direct parent-teacher…

  12. Child Abuse Reporting by School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jill; Milsom, Amy

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of child abuse reporting by school counselors and to examine factors affecting their decisions to report abuse. A sample of school counselors (N = 263) in one Midwestern state completed questionnaires to share their child abuse reporting behaviors, influences with regard to making a…

  13. [Community interventions in school].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The school plays a prominent role in the health of the community since it is where you identify address, teach and modify many of the habits and behaviors that can achieve good health both individually and collectively. It should be noted the important role, as co-teachers, nurses have in the EPS in school, in conjunction with other professional health teams. In Spain today the figure of the school nurse can exist only in privately managed schools and-or foreign origin (French School, European School British Institute, etc.), Or in special schools, and have not developed indicators of activity and quality no evidence could be measured and relevance. Therefore, it has conducted a literature review on the school nurse in the countries where it is consolidated in order to identify both the reasons for its existence and effectiveness. The most important conclusion is worth noting that in Spain the figure of the school nurse, as a freelancer isolated from the health team is unfounded since there is a network of well structured and accessible care and community nurses have the skills to to cover health needs at school, from a holistic perspective. In addition the specialty of Family and Community Nursing was established as a key element in this regard.

  14. Efficacy of Child-Focused and Parent-Focused Interventions in a Child Anxiety Prevention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ellin; Bogels, Susan Maria; Voncken, Jannie Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a parent-focused (n = 69), child-focused (n = 58) or…

  15. Efficacy of Child-Focused and Parent-Focused Interventions in a Child Anxiety Prevention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ellin; Bogels, Susan Maria; Voncken, Jannie Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a parent-focused (n = 69), child-focused (n = 58) or…

  16. Child Find Practices in Christian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Julie M.; Jones, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The 1997 Amendments of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that children placed in private schools by their parents are no longer afforded the right to special education services. However, IDEA does state that child find activities between public school representatives and private schools are to remain intact. This study…

  17. School Influences on Child and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osher, David; Kendziora, Kimberly; Spier, Elizabeth; Garibaldi, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Schools play a key role in child and youth development as both social microcosms of the broader society and reciprocally influencing people and communities. As such, schools can function as a protective factor that promotes safety, motivation, relationships, and support for positive student outcomes. However, schools may also function as a risk…

  18. Child Find Practices in Christian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Julie M.; Jones, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The 1997 Amendments of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that children placed in private schools by their parents are no longer afforded the right to special education services. However, IDEA does state that child find activities between public school representatives and private schools are to remain intact. This study…

  19. School Influences on Child and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osher, David; Kendziora, Kimberly; Spier, Elizabeth; Garibaldi, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Schools play a key role in child and youth development as both social microcosms of the broader society and reciprocally influencing people and communities. As such, schools can function as a protective factor that promotes safety, motivation, relationships, and support for positive student outcomes. However, schools may also function as a risk…

  20. Bullying in Schools: A Form of Child Abuse in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluedse, Oyaziwo

    2006-01-01

    Child abuse is largely recognized as a significant issue within the school system and the larger society. In the schools, incidents of child abuse can take any of physical, sexual and psychological forms. This paper would restrict itself to bullying, by more specifically providing a clearer understanding of the concept of bullying, its prevalence,…

  1. School-Age Child Care: A Handbook for North Carolina Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuMont, Linda; And Others

    This handbook provides an introduction to school-age child care for North Carolina public schools, an annotated bibliography on school-age child care, and information on before- and after-school child care programs in public schools. The introductory Section I focuses on the need for school-age child care and the public school's role in providing…

  2. Can mass media interventions reduce child mortality?

    PubMed

    Head, Roy; Murray, Joanna; Sarrassat, Sophie; Snell, Will; Meda, Nicolas; Ouedraogo, Moctar; Deboise, Laurent; Cousens, Simon

    2015-07-04

    Many people recognise that mass media is important in promoting public health but there have been few attempts to measure how important. An ongoing trial in Burkina Faso (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01517230) is an attempt to bring together the very different worlds of mass media and epidemiology: to measure rigorously, using a cluster-randomised design, how many lives mass media can save in a low-income country, and at what cost. Application of the Lives Saved Tool predicts that saturation-based media campaigns could reduce child mortality by 10-20%, at a cost per disability-adjusted life-year that is as low as any existing health intervention. In this Viewpoint we explain the scientific reasoning behind the trial, while stressing the importance of the media methodology used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. School Nurses Avoid Addressing Child Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Engh Kraft, Lisbet; Rahm, GullBritt; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-04-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a global public health problem with major consequences for the individual child and society. An earlier Swedish study showed that the school nurses did not initially talk about nor mention CSA as one form of child abuse. For the child to receive adequate support, the disclosure is a precondition and is dependent on an available person prepared to listen. The aim of the study was to explore the ability of the school nurses to detect and support sexually abused children. It is a secondary analysis of focus group interviews with school nurses. Thematic analysis was performed. Results showed that the school nurses avoided addressing CSA due to arousal of strong emotions, ambivalence, and a complicated disclosure process. In order to detect CSA and support abused children, attentiveness of sexual abuse as a possible cause of physical and mental ill-health is crucial.

  4. Advancing Intervention Research in School Psychology: Finding the Balance between Process and Outcome for Social and Behavioral Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Elise; Reinke, Wendy M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2011-01-01

    School psychology research focused on child outcomes is critical for understanding which social and behavioral interventions affect children in schools. Yet effective interventions fulfill their promise when they fit their implementation contexts, are implemented well with existing resources, and can be sustained or scaled up to new populations.…

  5. Organizational Constructs as Predictors of Effectiveness in Child Welfare Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Jane; Brooks, Devon; Patti, Rino

    2007-01-01

    Organizational context, including line worker characteristics and service settings, may help explain the equivocal findings of intervention studies in the field of child welfare. Yet organizational context has been largely ignored in studies of child welfare interventions. The purpose of this article is to expound upon the likely role of the…

  6. Mental health interventions in schools 1

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Mina; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Stephan, Sharon; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services embedded within school systems can create a continuum of integrative care that improves both mental health and educational attainment for children. To strengthen this continuum, and for optimum child development, a reconfiguration of education and mental health systems to aid implementation of evidence-based practice might be needed. Integrative strategies that combine classroom-level and student-level interventions have much potential. A robust research agenda is needed that focuses on system-level implementation and maintenance of interventions over time. Both ethical and scientific justifications exist for integration of mental health and education: integration democratises access to services and, if coupled with use of evidence-based practices, can promote the healthy development of children. PMID:26114092

  7. Cost-effectiveness of child-focused and parent-focused interventions in a child anxiety prevention program.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ellin; Dirksen, Carmen; Bögels, Susan; Bodden, Denise

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the cost-effectiveness of three indicated anxiety prevention strategies was examined from a societal perspective. Children (aged 8-12) were recruited via primary schools, selecting children scoring as high-anxious on an anxiety screening questionnaire. Participating children and their parents were randomized to a child--a parent-focused, or non-intervention group. All groups completed a diagnostic interview and standardized cost-diaries at pretest, and 1- and 2-year follow-up. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per 'ADIS improved' child (based on diagnostic information) were calculated and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves and frontiers were plotted. The base-case and most secondary analyses showed it would be cost-effective to offer high-anxious children an intervention, and the parent-focused intervention to be the optimal strategy at lower monetary threshold values than the child-focused intervention and when parents were anxious. The child-focused intervention was dominant when analyses were performed from a healthcare perspective, for boys, and for children of grades 7-8 of primary school.

  8. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  9. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  10. Parental Vaccine Beliefs and Child's School Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Allison M.; Gust, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    The school system plays an important role in a child's vaccination status, whether by directly offering immunization services, maintaining immunization records, or providing an incentive for up-to-date immunizations through the enforcement of school entry laws. Within the American educational system, however, children do not all attend the same…

  11. How to Help Your Child Start School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Bernard, Jr.

    The purpose of this book is to help parents and their prekindergarten children toward an awareness of what school is and an expectation of what it can be. Part I provides information on (1) the child's fifth year of development (needs, intelligence, and sensory experience); (2) the nature of kindergarten schooling (including a brief history of…

  12. School Quality, Child Wellbeing and Parents' Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Stephen; Silva, Olmo

    2011-01-01

    Child wellbeing at school and enjoyment of the learning environment are important economic outcomes, in particular because a growing body of research shows they are strongly linked to later educational attainments and labour market success. However, the standard working assumption in the economics of education is that parents choose schools on the…

  13. Parental Vaccine Beliefs and Child's School Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Allison M.; Gust, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    The school system plays an important role in a child's vaccination status, whether by directly offering immunization services, maintaining immunization records, or providing an incentive for up-to-date immunizations through the enforcement of school entry laws. Within the American educational system, however, children do not all attend the same…

  14. The Effects of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health Intervention on Psychosocial Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Behavior among Third-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Elizabeth; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Schools within the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health intervention were randomized into control, school-based, and school-based plus family intervention conditions. Measures of third graders' psychosocial determinants of risk behavior indicated significant improvements in all psychosocial determinants following the interventions,…

  15. The Effects of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health Intervention on Psychosocial Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Behavior among Third-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Elizabeth; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Schools within the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health intervention were randomized into control, school-based, and school-based plus family intervention conditions. Measures of third graders' psychosocial determinants of risk behavior indicated significant improvements in all psychosocial determinants following the interventions,…

  16. Does Social Labelling Encourage Child Schooling and Discourage Child Labour in Nepal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarty, Sayan; Grote, Ulrike; Luchters, Guido

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the determinants of child labour vis-a-vis child schooling. It further examines the influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) which are engaged in social labelling, on the incidence of child labour and schooling trade-off. The empirical results show that the probability of child schooling increases as well as child…

  17. Does Social Labelling Encourage Child Schooling and Discourage Child Labour in Nepal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarty, Sayan; Grote, Ulrike; Luchters, Guido

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the determinants of child labour vis-a-vis child schooling. It further examines the influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) which are engaged in social labelling, on the incidence of child labour and schooling trade-off. The empirical results show that the probability of child schooling increases as well as child…

  18. A 3-year physical activity intervention program increases the gain in bone mineral and bone width in prepubertal girls but not boys: the prospective copenhagen school child interventions study (CoSCIS).

    PubMed

    Hasselstrøm, H A; Karlsson, M K; Hansen, S E; Grønfeldt, V; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing the amount of time spent in physical education classes on bone mineral accrual and gain in bone size in prepubertal Danish children. A total of 135 boys and 108 girls, aged 6-8 years, were included in a school-based curriculum intervention program where the usual time spent in physical education classes was doubled to four classes (180 min) per week. The control group comprised age-matched children (62 boys and 76 girls) recruited from a separate community who completed the usual Danish school curriculum of physical activity (90 min/week). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (g/cm(2)), and bone width at the calcaneus and distal forearm before and after 3 years of intervention. Anthropometrics and Tanner stages were evaluated on the same occasions. General physical activity was measured with an accelerometer worn for 4 days. In girls, the intervention group had a 12.5% increase (P = 0.04) in distal forearm BMC and a 13.2% increase (P = 0.005) in distal forearm scanned area compared with girls in the control group. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups in boys. Increasing the frequency of physical education classes for prepubertal children is associated with a higher accrual of bone mineral and higher gain in bone size after 3 years in girls but not in boys.

  19. Collaboration for child adjustment: issues for school- and clinic-based child psychologists.

    PubMed

    Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie W

    1991-12-01

    Therapeutic gains for children may be maximized if the important systems serving their mental health needs develop sophisticated collaborative relationships. School- and clinic-based psychologists may overlook important ways in which they can cooperate. School-based psychologists may not be aware of how to extend or support the therapeutic interventions suggested by other psychologists. Clinic-based child therapists may lack a full understanding of both the promise of school-based programs and the constraints under which schools operate. Collaborative efforts between clinic- and school-based practitioners may increase ecologically valid treatment options. This article explores both the gains and the potential pitfalls that may arise when school- and clinic-based practitioners work together.

  20. Relational interventions for child maltreatment: past, present, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Toth, Sheree L; Gravener-Davis, Julie A; Guild, Danielle J; Cicchetti, Dante

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that child maltreatment has significant deleterious effects for the individual as well as for society. We briefly review research regarding the impact of child maltreatment on the attachment relationship, highlighting the need for relational interventions for maltreated children and their families to effectively thwart negative developmental cascades that are so often observed in the context of child maltreatment. Next, historical and contemporaneous perspectives on relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment are discussed, with attention to the empirical evidence for and the current evidence-based status of several relationally based interventions for child maltreatment. Differential sensitivity to the environment is then discussed as a theoretical framework with important implications for interventions for individuals who have been reared in maltreating environments. Current research on neurobiology and maltreatment is then reviewed, with an emphasis on the need for future investigations on genetic variants, epigenetics, and the efficacy of relational interventions for maltreated children. We conclude with a discussion of the tenets of developmental psychopathology, their implications for relational interventions for child maltreatment, and recommendations for advancing the development, provision, and evaluation of relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment.

  1. Relational Interventions for Child Maltreatment: Past, Present, & Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Sheree L.; Gravener-Davis, Julie A.; Guild, Danielle J.; Cicchetti, Dante

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that child maltreatment has significant deleterious effects for the individual as well as for society. We briefly review research regarding the impact of child maltreatment on the attachment relationship, highlighting the need for relational interventions for maltreated children and their families to effectively thwart negative developmental cascades that are so often observed in the context of child maltreatment. Next, historical and contemporaneous perspectives on relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment are discussed with attention to the empirical evidence for and the current evidence-based status of several relationally based interventions for child maltreatment. Differential sensitivity to the environment is then discussed as a theoretical framework with important implications for interventions for individuals who have been reared in maltreating environments. Current research on neurobiology and maltreatment is then reviewed, with an emphasis on the need for future investigations on genetic variants, epigenetics, and the efficacy of relational interventions for maltreated children. We conclude with a discussion of the tenets of developmental psychopathology, their implications for relational interventions for child maltreatment, and recommendations for advancing the development, provision, and evaluation of relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment. PMID:24342858

  2. The Influence of No Child Left Behind Status on Teacher Perceptions of School Organizational Cohesiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tydeman, Christina Klassen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine teacher perceptions of school process data over time to determine whether No Child Left Behind (NCLB) sanctions and interventions might produce any observable change in teachers' perceptions of the selected school processes. This study examined the relationship between the school's NCLB sanction status and…

  3. Care of Victims of Child Maltreatment: The School Nurse's Role. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Feeser, Cindy Jo; King, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that prevention, early recognition, intervention and treatment of child maltreatment are critical to the physical well-being and academic success of students. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the recognition…

  4. Child Delinquency: Early Intervention and Prevention. Child Delinquency Bulletin Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeber, Rolf; Farrington, David P.; Petechuk, David

    Sparked by high-profile cases involving children who commit violent crimes, public concerns regarding child delinquents have escalated. Compared with juveniles who first become involved in delinquency in their teens, child delinquents (offenders younger than age 13) face a much greater risk of becoming serious, violent, and chronic juvenile…

  5. Acceptability of reductive interventions for the control of inappropriate child behavior.

    PubMed

    Witt, J C; Robbins, J R

    1985-03-01

    Teacher attitudes about the acceptability of classroom intervention strategies were evaluated in two experiments. In both, teachers read descriptions of an intervention that was applied to a child with a behavior problem. In Experiment 1, an evaluation of six interventions for reducing inappropriate behavior suggested that one was highly acceptable (DRO), one was highly unacceptable (corporal punishment), and four ranged from mildly acceptable to mildly unacceptable (DRL, reprimands, time-out, and staying after school). In Experiment 2, the acceptability of the same intervention (staying after school) was evaluated as a function of who implemented it (teacher vs. principal). Analyses suggested that the teacher-implemented intervention was perceived as more acceptable. In both experiments, interventions were rated as less acceptable by highly experienced teachers versus those newer to the teaching profession. In addition, there was a trend for the acceptability of an intervention to vary as a function of the severity of the behavior problem to which it was applied.

  6. Effects of intervention programs on child and adolescent BMI: A meta-analysis study.

    PubMed

    Vasques, Catarina; Magalhães, Pedro; Cortinhas, António; Mota, Paula; Leitão, José; Lopes, Vitor Pires

    2014-02-01

    This meta-analysis study aims to assess the efficacy of school-based and after-school intervention programs on the BMIs of child and adolescents, addressing the correlation between some moderating variables. We analyzed 52 studies (N = 28,236) published between 2000-2011. The overall effect size was 0.068 (P < .001), school (r = .069) and after-school intervention (r = .065). Programs conducted with children aged between 15-19 years were the most effective (r = .133). Interventions programs with boys and girls show better effect sizes (r = .110) than programs that included just girls (r = .073). There were no significant differences between the programs implemented in school and after-school (P = .770). The effect size was higher in interventions lasting 1 year (r = .095), with physical activity and nutritional education (r = .148), and that included 3-5 sessions of physical activity per week (r = .080). The effect size also increased as the level of parental involvement increased. Although of low magnitude (r = .068), the intervention programs had a positive effect in prevention and decreasing obesity in children. This effect seems to be higher in older children's, involving interventions with physical activity and nutritional education combined, with parent's participation and with 1-year duration. School or after-school interventions had a similar effect.

  7. Child-Level Predictors of Responsiveness to Evidence-Based Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Cirino, Paul T.; Malone, Amelia S.

    2017-01-01

    We identified child-level predictors of responsiveness to 2 types of mathematics intervention (calculation and word problem) among second-grade children with mathematics difficulty. Participants were 250 children in 107 classrooms in 23 schools pretested on mathematics and general cognitive measures and posttested on mathematics measures. We…

  8. The At Risk Child: Early Identification, Intervention, and Evaluation of Early Childhood Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Joan M.

    A review of literature was conducted in order to: (1) determine whether factors placing the young child at risk for school failure can be identified; (2) determine whether early family interventions and early childhood programs are effective; and (3) identify policy implications. Findings are summarized, and recommendations are offered. Research…

  9. Efficacy of child-focused and parent-focused interventions in a child anxiety prevention study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ellin; Bogels, Susan Maria; Voncken, Jannie Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a parent-focused (n = 69), child-focused (n = 58) or non-intervention (n = 56) group. Families completed a pretest and 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Children selected as high-anxious or at risk were found to remain more susceptible to having anxiety problems and developing anxiety disorders than median-anxious children. Both intervention types showed favorable outcomes compared to no intervention on the number of "ADIS improved" children. These findings underline the need for effective preventive interventions for child anxiety. General improvements over time were found for symptoms of child and parental anxiety, however, and parental anxiety did not predict improvement in child anxiety after controlling for intervention. Therefore, it may not be necessary to focus on parental anxiety in interventions aimed at preventing child anxiety.

  10. Creating Environments for School-Age Child Care. Child Environment Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This module provides guidelines for constructing appropriate day care center environments for school-age children 6 through 12 years of age. One of a series of staff development modules for child caregivers working in military child care centers, the document is divided into two parts. The first part indicates some ways environments affect…

  11. City Initiatives in School-Age Child Care. SACC Action Research Paper No. 1. School-Age Child Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannett, Ellen

    Features contributing to the success of six city-wide, comprehensive school-age program models are highlighted. Models are Seattle, Washington's Community Partnerships for School-Age Child Care; Madison, Wisconsin's School-Age Child Care Project; Irvine, California's Irvine Child Care Project; Houston, Texas' After-School Partnership; Los Angeles,…

  12. Pediatric response to a large-scale child protection intervention.

    PubMed

    Lukefahr, James L; Kellogg, Nancy D; Anderst, James D; Gavril, Amy R; Wehner, Karl K

    2011-08-01

    In a rural area of the US state of Texas, in April 2008, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) responded to evidence of widespread child abuse in an isolated religious compound by removing 463 individuals into state custody. This mass child protection intervention is the largest such action that has ever occurred in the United States. The objective of this paper is to characterize the burdens placed on the area's community resources, healthcare providers, and legal system, the limitations encountered by the forensic and public health professionals, and how these might be minimized in future large-scale child protection interventions. Drawing on publicly available information, this article describes the child abuse investigation, legal outcomes, experiences of pediatric healthcare providers directly affected by the mass removal, and the roles of regional child abuse pediatric specialists. Because the compound's residents refused to cooperate with the investigation and the population of the compound was eight times higher than expected, law enforcement and child protection resources were insufficient to conduct standard child abuse investigations. Local medical and public health resources were also quickly overwhelmed. Consulting child abuse pediatricians were asked to recommend laboratory and radiologic studies that could assist in identifying signs of child abuse, but the lack of cooperation from patients and parents, inadequate medical histories, and limited physical examinations precluded full implementation of the recommendations. Although most children in danger of abuse were removed from the high-risk environment for several months and some suspected abusers were found guilty in criminal trials, the overall success of the child protection intervention was reduced by the limitations imposed by insufficient resources and lack of cooperation from the compound's residents. Recommendations for community and child abuse pediatricians who may

  13. Building Capacity for Trauma Intervention across Child-Serving Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinitz, Susan; Stettler, Erin M.; Giammanco, Denise; Silverman, Marian; Briggs, Rahil D.; Loeb, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Infants most vulnerable to trauma are often the least able to access interventions. Universal child-serving systems, such as primary pediatrics, early care and education, and the child welfare system, can offer a port of entry for millions of children annually for trauma-related supports and services. However, practitioners in these systems have…

  14. Pediatric Response to a Large-Scale Child Protection Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukefahr, James L.; Kellogg, Nancy D.; Anderst, James D.; Gavril, Amy R.; Wehner, Karl K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In a rural area of the US state of Texas, in April 2008, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) responded to evidence of widespread child abuse in an isolated religious compound by removing 463 individuals into state custody. This mass child protection intervention is the largest such action that has ever occurred…

  15. Pediatric Response to a Large-Scale Child Protection Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukefahr, James L.; Kellogg, Nancy D.; Anderst, James D.; Gavril, Amy R.; Wehner, Karl K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In a rural area of the US state of Texas, in April 2008, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) responded to evidence of widespread child abuse in an isolated religious compound by removing 463 individuals into state custody. This mass child protection intervention is the largest such action that has ever occurred…

  16. Three Views of Child Neglect: Expanding Visions of Preventive Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, J. Ronald

    1984-01-01

    Child neglect prevention is discussed at three levels: the individual, the social system, and fundamental beliefs and cultural agreements. An outline of a preventive child neglect intervention strategy is presented. Practices of government, the impact of business and technology and economic theory, and practice are shown as plausible areas for…

  17. Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities: Statistics and Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... interventions. Table of Contents Introduction How many children die each year from child abuse or neglect? What groups of children are most vulnerable? How do these deaths occur? Who are the perpetrators? How do communities respond to child fatalities? How can these fatalities be prevented? ...

  18. Social Skills Intervention for a Child Who Is Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, Marie

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a social skills intervention plan for a preschool child who is blind and has no additional disabilities. After the plan was implemented, the child demonstrated an increased frequency and range of play behaviors and social interactions. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. The Psychological Effects of Hospitalization for the Child and Family -- Implications for the School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouser, Kenia

    The author views hospitalization of the child as a time of potential crisis for the child and family and as an area where the school can play a significant role in minimizing potential disruption. Topics covered include historical trends in hospital treatment of children, the concept of crisis intervention, parents' reactions to their children's…

  20. Teacher consultation and coaching within mental health practice: classroom and child effects in urban elementary schools.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B; Frazier, Stacy L; Atkins, Marc S; Schoenwald, Sonja K

    2012-08-01

    To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to intervention (training + consultation/coaching) and control (training only) conditions. Classroom and child outcomes (n = 364; 43% girls) were assessed in the fall and spring. Random effects regression models showed main effects of intervention on teacher-student relationship closeness, academic self-concept, and peer victimization. Results of multiple regression models showed levels of observed teacher emotional support in the fall moderated intervention impact on emotional support at the end of the school year. Results suggest teacher consultation and coaching can be integrated within existing mental health activities in urban schools and impact classroom effectiveness and child adaptation across multiple domains. © 2012 American Psychological Association

  1. Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method Thirty-six classrooms within five urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to intervention (training + consultation/coaching) and control (training only) conditions. Classroom and child outcomes (n = 364; 43% girls) were assessed in the fall and spring. Results Random effects regression models showed main effects of intervention on teacher-student relationship closeness, academic self-concept, and peer victimization. Results of multiple regression models showed levels of observed teacher emotional support in the fall moderated intervention impact on emotional support at the end of the school year. Conclusions Results suggest teacher consultation and coaching can be integrated within existing mental health activities in urban schools and impact classroom effectiveness and child adaptation across multiple domains. PMID:22428941

  2. Pre-School Child Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This activity kit was designed for parents to use with their preschool children and focuses on the development of skills through play. Sixty activities are described. Descriptions are accompanied by a photograph, a list of materials needed, directions, the purpose of the activity, and a statement of what the child will learn from it. Many of the…

  3. Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaycox, Lisa H.; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Stein, Bradley D.; Langley, Audra K.; Wong, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    Developed out a community participatory research partnership with schools, the Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools Program is a targeted intervention for school children who have experienced a traumatic or violent event and have symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This article describes the original development of the…

  4. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  5. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  6. Promoting equity through integrated early child development and nutrition interventions.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development, a foundation of the post-2015 global agenda, depends on healthy and productive citizens. The origins of adult health begin early in life, stemming from genetic-environmental interactions that include adequate nutrition and opportunities for responsive learning. Inequities associated with inadequate nutrition and early learning opportunities can undermine children's health and development, thereby compromising their productivity and societal contributions. Transactional theory serves as a useful framework for examining the associations that link early child development and nutrition because it emphasizes the interplay that occurs between children and the environment, mediated through caregiver interactions. Although single interventions targeting early child development or nutrition can be effective, there is limited evidence on the development, implementation, evaluation, and scaling up of integrated interventions. This manuscript introduces a special edition of papers on six topics central to integrated child development/nutrition interventions: (1) review of integrated interventions; (2) methods and topics in designing integrated interventions; (3) economic considerations related to integrated interventions; (4) capacity-building considerations; (5) examples of integrated interventions; and (6) policy implications of integrated interventions. Ensuring the health and development of infants and young children through integrated child development/nutrition interventions promotes equity, a critical component of sustainable development.

  7. Child Maltreatment: Optimizing Recognition and Reporting by School Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kathleen S; MacKay, Peggy; Woods, Stephanie J

    2016-12-07

    School nurses perform a crucial role in the prevention, identification, intervention, and reporting of child maltreatment. The purpose of this article is to share the highlights of a research project conducted to (a) examine the effectiveness of an educational intervention program in increasing the knowledge, confidence, and self-efficacy in school nurses regarding children at risk of maltreatment; and (b) discover issues surrounding the comfort level engaging with children, communicating with teachers and other personnel, and ethical issues. The study consisted of two phases. Phase 1 was a face-to-face evidenced-based educational intervention. Focus groups implemented in Phase 2 discovered specific concerns of school nurses. Results indicate a significant increase in school nurse knowledge, confidence, and self-efficacy related to children at risk. Five themes were identified from the focus groups: the importance of interprofessional collaboration, identifiers of children at risk of maltreatment, the role of the school nurse as a mentor and leader, the importance of advancing one's knowledge and skill set, and constraints faced by school nurses.

  8. Waldorf Schools: A Child-Centered System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper presents an overview of the philosophy, psychology of learning, teaching methods, and curriculum of the Waldorf Schools. Most Waldorf teachers are influenced by the esoteric form of critical idealism propounded by Rudolf Steiner. The child is considered by Steiner to be a spiritual being who has reincarnated on to earth in a physical…

  9. Is Your Child's School Really Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, James

    2002-01-01

    Presents a brief quiz for parents to see if their child's school building is taking basic steps to ensure a safe learning environment (e.g., Is the building locked? Are strict guidelines in place when students participate in field trips? Is adult supervision always maintained on playgrounds?). Suggested action plans are included. A sidebar offers…

  10. Fostering the School Age Child: Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piers, James C.

    "Fostering the School Age Child" is a manual for use in training families providing service to children in foster care. Including instructor's materials and participants' course content, this instructor's manual is divided into eight lessons. Separate instructional sessions focus on development and behavior; building discipline and…

  11. Waldorf Schools: A Child-Centered System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper presents an overview of the philosophy, psychology of learning, teaching methods, and curriculum of the Waldorf Schools. Most Waldorf teachers are influenced by the esoteric form of critical idealism propounded by Rudolf Steiner. The child is considered by Steiner to be a spiritual being who has reincarnated on to earth in a physical…

  12. Is Your Child's School Really Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, James

    2002-01-01

    Presents a brief quiz for parents to see if their child's school building is taking basic steps to ensure a safe learning environment (e.g., Is the building locked? Are strict guidelines in place when students participate in field trips? Is adult supervision always maintained on playgrounds?). Suggested action plans are included. A sidebar offers…

  13. Household Schooling and Child Labor Decisions in Rural Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2007-01-01

    Using empirical methods, this paper examines household schooling and child labor decisions in rural Bangladesh. The results suggest the following: poverty and low parental education are associated with lower schooling and greater child labor; asset-owning households are more likely to have children combine child labor with schooling; households…

  14. School intervention related to school and community violence.

    PubMed

    Jaycox, Lisa H; Stein, Bradley D; Wong, Marleen

    2014-04-01

    Schools are well positioned to facilitate recovery for students exposed to community or school violence or other traumatic life events affecting populations of youth. This article describes how schools can circumvent several key barriers to mental health service provision, outcomes that school interventions target, and the role of the family in school-based services. It includes a description of the history of schools in facilitating recovery for students exposed to traumatic events, particularly related to crisis intervention, and the current status of early intervention and strategies for long-term recovery in the school setting. Challenges and future directions are also discussed.

  15. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice.

  16. Effects of integrated child development and nutrition interventions on child development and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Grantham-McGregor, Sally M; Fernald, Lia C H; Kagawa, Rose M C; Walker, Susan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of studies that examined the effect of interventions combining a child development component with a nutrition one; in some cases the nutrition interventions also included health-promotion components. Only papers with both child development and nutrition outcomes and rated as moderate-to-good quality were included. Eleven efficacy and two nonrandomized trials, and eight program evaluations were identified. Only six trials examined interventions separately and combined. The trials showed nutritional interventions usually benefited nutritional status and sometimes benefited child development. Stimulation consistently benefited child development. There was no significant loss of any effect when interventions were combined, but there was little evidence of synergistic interaction between nutrition and stimulation on child development. Only three trials followed up the children after intervention. All at-scale program evaluations were combined interventions. Five benefited child development, but one did not, and two showed deficits. There was generally little benefit of at-scale programs to nutritional status. We found no rigorous evaluations of adding stimulation to health and nutrition services at scale and there is an urgent need for them. There is also a need to establish quality-control mechanisms for existing scaled-up programs and to determine their long-term effects. There is also a need to determine if there are any sustained benefits for the children after programs finish. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Global school-based childhood obesity interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Ickes, Melinda J; McMullen, Jennifer; Haider, Taj; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-08-28

    The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) primary research; (2) overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3) school-based; (4) studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5) published in the English language; (6) child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7) studies that reported outcome data. A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy.

  18. Global School-Based Childhood Obesity Interventions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ickes, Melinda J.; McMullen, Jennifer; Haider, Taj; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Background: The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) primary research; (2) overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3) school-based; (4) studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5) published in the English language; (6) child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7) studies that reported outcome data. Results: A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Discussion: Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy. PMID:25170684

  19. Child abuse intervention: conflicts in current practice and legal theory.

    PubMed

    Markham, B

    1980-01-01

    Recent litigation of child abuse cases indicates that two contradictory policies compete for court approval. One policy would reduce the amount of intervention into abusive families on grounds of privacy. The other seeks to maintain and expand channels of investigation and treatment. While attempting to prescribe a comprehensive approach to child abuse, these conflicting policies, in fact, address different problems in child protection. Without a treatment formulation that focuses on the separate issues raised by each policy, it is not clear that clinicians will be able to sustain child abuse investigatory and protective authority against the privacy attack. This treatment synthesis must entail development of standards that maximize protection of the child from caretakers at the earliest stages of risk and protection from administrative procrastination in case resolution. Protecting the child rather than the family institution should provide the central focus of policy formulation.

  20. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  1. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  2. Trends in Methodological Rigor in Intervention Research Published in School Psychology Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Klingbeil, David A.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Petersen-Brown, Shawna

    2012-01-01

    Methodological rigor in intervention research is important for documenting evidence-based practices and has been a recent focus in legislation, including the No Child Left Behind Act. The current study examined the methodological rigor of intervention research in four school psychology journals since the 1960s. Intervention research has increased…

  3. Trends in Methodological Rigor in Intervention Research Published in School Psychology Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Klingbeil, David A.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Petersen-Brown, Shawna

    2012-01-01

    Methodological rigor in intervention research is important for documenting evidence-based practices and has been a recent focus in legislation, including the No Child Left Behind Act. The current study examined the methodological rigor of intervention research in four school psychology journals since the 1960s. Intervention research has increased…

  4. Influences of Family-Systems Intervention Practices on Parent-Child Interactions and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Carol M.; Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which the influences of family-systems intervention practices could be traced to variations in parent-child interactions and child development was investigated by meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM). MASEM is a procedure for producing a weighted pooled correlation matrix and fitting a structural equation model to the…

  5. How useful are systematic reviews of child obesity interventions?

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, L; Wiggers, J; Tursan d'Espaignet, E; Bell, A C

    2010-02-01

    To facilitate the translation of research evidence into practice, policy makers and practitioners require practice-relevant information such as the effectiveness of interventions delivered in specific settings, by various personnel, using various intervention modalities, and descriptions of intervention costs or adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to review the relevance of information reported in systematic reviews of child obesity interventions in terms of these requirements. A systematic search was conducted for systematic reviews of child obesity interventions published in English between 1990 and 2008. A total of 3150 citations were examined. Of the 44 eligible reviews, 16 examined prevention interventions, 18 examined treatment interventions, and 10 examined both prevention and treatment interventions. Less than 50% of prevention and treatment reviews reported the effect of interventions conducted in specific settings, the effect of interventions conducted by various personnel and the effect of those delivered via various intervention modalities. Similarly, few (4-15%) reviews reported cost or adverse event outcomes. Existing systematic reviews of childhood obesity interventions provide limited practice-relevant information. The potential for benefit from the translation of evidence into practice is therefore limited. Involving end users in systematic review development may improve the relevance of outcomes reported in systematic reviews.

  6. Intervention Research on School Bullying in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Yucui; Wang, Shuqiong; Zhang, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Intervention research on school bullying was conducted in a primary school with an action research method. After conducting a five-week intervention program, the occurrence ratio of being bullied on the way to school and back home and the degree to which children were bullied dropped significantly, but the rate of reduction in grade three was…

  7. Intervention Research on School Bullying in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Yucui; Wang, Shuqiong; Zhang, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Intervention research on school bullying was conducted in a primary school with an action research method. After conducting a five-week intervention program, the occurrence ratio of being bullied on the way to school and back home and the degree to which children were bullied dropped significantly, but the rate of reduction in grade three was…

  8. This Child Succeeds in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    Project Success Environment is an experimental program sponsored by the Atlanta Public Schools and funded by the State Department of Education under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The focus of this program, subtitled "An approach to Community Educational Improvement," is the development of a success…

  9. Clinical abnormalities, early intervention program of Down syndrome children: Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health experience.

    PubMed

    Fuengfoo, Adidsuda; Sakulnoom, Kim

    2014-06-01

    Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health is a tertiary institute of children in Thailand, where early intervention programs have been provided since 1990 by multidisciplinary approach especially in Down syndrome children. This aim of the present study is to follow the impact of early intervention on the outcome of Down syndrome children. The school attendance number of Down syndrome children was compared between regular early intervention and non-regular early intervention. The present study group consists of 210 Down syndrome children who attended early intervention programs at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health between June 2008 and January 2012. Data include clinical features, school attendance developmental quotient (DQ) at 3 years of age using Capute Scales Cognitive Adaptive Test/Scale (CAT/CLAMS). Developmental milestones have been recorded as to the time of appearance of gross motor, fine motor, language, personal-social development compared to those non-regular intervention patients. Of 210 Down syndrome children, 117 were boys and 93 were girls. About 87% received regular intervention, 68% attended speech training. Mean DQ at 3 years of age was 65. Of the 184 children who still did follow-up at developmental department, 124 children (59%) attended school: mainstream school children 78 (63%) and special school children 46 (37%). The mean age at entrance to school was 5.8 ± 1.4 years. The school attendance was correlated with maternal education and regular early intervention attendance. Regular early intervention starts have proven to have a positive effect on development. The school attendance number of Down syndrome children receiving regular early intervention was statistically and significantly higher than the number of Down syndrome children receiving non-regular early intervention was. School attendance correlated with maternal education and attended regularly early intervention. Regular early intervention together with maternal

  10. Effective Partnerships in School Reform: Lessons Learned from the Midwest Child-Parent Center Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Englund, Michelle M.; Candee, Allyson; Lease, Erin; Sullivan, Molly; Warner-Richter, Mallory; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    The Midwest Expansion of the Child-Parent Center Education Program (MCPC) is a pre-K to 3rd grade intervention program aimed at improving economically disadvantaged children's school success by enhancing continuity in instruction and increasing parental involvement. Opened in Chicago in the 1960s, this school reform model has undergone significant…

  11. Newborn Parent Based Intervention to Increase Child Safety Seat Use

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Yang, Jingzhen; Cheng, Fuyuan; Li, Liping

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to assess the effect of a maternity department intervention on improvement of knowledge and use of child safety seats (CSS) among newborn parents. An intervention study included three groups (one education plus free CSS intervention group, one education only group, and one control group). The participants were parents of newborns in the maternity department of two hospitals. Both of the intervention groups received a folded pamphlet of child passenger safety, a height chart and standardized safety education during their hospital stay after giving birth. The education plus free CSS intervention group received an additional free CSS and professional installation training at hospital discharge. The control group received a pamphlet with educational information about nutrition and food safety. Three months after enrollment, a telephone follow-up was conducted among participants in the three groups. Data on child passenger safety knowledge, risky driving behaviors, and use of CSS were evaluated before and after the intervention. A total of 132 newborn parents were enrolled in the study; of those, 52 (39.4%) were assigned into the education plus free CSS intervention group, 44 (33.3%) were in the education intervention only group, and 36 (27.3%) were in the control group. No significant differences existed in demographics among the three groups. There was a significant difference in newborn parents’ child passenger safety knowledge and behaviors in the three groups before and after the intervention. In addition, the CSS use increased significantly in the education plus free CSS group after the intervention compared to parents in the education only or control groups. Education on safety, combined with a free CSS and professional installation training, were effective at increasing newborn parents’ knowledge and use of CSS. Future studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up are needed to determine a long-term effect of the intervention. PMID

  12. Newborn Parent Based Intervention to Increase Child Safety Seat Use.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Yang, Jingzhen; Cheng, Fuyuan; Li, Liping

    2016-08-02

    This paper intends to assess the effect of a maternity department intervention on improvement of knowledge and use of child safety seats (CSS) among newborn parents. An intervention study included three groups (one education plus free CSS intervention group, one education only group, and one control group). The participants were parents of newborns in the maternity department of two hospitals. Both of the intervention groups received a folded pamphlet of child passenger safety, a height chart and standardized safety education during their hospital stay after giving birth. The education plus free CSS intervention group received an additional free CSS and professional installation training at hospital discharge. The control group received a pamphlet with educational information about nutrition and food safety. Three months after enrollment, a telephone follow-up was conducted among participants in the three groups. Data on child passenger safety knowledge, risky driving behaviors, and use of CSS were evaluated before and after the intervention. A total of 132 newborn parents were enrolled in the study; of those, 52 (39.4%) were assigned into the education plus free CSS intervention group, 44 (33.3%) were in the education intervention only group, and 36 (27.3%) were in the control group. No significant differences existed in demographics among the three groups. There was a significant difference in newborn parents' child passenger safety knowledge and behaviors in the three groups before and after the intervention. In addition, the CSS use increased significantly in the education plus free CSS group after the intervention compared to parents in the education only or control groups. Education on safety, combined with a free CSS and professional installation training, were effective at increasing newborn parents' knowledge and use of CSS. Future studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up are needed to determine a long-term effect of the intervention.

  13. Response to Intervention: A Study of Teacher Efficacy in Response to Intervention Implementation in Elementary Schools in Two Southeast Georgia School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Michele I.

    2012-01-01

    Response to Intervention has the potential to help schools reach the goals of both the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) 2004. The course of action with the Response to Intervention model is to apply instructionally sound practices based on students' needs, monitor students'…

  14. Parental health and child schooling.

    PubMed

    Bratti, Massimiliano; Mendola, Mariapia

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides new empirical evidence on the impact of parental health shocks on investments in children's education using detailed longitudinal data from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our study controls for individual unobserved heterogeneity by using child fixed effects, and it accounts for potential misreporting of self-reported health by employing several, more precise, health indicators. Results show that co-living children of ill mothers, but not of ill fathers, are significantly less likely to be enrolled in education at ages 15-24. Moreover, there is some evidence that mother's negative health shocks are likely to raise the employment probability of children due to the need to cover higher health expenditures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. School Counselors and Child Abuse Reporting: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jill K.

    2009-01-01

    A study was done to investigate school counselors' child abuse reporting behaviors and perceptions regarding the child abuse reporting process. Participants were randomly selected from the American School Counselor Association membership database with 193 school counselors returning questionnaires. Overall, school counselors indicated that they…

  16. School Counselors and Child Abuse Reporting: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jill K.

    2009-01-01

    A study was done to investigate school counselors' child abuse reporting behaviors and perceptions regarding the child abuse reporting process. Participants were randomly selected from the American School Counselor Association membership database with 193 school counselors returning questionnaires. Overall, school counselors indicated that they…

  17. Teacher-Mediated Interventions to Support Child Mental Health Following a Disaster: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Coombe, Jacqueline; Mackenzie, Lisa; Munro, Robyn; Hazell, Trevor; Perkins, David; Reddy, Prasuna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This review sought to identify, describe and assess the effectiveness of teacher-mediated interventions that aim to support child and adolescent recovery after a natural or man-made disaster. We also aimed to assess intervention applicability to rural and remote Australian school settings. Method: A systematic search of the academic literature was undertaken utilising six electronic databases (EBSCO, Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and CINAHL) using terms that relate to: teacher-mediated and school-based interventions; children and adolescents; mental health and wellbeing; natural disasters and man-made disasters. This was supplemented by a grey literature search. Results: A total of 20 articles reporting on 18 separate interventions were identified. Nine separate interventions had been evaluated using methodologically adequate research designs, with findings suggesting at least short-term improvement in student wellbeing outcomes and academic performance. Conclusions: Although none of the identified studies reported on Australian-based interventions, international interventions could be adapted to the Australian rural and remote context using existing psychosocial programs and resources available online to Australian schools. Future research should investigate the acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of implementing interventions modelled on the identified studies in Australian schools settings. PMID:26767147

  18. School food, politics and child health.

    PubMed

    Bundy, Donald A P; Drake, Lesley J; Burbano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    An analysis undertaken jointly in 2009 by the UN World Food Programme, The Partnership for Child Development and the World Bank was published as Rethinking School Feeding to provide guidance on how to develop and implement effective school feeding programmes as a productive safety net and as part of the efforts to achieve Education for All. The present paper reflects on how understanding of school feeding has changed since that analysis. Data on school feeding programme outcomes were collected through a literature review. Regression models were used to analyse relationships between school feeding costs (from data that were collected), the per capita costs of primary education and Gross Domestic Product per capita. Data on the transition to national ownership, supply chains and country examples were collected through country case studies. School feeding programmes increase school attendance, cognition and educational achievement, as well as provide a transfer of resources to households with possible benefits to local agricultural production and local market development. Low-income countries exhibit large variations in school feeding costs, with concomitant opportunities for cost containment. Countries are increasingly looking to transition from externally supported projects to national programmes. School feeding is now clearly evident as a major social programme in most countries with a global turnover in excess of $US 100 billion. This argues for a continuing focus on the evidence base with a view to helping countries ensure that their programmes are as cost-effective as possible. Clear policy advice has never been more important.

  19. Effective Intervention for School Refusal Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Clare; Woods, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of successful professional intervention for two case studies of female adolescents' school refusal behaviour is presented. Data gathered from the young person, professionals, and parents in each case are synthesised to propose a multi-level, ecologically situated model of intervention for school refusal behaviour. The proposed model…

  20. Effective Intervention for School Refusal Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Clare; Woods, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of successful professional intervention for two case studies of female adolescents' school refusal behaviour is presented. Data gathered from the young person, professionals, and parents in each case are synthesised to propose a multi-level, ecologically situated model of intervention for school refusal behaviour. The proposed model…

  1. "A Child Is Also a Teacher": Exploring the Potential for Children as Change Agents in the Context of a School-Based WASH Intervention in Rural Eastern Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresee, S.; Caruso, B. A.; Sales, J.; Lupele, J.; Freeman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    As part of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in low-income settings, it is frequently assumed that pupils can disseminate information and catalyze change at home, yet this assumption has not been rigorously assessed. We employed qualitative research methods in two phases to assess the potential for children to be change agents in five…

  2. "A Child Is Also a Teacher": Exploring the Potential for Children as Change Agents in the Context of a School-Based WASH Intervention in Rural Eastern Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresee, S.; Caruso, B. A.; Sales, J.; Lupele, J.; Freeman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    As part of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in low-income settings, it is frequently assumed that pupils can disseminate information and catalyze change at home, yet this assumption has not been rigorously assessed. We employed qualitative research methods in two phases to assess the potential for children to be change agents in five…

  3. Helping the Child with Cancer Go Back to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Marjorie B.

    1980-01-01

    For the child with cancer, return to school signals a return to normal living and provides a sense of future. Cooperation among the patient, family, medical staff, and school personnel is important for successful school reentry. (CJ)

  4. Adaptive Interventions and SMART Designs: Application to child behavior research in a community setting

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Kelley M.; Hyde, Luke W.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity between and within people necessitates the need for sequential personalized interventions to optimize individual outcomes. Personalized or adaptive interventions (AIs) are relevant for diseases and maladaptive behavioral trajectories when one intervention is not curative and success of a subsequent intervention may depend on individual characteristics or response. AIs may be applied to medical settings and to investigate best prevention, education, and community-based practices. AIs can begin with low-cost or low-burden interventions and followed with intensified or alternative interventions for those who need it most. AIs that guide practice over the course of a disease, program, or school year can be investigated through sequential multiple assignment randomized trials (SMARTs). To promote the use of SMARTs, we provide a hypothetical SMART in a Head Start program to address child behavior problems. We describe the advantages and limitations of SMARTs, particularly as they may be applied to the field of evaluation. PMID:28239254

  5. Countdown to 2015: tracking intervention coverage for child survival.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Jennifer; Terreri, Nancy; Victora, Cesar G; Mason, Elizabeth; Daelmans, Bernadette; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Bustreo, Flavia; Songane, Francisco; Salama, Peter; Wardlaw, Tessa

    2006-09-23

    The fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) calls for a two-thirds' reduction between 1990 and 2015 in deaths of children younger than five years; achieving this will require widespread use of effective interventions, especially in poor countries. We present the first report of the Child Survival Countdown, a worldwide effort to monitor coverage of key child-survival interventions in 60 countries with the world's highest numbers or rates of child mortality. In 2005, we developed a profile for each of the 60 countries to summarise information on coverage with essential child survival interventions. The profiles also present information on demographics, nutritional status, major causes of death in children under 5 years of age, and the status of selected health policies. Progress toward the fourth MDG is summarised by comparing the average annual rate of reduction in under-5 mortality in each country with that needed to achieve the goal. The profiles also include a comparison of the proportions of children in the poorest and richest quintiles of the population who received six or more essential prevention interventions. Each country's progress (as measured by defined indicators of intervention coverage) was put into one of three groups created on the basis of international targets: "on track"; "watch and act"; and "high alert". For indicators without targets, arbitrary thresholds for high, middle, and low performance across the 60 countries were used as a basis for categorisation. Only seven countries are on track to met MDG-4, 39 countries are making some progress, although they need to accelerate the speed, and 14 countries are cause for serious concern. Coverage of the key child survival interventions remains critically low, although some countries have made substantial improvements in increasing the proportion of mothers and children with access to life saving interventions by as much as ten percentage points in 2 years. Children from the poorest families were

  6. [Crisis Intervention in a Health Care Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Burchard, Falk; Diebenbusch, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Crisis Intervention in a Health Care Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry In the past years the pressure in society and psychological problems in Germany have risen up. This can especially be verified by the great influx of utilization of child and adolescent psychiatric clinics through the admission of crisis. In this connection social disadvantaged female adolescents with a low socio-economic status, students of the secondary school, children in care and the ones whose parents have to manage their upbringing alone are preferentially affected. These developments require a fast adaptation of the supply system to the transformed demands, in particular in terms of outpatient treatment, as well as a closely and structured cooperation between the youth welfare and child and adolescent psychiatric clinics in their function as systems of help. In the script statistical data and adaptive approaches of a supply department of child and adolescent psychiatry are presented.

  7. The New Haven School Intervention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James

    This paper reviews a New Haven, Connecticut school intervention project as a model for replication in other schools. The functions of a school advisory committee, parent participation, a mental health team, and a social skills curriculum are described as the principal components of the project. The need for preservice as well as inservice training…

  8. Child-Focused Intervention in Shelters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Honore M.

    Crisis intervention type services were initiated in the Battered Women's Shelter in Fayetteville, Arkansas with the purpose of assisting children with their immediate distress and possibly preventing repetition of the violent patterns within families. Services were provided by volunteers or hired staff as funding allowed. The families the shelter…

  9. Do multiple micronutrient interventions improve child health, growth, and development?

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Goldenberg, Tamar; Allen, Lindsay H

    2011-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common and often co-occur in many developing countries. Several studies have examined the benefits of providing multiple micronutrient (MMN) interventions during pregnancy and childhood, but the implications for programs remain unclear. The key objective of this review is to summarize what is known about the efficacy of MMN interventions during early childhood on functional outcomes, namely, child health, survival, growth, and development, to guide policy and identify gaps for future research. We identified review articles including meta-analyses and intervention studies that evaluated the benefits of MMN interventions (3 or more micronutrients) in children (<5 y of age) using Pubmed and EMBASE. Several controlled trials (n = 45) and meta-analyses (n = 6) have evaluated the effects of MMN interventions primarily for child morbidity, anemia, and growth. Two studies found no effects on child mortality. The findings for respiratory illness and diarrhea are mixed, although suggestive of benefit when provided as fortified foods. There is evidence from several controlled trials (>25) and 2 meta-analyses that MMN interventions improve hemoglobin concentrations and reduce anemia, but the effects were small compared to providing only iron or iron with folic acid. Two recent meta-analyses and several intervention trials also indicated that MMN interventions improve linear growth compared to providing a placebo or single nutrients. Much less is known about the effects on MMN interventions during early childhood on motor and mental development. In summary, MMN interventions may result in improved outcomes for children in settings where micronutrient deficiencies are widespread.

  10. Child labour or school attendance? Evidence from Zambia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Nielsen, H S

    1997-01-01

    "In this paper we investigate what affects school attendance and child labour in an LDC, using data for Zambia.... The empirical analysis suggests that both economic and sociological variables are important determinants for the choice between school attendance and child labour. In particular, we find some support for the hypothesis that poverty forces households to keep their children away from school."

  11. Child Neglect: A Guide for Intervention. The User Manual Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudin, James M., Jr.

    This manual provides a state-of-the art review of child neglect in the United States, its nature, causes, and the implications of that knowledge for preventive and remedial intervention. After an introduction, the first chapter considers the definition of neglect including types of neglect, the withholding of medically indicated treatment from…

  12. Three views of child neglect: expanding visions of preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Lally, J R

    1984-01-01

    The failure to address child neglect prevention efforts from a system viewpoint is presented as a major impediment to the generation of truly preventive interventions. Child neglect prevention is discussed at three levels: at the level of the individual, at the level of social systems and at the level of fundamental beliefs and cultural agreements. A process of component selection and placement is suggested with component selection based on components drawn from recent research and clinical work. Interventions would be geared to meet the particular needs of individual settings and at the same time be constructed so that each component would mesh with and build on previous components. An outline of a preventive child neglect intervention strategy is presented. Practices of government, the impact of business and technology and economic theory and practice are shown as plausible areas for preventive intervention. Core beliefs upon which social systems are built are challenged. It is stated that too narrow a view of child neglect often limits problem definition and encourages placement of blame at the family level. This decreases the effectiveness of the clinician who is coping with an individual problem as well as the researcher who is exploring the basic issues.

  13. Success in Early Intervention: The Chicago Child-Parent Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.

    Although early intervention programs have enjoyed popular and legislative support, little hard data exist on the long-term consequences of these efforts. This study examined the long-term effects of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program in Chicago. Begun in 1967, the program operates out of 24 centers, located in proximity to the elementary…

  14. Intervention in Child Sexual Abuse: An Analysis of Professional Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Ann; Newlon, Betty J.

    This study explored the similarities and differences in professional attitudes toward intervention in incest cases. The sample consisted of 35 men and women employed at one of the following: a counseling agency, child protective services, sheriff's department, and police department in a Southwest community. Demographic data were collected,…

  15. Enhancing parent-child interaction with a prenatal couple intervention.

    PubMed

    Bryan, A A

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of a prenatal couple group intervention on parent-child interaction postbirth. Quasiexperimental study. A nonrandomized convenience sample of treatment group (TG) couples (n = 35) who attended an additional prenatal three-class series was compared to a control group (CG) from childbirth education classes on measures of videotaped parent-child interaction using the NCATS tool. The intervention class series was based on individual and couple changes in meaning/identity, roles, and relationship/interaction during the transition to parenthood. It addressed mother/father roles, infant communication abilities, and patterns of the first 3 months of life in a mutually enjoyable, possibility-focused way. T-tests and ANCOVA on NCATS scores between groups showed higher TG scores for mothers in sensitivity to cues, for fathers in social-emotional growth fostering, and for couple mean scores in social-emotional growth fostering, couple mean response to child distress, caregiver total, and caregiver-child total. Higher contingency scores were also found in the TG group. Fewer TG mothers and fathers fell below NCATS lower cutoff scores. Interventions that enhance mutual parent-child interaction through increased sensitivity to cues and responsiveness to infant needs or signals are important avenues for facilitating secure attachment, father and mother involvement, optimal development, and prevention of child abuse and neglect. The positive approach to this intervention invites couples to see themselves as developing with their infants over time, and to view their infants in new ways that will help develop satisfying, self-reinforcing patterns of interaction.

  16. Mitigating the Effects of Family Poverty on Early Child Development through Parenting Interventions in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Cates, Carolyn Brockmeyer; Weisleder, Adriana; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2016-04-01

    Poverty related disparities in early child development and school readiness are a major public health crisis, the prevention of which has emerged in recent years as a national priority. Interventions targeting parenting and the quality of the early home language environment are at the forefront of efforts to address these disparities. In this article we discuss the innovative use of the pediatric primary care platform as part of a comprehensive public health strategy to prevent adverse child development outcomes through the promotion of parenting. Models of interventions in the pediatric primary care setting are discussed with evidence of effectiveness reviewed. Taken together, a review of this significant body of work shows the tremendous potential to deliver evidence-based preventive interventions to families at risk for poverty related disparities in child development and school readiness at the time of pediatric primary care visits. We also addresss considerations related to scaling and maximizing the effect of pediatric primary care parenting interventions and provide key policy recommendations.

  17. The burden of disaster: part II. applying interventions across the child's social ecology.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H

    2012-01-01

    This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the childs social ecology consisting of the Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning andpractice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem - including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems - affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child's Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child's environment.

  18. Formative research methods for designing culturally appropriate, integrated child nutrition and development interventions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Margaret E; Johnson, Susan L; Wasser, Heather; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Shroff, Monal; Fernandez Rao, Sylvia; Cunningham, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional and developmental insults in the first few years of life have profound public health implications, including substantial contributions to neonatal, infant, and early childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as longer term effects on cognitive development, school achievement, and worker productivity. Optimal development that can lead to the attainment of an individual's fullest potential, therefore, requires a combination of genetic capacity, adequate nutrition, psychosocial stimulation, and safe, clean physical environments. Researchers and policymakers have called for integrated child nutrition and development interventions for more than 20 years, yet there are only a handful of efficacy trials and even fewer examples of integrated interventions that have been taken to scale. While a critical component in the design of such interventions is formative research, there is a dearth of information in both the literature and policy arenas to guide this phase of the process. To move the field forward, this paper first provides an overview of formative research methods with a focus on qualitative inquiry, a description of the critical domains to be assessed (infant and young child feeding, responsive feeding, and child development), and currently available resources. Application of these methods is provided through a real-world case study--the design of an integrated nutrition and child development efficacy trial in Andhra Pradesh, India. Recommendations for next steps are discussed, the most important of which is the need for a comprehensive set of formative guidelines for designing locally tailored, culturally appropriate, integrated interventions.

  19. Formative research methods for designing culturally appropriate, integrated child nutrition and development interventions: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Margaret E.; Johnson, Susan L.; Wasser, Heather; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Shroff, Monal; Fernandez-Rao, Sylvia; Cunningham, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional and developmental insults in the first few years of life have profound public health implications, including substantial contributions to neonatal, infant, and early childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as longer term impacts on cognitive development, school achievement, and worker productivity. Optimal development that can lead to the attainment of the individual's fullest potential therefore requires a combination of genetic capacity, adequate nutrition, psychosocial stimulation, and safe, clean physical environments. Researchers and policymakers have called for integrated child nutrition and development interventions for more than twenty years, yet there are only a handful of efficacy trials and even fewer examples of integrated interventions that have been taken to scale. While a critical component to the design of such interventions is formative research, there is a dearth of information in both the literature and policy arenas to guide this phase of the process. To move the field forward, this paper first provides an overview of formative research methods with a focus on qualitative inquiry, a description of the critical domains to be assessed (infant and young child feeding, responsive feeding, and child development), and currently available resources. Application of these methods is provided through a real-world case study—the design of an integrated nutrition and child development efficacy trial in Andhra Pradesh, India. Recommendations for next steps are discussed, the most important of which is the need for a comprehensive set of formative guidelines for designing locally tailored, culturally appropriate integrated interventions. PMID:24673167

  20. Cortisol Patterns for Young Children Displaying Disruptive Behavior: Links to a Teacher-Child, Relationship-Focused Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Bridget E; Williford, Amanda P

    2017-01-01

    Supportive and close relationships that young children have with teachers have lasting effects on children's behavior and academic success, and this is particularly true for children with challenging behaviors. These relationships are also important for children's developing stress response system, and children in child care may be more likely to display atypical cortisol patterns at child care. However, warm, supportive relationships with teachers may buffer these negative effects of child care. While many relationship-focused early childhood interventions demonstrate changes in child behavior, associations with children's stress response system are unknown. This study assessed children's activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis via salivary cortisol as a function of their participation in a dyadic intervention intended to improve a teacher's interaction quality with a particular child. Seventy teachers and 113 preschool children participated who were part of a larger study of teachers and children were randomly assigned at the classroom level across three intervention conditions: Banking Time, Time-Control Comparison (Child Time), and Business-as-Usual. At the end of the school year, children in the Banking Time condition displayed a significantly greater decline in cortisol across the morning during preschool compared to children in Business-as-Usual condition. These pilot results are among the first to provide preliminary evidence that school-based interventions that promote sensitive and responsive interactions may improve young children's activity in the stress response system within the child care/early education context.

  1. Community led active schools programme (CLASP) exploring the implementation of health interventions in primary schools: headteachers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Christian, Danielle; Todd, Charlotte; Davies, Helen; Rance, Jaynie; Stratton, Gareth; Rapport, Frances; Brophy, Sinead

    2015-03-13

    Schools are repeatedly utilised as a key setting for health interventions. However, the translation of effective research findings to the school setting can be problematic. In order to improve effective translation of future interventions, it is imperative key challenges and facilitators of implementing health interventions be understood from a school's perspective. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted in primary schools (headteachers n = 16, deputy headteacher n = 1, healthy school co-ordinator n = 2). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. The main challenges for schools in implementing health interventions were; government-led academic priorities, initiative overload, low autonomy for schools, lack of staff support, lack of facilities and resources, litigation risk and parental engagement. Recommendations to increase the application of interventions into the school setting included; better planning and organisation, greater collaboration with schools and external partners and elements addressing sustainability. Child-centred and cross-curricular approaches, inclusive whole school approaches and assurances to be supportive of the school ethos were also favoured for consideration. This work explores schools' perspectives regarding the implementation of health interventions and utilises these thoughts to create guidelines for developing future school-based interventions. Recommendations include the need to account for variability between school environments, staff and pupils. Interventions with an element of adaptability were preferred over the delivery of blanket fixed interventions. Involving schools in the developmental stage would add useful insights to ensure the interventions can be tailored to best suit each individual schools' needs and improve implementation.

  2. Sociodrama: A Program for Intervention in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Gabriella; Tetel-Hanks, Joan

    1981-01-01

    Sociodrama is used at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (North Carolina) as a successful intervention method in dealing with emotionally handicapped learning disabled or mentally handicapped students. (SB)

  3. Intervention of the Courts in School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Walter G.

    1978-01-01

    The rhythm and intensity of judicial activity, questions and issues adjudicated by the courts, judicial approaches and strategies, and the roles played by the courts are discussed with regard to court intervention in state school finance systems. (DS)

  4. Intervention of the Courts in School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Walter G.

    1978-01-01

    The rhythm and intensity of judicial activity, questions and issues adjudicated by the courts, judicial approaches and strategies, and the roles played by the courts are discussed with regard to court intervention in state school finance systems. (DS)

  5. Child maltreatment: interventions to improve recognition and reporting.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kathleen Sanders; Steelman, Sara Hatfield

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a significant public health problem and described as one of the greatest threats facing the health, welfare, and social well-being of children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012). The effect of child maltreatment on the children involved, their families, and society as a whole is substantial. Despite mandatory reporting laws, the poignant reality is that child maltreatment is significantly underrecognized and underreported. Interventions must be designed, tested, and implemented to fulfill the goal of child maltreatment prevention. Forensic nurses are uniquely qualified to assume a leadership role and work collaboratively with children, their caregivers, and all members of the interdisciplinary team to ensure the safety and protection of children. The purpose of this article is to present an evidence-based discussion of the scope of the problem of child maltreatment, contributing barriers to recognition and reporting, and suggestions for interventions designed to achieve the goals of primary and secondary prevention.

  6. Adverse school context moderates the outcomes of selective interventions for aggressive children.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jan N; Cavell, Timothy A; Meehan, Barbara T; Zhang, Duan; Collie, Claire

    2005-08-01

    Drawing on social ecological theory and empirical studies on the role of school context in aggression, the authors argue that school adversity is an important consideration in choosing selective interventions for aggressive children. The moderating role of school adversity on intervention effectiveness is illustrated with data from a randomized clinical trial study investigating 2 selective interventions administered to 86 aggressive 2nd and 3rd graders. The authors expected that PrimeTime, an intervention targeting child competencies, would be more effective in low-adversity schools, whereas Lunch Buddy, an intervention targeting peer ecology, would be more effective in high-adversity schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses showed significant posttreatment effects on composite measures of aggression and achievement for the interaction between the level of school adversity and treatment condition. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Child language interventions in public health: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    De Cesaro, Bruna Campos; Gurgel, Léia Gonçalves; Nunes, Gabriela Pisoni Canedo; Reppold, Caroline Tozzi

    2013-01-01

    Systematically review the literature on interventions in children's language in primary health care. One searched the electronic databases (January 1980 to March 2013) MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), Scopus, Lilacs and Scielo. The search terms used were "child language", "primary health care", "randomized controlled trial" and "intervention studies" (in English, Portuguese and Spanish). There were included any randomized controlled trials that addressed the issues child language and primary health care. The analysis was based on the type of language intervention conducted in primary health care. Seven studies were included and used intervention strategies such as interactive video, guidance for parents and group therapy. Individuals of both genders were included in the seven studies. The age of the children participant in the samples of the articles included in this review ranged from zero to 11 years. These seven studies used approaches that included only parents, parents and children or just children. The mainly intervention in language on primary health care, used in randomized controlled trials, involved the use of interactional video. Several professionals, beyond speech and language therapist, been inserted in the language interventions on primary health care, demonstrating the importance of interdisciplinary work. None of the articles mentioned aspects related to hearing. There was scarcity of randomized controlled trials that address on language and public health, either in Brazil or internationally.

  8. [Recommendations for the management of the child with allergic diseases at school].

    PubMed

    Saranz, Ricardo J; Lozano, Alejandro; Mariño, Andrea; Boudet, Raúl V; Sarraquigne, María Paula; Cáceres, María Elena; Bandín, Gloria; Lukin, Alicia; Skrie, Víctor; Cassaniti, María Cristina; Agüero, Claudio; Chorny, Marta; Reichbach, Débora S; Arnolt, Roque Gustavo; Cavallo, Aldo

    2015-06-01

    Allergic diseases cause great impact on the health related quality of life in children and adolescents, resulting in increased school absenteeism and deficiencies in school performance. Although the bibliographic framework on allergic diseases is wide, in our country, there are no guidelines for proper management of the allergic child at school. It is necessary to establish guidelines for coordinated action among the educational community, the families, the pediatrician, the health team and governmental and non-governmental authorities. This position paper aims to provide information about the impact of allergic diseases on school activities, establish standards of competence of the various stakeholders at school and consider the legal framework for the intervention of the school staff about the child with allergies at school.

  9. School-Based Intervention for Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Goh, Valerie Grace; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With children today being tested at younger ages, test anxiety has an earlier onset age. There is relatively limited research on test anxiety management programs with elementary school children. The theoretical basis for this nonrandomized pre-post intervention study is grounded in cognitive and behavioral interventions for test…

  10. School-Based Intervention for Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Goh, Valerie Grace; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With children today being tested at younger ages, test anxiety has an earlier onset age. There is relatively limited research on test anxiety management programs with elementary school children. The theoretical basis for this nonrandomized pre-post intervention study is grounded in cognitive and behavioral interventions for test…

  11. Child Schooling in Ethiopia: The Role of Maternal Autonomy

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Itismita

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of maternal autonomy on child schooling outcomes in Ethiopia using a nationally representative Ethiopian Demographic and Health survey for 2011. The empirical strategy uses a Hurdle Negative Binomial Regression model to estimate years of schooling. An ordered probit model is also estimated to examine age grade distortion using a trichotomous dependent variable that captures three states of child schooling. The large sample size and the range of questions available in this dataset allow us to explore the influence of individual and household level social, economic and cultural factors on child schooling. The analysis finds statistically significant effects of maternal autonomy variables on child schooling in Ethiopia. The roles of maternal autonomy and other household-level factors on child schooling are important issues in Ethiopia, where health and education outcomes are poor for large segments of the population. PMID:27942039

  12. Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.…

  13. Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Missouri State Board of Education and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education are dedicated to ensuring that all children have access to good schools that prepare them for college and career success. The Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention Plan takes a differentiated approach to state support based on…

  14. School-Based Interventions for Anxious Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Gail A.; Layne, Ann E.; Egan, Elizabeth A.; Tennison, Dana M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of three school-based interventions for anxious children: group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children, group CBT for children plus parent training group, and no-treatment control. Method: Students (7-11 years old) in three elementary schools (N = 453) were screened using the Multidimensional…

  15. Response to Intervention in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuerborn, Laura L.; Sarin, Kathryn; Tyre, Ashli D.

    2011-01-01

    Many schools are turning to response to intervention (RTI) models to meet the needs of their students. The promise of RTI is that it will enable schools to better and more efficiently meet the learning needs of a large continuum of students by providing evidence-based schoolwide instruction, supplemental supports, and intensive individualized…

  16. Government intervention in child rearing: governing infancy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Robert Davis argues that much of the moral anxiety currently surrounding children in Europe and North America emerges at ages and stages curiously familiar from traditional Western constructions of childhood. The symbolism of infancy has proven enduringly effective over the last two centuries in associating the earliest years of children's lives with a peculiar prestige and aura. Infancy is then vouchsafed within this symbolism as a state in which all of society's hopes and ideals for the young might somehow be enthusiastically invested, regardless of the complications that can be anticipated in the later, more ambivalent years of childhood and adolescence. According to Davis, the understanding of the concept of infancy associated with the rise of popular education can trace its pedigree to a genuine shift in sensibility that occurred in the middle of the eighteenth century. After exploring the essentially Romantic positions of Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi and Friedrich Fröbel and their relevance to the pattern of reform of early childhood education in the United Kingdom and the United States, Davis also assesses the influence of figures such as Stanley Hall and John Dewey in determining the rationale for modern early childhood education. A central contention of Davis's essay is that the assumptions evident in the theory and practice of Pestalozzi and his followers crystallize a series of tensions in the understanding of infancy and infant education that have haunted early childhood education from the origins of popular schooling in the late eighteenth century down to the policy dilemmas of the present day.

  17. Parenting intervention effects on parental depressive symptoms: examining the role of parenting and child behavior.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessie J; Gonzales, Nancy A; Montaño, Zorash; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger E

    2014-06-01

    Parental depression is a major risk factor in child development. Growing research suggests parenting programs can positively impact parental depressive symptoms, although the specific mechanisms that explain these effects are unknown. The current study examined parenting mediated effects of a parenting program on mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, as well as the role of child behavior in linking parenting to reductions in depressive symptoms. The study samples included 494 mothers and 288 fathers of Mexican origin adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program/Proyecto Puentes a la Secundaria, a universal prevention and promotion intervention that included parent training but did not directly target parental depressive symptoms. Parenting mediator models tested program effects on parental depressive symptoms through changes in harsh and supportive parenting. Results showed a significant indirect intervention effect on maternal depressive symptoms through changes in mothers' harsh parenting. Next, child behavior models revealed a partial mediation effect of harsh parenting and a full mediation effect of supportive parenting on maternal depressive symptoms through mothers' reports of child externalizing symptoms. Indirect effects of fathers' harsh and supportive parenting on paternal depressive symptoms were also found through fathers' reports of child behavior.

  18. Idiosyncratic Shocks, Child Labor and School Attendance in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kharisma, Bayu

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of various idiosyncratic shocks against child labor, child labor hour and school attendance. Also, the role of the assets held by households as one of the coping strategies to mitigate the effects of shocks. The results show that various idiosyncratic shocks that encourage child labor is generally caused by crop…

  19. The Impact of Child Labor on Schooling Outcomes in Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabaleta, Mariela Buonomo

    2011-01-01

    Child labor is considered a key obstacle to reaching the international commitments of Education For All. However, the empirical evidence on the effects of child labor on educational attainments is mostly limited to static measurements. This paper assesses the consequences of child labor on schooling outcomes over time by employing a three-year…

  20. Child Maltreatment among School Children in the Kurdistan Province, Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Rob; Sheikhattari, Payam; Assasi, Nazilla; Eftekhar, Hassan; Zamani, Qasem; Maleki, Bahram; Kiabayan, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the determinants of three types of child maltreatment: physical maltreatment, mental maltreatment, and child neglect among school children in the Kurdistan Province of Iran. The analysis examines the impact of socioeconomic, familial, demographic, and household dynamic factors on the three child maltreatment…

  1. The Impact of Child Labor on Schooling Outcomes in Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabaleta, Mariela Buonomo

    2011-01-01

    Child labor is considered a key obstacle to reaching the international commitments of Education For All. However, the empirical evidence on the effects of child labor on educational attainments is mostly limited to static measurements. This paper assesses the consequences of child labor on schooling outcomes over time by employing a three-year…

  2. School-Related Stress and the Special Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1990-01-01

    The role of school-related stress in the life of the disabled child is examined, and parents and teachers are given suggestions to reduce stress and help the child cope. Stress is defined as the emotional and physical reaction to the pressures that society places upon the child to conform and live up to expectations. Among sources of stress are…

  3. Authoritative feeding behaviors to reduce child BMI through online interventions.

    PubMed

    Frenn, Marilyn; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Felzer, Holly; Zhang, Jiannan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE.: The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacies of parent- and/or child-focused online interventions and variables correlated with child body mass index percentile change. DESIGN AND METHODS.: A feasibility and cluster randomized controlled pilot study was used. RESULTS.: Recruitment was more effective at parent-teacher conferences compared with when materials were sent home with fifth- to eighth-grade culturally diverse students. Retention was 90% for students and 62-74% for parents. Authoritative parent feeding behaviors were associated with lower child body mass index. A larger study is warranted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.: Online approaches may provide a feasible option for childhood obesity prevention and amelioration.

  4. The impact of a child obesity treatment intervention on parent child-feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Burrows, T; Warren, J M; Collins, C E

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of childhood obesity requires a multi-factorial approach and should target factors impacting on a child's environment. To explore the impact of three treatment programs on parental child-feeding practices at 6, 12 and 24 months post-program. SUBJECTS/INTERVENTION: Overweight children (n=159) aged 5-7 years, recruited to the Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support (HIKCUPS) randomized controlled trial with three treatment arms; a dietary modification program, a physical activity skill development program or a combination of both programs. Main outcome measures. The Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ), a validated 31-item questionnaire measuring child-feeding practices, completed by parents. Statistical analysis. Linear mixed models were used to assess change over time and to determine differences by intervention group. A significant decrease (p<0.01) in CFQ domain scores were reported and sustained at 24 months for all groups, in the domain of pressure to eat (mean+/-SEM, 1.8+/-0.06, 1.6+/-0.06) with increases in degree of monitoring (4.0+/-0.07, 4.2+/-0.06). The domain of restriction showed significant decreases in dietary intervention groups only (baseline 3.9+/-0.05, 24 months 3.7+/-0.06), the domain scores for concern were found to be strongly associated with child BMI z-score (r=0.73, p < 0.001) at baseline only. This study provides evidence that specific child-feeding domains are modifiable in the context of a targeted obesity intervention and further that changes can be sustained over time. HIKCUPS study: National Centre for Clinical Trials (NCT): 00107692 clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00107692 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home.

  5. Effects of a Workplace Intervention on Parent-Child Relationships.

    PubMed

    McHale, Susan M; Davis, Kelly D; Green, Kaylin; Casper, Lynne; Kan, Marni L; Kelly, Erin L; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2016-02-01

    This study tested whether effects of a workplace intervention, aimed at promoting employees' schedule control and supervisor support for personal and family life, had implications for parent-adolescent relationships; we also tested whether parent-child relationships differed as a function of how many intervention program sessions participants attended. Data came from a group randomized trial of a workplace intervention, delivered in the information technology division of a Fortune 500 company. Analyses focused on 125 parent-adolescent dyads that completed baseline and 12-month follow-up home interviews. Results revealed no main effects of the intervention, but children of employees who attended 75% or more program sessions reported more time with their parent and more parent education involvement compared to adolescents whose parents attended less than 75% of sessions, and they tended to report more time with parent and more parental solicitation of information about their experiences compared to adolescents whose parents were randomly assigned to the usual practice condition.

  6. Risk, harm and intervention: the case of child obesity.

    PubMed

    Merry, Michael S; Voigt, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate the enormous ethical complexity that is prevalent in child obesity cases. This complexity, we argue, favors a cautious approach. Against those perhaps inclined to blame neglectful parents, we argue that laying the blame for child obesity at the feet of parents is simplistic once the broader context is taken into account. We also show that parents not only enjoy important relational prerogatives worth defending, but that children, too, are beneficiaries of that relationship in ways difficult to match elsewhere. Finally, against the backdrop of growing public concern and pressure to intervene earlier in the life cycle, we examine the perhaps unintended stigmatizing effects that labeling and intervention can have and consider a number of risks and potential harms occasioned by state interventions in these cases.

  7. A cluster randomised trial testing an intervention to improve parents' recognition of their child's weight status: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Jones, Angela R; Tovee, Martin J; Ells, Louisa J; Pearce, Mark S; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Adamson, Ashley J

    2015-06-12

    Parents typically do not recognise their child's weight status accurately according to clinical criteria, and thus may not take appropriate action if their child is overweight. We developed a novel visual intervention designed to improve parental perceptions of child weight status according to clinical criteria for children aged 4-5 and 10-11 years. The Map Me intervention comprises age- and sex-specific body image scales of known body mass index and supporting information about the health risks of childhood overweight. This cluster randomised trial will test the effectiveness of the Map Me intervention. Primary schools will be randomised to: paper-based Map Me; web-based Map Me; no information (control). Parents of reception (4-5 years) and year 6 (10-11 years) children attending the schools will be recruited. The study will work with the National Child Measurement Programme which measures the height and weight of these year groups and provides feedback to parents about their child's weight status. Before receiving the feedback, parents will complete a questionnaire which includes assessment of their perception of their child's weight status and knowledge of the health consequences of childhood overweight. The control group will provide pre-intervention data with assessment soon after recruitment; the intervention groups will provide post-intervention data after access to Map Me for one month. The study will subsequently obtain the child height and weight measurements from the National Child Measurement Programme. Families will be followed-up by the study team at 12 months. The primary outcome is any difference in accuracy in parental perception of child weight status between pre-intervention and post-intervention at one month. The secondary outcomes include differences in parent knowledge, intention to change lifestyle behaviours and/or seek advice or support, perceived control, action planning, coping planning, and child weight status at 12 month follow-up. The

  8. Ensuring Every Child Matters: Issues and Implications for School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Alma; Allen, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the challenges and issues facing school leaders in the implementation of Every Child Matters. It outlines the factors that contribute to the effective delivery of Every Child Matters and outlines some of the barriers that make the delivery of this agenda more difficult. The article concludes that school leaders play a…

  9. The Development of a School-Based Measure of Child Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deighton, Jessica; Tymms, Peter; Vostanis, Panos; Belsky, Jay; Fonagy, Peter; Brown, Anna; Martin, Amelia; Patalay, Praveetha; Wolpert, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of child mental health problems in schools is critical for implementing strategies for prevention and intervention. The development of an effective measure of mental health and well-being for this context must be both empirically sound and practically feasible. This study reports the initial validation of a brief self-report…

  10. School- And Home-Based Drug Prevention: Environmental, Parent, and Child Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Hall, Lynne A.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Myers, April V.; Bonnel, Galadriel

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to test the effect of a school- and home-based alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) prevention program on reducing environmental, parent, and child risk factors for ATOD use. The design was a three-group pretest-posttest with interviews at baseline and 1 and 6 months post-intervention. The sample was 126 parents and their…

  11. School- And Home-Based Drug Prevention: Environmental, Parent, and Child Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Hall, Lynne A.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Myers, April V.; Bonnel, Galadriel

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to test the effect of a school- and home-based alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) prevention program on reducing environmental, parent, and child risk factors for ATOD use. The design was a three-group pretest-posttest with interviews at baseline and 1 and 6 months post-intervention. The sample was 126 parents and their…

  12. The Development of a School-Based Measure of Child Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deighton, Jessica; Tymms, Peter; Vostanis, Panos; Belsky, Jay; Fonagy, Peter; Brown, Anna; Martin, Amelia; Patalay, Praveetha; Wolpert, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of child mental health problems in schools is critical for implementing strategies for prevention and intervention. The development of an effective measure of mental health and well-being for this context must be both empirically sound and practically feasible. This study reports the initial validation of a brief self-report…

  13. Relationships between Early Child Factors and School Readiness Skills in Young Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Marjorie; DesJardin, Jean L.; Shea, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this longitudinal study is to examine the relationships between early child factors (i.e., age at identification, enrollment in early intervention, oral language skills) and school readiness skills (i.e., conceptual knowledge) in a group of young children with hearing loss (HL). Standardized language, cognition, and conceptual…

  14. Mother-Child Conflict and Its Moderating Effects on Depression Outcomes in a Preventive Intervention for Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Gallop, Robert; Mufson, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on mother-child conflict as an outcome and moderator of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a preventive intervention for depression. Forty-one adolescents (average age = 13.37, SD = 1.19) with elevated depression symptoms were randomized to receive IPT-AST or school counseling (SC). Adolescents…

  15. Child prostitution: global health burden, research needs, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Willis, Brian M; Levy, Barry S

    2002-04-20

    Child prostitution is a significant global problem that has yet to receive appropriate medical and public health attention. Worldwide, an estimated 1 million children are forced into prostitution every year and the total number of prostituted children could be as high as 10 million. Inadequate data exist on the health problems faced by prostituted children, who are at high risk of infectious disease, pregnancy, mental illness, substance abuse, and violence. Child prostitution, like other forms of child sexual abuse, is not only a cause of death and high morbidity in millions of children, but also a gross violation of their rights and dignity. In this article we estimate morbidity and mortality among prostituted children, and propose research strategies and interventions to mitigate such health consequences. Our estimates underscore the need for health professionals to collaborate with individuals and organisations that provide direct services to prostituted children. Health professionals can help efforts to prevent child prostitution through identifying contributing factors, recording the magnitude and health effects of the problem, and assisting children who have escaped prostitution. They can also help governments, UN agencies, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to implement policies, laws, and programmes to prevent child prostitution and mitigate its effects on children's health.

  16. Child-Level Predictors of Responsiveness to Evidence-Based Mathematics Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Sarah R.; Cirino, Paul T.; Malone, Amelia S.

    2017-01-01

    We identified child-level predictors of responsiveness to 2 types of mathematics (calculation and word-problem) intervention among 2nd-grade children with mathematics difficulty. Participants were 250 children in 107 classrooms in 23 schools pretested on mathematics and general cognitive measures and posttested on mathematics measures. We assigned classrooms randomly assigned to calculation intervention, word-problem intervention, or business-as-usual control. Intervention lasted 17 weeks. Path analyses indicated that scores on working memory and language comprehension assessments moderated responsiveness to calculation intervention. No moderators were identified for responsiveness to word-problem intervention. Across both intervention groups and the control group, attentive behavior predicted both outcomes. Initial calculation skill predicted the calculation outcome, and initial language comprehension predicted word-problem outcomes. These results indicate that screening for calculation intervention should include a focus on working memory, language comprehension, attentive behavior, and calculations. Screening for word-problem intervention should focus on attentive behavior and word problems. PMID:28824197

  17. Lessons Learned From the Whole Child and Coordinated School Health Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Slade, Sean; Lohrmann, David K; Valois, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model, designed to depict links between health and learning, is founded on concepts of coordinated school health (CSH) and a whole child approach to education. METHODS The existing literature, including scientific articles and key publications from national agencies and organizations, was reviewed and synthesized to describe (1) the historical context for CSH and a whole child approach, and (2) lessons learned from the implementation and evaluation of these approaches. RESULTS The literature revealed that interventions conducted in the context of CSH can improve health-related and academic outcomes, as well as policies, programs, or partnerships. Several structural elements and processes have proved useful for implementing CSH and a whole child approach in schools, including use of school health coordinators, school-level and district-level councils or teams; systematic assessment and planning; strong leadership and administrative support, particularly from school principals; integration of health-related goals into school improvement plans; and strong community collaborations. CONCLUSIONS Lessons learned from years of experience with CSH and the whole child approaches have applicability for developing a better understanding of the WSCC model as well as maximizing and documenting its potential for impacting both health and education outcomes. PMID:26440817

  18. Suicide Intervention in the Schools. The Guilford School Practitioners Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poland, Scott

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death for teenagers. The rate has increased by 300% since the 1950s. By establishing a comprehensive, well-organized crisis intervention program, schools can do a great deal to prevent teenage suicide, and to help the school community survive if a tragedy cannot be averted. This book provides professionals…

  19. Suicide Intervention in the Schools. The Guilford School Practitioners Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poland, Scott

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death for teenagers. The rate has increased by 300% since the 1950s. By establishing a comprehensive, well-organized crisis intervention program, schools can do a great deal to prevent teenage suicide, and to help the school community survive if a tragedy cannot be averted. This book provides professionals…

  20. Child Abuse Investigations in the Public Schools: A Practical Guide for School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossey, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A guide to child abuse investigations reviews the following: theories of liability; legal responsibility to report child abuse; legal rights of a school employee accused of child abuse; legal problems that could arise if a school district enters into a secret settlement agreement; insurance concerns; and ways to interact with the press, the…

  1. Treatment of child abuse: a review of the behavioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, C D

    1982-01-01

    foundation for future researchers to formulate new, more effective intervention programs. Future researchers should focus on identifying those aspects of existing programs that lend themselves to empirical study and have led to more successful parent-child relationships.

  2. School-based obesity prevention interventions: practicalities and considerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A; Lubans, D R; Morgan, P J; Okely, A D; Parletta, N; Wolfenden, L; de Silva-Sanigorski, A; Gibbs, L; Waters, E

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Systems Intervention and School Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Judith S.

    An ecological model derived from family systems theory and strategies borrowed from family therapy are effective substitutes for the medical model and clinical methods traditionally used by school pyschologists to help children with academic or behavior problems. Behavior is an outgrowth of interpersonal processes in a particular system rather…

  4. Children of Alcoholics: School Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Judith A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the influences of parental alcoholism on children's daily lives, generally, and learning problems, absenteeism, and adjustment problems, specifically. Suggests that schools are one of the most promising settings for identifying and intervening with children of alcoholics as a target group. (DST)

  5. Parent and teacher perceptions of the impact of school nurse interventions on children's self-management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peery, Annette I; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this relationship in a sample of 69 school-age children who received case management from school nurses. Our findings suggest that teachers and parents do not always agree on how well a child manages their illness. When school nurses provide more education and counseling, parents are more likely to perceive an improvement in their child's self-management. Teachers are more likely to perceive an improvement when the nurse provides more classroom visits and includes the physical education teacher and guidance counselor. These findings suggest that the roles of educator, counselor, and collaborator are important for school nurses who provide care to school-age children with diabetes.

  6. Language Intervention with a Child with Hearing Whose Parents Are Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Brenda C.; Hammett, Lisa A.

    1995-01-01

    This case study describes an intervention program with a 20-month-old hearing child with deaf parents. The child was diagnosed as having a significant delay in both spoken and sign language. A home-based intervention program resulted in the child's increased use of sign and spoken vocabulary and the mother's improved interaction style. (Author/DB)

  7. Influence of Risk Factors for Child Disruptive Behavior on Parent Attendance at a Preventive Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sarah M.; Boxmeyer, Caroline L.; Lochman, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Although preventive interventions that include both parent and child components produce stronger effects on disruptive behavior than child-only interventions, engaging parents in behavioral parent training is a significant challenge. This study examined the effects of specific risk factors for child disruptive behavior on parent attendance in…

  8. Adaptation and Implementation of a Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Girls in Child Welfare.

    PubMed

    Auslander, Wendy; McGinnis, Hollee; Tlapek, Sarah; Smith, Penny; Foster, April; Edmond, Tonya; Dunn, Jerry

    2016-12-15

    This study describes the process of adapting and implementing Girls Aspiring toward Independence (GAIN), a trauma-focused, group-based therapy adapted from Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) for girls in child welfare. Descriptive data were examined on 3 outcomes: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and social problem-solving skills among adolescent girls in the child welfare system. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to inform the adaptation of the CBITS intervention, evaluate feasibility, treatment fidelity, and acceptability, and to test the effects of the intervention. Girls ages 12 to 18 (N = 27) were randomly assigned to the experimental and usual care conditions. Participants' symptoms of PTSD and depression and social problem-solving skills were evaluated at pre, post- (3 months), and follow-up (6 months) assessments. Adaptations for GAIN were primarily related to program structure. Data indicated that the program was receptive to girls in child welfare and that it was feasible to recruit, randomize, assess outcomes, and implement with adequate fidelity. Retention was more successful among younger girls. Descriptive initial data showed greater reductions in the percentage of girls with PTSD and depression, and modest increases in social problem-solving skills in the experimental versus usual care condition. Despite the growth of knowledge in dissemination and implementation research, the application of trauma-focused empirically supported treatment to child welfare populations lags behind. A large-scale RCT is needed to determine if GAIN is effective in reducing mental health problems and social problem-solving in the child welfare population. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Effects of simulated interventions to improve school entry academic skills on socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievement.

    PubMed

    Chittleborough, Catherine R; Mittinty, Murthy N; Lawlor, Debbie A; Lynch, John W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial evidence shows that interventions before age 5 can improve skills necessary for educational success; the effect of these interventions on socioeconomic inequalities is unknown. Using trial effect estimates, and marginal structural models with data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (n = 11,764, imputed), simulated effects of plausible interventions to improve school entry academic skills on socioeconomic inequality in educational achievement at age 16 were examined. Progressive universal interventions (i.e., more intense intervention for those with greater need) to improve school entry academic skills could raise population levels of educational achievement by 5% and reduce absolute socioeconomic inequality in poor educational achievement by 15%. © 2014 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development.

  10. Indiana High School Principals' Response to No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    The research problem for this qualitative study was "Effective response to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) by school leadership is critical to public school success or failure in Indiana. Because high schools have been the first and most-often to 'fail' under NCLB, knowing principals' concerns and the leadership and implementation of strategies…

  11. You and Your Elementary School-Aged Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 helps to ensure that all children receive a high-quality education and holds schools responsible for making sure that all children are learning. The information in this brochure is consistent with this important law. The early school years are the foundation for school success, the time when children will learn…

  12. You Can Talk to Your Child's School. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Children, Families, and Learning, St. Paul.

    This instructional video is designed for schools, teachers, and community groups as a tool for encouraging refugee and immigrant parents to communicate with their children's school. The video focuses on the willingness of school personnel to meet with parents to discuss their child's education needs. The video includes sample conversations between…

  13. Child Well-Being: The Intersection of Schools and Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred; Smithgall, Cheryl; Chen, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    The authors argue for closer collaboration between public schools and the public child welfare system, on behalf of children placed at risk, with respect to whether they will do as well in school as their abilities suggest they might, all else being equal. The need for closer collaboration is tied to two developments affecting schools and the…

  14. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  15. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  16. The Impact of the Adult-Child Relationship on School Adjustment for Children at Risk of Serious Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Fei; Cheney, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the adult-child relationship on students' social outcomes, academic competence and school engagement in a two-year Tier 2 intervention, the Check, Connect and Expect program. One hundred and three students from 2nd through 5th grade, their classroom teachers, and nine school-based coaches participated in this…

  17. The Child Anxiety Prevention Study: Intervention Model and Primary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the intervention model and primary outcomes of a preventive intervention designed to reduce anxiety symptoms and prevent the onset of anxiety disorders in the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders. Participants were 40 volunteer children (mean age = 8.94 years; 45% girls; 90% Caucasian) whose parents met criteria for a broad range of anxiety disorders. Families were randomly assigned to an 8-week cognitive–behavioral intervention, the Coping and Promoting Strength program (CAPS; n = 20) or a wait list control condition (WL; n = 20). Independent evaluators (IEs) conducted diagnostic interviews, and children and parents completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Assessments were conducted pre- and postintervention and 6 and 12 months after the postintervention assessment. On the basis of intent to treat analyses, 30% of the children in the WL group developed an anxiety disorder by the 1-year follow-up compared with 0% in the CAPS group. IE and parent-reported (but not child-reported) levels of anxiety showed significant decreases from the preintervention assessment to the 1-year follow-up assessment in the CAPS but not the WL group. Parental satisfaction with the intervention was high. Findings suggest that a family-based intervention may prevent the onset of anxiety disorders in the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders. PMID:19485597

  18. Child Race and Gender as Moderators of the Association between Teacher-Child Relationships and School Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christopher; Waas, Gregory A.; Murray, Kelly M.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examines teacher and child perceptions of teacher-child relationships and early school adjustment among children (N = 157) in low-income urban schools. Consistent with prior research, findings indicated that teacher-child relationships were associated with early school adjustment; however, the strength of this association varied…

  19. Navigating Your Child's School System with or without an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Accommodations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavoie, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Considering how much time a child spends in school and how much influence the school has on a child's future, success for students with ADHD must include a child's school. An important step in navigating a child's school system with or without an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 accommodations includes educating professionals and…

  20. Ten Tips for Your Child's Success in School

    MedlinePlus

    ... find everything during the morning rush. Designate a Space At school your child has a desk or ... type of environment for homework? A designated homework space often makes it easier and more fun for ...

  1. Addressing the Need for School Age Child Care: A Guide for Philadelphia Elementary School Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzer, Janet L.

    The Delaware Valley Child Care Council (DVCCC) developed this booklet to help Philadelphia school principals plan and develop privately run after-school centers in their schools. First, an executive summary documents the need for school-age day care nationwide and in the Philadelphia area. Section I offers guidance on planning a school-age child…

  2. Child Labor and School Attendance in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of child labor in the world and estimates show that it continues to grow. This paper examines the causes and magnitude of child labor in Kenya. Unlike previous studies that examined child labor as only an economic activity, this paper includes household chores. Including household chores is important…

  3. Child Labor and School Attendance in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of child labor in the world and estimates show that it continues to grow. This paper examines the causes and magnitude of child labor in Kenya. Unlike previous studies that examined child labor as only an economic activity, this paper includes household chores. Including household chores is important…

  4. Urban School Principals and the "No Child Left Behind" Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Mary E.; Canfield-Davis, Kathy; Anderson, Keith LeMar

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated how six practicing school principals responded to the requirements of the No Child Left Behind law (United States Congress Public Law 107-110, 2002, January, No Child Left Behind Act, http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/107-110.pdf ) in light of the multicultural leadership demands presented by an urban…

  5. The Relationship of Child Poverty to School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Child poverty is a global issue that affects around half the children in the world; it is inextricably bound to the poverty experienced by their parents and families and has been identified by the United Nations as a human rights issue. Child poverty can be a barrier to children and young people accessing school education or achieving any form of…

  6. After-School Child Care: Dilemma in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnock, Mary M.

    1992-01-01

    A rural community established an after-school child care program by forming a community coalition, acquiring funding, obtaining space, and arranging for children's transportation. The program enriched the quality of life for children, parents, and staff. Children's grades improved and the number of mothers satisfied with child care services…

  7. Principal Alert: A Child in Your School May Be Stolen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenleaf, Warren T.

    1983-01-01

    Chronicles the growing frequency of child abductions by divorced parents who are warring over child custody. Outlines the school's role in prevention of such kidnappings and how to recognize new students who are kidnap victims and help to return them to their rightful parents.

  8. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  9. The Relationship of Child Poverty to School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Child poverty is a global issue that affects around half the children in the world; it is inextricably bound to the poverty experienced by their parents and families and has been identified by the United Nations as a human rights issue. Child poverty can be a barrier to children and young people accessing school education or achieving any form of…

  10. School Professionals' Attributions of Blame for Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Harriett H.; Schindler, Claudia B.; Medway, Frederic J.

    2001-01-01

    Reports the results of two studies comparing school professionals' attributions of blame to a child victim, a father/perpetrator, and a nonparticipating mother in hypothetical vignettes of father-daughter incest. Results indicate that all professional groups assigned some degree of blame to the child victim and nonparticipating mother and very…

  11. Child Sexual Abuse: Offenders, Disclosure, and School-Based Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieldman, Jonathan P.; Crespi, Tony D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the characteristics of the child sexual offender and the devastating impact of sexual abuse on children. It discusses the importance of a child's disclosure of victimization and its significance in the treatment process. Recommendations are presented on ways to improve school-based sexual abuse programs since they are in a…

  12. Child-Friendly School Initiative in Jordan: A Sharing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weshah, Hani A.; Al-Faori, Oraib; Sakal, Reham M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to report on a Child-Friendly School (CFS) initiative pilot project in Jordan, which aims at initiating the creation of CFS and to raise stakeholders' awareness of the importance of this project in promoting and implementing Child Rights Conviction (CRC) in Jordan. The study was conducted by a joint team selected…

  13. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  14. Principal Alert: A Child in Your School May Be Stolen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenleaf, Warren T.

    1983-01-01

    Chronicles the growing frequency of child abductions by divorced parents who are warring over child custody. Outlines the school's role in prevention of such kidnappings and how to recognize new students who are kidnap victims and help to return them to their rightful parents.

  15. The Role of School Psychologists in Child Protection and Safeguarding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Kevin; Bond, Caroline; Tyldesley, Kath; Farrell, Peter; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Child protection and safeguarding are important aspects of work for all professionals working with children. The current article outlines the international context of school psychologists' work in relation to child protection and safeguarding and describes the United Kingdom context in more detail. Given the relatively recent broadening of the UK…

  16. Child-Friendly School Initiative in Jordan: A Sharing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weshah, Hani A.; Al-Faori, Oraib; Sakal, Reham M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to report on a Child-Friendly School (CFS) initiative pilot project in Jordan, which aims at initiating the creation of CFS and to raise stakeholders' awareness of the importance of this project in promoting and implementing Child Rights Conviction (CRC) in Jordan. The study was conducted by a joint team selected…

  17. Latent Growth Curve Modeling of Child Behavior in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Christine; Kamphaus, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated child behavioral change during the early years of elementary school. Behavioral Assessment System for Children (BASC; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992) teacher ratings of child behavior were collected over a three-year period. The sample consisted of 162 children measured yearly between first and third grade.…

  18. The Role of School Psychologists in Child Protection and Safeguarding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Kevin; Bond, Caroline; Tyldesley, Kath; Farrell, Peter; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Child protection and safeguarding are important aspects of work for all professionals working with children. The current article outlines the international context of school psychologists' work in relation to child protection and safeguarding and describes the United Kingdom context in more detail. Given the relatively recent broadening of the UK…

  19. [INTERVENTIONS FOR PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF CHILD AND YOUTH OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Pérez Morente, Ma Angeles; Sánchez Ocón, Ma Teresa; Mingorance Ruiz, Ma Visitación; Pérez Robles, Angustias; Munoz de la Fuente, José Manuel; Sánchez De Arias, Celia

    2015-02-01

    To determine the current epidemiological situation, prevention and management of child and youth obesity based on the best scientific evidence available. Literature search in PubMed, Cochrane, Science Direct, ENFISPO, Lilacs and SciELO, selecting articles about child and youth obesity, its prevention and treatment. Child and youth obesity is a multifactorial chronic disease that it has been increasing, tending to stay in adolescence and adulthood with greater intensity than more early starts. The data vary from country to country, although most articles are governed by body mass index (BMI). Pediatric overweight is defined by a BMI percentiles located between 91-98 and obesity by a percentile equal or greater than 99. Its prevalence varies according to time, geography, age, gender and race. The prevalence rates of obesity in Spain are one of the highest around the world. The overweight prevalence is lower slightly and there is no difference in gender. Its implications include the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus II. Unanimously, the combination of interventions on life and dietary habits and physical activity is important for the management of obesity and overweight. Currently, the obesity management requires a generalized approach, with changes in lifestyle, diet and physical activity. The best solution for reducing this epidemic lies in prevention rather than treatment.

  20. [Child subnutrition, health and poverty, integral intervention programme].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Andrellucchi, A; Peña Quintana, L; Albino Beñacar, A; Mönckeberg Barros, F; Serra-Majem, L

    2006-01-01

    Childood is considered a transcendental stage in the evolutionary process of man, characterized by two phenomenon: growth and development, for which a suitable nutrition is fundamental. The damage that causes undernourishment that is suffered in childhood is greatly lamented by society, since in this stage it is the child's brain that suffers the greatest impact, in which irreversible metabolisms and structural alterarions will occur. Nevertheless, infant undernourishment is not only a problem of lack of fodds, but is also a deeper social conflict, that must be considered at the time of offereing solutions. The Corporation for Childhood Nutrition (CONIN), founded in Chile in 1975, has the mission to help in the recovery of the children from 0 to 3 years who present primary or secondary undernourishment. From 1993, this proyect was extended to the province of Mendoza, Argentina, as the CONIN Foundation (Cooperative for Childhood Nutrition), where this experience was completed by creating Undernourishment Prevention Centres. At the moment this project has been developed in different provinces from the country, in Paraguay and in the near future in Peru, sustaining its work on three pillars: teaching, attendance and investigation. CONIN develops a intervention strategy of great impact, in their area of influence, which is used on the low income population. This in turn causes high social repercusions, as the family and its surrounding are reinforced as a basis for the correct physical and intellectual development of the child, together with an adequate nutrients contribution, allowing the child to develop his genetic potential.

  1. Child Rights and Quality Education: Child-Friendly Schools in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Nancy; Miske, Shirley; Patel, Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Since the breakup of the Soviet Union and former Yugoslavia, Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have engaged in education reforms based on international frameworks. One of these, the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) approach, is distinctively grounded in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). CFS standards are comprehensive,…

  2. Child Rights and Quality Education: Child-Friendly Schools in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Nancy; Miske, Shirley; Patel, Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Since the breakup of the Soviet Union and former Yugoslavia, Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have engaged in education reforms based on international frameworks. One of these, the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) approach, is distinctively grounded in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). CFS standards are comprehensive,…

  3. Effects of a Workplace Intervention on Parent-Child Relationships

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Susan M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Green, Kaylin; Casper, Lynne; Kan, Marni L.; Kelly, Erin L.; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Okechukwu, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    This study tested whether effects of a workplace intervention, aimed at promoting employees’ schedule control and supervisor support for personal and family life, had implications for parent-adolescent relationships; we also tested whether parent-child relationships differed as a function of how many intervention program sessions participants attended. Data came from a group randomized trial of a workplace intervention, delivered in the information technology division of a Fortune 500 company. Analyses focused on 125 parent-adolescent dyads that completed baseline and 12-month follow-up home interviews. Results revealed no main effects of the intervention, but children of employees who attended 75% or more program sessions reported more time with their parent and more parent education involvement compared to adolescents whose parents attended less than 75% of sessions, and they tended to report more time with parent and more parental solicitation of information about their experiences compared to adolescents whose parents were randomly assigned to the usual practice condition. PMID:26957897

  4. A population-level approach to promoting healthy child development and school success in low-income, urban neighborhoods: Impact on parenting and child conduct problems

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-McClure, Spring; Calzada, Esther; Huang, Keng-Yen; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Rhule, Dana; Kolawole, Bukky; Petkova, Eva; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2014-01-01

    Minority children living in disadvantaged neighborhoods are at high risk for school dropout, delinquency and poor health, largely due to the negative impact of poverty and stress on parenting and child development. This study evaluated a population-level, family-centered, school-based intervention designed to promote learning, behavior and health by strengthening parenting, early childhood classroom quality, and child self-regulation during early childhood. Ten schools in urban districts serving primarily low-income Black students were randomly assigned to intervention or a “pre-kindergarten education as usual” control condition. Intervention included a family program (13-week behavioral parenting intervention and concurrent group for children) and professional development for early childhood teachers. The majority (88%) of the pre-kindergarten population (N=1050; age 4) enrolled in the trial and nearly 60% of parents in intervention schools participated in the family program. This study evaluated intervention impact on parenting (knowledge, positive behavior support, behavior management, involvement in early learning) and child conduct problems over a 2-year period (end of kindergarten). Intent-to-treat analyses found intervention effects on knowledge, positive behavior support and teacher-rated parent involvement in early learning. For the highest-risk families, intervention also resulted in increased parent-rated involvement in early learning and decreased harsh and inconsistent behavior management. Among boys at high risk for problems based on baseline behavioral dysregulation (age 4, 23% of sample), intervention led to lower rates of conduct problems at age 6. Family-centered intervention at the transition to school has potential to improve population health and break the cycle of disadvantage for low-income, minority families. PMID:24590412

  5. A population-level approach to promoting healthy child development and school success in low-income, urban neighborhoods: impact on parenting and child conduct problems.

    PubMed

    Dawson-McClure, Spring; Calzada, Esther; Huang, Keng-Yen; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Rhule, Dana; Kolawole, Bukky; Petkova, Eva; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2015-02-01

    Minority children living in disadvantaged neighborhoods are at high risk for school dropout, delinquency, and poor health, largely due to the negative impact of poverty and stress on parenting and child development. This study evaluated a population-level, family-centered, school-based intervention designed to promote learning, behavior, and health by strengthening parenting, classroom quality, and child self-regulation during early childhood. Ten schools in urban districts serving primarily low-income Black students were randomly assigned to intervention or a "pre-kindergarten education as usual" control condition. Intervention included a family program (a 13-week behavioral parenting intervention and concurrent group for children) and professional development for early childhood teachers. The majority (88 %) of the pre-kindergarten population (N = 1,050; age 4) enrolled in the trial, and nearly 60 % of parents in intervention schools participated in the family program. This study evaluated intervention impact on parenting (knowledge, positive behavior support, behavior management, involvement in early learning) and child conduct problems over a 2-year period (end of kindergarten). Intent-to-treat analyses found intervention effects on parenting knowledge, positive behavior support, and teacher-rated parent involvement. For the highest-risk families, intervention also resulted in increased parent-rated involvement in early learning and decreased harsh and inconsistent behavior management. Among boys at high risk for problems based on baseline behavioral dysregulation (age 4, 23 % of sample), intervention led to lower rates of conduct problems at age 6. Family-centered intervention at the transition to school has potential to improve population health and break the cycle of disadvantage for low-income, minority families.

  6. Designing mental health interventions informed by child development and human biology theory: a social ecology intervention for child soldiers in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Jordans, Mark J D; Koirala, Suraj; Worthman, Carol M

    2015-01-01

    The anthropological study of human biology, health, and child development provides a model with potential to address the gap in population-wide mental health interventions. Four key concepts from human biology can inform public mental health interventions: life history theory and tradeoffs, redundancy and plurality of pathways, cascades and multiplier effects in biological systems, and proximate feedback systems. A public mental health intervention for former child soldiers in Nepal is used to illustrate the role of these concepts in intervention design and evaluation. Future directions and recommendations for applying human biology theory in pursuit of public mental health interventions are discussed.

  7. Designing mental health interventions informed by child development and human biology theory: A social ecology intervention for child soldiers in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Brandon A.; Jordans, Mark J.D.; Koirala, Suraj; Worthman, Carol M.

    2017-01-01

    The anthropological study of human biology, health, and child development provides a model with potential to address the gap in population-wide mental health interventions. Four key concepts from human biology can inform public mental health interventions: life history theory and tradeoffs, redundancy and plurality of pathways, cascades and multiplier effects in biological systems, and proximate feedback systems. A public mental health intervention for former child soldiers in Nepal is used to illustrate the role of these concepts in intervention design and evaluation. Future directions and recommendations for applying human biology theory in pursuit of public mental health interventions are discussed. PMID:25380194

  8. Systematic review of evidence on the effectiveness of safe child faeces disposal interventions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomohiko; Godfrey, Samuel; George, Christine Marie

    2016-11-01

    To review and synthesise the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions targeting unsafe child faeces disposal in reducing this behaviour and improving child health in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed and EMBASE were systematically searched. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed and key information on study methodologies and outcomes were extracted. A total of 1048 articles were screened, and eight studies representing five countries were included for the review. Three were randomised controlled trials, and five were prospective cohort studies. There was wide variability across studies in the definition of 'safe disposal' of child faeces. Six studies reported the change in child faeces disposal practices associated with safe child faeces disposal interventions. However, only one study found a significant improvement in this behaviour. Two of the six studies that evaluated the health impact of delivered interventions found significant reductions in childhood diarrhoea associated with safe faeces disposal practices, and one study reported a positive effect on child growth and ascariasis. Only one study was identified that delivered a single intervention solely focused on safe child faeces disposal. Unfortunately, this study did not investigate the impact of this intervention on child health. There are major methodological limitations in studies that assessed the impact of safe child faeces disposal interventions. The health impact of these interventions is inconclusive because the quality of the current evidence is poor. Randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to assess the impact of safe faeces disposal interventions on child health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Children with autism spectrum disorder and social skills groups at school: a randomized trial comparing intervention approach and peer composition.

    PubMed

    Kasari, Connie; Dean, Michelle; Kretzmann, Mark; Shih, Wendy; Orlich, Felice; Whitney, Rondalyn; Landa, Rebecca; Lord, Catherine; King, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Peer relationships improve for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in clinic-based social skills groups but rarely generalize to real world contexts. This study compares child outcomes of two social skills interventions conducted in schools with children in Kindergarten through fifth grade. Children with ASD were randomized to one of two interventions that varied on group composition (mixed typical and ASD vs. all ASD or social difficulties) and intervention approach (didactic SKILLS based vs. activity-based ENGAGE groups). Interventions were implemented at school for 8 weeks (16 sessions) with an 8-week follow-up. Innovative measures of peer nomination and playground peer engagement, as well as teacher reports of child behavior problems and teacher-child relationship were analyzed for 137 children with ASD across four sites. On the primary outcome of social network connections from the peer nomination measure, there was no main effect of treatment, but there were moderator effects. Children with low teacher-child closeness or high conflict improved more in their social connections if they received the SKILLS intervention, whereas children with higher teacher-child closeness improved more if they received the ENGAGE intervention. Only two secondary outcome measures yielded significant effects of treatment. Children in the SKILLS groups increased peer engagement and decreased isolation during recess. Child behavior problems and teacher-child closeness moderated peer engagement such that children with higher behavior problems and lower closeness benefitted more from SKILLS groups. These findings suggest that social skills groups conducted at school can affect both peer engagement during recess as well as peer acceptability. Child characteristics and teacher-child relationship prior to intervention yield important information on who might benefit from a specific social skills intervention. © 2015 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  10. Building a Contextually Responsive Evaluation Framework: Lessons from Working with Urban School Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Veronica G.

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a significant growth in the number of school improvement programs and in the accompanying efforts to evaluate such programs. Passage of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act in 2002 has intensified the need for evaluations to assess and understand the quality and value of educational interventions. Well over a…

  11. Perceptions of Middle School Educators in Hawai‘i about School-based Gardening and Child Health

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Caryn E; Loharuka, Sheila; Novotny, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity prevention is a national priority. School-based gardening has been proposed as an innovative obesity prevention intervention. Little is known about the perceptions of educators about school-based gardening for child health. As the success of a school-based intervention depends on the support of educators, we investigated perceptions of educators about the benefits of gardening programs to child health. Methods Semi-structured interviews of 9 middle school educators at a school with a garden program in rural Hawai‘i were conducted. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results Perceived benefits of school-based gardening included improving children's diet, engaging children in physical activity, creating a link to local tradition, mitigating hunger, and improving social skills. Poverty was cited as a barrier to adoption of healthy eating habits. Opinions about obesity were contradictory; obesity was considered both a health risk, as well as a cultural standard of beauty and strength. Few respondents framed benefits of gardening in terms of health. Conclusions In order to be effective at obesity prevention, school-based gardening programs in Hawai‘i should be framed as improving diet, addressing hunger, and teaching local tradition. Explicit messages about obesity prevention are likely to alienate the population, as these are in conflict with local standards of beauty. Health researchers and advocates need to further inform educators regarding the potential connections between gardening and health. PMID:21886287

  12. Investigating the role of parent and child characteristics in healthy eating intervention outcomes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Clare E; Farrow, Claire; Haycraft, Emma

    2016-10-01

    While numerous studies have investigated the efficacy of interventions at increasing children's vegetable consumption, little research has examined the effect of individual characteristics on intervention outcomes. In previous research, interventions consisting of modelling and rewards have been shown to increase children's vegetable intake, but differences were identified in terms of how much children respond to such interventions. With this in mind, the current study investigated the role of parental feeding practices, child temperament, and child eating behaviours as predictors of intervention success. Parents (N = 90) of children aged 2-4 years were recruited from toddler groups across Leicestershire, UK. Parents completed measures of feeding practices, child eating behaviours and child temperament, before participating in one of four conditions of a home-based, parent led 14 day intervention aimed at increasing their child's consumption of a disliked vegetable. Correlations and logistic regressions were performed to investigate the role of these factors in predicting intervention success. Parental feeding practices were not significantly associated with intervention success. However, child sociability and food fussiness significantly predicted intervention success, producing a regression model which could predict intervention success in 61% of cases. These findings suggest that future interventions could benefit from being tailored according to child temperament. Furthermore, interventions for children high in food fussiness may be better targeted at reducing fussiness in addition to increasing vegetable consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving teacher-child relationship quality and teacher-rated behavioral adjustment amongst externalizing preschoolers: effects of a two-component intervention.

    PubMed

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Wouters, Sofie; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-02-01

    The school-based Playing-2-gether is a 12-week intervention with two components aimed at decreasing child externalizing behavior through improving teacher-child interactions. The first component is rooted in attachment theory and aimed at enhancing teacher-child relationship quality, and the second is based on learning theory and aimed at improving teachers' behavior management. In this three-wave randomized study, effects of Playing-2-gether on the teacher-child relationship quality and on teacher-rated child behavioral adjustment were investigated. To this aim, 175 dyads consisting of male preschoolers with relatively high levels of externalizing problem behavior and their teachers were randomly assigned to Playing-2-gether (n = 89) or an education-as-usual control condition (n = 86). Teacher-rated questionnaires were collected at pre-test, after the first intervention component, and at post-test. At post-test, the intervention group showed a larger decrease in teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems, and child hyperactivity/inattention. Supplementary analyses showed that all positive effects were already visible after the first intervention component and that teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention did not further reduce during the second component. In addition, an increase in closeness was found following the first component, but subsequently disappeared at post-test.

  14. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  15. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  16. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  17. What works? Interventions for maternal and child undernutrition and survival.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Black, Robert E; Cousens, Simon; Dewey, Kathryn; Giugliani, Elsa; Haider, Batool A; Kirkwood, Betty; Morris, Saul S; Sachdev, H P S; Shekar, Meera

    2008-02-02

    We reviewed interventions that affect maternal and child undernutrition and nutrition-related outcomes. These interventions included promotion of breastfeeding; strategies to promote complementary feeding, with or without provision of food supplements; micronutrient interventions; general supportive strategies to improve family and community nutrition; and reduction of disease burden (promotion of handwashing and strategies to reduce the burden of malaria in pregnancy). We showed that although strategies for breastfeeding promotion have a large effect on survival, their effect on stunting is small. In populations with sufficient food, education about complementary feeding increased height-for-age Z score by 0.25 (95% CI 0.01-0.49), whereas provision of food supplements (with or without education) in populations with insufficient food increased the height-for-age Z score by 0.41 (0.05-0.76). Management of severe acute malnutrition according to WHO guidelines reduced the case-fatality rate by 55% (risk ratio 0.45, 0.32-0.62), and recent studies suggest that newer commodities, such as ready-to-use therapeutic foods, can be used to manage severe acute malnutrition in community settings. Effective micronutrient interventions for pregnant women included supplementation with iron folate (which increased haemoglobin at term by 12 g/L, 2.93-21.07) and micronutrients (which reduced the risk of low birthweight at term by 16% (relative risk 0.84, 0.74-0.95). Recommended micronutrient interventions for children included strategies for supplementation of vitamin A (in the neonatal period and late infancy), preventive zinc supplements, iron supplements for children in areas where malaria is not endemic, and universal promotion of iodised salt. We used a cohort model to assess the potential effect of these interventions on mothers and children in the 36 countries that have 90% of children with stunted linear growth. The model showed that existing interventions that were designed

  18. Bounce Back: Effectiveness of an Elementary School-Based Intervention for Multicultural Children Exposed to Traumatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Audra K.; Gonzalez, Araceli; Sugar, Catherine A.; Solis, Diana; Jaycox, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based intervention for diverse children exposed to a range of traumatic events, and to examine its effectiveness in improving symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety. Method Participants were 74 school children (grades 1-5) and their primary caregivers. All participating students endorsed clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms. School clinicians were trained to deliver Bounce Back, a 10-session cognitive-behavioral group intervention. Children were randomized to Immediate or Delayed (3-month waitlist) Intervention. Parent- and child-report of posttraumatic stress and depression, and child report of anxiety symptoms, were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Results Bounce Back was implemented with excellent clinician fidelity. Compared to children in the Delayed condition, children who received Bounce Back immediately demonstrated significantly greater improvements in parent- and child-reported posttraumatic stress and child-reported anxiety symptoms over the 3-month intervention. Upon receipt of the intervention, the Delayed intervention group demonstrated significant improvements in parent- and child-reported posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms. The Immediate treatment group maintained or showed continued gains in all symptom domains over the 3-month follow-up period (6 month assessment). Conclusions Findings support the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of the Bounce Back intervention as delivered by school-based clinicians for children with traumatic stress. Implications are discussed. PMID:26302251

  19. Economic perspectives on integrating early child stimulation with nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Harold; Behrman, Jere R; Grantham-McGregor, Sally; Lopez-Boo, Florencia; Urzua, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    There is a strongly held view that a narrow window exists for effective nutritional interventions and a widely known stylized depiction of age-dependent economic rates of returns to investments in cognitive and socioemotional development. Both indicate critical periods in early life. Moreover, the fact that both the physical and cognitive development of a child in these early years are highly dependent on childcare practices and on the characteristics of the caregivers motivates an interest in finding effective means to enhance stimulation in the context of nutritional programs, or vice versa. Nevertheless, there is relatively little evidence to date on how to align integrated interventions to these age-specific patterns and how to undertake benefit-cost analyses for integrated interventions. Thus, many core questions need further consideration in order to design integrated nutritional and stimulation programs. This paper looks at some of these questions and provides some guidelines as to how the economic returns from joint nutrition and stimulation programs might be estimated.

  20. Effectiveness Of A School-Based Multicomponent Intervention On Nutritional Status Among Primary School Children In Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Nattapon; Panza, Alessio; Sirikulchayanonta, Chutima; Kumar, Ramesh; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a major public health issue today. The prevalence of obesity and overweight is increasing in both adults and children. Childhood obesity in Thailand has more than doubled since the 1960s and a recent study reported that overweight and obesity in Thais is the 5th highest in Asia. The present study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a life-skills, multicomponent, school-based intervention on child nutritional status. A quasi-experimental design was conducted in two-groups (control and intervention schools) on 453 students attending grade levels 4-5 in Bangkok. Two schools were selected for control, and two schools for intervention groups. The interventions included education, diet, physical activity (PA), food-environment, school builtenvironment, and life-skills components. Subjects were measured at baseline and at 6 months post-treatment. The intervention group had significant differences in overall healthy practices (+1.5 mean difference, p=0.048), dietary habits, physical activity, lower total cholesterol (TC) levels (-2.43 mean, p=0.019) and higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (+4.06 p=0.028) as compared to the control. A higher reduction of overweight individuals among the intervention group over the intervention period was observed. Physical activity and consumption of vegetables increased while consumption of high-caloric snacks and fast foods decreased in children after the intervention. This study indicated that a multidisciplinary approach in school-based interventions is most likely to be effective in preventing children from becoming overweight in the long term. More research should be conducted on school-based interventions with longer intervention periods and higher sustainability.

  1. Effectiveness of Family, Child, and Family-Child Based Intervention on ADHD Symptoms of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malekpour, Mokhtar; Aghababaei, Sara; Hadi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the effectiveness of family, child, and family-child based intervention on the rate of ADHD symptoms in third grade students. The population for this study was all of students with ADHD diagnoses in the city of Isfahan, Iran. The multistage random sampling method was used to select the 60…

  2. The Effects of a Teacher-Child Play Intervention on Classroom Compliance in Young Children in Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Darren G.; Ducharme, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of a teacher-conducted play intervention on preschool-aged children's compliance in child care settings. Study participants included 8 children ranging in age from 3 to 5 years and 5 early childhood education teachers within 5 classrooms across 5 child care centers. A combination ABAB and multiple baseline…

  3. School-based developmental facilitation groups for children of divorce: a preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Kalter, N; Pickar, J; Lesowitz, M

    1984-10-01

    A model of time-limited, school-based groups for children of divorce is presented. Common themes that emerged in groups conducted in three schools suggest that youngsters continue to wrestle with divorce-related conflicts years after the marital disruption. Developmental tasks created by specific post-divorce stresses are described, and multiple brief interventions tied to nodal points in child development are proposed.

  4. School Mental Health Promotion and Intervention: Experiences from Four Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weist, Mark D.; Bruns, Eric J.; Whitaker, Kelly; Wei, Yifeng; Kutcher, Stanley; Larsen, Torill; Holsen, Ingrid; Cooper, Janice L.; Geroski, Anne; Short, Kathryn H.

    2017-01-01

    All around the world, partnerships among schools and other youth-serving systems are promoting more comprehensive school-based mental health services. This article describes the development of international networks for school mental health (SMH) including the International Alliance for Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Schools (INTERCAMHS)…

  5. First Steps School Intervention Module: CLASS-- Contingencies for Learning Academic and Social Skills. (Adapted Preschool Version). An Early School Intervention Program for At-Risk Kindergartners. A Component of the First Steps Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golly, Annemieke; Stiller, Bruce

    This report describes the second module of an early intervention program for at-risk kindergartners who show the early signs of antisocial behavior patterns. The second module of the "First Steps" program describes a school intervention involving the target child, peers, and teachers that teaches an adaptive, prosocial pattern of school…

  6. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  7. A School Counselor's Guide to Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikes, April

    2008-01-01

    The process of reporting abuse can be challenging, traumatic, and at times, overwhelming. In order for school counselors to be effective helpers for children, it is essential that they know how to recognize and prevent child abuse and neglect. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors with information they can use to…

  8. Children's Demonstration School. Project CHILD. Implementation Guidebook Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marjorie; And Others

    Using Project CHILD's Demonstration School as an example, the guidebook is designed to help administrators and directors/coordinators interested in initiating or expanding a summer program for migrant or other children. Activities of the school are described, with approximately 100 children participating in groups of 15 to 20 and working from 4…

  9. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  10. School Proximity and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondylis, Florence; Manacorda, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Is improved school accessibility an effective policy tool for reducing child labor in developing countries? We address this question using microdata from rural Tanzania and a regression strategy that attempts to control for nonrandom location of households around schools as well as classical and nonclassical measurement error in self-reported…

  11. Home Economics: Child Development. Secondary Schools. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Dept. of Education, Saipan.

    This document, a curriculum guide in home economics on child development, for secondary schools, is one of six guides developed for inservice teachers at Marianas High School in Saipan. The guide provides the rationale, description, goals and objectives of the program; the program of studies and performance objectives by levels; samples of lesson…

  12. Individualized Instruction through Open Structure; A Child Centered School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turman, Lynette; Blatt, Bobby

    Carthay Center Elementary School, an urban school in Los Angeles, developed Individualized Instruction through Open Structure in order to meet the needs of a changing student population. The program attempts to excite children about learning and to reinforce basic academic skills. The child's interest, needs, and abilities are integrated into the…

  13. The Homeless Child at School: From Welfare Hotel to Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtzman, Rena; Fodor, Iris

    1987-01-01

    This article elucidates some causes of homelessness and describes living conditions in shelters and welfare hotels. Recommendations are offered to the school-based support team, in cooperation with teachers, to help ease the child's transition from hotel to school and initiate preventative health measures. (Author/BN)

  14. Every Child Can Succeed: Readings for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backler, Alan, Ed.; Eakin, Sybil, Ed.

    This collection of articles on school reform and restructuring is intended to supplement the video series "Every Child Can Succeed," a set of videos presented on public television that includes a demonstration component, a successful-schools component, and an essential-elements component. The 50 articles of the collection describe…

  15. Choosing To Eat School Lunch: Child, Parent, or Joint Decision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Kay; Lambert, Laurel; Blackwell, Ann

    2002-01-01

    A parent telephone survey (n=300) was conducted to identify the primary customer of elementary school food programs. Results show that the decision to eat school lunch was most frequently made jointly by parent and child and the factor most frequently influencing the decision was the nutritional value of the meal. (Contains 15 references.) (JOW)

  16. School Proximity and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondylis, Florence; Manacorda, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Is improved school accessibility an effective policy tool for reducing child labor in developing countries? We address this question using microdata from rural Tanzania and a regression strategy that attempts to control for nonrandom location of households around schools as well as classical and nonclassical measurement error in self-reported…

  17. Adolescent Responsibility, Parent-Child Relations, and School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence; Elmen, Julie D.

    Examined are the relationships of student responsibility and parent-adolescent relations to the school performance of middle-school-age youth. A total of 120 families with a first-born child between 11 and 16 years of age participated in the study. Assessment of adolescent responsibility included measures of self-reliance, work orientation,…

  18. Child Labour and Child Schooling in Rural Ethiopia: Nature and Trade-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haile, Getinet; Haile, Beliyou

    2012-01-01

    We examine work participation and schooling for children aged 7-15 using survey data from rural Ethiopia. Bivariate probit and age-adjusted educational attainment equations have been estimated. Male children are found to be more likely to attend school than their female counterparts. "Specialization" in child labour is also found, with…

  19. Child Labour and Child Schooling in Rural Ethiopia: Nature and Trade-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haile, Getinet; Haile, Beliyou

    2012-01-01

    We examine work participation and schooling for children aged 7-15 using survey data from rural Ethiopia. Bivariate probit and age-adjusted educational attainment equations have been estimated. Male children are found to be more likely to attend school than their female counterparts. "Specialization" in child labour is also found, with…

  20. Roles for Schools and School Social Workers in Improving Child Food Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Maryah Stella; Frongillo, Edward A.; Fishbein, Eliza M.; Burke, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity is associated with a range of child developmental, behavioral, and emotional challenges, all of which can inhibit a child's school success. Schools offer a number of formal and informal services aimed at reducing food insecurity, but the problems associated with identifying children in need, addressing issues of stigma, and…

  1. Roles for Schools and School Social Workers in Improving Child Food Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Maryah Stella; Frongillo, Edward A.; Fishbein, Eliza M.; Burke, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity is associated with a range of child developmental, behavioral, and emotional challenges, all of which can inhibit a child's school success. Schools offer a number of formal and informal services aimed at reducing food insecurity, but the problems associated with identifying children in need, addressing issues of stigma, and…

  2. Assessment of a school-based intervention in eating habits and physical activity in school children: the AVall study

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Rosa; Recasens, Assumpta; Nadal, Ana; Vila, Maria; Pérez, Maria José; Manresa, Josep Maria; Recasens, Isabel; Salvador, Gemma; Serra, Jaume; Roure, Eulàlia; Castells, Conxa

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity has become a global public health problem, which also affects children. It has been proposed that the educational interventions during childhood could be a key strategy in the prevention of obesity. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an intervention on food habits and physical activity in school children. Methods A 2-year cluster-randomised prospective study with two parallel arms was used to evaluate an intervention programme in children in their first year of primary schooling (5–6 years of age) in schools in the city of Granollers. The intervention consisted of the promotion of healthy eating habits and physical activity by means of the educational methodology Investigation, Vision, Action and Change (IVAC). At the beginning and at the end of the study (2006 and 2008) the weight and height of each child was measured in situ, while the families were given a self-report physical activity questionnaire and the Krece Plus quick test. Results Two years after the beginning of the study, the body mass index of the children in the control group was 0.89 kg/m2 higher than that of the intervention schools. The intervention reduced by 62% the prevalence of overweight children. Similarly, the proportion of children that ate a second piece of fruit and took part in an after-school physical activity increased in the intervention group. In the control group, the weekly consumption of fish was reduced. Conclusions The educational intervention in healthy eating habits and physical activity in the school could contribute to lessen the current increase in child obesity. PMID:21398682

  3. School-Age Child-Care/"Latch-Key" Programs. Implementation Handbook for Indiana Schools. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This handbook is designed to provide local school corporations with information about legislation enacted by the Indiana General Assembly in 1991 that requires each corporation to offer latch-key programs, or child-care programs for school-age children, during the 1992-93 school year. The handbook supplies school corporations with: (1) a copy of…

  4. Aligning School Counselors, Comprehensive School Counseling Programs, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabens, Franciene S.; Zyromski, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act contains numerous implications for school counselors, but the affects of NCLB on school counselors' roles and identities has not been thoroughly explored. Further, ways comprehensive school counseling programs and school counselors can thrive while striving to meet the goals of NCLB have been ignored in previous…

  5. Mutuality in Mother-Child Interactions in an Antillean Intervention Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boomstra, Nienke W.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study on mutuality in mother-child interaction during reading and playing sessions. Within mother-child interaction, mutuality is seen as important in language acquisition. The study was executed within a group of Netherlands Antillean mother-child dyads who participated in an intervention programme. Mutuality was…

  6. Behavior Modification of Aggressive Children in Child Welfare: Evaluation of a Combined Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitkowski, Dennis; Petermann, Franz; Buttner, Peter; Krause-Leipoldt, Carsten; Petermann, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Children and adolescents with aggressive disorders are prevalent in child welfare settings. Therefore, the assumption is that child welfare services would benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention. This study investigates whether implementation of the training with aggressive children (TAC) could improve the outcome of child welfare. Twelve…

  7. Parental Beliefs and Values Related to Family Risk, Educational Intervention, and Child Academic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Frances A.; And Others

    Primary goals of this study were to determine: (1) whether a child-centered educational preschool program and/or a parent-centered early elementary educational intervention program for disadvantaged children had effects on the child rearing beliefs and values of parents; and (2) whether parents' child rearing beliefs and educational values were…

  8. Behavior Modification of Aggressive Children in Child Welfare: Evaluation of a Combined Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitkowski, Dennis; Petermann, Franz; Buttner, Peter; Krause-Leipoldt, Carsten; Petermann, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Children and adolescents with aggressive disorders are prevalent in child welfare settings. Therefore, the assumption is that child welfare services would benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention. This study investigates whether implementation of the training with aggressive children (TAC) could improve the outcome of child welfare. Twelve…

  9. Mutuality in Mother-Child Interactions in an Antillean Intervention Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boomstra, Nienke W.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study on mutuality in mother-child interaction during reading and playing sessions. Within mother-child interaction, mutuality is seen as important in language acquisition. The study was executed within a group of Netherlands Antillean mother-child dyads who participated in an intervention programme. Mutuality was…

  10. Caring for Play: The School and Child Care Connection. A Guide for Elementary School Principals, Child Care Professionals and School Board Officials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Noel

    Recognizing that child care located in the schools has many benefits, this manual was prepared for those planning or implementing school-age child care partnerships for kindergarten and primary grade children. Reporting on programs in the Ontario (Canada) area, the manual notes five issues that are central to developing such a program: (1)…

  11. Enhancing No Child Left Behind-School mental health connections.

    PubMed

    Daly, Brian P; Burke, Robert; Hare, Isadora; Mills, Carrie; Owens, Celeste; Moore, Elizabeth; Weist, Mark D

    2006-11-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 was signed into law by President George W. Bush in January 2002 and is regarded as the most significant federal education policy initiative in a generation. The primary focus of the No Child Left Behind Act is on promoting educational success for all children; however, the legislation also contains opportunities to advance school-based mental health. Unfortunately, the complexities of the provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act have made it difficult for educators, stakeholders, and mental health professionals to understand the legal and practical interface between No Child Left Behind and the school mental health movement. Therefore, the goals of this article are to (1) raise awareness about the challenges educators and school mental health professionals face as a result of the implementation of No Child Left Behind and (2) provide ideas and recommendations to advance the interface between No Child Left Behind and school mental health, which will support key provisions of the act and the growth of the field.

  12. Factors Affecting Parental Decision-Making Regarding Interventions for Their Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Elizabeth Baltus

    2014-01-01

    Due to the numerous interventions available for children with autism, parents are faced with challenging decisions regarding treatments from the time of diagnosis and throughout their child's life. This exploratory qualitative study investigated the reasons behind parents' decisions about interventions for their child with autism. In-depth…

  13. Child-Parent Interventions for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendel, Kristen Esposito; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the effects of direct child-parent interventions to the effects of child-focused interventions on anxiety outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Systematic review methods and meta-analytic techniques were employed. Eight randomized controlled trials examining effects of family cognitive behavior…

  14. The Continued Effects of Home Intervention on Child Development Outcomes in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadeed, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the continued effects of a home-based intervention programme on child development outcomes and parenting practices in Bahrain. The intervention is the "Mother-Child Home Education Programme" (MOCEP) which was implemented in Arabic in the Kingdom of Bahrain beginning in 2001. One hundred and sixty-seven poor,…

  15. The Continued Effects of Home Intervention on Child Development Outcomes in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadeed, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the continued effects of a home-based intervention programme on child development outcomes and parenting practices in Bahrain. The intervention is the "Mother-Child Home Education Programme" (MOCEP) which was implemented in Arabic in the Kingdom of Bahrain beginning in 2001. One hundred and sixty-seven poor,…

  16. Parental involvement in interventions to improve child dietary intake: A systematic review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interventions that aim to improve child dietary quality and reduce disease risk often involve parents. The most effective methods to engage parents remain unclear. A systematic review of interventions designed to change child and adolescent dietary behavior was conducted to answer whether parent inv...

  17. The Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention: Secondary Prevention for Youth at Risk of Developing PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Steven J.; Stover, Carla Smith; Marans, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of a four-session, caregiver-child Intervention, the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), to prevent the development of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) provided within 30 days of exposure to a potentially traumatic event (PTE). Method: One-hundred seventy-six 7…

  18. Child-Parent Interventions for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendel, Kristen Esposito; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the effects of direct child-parent interventions to the effects of child-focused interventions on anxiety outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Systematic review methods and meta-analytic techniques were employed. Eight randomized controlled trials examining effects of family cognitive behavior…

  19. Early Intervention in a Child Care Setting Using Play and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matte, Rebecca L.; Messmore, Carol

    2013-01-01

    At an alarming rate, preschoolers are being expelled from child care centers because of disruptive behavior, and elementary schools are dealing with social-emotional behaviors that affect the entire classroom. The authors share the story of a child who would have been one of those expelled from child care and at risk in the elementary school…

  20. Early Intervention in a Child Care Setting Using Play and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matte, Rebecca L.; Messmore, Carol

    2013-01-01

    At an alarming rate, preschoolers are being expelled from child care centers because of disruptive behavior, and elementary schools are dealing with social-emotional behaviors that affect the entire classroom. The authors share the story of a child who would have been one of those expelled from child care and at risk in the elementary school…

  1. Improvements in Child Behavior and Family Mealtime Environment After an Intensive Behavioral Feeding Intervention.

    PubMed

    Seiverling, Laura; Hendy, Helen M; Yusupova, Stella

    2016-08-31

    The present study examined changes in child and family mealtime patterns before and after intensive behavioral feeding intervention at a multidisciplinary hospital-based program for 50 children. At preintervention and postintervention, caregivers completed surveys to report child feeding goals and the About Your Child's Eating scale (AYCE). In addition, at postintervention, each caregiver rated intervention effectiveness for his or her child's feeding goals identified at preintervention and provided intervention satisfaction ratings. Results revealed that caregivers perceived all three AYCE family mealtime patterns to improve from preintervention to postintervention, the majority of caregivers rated intervention as being effective for improving the specific child feeding goals identified at preintervention, and caregivers gave high satisfaction ratings for the intervention.

  2. Process evaluation outcomes from a global child obesity prevention intervention.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Simone; Borys, Jean Michel; du Plessis, Hugues Ruault; Walter, Lea; Huang, Terry T-K; Levi, Jeffrey; Vinck, Jan

    2014-07-28

    While it is acknowledged that child obesity interventions should cover multiple ecological levels (downstream, midstream and upstream) to maximize their effectiveness, there is a lack of evaluation data to guide the development and implementation of such efforts. To commence addressing this knowledge gap, the present study provides process evaluation data relating to the experiences of groups implementing the EPODE approach to child obesity prevention in various locations around the world. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the barriers and facilitators to program implementation in program sites around the world to assist in developing strategies to enhance program outcomes. An online survey that included open-ended questions was distributed to the 25 EPODE programs in operation at the time of the survey (May 2012). The survey items asked respondents to comment on those aspects of program implementation that they found challenging and to suggest areas for future improvement. Eighteen programs representing 14 countries responded to the request to participate in the survey, yielding a 72% response rate. The responses were analyzed via the constant comparative method using NVivo qualitative data analysis software. The main concerns of the various EPODE programs were their ability to secure ongoing funding and their access to evidence-based intervention methods and policy advice relating to relationships with third parties. These issues were in turn impacted by other factors, including (i) access to user-friendly information relating to the range of intervention strategies available and appropriate evaluation measures; (ii) assistance with building and maintaining stakeholder relationships; and (iii) assurance of the quality, independence, and transparency of policies and practices. The findings are facilitating the ongoing refinement of the EPODE approach. In particular, standardized and tailored information packages are being made available to

  3. 20 CFR 219.55 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... school attendance for child age 18. The child will be asked to submit (on a form furnished by the Board... is attending school full-time and is not being paid by an employer to attend school; and (b)...

  4. Child Sexual Behaviors in School Context: Age and Gender Differences.

    PubMed

    Miragoli, Sarah; Camisasca, Elena; Di Blasio, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to explore the child sexual behaviors that Italian teachers have observed in the school context. A representative sample of 227 children, from 5 to 10 years old, was rated by their teachers through the Child Sexual Behavior Inventory. Frequencies of sexual behaviors among children aged 5 to 6, 7 to 8, and 9 to 10 are presented. Younger children showed a broader range of sexual behaviors that decrease with the growing age, such as males in comparison to females. Moreover, findings showed that child sexual behavior is not only related to age and gender but also to family characteristics. These results suggested that child sexual behaviors reported by teachers through the Child Sexual Behavior Inventory may provide useful information about the development of children's sexuality. The knowledge of age appropriate sexual behaviors can help teachers discern normal sexual behaviors from problematic sexual behaviors.

  5. Jerry, a Gifted Child, at Our School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunic, Dora Balic; Christiansen, Mette; Oersted, Lea

    2010-01-01

    Based on the observations of teachers and other adults in the framework of our school concept, this study follows the development of a young boy during his first three school years. Jerry is gifted in many fields and shows a complex range of interests. Although he was among the youngest in his class coming into the school, Jerry was more…

  6. Jerry, a Gifted Child, at Our School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunic, Dora Balic; Christiansen, Mette; Oersted, Lea

    2010-01-01

    Based on the observations of teachers and other adults in the framework of our school concept, this study follows the development of a young boy during his first three school years. Jerry is gifted in many fields and shows a complex range of interests. Although he was among the youngest in his class coming into the school, Jerry was more…

  7. School composition, family poverty and child behaviour.

    PubMed

    Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily

    2016-06-01

    There is little research on the role of school composition in young children's behaviour. School composition effects may be particularly important for children in disadvantaged circumstances, such as those growing up in poverty. We explored the role of school academic and socio-economic composition in internalising problems, externalising problems and prosocial behaviour at age 7 years, and tested if it moderates the effect of family poverty on these outcomes. We used data from 7225 7-year-olds of the Millennium Cohort Study who attended state primary schools in England and for whom we had information on these outcomes. In multiple membership models, we allowed for clustering of children in schools and moves between schools since the beginning of school, at age 5. Our school academic and socio-economic composition variables were school-level achievement and % of pupils eligible for free school-meals, respectively. Poverty (family income below the poverty line) was measured in all sweeps until age 7. We explored the roles of both timing and duration of poverty. The effects of poverty were strong and robust to adjustment. School socio-economic composition was associated with individual children's internalising and externalising problems, even in adjusted models. School composition did not interact with poverty to predict any of the outcomes. Neither the academic nor the socio-economic composition of the school moderated the effect of family poverty on children's behaviour in primary school. However, children attending schools with more disadvantaged socio-economic intakes had more internalising and externalising problems than their counterparts.

  8. School-based interventions for disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Youth disruptive behavior is a concern for youth, school personnel,families, and society. Early childhood disruptive behaviors negatively impact the classroom, and are associated with negative academic, social, behavioral, emotional, substance use, health, and justice system outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. Effective, comprehensive, multicomponent interventions targeting risk/protective factors and pathways associated with antisocial behavior reduce and/or mitigate these negative outcomes. Positive effects have been demonstrated for universal and indicated programs for participating youth and families in early childhood, and for high-risk youth in adolescence and young adulthood. These empirically supported programs inform the treatment of complex and difficult-to-treat disruptive behavior.

  9. Evidence-Based Family-School Interventions with Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Stacey L.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen studies of family-school interventions with preschool children conducted between 1980 and 2002, and published in peer-reviewed journals, were reviewed and evaluated according to the criteria developed by the Task Force on Evidence-Based Intervention in School Psychology (Division 16 and Society for the Study of School Psychology Task…

  10. Interventions to Increase Free School Meal Take-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Jenny; Sahota, Pinki; Pike, Jo; Molinari, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to design and implement interventions to increase free school meal (FSM) uptake in pilot schools. This paper describes the interventions, reports on acceptability (as perceived by school working parties) and explores the process of implementing change. Design/Methodology/Approach: The research consisted of two…

  11. Implementation of a Pilot School-site Cholesterol Reduction Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnicow, Ken; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A school-based cholesterol-reduction intervention for primary grade students in New York City public schools offered a workshop to teach those with high total serum cholesterol values to identify negative health consequences of high-fat diets. Results indicate that school-site cholesterol reduction interventions for high-risk individuals are…

  12. Interventions to Increase Free School Meal Take-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Jenny; Sahota, Pinki; Pike, Jo; Molinari, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to design and implement interventions to increase free school meal (FSM) uptake in pilot schools. This paper describes the interventions, reports on acceptability (as perceived by school working parties) and explores the process of implementing change. Design/Methodology/Approach: The research consisted of two…

  13. Determining Responsiveness to School Counseling Interventions Using Behavioral Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruman, Diana H.; Hoelzen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    School districts are in the process of adopting the Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to identify and remediate academic and behavioral deficits. As an integral member of the school behavior team, school counselors must use data on individual interventions to contribute to the data-based decision making process in RTI. This article presents…

  14. Assessing the Outcomes of School-Based Partnership Resilience Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mampane, Ruth; Huddle, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the outcomes of educational psychology school-based intervention. The aim was to determine whether the intervention served as an educational pathway to resilience. Through a concurrent mixed-methods research design interpreted through a pragmatic lens, academic school performance of students in a rural school was used as an…

  15. Multilevel analysis of the Be Active Eat Well intervention: environmental and behavioural influences on reductions in child obesity risk.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B A; Kremer, P J; Swinburn, B A; de Silva-Sanigorski, A M

    2012-07-01

    The Be Active Eat Well (BAEW) community-based child obesity prevention intervention was successful in modestly reducing unhealthy weight gain in primary school children using a multi-strategy and multi-setting approach. To (1) examine the relationship between changes in obesity-related individual, household and school factors and changes in standardised child body mass index (zBMI), and (2) determine if the BAEW intervention moderated these effects. The longitudinal relationships between changes in individual, household and school variables and changes in zBMI were explored using multilevel modelling, with measurement time (baseline and follow-up) at level 1, individual (behaviours, n = 1812) at level 2 and households (n = 1318) and schools (n = 18) as higher levels (environments). The effect of the intervention was tested while controlling for child age, gender and maternal education level. This study confirmed that the BAEW intervention lowered child zBMI compared with the comparison group (-0.085 units, P = 0.03). The variation between household environments was found to be a large contributor to the percentage of unexplained change in child zBMI (59%), compared with contributions from the individual (23%) and school levels (1%). Across both groups, screen time (P = 0.03), sweet drink consumption (P = 0.03) and lack of household rules for television (TV) viewing (P = 0.05) were associated with increased zBMI, whereas there was a non-significant association with the frequency the TV was on during evening meals (P = 0.07). The moderating effect of the intervention was only evident for the relationship between the frequency of TV on during meals and zBMI, however, this effect was modest (P = 0.04). The development of childhood obesity involves multi-factorial and multi-level influences, some of which are amenable to change. Obesity prevention strategies should not only target individual behaviours but also the household environment and family practices. Although z

  16. Parental Factors Associated with Child Post-traumatic Stress Following Injury: A Consideration of Intervention Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Anna E.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are relatively common following pediatric traumatic injury and are related to poor long-term child outcomes. However, due to concerns regarding the efficacy of early child preventive interventions, and difficulty intervening with injured and medicated children soon after the event, it is not feasible to provide early psychological interventions to children exposed to traumatic injury. Parental PTSD symptoms and reactions to the child’s traumatic injury impact child outcomes and provide potential targets for early intervention to reduce child symptom development without involving the child. The authors conducted a review of the literature using Psycinfo and Pubmed research databases (publication years = 1990–2017) and identified 65 published studies relevant to the topic of the review. The present review considers parent factors [parenting styles, parental post-traumatic pathology (PTS), adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, and communication regarding the traumatic injury] and their impact on child PTS. We focus specifically on factors amenable to intervention. We further review moderators of these relationships (e.g., child age and gender, parent gender) and conclude that it is unlikely that a one-size-fits-all approach to treatment will be successful. Rather, it is necessary to consider the age and gender of parent child dyads in designing and providing targeted interventions to families following the traumatic injury of a child. PMID:28878711

  17. Bidirectional Effects between Parenting and Aggressive Child Behavior in the Context of a Preventive Intervention.

    PubMed

    Te Brinke, Lysanne W; Deković, Maja; Stoltz, Sabine E M J; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2016-10-27

    Over time, developmental theories and empirical studies have gradually started to adopt a bidirectional viewpoint. The area of intervention research is, however, lagging behind in this respect. This longitudinal study examined whether bidirectional associations between (changes in) parenting and (changes in) aggressive child behavior over time differed in three conditions: a child intervention condition, a child + parent intervention condition and a control condition. Participants were 267 children (74 % boys, 26 % girls) with elevated levels of aggression, their mothers and their teachers. Reactive aggression, proactive aggression and perceived parenting were measured at four measurement times from pretest to one-year after intervention termination. Results showed that associations between aggressive child behavior and perceived parenting are different in an intervention context, compared to a general developmental context. Aggressive behavior and perceived parenting were unrelated over time for children who did not receive an intervention. In an intervention context, however, decreases in aggressive child behavior were related to increases in perceived positive parenting and decreases in perceived overreactivity. These findings underscore the importance of addressing child-driven processes in interventions aimed at children, but also in interventions aimed at both children and their parents.

  18. Child eating behavior outcomes of an early feeding intervention to reduce risk indicators for child obesity: the NOURISH RCT.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Lynne Allison; Mallan, Kimberley Margaret; Battistutta, Diana; Nicholson, Jan Maree; Meedeniya, Josephine Emma; Bayer, Jordana Kim; Magarey, Anthea

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to describe parent-reported child eating behavior and maternal parenting impact outcomes of an infant feeding intervention to reduce child obesity risk. An assessor masked Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) with concealed allocation of individual mother-infant dyads. The NOURISH RCT enrolled 698 first-time mothers (mean age 30.1 years, SD = 5.3) with healthy term infants (51% female) aged 4.3 months (SD = 1.0) at baseline. Outcomes were assessed 6 months post-intervention when the children were 2 years old. Mothers reported on child eating behaviors using the Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ), food preferences, and dietary intake using a 24-hour telephone recall. Parenting was assessed using five scales validated for use in Australia. Intervention effects were evident on the CEBQ overall (MANOVA P = 0.002) and 4/8 subscales: child satiety responsiveness (P = 0.03), fussiness (P = 0.01), emotional overeating (P < 0.01), and food responsiveness (P = 0.06). Intervention children "liked" more fruits (P < 0.01) and fewer non-core foods and beverages (P = 0.06, 0.03). The intervention mothers reported greater "autonomy encouragement" (P = 0.002). Anticipatory guidance on protective feeding practices appears to have modest positive impacts on child eating behaviors that are postulated to reduce future obesity risk. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  19. Does No Child Left Behind Really Capture School Quality? Evidence from an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Heather E.

    2010-01-01

    Before revising the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation under the new administration, policy makers need to be informed as to whether or not the NCLB labeling formula adequately distinguishes good-quality schools from poor-quality schools. This study tests this question, using rich descriptive data for Milwaukee's urban school district (MPS).…

  20. Does No Child Left Behind Really Capture School Quality? Evidence from an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Heather E.

    2010-01-01

    Before revising the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation under the new administration, policy makers need to be informed as to whether or not the NCLB labeling formula adequately distinguishes good-quality schools from poor-quality schools. This study tests this question, using rich descriptive data for Milwaukee's urban school district (MPS).…

  1. Behavior modification of aggressive children in child welfare: evaluation of a combined intervention program.

    PubMed

    Nitkowski, Dennis; Petermann, Franz; Büttner, Peter; Krause-Leipoldt, Carsten; Petermann, Ulrike

    2009-07-01

    Children and adolescents with aggressive disorders are prevalent in child welfare settings. Therefore, the assumption is that child welfare services would benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention. This study investigates whether implementation of the training with aggressive children (TAC) could improve the outcome of child welfare. Twelve children (average age 10 years), diagnosed with an oppositional defiant disorder or a conduct disorder, are treated either with a child welfare program or with a combined intervention of child welfare program and TAC. Before and immediately after completion of the combined treatment, parent and teacher ratings are collected. Parents report children participating in child welfare and TAC to show a stronger decline in social and conduct problems as well as a clearer increase in prosocial behavior. Teachers see a better improvement in social problems and tended to report a decrease in aggressive behavior. Results confirm that the TAC can enhance effects of a child welfare program.

  2. Cost of school-based drug treatment in Tanzania. The Partnership for Child Development.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    It has been argued that targeting delivery of anthelmintics to school-children by taking advantage of the existing education infrastructure and administrative system can be one of the most cost-effective approaches in minimizing the intensity of infections with both schistosomiasis and major intestinal nematodes in many developing countries. The study was conducted in January 1997, shortly after the completion of the drug intervention programme. This paper provides an analysis of the costs of providing age-targeted treatment of school-children for urinary schistosomiasis using praziquantel and for intestinal nematodes using albendazole as an integral part of the School Health Programme in Tanga Region, Tanzania. The analysis shows that the total financial cost of the intervention programme in 1996 prices was US$54 252.28 (exchange rate: TSH 573 = US$1). Of this amount, the cost of drugs constitutes 80.6%, while the delivery cost appears relatively low, representing just below 20%. Even when the opportunity cost of unpaid days of labour input is included, the cost of drugs still remains the highest cost component of the intervention (55.8%). In the current epidemiological and logistic setting of Tanzania, the financial cost per child treated using praziquantel, which involved prior screening at the school level, was US$0.79, while treatment using albendazole was as low as US$0.23, of which US$0.20 was drug purchase cost. It is concluded that the base cost of delivering a universal, standard, school-based health intervention such as albendazole can be as low as US$0.03 per child tested, but even a very slight increase in the complexity of delivery can have a very significant impact on the cost of intervention.

  3. Fast Track: Elementary School. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Fast Track" is a comprehensive intervention designed to reduce conduct problems and promote academic, behavioral, and social improvement. The program's components include the "Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies" curriculum, parent groups, parent-child sharing time, child social skills training, home visiting, child…

  4. School Functioning of a Particularly Vulnerable Group: Children and Young People in Residential Child Care

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Carla; Lázaro-Visa, Susana; Santos, Iriana; del Valle, Jorge F.; Bravo, Amaia

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of the children and young people in residential child care in Spain are there as a consequence of abuse and neglect in their birth families. Research has shown that these types of adverse circumstances in childhood are risk factors for emotional and behavioral problems, as well as difficulties in adapting to different contexts. School achievement is related to this and represents one of the most affected areas. Children in residential child care exhibit extremely poor performance and difficulties in school functioning which affects their transition to adulthood and into the labor market. The main aim of this study is to describe the school functioning of a sample of 1,216 children aged between 8 and 18 living in residential child care in Spain. The specific needs of children with intellectual disability and unaccompanied migrant children were also analyzed. Relationships with other variables such as gender, age, mental health needs, and other risk factors were also explored. In order to analyze school functioning in this vulnerable group, the sample was divided into different groups depending on school level and educational needs. In the vast majority of cases, children were in primary or compulsory secondary education (up to age 16), this group included a significant proportion of cases in special education centers. The rest of the sample were in vocational training or post-compulsory secondary school. Results have important implications for the design of socio-educative intervention strategies in both education and child care systems in order to promote better school achievement and better educational qualifications in this vulnerable group. PMID:28725205

  5. Helping Your Child Feel Connected to School. Information for Parents and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Parents want their child to do well in school. They also want their child to be healthy and avoid behaviors that are risky or harmful. Through their guidance and support, parents can have great influence on their child's health and learning. But they also have important allies in this effort--the caring adults in their child's school. Research…

  6. Communicating Effectively with Your Gifted Child's School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutny, Joan Franklin

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common questions the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) receives from parents is, "How should I advocate for my child in the classroom?" Dr. Joan Smutny first tackled this topic for "Parenting for High Potential" in 2002, but her practical, step-by-step approach is still very applicable today. Some…

  7. Child Sexual Abuse: A School Leadership Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Child Sexual Abuse is a growing epidemic. In the United States, 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls will be sexually abused before reaching adulthood. From a legal standpoint, inappropriate sexual relations between a faculty/staff member and a student are a growing national concern. In 1991, the Supreme Court heard the Franklin v. Gwinnett County Public…

  8. The Pre-School Gifted Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gensley, Juliana

    1973-01-01

    Suggestions for parents of gifted preschool children include talking to the child as an individual, listening perceptively, finding ways to round out knowledge for development of true concepts, and providing a good learning environment with many things to handle, smell, taste, see, and hear. (MC)

  9. Inkster Public Schools Implement Child Development Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inkster Public Schools, MI. Lincoln Child Development Center.

    An innovative kindergarten program was established as a federally funded project to pursue the following objectives: (1) to discover and develop the potential ability of each child, (2) to develop feelings of autonomy and self-worth, (3) to provide experiences for developing inquiring attitudes and for development of self-confidence and positive…

  10. The Child Who Stutters at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dean E., Comp.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers often report difficulty in knowing how to best help a child who stutters in the classroom. Many children who stutter can handle oral reading tasks satisfactorily, particularly if they are encouraged to practice at home. Some, however, will stutter severely while reading aloud in class. Teachers should always keep in mind that each child…

  11. The Child Who Stutters at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dean E., Comp.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers often report difficulty in knowing how to best help a child who stutters in the classroom. Many children who stutter can handle oral reading tasks satisfactorily, particularly if they are encouraged to practice at home. Some, however, will stutter severely while reading aloud in class. Teachers should always keep in mind that each child…

  12. Communicating Effectively with Your Gifted Child's School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutny, Joan Franklin

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common questions the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) receives from parents is, "How should I advocate for my child in the classroom?" Dr. Joan Smutny first tackled this topic for "Parenting for High Potential" in 2002, but her practical, step-by-step approach is still very applicable today. Some…

  13. [Psychosocial intervention to help child and adolescent witnesses in court].

    PubMed

    Habel, U; Schneider, F

    2001-01-01

    The risk of crimes being committed against children and adolescents is particularly high. These individuals should receive effective protection. Confronted with judicial proceedings, they are exposed to enormous amounts of stress. Often they are overwhelmed by feelings of fear and insecurity. Secondary victimization is likely to follow as a result of the negative experiences they encounter with the judicial system. A victim assistance program has been set up in the regional and district court of Düsseldorf in order to protect against such trauma. Forty-seven child and adolescent victims and 53 adult victims, all turned witnesses, took part in the program. Standardized questionnaires for mood and affect were applied. Results show that the younger witnesses perceive the experience of the court proceedings as stressful compared to adults. However, they also benefit mostly from the victim support services. Fear and stress were successfully alleviated. Qualified victim support interventions may play an important role in protecting children and adolescents in the courtroom from "secondary victimization".

  14. Relations of Children's Effortful Control and Teacher-Child Relationship Quality to School Attitudes in a Low-Income Sample.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kassondra M; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eisenberg, Nancy; Sulik, Michael J; Valiente, Carlos; Huerta, Snjezana; Edwards, Alison; Eggum, Natalie D; Kupfer, Anne S; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Wilson, Shauna B; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Landry, Susan H; Swank, Paul R; Assel, Michael A; Taylor, Heather B

    2011-01-01

    RESEARCH FINDINGS: The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of children's effortful control and quality of relationships with teachers to school attitudes longitudinally in an ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged sample. Data were collected as part of a larger intervention project during mid-fall, winter, and late spring (ns = 823, 722, and 758, respectively) for 2 cohorts of 3- to 5-year-olds (collected during 2 different school years). Children's effortful control was assessed in the fall with parents' and teachers' reports and 2 behavioral measures. Teacher-child relationship quality was assessed mid-year with teachers' reports of closeness and conflict. Attitudes toward school were assessed in late spring using teachers' and students' reports of school avoidance and liking. Effortful control, in general, was positively correlated with teacher-child closeness and school liking and negatively correlated with conflict and school avoidance. Using structural equation modeling and controlling for sex and ethnicity, we found that effortful control was positively related to teacher-child relationship quality, which in turn was positively related to school attitudes. Furthermore, the relation of effortful control to school attitudes was mediated by teacher-child relationship quality. PRACTICE OR POLICY: Results provide evidence for the importance of relational processes that take place within the classroom context and have implications for teachers and clinicians working to increase school success in ethnic minority and low-income children.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of two primary school intervention strategies to prevent early onset tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Storr, Carla L; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Kellam, Sheppard G; Anthony, James C

    2002-03-01

    In this article, we examine the impact of two universal, grade 1 preventive interventions on the onset of tobacco smoking as assessed in early adolescence. The classroom-centered (CC) intervention was designed to reduce the risk for tobacco smoking by enhancing teachers' behavior management skills in first grade and, thereby, reducing child attention problems and aggressive and shy behavior-known risk behaviors for later substance use. The family-school partnership (FSP) intervention targeted these early risk behaviors via improvements in parent-teacher communication and parents' child behavior management strategies. A cohort of 678 urban, predominately African-American, public school students were randomly assigned to one of three Grade 1 classrooms at entrance to primary school (age 6). One classroom featured the CC intervention, a second the FSP intervention, and the third served as a control classroom. Six years later, 81% of the students completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Relative to controls, a modest attenuation in the risk of smoking initiation was found for students who had been assigned to either the CC or FSP intervention classrooms (26% versus 33%) (adjusted relative risk for CC/control contrast=0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.96; adjusted relative risk for FSP/control contrast=0.69, 95% CI, 0.50-0.97). Results lend support to targeting the early antecedent risk behaviors for tobacco smoking.

  16. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    STUEBING, KARLA K.; BARTH, AMY E.; TRAHAN, LISA H.; REDDY, RADHIKA R.; MICIAK, JEREMY; FLETCHER, JACK M.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, “What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?” Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from the National Reading Panel Report. Eligible participant populations included at-risk elementary school children enrolled in the third grade or below. Effects were analyzed using a shifting unit of analysis approach within three statistical models: cognitive characteristics predicting growth curve slope (Model 1, mean r = .31), gain (Model 2, mean r = .21), or postintervention reading controlling for preintervention reading (Model 3, mean r = .15). Effects were homogeneous within each model when effects were aggregated within study. The small size of the effects calls into question the practical significance and utility of using cognitive characteristics for prediction of response when baseline reading is available. PMID:26535015

  17. The DSM and the Dangerous School Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The history of ADHD is in part a history of children who have not fitted in at school. Yet until recently, surges in diagnostic levels had not prompted a questioning of the school's complicity in the trend. Through an analysis of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM), the principal diagnostic guideline relating to ADHD,…

  18. Today's Child at School: A Parent's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Barry

    This guide, which is intended for parents in New South Wales, Australia, provides a description of primary school and its curriculum and guidelines for conducting learning activities with children both at school and at home. Introductory sections briefly discuss the topics of parents as children's first teachers, knowledge about children's…

  19. The DSM and the Dangerous School Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The history of ADHD is in part a history of children who have not fitted in at school. Yet until recently, surges in diagnostic levels had not prompted a questioning of the school's complicity in the trend. Through an analysis of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM), the principal diagnostic guideline relating to ADHD,…

  20. Protecting Your Child's Personal Information at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Trade Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Back to school--an annual ritual that includes buying new notebooks, packing lunches, coordinating transportation, and filling out forms: registration forms, health forms, permission slips, and emergency contact forms, to name a few. Many school forms require personal and, sometimes, sensitive information. In the wrong hands, this information can…

  1. Every Child, Every School: Success for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.; And Others

    "Success for All" and "Roots and Wings" are comprehensive restructuring programs for elementary schools designed to make the idea that "all children can learn" into a practical, daily organizing principle for schools, especially those serving many children placed at risk. This book describes the programs in detail,…

  2. Child Health and School Enrollment: A Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handa, Sudhanshu; Peterman, Amber

    2007-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data from South Africa to estimate the relationship between early childhood nutritional status and schooling outcomes five years later. Preferred estimates from the full sample aged zero to five, which treat prior nutritional status as endogenous, show no impact of past nutritional status on current schooling, in…

  3. Child Health and School Enrollment: A Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handa, Sudhanshu; Peterman, Amber

    2007-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data from South Africa to estimate the relationship between early childhood nutritional status and schooling outcomes five years later. Preferred estimates from the full sample aged zero to five, which treat prior nutritional status as endogenous, show no impact of past nutritional status on current schooling, in…

  4. Time in Reconstructing the (School) Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarre, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Policies and practices around school work, operating within and beyond the family, are fundamentally rooted in and perpetuate a particular generational order. Working from a temporal perspective this article focuses on "school work" in order to demonstrate how time operates across spheres as a key means of constructing generation, making…

  5. 24 CFR 35.1225 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1225 Section 35.1225 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1225 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level... as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the designated party shall complete a...

  6. 24 CFR 35.1225 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1225 Section 35.1225 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1225 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level... as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the designated party shall complete a...

  7. 24 CFR 35.730 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.730 Section 35.730 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Project-Based Assistance § 35.730 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... subpart applies has been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the...

  8. 24 CFR 35.730 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.730 Section 35.730 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Project-Based Assistance § 35.730 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... subpart applies has been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the...

  9. 24 CFR 35.1225 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1225 Section 35.1225 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1225 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level... as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the designated party shall complete a...

  10. 24 CFR 35.325 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.325 Section 35.325 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... environmental intervention blood lead level. If a child less than 6 years of age living in a federally assisted dwelling unit has an environmental intervention blood lead level, the owner shall immediately conduct...

  11. 24 CFR 35.325 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.325 Section 35.325 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... environmental intervention blood lead level. If a child less than 6 years of age living in a federally assisted dwelling unit has an environmental intervention blood lead level, the owner shall immediately conduct...

  12. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs § 35.1130 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the PHA shall complete a...

  13. 24 CFR 35.325 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.325 Section 35.325 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... environmental intervention blood lead level. If a child less than 6 years of age living in a federally assisted dwelling unit has an environmental intervention blood lead level, the owner shall immediately conduct...

  14. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs § 35.1130 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the PHA shall complete a...

  15. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs § 35.1130 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the PHA shall complete a...

  16. 24 CFR 35.730 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.730 Section 35.730 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Project-Based Assistance § 35.730 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... subpart applies has been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the...

  17. 24 CFR 35.325 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.325 Section 35.325 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... environmental intervention blood lead level. If a child less than 6 years of age living in a federally assisted dwelling unit has an environmental intervention blood lead level, the owner shall immediately conduct...

  18. 24 CFR 35.1225 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1225 Section 35.1225 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1225 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level... as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the designated party shall complete a...

  19. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs § 35.1130 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the PHA shall complete a...

  20. 24 CFR 35.730 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.730 Section 35.730 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Project-Based Assistance § 35.730 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... subpart applies has been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the...

  1. 24 CFR 35.325 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.325 Section 35.325 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... environmental intervention blood lead level. If a child less than 6 years of age living in a federally assisted dwelling unit has an environmental intervention blood lead level, the owner shall immediately conduct...

  2. 24 CFR 35.1225 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1225 Section 35.1225 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1225 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level... as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the designated party shall complete a...

  3. 24 CFR 35.730 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.730 Section 35.730 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Project-Based Assistance § 35.730 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... subpart applies has been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the...

  4. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs § 35.1130 Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. (a... been identified as having an environmental intervention blood lead level, the PHA shall complete a...

  5. School-Aged Child Care Programs: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towell, Bonita Rae; Tsuji, Gerry K.

    This report is presented in three parts. Part 1 consists of synopses of the child care situation in 13 countries. For each country, the child care environment, including the philosophy and historical background of child care, appropriate legislation, and types of child care services provided, are discussed. School-age child care programs for…

  6. Piloting a classroom‐based intervention in after‐school programmes: a case study in science migration

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Kathryn; Smith, Emilie Phillips; Perkins, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Policy-makers are looking to after-school programs to improve family and child well-being and are searching for evidence-based ways to improve the quality of after-school programs. This study examines whether the Good Behavior Game, a behavior management curriculum designed for school classrooms, can be easily migrated to academically-focused after-school programs. Our results are based on program observations, qualitative interviews, and ratings of implementation fidelity. We provide a description of the structure and activities in these after-school programs, then identify challenges to implementing and evaluating classroom-based interventions in the after-school setting. PMID:26609315

  7. Elementary School Child Health for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    The primary health educators of children are their parents; secondary health educators of children are their teachers. This book provides a resource for parents and teachers interested in child and school health and offers guidance to promote the health of children between the ages of 5 and 12. An introductory chapter describes such terms as…

  8. School Help Professionals' Ideas on Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Method: In this study, a qualitative research has been carried out; there were interviews with 50 school counselors working in Sinop; they stated their ideas on child abuse and neglect. Analysis: Data collected via semi constructed interviews have been subjected to descriptive and content analysis.The participant counselors were asked three…

  9. Child Marriage, Agency, and Schooling in Rural Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Graham, Erin; Leal, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationships between child marriage, agency, and schooling in rural Honduras. Through an in-depth qualitative case study, we address the following questions: (1) In what ways, if any, do girls exercise agency in their decision to marry? (2) How might education enhance girls' agency, expanding their choice sets and…

  10. 10 Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in Middle School

    MedlinePlus

    ... for parents to know which situations call for involvement and which call for a more behind-the-scenes approach. Here are 10 ways to keep your child on track for academic success in middle school. 1. Attend Back-to- ...

  11. Child Marriage, Agency, and Schooling in Rural Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Graham, Erin; Leal, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationships between child marriage, agency, and schooling in rural Honduras. Through an in-depth qualitative case study, we address the following questions: (1) In what ways, if any, do girls exercise agency in their decision to marry? (2) How might education enhance girls' agency, expanding their choice sets and…

  12. No Child Left Behind and High School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although No Child Left Behind (NCLB) aims to close the achievement gap that parallels race and class, some of its key provisions are at odds with reforms that are successfully overhauling the large, comprehensive high schools that traditionally have failed students of color and low-income students in urban areas. While small, restructured schools…

  13. High School Child Development Courses Provide a Valuable Apprenticeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombie, Sally M.

    2009-01-01

    The current media are laden with reports of the many significant problems facing today's youth. In fact, parenting has become a national topic of discussion. Parenting instruction, a responsibility that had previously rested in the home, has become part of educational curricula. Courses in child development are offered for high school students in…

  14. Elementary School Child Health for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    The primary health educators of children are their parents; secondary health educators of children are their teachers. This book provides a resource for parents and teachers interested in child and school health and offers guidance to promote the health of children between the ages of 5 and 12. An introductory chapter describes such terms as…

  15. The Exceptional Child in the Open Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrney, Louise C., Ed.

    Reported are the conclusions of a summer institute of special educators for the purpose of evaluating the appropriateness of the open-middle school for the exceptional child. The study is based on the ideas of architects Michael Bednar and David Haviland, who order exceptionalities along a continuum of intactness of the adaptive mechanism and…

  16. Child Labor Law and School Work. A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Educational and Cultural Services, Augusta.

    This guide to Maine and United States child labor laws and their relevance to school work experiences for youths aged 14 to 18 is intended to provide teachers, guidance counselors, job developers, and job coordinators with basic information on the standards and major provisions of the laws. Chapter 1 tells why the guide was developed; recommends…

  17. Child health and education in Kenyan schools programmes.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J

    1991-03-01

    Jane Fleming describes the health education in schools programme launched by the Aga Khan Health Services in Kisumu, Kenya. The project has brought major improvements in child health and mortality rates as well as better health awareness to the community as a whole.

  18. Low Achievers' Parent-Child Relations and Liking of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hon, Rachel Yuk Hung; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2005-01-01

    Educators and researchers have suggested that positive relations with their parents would have significant impacts on children's attitudes and behaviours. The present study has two purposes: (a) to examine whether parent-child relations would influence low achievers' liking of school, and (b) to investigate whether low achievers' parent-child…

  19. Being Your Child's Ombudsman at School and Elsewhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Clara Claiborne; Shapiro, Leon N.

    1976-01-01

    Excerpted from the book "You Are Not Alone: Understanding and Dealing with Mental Illness," the article provides suggestions for parents regarding their role as ombudsmen for their emotionally disturbed child and notes advantages of private schools, residential treatment programs, and hospital programs. (IM)

  20. Women's Schooling, Patterns of Fertility, and Child Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeVine, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Expansion of women's schooling is associated with lower fertility and child mortality. This article provides demographic evidence and a framework for discovering how educational processes operate on maternal behavior. Findings from a study in Mexico focus on mother-infant interaction and social attitudes as important variables. Research needs are…

  1. Do Child Care Centers Benefit Poor Children after School Entry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; French, Desiree; Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Attendance in preschool centers can yield short-term benefits for children from poor or middle-class families. Yet debate persists in Europe and the United States over whether centers yield gains of sufficient magnitude to sustain children's cognitive or social advantages as they move through primary school. We report on child care and home…

  2. Planning Manual for School-Age Child Care in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainhart, Dolly

    This manual was designed to assist concerned individuals and organizations within communities in New Mexico to develop and plan effective school-age child care programs. Emphasized are the first steps in initiating and implementing school-age child care in a community. Chapter I discusses the need for school-age child care programs and the…

  3. The role of preschool teacher-child interactions in academic adjustment: An intervention study with Playing-2-gether.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Verschueren, Karine; Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    Social relationships can serve as important risk or protective factors for child development in general, and academic adjustment in particular. This study investigated the role of teacher-child interactions in academic adjustment among preschool boys at risk of externalizing behaviour, using a randomized controlled trial study with Playing-2-gether (P2G), a 12-week indicated two-component intervention aimed at improving the affective quality of the teacher-child relationship and teacher behaviour management. In a sample of 175 preschool boys showing signs of externalizing behaviour (Mage  = 4 years, 9 months, SDage  = 7 months) and their teachers, we investigated P2G effects on academic engagement as well as on language achievement. Academic engagement was rated by teachers at three occasions within one school year (T1 = pretest, T3 = post-test, and T2 = in-between intervention components). Language achievement was assessed by researchers at pre- and post-test, using a standardized test. Cross-lagged path analyses revealed a direct intervention effect of P2G on academic engagement at Time 2. In addition, a significant indirect intervention effect was found on academic engagement at Time 3 through academic engagement at Time 2. Finally, academic engagement at Time 2 was found to predict language achievement at post-test. A marginally significant indirect intervention effect was found on language achievement at Time 3, through academic engagement at Time 2. This intervention study suggests that teacher-child interactions predict academic engagement over time, which in turn improves language achievement among preschool boys at risk of externalizing behaviour. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Early teacher-child relationships and the trajectory of children's school outcomes through eighth grade.

    PubMed

    Hamre, B K; Pianta, R C

    2001-01-01

    This study followed a sample of 179 children from kindergarten through eighth grade to examine the extent to which kindergarten teachers' perceptions of their relationships with students predict a range of school outcomes. Kindergarten teachers rated children's behavior and the quality of the teacher-child relationship. Follow-up data from first through eighth grade were organized by epoch and included academic grades, standardized test scores, work-habit ratings, and discipline records. Relational Negativity in kindergarten, marked by conflict and dependency, was related to academic and behavioral outcomes through eighth grade, particularly for children with high levels of behavior problems in kindergarten and for boys generally. These associations remained significant after controlling for gender, ethnicity, cognitive ability, and behavior ratings. The results have implications for theories of the determinants of school success, the role of adult-child relationships in development, and a range of early intervention and prevention efforts.

  5. Nutrition-sensitive interventions and programmes: how can they help to accelerate progress in improving maternal and child nutrition?

    PubMed

    Ruel, Marie T; Alderman, Harold

    2013-08-10

    Acceleration of progress in nutrition will require effective, large-scale nutrition-sensitive programmes that address key underlying determinants of nutrition and enhance the coverage and effectiveness of nutrition-specific interventions. We reviewed evidence of nutritional effects of programmes in four sectors--agriculture, social safety nets, early child development, and schooling. The need for investments to boost agricultural production, keep prices low, and increase incomes is undisputable; targeted agricultural programmes can complement these investments by supporting livelihoods, enhancing access to diverse diets in poor populations, and fostering women's empowerment. However, evidence of the nutritional effect of agricultural programmes is inconclusive--except for vitamin A from biofortification of orange sweet potatoes--largely because of poor quality evaluations. Social safety nets currently provide cash or food transfers to a billion poor people and victims of shocks (eg, natural disasters). Individual studies show some effects on younger children exposed for longer durations, but weaknesses in nutrition goals and actions, and poor service quality probably explain the scarcity of overall nutritional benefits. Combined early child development and nutrition interventions show promising additive or synergistic effects on child development--and in some cases nutrition--and could lead to substantial gains in cost, efficiency, and effectiveness, but these programmes have yet to be tested at scale. Parental schooling is strongly associated with child nutrition, and the effectiveness of emerging school nutrition education programmes needs to be tested. Many of the programmes reviewed were not originally designed to improve nutrition yet have great potential to do so. Ways to enhance programme nutrition-sensitivity include: improve targeting; use conditions to stimulate participation; strengthen nutrition goals and actions; and optimise women's nutrition, time

  6. The effects of the child and adolescent trial for cardiovascular health intervention on psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk behavior among third-grade students.

    PubMed

    Edmundson, E; Parcel, G S; Perry, C L; Feldman, H A; Smyth, M; Johnson, C C; Layman, A; Bachman, K; Perkins, T; Smith, K; Stone, E

    1996-01-01

    The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health is a multi-site study of a school-based intervention designed to reduce or prevent the development of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The goal was to change (or prevent) related risk behaviors and the psychosocial variables that theoretically influence those behaviors. A nested design was used in which schools served as the primary unit of analysis. Twenty-four schools participated at each of four sites (Austin, San Diego, Minneapolis, and New Orleans). Each site had 10 control and 14 intervention schools. Ninety-six schools (with more than 6000 students) in the four sites were randomized to three treatment conditions: control, school-based interventions, and school-plus-family interventions. The sample included approximately equal numbers of males and females and was 67.5% white, 13.9% African-American, 13.9% Hispanic, and 4.7% other. The psychosocial determinants included improvements in dietary knowledge, intentions, self-efficacy, usual behavior, perceived social reinforcement for healthy food choices, and perceived reinforcement and self-efficacy for physical activity. The findings indicated significant improvements in all the psychosocial determinants measured (p < .0001). The results revealed a greater impact in the school-plus-family intervention schools for two determinants, usual dietary behavior and intentions to eat heart-healthy foods. These findings support theory-based interventions for changing selected psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk behavior among children.

  7. Assessing and Treating Child Anxiety in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jeremy S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in youth are common and, if left untreated, can lead to a variety of negative sequelae. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for anxiety disorders in youth with preliminary evidence showing that CBT can be successfully transported into schools. The present article provides (a) a discussion of the inherent challenges and advantages of implementing CBT in the school setting, (b) methods used to identify anxious youth, and (c) key components of CBT for anxious youth with an emphasis on adaptation and application in the school environment. Future research directions are discussed. The successful integration of a flexible CBT approach into the domain of school mental health would be a favorable step toward effective dissemination and would ensure the enduring provision of evidence-based practice to children and adolescents struggling with anxiety. PMID:28775387

  8. Physical Activity and School Performance: Evidence from a Danish Randomised School-Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinto Romani, A.; Klausen, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    It has been claimed that physical activity has a positive effect on not only health but also on school performance. Using data from a randomised school-intervention study, this paper investigates whether different interventions promoting physical activity affect school performance in primary school children. The results indicate that on average,…

  9. Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta R; Nyshadham, Anant

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children's allocation of time to school and work. Children attend school for more days per week-but not for more hours per day-as a result of accessing better healthcare. There are no significant effects on child labor, but the results suggest that time spent in physically strenuous activities such as farming and herding increases.

  10. Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta R.; Nyshadham, Anant

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children’s allocation of time to school and work. Children attend school for more days per week—but not for more hours per day—as a result of accessing better healthcare. There are no significant effects on child labor, but the results suggest that time spent in physically strenuous activities such as farming and herding increases. PMID:24353348

  11. School-Based Crisis Intervention: Its Effectiveness and Role in Broader Crisis Intervention Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie; Russo, Charles J.; Ilg, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Crisis in the context of a school has many unique features related to the social structure and sense of community within schools. A school crisis exposes children and staff to threat, loss, and trauma that undermine the safety and stability of the entire school. Crisis intervention has as its explicit aim the goal of providing immediate support to…

  12. School-Based Crisis Intervention: Its Effectiveness and Role in Broader Crisis Intervention Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie; Russo, Charles J.; Ilg, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Crisis in the context of a school has many unique features related to the social structure and sense of community within schools. A school crisis exposes children and staff to threat, loss, and trauma that undermine the safety and stability of the entire school. Crisis intervention has as its explicit aim the goal of providing immediate support to…

  13. Understanding caregivers' intentions for their child to walk to school: Further application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Lisa; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn

    2016-01-01

    Increases in childhood obesity have coincided with declines in active transportation to school. This research builds on largely atheoretical extant literature examining factors that influence walk-to-school behavior through application of the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Understanding caregivers' decision for their child to walk to/from school is key to developing interventions to promote this cost-effective and accessible health behavior. The results from an online survey of 512 caregivers provide support for the TPB, highlighting the important role of subjective norms. This suggests marketers should nurture caregivers' perception that important others approve of walking to school.

  14. Outcomes of parenting interventions for child conduct problems: a review of differential effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Shelleby, Elizabeth C; Shaw, Daniel S

    2014-10-01

    This review integrates findings from studies formally testing moderators of parenting interventions targeting child conduct problems from ages 1 to 10 with a focus on baseline child problem behavior, sociodemographic risks, and family process risks as moderators. The review examines whether differential effectiveness has been found for individuals at higher versus lower risk across the body of moderator studies of parenting interventions. We conclude that greater problematic child behavior at baseline may, in some cases, be associated with greater benefit from parenting interventions. None of these studies reviewed found reduced effects for those with higher baseline child problem behavior. With regard to sociodemographic and family process risks as moderators, findings are less consistent; however, on the whole, the collection of studies suggests equal effectiveness across levels of risk, with reduced effects for those at higher risk rarely demonstrated. Implications of these conclusions for future research and intervention efforts are discussed.

  15. Prioritizing child health interventions in Ethiopia: modeling impact on child mortality, life expectancy and inequality in age at death.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, Kristine Husøy; Tessema, Solomon; Johansson, Kjell Arne; Eide, Kristiane Tislevoll; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Miljeteig, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The fourth Millennium Development Goal calls for a two-thirds reduction in under-5 mortality between 1990 and 2015. Under-5 mortality rate is declining, but many countries are still far from achieving the goal. Effective child health interventions that could reduce child mortality exist, but national decision-makers lack contextual information for priority setting in their respective resource-constrained settings. We estimate the potential health impact of increasing coverage of 14 selected health interventions on child mortality in Ethiopia (2011-2015). We also explore the impact on life expectancy and inequality in the age of death (Gini(health)). We used the Lives Saved Tool to estimate potential impact of scaling-up 14 health interventions in Ethiopia (2011-2015). Interventions are scaled-up to 1) government target levels, 2) 90% coverage and 3) 90% coverage of the five interventions with the highest impact. Under-5 mortality rate, neonatal mortality rate and deaths averted are primary outcome measures. We used modified life tables to estimate impact on life expectancy at birth and inequality in the age of death (Gini(health)). Under-5 mortality rate declines from 101.0 in 2011 to 68.8, 42.1 and 56.7 per 1000 live births under these three scenarios. Prioritizing child health would also increase life expectancy at birth from expected 60.5 years in 2015 to 62.5, 64.2 and 63.4 years and reduce inequality in age of death (Gini(health)) substantially from 0.24 to 0.21, 0.18 and 0.19. The Millennium Development Goal for child health is reachable in Ethiopia. Prioritizing child health would also increase total life expectancy at birth and reduce inequality in age of death substantially (Gini(health)).

  16. Adaptation and Feasibility of a Communication Intervention for Mexican Immigrant Mothers and Children in a School Setting

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Diane B.; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Children of Mexican immigrants are exposed to multiple ecological risks that heighten their likelihood of experiencing depressive symptoms. In previous studies, affirming parent–child communication has been found to be protective against depressive symptoms in Hispanic youth. Interventions focused on enhancing communication between parents and youth have the possibility of strengthening protective factors for children. The aims of this study were to (1) adapt an evidence-based parent–child communication intervention (Mission Possible) for cultural relevance for low-income, low-literacy Mexican immigrant mothers and their children and (2) assess feasibility of delivering the adapted intervention in a school setting. Adaptation took place in a series of focus groups of mother–child dyads. The revised intervention was delivered to 27 mother–child dyads in two elementary schools. Feasibility was supported by high participant satisfaction, 80% attendance rate, and 75% retention rate. This preliminary work suggests strategies for school nurses to partner with immigrant families and outlines a potential intervention that expands the school nursing role. PMID:23616468

  17. Adaptation and feasibility of a communication intervention for Mexican immigrant mothers and children in a school setting.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Diane B; Cowell, Julia Muennich; Fogg, Louis

    2014-04-01

    Children of Mexican immigrants are exposed to multiple ecological risks that heighten their likelihood of experiencing depressive symptoms. In previous studies, affirming parent-child communication has been found to be protective against depressive symptoms in Hispanic youth. Interventions focused on enhancing communication between parents and youth have the possibility of strengthening protective factors for children. The aims of this study were to (1) adapt an evidence-based parent-child communication intervention (Mission Possible) for cultural relevance for low-income, low-literacy Mexican immigrant mothers and their children and (2) assess feasibility of delivering the adapted intervention in a school setting. Adaptation took place in a series of focus groups of mother-child dyads. The revised intervention was delivered to 27 mother-child dyads in two elementary schools. Feasibility was supported by high participant satisfaction, 80% attendance rate, and 75% retention rate. This preliminary work suggests strategies for school nurses to partner with immigrant families and outlines a potential intervention that expands the school nursing role.

  18. Moving from Pathology to Possibility: Integrating Strengths-Based Interventions in Child Welfare Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabalauskas, Kara L.; Ortolani, Charles L.; McCall, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Child welfare providers are increasingly required to demonstrate that strengths-based, evidence-informed practices are central to their intervention methodology. This case study describes how a large child welfare agency instituted cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as the core component of a strength-based practice model with the goal of…

  19. A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution: Identifying Possible Target Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Brendon R.; Mathee, Angela; Shafritz, Lonna B.; Krieger, Laurie; Zimicki, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Indoor air pollution has been causally linked to acute lower respiratory infections in children younger than 5. The aim of this study was to identify target behaviors for a behavioral intervention to reduce child exposure to indoor air pollution by attempting to answer two research questions: Which behaviors are protective of child respiratory…

  20. Parental Beliefs and Experiences Regarding Involvement in Intervention for Their Child with Speech Sound Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts Pappas, Nicole; McAllister, Lindy; McLeod, Sharynne

    2016-01-01

    Parental beliefs and experiences regarding involvement in speech intervention for their child with mild to moderate speech sound disorder (SSD) were explored using multiple, sequential interviews conducted during a course of treatment. Twenty-one interviews were conducted with seven parents of six children with SSD: (1) after their child's initial…

  1. Early Childhood Intervention Programs: Opportunities and Challenges for Preventing Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asawa, Lindsay E.; Hansen, David J.; Flood, Mary Fran

    2008-01-01

    Due to the destructive impact of child maltreatment and limited available funding to address its consequences, the value of preventive measures is evident. Early Childhood Intervention Programs (ECIPs) provide excellent opportunities to prevent and identify cases of child maltreatment, among other varied objectives. These programs are typically…

  2. Parental Beliefs and Experiences Regarding Involvement in Intervention for Their Child with Speech Sound Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts Pappas, Nicole; McAllister, Lindy; McLeod, Sharynne

    2016-01-01

    Parental beliefs and experiences regarding involvement in speech intervention for their child with mild to moderate speech sound disorder (SSD) were explored using multiple, sequential interviews conducted during a course of treatment. Twenty-one interviews were conducted with seven parents of six children with SSD: (1) after their child's initial…

  3. A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution: Identifying Possible Target Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Brendon R.; Mathee, Angela; Shafritz, Lonna B.; Krieger, Laurie; Zimicki, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Indoor air pollution has been causally linked to acute lower respiratory infections in children younger than 5. The aim of this study was to identify target behaviors for a behavioral intervention to reduce child exposure to indoor air pollution by attempting to answer two research questions: Which behaviors are protective of child respiratory…

  4. Moving from Pathology to Possibility: Integrating Strengths-Based Interventions in Child Welfare Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabalauskas, Kara L.; Ortolani, Charles L.; McCall, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Child welfare providers are increasingly required to demonstrate that strengths-based, evidence-informed practices are central to their intervention methodology. This case study describes how a large child welfare agency instituted cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as the core component of a strength-based practice model with the goal of…

  5. Early Intervention and Five Years Later with an Autistic Child and Her Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautman, Retta C.; Ryley, Anderia Trail

    A case study of a 3-year-old autistic child and her family is presented, following the child through a 3-year intensive intervention program with a multidisciplinary team in a day treatment program. The day treatment program plan included academic goals, language goals, parental goals, and home training goals. A major component of the program was…

  6. The Middle School Intervention Project: Use of a Regression Discontinuity Design to Evaluate a Multi-Component Intervention for Struggling Readers in Middle School in Six School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crone, Deanne A.; Stoolmiller, Michael; Baker, Scott K.; Fien, Hank

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the Middle School Intervention Project (MSIP) is to evaluate the impact of a multi-component intervention for struggling adolescent readers on reading outcomes. The intervention consists of: (1) targeted, Tier 2 reading and (2) school engagement interventions, and (3) data-based-decision-making (DBDM) teams to review and act on…

  7. Impact of a school health coordinator intervention on health-related school policies and student behavior.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Liam M; Polacsek, Michele; Macdonald, Pamela B; Ellis, Jacqueline; Berry, Susan; Martin, Maurice

    2010-04-01

    Health-related, school-based interventions may serve to prevent disease and improve academic performance. The Healthy Maine Partnerships (HMP) initiative funded local school health coordinators (SHCs) as a part of Maine's Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) beginning in January 2001. SHCs established school health leadership teams and implemented annual work plans to address health risk behaviors. This study evaluates the impact of the Healthy Maine Partnerships SHC (HMPSHC) intervention on school policies and student risk behaviors after its first 5 years. Data sources include the Maine School Health Profiles Survey and the Maine Youth Drug and Alcohol Use Survey/Youth Tobacco Survey. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on 2006 data to assess physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco-related policy associations with the HMPSHC intervention. Finally, policy and student behavior analyses were conducted to assess associations. Intervention schools were more likely to be associated with physical activity intramural offerings, improved nutritional offerings, and tobacco cessation programs. In intervention schools, supportive school policies were associated with decreased soda consumption, decreased inactivity, and decreased tobacco use. Required school health education curricula were more predictive of decreased risk behavior in intervention schools than in nonintervention schools. In schools with SHCs, there exists a stronger association with improved school programs. Improved policies and programs were associated with decreases in risk behavior among students in intervention schools. The HMPSHC intervention may be a viable CSHP model to replicate and evaluate in other settings.

  8. Development and feasibility of a child obesity prevention intervention in general practice: the Healthy 4 Life pilot study.

    PubMed

    Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Robinson, Alison; Laws, Rachel; Harris, Mark Fort

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 20% of Australian pre-school children are overweight. Primary care providers have a crucial role in identifying children at risk of unhealthy weight gain and to offer advice and suggestions to parents. The Healthy 4 Life pilot study aimed to develop and test the feasibility of a practice nurse (PN)-led brief intervention into a healthy kid's check in general practice. A PN intervention was developed based on a needs assessment and existing literature. A workshop was conducted, and resources were provided to enable four PNs to deliver a brief obesity prevention intervention to parents. Nurses then incorporated the Healthy 4 Life components into the healthy kid's checks they conducted on the next 10 children. Medical records were reviewed and nurses interviewed to establish the feasibility of the intervention. All of the nurses incorporated some Healthy 4 Life components into their healthy kid's checks. Body mass index was calculated and plotted for all children, and advice around healthy eating was offered in 60% of consultations; however, advice about limiting screen time provided in only 2% of consultations. Nurses reported that the intervention fitted well with their current practice, although time constraints were a concern for some nurses and some parents. The provision of a brief training workshop and resources can equip nurses in general practice to offer an obesity prevention intervention to parents of young children. Further research is required to examine the impact of such an intervention on parent and child behaviours and the sustainability of such practices for PNs. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. An explorative cost-effectiveness analysis of school-based screening for child anxiety using a decision analytic model.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ellin; Dirksen, Carmen D; Bögels, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    Anxiety in children is highly frequent and causes severe dysfunction. Various studies have used screening procedures to identify high-anxious children and offer them indicated prevention, but the cost-effectiveness of these screening procedures in combination with a preventive intervention has never been examined. This study compared four potential strategies in relation to the prevention of child anxiety: (1) a one-time school-based screening which offers a child-focused intervention, (2) the screening and offering of a parent-focused intervention, (3) the screening and differentially offering a child- or parent-focused intervention, depending on whether or not the parents are anxious themselves, and (4) or doing nothing. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective (i.e. including direct healthcare costs, direct non-healthcare costs, indirect costs, and out-of-pocket costs), using a decision-analytic model. The model was based on the real-world 2-year participation rates of screening and intervention, and real-world costs and effects of high- and median-anxious children (aged 8-12) from regular primary schools. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated, and several secondary and one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. The strategy of doing nothing and the strategy of screening and differentially offering the child- or parent-focused intervention, depending on parental anxiety levels were both worthwhile, with the latter strategy costing relatively little extra money compared to doing nothing. In conclusion, some evidence for the cost-effectiveness of screening and intervening was found. Screening and offering a parent-focused intervention to children of anxious parents, and a child-focused intervention to children of non-anxious parents, were found to be the most cost-effective approach.

  10. Academic Performance of Subsequent Schools and Impacts of Early Interventions: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Head Start Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C. Cybele; Jones, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of subsequent school contexts in the long-term effects of early childhood interventions has received increasing attention, but has been understudied in the literature. Using data from the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), a cluster-randomized controlled trial conducted in Head Start programs, we investigate whether the intervention had differential effects on academic and behavioral outcomes in kindergarten if children attended high- or low-performing schools subsequent to the preschool intervention year. To address the issue of selection bias, we adopt an innovative method, principal score matching, and control for a set of child, mother, and classroom covariates. We find that exposure to the CSRP intervention in the Head Start year had significant effects on academic and behavioral outcomes in kindergarten for children who subsequently attended high-performing schools, but no significant effects on children attending low-performing schools. Policy implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:22773872

  11. Effectiveness of an individual school-based intervention for children with aggressive behaviour: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, Sabine; van Londen, Monique; Deković, Maja; de Castro, Bram O; Prinzie, Peter; Lochman, John E

    2013-10-01

    For elementary school-children with aggressive behaviour problems, there is a strong need for effective preventive interventions to interrupt the developmental trajectory towards more serious behaviour problems. The aim of this RCT-study was to evaluate a school-based individual tailor-made intervention (Stay Cool Kids), designed to reduce aggressive behaviour in selected children by enhancing cognitive behavioural skills. The sample consisted of 48 schools, with 264 fourth-grade children selected by their teachers because of elevated levels of externalizing behaviour (TRF T-score>60), randomly assigned to the intervention or no-intervention control condition. The intervention was found to be effective in reducing reactive and proactive aggressive behaviour as reported by children, mothers, fathers or teachers, with effect sizes ranging from .11 to .32. Clinically relevant changes in teacher-rated externalizing behaviour were found: the intervention reduced behaviour problems to (sub) clinical or normative levels for significantly more children than the control condition. Some aspects of problems in social cognitive functioning were reduced and children showed more positive self-perception. Ethnic background and gender moderated intervention effects on child and teacher reported aggression and child response generation. The results of this study demonstrate the effectiveness on outcome behaviour and child cognitions of an individual tailor-made intervention across informants under real-world conditions.

  12. Academic Interventions and Academic Achievement in the Middle School Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kite, Toby G.

    2015-01-01

    After the passing of the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004, many schools began to use a Response to Intervention (RtI) model instead of the discrepancy model when identifying students with specific learning disabilities (National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011). When elementary schools adopted the RtI model, it was shown to be…

  13. Academic Interventions and Academic Achievement in the Middle School Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kite, Toby G.

    2015-01-01

    After the passing of the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004, many schools began to use a Response to Intervention (RtI) model instead of the discrepancy model when identifying students with specific learning disabilities (National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011). When elementary schools adopted the RtI model, it was shown to be…

  14. Treatment Acceptability of Interventions Published in Six School Psychology Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Victor; Ponce, Christopher; Gutierrez, Heveli

    2015-01-01

    Treatment acceptability (TA) is critical when selecting and implementing an intervention, as TA is associated with treatment outcomes. The significance of TA is reflected in school psychology models for services that state that school psychologists should address TA during development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions. However, the…

  15. An Intervention to Improve School and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Becky

    2008-01-01

    Georgia Leadership Institute for School Improvement (GLISI) used ISPI's 10 Standards of Performance Technology to share the design, development, and implementation of an intervention striving to help Georgia districts and schools share their success stories in a clear and concise format. This intervention took the form of a PowerPoint…

  16. School-Based Interventions for Students with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The professional literature regarding treatments for depressive disorders in children and adolescents, while often not directly applicable to school-based interventions, does provide some direction for the creation of guidelines for effective school-based interventions for depression. These guidelines follow, with linkages to the professional…

  17. Toward Successful School Crisis Intervention: 9 Key Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaksec, Charles M., III

    2007-01-01

    Despite their best and frequently heroic efforts, school crisis intervention teams often find themselves unprepared for the many types of tragedies they face. This timely text prompts crisis intervention team members to reevaluate their beliefs and practices and consider a new approach to dealing with school crises. The author, a longtime school…

  18. Strengthening Rural Schools: Training Paraprofessionals in Crisis Prevention and Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Melissa; Ashbaker, Betty Y.; Stott, Kathryn A.

    The long-term effects of crisis and tragedy can be improved significantly by immediate intervention and emergency mental health services. Providing crisis intervention in rural schools poses challenges related to lack of financial resources, community resources, and trained personnel; isolation of rural schools; and long distances between school…

  19. Toward Successful School Crisis Intervention: 9 Key Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaksec, Charles M., III

    2007-01-01

    Despite their best and frequently heroic efforts, school crisis intervention teams often find themselves unprepared for the many types of tragedies they face. This timely text prompts crisis intervention team members to reevaluate their beliefs and practices and consider a new approach to dealing with school crises. The author, a longtime school…

  20. School Counseling Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Examination of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiston, Susan C.; Tai, Wendi Lee; Rahardja, Daryn; Eder, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of school counseling interventions is important in this era of evidence-based practices. In this study, Meta-Analysis 1 involved treatment-control comparisons and Meta-Analysis 2 involved pretest-posttest differences. The overall average weighted effect size for school counseling interventions was 0.30. The study examined whether…

  1. Treatment Acceptability of Interventions Published in Six School Psychology Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Victor; Ponce, Christopher; Gutierrez, Heveli

    2015-01-01

    Treatment acceptability (TA) is critical when selecting and implementing an intervention, as TA is associated with treatment outcomes. The significance of TA is reflected in school psychology models for services that state that school psychologists should address TA during development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions. However, the…

  2. Close Reading as an Intervention for Struggling Middle School Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Thousands and thousands of middle school students around the world participate in reading intervention programs, many that are very expensive with limited effectiveness. We wanted to know if an after-school intervention focused on close reading procedures could improve student achievement. Close reading of complex text involves annotations,…

  3. Assessing and Treating Child Anxiety in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jeremy S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in youth are common and, if left untreated, can lead to a variety of negative sequelae. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for anxiety disorders in youth with preliminary evidence showing that CBT can be successfully transported into schools. The…

  4. Assessing and Treating Child Anxiety in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jeremy S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in youth are common and, if left untreated, can lead to a variety of negative sequelae. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for anxiety disorders in youth with preliminary evidence showing that CBT can be successfully transported into schools. The…

  5. Space, Schools and the Younger Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Annabelle

    2004-01-01

    That young children need space seems an unsurprising statement. So unsurprising that it scarcely needs further examination, to say nothing of further thought. But what is really meant by "space" when considered in the context of young children in school and their developing needs? Various studies have mostly described the actual physical…

  6. Space, Schools and the Younger Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Annabelle

    2005-01-01

    This article first appeared in FORUM, Volume 46, Number 1, 2004, pp.19-23, and appears now as a tribute to the late Annabelle Dixon. In this article Annabelle looks at the nature, potential and changing character of the spaces provided for younger children in present day schools from the viewpoint of an Early Years teacher. In typically elegant…

  7. The School Psychologist and the Exceptional Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Geraldine T., Ed.

    Intended for use with students preparing for careers in school psychology, the text assumes little familiarity with special education and focuses on those aspects of special education of greatest relevance for the assessment process. The book is divided into two major parts: Part I, "General Considerations," includes a brief description of the…

  8. Association between parent and child weight status among private school children in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Greene-Cramer, Blanche; Harrell, Melissa B; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Sharma, Shreela; Ranjit, Nalini; Gupta, Vinay; Nazar, Gaurang; Arora, Monika

    2016-07-28

    Over the past three decades there has been a surge in the prevalence of overweight and obesity worldwide in both adults and children. To date few studies have examined obesity in India and most have only looked at prevalence estimates. While studies in Western countries have identified parent weight status as a predictor of child weight status, there have been no studies examining this association in India. This study examined the relationship between parent weight status and child weight status using an internationally representative growth reference for children and Asian-specific action points for adults.Overall, this study found 29.6% of children and 77.7% of parents in a sample of private schools in Delhi, India were overweight/obese. Parent weight status was found to be associated with child weight status after controlling for child grade and sex. However, while maternal weight status was associated with child weight status (odds ratio=1.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.20), paternal weight status was not (odds ratio=1.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.81-1.48). The association was greatest between mothers and sons (odds ratio=2.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.39-3.27).These results provide initial evidence that parent weight status is associated with child weight status in Delhi, India. Future research should continue to explore the relationship between parent, particularly maternal, and child weight status to better understand the nature of the relationship and the differences between male and female children. Interventions to address child overweight and obesity in India should include parents as direct targets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 4: The School Counselor and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camblin, Lanthan D., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 4 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "School Counselors and the Reporting of Child Abuse: A Survey of State Laws and…

  10. Child Abuse and Neglect: The School's Response. The Guilford School Practitioner Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Connie Burrows; Cruise, Tracy K.

    This book reviews the current knowledge on child maltreatment and links it specifically to practical applications in the schools. It is intended to be a guide for school-based mental-health practitioners, administrators, and teachers. It is also intended to serve as a text in graduate-level courses and clinical practica. Chapter titles reflect the…

  11. Analysis of the Impacts of City Year's Whole School Whole Child Model on Partner Schools' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Julie; Anderson, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    City Year is a learning organization committed to the rigorous evaluation of its "Whole School Whole Child" model, which trains and deploys teams of AmeriCorps members to low-performing, urban schools to empower more students to reach their full potential. A third-party study by Policy Studies Associates (PSA) examined the impact of…

  12. Factors of Social Adjustment to School: Child's Personality, Family and Pre-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The role of child's characteristics (gender, cognitive ability, mother-perceived personality traits), family environment (maternal education, self-reported parenting practices) and pre-school experience (at least three years vs. no experience) in social adjustment to school, reflected through teacher reports on social competence and internalising…

  13. Child Participation in School Governance: The Case of Prefects at a Primary School in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morojele, Pholoho; Muthukrishna, Nithi

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on literature that has theorised child participation within the sociology of childhood framework to examine how children participate in governance within school spaces. Four children aged between 13 and 17 (in grades six and seven) who serve as prefects at a primary school in Lesotho were participants in this study. Data was…

  14. Ethical & Legal Issues in School Counseling. Chapter 4: The School Counselor and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camblin, Lanthan D., Jr.; And Others

    This document contains chapter 4 (7 articles) of a collection of 35 articles primarily from American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) publications on the most important legal and ethical topics about which all school counselors need to be informed. "School Counselors and the Reporting of Child Abuse: A Survey of State Laws and…

  15. Factors of Social Adjustment to School: Child's Personality, Family and Pre-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The role of child's characteristics (gender, cognitive ability, mother-perceived personality traits), family environment (maternal education, self-reported parenting practices) and pre-school experience (at least three years vs. no experience) in social adjustment to school, reflected through teacher reports on social competence and internalising…

  16. Child Participation in School Governance: The Case of Prefects at a Primary School in Lesotho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morojele, Pholoho; Muthukrishna, Nithi

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on literature that has theorised child participation within the sociology of childhood framework to examine how children participate in governance within school spaces. Four children aged between 13 and 17 (in grades six and seven) who serve as prefects at a primary school in Lesotho were participants in this study. Data was…

  17. School Restructuring Options Under No Child Left Behind: "What Works When?" Reopening as a Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Several years after the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), there are persistently low-performing schools in every state that face increasingly strong consequences for failing to improve student achievement sufficiently. In particular, schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) for five consecutive years must…

  18. School Children's Intestinal Parasite and Nutritional Status 1 Year after Complementary School Garden, Nutrition, Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Erismann, Séverine; Diagbouga, Serge; Schindler, Christian; Odermatt, Peter; Knoblauch, Astrid M; Gerold, Jana; Leuenberger, Andrea; Shrestha, Akina; Tarnagda, Grissoum; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2017-07-10

    The potential health benefits of combined agricultural, nutrition, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions are poorly understood. We aimed to determine whether complementary school garden, nutrition, and WASH interventions reduce intestinal parasites and improve school children's nutritional status in two regions of Burkina Faso. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Plateau Central and Center-Ouest regions of Burkina Faso. A total of 360 randomly selected children, aged 8-15 years, had complete baseline and end-line survey data. Mixed regression models were used to assess the impact of the interventions, controlling for baseline characteristics. The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections decreased both in intervention and control schools, but the decrease was significantly higher in the intervention schools related to the control schools (odds ratio [OR] of the intervention effect = 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1-0.5). Indices of undernutrition did not decrease at end line in intervention schools. Safe handwashing practices before eating and the use of latrines at schools were significantly higher in the intervention schools than in the control schools at end line (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.4-34.4, and OR = 14.9, 95% CI = 1.4-153.9, respectively). Parameters of water quality remained unchanged. A combination of agricultural, nutritional, and WASH-related interventions embedded in the social-ecological systems and delivered through the school platform improved several child health outcomes, including intestinal parasitic infections and some WASH-related behaviors. Sustained interventions with stronger household and community-based components are, however, needed to improve school children's health in the long-term.

  19. How residential mobility and school choice challenge assumptions of neighborhood place-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Silver, Diana; Weitzman, Beth C; Mijanovich, Tod; Holleman, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Explore the importance of residential mobility and use of services outside neighborhoods when interventions targeting low-income families are planned and implemented. Analysis of cross-sectional telephone household survey data on childhood mobility and school enrollment in four large distressed cities. Baltimore, Maryland; Detroit, Michigan; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Richmond, Virginia. Total of 1723 teens aged 10 to 18 years and their parents. Continuous self-report of the number of years parents lived in the neighborhood of residence and city; self-report of whether the child attends school in their neighborhood; and categorical self report of parents' marital status, mother's education, parent race, family income, child's age, and child's sex. Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression. In this sample, 85.2% of teens reported living in the city where they were born. However, only 44.4% of black teens lived in neighborhoods where they were born, compared with 59.2% of white teens. Although 50.3% of black teens attended schools outside of their current neighborhoods, only 31.4% of whites did. Residential mobility was more common among black than white children (odds ratio = 1.82; p < .001), and black teens had 43% lesser odds of attending school in their home communities. Mobility among low-income and minority families challenges some assumptions of neighborhood interventions premised on years of exposure to enriched services and changes in the built environment.

  20. [Effects of an early nursing intervention program for infants' development and mother's child rearing in poverty].

    PubMed

    Bang, Kyung-Sook

    2009-12-01

    This quasi-experimental study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of an early nursing intervention program to support mothers of children aged 0-3 yr living in poverty. In this study, mothers who received financial support from the government were recruited from one city and assigned to an intervention group (24) and comparison group (18). They completed a baseline questionnaire about depression, child rearing burden, agreement on physical punishment, and child temperament. Also, Denver II screening of the children was performed by the researcher. Mothers in the intervention group received a home visit intervention every two weeks for three months. At 3-months post-baseline, questionnaire and Denver II screening were reused to compare these two groups. Mother's depression, child rearing burden, agreement on physical punishment, and child temperament were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the percentage of depression declined only in the intervention group. Mothers in the intervention group showed higher Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) scores than mothers in the comparison group. The findings of the study show that this nursing intervention is an effective parenting program. The early nursing program for mothers with infant and toddlers in poverty is effective in promoting HOME, the child rearing home environment.

  1. Child maltreatment experience among primary school children: a large scale survey in Selangor state, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayesha; Wan-Yuen, Choo; Marret, Mary Joseph; Guat-Sim, Cheah; Othman, Sajaratulnisah; Chinna, Karuthan

    2015-01-01

    Official reports of child maltreatment in Malaysia have persistently increased throughout the last decade. However there is a lack of population surveys evaluating the actual burden of child maltreatment, its correlates and its consequences in the country. This cross sectional study employed 2 stage stratified cluster random sampling of public primary schools, to survey 3509 ten to twelve year old school children in Selangor state. It aimed to estimate the prevalence of parental physical and emotional maltreatment, parental neglect and teacher- inflicted physical maltreatment. It further aimed to examine the associations between child maltreatment and important socio-demographic factors; family functioning and symptoms of depression among children. Logistic regression on weighted samples was used to extend results to a population level. Three quarters of 10-12 year olds reported at least one form of maltreatment, with parental physical maltreatment being most common. Males had higher odds of maltreatment in general except for emotional maltreatment. Ethnicity and parental conflict were key factors associated with maltreatment. The study contributes important evidence towards improving public health interventions for child maltreatment prevention in the country.

  2. Child Maltreatment Experience among Primary School Children: A Large Scale Survey in Selangor State, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ayesha; Wan-Yuen, Choo; Marret, Mary Joseph; Guat-Sim, Cheah; Othman, Sajaratulnisah; Chinna, Karuthan

    2015-01-01

    Official reports of child maltreatment in Malaysia have persistently increased throughout the last decade. However there is a lack of population surveys evaluating the actual burden of child maltreatment, its correlates and its consequences in the country. This cross sectional study employed 2 stage stratified cluster random sampling of public primary schools, to survey 3509 ten to twelve year old school children in Selangor state. It aimed to estimate the prevalence of parental physical and emotional maltreatment, parental neglect and teacher- inflicted physical maltreatment. It further aimed to examine the associations between child maltreatment and important socio-demographic factors; family functioning and symptoms of depression among children. Logistic regression on weighted samples was used to extend results to a population level. Three quarters of 10–12 year olds reported at least one form of maltreatment, with parental physical maltreatment being most common. Males had higher odds of maltreatment in general except for emotional maltreatment. Ethnicity and parental conflict were key factors associated with maltreatment. The study contributes important evidence towards improving public health interventions for child maltreatment prevention in the country. PMID:25786214

  3. [The CHILT I project (Children's Health Interventional Trial). A multicomponent intervention to prevent physical inactivity and overweight in primary schools].

    PubMed

    Graf, C; Dordel, S

    2011-03-01

    Child and juvenile obesity is increasing worldwide; therefore, effective preventive strategies are warranted. The stepwise project CHILT (Children's Health Interventional Trial) was initiated in 2000 and combines in its multicomponent school-based arm CHILT I health education and physical activity for primary school children to prevent physical inactivity and overweight. The effect on obesity and physical performance was studied in 12 primary schools (intervention schools, IS) compared with 5 control schools (CS). Anthropometric data were recorded. Physical performance was measured by a coordination test for children (the "Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder", KTK) and the 6-minute run. Anthropometric and motoric data of 436 children in IS (55.0% of the population) and 179 children in CS (62.8%) were available at baseline and at follow-up. No difference in the incidence of overweight was found between the IS and CS after 4 years of intervention. Remission of overweight was higher in IS (23.2% versus 19.2%), but not significant. The increase in BMI was significantly lower in IS, in which the program was regularly performed. There was an improvement in selected items of the KTK in IS. In particular, endurance performance tended to be higher at final examination. School-based preventive intervention seems to have a positive influence on physical motor skills and the remission of overweight. To optimize the effects, a consistent and quality assured implementation and the integration of the children's whole environment are warranted.

  4. Evaluation of an Abstinence Based Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rue, Lisa; Chandran, Raj; Pannu, Aman; Bruce, David; Singh, Rana; Traxler, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes associated with an abstinence education intervention were evaluated using a single group design with a 12-month longitudinal follow-up. The intervention group of adolescents ages 12-14 years (N = 427) were enrolled in an 11.5-hour abstinence education intervention offered during the school day. Significant differences were found in the…

  5. Evaluation of an Abstinence Based Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rue, Lisa; Chandran, Raj; Pannu, Aman; Bruce, David; Singh, Rana; Traxler, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes associated with an abstinence education intervention were evaluated using a single group design with a 12-month longitudinal follow-up. The intervention group of adolescents ages 12-14 years (N = 427) were enrolled in an 11.5-hour abstinence education intervention offered during the school day. Significant differences were found in the…

  6. A School-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Urban Youth: Exploring Moderators of Intervention Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Dariotis, Jacinda K.; Mendelson, Tamar; Greenberg, Mark. T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines gender, grade-level, and baseline depressive symptoms as potential moderators of a school-based mindfulness intervention's impact on the self-regulatory outcomes of urban youth. Ninety-seven participants from four urban public schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or wait-list control condition. Fourth and fifth…

  7. A School-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Urban Youth: Exploring Moderators of Intervention Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Dariotis, Jacinda K.; Mendelson, Tamar; Greenberg, Mark. T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines gender, grade-level, and baseline depressive symptoms as potential moderators of a school-based mindfulness intervention's impact on the self-regulatory outcomes of urban youth. Ninety-seven participants from four urban public schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or wait-list control condition. Fourth and fifth…

  8. Effects of a Curricular Physical Activity Intervention on Children's School Performance, Wellness, and Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bunketorp Käll, Lina; Malmgren, Helge; Olsson, Erik; Lindén, Thomas; Nilsson, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Physical activity and structural differences in the hippocampus have been linked to educational outcome. We investigated whether a curriculum-based physical activity intervention correlates positively with children's academic achievement, psychological well-being, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), fitness, and structural development of the brain. The study had a quasi-experimental design and a control group. National test results were gathered from 545 students, 122 in the intervention school, and 423 in 3 control schools. HRQoL and socioemotional data were collected with child and proxy versions of KIDSCREEN and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. Overall, 79 students in grades 5 and 6 were recruited for an in-depth study, consisting of a submaximal oxygen consumption test and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. HRQoL and socioemotional data were collected from 349 students (65%), 182 (52%) in the intervention school, and 167 (48%) in one of the control schools. Girls attending the intervention school were more likely to pass national tests in Swedish (odds ratio 5.7) and Mathematics (odds ratio 3.2). The fourth to sixth graders in the intervention school reported lower levels of conduct problems (p < .05), and the girls were also less likely to report hyperactivity (p < .05). Girls reported higher levels of emotional problems (p < .05) than boys. Boys in the intervention group had significantly higher levels of estimated maximal oxygen uptake (p < .05) than controls. No difference in hippocampal structure was seen. Curriculum-based physical activity in school may improve the academic achievement and psychological health of children, particularly for girls. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  9. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention.

    PubMed

    Drake, Kelly L; Stewart, Catherine E; Muggeo, Michela A; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2015-08-01

    Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new intervention (Child Anxiety Learning Modules; CALM), delivered by school nurses, to reduce child anxiety and improve academic functioning. An iterative development process including consultation with an expert panel, two open trials, and a pilot randomized controlled study comparing CALM to usual care is proposed. Feedback will be solicited from all participants during each phase and data on outcome measures will be provided by children, parents, teachers, and independent evaluators. Data will be collected on intervention satisfaction and feasibility. Primary outcomes that include child anxiety symptoms, classroom behavior, and school performance (e.g., attendance, grades, standardized test scores) will be collected at pre- and post-interventions and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation. Pediatric anxiety is a common problem that school nurses frequently encounter. Consequently, they are well positioned to play a key role in enhancing access to behavioral health interventions to reduce anxiety and may therefore make a significant positive public health impact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Child Allergic Symptoms and Well-Being at School: Findings from ALSPAC, a UK Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Teyhan, Alison; Galobardes, Bruna; Henderson, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Eczema and asthma are common conditions in childhood that can influence children’s mental health. Despite this, little is known about how these conditions affect the well-being of children in school. This study examines whether symptoms of eczema or asthma are associated with poorer social and mental well-being in school as reported by children and their teachers at age 8 years. Methods Participants were from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Measures of child well-being in school were child-reported (n = 6626) and teacher reported (n = 4366): children reported on their enjoyment of school and relationships with peers via a self-complete questionnaire; teachers reported child mental well-being using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire [binary outcomes were high ‘internalizing’ (anxious/depressive) and ‘externalizing’ (oppositional/hyperactive) problems (high was >90th percentile)]. Child rash and wheeze status were maternally reported and symptoms categorised as: ‘none’; ‘early onset transient’ (infancy/preschool only); ‘persistent’ (infancy/preschool and at school age); and ‘late onset’ (school age only). Results Children with persistent (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.63) and late onset (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.14) rash were more likely to report being bullied, and children with persistent wheeze to feel left out (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.84). Late onset rash was associated with high teacher-reported internalising behaviours (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.54), and persistent rash with high externalising behaviours (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.84). Child sleep and maternal mental health explained some of the associations with teacher-reported mental well-being. Conclusion Symptoms of eczema or asthma can adversely affect a child’s social and mental well-being at primary school. This suggests interventions, such as additional support or education of peers, should begin at early stages in schooling. PMID

  11. Early Intervention and Maltreated Children: A Current Look at the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and Part C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Kathleen M.; Squires, Jane; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current literature regarding the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, resulting developmental impacts on children, and early intervention services for children and families involved in the child welfare system is summarized. While early intervention eligibility referrals are mandated for this population under the Child Abuse Prevention and…

  12. Early Intervention and Maltreated Children: A Current Look at the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and Part C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Kathleen M.; Squires, Jane; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current literature regarding the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, resulting developmental impacts on children, and early intervention services for children and families involved in the child welfare system is summarized. While early intervention eligibility referrals are mandated for this population under the Child Abuse Prevention and…

  13. Nationally Certified School Psychologists' Use and Reported Barriers to Using Evidence-Based Interventions in Schools: The Influence of Graduate Program Training and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Taylor B.; Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.; Carlson, John S.; Palejwala, Mohammed H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate Nationally Certified School Psychologists' (NCSP) training in and use of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) for child behavior concerns as well as their reported implementation barriers. A modified Tailored Design Method (TDM; Dillman, Smyth, & Christian, 2009) using up to four…

  14. Education and Health Matters: School Nurse Interventions, Student Outcomes, and School Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a quantitative, correlational study that examined selected school nursing services, student academic outcomes, and school demographics. Ex post facto data from the 2011-2012 school year of Delaware public schools were used in the research. The selected variables were school nurse interventions provided to students…

  15. School staff members experience and knowledge in the reporting of potential child and youth victimization.

    PubMed

    Greco, Ana M; Guilera, Georgina; Pereda, Noemí

    2017-07-22

    Victimization has been widely demonstrated to have negative consequences in minors. Most crimes against children go unreported and victims tend to reach adulthood without receiving any of the available specialized support. Studies have highlighted the unique role of school workers in early detection and reporting of possible cases of victimization, and have also found high rates of underreporting by school staff. The present study analyzes the underreporting of child and youth victimization suspicions among school staff and aims to identify variables related to its detection and reporting. One hundred and eighty-four school staff members (83.7% females, M=42.6years old, SD=11.7) from 17 different schools completed a self-administered questionnaire designed to record their knowledge and experience regarding the detection and reporting of potential victimization cases. Over 74% of the school workers had suspected at least one situation of victimization during their careers, but only 27% had actually reported these concerns. Higher rates of reporting were significantly associated with male gender, more years of experience, and awareness of five common misconceptions. Reporting behavior could be predicted by gender, years of experience and two statements assessing respondents' knowledge of victimization. In order to increase early reporting of possible cases of victimization, it is necessary to overcome certain misconceptions, raise awareness among school staff, design new training programs or interventions, and adapt the school dynamics in the light of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting Abandonment of School-Wide Behavior Support Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nese, Rhonda N. T.; McIntosh, Kent; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Ghemraoui, Adam; Bloom, Jerry; Johnson, Nanci W.; Phillips, Danielle; Richter, Mary F.; Hoselton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study examines predictors of abandonment of evidence-based practices through descriptive analyses of extant state-level training data, fidelity of implementation data, and nationally reported school demographic data across 915 schools in 3 states implementing school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS). Schools…

  17. Homicide Crisis Intervention in a Multicultural School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    This paper summarizes information concerning homicide crisis intervention in a multicultural school that would be useful for school psychologists. School psychologists are encouraged to be introspective about their own beliefs about death, grief, and multiculturalism. This paper discusses the eight factors to consider when providing services to…

  18. Predicting Abandonment of School-Wide Behavior Support Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nese, Rhonda N. T.; McIntosh, Kent; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Ghemraoui, Adam; Bloom, Jerry; Johnson, Nanci W.; Phillips, Danielle; Richter, Mary F.; Hoselton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study examines predictors of abandonment of evidence-based practices through descriptive analyses of extant state-level training data, fidelity of implementation data, and nationally reported school demographic data across 915 schools in 3 states implementing school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS). Schools…

  19. School-Based Opportunities for Tobacco Use Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, D. Michael; Morosco, Gregory J.

    This guide was written for physicians who might be interested in working with school-aged children in the area of tobacco use intervention. It briefly describes the physician's role in providing health education to students in the school setting and notes the effectiveness of health education in the schools in reducing the number of students who…

  20. Response to Intervention: Are Schools Prepared to Implement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elaine T.

    2011-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is a process that has shown to be advantageous in improving academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine if teachers in two elementary schools in a Detroit, Michigan, suburban school district felt that their schools were ready to implement RtI, and also to identify teachers' priorities to improve…