Science.gov

Sample records for scientific publication pitfalls

  1. Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors.

    PubMed

    Gollogly, Laragh; Momen, Hooman

    2006-08-01

    Editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. This paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. Fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. Editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. Editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. Editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. Reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.

  2. The Promise (and Pitfalls) of Public Health Policy Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G

    2016-08-16

    Though public health policy surveillance is an integral tool in correlating the law to scientifically based public health law studies, drawing accurate legal conclusions from collected data can be challenging. Data may be of poor quality, inaccessible to law and policy makers, or inapplicable to other jurisdictions over time and place. As Burris et al. (2016) advocate, modern, sophisticated, and interactive data collection systems would render more precise legal analysis tied to public health improvements. Although policy surveillance is promising, public health officials, health care providers, attorneys, and researchers must be skilled and prepared to successfully navigate and resolve potential pitfalls for its benefits to be fully realized. Among the significant challenges related to policy surveillance are: (1) timing, (2) agenda setting, (3) predictable misuse, and (4) politics inherent in a federalist public health legal infrastructure. As public health data infrastructure is developed, better legal approaches must be simultaneously crafted to achieve optimal public health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  3. Ethics of scientific publication

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Ponnambath, Dinoop Korol; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Published scientific research breeds the development of clinical management guidelines and pathways. Currently, scholarly proficiency is assessed using numerous primitive metrics for incentives that can kindle publication of hoax or flawed research content. Such flawed data can lead to wastage of resources, time, and most importantly harm to the society. Authors, editors, and peer reviewers need to be genuine in conducting, analyzing, and publication of scientific research. Institutions need to be aware and utilize advanced metrics to assess the scientific reputation of researchers. This short review discusses in brief the common authorship and editorial ethical issues encountered in scientific publication and the newer metrics available for the assessment of scholarly excellence. Editors and peer reviewers need to be acquainted with the common ethical issues and follow consensus international guidelines on publication ethics to tackle them appropriately. PMID:27722097

  4. Ethics of scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Ponnambath, Dinoop Korol; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Published scientific research breeds the development of clinical management guidelines and pathways. Currently, scholarly proficiency is assessed using numerous primitive metrics for incentives that can kindle publication of hoax or flawed research content. Such flawed data can lead to wastage of resources, time, and most importantly harm to the society. Authors, editors, and peer reviewers need to be genuine in conducting, analyzing, and publication of scientific research. Institutions need to be aware and utilize advanced metrics to assess the scientific reputation of researchers. This short review discusses in brief the common authorship and editorial ethical issues encountered in scientific publication and the newer metrics available for the assessment of scholarly excellence. Editors and peer reviewers need to be acquainted with the common ethical issues and follow consensus international guidelines on publication ethics to tackle them appropriately.

  5. Ethics and Scientific Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benos, Dale J.; Fabres, Jorge; Farmer, John; Gutierrez, Jessica P.; Hennessy, Kristin; Kosek, David; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Olteanu, Dragos; Russell, Tara; Wang, Kai

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section,…

  6. Pitfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triffet, Terry

    1990-01-01

    Though potentially of great benefit to the nation, the experience of the workshop participants and their discussions with Sea Grant and Land Grant officials make it clear that the Space Grant Program must avoid certain pitfalls of the past and present if it is to be successful. The most important of these are listed and briefly discussed.

  7. [Challenge in scientific publication].

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gilson Luiz; de Freitas, Eliane Gonçalves

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the main problems which make a scientific text difficult to find, to be read or to be accepted by readers. A scientific text is considered a logical argument. Therefore, methods, results and data from literature are premises supporting the conclusions of the work; and in the "Introduction" session, the justification corroborates the objective of the study. This conception makes the text a hermetically coherent structure where only the necessary data should be included (some controversy is still pertinent). In a second step, we show formal mistakes in scientific writing which make texts less attractive. Thus, we give examples of errors or inadequacy of formal aspects of presenting titles, abstracts, results (figures and tables), and grammar mistakes in Portuguese (but also valid for English grammar). After that, we emphasize the need for writing in international language (English) and for publication in periodicals with international impact on the scientific community. Finally, considerations to improve the Brazilian periodicals in the biological area are presented.

  8. Ethics and scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Benos, Dale J; Fabres, Jorge; Farmer, John; Gutierrez, Jessica P; Hennessy, Kristin; Kosek, David; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Olteanu, Dragos; Russell, Tara; Shaikh, Faheem; Wang, Kai

    2005-06-01

    This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section, pertinent historical background and citation of relevant regulations and statutes are provided. Furthermore, a specific case(s) derived from actual situations is(are) presented. These cases were chosen to highlight the complexities that investigators and journals must face when dealing with ethical issues. A series of discussion questions follow each case. It is our hope that by increasing education and awareness of ethical matters relevant to scientific investigation and publication, deviations from appropriate conduct will be reduced.

  9. Scientific publications in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Magar, A

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications have become a mainstay of communication among readers, academicians, researchers and scientists worldwide. Although, its existence dates back to 17 th century in the West, Nepal is still struggling to take few steps towards improving its local science for last 50 years. Since the start of the first medical journal in 1963, the challenges remains as it were decades back regarding role of authors, peer reviewers, editors and even publishers in Nepal. Although, there has been some development in terms of the number of articles being published and appearances of the journals, yet there is a long way to go. This article analyzes the past and present scenario, and future perspective for scientific publications in Nepal.

  10. [Plagiarism in scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Reyes B, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    Similar to what occurs in literature, art and other human endeavours, every scientific report is based in previous work done by others. The new paper should add something original but a basic law of scientific honesty demands that any mention ideas, observations or thinking that has been previously proposed or published by others, should be acknowledged properly in the text and in the references. Plagiarism is identified when the authors of a scientific report use ideas or text that belong to others and present them as original, the previous source is concealed or it is referred to in a different context. The authors of a paper that contains plagiarism have the intention to mislead the readers, pretending to be the original authors of an idea that was expressed previously by others, or to be the owners of results shown by them. Plagiarism is a dishonest behaviour and, when discovered, may have dangerous consequences because the editors of the journal may publish a notice of retraction that will be inserted by Medline in both papers: the plagiarized and the plagiarizer, to be noticed by everyone who accesses to either of them in the Internet.

  11. Scientific Autonomy and Public Oversight.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2008-06-01

    When scientific research collides with social values, science's right to self-governance becomes an issue of paramount concern. In this article, I develop an account of scientific autonomy within a framework of public oversight. I argue that scientific autonomy is justified because it promotes the progress of science, which benefits society, but that restrictions on autonomy can also be justified to prevent harm to people, society, or the environment, and to encourage beneficial research. I also distinguish between different ways of limiting scientific autonomy, and I argue that government involvement in scientific decision-making should usually occur through policies that control the process of science, rather than policies that control the content of science.

  12. Scientific Autonomy and Public Oversight

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    When scientific research collides with social values, science’s right to self-governance becomes an issue of paramount concern. In this article, I develop an account of scientific autonomy within a framework of public oversight. I argue that scientific autonomy is justified because it promotes the progress of science, which benefits society, but that restrictions on autonomy can also be justified to prevent harm to people, society, or the environment, and to encourage beneficial research. I also distinguish between different ways of limiting scientific autonomy, and I argue that government involvement in scientific decision-making should usually occur through policies that control the process of science, rather than policies that control the content of science. PMID:19777124

  13. Accelerating scientific publication in biology

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific publications enable results and ideas to be transmitted throughout the scientific community. The number and type of journal publications also have become the primary criteria used in evaluating career advancement. Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past 30 years. More experimental data are now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of PhD training. Because publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and the scientific community. PMID:26508643

  14. Accelerating scientific publication in biology.

    PubMed

    Vale, Ronald D

    2015-11-03

    Scientific publications enable results and ideas to be transmitted throughout the scientific community. The number and type of journal publications also have become the primary criteria used in evaluating career advancement. Our analysis suggests that publication practices have changed considerably in the life sciences over the past 30 years. More experimental data are now required for publication, and the average time required for graduate students to publish their first paper has increased and is approaching the desirable duration of PhD training. Because publication is generally a requirement for career progression, schemes to reduce the time of graduate student and postdoctoral training may be difficult to implement without also considering new mechanisms for accelerating communication of their work. The increasing time to publication also delays potential catalytic effects that ensue when many scientists have access to new information. The time has come for life scientists, funding agencies, and publishers to discuss how to communicate new findings in a way that best serves the interests of the public and the scientific community.

  15. Going public: good scientific conduct.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem underexposed as ethical challenges. Consequently, individual scientists here tend to be left alone with problems and dilemmas, with no guidance for good conduct. Ideas are presented about how to make up for this omission. Using a practical, ethical approach, the paper attempts to identify ways scientists might deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand, sins of omission-withholding important information from the public-and, on the other hand, abuses of the authority of science in order to gain publicity. Statements from interviews with scientists are used to illustrate how scientists might view the relevance of the issues raised.

  16. Publication ethics and scientific misconduct.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C G; Ng, K H

    2010-12-01

    To maintain the readers' trust and to uphold the journal's reputation, it is paramount for the entire research, peer reviewer and publication process to follow ethical principles and decisions. Studies involving humans, animals, medical records and human tissues/organs need to be conducted ethically, and the appropriate approvals obtained. The privacy and confidentiality of patients, authors and reviewers should be respected. When required, rights and permissions should be sought. Common forms of scientific misconduct include misappropriation of ideas, violation of generally accepted research practices, failure to comply with legislative and regulatory requirements, falsification of data, and inappropriate behaviour in relation to misconduct. Authors can expect editorial action to be taken, should duplicate publication, plagiarism and other forms of scientific misconduct be attempted or detected.

  17. Executive Programs for Brazilian Mid-Career Public Managers: Pitfalls and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Regina Silvia; Franzese, Cibele

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges of professional education for mid-career public managers at graduate level, pointing out pitfalls to avoid and obstacles to face. Analyzing the Brazilian case, the goal is to raise issues that may also be present in other cases. The main argument developed here is that the puzzle faced by graduate programs on…

  18. Ethics of reviewing scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Napolitani, Federica; Petrini, Carlo; Garattini, Silvio

    2017-05-01

    The approval or rejection of scientific publications can have important consequences for scientific knowledge, so considerable responsibility lies on those who have to assess or review them. Today it seems that the peer review process, far from being considered an outdated system to be abandoned, is experiencing a new upturn. This article proposes criteria for the conduct of reviewers and of those who select them. While commenting on new emerging models, it provides practical recommendations for improving the peer-review system, like strengthening the role of guidelines and training and supporting reviewers. The process of peer review is changing, it is getting more open and collaborative, but those same ethical principles which guided it from its very origin should remain untouched and be firmly consolidated. The paper highlights how the ethics of reviewing scientific publications is needed now more than ever, in particular with regard to competence, conflict of interest, willingness to discuss decisions, complete transparency and integrity. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Public Access to Scientific Data and Publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, L. M.; Bernstein, M.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    NASA has developed a plan for complying with the OSTP requirement on public access to the results of scientific research - including both data and publications. NASA is establishing a single archive for public access to peer-reviewed publications following an appropriate embargo period. NASA has made a great effort to have data from its spacecraft openly available for many years. What is new is that now NASA will require scientists to submit -- at the time the research is proposed - a "data management plan". This plan will be evaluated along with the proposal during the review process. It is expected that the data used in peer-reviewed publications will be archived in a persistent format. Managing data for long-term storage will be a challenge as data volumes grow, formats and media evolve, and people are increasingly mobile. While we now have the capacity to store (cheaply) every bit of data we produce, that is certainly not the right strategy. In this talk, we will give a brief overview of how NASA interprets data publishing.

  20. Editorial bias in scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Many authors believe that there are biases in scientific publications. Editorial biases include publication bias; which refers to those situations where the results influence the editor's decision, and editorial bias refers to those situations where factors related with authors or their environment influence the decision. This paper includes an analysis of the situation of editorial biases. One bias is where mainly articles with positive results are accepted, as opposed to those with negative results. Another is latent bias, where positive results are published before those with negative results. In order to examine editorial bias, this paper analyses the influence of where the article originated; the country or continent, academic centre of origin, belonging to cooperative groups, and the maternal language of the authors. The article analyses biases in the editorial process in the publication of funded clinical trials. Editorial biases exists. Authors, when submitting their manuscript, should analyse different journals and decide where their article will receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. [Editorial independence and scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2010-01-01

    Various cases of editors of leading journals resigning has led to a debate on the question of editorial independence, understood as the unconditional freedom of editors to approve the contents of their journals. An analysis is made of cases in which editorial independence has been questioned, as well as the position those who resolutely defend it against those who consider that it must be limited by the institutions of which they are their organs of expression. Editors of scientific publications not only have to be judges of the articles they receive, but they must also be judged by their decisions, and editorial independence cannot be a refuge for personal stances. By independence it must be understood as the meticulousness in accepting manuscripts and the application of transparent criteria.

  2. NCI at Frederick Scientific Library Reintroduces Scientific Publications Database | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A 20-year-old database of scientific publications by NCI at Frederick, FNLCR, and affiliated employees has gotten a significant facelift. Maintained by the Scientific Library, the redesigned database—which is linked from each of the Scientific Library’s web pages—offers features that were not available in previous versions, such as additional search limits and non-traditional metrics for scholarly and scientific publishing known as altmetrics.

  3. The power and pitfalls of HIV phylogenetics in public health.

    PubMed

    Brooks, James I; Sandstrom, Paul A

    2013-07-25

    Phylogenetics is the application of comparative studies of genetic sequences in order to infer evolutionary relationships among organisms. This tool can be used as a form of molecular epidemiology to enhance traditional population-level communicable disease surveillance. Phylogenetic study has resulted in new paradigms being created in the field of communicable diseases and this commentary aims to provide the reader with an explanation of how phylogenetics can be used in tracking infectious diseases. Special emphasis will be placed upon the application of phylogenetics as a tool to help elucidate HIV transmission patterns and the limitations to these methods when applied to forensic analysis. Understanding infectious disease epidemiology in order to prevent new transmissions is the sine qua non of public health. However, with increasing epidemiological resolution, there may be an associated potential loss of privacy to the individual. It is within this context that we aim to promote the discussion on how to use phylogenetics to achieve important public health goals, while at the same time protecting the rights of the individual.

  4. The martial art of scientific publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    Publication of scientific results in refereed journals is an essential part of the scientific process. It is the final payoff for the obscure labors that compose scientific research. Unfortunately, effective operation of the publication procedure requires simultaneous rational scientific judgment on the part of the author, the referee, and the editor, and the coincidence of all of these cannot be taken for granted on every given occasion. There are times when the working definition of truth is taken to be the consensus of one's scientific intimates: the “good old boys.” Anything outside that limited horizon is discomforting and improper and is to be barred from consideration.

  5. Tachycardia detection in ICDs by Boston Scientific : Algorithms, pearls, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Zanker, Norbert; Schuster, Diane; Gilkerson, James; Stein, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize how implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) by Boston Scientific sense, detect, discriminate rhythms, and classify episodes. Modern devices include multiple programming selections, diagnostic features, therapy options, memory functions, and device-related history features. Device operation includes logical steps from sensing, detection, discrimination, therapy delivery to history recording. The program is designed to facilitate the application of the device algorithms to the individual patient's clinical needs. Features and functions described in this article represent a selective excerpt by the authors from Boston Scientific publicly available product resources. Programming of ICDs may affect patient outcomes. Patient-adapted and optimized programming requires understanding of device operation and concepts.

  6. Scientific publications: now a marketing decision?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scientists have been publishing in journals related to their disciplines. Now with the advent of the internet, many more options are now available and scientific publication has become a marketing decision. Scientific journals are rated by "impact factor" which is based on the average number of cita...

  7. Scientific Publications Inhibit the Application of Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that, with New Zealand's new form of block grant funding, greater emphasis is placed on scientific publications than on disseminating research results in a more useful way to clients. It is recommmended that successful communication of information be identified and rewarded. (MSE)

  8. Scientific Publications Inhibit the Application of Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that with New Zealand's new form of block grant funding, greater emphasis is placed on scientific publications than on disseminating research results in a more useful way to clients. It is recommended that successful communication of information be identified and rewarded. (MSE)

  9. A Scientific Approach to Monitoring Public Perceptions of Scientific Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, N. I.; Lee, A. J.; Cribb, J. H. J.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a three-year study to evaluate a new approach to increasing the impact and adoption of new scientific findings and technologies. The purpose of the case study was to monitor the public's perception of the severity of problems posed by invasive animal species and of possible methods of managing them. A real-time "moving…

  10. Temporal patterns of genes in scientific publications

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Hoffmann, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Publications in scientific journals contain a considerable fraction of our scientific knowledge. Analyzing data from publication databases helps us understand how this knowledge is obtained and how it changes over time. In this study, we present a mathematical model for the temporal dynamics of data on the scientific content of publications. Our data set consists of references to thousands of genes in the >15 million publications listed in PubMed. We show that the observed dynamics may result from a simple process: Researchers predominantly publish on genes that already appear in many publications. This might be a rewarding strategy for researchers, because there is a positive correlation between the frequency of a gene in scientific publications and the journal impact of the publications. By comparing the empirical data with model predictions, we are able to detect unusual publication patterns that often correspond to major achievements in the field. We identify interactions between yeast genes from PubMed and show that the frequency differences of genes in publications lead to a biased picture of the resulting interaction network. PMID:17620606

  11. Ways forward in public scientific controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Mike

    2010-04-01

    Public scientific controversies are considered in a defined but fairly general form, essentially where there is uncertainty and divided scientific opinion. General considerations are exemplified in the case of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from both power supply and mobile phones and other telecoms systems. Characteristics of scientific evaluation and dialogue are discussed. The concept of scientific plausibility is examined and a system of degrees of plausibility is suggested. The paper argues for using graded systems of evaluation in various respects where imposing an inappropriate dichotomy may otherwise make controversies worse. Recognising a plurality of scientifically valid evaluations is recommended and may help to foster public trust in science. Specific steps are suggested for scientists in EMF controversies.

  12. Scientific Coolections: Informational - Navigational Portal for Scientific Publications Access.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatencov, Petru; Kozlenco, Ludmila; Ginculova, Silvia; Keradi, Natalia

    At present there is the tendency of uniting efforts of scientific establishments and libraries for using information - communication medium with the purpose of information support of research and pedagogical activity in Moldova. The efficient access to the scientific and technical literature and, first of all, to the new publications, is necessary practically for all scientists and experts irrespective of a field of knowledge, in which they work. Research institutions, knowing how to receive access to the electron information and to use it intellectually, realize that it effects positively the quality and outcomes of the research process. It is obvious, that to ensure maximum utilization of the new information stream by habitual methods is impossible. New non-traditional approaches are necessary for the increase of the level of information provision of scientists and experts. Creation of electron libraries, realizing qualitatively other level of production, storage, organization and distribution of various information is the most effective way to gin this object. The access to the electron versions of scientific journals allows to reduce the acuteness of shortage of scientific literature, the electron information becomes accessible before the publication of paper version of a journal, and taking into account the delivery time of foreign issues into Moldova, this outstripping can reach several months.

  13. Retractions of scientific publications: responsibility and accountability.

    PubMed

    Katavić, Vedran

    2014-01-01

    This evidence-based opinion piece gives a short overview of the increase in retractions of publications in scientific journals and discusses various reasons for that increase. Also discussed are some of the recent prominent cases of scientific misconduct, the number of authors with multiple retractions, and problems with reproducibility of published research. Finally, some of the effects of faulty research on science and society, as well as possible solutions are discussed.

  14. [Fraud and misconduct in scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2010-01-01

    Editors of scientific publications have, traditionally, been unaware of frauds and misconduct, being more concerned with subjects associated to impact or with editorial review. But, in the last few years they have been checking and reporting that there is misconduct in the scientific field, and furthermore, it is not uncommon. The most common misconduct of authors is reviewed. These are seen as an infringement of the conditions that a scientific work must have, and include fraud, such as plagiarism, repeated publications or redundant publications. Their frequency and the perspectives from a publishing point of view are discussed. Many editors are demanding clear regulations to prevent misconduct. Editorial review and the provision of evaluation tools for reviewers are prevention, but not infallible formulas. What is most important could be that editorial teams be aware of its existence.

  15. Ethics of authorship in scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2013-07-01

    Authorship should be based on the contribution provided by each author who has made a significant scientific contribution to a study. Credit of authorship has important academic, social and financial implications and is bound by guidelines, which aid in preserving transparency during writing and publication of research material so as to prevent violation of ethics.

  16. Scientific Publications of a Medical School Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumland, Rand B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Reports results of a study of the way in which the quantity and apparent scientific quality of publications produced by the full-time faculty at Baylor College of Medicine vary with degree, rank, and maturity. Of particular interest is the pattern suggested: waxing and waning of productivity of faculty over the course of their careers. (JMD)

  17. Ethics of authorship in scientific publications

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Authorship should be based on the contribution provided by each author who has made a significant scientific contribution to a study. Credit of authorship has important academic, social and financial implications and is bound by guidelines, which aid in preserving transparency during writing and publication of research material so as to prevent violation of ethics. PMID:24470992

  18. Acid Precipitation: Scientific Progress and Public Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowling, Ellis B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes certain perspectives on scientific research and on the public debates about acid deposition and its effects. Although primary attention is given to European/North American research, the ideas developed are relevant in any world region sensitive to acid deposition resulting from intense industrialization. (Author/JN)

  19. Public perception and communication of scientific uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Broomell, Stephen B; Kane, Patrick Bodilly

    2017-02-01

    Understanding how the public perceives uncertainty in scientific research is fundamental for effective communication about research and its inevitable uncertainty. Previous work found that scientific evidence differentially influenced beliefs from individuals with different political ideologies. Evidence that threatens an individual's political ideology is perceived as more uncertain than nonthreatening evidence. The authors present 3 studies examining perceptions of scientific uncertainty more broadly by including sciences that are not politically polarizing. Study 1 develops scales measuring perceptions of scientific uncertainty. It finds (a) 3 perceptual dimensions of scientific uncertainty, with the primary dimension representing a perception of precision; (b) the precision dimension of uncertainty is strongly associated with the perceived value of a research field; and (c) differences in perceived uncertainty across political affiliations. Study 2 manipulated these dimensions, finding that Republicans were more sensitive than Democrats to descriptions of uncertainty associated with a research field (e.g., psychology). Study 3 found that these views of a research field did not extend to the evaluation of individual results produced by the field. Together, these studies show that perceptions of scientific uncertainty associated with entire research fields are valid predictors of abstract perceptions of scientific quality, benefit, and allocation of funding. Yet, they do not inform judgments about individual results. Therefore, polarization in the acceptance of specific results is not likely due to individual differences in perceived scientific uncertainty. Further, the direction of influence potentially could be reversed, such that perceived quality of scientific results could be used to influence perceptions about scientific research fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Authorship in scientific publications: analysis and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christian W; Brückner, Christian; Kaiser, Tony; Mauron, Alex; Wahli, Walter; Wenzel, Uwe Justus; Salathé, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, a Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences working group chaired by Professor Emilio Bossi issued a "Memorandum on scientific integrity and the handling of misconduct in the scientific context", together with a paper setting out principles and procedures concerning integrity in scientific research. In the Memorandum, unjustified claims of authorship in scientific publications are referred to as a form of scientific misconduct - a view widely shared in other countries. In the Principles and Procedures, the main criteria for legitimate authorship are specified, as well as the associated responsibilities. It is in fact not uncommon for disputes about authorship to arise with regard to publications in fields where research is generally conducted by teams rather than individuals. Such disputes may concern not only the question who is or is not to be listed as an author but also, frequently, the precise sequence of names, if the list is to reflect the various authors' roles and contributions. Subjective assessments of the contributions made by the individual members of a research group may differ substantially. As scientific collaboration - often across national boundaries - is now increasingly common, ensuring appropriate recognition of all parties is a complex matter and, where disagreements arise, it may not be easy to reach a consensus. In addition, customs have changed over the past few decades; for example, the practice of granting "honorary" authorship to an eminent researcher - formerly not unusual - is no longer considered acceptable. It should be borne in mind that the publications list has become by far the most important indicator of a researcher's scientific performance; for this reason, appropriate authorship credit has become a decisive factor in the careers of young researchers, and it needs to be managed and protected accordingly. At the international and national level, certain practices have therefore developed concerning the listing of authors

  1. Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-02

    98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress Summary The federal...6 Current Federal Policy on Scientific Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8...OECD), 2002, p. 30. Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress Introduction Publication of scientific

  2. Bibliometric indicators: quality measurements of scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Durieux, Valérie; Gevenois, Pierre Alain

    2010-05-01

    Bibliometrics is a set of mathematical and statistical methods used to analyze and measure the quantity and quality of books, articles, and other forms of publications. There are three types of bibliometric indicators: quantity indicators, which measure the productivity of a particular researcher; quality indicators, which measure the quality (or "performance") of a researcher's output; and structural indicators, which measure connections between publications, authors, and areas of research. Bibliometric indicators are especially important for researchers and organizations, as these measurements are often used in funding decisions, appointments, and promotions of researchers. As more and more scientific discoveries occur and published research results are read and then quoted by other researchers, bibliometric indicators are becoming increasingly important. This article provides an overview of the currently used bibliometric indicators and summarizes the critical elements and characteristics one should be aware of when evaluating the quantity and quality of scientific output.

  3. Preparing manuscript: Scientific writing for publication

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sawhney, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Publication has become a burning issue among Indian medical fraternity owing to certain academic and professional necessities. The large number of submissions to the anaesthesia journals has resulted in accumulation of too much below average scientific material. A properly written manuscript is the dream of every editor and reviewer. The art of preparing a manuscript can be acquired only by following certain basic rules and technical aspects, besides knowledge and skills. Before preparing the manuscript, a target journal should be considered. All the instructions to the authors pertaining to that particular journal should be followed meticulously before preparing the manuscript for submission. The basic structure of the manuscript to be followed can be summarised by the acronym IMRaD (introduction, methods, results and discussion). The current review article aims to highlight all those mandatory and desirable features which should be kept in consideration while preparing a scientific manuscript for publication. PMID:27729696

  4. Scientific disintegrity as a public bad.

    PubMed

    Engel, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    In this article, I argue that scientific dishonesty essentially results from an incentive problem; I do so using a standard economic model-the public bad. Arguably, at least in the short run, most scientists would increase their personal utility by being sloppy with scientific standards. Yet, if they do, it becomes more difficult for all scientists to make their voice heard in society, to convince policy makers to assign public funds to academia, and to lead fulfilling academic lives. The nature of the ensuing governance problem (and appropriate policy intervention) hinges on the definition of scientists' utility function. The policy problem is less grave if society attaches disproportionally more weight to severe or widespread violations and if individual scientists do not precisely know in advance when they will quit their academic lives. If most scientists internalize most scientific standards, then the problem is alleviated. However, internalization is immaterial if honorable scientists dislike that others advance their careers by violating those standards. Sanctions are helpful, even if relatively mild. However, it is important to also punish those who do not punish others for breaking the rules or, alternatively, to put some centralized mechanism for vigilance and enforcement into place. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. [SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS: ON HONORS AND GHOSTS].

    PubMed

    Glezerman, Marek; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-06-01

    The ethics committee at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University deals with complaints which are not necessarily related to teaching or to issues in the realm of the Institutional Review Board (Helsinki Commission). Virtually all complaints reaching the committee are based on disputed authorship of scientific publications. Researchers and clinicians are interested in publishing their research in order to share knowledge but also in order to comply with the dictum "Publish or Perish". They are publishing to enhance their reputation, to improve chances for funding and to increase the likelihood for clinical and academic promotion. Yet, lack of appropriate planning and agreements on authorship ahead of time may lead to frictions, misunderstandings and outright belligerence between authors. The issue of authorship is being addressed by scientific journals, academic institutions and committees of editors. All of them have published appropriate guidelines which form the basis for the work of the ethics committee. We deal with "honorary authorship", that is individuals who are listed as authors, although they have not contributed sufficiently to the research in order to merit authorship and we deal with "Ghost Authorship" that is when contributing researchers are not listed, as they should be among authors of a scientific publication. Specific case studies are presented.

  6. [What scientific publications should be read?].

    PubMed

    Belitzky, R

    1980-01-01

    Students in the biomedical fields, and even those at the graduate level, often tend to accept more readily the opinions of authority than scientific knowledge itself. Books and papers sometimes confuse hypotheses with evidence. Similarly, the great profusion of scientific publications makes it necessary to sift the sound from the fatuous, the important from the trivial, the useful from the dangerous. A good way to choose one's reading matter is to learn the scientific method and to consider each article from that point of view. Is the writing a mere description of phenomena, a study of case histories, a presentation of new techniques, or a report of really valid experimental work? One should be aware of the scope and limitations of experimental design models applicable to physiological and biochemical research and of those for clinical experimentation. This paper offers guidelines for the analysis of articles and indicates the need to determine whether the components of an experimental design (a target population, alternative therapies, and situations of change) are present, and to review its structure and the sequence it prescribes on that basis. Several questions are asked following the above steps, as a quick gauge of the value and usefulness of the publication or paper.

  7. Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-10

    2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress Summary The federal...6 Current Federal Policy on Scientific Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

  8. [Proposed scoring system for biomedical scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Figueredo, E

    2007-02-01

    There are no bibliometric formulas currently available to measure the intrinsic quality of scientific publications. Nonetheless, publication assessment is an inescapable feature of academic and professional evaluation although it is not always done fairly. This paper proposes a scoring system that combines several of the variables most often used for evaluation: article length, inclusion in biomedical databases, impact factor of the journals publishing the articles, and number of citations received during the 2 years following publication. Articles can be classified in 20 categories and assigned scores depending on how the factors are combined. The scoring system's advantage is that it limits excessive weight given to extreme impact factors and corrects differences due to varying citing behaviors in different Science Citation Index categories. Finally, scores are classified by type of article, number of co-authors, and arthorship order. When applying this system, it would be sufficient to evaluate candidates' 5 best articles in order to establish quantitative differences between them, reducing administrative costs and the workloads of assessment committees.

  9. Genetically Modified Plants: Public and Scientific Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed. PMID:25937981

  10. Genetically modified plants: public and scientific perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rastogi Verma, Smita

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed.

  11. Writing scientific papers for publication: "Without publication research is sterile".

    PubMed

    Curzon, M E J; Cleaton-Jones, P E

    2012-02-01

    The publication of basic science and clinical research findings, as well as new clinical diagnosis and treatment techniques, is widely disseminated. These days there is considerable competition to publish so the selection process is even more competitive. To present advice as to how to enhance the chances of being published and more importantly how to prepare a paper for submission. Instructions are presented as to the steps to be taken in writing a scientific manuscript. This covers Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results and Discussion. Guidance is given as to what should be included and also what should be left out. The precision of writing is paramount and scientific text needs to be simple, easily read and translated by those whose day-to-day language is not English. Advice is given on journal selection and how to ensure the best chance of manuscript acceptance.

  12. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  13. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-10-17

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  14. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected. PMID:25322852

  15. The spacelab scientific missions: A comprehensive bibliography of scientific publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Marsha (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    November 1993 represented the 10-year anniversary of the flight of Spacelab 1 mission, with the first precursor mission (OSTA-1) being launched 2 years earlier. Since that time, a total of 27 Shuttle missions has been flown, using the Spacelab system as a facility for conducting scientific research in space. The missions flown to date have allowed a total of approximately 500 Principle Investigator class investigations to be conducted in orbit. These investigations have constituted major scientific efforts in astronomy/astrophysics, atmospheric science, Earth observation, life sciences, microgravity science, and space plasma physics. An initial survey of the scientific products gleaned from Spacelab missions already flown was sent to the Principle Investigators. In that survey, information was gathered from the investigators on the scientific highlights of their investigations and statistical measurements of overall success -- such as papers published. This document is a compilation of the papers that have been published to date in referred literature.

  16. Access to Scientific Publications: The Scientist's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Myrzahmetov, Askar; Bernstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientific publishing is undergoing significant changes due to the growth of online publications, increases in the number of open access journals, and policies of funders and universities requiring authors to ensure that their publications become publicly accessible. Most studies of the impact of these changes have focused on the growth of articles available through open access or the number of open-access journals. Here, we investigated access to publications at a number of institutes and universities around the world, focusing on publications in HIV vaccine research – an area of biomedical research with special importance to the developing world. Methods and Findings We selected research papers in HIV vaccine research field, creating: 1) a first set of 50 most recently published papers with keywords “HIV vaccine” and 2) a second set of 200 articles randomly selected from those cited in the first set. Access to the majority (80%) of the recently published articles required subscription, while cited literature was much more accessible (67% freely available online). Subscriptions at a number of institutions around the world were assessed for providing access to subscription-only articles from the two sets. The access levels varied widely, ranging among institutions from 20% to 90%. Through the WHO-supported HINARI program, institutes in low-income countries had access comparable to that of institutes in the North. Finally, we examined the response rates for reprint requests sent to corresponding authors, a method commonly used before internet access became widespread. Contacting corresponding authors with requests for electronic copies of articles by email resulted in a 55-60% success rate, although in some cases it took up to 1.5 months to get a response. Conclusions While research articles are increasingly available on the internet in open access format, institutional subscriptions continue to play an important role. However, subscriptions do not

  17. Access to scientific publications: the scientist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Yegor; Myrzahmetov, Askar; Bernstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Scientific publishing is undergoing significant changes due to the growth of online publications, increases in the number of open access journals, and policies of funders and universities requiring authors to ensure that their publications become publicly accessible. Most studies of the impact of these changes have focused on the growth of articles available through open access or the number of open-access journals. Here, we investigated access to publications at a number of institutes and universities around the world, focusing on publications in HIV vaccine research--an area of biomedical research with special importance to the developing world. We selected research papers in HIV vaccine research field, creating: 1) a first set of 50 most recently published papers with keywords "HIV vaccine" and 2) a second set of 200 articles randomly selected from those cited in the first set. Access to the majority (80%) of the recently published articles required subscription, while cited literature was much more accessible (67% freely available online). Subscriptions at a number of institutions around the world were assessed for providing access to subscription-only articles from the two sets. The access levels varied widely, ranging among institutions from 20% to 90%. Through the WHO-supported HINARI program, institutes in low-income countries had access comparable to that of institutes in the North. Finally, we examined the response rates for reprint requests sent to corresponding authors, a method commonly used before internet access became widespread. Contacting corresponding authors with requests for electronic copies of articles by email resulted in a 55-60% success rate, although in some cases it took up to 1.5 months to get a response. While research articles are increasingly available on the internet in open access format, institutional subscriptions continue to play an important role. However, subscriptions do not provide access to the full range of HIV vaccine

  18. Public understanding of science is not scientific literacy

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, A.

    1995-12-31

    The author notes that public understanding of science has, in many quarters, been taken over by the wrong notion of scientific literacy. The need for the scientific community to develop the language that speaks to the public in general is explored. Methodologies to improve communication to the general public and increase their understanding with clearly developed metaphors are examined.

  19. [Increasing difficulties for scientific publication in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Ryder, Elena

    2014-03-01

    A very important increase in the costs of the edition of scientific journals has taken place in Venezuela, due to difficulties in obtaining imported free acid paper and other materials used for handling documents. Like other journals, Investigaci6n Clinica has been considering switching completely to a digital publication format; however there are several reasons that prevent us to doing it at this time: the journal is distributed in printed form to many national institutions, which do not have immediate access to digital information. In addition, there exists a commitment of shipment of printed issues for some international indices and in exchange with other national and foreign journals, whose printed format we receive. Another important aspect is that our University maintains a weak technological platform that makes difficult the immediacy required for the interchange with authors and consulted referees of received papers; and there is a latent danger of limitations in the use of digital technologies, due to current national politic problems. Consequently, we need to continue with the printed format, but must reduce the amount of printed issues, so as not to limit the number of papers published in each edition. Nevertheless, there is an ever increasing number of contributions from foreign researches and Investigaci6n Clinica has been recently included in two new international indices, the SEIIC from Argentina and the Infobase Index from India, reasons that obligate us to maintain our levels of excellence and commitment to our authors and readers.

  20. [Scientific publications: a resource for the physician's intellectual development].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The physician's professional life involves reading and analysis of scientific journals, regardless of the specialization field. The hospital and academic areas lead to the scientific-literary activity development. The aim of this editorial is to make some reflections about the way a physician reaches intellectual development, through the creation of a culture of writing and reading scientific publications.

  1. Scientific Research and the Public Trust

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2011-01-01

    This essay analyzes the concept of public trust in science and offers some guidance for ethicists, scientists, and policymakers who use this idea defend ethical rules or policies pertaining to the conduct of research. While the notion the public trusts science makes sense in the abstract, it may not be sufficiently focused to support the various rules and policies that authors have tried to derive from it, because the public is not a uniform body with a common set of interests. Well-focused arguments that use public trust to support rules or policies for the conduct of research should specify a) which public is being referred to (e.g. the general public or a specific public, such as a particular community or group); b) what this public expects from scientists; c) how the rule or policy will ensure that these expectations are met; and d) why is it important to meet these expectations. PMID:20803259

  2. Scientific research and the public trust.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2011-09-01

    This essay analyzes the concept of public trust in science and offers some guidance for ethicists, scientists, and policymakers who use this idea defend ethical rules or policies pertaining to the conduct of research. While the notion that public trusts science makes sense in the abstract, it may not be sufficiently focused to support the various rules and policies that authors have tried to derive from it, because the public is not a uniform body with a common set of interests. Well-focused arguments that use public trust to support rules or policies for the conduct of research should specify (a) which public is being referred to (e.g. the general public or a specific public, such as a particular community or group); (b) what this public expects from scientists; (c) how the rule or policy will ensure that these expectations are met; and (d) why is it important to meet these expectations.

  3. [SIGAPS, a tool for the analysis of scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Sillet, Arnauld

    2015-04-01

    The System for the Identification, Management and Analysis of Scientific Publications (SIGAPS) is essential for the funding of teaching hospitals on the basis of scientific publications. It is based on the analysis of articles indexed in Medline and is calculated by taking into account the place of the author and the ranking of the journal according to the disciplinary field. It also offers tools for the bibliometric analysis of scientific production.

  4. Positive Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how Cahokia middle and high school students conduct inquiry-based science through a pitfall trap experiment. In a collaborative effort, students designed and conducted pitfall trap investigations that combined their interest in the natural world with their love of technology. The students set up their own experiments to…

  5. Positive Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how Cahokia middle and high school students conduct inquiry-based science through a pitfall trap experiment. In a collaborative effort, students designed and conducted pitfall trap investigations that combined their interest in the natural world with their love of technology. The students set up their own experiments to…

  6. The citation merit of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Juan A; Ortuño-Ortín, Ignacio; Ruiz-Castillo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method to assess the merit of any set of scientific papers in a given field based on the citations they receive. Given a field and a citation impact indicator, such as the mean citation or the [Formula: see text]-index, the merit of a given set of [Formula: see text] articles is identified with the probability that a randomly drawn set of [Formula: see text] articles from a given pool of articles in that field has a lower citation impact according to the indicator in question. The method allows for comparisons between sets of articles of different sizes and fields. Using a dataset acquired from Thomson Scientific that contains the articles published in the periodical literature in the period 1998-2007, we show that the novel approach yields rankings of research units different from those obtained by a direct application of the mean citation or the [Formula: see text]-index.

  7. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This catalog lists 190 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1989. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  8. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This catalog lists 458 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information database during accession year 1991 through 1992. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  9. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of Special Publications, Reference Publications, Conference Publications, and Technical Papers, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalog lists 239 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered in the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1987. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  10. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1987-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog lists 783 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database during the year's 1987 through 1990. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  11. Publication pressure and scientific misconduct in medical scientists.

    PubMed

    Tijdink, Joeri K; Verbeke, Reinout; Smulders, Yvo M

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that scientific misconduct is more common than previously thought. Strong emphasis on scientific productivity may increase the sense of publication pressure. We administered a nationwide survey to Flemish biomedical scientists on whether they had engaged in scientific misconduct and whether they had experienced publication pressure. A total of 315 scientists participated in the survey; 15% of the respondents admitted they had fabricated, falsified, plagiarized, or manipulated data in the past 3 years. Fraud was more common among younger scientists working in a university hospital. Furthermore, 72% rated publication pressure as "too high." Publication pressure was strongly and significantly associated with a composite scientific misconduct severity score. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Desirable Characteristics of a Scientific Publication System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkade, Robert G.

    The six characteristics of an Experimental Publication System (EPS) evaluated are: (1) prompt dissemination, (2) focused distribution, (3) diversity of content, (4) catalog of abstracts, (5) articles printed separately and (6) low acceptance criteria. Approximately 20% of the psychologists who might be interested in the subject matter are covered…

  13. Bibliography of Scientific Publications 1978-1990,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    J.R. and Graybiel, A., "Visual and Postural Motion Aftereffects Following Parabolic Flight." Aviation, Space, and Enviromental Medicine, Vol. 51, pp... Virolog , Vol. 96, pp. 271-273, May 1987. 28 NAMRL PUBLICATIONS 1988 Anthropometry and Mass Distribution for Human Analogues Vol. b. Military Male

  14. Mixed-membership models of scientific publications

    PubMed Central

    Erosheva, Elena; Fienberg, Stephen; Lafferty, John

    2004-01-01

    PNAS is one of world's most cited multidisciplinary scientific journals. The PNAS official classification structure of subjects is reflected in topic labels submitted by the authors of articles, largely related to traditionally established disciplines. These include broad field classifications into physical sciences, biological sciences, social sciences, and further subtopic classifications within the fields. Focusing on biological sciences, we explore an internal soft-classification structure of articles based only on semantic decompositions of abstracts and bibliographies and compare it with the formal discipline classifications. Our model assumes that there is a fixed number of internal categories, each characterized by multinomial distributions over words (in abstracts) and references (in bibliographies). Soft classification for each article is based on proportions of the article's content coming from each category. We discuss the appropriateness of the model for the PNAS database as well as other features of the data relevant to soft classification. PMID:15020766

  15. [A view of clinical engineering from scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to characterize clinical engineering from the perspective of scientific publications. First of all, the most significant factors that influence the change in health systems are briefly exposed. Then, clinical engineering is defined and its main functions and evolution within the development of the health system is explained. Finally, the author describes the state of the field from the viewpoint of the scientific publications; an apparent lack of interest in the engineering community to publish scientific research was observed. This behavior can be seen in the clear declining tendency in the number of citations and the number of publications (in volume or quantity) in major scientific journals in the field. Finally, current challenges and future developments must be addressed to accomplish a better positioning of the specialty in the publishing world.

  16. Digital Format for Depositary Part of Scientific Publications' Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskov, Andrei; Evstigneeva, Galina

    As a rule, any large library has so called depositary part of collection. Specific circulation of these publications is not high, but preservation, conservation and provision of access to given collection need permanent efforts. The paper presents evaluation of expenses and centralized systems efficiency. These systems (e.g. JSTOR, Backfiles for Future) are publicly accessible collections of full text versions of scientific periodicals.

  17. Threat to Scientific Publication Seen in GPO Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henig, Robin Marantz

    1979-01-01

    The controversy concerning H.R. 4572, the Public Printing Reorganization Act, is presented; the bill is scheduled to appear before Congress this month. The belief among the scientific community and publishing industry is that it will jeopardize the distribution of publications of scientists' research. (SA)

  18. Politics and the erosion of federal scientific capacity: restoring scientific integrity to public health science.

    PubMed

    Rest, Kathleen M; Halpern, Michael H

    2007-11-01

    Our nation's health and prosperity are based on a foundation of independent scientific discovery. Yet in recent years, political interference in federal government science has become widespread, threatening this legacy. We explore the ways science has been misused, the attempts to measure the pervasiveness of this problem, and the effects on our long-term capacity to meet today's most complex public health challenges. Good government and a functioning democracy require public policy decisions to be informed by independent science. The scientific and public health communities must speak out to defend taxpayer-funded science from political interference. Encouragingly, both the scientific community and Congress are exploring ways to restore scientific integrity to federal policymaking.

  19. Politics and the Erosion of Federal Scientific Capacity: Restoring Scientific Integrity to Public Health Science

    PubMed Central

    Rest, Kathleen M.; Halpern, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Our nation’s health and prosperity are based on a foundation of independent scientific discovery. Yet in recent years, political interference in federal government science has become widespread, threatening this legacy. We explore the ways science has been misused, the attempts to measure the pervasiveness of this problem, and the effects on our long-term capacity to meet today’s most complex public health challenges. Good government and a functioning democracy require public policy decisions to be informed by independent science. The scientific and public health communities must speak out to defend taxpayer-funded science from political interference. Encouragingly, both the scientific community and Congress are exploring ways to restore scientific integrity to federal policymaking. PMID:17901422

  20. [Towards a new equitable system of scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno-Salazar, Gilberto

    2009-06-01

    Scientific publications are the most accessible manifestations of research activities and the main mission of public universities and academic communities. The publication legitimizes scientific activity, the authors and the institutions that they promote, but specialized publications have a very small impact on society, since a limited market have implications on their costs' increase and on their possible extinction. In this context, the Open Access initiative (OAI) promotes free access to the scientific knowledge. This movement supports the need for the free availability on Internet of scientific information, for the whole humanity, without restrictions. The modality of open access promotes actions such as stimulus, development and the claim for support for the free subsistence of publications with standards of quality that guarantee a healthy practice, with recognition by the scientific community. In the OAI, the role of the author's copyright should be to grant the control to the authors on the integrity of their work and the right to be adequately recognized and mentioned. It is necessary to emphasize that the OAI will reduce the phenomenon of "lost science", understood as those researches that are never published, taking advantage of the model of development of the Society of the Knowledge and the suitable use of the TICs (technologies of information and communication), to achieve the increment of productivity and the economic and social progress of the countries.

  1. Getting the Public Addicted to Scientific Data Through Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.; Flasher, J. C.; Lodoysamba, S.

    2013-12-01

    Effectively communicating about a scientific topic to the public can be challenging for scientists for a variety reasons that often boil down to an inadequate bridge between general knowledge and the specialized scientific knowledge needed to understand the context of what a scientist from a particular field wishes to convey. This issue makes it difficult for the public to interpret scientific information and leaves it vulnerable to misinterpretation and misrepresentation. Rather than 'dumb down' scientific information to the public, we believe the most effective way to bridge this gap is to provide a means for the public to have easy access to - and get addicted to! - the actual scientific data itself, presented in a straightforward form. To this end, we will discuss an air quality public awareness campaign that we launched in one of the most polluted cities in the world, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, over the past year. We have installed an air quality instrument at a university in Mongolia, and we automatically post data from the instrument on Facebook (UB Air Quality Info) and Twitter (@UB_Air). We provide infographics on how to understand the data, share relevant articles and local activities, and monitor the sites for questions from the public about the data. We also maintain a website that posts aggregate air quality information (http://ubdata.herokuapp.com) and publicly shares the code that automatically connects our air quality instrument to the social media sites. This social media project, the first of its kind in Mongolia, has been an effective way to provide: (1) a quantifiable context to the public about air pollution issues in Ulaanbaatar, (2) a forum for the public and decision makers - from ambassadors to politicians - to engage with experts in the field and each other, and (3) a device that helps prevent misrepresentation (or fabrication) of data for political ends. We will also discuss the broader utility of our project and possible application to other

  2. The scientific basis for law as a public health tool.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Anthony D; Mercer, Shawna L; Popovic, Tanja; Briss, Peter A; Goodman, Richard A; Thombley, Melisa L; Hahn, Robert A; Fox, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    Systematic reviews are generating valuable scientific knowledge about the impact of public health laws, but this knowledge is not readily accessible to policy makers. We identified 65 systematic reviews of studies on the effectiveness of 52 public health laws: 27 of those laws were found effective, 23 had insufficient evidence to judge effectiveness, 1 was harmful, and 1 was found to be ineffective. This is a valuable, scientific foundation-that uses the highest relevant standard of evidence-for the role of law as a public health tool. Additional primary studies and systematic reviews are needed to address significant gaps in knowledge about the laws' public health impact, as are energetic, sustained initiatives to make the findings available to public policy makers.

  3. [Scientific publications and their influence in specialty teaching].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Alvaro; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2010-10-01

    Scientific publication is used by researchers to transmit information and is the means through which scientists can validate the results obtained in their studies. The rapid introduction of electronic scientific journals faces training specialists with an endless source of information. This article discusses the present and future of biomedical journals in the field of clinical microbiology. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the main sources of information for training specialists in microbiology and parasitology are also evaluated.

  4. PaperMaker: validation of biomedical scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Rebholz-Schuhmann, D; Kavaliauskas, S; Pezik, P

    2010-04-01

    The automatic analysis of scientific literature can support authors in writing their manuscripts. PaperMaker is a novel IT solution that receives a scientific manuscript via a Web interface, automatically analyses the publication, evaluates consistency parameters and interactively delivers feedback to the author. It analyses the proper use of acronyms and their definitions, and the use of specialized terminology. It provides Gene Ontology (GO) and Medline Subject Headings (MeSH) categorization of text passages, the retrieval of relevant publications from public scientific literature repositories, and the identification of missing or unused references. The author receives a summary of findings, the manuscript in its corrected form and a digital abstract containing the GO and MeSH annotations in the NLM/PubMed format. http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Rebholz-srv/PaperMaker.

  5. Survival analysis: part 15 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Zwiener, Isabella; Blettner, Maria; Hommel, Gerhard

    2011-03-01

    Survival times are often used to compare treatments. Survival data are a special type of data, and therefore have to be analyzed with special methods. We illustrate special techniques for analyzing survival times by applying them to a publication on the treatment of patients with brain tumors. The present article is based on textbooks of statistics, a selective review of the literature, and the authors' own experience. Survival times are analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method, which yields two measures of interest: survival rates and the median survival time. The log-rank test is used to compare survival times across treatment groups. Cox regression is used in multivariable models. The hazard ratio, a descriptive measure for differences in survival times, is explained. If survival times are analyzed without the use of special techniques, or if the underlying assumptions are not taken into account, faulty interpretation may result. Readers of scientific publications should know these pitfalls and be able to judge for themselves whether the chosen analytical method is correct.

  6. Promises, Pitfalls, and Proposals: Automating Small Public Library Cataloging in a Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of issues that should be addressed when catalogers in small public libraries begin to automate as part of a consortium uses library cooperatives from Massachusetts (Cape Libraries Automated Materials Sharing, CLAMS) and Florida as examples. Topics discussed include characteristics of the catalogers; cataloging standards; decision…

  7. Promises, Pitfalls, and Proposals: Automating Small Public Library Cataloging in a Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of issues that should be addressed when catalogers in small public libraries begin to automate as part of a consortium uses library cooperatives from Massachusetts (Cape Libraries Automated Materials Sharing, CLAMS) and Florida as examples. Topics discussed include characteristics of the catalogers; cataloging standards; decision…

  8. [Financing of the scientific publication and protection of the scientific knowledge].

    PubMed

    Oliveira Filho, Renato Santos de; Hochman, Bernardo; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of a study is its publication on a scientific journal. Research financing agencies are important institutions so that studies can be developed and published. The most important research financing agencies that are discussed in this article are: "Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior" (CAPES), "Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico" (CNPq) and "Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo" (FAPESP). CAPES' activities can be grouped in four different strategy lines: a) it evaluates the stricto sensu, at the post-graduation level; b) it provides access and development of scientific research; c) it provides investment on the development of high qualified human resources in Brazil and abroad, and d) it promotes international scientific cooperation. Although CAPES does not support directly scientific publications, almost all actions of this agency contribute to the development of scientific research and publication. CNPq has two main purposes: financing researches and development of human resources. It provides the researchers with financial aid to scientific publication. The grants for editing were specifically created for supporting the national scientific and technical publications edited by Brazilians institutions or societies. CNPq can also support Congresses, Symposiums and similar short-term courses. The Plataforma Lattes is also a branch of CNPq on which the Curriculum Lattes is available. This site has the curriculum vitae of the scientific community and is of great value for researchers. FAPESP also finances journal publications, articles and books that bring up original results of studies made by researchers from the state of São Paulo. It finances, partially, the travel expenses of innovative papers authors in meetings within the country or abroad. Brazilian authors are increasing the number of international publications. Universities, research institutes, financing agencies and

  9. Publication and citation of scientific software with persistent identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitzsch, Martin; Klump, Jens

    2014-05-01

    , reproducibility and reusability, archiving and the use of persistent identifiers, metrics for evaluation and validation, measuring of productivity and impact as well as the dissemination and recognition of scientific achievement. Furthermore, open access and the use and interplay of software publication, data publication and traditional paper publication have to be considered. As a contribution to improve the publication of scientific software, the project SciForge [1], funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), addresses these issues. A network of interested groups and individuals in different research areas contributes to the project to recognize, create, and act upon opportunities for the development of concepts establishing defined processes and a reference platform. Established and working mechanisms, such as the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) based on the Handle System, will be an integral part of the concept. By this way established processes and existing frameworks are extended by new possibilities to publish software and recognize its scientific contributions and achievements. [1] www.gfz-potsdam.de/sciforge

  10. The public's trust in scientific claims regarding offshore oil drilling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Juliet E; Feezell, Jessica T; Michaud, Kristy E H; Smith, Eric R A N; Smith, Leeanna

    2010-09-01

    Our study examines how individuals decide which scientific claims and experts to believe when faced with competing claims regarding a policy issue. Using an experiment in a public opinion survey, we test the source content and credibility hypotheses to assess how much confidence people have in reports about scientific studies of the safety of offshore oil drilling along the California coast. The results show that message content has a substantial impact. People tend to accept reports of scientific studies that support their values and prior beliefs, but not studies that contradict them. Previous studies have shown that core values influence message acceptance. We find that core values and prior beliefs have independent effects on message acceptance. We also find that the sources of the claims make little difference. Finally, the public leans toward believing reports that oil drilling is riskier than previously believed.

  11. Media Coverage and Public Opinion on Scientific Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Allan

    1981-01-01

    Examines the relationship of media coverage and public opinion in scientific controversy. A survey of coverage of controversies arising regarding sociobiology, water fluoridation, nuclear power and the Three Mile Island disaster indicates that the media play an active role in shaping and constructing controversy rather than just reporting it. (JMF)

  12. Advice for a young editor: the scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Turpin, David L

    2005-01-01

    Being the editor of a scientific journal involves the same challenges of working with authors, association officers, and readers as in all publications. In addition to the communication in the journal, editors must manage the communication about the journal. The editor's job involves building and maintaining trust.

  13. Media Coverage and Public Opinion on Scientific Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Allan

    1981-01-01

    Examines the relationship of media coverage and public opinion in scientific controversy. A survey of coverage of controversies arising regarding sociobiology, water fluoridation, nuclear power and the Three Mile Island disaster indicates that the media play an active role in shaping and constructing controversy rather than just reporting it. (JMF)

  14. A "Sense of Place" in Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Public participation in scientific research (PPSR) within the natural sciences has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to expand cognitive knowledge and understanding of ecology, with implications regarding individual perspectives, attitudes, and behaviors about the environment and feelings about the personal relevance of science. Yet the…

  15. A "Sense of Place" in Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Public participation in scientific research (PPSR) within the natural sciences has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to expand cognitive knowledge and understanding of ecology, with implications regarding individual perspectives, attitudes, and behaviors about the environment and feelings about the personal relevance of science. Yet the…

  16. Lead and Cadmium in Public Health in Nigeria: Physicians Neglect and Pitfall in Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2014-01-01

    Low-level heavy metals exposure may contribute much more toward the causation of chronic disease and impaired functioning than previously thought. Among the suggested preventive and intervention measures for the control of renal diseases are the reduction in the exposure to heavy metals. Although these indicate knowledge and awareness of possible role of some heavy metals in the etiogenesis of some chronic diseases by Nigerian Physicians, heavy metal assay as diagnostic guide in patient management is often omitted in most healthcare settings. This is a synoptic capture of the increased incidence and prevalence of some metabolic disorders where heavy metals may be implicated. A search of the terms heavy metal exposure, source, toxicity, metabolic disorders, poisoning in Nigeria, in bibliographical databases (in English language) such as PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Africa Journal Online (AJOL) digital library was conducted. Leaded gasoline, refuse dumping, absence of poison information centers, and poor record keeping characterize environmental health in Nigeria. Lead and cadmium are of most significant public health importance in Nigeria. The recognition and inclusion of heavy metals assays in the diagnosis of metabolic disorders may ensure early diagnosis and improve management. PMID:24696827

  17. Fiction and scientific communication about volcanoes for the young public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonach, H.; Drouin, V.

    2003-12-01

    Since January 2002, I have developed a new type of interactive web site for scientific news and communications about volcanic activities on the Earth and in our solar system. With the help of a small team (including an illustrator) based in GEOTOP at the University of Quebec in Montreal, I have created a monthly French language site on volcanoes including ongoing activity. Our multimedia site www.vickivolka.uqam.ca, combines open-style scientific news, including texts and pictures with scientific explanations. The originality lies in both the content and site structure. The monthly renewals inform the public on volcanic news but also on academic research and scientific experiments that young people can perform at home. We thus link breaking volcanic news with a deeper understanding of the processes and knowledge. Another original aspect is the use of fictional characters (Vicki and Anaky) who present the news and describe their adventures during the volcanic trips (volcanological, geographical, historic contents). Additional sections include interactive functions. Based on the success of this web site (published at the moment in French) - as evidenced notably by numerous primary school visits - we are planning to translate it in English very soon. This mixture of fiction with real world stories and scientific knowledge is an unusual effort by practising researchers and collaborators to strengthen links between the academic world and the general public, especially with children and educators.

  18. Toolkit for evaluating impacts of public participation in scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonney, R.; Phillips, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Toolkit for Evaluating Impacts of Public Participation in Scientific Research is being developed to meet a major need in the field of visitor studies: To provide project developers and other professionals, especially those with limited knowledge or understanding of evaluation techniques, with a systematic method for assessing project impact that facilitates longitudinal and cross-project comparisons. The need for the toolkit was first identified at the Citizen Science workshop held at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in 2007 (McEver et al. 2007) and reaffirmed by a CAISE inquiry group that produced the recent report: "Public Participation in Scientific Research: Defining the Field and Assessing its Potential for Informal Science Education" (Bonney et al. 2009). This presentation will introduce the Toolkit, show how it is intended to be used, and describe ways that project directors can use their programmatic goals and use toolkit materials to outline a plan for evaluating the impacts of their project.

  19. Balancing Scientific Publication and National Security Concerns: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-09

    scientific publications have been viewed as potentially aiding terrorist groups or countries. In October 2001, the full genome of Yersinia pestis, the...bacteria which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, was published in the journal Nature.11 CRS-5 11 (...continued) Whitehead and B.G. Barrell, “ Genome ...al., “Complete Genome Sequence of the Q-fever Pathogen Coxiella burnetii,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, Vol. 100 (April 9, 2003) pp. 5455- 5460. 14

  20. Influencing public policies: Two (very good) reasons to look toward scientific knowledge in public policy.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, François; Bellefleur, Olivier

    2014-07-11

    The healthy public policy movement rests on the belief that a range of public policies should be at least partly informed by evidence demonstrating the positive effects of these policies on population health, health inequalities and their determinants. In order to address certain difficulties that the movement faces, knowledge produced in various scientific disciplines regarding public policies may provide some valuable guidance. In this short commentary, we examine how knowledge from the scientific disciplines investigating public policies makes it possible to address two difficulties in the development of healthy public policies: 1) adequately anticipating the effects of public policies, and 2) assessing the political viability of the policies being promoted. Since urban traffic policies are of interest to most of the other contributors to this supplement, we use examples from this field to illustrate some of our points.

  1. Tracking scientific interest in the dissociative disorders: a study of scientific publication output 1984-2003.

    PubMed

    Pope, Harrison G; Barry, Steven; Bodkin, Alexander; Hudson, James I

    2006-01-01

    We attempted to track scientific interest in dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder by estimating the annual output of publications regarding these entities over the last 20 years. Using a standard medical index, PsycINFO, we counted the number of indexed publications involving dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder listed for each year. We then compared these rates with those of well-established diagnoses such as anorexia nervosa, alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia. We also systematically reviewed all publications involving dissociative amnesia that appeared in 2003. Annual publications involving dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder rose from low levels in the 1980's to a sharp peak in the mid 1990's, followed by an equally sharp decline to only about one quarter of their peak levels by 2002 and 2003. In contrast, all of the 25 comparison diagnoses in our survey showed constant or steadily rising publication rates; none showed the 'bubble' pattern of the dissociative disorders. Of the 34 papers involving dissociative amnesia identified by PsycINFO for 2003, 10 (32%) appeared skeptical of the validity of dissociative amnesia and/or recovered-memory therapy. Despite a detailed search using multiple medical indices and search terms, we could find only 13 explicit cases of individuals with dissociative amnesia worldwide in the 2003 literature. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder have not generated consistent scientific interest over the years, but instead apparently enjoyed a brief period of fashion that now has waned. Overall, our observations suggest that these diagnostic entities presently do not command widespread scientific acceptance. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Writing for scientific publication: tips for getting started.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela E

    2006-05-01

    Pediatricians in training and clinical practice may be eager to submit their first scientific publication by writing a letter to the editor, case report, review article, or short clinical series. Unfortunately, the would-be author encounters a literary developmental delay when facing the blank page or computer screen. This article is dedicated to the novice author and offers practical tips on writing the first manuscript. Authors are encouraged to draw from their extensive experience writing other materials and to approach the task in a systematic way. Computer technology and software developments should facilitate the process.

  3. Biomedical informatics: precious scientific resource and public policy dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Donald A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical informatics includes the application of computers, information networks and systems, and a growing body of scientific understanding to a range of problems. As skill in this field increases and as progress in virtually all modern biomedical science becomes more data intensive, informatics becomes a precious resource. Applications areas include access to knowledge, discovery in genomics, medical records, mathematical modeling, and bioengineering. At the same time, progress in informatics is deeply dependent on resolution of four major public policy issues: digital intellectual property rights, genetic testing protection, medical data privacy, and the role of biomedical data in the context of information warfare and homeland security. PMID:12813915

  4. Biomedical informatics: precious scientific resource and public policy dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Donald A B

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical informatics includes the application of computers, information networks and systems, and a growing body of scientific understanding to a range of problems. As skill in this field increases and as progress in virtually all modern biomedical science becomes more data intensive, informatics becomes a precious resource. Applications areas include access to knowledge, discovery in genomics, medical records, mathematical modeling, and bioengineering. At the same time, progress in informatics is deeply dependent on resolution of four major public policy issues: digital intellectual property rights, genetic testing protection, medical data privacy, and the role of biomedical data in the context of information warfare and homeland security.

  5. Peer Review in Scientific Publications: Benefits, Critiques, & A Survival Guide

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jacalyn; Sadeghieh, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Peer review has been defined as a process of subjecting an author’s scholarly work, research or ideas to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the same field. It functions to encourage authors to meet the accepted high standards of their discipline and to control the dissemination of research data to ensure that unwarranted claims, unacceptable interpretations or personal views are not published without prior expert review. Despite its wide-spread use by most journals, the peer review process has also been widely criticised due to the slowness of the process to publish new findings and due to perceived bias by the editors and/or reviewers. Within the scientific community, peer review has become an essential component of the academic writing process. It helps ensure that papers published in scientific journals answer meaningful research questions and draw accurate conclusions based on professionally executed experimentation. Submission of low quality manuscripts has become increasingly prevalent, and peer review acts as a filter to prevent this work from reaching the scientific community. The major advantage of a peer review process is that peer-reviewed articles provide a trusted form of scientific communication. Since scientific knowledge is cumulative and builds on itself, this trust is particularly important. Despite the positive impacts of peer review, critics argue that the peer review process stifles innovation in experimentation, and acts as a poor screen against plagiarism. Despite its downfalls, there has not yet been a foolproof system developed to take the place of peer review, however, researchers have been looking into electronic means of improving the peer review process. Unfortunately, the recent explosion in online only/electronic journals has led to mass publication of a large number of scientific articles with little or no peer review. This poses significant risk to advances in scientific knowledge and its future potential. The current

  6. Peer Review in Scientific Publications: Benefits, Critiques, & A Survival Guide.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jacalyn; Sadeghieh, Tara; Adeli, Khosrow

    2014-10-01

    Peer review has been defined as a process of subjecting an author's scholarly work, research or ideas to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the same field. It functions to encourage authors to meet the accepted high standards of their discipline and to control the dissemination of research data to ensure that unwarranted claims, unacceptable interpretations or personal views are not published without prior expert review. Despite its wide-spread use by most journals, the peer review process has also been widely criticised due to the slowness of the process to publish new findings and due to perceived bias by the editors and/or reviewers. Within the scientific community, peer review has become an essential component of the academic writing process. It helps ensure that papers published in scientific journals answer meaningful research questions and draw accurate conclusions based on professionally executed experimentation. Submission of low quality manuscripts has become increasingly prevalent, and peer review acts as a filter to prevent this work from reaching the scientific community. The major advantage of a peer review process is that peer-reviewed articles provide a trusted form of scientific communication. Since scientific knowledge is cumulative and builds on itself, this trust is particularly important. Despite the positive impacts of peer review, critics argue that the peer review process stifles innovation in experimentation, and acts as a poor screen against plagiarism. Despite its downfalls, there has not yet been a foolproof system developed to take the place of peer review, however, researchers have been looking into electronic means of improving the peer review process. Unfortunately, the recent explosion in online only/electronic journals has led to mass publication of a large number of scientific articles with little or no peer review. This poses significant risk to advances in scientific knowledge and its future potential. The current article

  7. A Simple Framework for Evaluating Authorial Contributions for Scientific Publications.

    PubMed

    Warrender, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    A simple tool is provided to assist researchers in assessing contributions to a scientific publication, for ease in evaluating which contributors qualify for authorship, and in what order the authors should be listed. The tool identifies four phases of activity leading to a publication-Conception and Design, Data Acquisition, Analysis and Interpretation, and Manuscript Preparation. By comparing a project participant's contribution in a given phase to several specified thresholds, a score of up to five points can be assigned; the contributor's scores in all four phases are summed to yield a total "contribution score", which is compared to a threshold to determine which contributors merit authorship. This tool may be useful in a variety of contexts in which a systematic approach to authorial credit is desired.

  8. Writing a scientific publication for a management journal.

    PubMed

    Øvretveit, John

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to stimulate debate about criteria for assessing the scientific contribution of a piece of management research and to guide and encourage researchers in writing papers for publication. The paper also seeks to reduce the number of papers submitted to journals and reviewers which are really unfinished early drafts or which do provide knowledge which could contribute to reducing suffering. The paper draws on and discusses the difference between practical research for a manager and scientific research, as well as the author's experience as researcher, writer, reviewer, editor, research methods course leader and director of research. The discussion highlights that the author should draft the paper under the suggested headings and fulfil criteria of validity, reliability, supported conclusions, generalisability, ensuring that each section follows on from the other, and that the findings are related to previous research. This is the author's personal view about how to carry out and write research to get published, without discussions of other views. The findings in this paper may provoke more debate about management science and the role of this journal. The guidance may help many researchers publish their management research. The paper links practical guidance with discussion of criteria for scientific contribution in a readable way.

  9. How to measure the internationality of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Buela-Casal, Gualberto; Zych, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    Although the term "internationality" has never been defined by consensus, it is commonly used as a synonym of quality. Even though its meaning has never been established, internationality is frequently used to evaluate scientists, publications, or universities in many different countries. The present investigation is based on the opinion about the meaning of the concept "internationality" of the members of scientific community, represented by a broad sample of 16,056 scientists from 109 countries working in all the fields of knowledge defined by UNESCO. The sample was randomly selected from the Web of Science database from the scientists who have published at least one article in one of the journals indexed by the database. A questionnaire based on eleven criteria was designed for the purpose of the study. As a result, the first measure of internationality has been obtained. The most important criteria of internationality are: the publication language, online access, and international publication standards. There are significant differences among geographic zones and fields of knowledge.

  10. Misconduct accounts for the majority of retracted scientific publications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.; Steen, R. Grant; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A detailed review of all 2,047 biomedical and life-science research articles indexed by PubMed as retracted on May 3, 2012 revealed that only 21.3% of retractions were attributable to error. In contrast, 67.4% of retractions were attributable to misconduct, including fraud or suspected fraud (43.4%), duplicate publication (14.2%), and plagiarism (9.8%). Incomplete, uninformative or misleading retraction announcements have led to a previous underestimation of the role of fraud in the ongoing retraction epidemic. The percentage of scientific articles retracted because of fraud has increased ∼10-fold since 1975. Retractions exhibit distinctive temporal and geographic patterns that may reveal underlying causes. PMID:23027971

  11. Misconduct accounts for the majority of retracted scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Steen, R Grant; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-10-16

    A detailed review of all 2,047 biomedical and life-science research articles indexed by PubMed as retracted on May 3, 2012 revealed that only 21.3% of retractions were attributable to error. In contrast, 67.4% of retractions were attributable to misconduct, including fraud or suspected fraud (43.4%), duplicate publication (14.2%), and plagiarism (9.8%). Incomplete, uninformative or misleading retraction announcements have led to a previous underestimation of the role of fraud in the ongoing retraction epidemic. The percentage of scientific articles retracted because of fraud has increased ∼10-fold since 1975. Retractions exhibit distinctive temporal and geographic patterns that may reveal underlying causes.

  12. Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science.

    PubMed

    Mikulak, Anna

    2011-06-01

    As differentiation within scientific disciplines increases, so does differentiation between the sciences and other ways of knowing. This distancing between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' cultures reflects differences in what are considered valid and reliable approaches to acquiring knowledge and has played a major role in recent science-oriented controversies. Scientists' reluctance to actively engage in science communication, coupled with journalists' reliance on the norms of balance, conflict, and human interest in covering scientific issues, have combined to exacerbate public mistrust of science on issues like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The failure of effective communications between scientists and non-scientists has hindered the progress of both effective science and effective policy. In order to better bridge the gap between the 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' cultures, renewed efforts must be made to encourage substantive public engagement, with the ultimate goal of facilitating an open, democratic policy-making process.

  13. Health needs and public health functions addressed in scientific publications in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Benie-Bi, J; Cambon, L; Grimaud, O; Kivits, J; Alla, F

    2013-09-01

    To describe the reporting of public health research in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSA). A bibliometric research study of scientific public health publications in FSA, which includes 24 countries and approximately 260 million people. Two researchers analysed original articles published in 2007 in the medical or social sciences fields and indexed in Scopus. At least one co-author of articles had to be based in FSA. The analysis focused on research field, public health function (WHO classification), FSA country author's affiliation, language, journal type and global burden of disease (WHO classification). Of 1047 articles retrieved by the search, 212 were from the public health field. The number of articles per country varied from 0 to 36. Public health functions examined were health service research (24.5%), health monitoring (27.4%), prevention (15%) and legislation (0.5%). The distribution of health needs described in the articles was close to that of the WHO data for Africa for 2004: infectious and parasitic diseases (70% vs 54%), maternal and perinatal conditions (15% vs 17%), non-communicable diseases (15.6% vs 21%), and injuries (0.5% vs 8%). The areas reported in published articles from sub-Saharan Africa reflect the health needs distribution in Africa; however, the number of publications is low, particularly for prevention. In light of the current focus on evidence-based public health, this study questions whether the international scientific community adequately considers the expertise and perspectives of African researchers and professionals. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [North-South relations in scientific publications: editorial racism?].

    PubMed

    Victora, Cesar G; Moreira, Carmen B

    2006-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to comment on the possible existence of editorial prejudice among the editors of scientific journals from Northern countries against Southern authors. We highlight that a study using bibliometric methods documented an important imbalance in terms of the international scientific production of health researchers from high-income countries (the "North") and those from low and middle-income countries (the "South"). In a survey of Brazilian researchers, three in every four blamed this imbalance, at least in part, on prejudice among international editors. This is supported by the fact that a very small percentage of editorial board members of international journals come from the South. Although prejudice can explain part of the imbalance, there are also specific measures that may increase the likelihood of a paper from the South being accepted in international journals. These include the need to invest in the quality of the written text, and to show empathy with editors and readers, emphasizing the contribution of the manuscript to the international literature. Finally, we discuss whether research carried out in the South should be published in national or international journals, and suggest that there are at least six dimensions to this choice. These include language and target audience; type of contribution to knowledge; generalizability; citation index; speed of publication; and open access. The rapid growth in the number of Brazilian contributions to the international health literature shows that editorial prejudice, although often present, can be effectively offset by research with solid methodology and good-quality presentation.

  15. Abstraction the public from scientific - applied meteorological-climatologic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajanoska, L.

    2010-09-01

    Mathematical and meteorological statistic processing of meteorological-climatologic data, which includes assessment of the exactness, level of confidence of the average and extreme values, frequencies (probabilities) of the occurrence of each meteorological phenomenon and element e.t.c. helps to describe the impacts climate may have on different social and economic activities (transportation, heat& power generation), as well as on human health. Having in mind the new technology and the commercial world, during the work with meteorological-climatologic data we have meet many different challenges. Priority in all of this is the quality of the meteorological-climatologic set of data. First, we need compatible modern, sophisticated measurement and informatics solution for data. Results of this measurement through applied processing and analyze is the second branch which is very important also. Should we all (country) need that? Today we have many unpleasant events connected with meteorology, many questions which are not answered and all of this has too long lasting. We must give the answers and solve the real and basic issue. In this paper the data issue will be presented. We have too much of data but so little of real and quality applied of them, Why? There is a data for: -public applied -for jurisdiction needs -for getting fast decision-solutions (meteorological-dangerous phenomenon's) -for getting decisions for long-lasting plans -for explore in different sphere of human living So, it is very important for what kind of data we are talking. Does the data we are talking are with public or scientific-applied character? So,we have two groups. The first group which work with the data direct from the measurement place and instrument. They are store a quality data base and are on extra help to the journalists, medical workers, human civil engineers, electromechanical engineers, agro meteorological and forestry engineer e.g. The second group do work with all scientific

  16. 76 FR 54462 - Notification of a Public Teleconference; Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; Air Monitoring...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... teleconference of the Air Monitoring and Methods Subcommittee (AMMS) of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory... AGENCY Notification of a Public Teleconference; Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; Air Monitoring and Methods Subcommittee AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  17. Air pollution in China: Scientific and Public Policy Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Sever air pollution in China has in recent years caused intensive public, media and governmental attention. Many questions need to be answered about the air pollution in China, such as how harmful is the air pollution, especially PM2.5? Why suddenly so many reports about sever air pollution, is the air in China getting more polluted? How to design a policy that can control the air pollution most efficiently? After updated the national Ambient Air Quality Standards in 2012 and included PM2.5 as one of the critical air pollutants, in 2013, Chinese central government released for the first time the "Air Pollution Prevention and Control Action Plan". The plan has set goals to reduce annual mean concentration of PM2.5 up to 25% in 2017 in different regions in China. If the ambitious goals were achieved, this could be the most significant air pollution reduction in such a short time that affects so many people in human history. To achieve these goals, however, there are enormous scientific and public policy challenges to deal with. For example: Identify the key components, size fraction of PM that have the largest health effects; and identify the sources of PM that has the most harmful effects on human health and ecosystem. Reduce the uncertainty in health risk assessment. Understand complicate chemical transformation processes in air pollution formation with intensive emissions from industry, power plant, vehicles, agriculture. Interactions between air pollution, PBL, and atmospheric circulation at different scales. The accountability, feasibility, effectiveness, and efficiency of air pollution control policies. Integrate multi-pollutant control and achieve co-benefit with climate and energy policy. Regional coordinated air pollution control. The largest challenge in China for air pollution control remains how to strength the link between science and policy.

  18. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    AD-A268 886 NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY NBDL-93R001 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1992 NAVAL...LA, November 1980. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS Dixon, D. J., Copeland, M. O., and Halcomb, C. G., Psychomotor Battery Approaches to...Factors Society, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, October 1980. 3 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS McCauley, M. E., Kennedy, R. S., and Bittner, A. C., Jr

  19. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-04

    NBDL-90R005 r-’ -- nt AD-A229 030 111ILur BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1990 [ELECT A D NAVAL...AND DATES COVERED 74 Sept 1990 interim: I Jan 1980 - 31 Aug 1990 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Bibliography of Scientific Publications of...CALL Captain, Medical Service Corps -w"O U.S. Navy 6 Commanding Officer. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY

  20. Persistent data archives, data publication, authorship and scientific recognition (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Why don’t researchers get nearly as much credit for collecting and publishing high-quality data sets as they do for even a preliminary interpretation of data collected by themselves or by others? That does not seem fair! In the natural sciences, observations collected once can almost never be acquired again, nor can many experiments be repeated. These observations, therefore, are unique by definition, and hence might well become immensely valuable to future scientists. One would think, therefore that a premium should be placed on excellent data science, including peer-review, publication in secure, yet transparently accessible locations, commonly accepted citation standards, and full professional credit and recognition accorded to the practitioners. Technological options opened by today’s management, curation and on-line distribution of multi-disciplinary digital data sets make this an achievable goal. The new ICSU World Data System (WDS) is conceived as a global federated system of long-term data archives and data related services covering a wide spectrum of the sciences, and encouraging interdisciplinary science approaches. Because different disciplines (e.g. seismology, oceanography, astronomy, space sciences, biodiversity, health and social sciences) have developed domain-specific efficient answers to their own data challenges, WDS will by necessity evolve as a system of data systems. Nonetheless, certain overarching principles must be shared by all components: the main focus of WDS is on the long-term stewardship of scientific data (so that the value of data holdings might actually increase with time.) This calls, for instance, for the development and adoption of quality control practices, analysis and metadata services, and data publication services that can be recognized across domain boundaries. The latter will require a strong relationship with science publishers and libraries. Another focus point will be assisting scientists in developing a data

  1. 78 FR 66938 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Board of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response, Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC OPHPR) Cancellation This... More Information: Marquita Black, Executive Assistant, Office of Science and Public Health Practice... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  2. Planning pitfalls

    Treesearch

    James H. Freeman

    1977-01-01

    The subject this morning is planning and the problems peculiar to planning for management on public lands. As I am sure you know, we could devote entire seminars to problems encountered in planning. However, within the scope of the program today, we have the opportunity to touch briefly on some of the more important highlights of planning with the focus on major...

  3. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  4. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  5. 76 FR 66717 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... AGENCY Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee Air Monitoring and Methods Subcommittee AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... announces a public teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Air Monitoring and...

  6. 76 FR 47271 - Implementation of Scientific Integrity Principles: Draft Plan for Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... public relations activities. A principal goal of public affairs is to help NSF most efficiently achieve... Implementation of Scientific Integrity Principles: Draft Plan for Public Comment AGENCY: National Science...: Draft Plan for Public Comment. SUMMARY: On March 9, 2009, President Obama issued a Memorandum for...

  7. Critical appraisal of scientific articles: part 1 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Röhrig, Bernd; Blettner, Maria

    2009-02-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, one of the most important skills a physician needs is the ability to analyze scientific literature critically. This is necessary to keep medical knowledge up to date and to ensure optimal patient care. The aim of this paper is to present an accessible introduction into critical appraisal of scientific articles. Using a selection of international literature, the reader is introduced to the principles of critical reading of scientific articles in medicine. For the sake of conciseness, detailed description of statistical methods is omitted. Widely accepted principles for critically appraising scientific articles are outlined. Basic knowledge of study design, structuring of an article, the role of different sections, of statistical presentations as well as sources of error and limitation are presented. The reader does not require extensive methodological knowledge. As far as necessary for critical appraisal of scientific articles, differences in research areas like epidemiology, clinical, and basic research are outlined. Further useful references are presented. Basic methodological knowledge is required to select and interpret scientific articles correctly.

  8. Factors influencing publication of scientific articles derived from masters theses in public health.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Malen; Borrell, Carme; Garin, Olatz; Fernández, Esteve; Alonso, Jordi

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate theses of a Masters program in Public Health (MPH), in terms of the students' and theses' characteristics that influence publication of the thesis as a scientific article. Longitudinal study of students who successfully completed the MPH at Universitat Pompeu Fabra and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain) from 2006 to 2010. Participants completed an electronic survey and additional data were gathered from university files. 162 students participated in the study (83 % response rate). 60.5 % had already published an article derived from their thesis at the time of the study or were in process of publishing it. The likelihood of publishing in a peer-reviewed journal was greater among women (aRR = 1.41), among those who had a bachelor's degree in sciences other than health (aRR = 1.40), had completed the MPH on time (aRR = 2.10), had enrolled in a doctoral program after the MPH (aRR = 1.44) or had a masters thesis score of ≥7 (aRR = 1.61). The majority of MPH students published their thesis in a peer-reviewed journal. The strongest predictors of successful publication were related to academic performance.

  9. [Preparing a manuscript for publication in a scientific journal].

    PubMed

    Claes, L; Rosenbaum, D

    1999-05-01

    Nowadays scientific publishing in peer reviewed international accepted journals is not easy. Rejection rates up to 75% occur. The aim of this paper is to provide guidance in the preparation of journal papers for the inexperienced scientific writer. The traditional paragraphs Abstract, Introduction, Material and Methods, Results, and Discussion are described with respect to its contents and basic message and how these sections are designed to build a logical flow. Approved suggestions for the structural outline of each paragraph are made. The significance of reference list, figures, and tables is also explained. The review of a manuscript is discussed and the criterias for acceptance of a journal paper are indicated.

  10. Implicit normativity in scientific advice: values in nutrition scientists' decisions to give public advice.

    PubMed

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Andersen, Hanne; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on implicit normative considerations underlying scientific advice -- those normative questions, decisions, or issues that scientific advisers and the general public are not fully aware of but that nevertheless have implications for the character of the advice given. Using nutritional science as an example, we identify three such implicit normative issues. The first concerns the aim of scientific advice: whether it is about avoiding harm or promoting good. The second concerns the intended beneficiaries of the advice: whether advice should be framed to benefit the society as a whole or with special concern for the most vulnerable members of the population. The third consideration involves scientific advisers' attempts to balance the strengths of the scientific evidence with the expected consequences of scientific advice. We hope to promote more explicit discussion of these issues among scientific advisers and a wider public.

  11. [Impact of scientific publications of German otorhinolaryngologist in international comparison].

    PubMed

    Godau, S; Finkensieper, M; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2012-11-01

    The value of German publications in otorhinolaryngology in comparison to the international community has not been analyzed in detail yet. Using the Web of Science ® data base a quantitative bibliometric analysis of publications in the field of otorhinolaryngology was performed for the years 2000-2010. We compared countries, institutions and individual authors in relation to the whole field of otorhinolaryngology and to special topics. 57 157 ENT-publications were identified for the period between 2000 and 2010. The second most number, 12 % of the publications came from Germany. Ranking the authors with most publications, 6 German scientists could be found on the fi rst 20 ranks. USA, Japan, and Germany were the dominating countries looking on publication for the subspecialties. From Germany originated the most publications for the topics smell and taste disorders. Publications form German institutions in the field of clinical and experimental otorhinolaryngology have a high impact in international comparison. German authors could be found in all subspecialties of otorhinolaryngology on the top 3 places. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Public health care in Europe: moral aspirations, ideological obsessions, and structural pitfalls in a post-enlightenment culture.

    PubMed

    Azguridienė, Guoda; Delkeskamp-Hayes, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    This essay focuses on the challenge European states have imposed on themselves, namely, to provide state-of-the-art health care equally to all and for less than market price. Continued endorsement of that challenge in these states hinges on their character as media democracies: the public is moved by a supposed morally warranted expectation that all should receive adequate health care at no significant personal cost. The structural and economic constraints that hamper such forms of healthcare delivery result in systems that are financially inefficient and fail to provide the quality of treatment patients are led to expect. This essay examines the tension between secular moral claims to social solidarity and the actual limits of accessibility to healthcare services. Its critical focus addresses both the difficulties that result from politicians invoking high moral ideals while framing their decisions around short-term political advantage, and the transformation of the Enlightenment's secular aspirations into a political ideology that distorts such moral ideals. This essay concludes that the commitments to very particular notions of equality and human dignity, which frame contemporary Europe's provision of publicly subsidized health care, have given rise to a governance that is morally incoherent and unsustainable. This failure of public health care in Europe can thus be read as one more belated manifestation of the epistemological and moral failure of the Enlightenment's secularizing project, a failure which should invite contemporary Europeans to honestly face the moral challenge of postmodernity.

  13. 76 FR 77235 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal... of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC, HHS, 1600 Clifton Road NE...

  14. 78 FR 40743 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Board of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response, Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC OPHPR) In accordance with... Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR... Address Contact Person for More Information: Marquita Black, Office of Science and Public Health Practice...

  15. 78 FR 69682 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal... of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC, HHS, 1600 Clifton Road, NE...

  16. Turkish endocrine surgery publications in international scientific journals.

    PubMed

    Demir, Batuhan; Alçı, Erman; Hasanov, Ruslan; Mulailua, Kilongo; Makay, Özer; Koçak, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, major progress has been made in the field of endocrine surgery in Turkey, similar to that in the rest of the world. Parallel to these developments, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications in the related field. Our study aimed to evaluate Turkey's publications related to endocrine surgery in the international arena. Members of the general surgery departments from academic centers in Turkey were determined. Using these member names, a PubMed search was performed for English papers related to "endocrine surgery." For searching papers from non-academic centers, the same engine was used. To reach manuscripts possibly missed by the PubMed search, 3 national calls were made through the website of the Turkish Society of Endocrine Surgery. The obtained papers were divided into "thyroid," "parathyroid," "adrenal," and "neuroendocrine tumors" and were listed according to the publication year. In addition, all manuscripts were listed according to the publishing journal and the 2012 impact factor of that journal. This study did not require ethical approval, because it did not involve evaluation of experimental or patient data. A search of Turkish general surgery clinics revealed 497 international publications, between 1976 and 2012. When listed according to the year of publication, most publications were found to be in the year 2009. Papers appeared mostly in "Surgery Today." The mean impact factor of the journals where the papers have been published was 1.9 (0.1-13.8). The rates of thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal tissue and neuroendocrine tumors related publications were 69%, 10%, 15% and 6%, respectively. Since this study is not an experimental study or a study related to patient data, we did not apply for ethical approval. The contribution of Turkish general surgeons' to world science is apparent when evaluated in terms of publications related to endocrine surgery until recently. Particularly, since 2002, with the increase in the

  17. Self-correction in biomedical publications and the scientific impact

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A.; Kitas, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To analyze mistakes and misconduct in multidisciplinary and specialized biomedical journals. Methods We conducted searches through PubMed to retrieve errata, duplicate, and retracted publications (as of January 30, 2014). To analyze publication activity and citation profiles of countries, multidisciplinary, and specialized biomedical journals, we referred to the latest data from the SCImago Journal & Country Rank database. Total number of indexed articles and values of the h-index of the fifty most productive countries and multidisciplinary journals were recorded and linked to the number of duplicate and retracted publications in PubMed. Results Our analysis found 2597 correction items. A striking increase in the number of corrections appeared in 2013, which is mainly due to 871 (85.3%) corrections from PLOS One. The number of duplicate publications was 1086. Articles frequently published in duplicate were reviews (15.6%), original studies (12.6%), and case reports (7.6%), whereas top three retracted articles were original studies (10.1%), randomized trials (8.8%), and reviews (7%). A strong association existed between the total number of publications across countries and duplicate (rs = 0.86, P < 0.001) and retracted items (rs = 0.812, P < 0.001). A similar trend was found between country-based h-index values and duplicate and retracted publications. Conclusion The study suggests that the intensified self-correction in biomedicine is due to the attention of readers and authors, who spot errors in their hub of evidence-based information. Digitization and open access confound the staggering increase in correction notices and retractions. PMID:24577829

  18. Self-correction in biomedical publications and the scientific impact.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A; Kitas, George D

    2014-02-01

    To analyze mistakes and misconduct in multidisciplinary and specialized biomedical journals. We conducted searches through PubMed to retrieve errata, duplicate, and retracted publications (as of January 30, 2014). To analyze publication activity and citation profiles of countries, multidisciplinary, and specialized biomedical journals, we referred to the latest data from the SCImago Journal and Country Rank database. Total number of indexed articles and values of the h-index of the fifty most productive countries and multidisciplinary journals were recorded and linked to the number of duplicate and retracted publications in PubMed. Our analysis found 2597 correction items. A striking increase in the number of corrections appeared in 2013, which is mainly due to 871 (85.3%) corrections from PLOS One. The number of duplicate publications was 1086. Articles frequently published in duplicate were reviews (15.6%), original studies (12.6%), and case reports (7.6%), whereas top three retracted articles were original studies (10.1%), randomized trials (8.8%), and reviews (7%). A strong association existed between the total number of publications across countries and duplicate (rs=0.86, P<0.0001) and retracted items (rs=0.812, P<0.0001). A similar trend was found between country-based h-index values and duplicate and retracted publications. The study suggests that the intensified self-correction in biomedicine is due to the attention of readers and authors, who spot errors in their hub of evidence-based information. Digitization and open access confound the staggering increase in correction notices and retractions.

  19. Contested evidence: Exposure to competing scientific claims and public support for banning bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul R; Ley, Barbara L

    2014-05-01

    The public controversy surrounding bisphenol A (BPA) revolves around competing claims about what scientific evidence shows regarding the effects of the chemical on human health. This study uses an experiment embedded within a public opinion survey to test the effects of exposure to such claims on public support for banning the use of BPA in products. Exposure to the claim that "there is not enough scientific evidence that BPA harms human health" reduced support, whereas exposure to the claim that there "is enough scientific evidence" failed to increase support. No effect emerged among those simultaneously exposed to both claims. The "not enough evidence" claim influenced less educated respondents and women but not college-educated respondents or men. Aspects of the underlying structure of opinion also differed depending on which claim(s) respondents received. The results illuminate how members of the public respond to competing scientific claims regarding controversial issues.

  20. Mass Media and Global Warming: A Public Arenas Model of the Greenhouse Effect's Scientific Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuzil, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Uses the Public Arenas model to examine the historical roots of the greenhouse effect issue as communicated in scientific literature from the early 1800s to modern times. Utilizes a constructivist approach to discuss several possible explanations for the rise and fall of global warming as a social problem in the scientific arena. (PA)

  1. 77 FR 1677 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ..., and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review Methods for Efficacy... AGENCY FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the on-line instructions for...

  2. Seminar on Foci for Progress in Scientific Publications: A Summary and Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH.

    A one-day seminar was convened on November 4, 1969, to consider problems involved in communicating scientific information and the progress that has been made in improving the scientific publication mechanism. Thirty participants representing different types of information producers, users, and organizations contributed to the seminar discussion.…

  3. 76 FR 65722 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences; Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... AGENCY Notification of Two Public Teleconferences; Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY... Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) to discuss its draft review of EPA's Integrated Science... CASAC was established pursuant to the under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1977, codified at 42...

  4. Publication Bias ( The "File-Drawer Problem") in Scientific Inference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Publication bias arises whenever the probability that a study is published depends on the statistical significance of its results. This bias, often called the file-drawer effect since the unpublished results are imagined to be tucked away in researchers' file cabinets, is potentially a severe impediment to combining the statistical results of studies collected from the literature. With almost any reasonable quantitative model for publication bias, only a small number of studies lost in the file-drawer will produce a significant bias. This result contradicts the well known Fail Safe File Drawer (FSFD) method for setting limits on the potential harm of publication bias, widely used in social, medical and psychic research. This method incorrectly treats the file drawer as unbiased, and almost always miss-estimates the seriousness of publication bias. A large body of not only psychic research, but medical and social science studies, has mistakenly relied on this method to validate claimed discoveries. Statistical combination can be trusted only if it is known with certainty that all studies that have been carried out are included. Such certainty is virtually impossible to achieve in literature surveys.

  5. Using Astronomy to Promote a Scientific Culture in the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, O.

    2009-05-01

    The new ``Planetario Habana'' Cultural Centre for Science and Technology under construction is a joint project between the Office of the Historian of the City of Havana and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment of Cuba. The whole centre will be aimed at guiding the interest towards basic sciences and astronomical formation of the people, in the most populated and frequented area of the country. A key objective of this project shall be serving as an instructive motivation and entertainment for the casual or habitual visitors to these facilities, offering them the possibility to enjoy vivid representations, play with interactive amusement equipments and listen to instructive presentations on astronomy and related sciences guided by qualified specialists, professors and outstanding university students. Another fundamental purpose shall be the establishment of a plan for educational complementation in coordination with schools in order to allow children and young people to participate in activities enabling them to get into the fascinating world of Astronomy, Exploration of Outer Space and Life as Cosmic Phenomenon. The setting up of the ``Planetario Habana'' Cultural Centre for Science and Technology will show in function the GOTO Planetarium G Cuba custom obtained under a Japanese Cultural Grant Aid. This centre shall develop into a nonpareil pole in the national environment for the scientific outreach and education of these sciences. Surrounded by the attractiveness of the colonial ``ambience'' of the Old Town of Havana, it shall become a centre for dissemination of information about new discoveries and scientific programs developed at national and international level. Here we present a general view of the project, its objectives, and its present and future development.

  6. Open semantic annotation of scientific publications using DOMEO

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our group has developed a useful shared software framework for performing, versioning, sharing and viewing Web annotations of a number of kinds, using an open representation model. Methods The Domeo Annotation Tool was developed in tandem with this open model, the Annotation Ontology (AO). Development of both the Annotation Framework and the open model was driven by requirements of several different types of alpha users, including bench scientists and biomedical curators from university research labs, online scientific communities, publishing and pharmaceutical companies. Several use cases were incrementally implemented by the toolkit. These use cases in biomedical communications include personal note-taking, group document annotation, semantic tagging, claim-evidence-context extraction, reagent tagging, and curation of textmining results from entity extraction algorithms. Results We report on the Domeo user interface here. Domeo has been deployed in beta release as part of the NIH Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF, http://www.neuinfo.org) and is scheduled for production deployment in the NIF’s next full release. Future papers will describe other aspects of this work in detail, including Annotation Framework Services and components for integrating with external textmining services, such as the NCBO Annotator web service, and with other textmining applications using the Apache UIMA framework. PMID:22541592

  7. Analysis of Scientific Publication Networks among Medical Schools in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Oh; Park, Seo Hyun

    2010-06-01

    This research was intended to analyze the special characteristics and structure of social networks among Korean medical schools for the purpose of providing knowledge regarding medical field structure, dynamics, and potential paradigm development. A collaborative 12-year data set of 35,469 published articles in the SCOPUS® database was analyzed. Among ISI subcategories, 61 having more than 20 articles were scrutinized. Following identification of correspondence and co-authorship, centralization indices and Key Player analysis were run for each subcategory. Medical schools were grouped into uniform clusters with convergence of iterated correlation (CONCOR) for structural equivalence. Finally, multidimensional scaling was used to visualize similarities. All centralization indexes analyzed demonstrated a shift in the degree of centralization in the network of medical schools throughout the period examined. Betweenness centrality and eigenvector centrality in particular revealed a dramatic change indicating minimization of the role of a specific "gatekeeper". Key Player analysis confirmed Seoul National University as a constant 'key player' throughout the period evaluated and for the subcategories examined as well. This study provided insight into the scientific network among the medical schools of Korea. By understanding this network, a strategy to strengthen the basis of research may be developed.

  8. Guide for the Preparation of Scientific Papers for Publication. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsson, Anders

    Updating a 1968 publication, this document presents rules and explanatory comments for use by authors and editors involved in the preparation of a scientific manuscript for professional typesetting prior to publication. It is noted that the guidelines should also be useful for authors producing camera-ready typescript with word processing…

  9. 75 FR 16817 - 2010 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Resistance Monitoring System; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... announcing a public meeting entitled ``2010 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System.'' The topic to be discussed is the results from the National Antimicrobial Resistance...

  10. Offshore scientific and technical publications, February-July, Spring 1989. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The catalog lists all current (1987-1989) scientific and technical publications of the Offshore Minerals Management Program. The catalog is updated and released on a quarterly basis in winter, spring, summer, and fall. Publications available after July 21, 1989, will be listed in the next issue.

  11. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  12. The Influence of Publication Delays on the Observed Aging Distribution of Scientific Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the influence of publication delays on the aging of scientific literature and explains how the undisturbed aging function and the publication delay combine to give the observed aging function through a mathematical operation called convolution. Shows the convolution of various distributions and considers a paradox between theory and real…

  13. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  14. Dietary sodium intake: scientific basis for public policy.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    National and international agencies recommend a reduction in dietary sodium intake. However, some have questioned the wisdom of these policies. The goal of this report was to assess the findings and quality of studies that have examined the relationship between dietary sodium and both blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Literature review of the available observational studies and randomized controlled trials, including systematic reviews and meta-analyses. A large body of evidence from observational studies and clinical trials documents a direct relationship between dietary sodium intake and the level of blood pressure, especially in persons with a higher level of blood pressure, African-Americans, and those who are older or have comorbidity, including chronic kidney disease. A majority of the available observational reports support the presence of a direct relationship between dietary sodium intake and cardiovascular disease but the quality of the evidence according to most studies is poor. The limited information available from clinical trials is consistent with a beneficial effect of reduced sodium intake on incidence of cardiovascular disease. The scientific underpinning for policies to reduce the usual intake of dietary sodium is strong. In the United States and many other countries, addition of sodium during food processing has led to a very high average intake of dietary sodium, with almost everyone exceeding the recommended goals. National programs utilizing voluntary and mandatory approaches have resulted in a successful reduction in sodium intake. Even a small reduction in sodium consumption is likely to yield sizable improvement in population health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Publication bias in papers presented to the Australian Orthopaedic Association Annual Scientific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian A; Mourad, Mohamed S; Kadir, Agus; Solomon, Michael J; Young, Jane M

    2006-06-01

    The selective publication of articles based on factors, such as positive outcome, statistical significance and study size is known as publication bias. If publication bias is present, any clinical decision based on a review of the published work will also be biased. Publication bias has been shown in various specialties, based on review of publication rates for abstracts presented at major scientific meetings. This study was conducted to investigate publication bias in orthopaedics. Abstracts presented at the 1998 Australian Orthopaedic Association Annual Scientific Meeting were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Details of sample size, study setting, country of origin, outcome and study type were recorded for each abstract. Publication within 5 years was ascertained by electronic searching of Medline and Embase databases and direct author contact. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of publication. The overall publication rate was 31%. Publication was more likely if the study was a laboratory study, rather than a clinical study (odds ratio (OR), 3.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-7.01, P < 0.001). Sample size, country of origin, study type, statistical significance and positive outcome were not significantly associated with publication. According to this study, laboratory studies were significantly more likely to be published than clinical studies. In contrast to previous studies, publication bias due to the selective publication of papers with a positive outcome or those reporting statistical significance was not found.

  16. Scientific publications in international anaesthesiology journals: a 10-year survey.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Qiu, L-X; Wu, F-X; Yang, L-Q; Sun, S; Yu, W F

    2011-03-01

    Significant growth has been seen in the field of anaesthesiology in recent decades. The current geographic distribution of the publications on anaesthesia research may be different from ten years ago. We performed this literature survey to examine the national origin of articles published in international anaesthesiology journals and to evaluate their contribution to anaesthesia research. Articles published in 18 major anaesthesiology journals from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the PubMed database and the Science Citation Index. A total of 30,191 articles were published in the selected 18 journals from 2000 to 2009. The country responsible for the largest number of articles was the United States of America (29.4%), followed by the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Canada, Australia and France. Denmark, Switzerland and Finland had the largest number of articles per capita. Anesthesia & Analgesia published the most number of articles from 2000 to 2009, followed by Anesthesiology, Pain and the British Journal of Anaesthesia. The numbers of clinical studies and randomised controlled trials decreased markedly from 2000 to 2009.

  17. [Scientific and technical publications of the Institute of Medical Research and Occupational Health 1988-1993].

    PubMed

    Simeon-Rudolf, V; Kosicek, M

    1995-09-01

    The bibliographic output of the Institute over an eight-year period (1988-1993) was classified into nine categories: scientific papers published in journals covered by Current Contents, scientific papers covered by other secondary publications, scientific papers in journals not covered by non-selective secondary or tertiary publications, congress communications, congress abstracts, technical papers, chapters in books, books and theses. The number of the Institute's staff, their academic degrees and professions were also recorded. The ratio between the number of papers and the number of scientists was calculated and compared to the ratio in the previous years and in some other research institutions in the country. An increase was observed in the Institute production of scientific papers in international journals. The papers were published in journals covered by all seven Current Contents editions. Most papers were in journals which were covered by the Life Sciences edition of Current Contents.

  18. Science for the Public Good: Tackling scientific integrity in the federal government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, G. T.; Halpern, M.; Johnson, C.

    2016-12-01

    From hydraulic fracturing to climate change to seismic risk, government science and scientists are integral to public decision making in the geosciences. Following calls for increased scientific integrity across the government, policies have been put in place in recent years to be promote transparency and appropriate use of science in government decision making. But how effective have these initiatives been? With the development of scientific integrity policies, new transparency measures, and other efforts in recent years, are we seeing improvements in how federal agencies use science? And importantly, can these safeguards prevent potential future breaches of scientific integrity and misuse science for political gain? Review of recent progress and problems around government scientific integrity, including case studies, policy assessments, and surveys of federal scientists, can shed light on how far the we have come and what areas still need improvement to ensure that government scientific integrity is preserved in the future.

  19. [History in the public communication of specialist scientific societies: history marketing].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Halling, T; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2014-10-01

    History is nowadays used as an economic factor. The past is therefore specifically targeted and cultivated, which for specialist scientific associations and societies often fullfils totally different functions in comparison to the open market, although the techniques and requirements are similar. Within medical specialties these facts are often still unknown. Museums and archives as well as the historians and curators working in them are very familiar with the special cultures of communication within these scientific communities and they play a major role in the establishment and development of history as a modern part of public relations and public identity.

  20. Leaping "out of the doubt"--nutrition advice: values at stake in communicating scientific uncertainty to the public.

    PubMed

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-06-01

    This article deals with scientific advice to the public where the relevant science is subject to public attention and uncertainty of knowledge. It focuses on a tension in the management and presentation of scientific uncertainty between the uncertain nature of science and the expectation that scientific advisers will provide clear public guidance. In the first part of the paper the tension is illustrated by the presentation of results from a recent interview study with nutrition scientists in Denmark. According to the study, nutrition scientists feel their roles as ''public advisers'' and ''scientists'' differ in that the former involves an expectation that they will provide unambiguous advice of the kind that might relegate scientific uncertainty to the background. In the second, more general, part of the paper we provide a normative analysis of different strategies of dealing with the tension. The analysis is structured around the extremes of either total concealment or full openness regarding scientific uncertainty. The result of analysis is that scientific advisers should not simply ''feed'' scientific conclusions to the public. They should rather attempt to promote the ability and willingness of the public to assess and scrutinize scientific knowledge by displaying uncertainties in the scientific basis of advice. On the other hand, scientific advisers must accommodate the public's need for guidance. Such guidance should be restricted by careful consideration of what it is relevant for the public to know in order to evaluate scientific advice in practical terms.

  1. Trusted Sources: The Role Scientific Societies Can Play in Improving Public Opinions on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, C.; Cairns, A.; Buhrman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Public acceptance of the scientific consensus regarding climate change has eroded and misinformation designed to confuse the public is rapidly proliferating. Those issues, combined with an increase of politically motivated attacks on climate scientists and their research, have led to a place where ideology can trump scientific consensus as the foundation for developing policy solutions. The scientific community has been, thus far, unprepared to respond effectively to these developments. However, as a scientific society whose members engage in climate science research, and one whose organizational mission and vision are centered on the concepts of science for the benefit of humanity and ensuring a sustainable future, the American Geophysical Union can, and should, play an important role in reversing this trend. To that end, in 2011, AGU convened a Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication, in which presidents, executive directors, and senior public policy staff from 17 scientific organizations engaged with experts in the social sciences regarding effective communication of climate science and with practitioners from agriculture, energy, and the military. The discussions focused on three key issues: the environment of climate science communication; public understanding of climate change; and the perspectives of consumers of climate science-based information who work with specific audiences. Participants diagnosed previous challenges and failings, enumerated the key constituencies that need to be effectively engaged, and identified the critical role played by cultural cognition—the influence of group values, particularly around equality and authority, individualism, and community; and the perceptions of risk. Since that meeting, AGU has consistently worked to identify and explore ways that it, and its members, and improve the effectiveness of their communication with the public about climate change. This presentation will focus on the insights AGU has

  2. Trends in scientific publications of Indian spine surgeons over 14 years (2000–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Falavigna, Asdrubal; da Silva, Pedro Guarise; Quadros, Francine Wurzius; Merlin, Luiz Henrique; Radaelli, Lucas; Guyot, Juan Pablo; Dozza, Diego; Riew, Daniel K; Martins, Délio; Yoshiharu, Kawaguchi; Rajasekaran, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number and quality of scientific publications reflects the standards of scientific research in a country. However, the contribution of Indian spine surgeons toward global publications is unknown. The goal is to study the publications of Indian spine surgeons between 2000 and 2013. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the publications by Indian spine surgeons was performed using MEDLINE. The search terms used were India and several spine-related terminologies. The main information of the selected papers including the year of publication, scientific journal, type of pathology studied, Neurosurgical or Orthopedic Department where the study was done, type of study, and the type of article was analyzed. Results: A total of 4459 articles were identified using MEDLINE and after exclusion, 507 articles were analyzed. A growth of 440% in the number of publications was observed in the period between 2009 and 2013, during which 60.15% of the articles were published. Clinical studies (n = 492; 97.04) were the most common types of articles, followed by experimental studies and other types. The Neurosurgery department published the majority of the articles (58.2%). The three most common pathologies studied were spinal tumors (17.35%), surgical technique (15.4%), and spinal infection (15.2%). Conclusion: The current study shows that publications in the field of spine surgery have been increasing in the last few years, although it is less. Further efforts such as research training of spine surgeons, inducing collaborations and formulation of multicenter projects and periodically allocating adequate funds are key factors to improve the scientific publications from India. PMID:27293295

  3. Trends in scientific publications of Indian spine surgeons over 14 years (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Falavigna, Asdrubal; da Silva, Pedro Guarise; Quadros, Francine Wurzius; Merlin, Luiz Henrique; Radaelli, Lucas; Guyot, Juan Pablo; Dozza, Diego; Riew, Daniel K; Martins, Délio; Yoshiharu, Kawaguchi; Rajasekaran, S

    2016-01-01

    The number and quality of scientific publications reflects the standards of scientific research in a country. However, the contribution of Indian spine surgeons toward global publications is unknown. The goal is to study the publications of Indian spine surgeons between 2000 and 2013. A literature search of the publications by Indian spine surgeons was performed using MEDLINE. The search terms used were India and several spine-related terminologies. The main information of the selected papers including the year of publication, scientific journal, type of pathology studied, Neurosurgical or Orthopedic Department where the study was done, type of study, and the type of article was analyzed. A total of 4459 articles were identified using MEDLINE and after exclusion, 507 articles were analyzed. A growth of 440% in the number of publications was observed in the period between 2009 and 2013, during which 60.15% of the articles were published. Clinical studies (n = 492; 97.04) were the most common types of articles, followed by experimental studies and other types. The Neurosurgery department published the majority of the articles (58.2%). The three most common pathologies studied were spinal tumors (17.35%), surgical technique (15.4%), and spinal infection (15.2%). The current study shows that publications in the field of spine surgery have been increasing in the last few years, although it is less. Further efforts such as research training of spine surgeons, inducing collaborations and formulation of multicenter projects and periodically allocating adequate funds are key factors to improve the scientific publications from India.

  4. Journal Aspirations: Improving Scientific Writing and Publication Through a Writing Mentorship Program

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2017-01-01

    Looking to help novice scientific writers improve their skills and enhance the likelihood of scientific publication, the IJTMB launched a writing mentorship program. Research indicates that when novice writers have a mentor and work on writing as a team, the authors can gain self-efficacy, manuscripts are improved, thoughts and writing are clarified, and differing perspectives are added. This editorial identifies the process for being recommended to use a writing mentor, discusses recommendations in the forming of a mentor/mentee relationship, describes the qualities of good mentors and mentees, and offers suggestions for improving writing for scientific publication. As our database of writing mentors grows, we encourage those who join this program both as mentors and as mentees to consider what it means to be in these roles. It is my hope that the suggestions herein help in developing these relationships. PMID:28690702

  5. [How to increase the visibility of your scientific publication on the Internet?].

    PubMed

    Maczuga, Justyna; Przyłuska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    New technologies compel the scientists to change their thinking about dissemination of their own publications. In the time of rapid information exchange scientific papers should be available to the largest possible audience, it is therefore of vital importance to prepare them properly. The authors present the ways how to optimize the visibility of scientific publications on the Internet by the use of appropriate choice of words in the title, summary and key words. They discuss the mechanisms of indexing in scientific search engines and bibliographic-abstract databases showing at the same time how to use them in drawing up the paper. They also give an example of two summaries of the same article. The first one comprises the elements of academic search engine optimization (ASEO) while the other one does not follow these principles in the article description.

  6. Media Violence and the American Public: Scientific Facts versus Media Misinformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushman, Brad J.; Anderson, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how news coverage on the connections between media violence and aggression have left the public confused, examining whether media violence mirrors real world violence and how news reports about media violence and aggression have changed over time. Highlights the entertainment industry and scientific community, discussing why they often…

  7. 76 FR 36544 - Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... produced by the consumption of that tobacco product, that may affect a disease or health-related condition... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product... of public workshop; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for...

  8. Presenting Global Warming and Evolution as Public Health Issues to Encourage Acceptance of Scientific Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Shawn K.; McArthur, Laurence B.; Mabry, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Although evidence supporting anthropogenic global warming and evolution by natural selection is considerable, the public does not embrace these concepts. The current study explores the hypothesis that individuals will become more receptive to scientific viewpoints if evidence for evolution and implications of global warming are presented as issues…

  9. Media Violence and the American Public: Scientific Facts versus Media Misinformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushman, Brad J.; Anderson, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how news coverage on the connections between media violence and aggression have left the public confused, examining whether media violence mirrors real world violence and how news reports about media violence and aggression have changed over time. Highlights the entertainment industry and scientific community, discussing why they often…

  10. English as an International Language of Scientific Publication: A Study of Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Gibson; Perez-Llantada, Carmen; Plo, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on an issue attracting increasing attention: the possible disadvantage inflicted on non-Anglophone academics by the dominance of English in scientific publication and academic exchange. We critically review the evidence for linguistic disadvantage, noting some of its limitations, and critique the native/non-native distinction as…

  11. 75 FR 22783 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: There will be a 1-day meeting of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide...

  12. English as an International Language of Scientific Publication: A Study of Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Gibson; Perez-Llantada, Carmen; Plo, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on an issue attracting increasing attention: the possible disadvantage inflicted on non-Anglophone academics by the dominance of English in scientific publication and academic exchange. We critically review the evidence for linguistic disadvantage, noting some of its limitations, and critique the native/non-native distinction as…

  13. Attitude of Indian dental professionals toward scientific publications: A questionnaire based study.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pradhuman; Sachdeva, Suresh K; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Khosa, Rameen; Basavraju, Suman; Dutta, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Due to competitiveness and academic benefits, most dental professionals feel an urgent need to increase their publications. Hence, we explored the attitude of students and faculty members toward scientific publications through a questionnaire. A questionnaire consisting of 13 questions was sent by e-mails and posting the printed copies to dental postgraduate (PG) students (second and third year) and faculty members (n = 500 each). The returned completed questionnaires were analyzed. About 37% of dental PG faculty and 35.6% PG students responded to the questionnaire, with overall response of 72.6%. Among the PG faculty, professors (P) had more scientific publications, followed by senior lecturers (SL) and readers (R). The publications as first or corresponding author were less among both faculty and PG students while co-authorship was more among PG students compared to faculty members. Awareness about the term "plagiarism" was overall high and relatively highest among R, followed by SL, P and PG students. The percentage of publications in fee charging journals was more among PG students than faculty members and self-funding for publication was observed in 86.4% of PG students and 94-100% among faculty members. About 72.6% of dental professionals were involved in publishing of their research work and the number of publications increased steadily with an increase in their academic experience. All the dental professionals concurred publications as the criteria for academic excellence.

  14. Attitude of Indian dental professionals toward scientific publications: A questionnaire based study

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pradhuman; Sachdeva, Suresh K.; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Khosa, Rameen; Basavraju, Suman; Dutta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to competitiveness and academic benefits, most dental professionals feel an urgent need to increase their publications. Hence, we explored the attitude of students and faculty members toward scientific publications through a questionnaire. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 13 questions was sent by e-mails and posting the printed copies to dental postgraduate (PG) students (second and third year) and faculty members (n = 500 each). The returned completed questionnaires were analyzed. Results: About 37% of dental PG faculty and 35.6% PG students responded to the questionnaire, with overall response of 72.6%. Among the PG faculty, professors (P) had more scientific publications, followed by senior lecturers (SL) and readers (R). The publications as first or corresponding author were less among both faculty and PG students while co-authorship was more among PG students compared to faculty members. Awareness about the term “plagiarism” was overall high and relatively highest among R, followed by SL, P and PG students. The percentage of publications in fee charging journals was more among PG students than faculty members and self-funding for publication was observed in 86.4% of PG students and 94-100% among faculty members. Conclusion: About 72.6% of dental professionals were involved in publishing of their research work and the number of publications increased steadily with an increase in their academic experience. All the dental professionals concurred publications as the criteria for academic excellence. PMID:26604598

  15. Seven PC Purchasing Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    1997-01-01

    Explores how to avoid common pitfalls when schools purchase computer equipment. Purchasing tips are provided in the areas of choosing multiple platforms, buying the cheapest model available, choosing a proprietary design, falling for untested technology, purchasing systems that are not upgradable, ignoring extended warranties, and failing to plan…

  16. Media violence and the American public. Scientific facts versus media misinformation.

    PubMed

    Bushman, B J; Anderson, C A

    2001-01-01

    Fifty years of news coverage on the link between media violence and aggression have left the U.S. public confused. Typical news articles pit researchers and child advocates against entertainment industry representatives, frequently giving equal weight to the arguments of both sides. A comparison of news reports and scientific knowledge about media effects reveals a disturbing discontinuity: Over the past 50 years, the average news report has changed from claims of a weak link to a moderate link and then back to a weak link between media violence and aggression. However, since 1975, the scientific confidence and statistical magnitude of this link have been clearly positive and have consistently increased over time. Reasons for this discontinuity between news reports and the actual state of scientific knowledge include the vested interests of the news, a misapplied fairness doctrine in news reporting, and the failure of the research community to effectively argue the scientific case.

  17. Does the public communication of science influence scientific vocation? Results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Stekolschik, Gabriel; Draghi, Cecilia; Adaszko, Dan; Gallardo, Susana

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine if public communication of science and technology (PCST) has any influence on people's decision to become dedicated to scientific research. For this reason, a national survey involving 852 researchers from all disciplines was conducted in Argentina. The results showed that the factors affecting scientific vocation are many, and that, regardless of differences in gender, age or discipline, the greatest influence on the decision to go into scientific research is exerted by teachers. The analysis also demonstrated that different manifestations of PCST (science books, press articles, audiovisual material, and activities such as visits to science museums) play a significant role in awakening the vocation for science. From these results it may be stated that PCST--in addition to its function of informing and forming citizens--exerts a significant influence in fostering scientific vocation.

  18. Scientific authority in policy contexts: Public attitudes about environmental scientists, medical researchers, and economists.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Timothy L

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses data from the US General Social Survey to examine public support for scientists in policy contexts and its link to scientific disciplines. An analysis of attitudes about the amount of influence that environmental scientists, two kinds of medical researchers, and economists should have over policy decisions reveals that in each discipline the extent to which scientists are thought to serve the nation's best interests is the strongest determinant of attitudes about scientists as policy advisors. Perceptions of scientists' technical knowledge and the level of consensus in the scientific community also have direct, albeit weaker effects on opinions about scientists' appropriate roles in policy settings. Whereas previous research has stressed the importance of local variability in understanding the transfer of scientific authority across institutional boundaries, these results point to considerable homogeneity in the social bases of scientific authority in policy contexts.

  19. The annotation and the usage of scientific databases could be improved with public issue tracker software

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Olio, Giovanni Marco; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Laayouni, Hafid

    2010-01-01

    Since the publication of their longtime predecessor The Atlas of Protein Sequences and Structures in 1965 by Margaret Dayhoff, scientific databases have become a key factor in the organization of modern science. All the information and knowledge described in the novel scientific literature is translated into entries in many different scientific databases, making it possible to obtain very accurate information on a biological entity like genes or proteins without having to manually review the literature on it. However, even for the databases with the finest annotation procedures, errors or unclear parts sometimes appear in the publicly released version and influence the research of unaware scientists using them. The researcher that finds an error in a database is often left in a uncertain state, and often abandons the effort of reporting it because of a lack of a standard procedure to do so. In the present work, we propose that the simple adoption of a public error tracker application, as in many open software projects, could improve the quality of the annotations in many databases and encourage feedback from the scientific community on the data annotated publicly. In order to illustrate the situation, we describe a series of errors that we found and helped solve on the genes of a very well-known pathway in various biomedically relevant databases. We would like to show that, even if a majority of the most important scientific databases have procedures for reporting errors, these are usually not publicly visible, making the process of reporting errors time consuming and not useful. Also, the effort made by the user that reports the error often goes unacknowledged, putting him in a discouraging position. PMID:21186182

  20. The Space Apps Challenge: Using Open Innovation Competitions to Engage The Public in the Scientific Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Space Apps Challenge encourages innovation, creativity and collaborative problem solving by gathering coders, builders, artists, designers, and storytellers in a 48-hour hackathon. Open Innovation competitions such as the Space Apps Challenge bring the scientific world to members of the public, regardless of age, experience, credentials, or expertise. In the past five years, this model of public engagement has been widely employed by government, nonprofit and academic institutions, allowing the building of partnerships between the scientific community and the individuals and communities they serve. Furthermore, advances in technology and challenge models have lowered the barriers and costs to scientific collaboration with and for the public. NASA's Space Apps Challenge, structured as a competition seeking solutions from the public to posed problems, brings together teams and forges collaborations between individuals and groups who would otherwise have never worked together for a short but high intensity problem solving session, Space Apps has has created a pathway to public engagement and innovation that is often faster, cheaper, and more impactful than traditional approaches.

  1. Publication trends in newspapers and scientific journals for SSRIs and suicidality: a systematic longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J F; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A K; van Thiel, G J M W; Belitser, S V; Raaijmakers, J A M

    2011-01-01

    Background In the period 2003–2008, the regulatory authorities issued several warnings restricting the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in paediatrics, in reaction to safety concerns regarding the risk of suicidality. In this study, the SSRIs and suicidality controversy serves as a template to analyse the long-term publication trends regarding the benefit/risk profile of medications. The aim is to ascertain differences (in terms of numbers, categories and timing) between negative and positive newspaper and journal articles on SSRIs and suicidality and to ascertain correlations between changes in the reports and regulatory warnings. Methods A systematic review of scientific articles (Embase) and the Netherlands (NL) and the UK newspapers (LexisNexis) was performed between 2000 and 2010. Categorisation was done by ‘effect’ (related treatment effect), ‘type of article’ and ‘age group’. The articles' positive-to-negative effect ratio was determined. Differences in distribution of effect categories were analysed across sources, type of article and age group using the Mann–Whitney (two subgroups) or Kruskal–Wallis test (three or more). Findings In total, 1141 articles were categorised: 352 scientific, 224 Dutch and 565 British newspaper articles. Scientific articles were predominantly on research and were positive, whereas newspaper articles were negative (ratios=3.50—scientific, 0.69—NL and 0.94—UK; p<0.001). Articles on paediatrics were less positive in scientific journals and more negative in newspapers (ratios=2.29—scientific, 0.26—NL and 0.20—UK; p<0.001), while articles on adults were positive overall (ratios=10.0—scientific, 1.06—NL and 1.70—UK; p<0.001). In addition, negative-effect reporting trends were exacerbated following regulatory warnings and were generally opinion articles, both in scientific journals and in newspapers (2003/2004 and after 2007). Interpretation The authors found a positive

  2. Fostering public health awareness on risks in contaminated sites. Capacity building and dissemination of scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Paola; Pasetto, Roberto; Marsili, Daniela; Comba, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the multidisciplinary nature of public health and the need to develop target oriented capacity building and dissemination plans taking into account both scientific evidence and the information needs of the different stakeholders. In particular, issues regarding stakeholders' involvement in epidemiological studies in contaminated sites, considering their different levels of awareness on risk characterization and management, are discussed. In a public health perspective, the main stakeholders in contaminated sites are researchers and public health officers, risk managers and policy makers, population residing in the contaminated areas, environmental associations, patient's organizations. The different components of a dissemination strategy addressed to different stakeholders are analyzed with the objective to create awareness and preparedness to facilitate management in contaminated sites, foster scientific knowledge and informed decisions to consolidate risk perception through science-driven information.

  3. A substantial number of scientific publications originate from non-university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fedder, Jens; Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge; Petersen, Lars J; Rasmussen, Claus; Lauszus, Finn F; Frost, Lars; Hornung, Nete; Lederballe, Ole; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2011-11-01

    As we found no recent published reports on the amount and kind of research published from Danish hospitals without university affiliation, we have found it relevant to conduct a bibliometric survey disclosing these research activities. We retrieved all scientific papers published in the period 2000-2009 emanating from all seven Danish non-university hospitals in two regions, comprising 1.8 million inhabitants, and which were registered in a minimum of one of the three databases: PubMed MEDLINE, Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Elsevier's Scopus. In 878 of 1,252 papers, the first and/or last author was affiliated to a non-university hospital. Original papers made up 69% of these publications versus 86% of publications with university affiliation on first or last place. Case reports and reviews most frequently had authors from regional hospitals as first and/or last authors. The total number of publications from regional hospitals increased by 48% over the 10-year period. Publications were cited more often if the first or last author was from a university hospital and even more so if they were affiliated to foreign institutions. Cardiology, gynaecology and obstetrics, and environmental medicine were the three specialities with the largest number of regional hospital publications. A substantial number of scientific publications originate from non-university hospitals. Almost two thirds of the publications were original research published in international journals. Variations between specialities may reflect local conditions. not relevant. not relevant.

  4. Bibliometric analysis of regional Latin America's scientific output in Public Health through SCImago Journal & Country Rank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the greater framework of the essential functions of Public Health, our focus is on a systematic, objective, external evaluation of Latin American scientific output, to compare its publications in the area of Public Health with those of other major geographic zones. We aim to describe the regional distribution of output in Public Health, and the level of visibility and specialization, for Latin America; it can then be characterized and compared in the international context. Methods The primary source of information was the Scopus database, using the category “Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health”, in the period 1996–2011. Data were obtained through the portal of SCImago Journal and Country Rank. Using a set of qualitative (citation-based), quantitative (document recount) and collaborative (authors from more than one country) indicators, we derived complementary data. The methodology serves as an analytical tool for researchers and scientific policy-makers. Results The contribution of Latin America to the arsenal of world science lies more or less midway on the international scale in terms of its output and visibility. Revealed as its greatest strengths are the high level of specialization in Public Health and the sustained growth of output. The main limitations identified were a relative decrease in collaboration and low visibility. Conclusions Collaboration is a key factor behind the development of scientific activity in Latin America. Although this finding can be useful for formulating research policy in Latin American countries, it also underlines the need for further research into patterns of scientific communication in this region, to arrive at more specific recommendations. PMID:24950735

  5. United European Gastroenterology Week scientific abstracts and their progression to full publication.

    PubMed

    Raju, Suneil A; Sanders, David S; Akram, Rahim; Glover, Rebecca; Al-Rifaie, Ammar; Peever, Elise; Purves, Josh; Scanu, Emily; Kurien, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    Abstracts presentations at scientific meetings enable rapid dissemination of novel research. The percentage of abstracts that proceed to full publication from differing medical specialties is highly variable. This study aims to evaluate the outcomes of abstracts presented at the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). All abstracts presented at UEGW between 2009 and 2011 were assessed. Cross-referencing of the first author, senior author and at least one keyword of the abstract was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases. Abstracts and possible resultant full publications were then examined in tandem to ensure that they represented the same study. Data were also collected on lag time to publication, journal impact factors, country of the author and factors influencing subsequent publication. A total of 6785 abstracts (1438 oral and 5347 poster presentations) were presented during the period assessed. Of these, 2099 (30.9%) proceeded to full publication in indexed journals. Oral abstract presentations were most likely to proceed to full publication compared with poster presentations (odds ratio: 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-1.56) and were more likely to achieve publication in higher impact journals (median impact factor 4.78 vs. 2.89, P<0.0005). The median lag time to full publication was 15 (IQR: 7-15) months. The Netherlands had the highest United European Gastroenterology abstract conversion rate to full publication (46.8%). This is the first study to assess the publication rates of UEGW. Findings are favourable with similar studies from other societies.

  6. ORI findings of scientific misconduct in clinical trials and publicly funded research, 1992-2002.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Sandra M

    2004-01-01

    Since 1992 the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) had reviewed investigations of scientific misconduct in research funded by the US Public Health Service (PHS). ORI defined scientific misconduct as "fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research". The purpose of this study was to summarize the findings and administrative actions reported in ORI notices of scientific misconduct in clinical trials occurring between May 1992 and 2002. Findings of misconduct were gathered from publicly available sources: the ORI annual reports and the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts. Clinical trials accounted for 17 (13%) of the 136 investigations that resulted in findings of scientific misconduct, and they were noted in 12 (11%) of the 113 brief reports of investigations closed with findings of no scientific misconduct. In clinical trials, the most severe sanction, debarment from US Government funding, was applied in six (35%) of the cases of misconduct compared to 79 (66%) of 119 cases from all other types of research combined. Of individuals cited for misconduct in clinical trials, three (18%) held doctorates in contrast to 81 (68%) in other types of research. In clinical trials, junior employees may bear the burden of sanction for scientific misconduct. The most frequently applied sanction was the requirement that a plan of supervision of the sanctioned employees accompany any future application for funding which would include them. This imposition of sanction on an individual employee does not address possible causes of misconduct which may be inherent in the overall pattern of leadership, training and supervision in the trial. Furthermore, the definition of misconduct, as interpreted by the Departmental Appeals Board, excludes carelessness and other poor research practices that may lead to dissemination of more incorrect data

  7. Economic analysis of scientific publications and implications for energy research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, David

    2016-04-01

    The mix of public and private funding in alternative energy research makes isolating the effect of government funding challenging. Factors such as energy prices and environmental policy influence both private and public R&D decisions, and it may take several years for public R&D’s effect on technology to be realized. Here, by combining data on scientific publications for alternative energy technologies with data on government R&D support, I provide information on the lags between research funding and new publications and link these articles to citations in US energy patents. I find that US$1 million in additional government funding leads to one to two additional publications, but with lags as long as ten years between initial funding and publication. Finally, I show that adjustment costs associated with large increases in research funding are of little concern at current levels of public energy R&D support. These results suggest that there is room to expand public R&D budgets for renewable energy, but that the impact of any such expansion may not be realized for some time.

  8. Presenting a scientific paper, including the pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Lashford, L S

    1995-01-01

    The tone of the presentation is set with the writing of the abstract. Wanting a trip to Vienna is not a good enough reason for framing an abstract unless the data are really interesting. If you don't find them so, you can bet your life that nobody else will. Have you presented the work before? Increasingly, the forms inviting abstracts stipulate that they should contain novel data. This protects the audience from boredom and your reputation from the aspersion that you never have anything new to say. It has been my practice to communicate similar data at a second meeting provided it contains some new results and that it is targeted at a totally unrelated specialist group. Hopefully, no one will have heard the information before. However, it is not acceptable to simply rehash the same abstract but should reflect the special interests of the second group. If one genuinely wants the abstract accepted for oral presentation it must contain a clear hypothesis, a brief description of methods, an exposition of results, and a conclusion. That well worn phrase 'results will be presented' simply raises the suspicion that the author is hoping that the data will be ready by the time that the conference begins. Sometimes, in the rush to meet deadlines for abstract submission, the needs of coauthors are overlooked. This is a sensitive area and can easily temporarily wreck what appeared to be a harmonious collaboration. Do make sure that all coauthors have seen the abstract before submission and are happy with the content--it is good research practice and important to the smooth running of the research group. PMID:7574867

  9. 42 CFR 82.31 - How can the public recommend changes to scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How can the public recommend changes to scientific... ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions § 82.31 How...

  10. 75 FR 54146 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Office; Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC), Ambient Air Methods and Monitoring Subcommittee (AAMMS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces a public meeting on September 29-30, 2010, of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory...

  11. 42 CFR 82.31 - How can the public recommend changes to scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How can the public recommend changes to scientific... ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions § 82.31 How...

  12. 42 CFR 82.33 - How will NIOSH inform the public of changes to the scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process? 82.33 Section 82.33 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions...

  13. 76 FR 23809 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... AGENCY Science Advisory Board Staff Office Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific... announces a public meeting on May 19 and 20, 2011, of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC... Standards: Scope and Methods Plan for Health Risk and Exposure Assessment (April 2011 Draft), and Ozone...

  14. 42 CFR 82.33 - How will NIOSH inform the public of changes to the scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process? 82.33 Section 82.33 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions...

  15. 42 CFR 82.33 - How will NIOSH inform the public of changes to the scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process? 82.33 Section 82.33 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions...

  16. 42 CFR 82.31 - How can the public recommend changes to scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How can the public recommend changes to scientific... ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions § 82.31 How...

  17. 42 CFR 82.31 - How can the public recommend changes to scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How can the public recommend changes to scientific... ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions § 82.31 How...

  18. 42 CFR 82.33 - How will NIOSH inform the public of changes to the scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process? 82.33 Section 82.33 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions...

  19. 42 CFR 82.31 - How can the public recommend changes to scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How can the public recommend changes to scientific... ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions § 82.31 How...

  20. 42 CFR 82.33 - How will NIOSH inform the public of changes to the scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process? 82.33 Section 82.33 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Updating the Scientific Elements Underlying Dose Reconstructions...

  1. Pitfalls of nonstandardized photography.

    PubMed

    Archibald, David J; Carlson, Matthew L; Friedman, Oren

    2010-05-01

    Accurate, consistent, high-quality photographs of patients before, during, and after surgery are critical for planning and performing surgical procedures, analyzing and documenting surgical outcomes, and educating patients and surgeons. Attaining the necessary high standards of photography and avoiding common pitfalls associated with nonstandardized medical photography requires stringent uniformity in equipment, lighting, room setup, patient positioning, and camera settings. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Results of a survey regarding the publication of scientific results in German-speaking countries].

    PubMed

    Arlt, S; Haimerl, P; Wehrend, A; Reinhardt, J; Heuwieser, W

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians should conduct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures according to the most recent and scientifically proven methods. Therefore, a rapid and effective transfer of scientific information is crucial. An important link between science and practice are findings published in scientific journals. The productivity of scientists is often measured referring to the number of papers published in reputable journals. Because many of these journals publish in the English language, it is possible that results from German research may never reach German veterinarians or only after a delay. Using an online questionnaire, faculty members (professors and scientific assistants) from Germany, Austria and Switzerland were asked how they had published their results during the previous 5 years. Furthermore, they were asked to identify the factors influencing their choice of journal for publication. A total of 118 respondents completed the questionnaire. Nearly two thirds had published ten or more papers during the previous 5 years. More than half of these were published in the English language. Most participants consider the peer review process suitable for enhancing the quality of publications. The impact factor is seen as a fair indicator for the quality of a paper while considered an important factor for the choice of a journal for publication of the respondents own results. According to the data, respondents prefer to publish their results in the English language and in journals with a high impact factor. Therefore, veterinarians may never receive this information via German journals or only after a delay. One possible solution could be a regularly published practice-oriented compilation of relevant scientific findings.

  3. Mediating objects: scientific and public functions of models in nineteenth-century biology.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the scientific and public functions of two- and three-dimensional models in the context of three episodes from nineteenth-century biology. I argue that these models incorporate both data and theory by presenting theoretical assumptions in the light of concrete data or organizing data through theoretical assumptions. Despite their diverse roles in scientific practice, they all can be characterized as mediators between data and theory. Furthermore, I argue that these different mediating functions often reflect their different audiences that included specialized scientists, students, and the general public. In this sense, models in nineteenth-century biology can be understood as mediators between theory, data, and their diverse audiences.

  4. Publication Ethics and the Emerging Scientific Workforce: Understanding ‘Plagiarism’ in a Global Context

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Carrie; Zhao, Hui; McHugh, Michelle K.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific publication has long been dominated by the English language and is rapidly moving towards near complete hegemony of English, while the majority of the world’s publishing scientists are not native English speakers. This imbalance has important implications for training in and enforcement of publication ethics, particularly with respect to plagiarism. A lack of understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and the use of a linguistic support strategy known as patchwriting can lead to inadvertent misuse of source material by non-native speakers writing in English as well as to unfounded accusations of intentional scientific misconduct on the part of these authors. A rational and well-informed dialogue about this issue is needed among both native English speaking and non-native English speaking writers, editors, educators, and administrators. Recommendations for educating and training are provided. PMID:22104051

  5. Perspective: publication ethics and the emerging scientific workforce: understanding "plagiarism" in a global context.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Carrie; Zhao, Hui; McHugh, Michelle K

    2012-01-01

    English has long been the dominant language of scientific publication, and it is rapidly approaching near-complete hegemony. The majority of the scientists publishing in English-language journals are not native English speakers, however. This imbalance has important implications for training concerning ethics and enforcement of publication standards, particularly with respect to plagiarism. The authors suggest that lack of understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and the use of a linguistic support strategy known as "patchwriting" can lead to inadvertent misuse of source material by nonnative speakers writing in English as well as to unfounded accusations of intentional scientific misconduct on the part of these authors. They propose that a rational and well-informed dialogue about this issue is needed among editors, educators, administrators, and both native-English-speaking and nonnative-English-speaking writers. They offer recommendations for creating environments in which such dialogue and training can occur.

  6. In science "there is no bad publicity": papers criticized in comments have high scientific impact.

    PubMed

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Comments are special types of publications whose aim is to correct or criticize previously published papers. For this reason, comments are believed to make commented papers less worthy or trusty to the eyes of the scientific community, and thus predestined to have low scientific impact. Here, we show that such belief is not supported by empirical evidence. We consider thirteen major publication outlets in science, and perform systematic comparisons between the citations accumulated by commented and non commented articles. We find that (i) commented papers are, on average, much more cited than non commented papers, and (ii) commented papers are more likely to be among the most cited papers of a journal. Since comments are published soon after criticized papers, comments should be viewed as early indicators of the future impact of criticized papers.

  7. Between confidentiality and scientific exchange: the place of publication in drug discovery and pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Clozel, Martine

    2011-01-26

    To continue to improve life expectancy and quality of life, the discovery of innovative therapies should be among the prime goals of the life sciences. The large majority of the drugs that are discovered and successfully developed to the point of being used by patients come from the drug industry, but publications from this sector are rare among life sciences research publications. Publications in the field of pharmaceutical drug discovery should take into account the confidentiality inherent to the protection of the intellectual property rights of a discovery, but they are fundamentally important because they can enhance scientific knowledge, improve the care and safety of patients, provide information for prescribers, and educate the public about the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Persistent Identifiers in the Publication and Citation of Scientific Data - Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Brase, J.; Diepenbroek, M.; Grobe, H.; Hildenbrand, B.; Hoeck, H.; Lautenschlager, M.; Sens, I.

    2008-12-01

    In the last decade data driven research has become a third pillar of scientific work alongside with theoretical reasoning and experiment. Greatly increased computing power and storage, together with web services and other electronic resources have facilitated a quantum leap in new research based on the analysis of great amounts of data. However, traditional scientific communication only slowly changes to new media other than an emulation of paper. This leaves many data inaccessible and, in the long run exposes valuable data to the risk of loss. To improve access to data and to create incentives for scientists to make their data accessible, a group of German data centres initiated the project "Publication and Citation of Scientific Data" (STD-DOI) which was funded by the German Science Foundation DFG for the periods 2003-2005 and 2006-2008. In this project the German National Library for Science and Technology (TIB Hannover), together with the German Research Centre for Geoscience (GFZ Potsdam), Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) Bremerhaven, University of Bremen, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the DLR German Remote Sensing Data Center set up the first system to assign DOIs to data sets and for their publication. A prerequisite for data to be made available is a proper citation. This means that all fields mandatory for a bibliographic citation are included. In addition, a mechanism is needed that ensures that the location of the referenced data on the internet can be resolved at any time. In the past, this was a problematic issue because URLs are short-lived, many becoming invalid after only a few months. Data publication on the internet therefore needs a system of reliable pointers to a web publication to make these publications citeable. To achieve this persistence of identifiers for their conventional publications many scientific publishers use Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). The identifier is resolved through

  9. Medical journal editors lacked familiarity with scientific publication issues despite training and regular exposure.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victoria S S; Callaham, Michael L

    2012-03-01

    To characterize medical editors by determining their demographics, training, potential sources of conflict of interest (COI), and familiarity with ethical standards. We selected editors of clinical medical journals with the highest annual citation rates. One hundred eighty-three editors were electronically surveyed (response rate, 52%) on demographics and experiences with editorial training, publication ethics, industry, and scientific publication organizations. Editors reported formal (76%) and informal (89%) training in medical editing topics. Most editors saw publication ethics issues (e.g., authorship, COIs) at least once a year. When presented with four questions about editorial issues discussed in commonly cited authoritative policy sources, performance was poor on topics of authorship (30% answered correctly), COI (15%), peer review (16%), and plagiarism (17%). Despite this, confidence level in editorial skills on a Likert scale from the beginning to the end of the survey dropped only slightly from 4.2 to 3.9 (P<0.0001). Our study presents a current look at editors of major clinical medical journals. Most editors reported training in medical editing topics, saw ethical issues regularly, and were aware of scientific publication organizations, but their knowledge of four common and well-disseminated publication ethics topics appears poor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Open access and openly accessible: a study of scientific publications shared via the internet

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Jonathan D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To determine how often reprints of scientific publications are shared online, whether journal readership level is a predictor, how the amount of file sharing changes with the age of the article, and to what degree open access publications are shared on non-journal websites. Design The internet was searched using an application programming interface to Google, a popular and freely available search engine. Main outcome measures The proportion of reprints of journal articles published between 1994 and 2004 from within 13 subscription based and four open access journals that could be located online at non-journal websites. Results The probability that an article could be found online at a non-journal website correlated with the journal impact factor and the time since initial publication. Papers from higher impact journals and more recent articles were more likely to be located. On average, for the high impact journal articles published in 2003, over a third could be located at non-journal websites. Similar trends were observed for the delayed or full open access publications. Conclusions Decentralised sharing of scientific reprints through the internet creates a degree of de facto open access that, though highly incomplete in its coverage, is none the less biased towards publications of higher popular demand. PMID:15827063

  11. Open access and openly accessible: a study of scientific publications shared via the internet.

    PubMed

    Wren, Jonathan D

    2005-05-14

    To determine how often reprints of scientific publications are shared online, whether journal readership level is a predictor, how the amount of file sharing changes with the age of the article, and to what degree open access publications are shared on non-journal websites. The internet was searched using an application programming interface to Google, a popular and freely available search engine. The proportion of reprints of journal articles published between 1994 and 2004 from within 13 subscription based and four open access journals that could be located online at non-journal websites. The probability that an article could be found online at a non-journal website correlated with the journal impact factor and the time since initial publication. Papers from higher impact journals and more recent articles were more likely to be located. On average, for the high impact journal articles published in 2003, over a third could be located at non-journal websites. Similar trends were observed for the delayed or full open access publications. Decentralised sharing of scientific reprints through the internet creates a degree of de facto open access that, though highly incomplete in its coverage, is none the less biased towards publications of higher popular demand.

  12. Confined to grow?. Publication dynamics and the proliferation of scientific journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daruka, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    The number of research papers published yearly shows a staggering exponential growth. One can in fact witness a century-long publication avalanche (Fig.1). According to the two major databases INSPEC and Thomson Reuters, there is a 300-fold increase in the number of published items since the year 1900. The world of science has recently reached such a level of proliferating complexity that its structural evolution itself poses challenging scientific problems.

  13. Publication rate of scientific abstracts presented at ESSR 2008 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Parkar, A P; Vanhoenacker, F M; Adriaensen van Roij, M E A P M

    2013-04-01

    During the ESSR 2011 Research Committee Meeting, the duration of intellectual property of a research proposal was discussed. A duration of 2 years from idea to publication was suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how many ESSR 2008 and 2009 scientific abstracts were PubMed cited in print within 2 years of the congress. In September of 2011, two researchers independently performed a literature search using author names and title words of all ESSR 2008 and 2009 scientific abstracts published in Skeletal Radiology. In case of similarity or doubt, a senior reviewer made the final decision. Publication details were recorded and analyses were performed in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA). Until September of 2011, 62 out of 137 ESSR 2008 and 2009 scientific abstracts (45%) were PubMed cited in print [2008: 34/73 (47%); 2009: 28/64 (44%)]. 54 out of 137 abstracts (39%) were PubMed cited in print within 2 years of the congress [2008: 30/73(41%); 2009: 23/64 (36%)] including eight out of 137 abstracts (6%), which were already published before the congress [2008: 4/73 (5%); 2009: 4/64 (6%)]. The top-ranking journal in absolute numbers of publications was Skeletal Radiology. The top publishing country was the United Kingdom. Study sample size and first author position between abstract and publication did not change in the majority. Thirty-nine percent of ESSR 2008 and 2009 scientific abstracts were published within 2 years of the congress including 6% that were already PubMed cited in print before the congress.

  14. CT Colonography: Pitfalls in Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis As with any radiologic imaging test, there are a number of potential interpretive pitfalls at CT colonography (CTC) that need to be recognized and handled appropriately. Perhaps the single most important step in learning to avoid most of these diagnostic traps is simply to be aware of their existence. With a little experience, most of these potential pitfalls will be easily recognized. This review will systematically cover the key pitfalls confronting the radiologist at CTC interpretation, primarily dividing them into those related to technique and those related to underlying anatomy. Tips and pointers for how to effectively handle these potential pitfalls are included. PMID:23182508

  15. Lost in translation: the impact of publication language on citation frequency in the scientific dental literature.

    PubMed

    Poomkottayil, Deepak; Bornstein, Michael M; Sendi, Pedram

    2011-01-28

    Citation metrics are commonly used as a proxy for scientific merit and relevance. Papers published in English, however, may exhibit a higher citation frequency than research articles published in other languages, though this issue has not yet been investigated from a Swiss perspective where English is not the native language. To assess the impact of publication language on citation frequency we focused on oral surgery papers indexed in PubMed MEDLINE that were published by Swiss Dental Schools between 2002 and 2007. Citation frequency of research papers was extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and Google Scholar database. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the impact of publication language (English versus German/French) on citation frequency, adjusted for journal impact factor, number of authors and research topic. Papers published in English showed a 6 (ISI database) and 7 (Google Scholar) times higher odds for being cited than research articles published in German or French. Our results suggest that publication language substantially influences the citation frequency of a research paper. Researchers should publish their work in English to render them accessible to the international scientific community.

  16. A scientific impact indicator based on the latent ``citability'' of a researcher's publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Joao; Zeng, Xiaohan; Amaral, Luis

    2014-03-01

    How to quantify the impact of a scientist's body of work is currently a matter of great concern. The use of bibliometric indicators, such as the h-index or the Journal Impact Factor, have become widespread despite their known limitations. We surmise that many of the deficiencies of existing bibliometric indicators arise from their heuristic nature. Here, we pursue a principled approach to the development of an indicator to quantify the scientific impact of individual researchers, grounded on the functional form of the distribution of the ultimate number of citations. We validate our approach using the publication records of 1,283 researchers from seven scientific disciplines. Our approach has three distinct advantages. First, it accurately captures the overall scientific impact of researchers, as measured by ultimate citation counts. Second, in contrast to prior bibliometric indicators, our proposed measure does not depend on the number of publications, offering the possibility to compare researchers at different career stages. Third, more than other measures, our index is resistant to manipulation and rewards publication quality over quantity. The authors acknowledge the support of FCT-Portugal grant SFRH/BD/76115/2011 and NSF awards SBE 0624318 and IIS 0830388.

  17. Publication Rates of Presentations at Annual Scientific Meetings of the Turkish Neurosurgical Society.

    PubMed

    Eksi, Murat Sakir; Kaplan, Sumeyye Coruh; Yilmaz, Baran; Akakin, Akin; Toktas, Zafer Orkun; Konya, Deniz; Kilic, Turker

    2017-01-01

    National and international society meetings are suitable mediums at which diverse research topics from basic, clinical and translational sciences can be presented to an audience of peers. In this study, our purpose was to evaluate publication rates of presentations in the last recent four years" annual scientific meetings of Turkish Neurosurgical Society (TNS). Abstracts of both podium and poster presentations were retrieved from the congress booklets of TNS. Study timeline included TNS annual scientific meetings of 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Abstract titles and author names of the abstracts were searched in Pubmed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases. In total, 3105 presentations to an audience took place in the annual scientific meetings of TNS organized between 2011 and 2014. Acceptance rate of these studies by peer-reviewed scientific journals was 326 (10.5%). In sub-analysis, there were 2408 electronic posters (148 accepted, 6.1%), 195 poster presentations with discussion (44 accepted, 22.6%), and 502 podium presentations (134 accepted, 26.7%). Acceptance rate of podium presentations in annual scientific meeting of TNS is at comparable levels with similar organizations on the world. However, the rate is lower for poster presentations.

  18. Lack of publicly available scientific evidence on the safety and effectiveness of implanted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Diana; Brown, Paul; Das, Aditi

    2014-11-01

    Under the 510(k) process, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clears about 400 implanted medical devices that are considered moderate to high risk for market each year without requiring clinical testing. Instead, the FDA requires the applicant to provide scientific evidence that the new device is "substantially equivalent" to a device or devices already on the market (predicate devices). Companies are legally required to submit the evidence to the FDA and to make publicly available at least a summary of the evidence. To assess the types of scientific evidence used to determine substantial equivalence, safety, or effectiveness for a representative sample of implanted medical devices; the number of predicates for each implant; and whether this evidence was publicly available. Using FDA databases, we determined the device categories of the first 5 implanted medical devices cleared through the 510(k) process in 2008: cardiovascular, dental, general and plastic surgery, neurological, and orthopedic. We then identified the first 2 implanted medical devices approved in each of the 5 categories for each year from 2008 through 2012. The sample of 50 devices included, for example, total hip implants, vascular embolization devices, and surgical mesh. We also identified the 1105 predicates the manufacturers listed for these devices. For each implanted medical device and its predicates, we determined whether clinical or nonclinical scientific evidence was provided to the FDA to support the claim of substantial equivalence and whether this evidence was publicly available. We also determined if safety or effectiveness data were provided. Scientific data to support the claim of substantial equivalence were publicly available for 8 of the 50 newly cleared implants (16%) and 31 of their 1105 listed predicates (3%). Most of the evidence was nonclinical data; some of the data also evaluated safety or effectiveness. Despite the legal requirement that scientific evidence of

  19. Features and publication rates of scientific abstracts presented at a rheumatology congress--EULAR 2008.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sedat; Kalyoncu, Umut; Cinar, Muhammet; Karadag, Omer; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Simsek, Ismail; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinc, Ayhan

    2013-01-01

    Various types of scientific abstracts are selected and presented at meetings and listed in abstract books. Recently, a systematic review has shown that 45% of 30,000 abstracts were published in a journal. The aim of this study was to determine the features of abstracts selected to be presented at a EULAR meeting (2008) and the corresponding publication rates. The EULAR 2008 Abstract Book was extracted, presented abstracts were assessed, their publication status was checked, and features related with publication rate were determined. The publication status of abstracts as of January 20, 2011, was verified using PubMed. A total of 1,732 abstracts were assessed. Median publication duration was 13 (range: 0 to 31) months. Most of the abstracts (N=339) were of multi-national origin. Sixty seven percent of abstracts were clinical and 563 (33%) abstracts were preclinical. We found that 601 of all abstracts (34.7%) had been published in a journal, and most of were published in a rheumatology journal. Fifty-seven percent of published abstracts were in journals with an impact factor higher than 4. The publication rate was correlated with presentation type, number of centers involved, trial design, and number of patients enrolled. We found that the publication rate of EULAR 2008 abstracts at 30 months was approximately 35%. This is a high rate compared to a previously published systematic review that investigated the publication rate of studies initially presented as abstracts in medical meetings, which reported the publication rate at 24 and 36 months as 20.7% and 28.1%, respectively. More than half of the published abstracts were accepted by high-impact journals. Presentation type, number of centers, trial design, and enrolled patient numbers were all correlated with the rate of publication.

  20. Canadian Association of Radiologists Annual Scientific Meetings: How Many Abstracts Go on to Publication?

    PubMed

    Dressler, Danielle; Leswick, David

    2015-05-01

    To determine the percentage of abstracts presented at the Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) annual scientific meetings that go on to publication. Records of previous CAR meetings from the years 2005-2011 were obtained. An Internet search was performed to determine which abstracts went on to publication. Abstracts were assessed according to exhibit category (Resident Award Papers), educational institution, publishing journal, and time to publication. Of the 402 abstracts presented, 112 (28%) were published. Overall, an average of 37% of Radiologists-In-Training Presentations, 34% of Scientific Exhibits, and 20% of Educational Exhibits went on to publication. The University of British Columbia and University of Ottawa published the largest number of abstracts (66 and 62, respectively) from the years 2005-2011. The University of Montreal had the largest percentage of abstracts published (42%). The range of publishing journals was wide, but the top publisher was the Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal (27%). Eighty-three percent of abstracts were published within 3 years of being presented. In total, 28% of all the abstracts presented at the CAR conferences between 2005 and 2011 were published. Further exploration into the reasons and barriers for abstracts not being published may be a next step in future research. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plagiarism in Scientific Research and Publications and How to Prevent It

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    Quality is assessed on the basis of adequate evidence, while best results of the research are accomplished through scientific knowledge. Information contained in a scientific work must always be based on scientific evidence. Guidelines for genuine scientific research should be designed based on real results. Dynamic research and use correct methods of scientific work must originate from everyday practice and the fundamentals of the research. The original work should have the proper data sources with clearly defined research goals, methods of operation which are acceptable for questions included in the study. When selecting the methods it is necessary to obtain the consent of the patients/respondents to provide data for execution of the project or so called informed consent. Only by the own efforts can be reached true results, from which can be drawn conclusions and which finally can give a valid scholarly commentary. Text may be copied from other sources, either in whole or in part and marked as a result of the other studies. For high-quality scientific work necessary are expertise and relevant scientific literature, mostly taken from publications that are stored in biomedical databases. These are scientific, professional and review articles, case reports of disease in physician practices, but the knowledge can also be acquired on scientific and expert lectures by renowned scientists. Form of text publications must meet standards on writing a paper. If the article has already been published in a scientific journal, the same article cannot be published in any other journal with a few minor adjustments, or without specifying the parts of the first article which is used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article, with or without mentioning the author, uses a substantial portion of previously published articles, including past contributions in the first article. With the permission of the publisher and the author, another journal

  2. Plagiarism in scientific research and publications and how to prevent it.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2014-04-01

    Quality is assessed on the basis of adequate evidence, while best results of the research are accomplished through scientific knowledge. Information contained in a scientific work must always be based on scientific evidence. Guidelines for genuine scientific research should be designed based on real results. Dynamic research and use correct methods of scientific work must originate from everyday practice and the fundamentals of the research. The original work should have the proper data sources with clearly defined research goals, methods of operation which are acceptable for questions included in the study. When selecting the methods it is necessary to obtain the consent of the patients/respondents to provide data for execution of the project or so called informed consent. Only by the own efforts can be reached true results, from which can be drawn conclusions and which finally can give a valid scholarly commentary. Text may be copied from other sources, either in whole or in part and marked as a result of the other studies. For high-quality scientific work necessary are expertise and relevant scientific literature, mostly taken from publications that are stored in biomedical databases. These are scientific, professional and review articles, case reports of disease in physician practices, but the knowledge can also be acquired on scientific and expert lectures by renowned scientists. Form of text publications must meet standards on writing a paper. If the article has already been published in a scientific journal, the same article cannot be published in any other journal with a few minor adjustments, or without specifying the parts of the first article which is used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article, with or without mentioning the author, uses a substantial portion of previously published articles, including past contributions in the first article. With the permission of the publisher and the author, another journal

  3. Immunohistochemistry for Pathologists: Protocols, Pitfalls, and Tips

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Woon; Roh, Jin; Park, Chan-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an important auxiliary method for pathologists in routine diagnostic work as well as in basic and clinical research including exploration of biomarkers, as IHC allows confirmation of target molecule expressions in the context of microenvironment. Although there has been a considerable progress in automation and standardization of IHC, there are still many things to be considered in proper optimization and appropriate interpretation. In this review, we aim to provide possible pitfalls and useful tips for practicing pathologists and residents in pathology training. First, general procedure of IHC is summarized, followed by pitfalls and tips in each step and a summary of troubleshooting. Second, ways to an accurate interpretation of IHC are discussed, with introduction to general quantification and analysis methods. This review is not intended to provide complete information on IHC, but to be used as a basic reference for practice and publication. PMID:27809448

  4. Surgical scientific publication and the 1991-1995 war in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Dukić, Vanja; Udiljak, Nikola; Bartolić, Nina; Vargović, Martina; Kuduz, Robert; Boban, Natasa; Pećina, Marko; Polasek, Ozren

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical scientific publication in relation to the 1991-1995 war in Croatia, based on the articles indexed in Medline database that were published in 1980-2005 period. The number of articles was extracted from PubMed and analysed with trend analysis, which is preferred analytic approach over calculation of crude publication rates. The results indicate sporadic pre-war output, which was almost completely reduced by the onset of war. During wartime, a significant increasing trend in the number of published surgical articles that were related to warfare was detected (p = 0.003). During the post-war period a gradual shift towards surgical articles that were not related to warfare was detected, also marked by the significant increasing trend (p = 0.027). Both trends were significantly steeper than the overall Croatian biomedical output, suggesting that surgical scientific articles were being published more dynamically than in other biomedical areas in Croatia. The results suggest that war in Croatia has had a strong modifying effect on the surgical scientific output.

  5. Proposal Pitfalls Plaguing Researchers: Can Technical Communicators Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemanski, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The facts bear out that the odds are against most scientific researchers and scholars--especially those just starting out--in their attempts to win funding for their research projects through their grant proposals. In this article, the author takes a close look at some of the proposal-related problems and pitfalls that have historically challenged…

  6. Proposal Pitfalls Plaguing Researchers: Can Technical Communicators Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemanski, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The facts bear out that the odds are against most scientific researchers and scholars--especially those just starting out--in their attempts to win funding for their research projects through their grant proposals. In this article, the author takes a close look at some of the proposal-related problems and pitfalls that have historically challenged…

  7. Improving Scientific Communication and Publication Output in a Multidisciplinary Laboratory: Changing Culture Through Staff Development Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, Christine F.; Stratton, Kelly G.

    2015-07-13

    Communication plays a fundamental role in science and engineering disciplines. However, many higher education programs provide little, if any, technical communication coursework. Without strong communication skills scientists and engineers have less opportunity to publish, obtain competitive research funds, or grow their careers. This article describes the role of scientific communication training as an innovative staff development program in a learning-intensive workplace – a national scientific research and development laboratory. The findings show that involvement in the workshop has increased overall participating staff annual publications by an average of 61 percent compared to their pre-workshop publishing performance as well as confidence level in their ability to write and publish peer-reviewed literature. Secondary benefits include improved information literacy skills and the development of informal communities of practice. This work provides insight into adult education in the workplace.

  8. Designing a Secure Storage Repository for Sharing Scientific Datasets using Public Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kumbhare, Alok; Simmhan, Yogesh; Prasanna, Viktor

    2011-11-14

    As Cloud platforms gain increasing traction among scientific and business communities for outsourcing storage, computing and content delivery, there is also growing concern about the associated loss of control over private data hosted in the Cloud. In this paper, we present an architecture for a secure data repository service designed on top of a public Cloud infrastructure to support multi-disciplinary scientific communities dealing with personal and human subject data, motivated by the smart power grid domain. Our repository model allows users to securely store and share their data in the Cloud without revealing the plain text to unauthorized users, the Cloud storage provider or the repository itself. The system masks file names, user permissions and access patterns while providing auditing capabilities with provable data updates.

  9. Identification of trends in scientific publications related to genetic polymorphisms in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J S; Minasi, L B; da Cruz, A D; Rodrigues, F M

    2016-05-09

    Gestational diabetes is a genetic multifactorial systemic disease that has been extensively studied. Consequently, there is a large volume of scientific literature pertaining to genes associated with gestational diabetes. The aim of this study was to characterize the main trends in scientific publications focusing on the associations between genetic polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The related articles were extracted from Scopus using the key words "genetic polymorphism" and "gestational diabetes mellitus"; the collected data focused on various fields (medical, biochemical, etc.) and included papers published within December 2013. One hundred and eighty-three relevant articles published between 1987 and 2013 were identified; we observed a significantly increasing trend in the number of publications pertaining to GDM. A majority of the articles focused on the medical (59.9%), biochemical, and genetics and molecular biological (29.6%) aspects of the disease. The genes coding for transcription factor 7-like 2 and glucokinase (TCF7L2, 29% and GCK, 28%) were predominantly studied and reported. This study helped quantify the growth in research pertaining to GDM; researchers from the USA have published a majority of the publications related to GDM. Several candidate genes have been linked to diabetes; however, the specific gene locus responsible for GDM has not yet been identified. The results of this study could help determine the orientation of future research on genetic factors associated with GDM.

  10. Dynamics of scientific publications on the MERS-CoV outbreaks in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Rabaan, Ali A; Al-Ahmed, Shamsah H; Bazzi, Ali M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A

    2017-06-24

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging disease with a relatively high case fatality rate. Most cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia, and the disease epidemic potential is considered to be limited. However, human-human transmission has occurred, usually in the context of healthcare facility-associated outbreaks. The scientific and medical community depends on timely publication of epidemiological information on emerging diseases during outbreaks to appropriately target public health responses. In this review, we considered the academic response to four MERS CoV outbreaks that occurred in Al-Hasa in 2013, Jeddah in 2014 and Riyadh in 2014 and 2015. We analysed 68 relevant epidemiology articles. For articles for which submission dates were available, six articles were submitted during the course of an outbreak. One article was published within a month of the Al-Hasa outbreak, and one each was accepted during the Jeddah and Riyadh outbreaks. MERS-CoV epidemiology articles were cited more frequently than articles on other subjects in the same journal issues. Thus, most epidemiology articles on MERS-CoV were published with no preferential advantage over other articles. Collaboration of the research community and the scientific publishing industry is needed to facilitate timely publication of emerging infectious diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of Oswaldo Paulo Forattini to public health: analysis of scientific production

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Juliana Gonçalves; Kobayashi, Keilla Miki; Ueno, Helene Mariko; Ribeiro, Cristiane Martins; Cardoso, Telma Abdalla de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the main characteristics of the scientific production of Oswaldo Paulo Forattini, researcher and, for 40 years, editor of Revista de Saúde Pública. METHODS Descriptive study with bibliometric approach conducted in three steps. (1) identification of bibliographic records using the following search strategy: “Oswaldo Paulo Forattini” OR “Forattini OP” OR “Forattini” up information sources Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed, in July 2016, which retrieved 867 records. (2) composition of research corpus, in which we included 351 bibliographic records of articles, books, book chapters, editorials, book reviews, informative notes and annual reports of the RSP and excluded 516 duplicates and acknowledgement notes, obituary notes, and nonretrievable citations. (3) data organization and analysis, in which we built databases for descriptive analysis and development of the MeSH coauthors and terms networks in VOSviewer software. For analysis of editorials, three reviewers read the full text of each editorial and categorized them according to subject, historical context and perspectives, relating them with historical milestones. RESULTS Forattini’s scientific production occurred from 1946 to 2009, most consisting of articles (n = 218; 62.1%), editorials (n = 43; 12.3%), and books (n = 13; 3.7%). The main subjects were Culicidae (36.8%), Triatominae (12.5%), and Epidemiology (10.0%). The coauthors of articles were his professors, colleagues of his generation, and graduate students. His editorials addressed critical reflections on the production of knowledge, research priorities, and factors that contributed to or hindered progress. The scope of subjects is broad, referring to socioeconomic and scientific development, public health issues in developed countries, or global health. CONCLUSIONS The analysis shows Forattini’s commitment with public health, research with vectors, training of researchers, and scientific

  12. Pitfalls in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yvergneaux, J P; Kint, M; Kuppens, E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of literature and of 475 laparoscopic cholecystectomies of the authors, some pitfalls are reviewed. The circumstances, the mechanism and the prevention of injuries were detailed together with the connected problem of postoperative bile leakage. Among the cholangiographic pitfalls the importance of detection of congenital and acquired anomalies of the biliary tree by means of preoperative ERCP or intraoperative trans-cystic cholangiograms was emphasized. A particular study was made of 3 pictures: Mirizzi syndrome; stone impaction in Vater's papilla; no retrograde flow of the common hepatic duct on intraoperative cholangiograms. Biliodigestive fistulas were briefly commented. The problems with cystic duct stones, particularly the treatment of stones in a long, low inserted cystic duct with retroduodenal course and the closing of thick-walled or wide cystic stumps, were explained. In patients with intraoperative residual common bile duct stones and with failed preoperative catheterization of the papilla, the authors advocate their double approach technique. This combined intraoperative laparoscopic and postoperative endoscopic procedure is carried out via the same transcystic polythene catheters as used for cholangiography and external biliary drainage of the common bile duct.

  13. 75 FR 78338 - Notice of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory... Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory Board will meet on January 6-7, 2011 at the St.... Global AIDS Coordinator, Ambassador Eric Goosby, who leads implementation of the President's...

  14. SOUTH AMERICAN COLLABORATION IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS ON LEISHMANIASIS: BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS IN SCOPUS (2000-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Huamaní, Charles; Romaní, Franco; González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Mejia, Miluska O.; Ramos, José Manuel; Espinoza, Manuel; Cabezas, César

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluate the production and the research collaborative network on Leishmaniasis in South America. Methods: A bibliometric research was carried out using SCOPUS database. The analysis unit was original research articles published from 2000 to 2011, that dealt with leishmaniasis and that included at least one South American author. The following items were obtained for each article: journal name, language, year of publication, number of authors, institutions, countries, and others variables. Results: 3,174 articles were published, 2,272 of them were original articles. 1,160 different institutional signatures, 58 different countries and 398 scientific journals were identified. Brazil was the country with more articles (60.7%) and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ) had 18% of Brazilian production, which is the South American nucleus of the major scientific network in Leishmaniasis. Conclusions: South American scientific production on Leishmaniasis published in journals indexed in SCOPUS is focused on Brazilian research activity. It is necessary to strengthen the collaboration networks. The first step is to identify the institutions with higher production, in order to perform collaborative research according to the priorities of each country. PMID:25229217

  15. South American collaboration in scientific publications on leishmaniasis: bibliometric analysis in SCOPUS (2000-2011).

    PubMed

    Huamaní, Charles; Romaní, Franco; González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Mejia, Miluska O; Ramos, José Manuel; Espinoza, Manuel; Cabezas, César

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the production and the research collaborative network on Leishmaniasis in South America. A bibliometric research was carried out using SCOPUS database. The analysis unit was original research articles published from 2000 to 2011, that dealt with leishmaniasis and that included at least one South American author. The following items were obtained for each article: journal name, language, year of publication, number of authors, institutions, countries, and others variables. 3,174 articles were published, 2,272 of them were original articles. 1,160 different institutional signatures, 58 different countries and 398 scientific journals were identified. Brazil was the country with more articles (60.7%) and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ) had 18% of Brazilian production, which is the South American nucleus of the major scientific network in Leishmaniasis. South American scientific production on Leishmaniasis published in journals indexed in SCOPUS is focused on Brazilian research activity. It is necessary to strengthen the collaboration networks. The first step is to identify the institutions with higher production, in order to perform collaborative research according to the priorities of each country.

  16. The Disconnect Between Journalism and Science and its Role in Public Misunderstanding of Important Scientific Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulsman, T.

    2006-12-01

    Research shows that Americans' knowledge of science is sorely inaccurate. U.S. adults get most of their knowledge from the popular media, so it has been claimed that problems with media coverage of science are to blame. But this is a simplistic analysis. At their roots, scientific and journalistic modes of inquiry actually share two important normative standards: empiricism and skepticism. On the other hand, news and new scientific knowledge are two very different things. News gathering is guided in large measure by criteria that help journalists decide what is worth covering, as well as by standards of fairness and balance. The overarching goal is to report on things considered newsworthy in a neutral manner. In science, the goal is to ruthlessly discard incorrect ideas to get at the truth about nature. This talk will examine the "good" -- the normative standards that journalists and scientists share, as well as the "bad" -- how the significant disconnects between science and journalism may be contributing to a lack of public understanding of critical scientific issues such as climate change. Among the questions that will be addressed: How do journalists decide what is news? How does science fare when these newsworthiness standards are applied to it? How does the journalistic standard of balance result in inaccurate reporting on climate change? And how might we improve the situation by enhancing communication between scientists and journalist?

  17. The influence of cultural capital on consumption of scientific culture: A survey of visitors to an open house event at a public scientific research institution.

    PubMed

    Kato-Nitta, Naoko

    2013-04-01

    Based on the concept of cultural capital, this study explores the relationship between habitual behaviors of individuals regarding their past accumulation of such capital and current responses to a scientific institute's public outreach activity. At an open house held at the Institute for Molecular Science (IMS), anonymous questionnaires were distributed among 1,350 visitors and collected from 785 of them (collection rate = 58.1%). The results, measuring the past five to six years, showed that the respondents accumulated cultural capital through participation in scientific activities as well as in activities involving art, music, and literature. Given these quantified values, correlations between citizens' levels of accumulated cultural capital and their current scientific consumption behavior were studied. A statistical analysis of the two components of cultural capital (science and technology/art and literature) showed that people's accumulated scientific capital influenced their current behavior and revealed a correlation between the two components.

  18. Masculine Knowledge, the Public Good, and the Scientific Household of Réaumur.

    PubMed

    Terrall, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In the Royal Academy of Sciences of Paris (founded 1666), expressions of a masculine culture of science echoed contemporary language used to articulate the aristocracy's value to crown and state--even though the academy was not an aristocratic institution as such. In the eighteenth century, the pursuit of science became a new form of manly service to the crown, often described in terms of useful knowledge and benefit to the public good [le bien public]. This article explores the connection of academic scientific knowledge to the domestic spaces where it was made and, in particular, to the household of R.-A. Ferchault de Réaumur, an exemplary academician. Although Réaumur had neither wife nor children, a complex net of affective ties, some of them familial, linked the members of the household, which accommodated women (the artist Hélène Dumoustier and her female relatives) as well as men (a series of assistants, many of whom eventually entered the academy). As head of this dynamic household, Réaumur produced not only scientific results but also future academicians.

  19. Scientific composition and review of manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed dental journals.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Stephen C; McGivney, Glen P; Mazer, Sarah C

    2003-02-01

    This article provides an extensive tutorial for writers and reviewers involved with the preparation and evaluation of manuscripts submitted for publication in dental journals. The contents were compiled from the Instructions for Authors printed in various peer-reviewed dental journals and from feedback from 10 workshops conducted for the Editorial Review Board of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. The 10 major sections of a scientific manuscript are reviewed in detail in terms of content, format, and common errors; examples of good content are provided. The review process is described, and instructions on conducting fair and expeditious manuscript evaluations are provided for reviewers. In addition, a number of special topics are addressed, including potential conflicts of interest for an author, institutional review of experiments that involve human subjects or animals, and the reproduction of photographs and other images in color versus black and white. In summary, this article presents key guidelines to ensure compliance with the principles of sound scientific writing and the expeditious review of manuscripts prepared for publication in peer-reviewed dental journals.

  20. The Scientific Publications of Richard H. Dalitz, FRS (1925-2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitchison, Ian J.R.; Close, Frank E.; Gal, Avraham; Millener, D.John

    2006-03-29

    Professor Richard H. Dalitz passed away on January 13, 2006. He was almost 81 years old and his outstanding contributions are intimately connected to some of the major breakthroughs of the 20th century in particle and nuclear physics. These outstanding contributions go beyond the Dalitz Plot, Dalitz Pair and CDD poles that bear his name. He pioneered the theoretical study of strange baryon resonances, of baryon spectroscopy in the quark model, and of hypernuclei, to all of which he made lasting contributions. His formulation of the ''{theta} - {tau} puzzle'' led to the discovery that parity is not a symmetry of the weak interactions. A brief scientific evaluation of Dalitz's major contributions to particle and nuclear physics is hereby presented, followed by the first comprehensive list of his scientific publications, as assembled from several sources. The list is divided into two categories: the first, main part comprises Dalitz's research papers and reviews, including topics in the history of particle physics, biographies and reminescences; the second part lists book reviews, public lectures and obituaries authored by Dalitz, and books edited by him. This provides the first necessary step towards a more systematic research of the Dalitz heritage in modern physics.

  1. Clustering Scientific Publications Based on Citation Relations: A Systematic Comparison of Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Šubelj, Lovro; van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between different properties that may be considered desirable for a good clustering of publications. Overall, map equation methods appear to perform best in our analysis, suggesting that these methods deserve more attention from the bibliometric community.

  2. Clustering Scientific Publications Based on Citation Relations: A Systematic Comparison of Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Šubelj, Lovro; van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between different properties that may be considered desirable for a good clustering of publications. Overall, map equation methods appear to perform best in our analysis, suggesting that these methods deserve more attention from the bibliometric community. PMID:27124610

  3. Scientific publications in anesthesiology journals from East Asia: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Li-Qun; Sun, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2011-04-01

    The scientific publications in anesthesiology research from East Asian authors have not been reported yet. The present study was designed to analyze the contribution of articles from East Asia to anesthesiology research. Articles published in 17 journals in anesthesiology originating from Japan, China, and South Korea from 2000 to 2009 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Web of Science. From 2000 to 2009, there were 3,076 articles published from East Asia. During this period, there were a notable decrease in publications from Japan and modest increases in publications from both China and South Korea. The average 5-year impact factor of the published articles was similar among the three regions, and China had the highest average number of citations to each article. Anesthesia & Analgesia published more articles than any other journal from all three regions. Our analysis showed that Japan was the most productive region in East Asia, but there was a notable decrease in publications from Japan in 2000-2009. The impact factor of the articles suggests similar levels of scholarship. Anesthesia & Analgesia was the most popular journal in East Asia.

  4. Looking for landmarks: the role of expert review and bibliometric analysis in evaluating scientific publication outputs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Dolby, Kevin; Lynn, David; Walport, Mark

    2009-06-18

    To compare expert assessment with bibliometric indicators as tools to assess the quality and importance of scientific research papers. Shortly after their publication in 2005, the quality and importance of a cohort of nearly 700 Wellcome Trust (WT) associated research papers were assessed by expert reviewers; each paper was reviewed by two WT expert reviewers. After 3 years, we compared this initial assessment with other measures of paper impact. Shortly after publication, 62 (9%) of the 687 research papers were determined to describe at least a 'major addition to knowledge' -6 were thought to be 'landmark' papers. At an aggregate level, after 3 years, there was a strong positive association between expert assessment and impact as measured by number of citations and F1000 rating. However, there were some important exceptions indicating that bibliometric measures may not be sufficient in isolation as measures of research quality and importance, and especially not for assessing single papers or small groups of research publications. When attempting to assess the quality and importance of research papers, we found that sole reliance on bibliometric indicators would have led us to miss papers containing important results as judged by expert review. In particular, some papers that were highly rated by experts were not highly cited during the first three years after publication. Tools that link expert peer reviews of research paper quality and importance to more quantitative indicators, such as citation analysis would be valuable additions to the field of research assessment and evaluation.

  5. Revista de Saúde Pública in scientific publications on Violence and Health (1967-2015)

    PubMed Central

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Barros, Claudia; d’Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Peres, Maria Fernanda Tourinho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article retrieved the publications from the Revista de Saúde Pública journal (from 1967 to 2015) on violence and health, on the SciELO and PubMed bases, by searching for the terms “violence”, “suicide”, “aggression”, “bullying”, and “external causes”, registered in any part of the text. We found 130 articles (the first one published in 1974). We observed: increase of publications over time, with decrease in the last five years; similar production volume in lethal and non-lethal violence; later publication of the latter; few studies in qualitative research; mostly descriptive production; and visualization of the problem more by the acts than by contexts or motivations and aggressors. Social markers were little approached, appearing, from largest to smallest frequency, social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and generation. Human rights were little used and only recently used as analytical framework, connected more to gender than to social class. Although Revista de Saúde Pública has registered the theme in its publications, consolidating it as scientific production line, there is still great explanatory theoretical rarefaction and little intersectionality between violence, social inequalities, and human rights. PMID:27849291

  6. Promises and pitfalls of quantitative structure-activity relationship approaches for predicting metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zvinavashe, Elton; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2008-12-01

    The description of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models has been a topic for scientific research for more than 40 years and a topic within the regulatory framework for more than 20 years. At present, efforts on QSAR development are increasing because of their promise for supporting reduction, refinement, and/or replacement of animal toxicity experiments. However, their acceptance in risk assessment seems to require a more standardized and scientific underpinning of QSAR technology to avoid possible pitfalls. For this reason, guidelines for QSAR model development recently proposed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (2007) Guidance document on the validation of (quantitative) structure-activity relationships [(Q)SAR] models. OECD Environment Health and Safety Publications: Series on Testing and Assessment No. 69, Paris] are expected to help increase the acceptability of QSAR models for regulatory purposes. The guidelines recommend that QSAR models should be associated with (i) a defined end point, (ii) an unambiguous algorithm, (iii) a defined domain of applicability, (iv) appropriate measures of goodness-of-fit, robustness, and predictivity, and (v) a mechanistic interpretation, if possible [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (2007) Guidance document on the validation of (quantitative) structure-activity relationships [(Q)SAR] models. The present perspective provides an overview of these guidelines for QSAR model development and their rationale, as well as the promises and pitfalls of using QSAR approaches and these guidelines for predicting metabolism and toxicity of new and existing chemicals.

  7. [The representation of scientific publications of RAMS in WEB of science: evaluation of current indicators and prospects of their increasing].

    PubMed

    Starodubtsev, V I; Kuznetsov, S L; Kurakova, N G; Tsvetkova, L A

    2012-01-01

    The contribution scientific publications of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS) in the national publication stream, indexed by Web of Science over the past thirty years, was estimated. The indicators of publication activity that are necessary for the institutions of RAMS to achieve in short-term period the conformity with bibliometric indicators, established by Presidential Decree of May 7, 2012 (to increase the share of Russian publications in Web of Science to 2.44% in 2015) were calculated. It is shown that the current structure of global science, where publications in medicine make up for approximately one third of scientific publications in the world, set for RAMS scientists particularly difficult task: to double in three years the number of publications in Web of Sci. In the article are proposed the priorities and the necessary steps to fulfill this task.

  8. Global nanotechnology development from 1991 to 2012: patents, scientific publications, and effect of NSF funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsinchun; Roco, Mihail C.; Son, Jaebong; Jiang, Shan; Larson, Catherine A.; Gao, Qiang

    2013-09-01

    In a relatively short interval for an emerging technology, nanotechnology has made a significant economic impact in numerous sectors including semiconductor manufacturing, catalysts, medicine, agriculture, and energy production. A part of the United States (US) government investment in basic research has been realized in the last two decades through the National Science Foundation (NSF), beginning with the nanoparticle research initiative in 1991 and continuing with support from the National Nanotechnology Initiative after fiscal year 2001. This paper has two main goals: (a) present a longitudinal analysis of the global nanotechnology development as reflected in the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO) patents and Web of Science (WoS) publications in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) for the interval 1991-2012; and (b) identify the effect of basic research funded by NSF on both indicators. The interval has been separated into three parts for comparison purposes: 1991-2000, 2001-2010, and 2011-2012. The global trends of patents and scientific publications are presented. Bibliometric analysis, topic analysis, and citation network analysis methods are used to rank countries, institutions, technology subfields, and inventors contributing to nanotechnology development. We then, examined how these entities were affected by NSF funding and how they evolved over the past two decades. Results show that dedicated NSF funding used to support nanotechnology R&D was followed by an increased number of relevant patents and scientific publications, a greater diversity of technology topics, and a significant increase of citations. The NSF played important roles in the inventor community and served as a major contributor to numerous nanotechnology subfields.

  9. Scientific publications in endoscopic ultrasonography: changing trends in the third millennium.

    PubMed

    Fusaroli, Pietro; Kypreos, Dimitrios; Alma Petrini, Chiara Ada; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    The literature about endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is still very prolific although it was introduced in the early 1980s. We aimed to review last decade's scientific production and to compare it with our earlier data about the period from 1980 to 2000. EUS publications of the period January 2001 to January 2010 were retrieved. Reviews, prospective, and retrospective studies, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, surveys, guidelines, and case-series were assessed. Data were collected on the subject-matter, type of publication, number of patients included, publishing journal, most recent impact factor, year of publication, and country accredited for publication. A total of 1763 relevant papers were published in more than 250 journals. The main areas of research were pancreatic disorders, tumors of the gastrointestinal wall, the extrahepatic biliary tree, submucosal lesions, lung cancer, and mediastinal masses. It is interesting to note that the therapeutic applications of EUS accounted for a new field of investigation. The majority of articles comprised retrospective trials and reviews, followed by prospective studies and case series. However, a considerable number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses was retrieved, which were absent in the earlier survey. United States, Europe, and Japan still possessed a pivotal role on EUS research, but an increasing number of publications has also emerged from other countries. The available literature on EUS keeps expanding, encompassing not only its well-established diagnostic role, but also novel indications and therapeutic interventions. EUS has evolved into a valuable implement of modern clinical practice, with a critical effect on patients' management. A trend toward well-structured studies is evident.

  10. 77 FR 6796 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC); Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... AGENCY Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC); Ozone... Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office announces a public teleconference of the CASAC Ozone Review Panel to discuss its draft review of EPA's Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related...

  11. 78 FR 55326 - Notice of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory... is open to the public. The meeting will be hosted by the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, and led by Ambassador Eric Goosby, who leads implementation of the President's Emergency Plan for...

  12. 76 FR 52731 - Notice of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... of Public Meeting of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory... open to the public. The meeting will be hosted by the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, Ambassador Eric Goosby, who leads implementation of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief...

  13. Beyond Data Points and Research Contributions: The Personal Meaning and Value Associated with Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    As public participation in scientific research (PPSR) initiatives have expanded rapidly among private, public, and non-profit science research communities over the past decade, program managers and scholars regularly promote, evaluate, and manage such programs with a focus on the value and impact of PPSR efforts on the practice and relevancy of…

  14. Beyond Data Points and Research Contributions: The Personal Meaning and Value Associated with Public Participation in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    As public participation in scientific research (PPSR) initiatives have expanded rapidly among private, public, and non-profit science research communities over the past decade, program managers and scholars regularly promote, evaluate, and manage such programs with a focus on the value and impact of PPSR efforts on the practice and relevancy of…

  15. Public health benefits and risks of fish consumption: current scientific evidence v. media coverage.

    PubMed

    Pasquaré, Federico A; Bettinetti, Roberta; Fumagalli, Sonia; Vignati, Davide A

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate if and how the current degree of scientific uncertainty about the safety of fish consumption is incorporated at the media level. We used a dedicated software (TalTac®) to investigate the content of 169 news articles related to ‘mercury and fish consumption’ that appeared from 1990 to 2010 in the two Italian broadsheets with the highest circulation figures, in order to identify journalistic frames used in the coverage of benefits v. risks associated with fish consumption. Hypotheses were made on how the public might change fish consumption patterns as a result of media coverage. Italy. The two newspapers have different agendas in covering the issue. La Repubblica appears to support the view that, besides health benefits, there may be risks associated with fish consumption, while Corriere della Sera emphasizes health benefits more than possible risks. Depending on the preferred information source, the public could: (i) reduce its fish intake; (ii) increase its fish intake; or (iii) become confused about the problem and sceptical towards the media, as a result of conflicting journalistic frames. The Italian media, in cooperation with scientists, public health nutritionists and dietitians, should place more emphasis on the existence of a few fish species with high to very high Hg levels and relatively low contents of beneficial n-3 fatty acids (e.g. swordfish and shark). This would enable consumers to make more educated purchasing decisions to maximize the benefits of n-3 intake while reducing possible risks from consuming Hg-contaminated fish.

  16. Choosing statistical tests: part 12 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Röhrig, Bernd; Hommel, Gerhard; Blettner, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The interpretation of scientific articles often requires an understanding of the methods of inferential statistics. This article informs the reader about frequently used statistical tests and their correct application. The most commonly used statistical tests were identified through a selective literature search on the methodology of medical research publications. These tests are discussed in this article, along with a selection of other standard methods of inferential statistics. Readers who are acquainted not just with descriptive methods, but also with Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t test will be able to interpret a large proportion of medical research articles. Criteria are presented for choosing the proper statistical test to be used out of the most frequently applied tests. An algorithm and a table are provided to facilitate the selection of the appropriate test.

  17. Art, Aesthetics, Design, And Data: Reaching The Public Through Scientific Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmon, R.; Allen, J.; Ward, K.; Carlowicz, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary challenge in science communication is attracting a broad audience while maintaining technical accuracy. Scientific topics are often and reflexively considered boring, dry, or difficult by non-scientists. One way to overcome this hurdle and gain the public's attention is through beautiful and striking imagery. Imaging techniques borrowed from art and design can generate interest in technical or abstract concepts. NASA's Earth Observatory routinely uses imagery to communicate current Earth science research. Earth Observatory designers collaborate with NASA scientists to produce imagery using the principles of data visualization. Curiously, the popularity of images tends to be inversely correlated with the scientific content. Simple photographs and illustrations tend to be viewed more often, and more widely shared, than maps and graphs. However, maps of tree density and melt on the Greenland ice sheet are among the most popular images published on the Earth Observatory. These graphics share some features both with each other and our most-viewed natural-color images: clear, relatable themes, intuitive color palettes, and a clean aesthetic. These similarities may explain their success, and provide a roadmap for future data-rich visualizations that engage viewers while communicating complex science.This map of tree density in the united states, based on the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset (NBCD) is one of the NASA Earth Observatory's most popular data-based images. (Map by Robert Simmon, based on data from Woods Hole Research Center.)

  18. Disasters related to droughts and public health - a review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Alpino, Tais Ariza; de Sena, Aderita Ricarda Martins; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, the history of droughts has been marked by constant social and health tragedies, with estimates of up to 3 million deaths from the early 19th century until the late 20th century. There is a record of nearly 32,000 events related to the above and more than 96 million people were affected between 1991 and 2010. Although droughts have historically brought disasters to Brazil, which was noted in the scientific expeditions of Arthur Neiva and Belisario Penna that documented these droughts, there have not been many studies on them. The objective of this paper is to present a revision of the scientific articles related to droughts and public health. The following databases were used: PubMed, the Preparation and Response to Disasters Portal from BVS and the Capes Periodical Portal. The descriptors drought and health were used to search titles and summaries of articles in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Among the repercussions related to health that were discovered: malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies, mental health problems, issues relating to water and air quality and commitments made concerning access to health services. As there is a trend for more intense droughts and a scarcity of water until 2030, there is an urgent need for more research and studies in these areas.

  19. The Einstein Observatory: A New Public/Private Observatory Complex for Community Education and Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowell, J.

    1999-12-01

    The Development Authority of Cherokee County (Georgia) is leading a public/private partnership of business/industry professionals, educators, and university scientists that seeks to develop a national prototype educational and scientific research facility for grades K-12, as well as college-level research, that will inspire our youth to become literate in science and technology. In particular, the goal is to make this complex a science, math, and engineering magnet learning facility and to raise the average SAT scores of local area students by 100 points. A dark-site mountain, nestled on the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains at the northern-most edge of Atlanta, will become the home for the "Einstein" Observatory. The complex will have four telescopes: one 50-inch, one 24-inch, and two 16-inch telescopes. Each telescope will have digital cameras and an optic-fiber feed to a single, medium-resolution spectroscope. All four telescopes will be electronically accessible from local schools. Professional astronomers will establish suitable observational research projects and will lead K-12 and college students in the acquisition and analysis of data. Astronomers will also assist the local area schoolteachers in methods for nurturing children's scientific inquiry. The observatory mountain will have 100 platform locations for individual viewing by visiting families, school groups, and amateur astronomers. The Atlanta Astronomer Club will provide numerous evening programs and viewing opportunities for the general public. An accompanying Planetarium & Science Center will be located on the nearby campus of Reinhardt College. The Planetarium & Science Center will be integrated with Reinhardt College's theme of learning focused upon studying the past and present as a basis for projecting the future.

  20. Half-century of Dental Public Health research: bibliometric analysis of world scientific trends.

    PubMed

    Celeste, Roger Keller; Broadbent, Jonathan M; Moyses, Samuel Jorge

    2016-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of Dental Public Health (DPH) scientific publications within core DPH journals over time and to compare DPH journals with DPH content from other journal types. The Scopus database was used to identify DPH-relevant articles published from 1965 to 2014 in three core DPH journals (DPHJs) and from 2005 to 2014 in Dental Journals (DJs), Public Health (PHJs) and General Journals (GJs). To identify DPH-relevant articles, a search strategy with words about oral health and public health was applied to each group of journals. Research themes were created by grouping similar keywords to report changes in the focus of articles over time. The most productive journals, countries, institutions and authors were also estimated for each set of journals. In 2005-2014, 60 297 articles were identified, of which 2.7% in DPHJs, 10.4% from PHJs, 38.2% from GJs and 48.7% from DJs. DPH-relevant articles published in the core DPHJs, DJs and PHJs tended to share a strong emphasis on dental caries, healthcare/services research on children and adolescents. Over time, the focus in the DPHJs has increased towards health behaviour/promotion/education, quality of life and socioeconomic factors. In the last decade, those themes were more frequent in DPH journals than in the other groups. DPH research published in DPHJs had some unique features and greater focus on the themes of quality of life, socioeconomic factors and health behaviour/education/promotion than other groups of journals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Scientific publications in obstetrics and gynecology journals from China, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Hao, Jun-Feng; Xin, Lei

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the output of scientific publications in obstetrics and gynecology journals from 3 principal regions of China: mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Information on article numbers, impact factors, citation reports, and publication in high-impact obstetrics and gynecology journals by Chinese authors between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2009, was extracted from PubMed and WoS databases. Comparisons of quantity and quality were done by Kruskal-Wallis and rank-sum tests. There were 3044 articles from mainland China (n=1042), Taiwan (n=1304), and Hong Kong (n=698). The cumulative impact factors and citations of articles from Taiwan were highest among the 3 regions. In terms of average impact factor and number of citations per article, Hong Kong exceeded mainland China and Taiwan. Fertility and Sterility, Human Reproduction and Gynecologic Oncology were among the most popular obstetrics and gynecology journals used by authors in the 3 regions. The annual number of articles published in obstetrics and gynecology journals from the 3 regions of China increased during the past decade, especially for mainland China. However, the quality of articles from mainland China arouses attention because the average citation of articles from Hong Kong and Taiwan was higher than that of articles from the mainland. © 2013.

  2. Country Differences and Changes in Focus of Scientific Tobacco Control Publications between 2000 and 2012 in Europe.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Marc C; Nagelhout, Gera E

    2016-01-01

    The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) stresses the importance of scientific research. We examined the differences between 31 European countries regarding quantity and focus of tobacco control research publications. PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycInfo were searched for peer-reviewed articles on tobacco, written by European authors, published between 2000 and 2012. For 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012 we further identified the main focus of the publication. The volume of European tobacco control scientific publications had almost doubled. Scandinavian countries had most publications per inhabitant, while Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia had relatively little research output. There was a smaller increase in publications about harm from tobacco, relative to publications about treatment, and education, and to publications about environmental interventions. In 2012, 49% of all publications were about health, while the total number of publications on environmental interventions was relatively small (10%). Research output had almost doubled, in line with global trends, but is still unevenly distributed across Europe. Although we observed a shift in European publications away from the harm of tobacco towards protecting smokers and changing the environment, the field is still dominated by publications on smoking and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Enhancing Scientific Collaboration, Transparency, and Public Access: Utilizing the Second Life Platform to Convene a Scientific Conference in 3-D Virtual Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies reveal a general mistrust of science as well as a distorted perception of the scientific method by the public at-large. Concurrently, the number of science undergraduate and graduate students is in decline. By taking advantage of emergent technologies not only for direct public outreach but also to enhance public accessibility to the science process, it may be possible to both begin a reversal of popular scientific misconceptions and to engage a new generation of scientists. The Second Life platform is a 3-D virtual world produced and operated by Linden Research, Inc., a privately owned company instituted to develop new forms of immersive entertainment. Free and downloadable to the public, Second Life offers an imbedded physics engine, streaming audio and video capability, and unlike other "multiplayer" software, the objects and inhabitants of Second Life are entirely designed and created by its users, providing an open-ended experience without the structure of a traditional video game. Already, educational institutions, virtual museums, and real-world businesses are utilizing Second Life for teleconferencing, pre-visualization, and distance education, as well as to conduct traditional business. However, the untapped potential of Second Life lies in its versatility, where the limitations of traditional scientific meeting venues do not exist, and attendees need not be restricted by prohibitive travel costs. It will be shown that the Second Life system enables scientific authors and presenters at a "virtual conference" to display figures and images at full resolution, employ audio-visual content typically not available to conference organizers, and to perform demonstrations or premier three-dimensional renderings of objects, processes, or information. An enhanced presentation like those possible with Second Life would be more engaging to non- scientists, and such an event would be accessible to the general users of Second Life, who could have an

  4. 42 CFR 82.30 - How will NIOSH inform the public of any plans to change scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... change scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process to maintain methods reasonably current with scientific progress? 82.30 Section 82.30 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... methods reasonably current with scientific progress? Periodically, NIOSH will publish a notice in the...

  5. 42 CFR 82.30 - How will NIOSH inform the public of any plans to change scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... change scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process to maintain methods reasonably current with scientific progress? 82.30 Section 82.30 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... methods reasonably current with scientific progress? Periodically, NIOSH will publish a notice in the...

  6. 42 CFR 82.30 - How will NIOSH inform the public of any plans to change scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... change scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process to maintain methods reasonably current with scientific progress? 82.30 Section 82.30 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... methods reasonably current with scientific progress? Periodically, NIOSH will publish a notice in the...

  7. 42 CFR 82.30 - How will NIOSH inform the public of any plans to change scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... change scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process to maintain methods reasonably current with scientific progress? 82.30 Section 82.30 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... methods reasonably current with scientific progress? Periodically, NIOSH will publish a notice in the...

  8. 42 CFR 82.30 - How will NIOSH inform the public of any plans to change scientific elements underlying the dose...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... change scientific elements underlying the dose reconstruction process to maintain methods reasonably current with scientific progress? 82.30 Section 82.30 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... methods reasonably current with scientific progress? Periodically, NIOSH will publish a notice in the...

  9. Public funding of scientific research: Policy criteria for investigator discretion, sponsor`s intent, and accountability for outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Branscomb, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    The author explores when government expenditures for scientific research are justified and how should the funds be allocated to purposes and performers. The definition of scientific research includes basic, fundamental and application of results. Technology development is viewed as a critical link between societal goals and the research that is pursued by virtue of society`s commitment to those goals. Thus technology is considered the most important source of demand for science in the sense of motivation and financial support. The growing budget pressure on public funding of scientific research exacerbates tensions that have accompanied public funding of research for a long time. The author explores policies of the current administration and those of the congress and suggests a methodology for decision makers to apply in public funding of research. 33 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The rate of growth in scientific publication and the decline in coverage provided by Science Citation Index

    PubMed Central

    von Ins, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The growth rate of scientific publication has been studied from 1907 to 2007 using available data from a number of literature databases, including Science Citation Index (SCI) and Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Traditional scientific publishing, that is publication in peer-reviewed journals, is still increasing although there are big differences between fields. There are no indications that the growth rate has decreased in the last 50 years. At the same time publication using new channels, for example conference proceedings, open archives and home pages, is growing fast. The growth rate for SCI up to 2007 is smaller than for comparable databases. This means that SCI was covering a decreasing part of the traditional scientific literature. There are also clear indications that the coverage by SCI is especially low in some of the scientific areas with the highest growth rate, including computer science and engineering sciences. The role of conference proceedings, open access archives and publications published on the net is increasing, especially in scientific fields with high growth rates, but this has only partially been reflected in the databases. The new publication channels challenge the use of the big databases in measurements of scientific productivity or output and of the growth rate of science. Because of the declining coverage and this challenge it is problematic that SCI has been used and is used as the dominant source for science indicators based on publication and citation numbers. The limited data available for social sciences show that the growth rate in SSCI was remarkably low and indicate that the coverage by SSCI was declining over time. National Science Indicators from Thomson Reuters is based solely on SCI, SSCI and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). Therefore the declining coverage of the citation databases problematizes the use of this source. PMID:20700371

  11. The rate of growth in scientific publication and the decline in coverage provided by Science Citation Index.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; von Ins, Markus

    2010-09-01

    The growth rate of scientific publication has been studied from 1907 to 2007 using available data from a number of literature databases, including Science Citation Index (SCI) and Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Traditional scientific publishing, that is publication in peer-reviewed journals, is still increasing although there are big differences between fields. There are no indications that the growth rate has decreased in the last 50 years. At the same time publication using new channels, for example conference proceedings, open archives and home pages, is growing fast. The growth rate for SCI up to 2007 is smaller than for comparable databases. This means that SCI was covering a decreasing part of the traditional scientific literature. There are also clear indications that the coverage by SCI is especially low in some of the scientific areas with the highest growth rate, including computer science and engineering sciences. The role of conference proceedings, open access archives and publications published on the net is increasing, especially in scientific fields with high growth rates, but this has only partially been reflected in the databases. The new publication channels challenge the use of the big databases in measurements of scientific productivity or output and of the growth rate of science. Because of the declining coverage and this challenge it is problematic that SCI has been used and is used as the dominant source for science indicators based on publication and citation numbers. The limited data available for social sciences show that the growth rate in SSCI was remarkably low and indicate that the coverage by SSCI was declining over time. National Science Indicators from Thomson Reuters is based solely on SCI, SSCI and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). Therefore the declining coverage of the citation databases problematizes the use of this source.

  12. Connecting the Public to Scientific Research Data - Science On a Sphere°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, M. A.; Russell, E. L.; Science on a Sphere Datasets

    2011-12-01

    Connecting the Public to Scientific Research Data - Science On a Sphere° Maurice Henderson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Elizabeth Russell, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Science On a Sphere° is a six foot animated globe developed by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, as a means to display global scientific research data in an intuitive, engaging format in public forums. With over 70 permanent installations of SOS around the world in science museums, visitor's centers and universities, the audience that enjoys SOS yearly is substantial, wide-ranging, and diverse. Through partnerships with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, the SOS Data Catalog (http://sos.noaa.gov/datasets/) has grown to a collection of over 350 datasets from NOAA, NASA, and many others. Using an external projection system, these datasets are displayed onto the sphere creating a seamless global image. In a cross-site evaluation of Science On a Sphere°, 82% of participants said yes, seeing information displayed on a sphere changed their understanding of the information. This unique technology captivates viewers and exposes them to scientific research data in a way that is accessible, presentable, and understandable. The datasets that comprise the SOS Data Catalog are scientific research data that have been formatted for display on SOS. By formatting research data into visualizations that can be used on SOS, NOAA and NASA are able to turn research data into educational materials that are easily accessible for users. In many cases, visualizations do not need to be modified because SOS uses a common map projection. The SOS Data Catalog has become a "one-stop shop" for a broad range of global datasets from across NOAA and NASA, and as a result, the traffic on the site is more than just SOS users. While the target audience for this site is SOS users, many

  13. A bibliometric study of the scientific publications on patient-reported outcomes in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Marta; Leon, Leticia; Povedano, Francisco Javier; Abasolo, Lydia; Perez-Nieto, Miguel Angel; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    We have conducted a bibliometric study of the scientific publications on patient-reported outcomes in the field of rheumatology. SCOPUS was the database used in this bibliometric study. We performed two searches. The main search involved selecting the documents published between 2000 and 2014 limited to top-tier journals addressing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases, using specific descriptors together with the operator and main descriptor "patient-reported outcomes" (PROs), and we performed a secondary search, with the following specific descriptors: "pain," "functional capacity," and "fatigue." We used bibliometric indicators for articles distribution (Price's law for the increase of scientific literature and Bradford's law for dispersion of articles). We also calculated the participation index of the different countries. A total of 983 original articles were published between 2000 and 2014. Our results confirmed the fulfilment of Price's law (correlation coefficient r = 0.9385 after linear adjustment). The average number of articles per Bradford Zone was 327.6. A total of 30 different journals were published. The type of growth for the descriptors "pain" (r(2) = 0.5417 compared to r(2) = 0.4839) and "fatigue" (r(2) = 06276 compared to r(2) = 0.5544) is exponential, whereas it is linear for the descriptor "functional capacity" (r(2) = 0.6769 compared to r(2) = 0.3779). This study revealed significant linear growth of patient-related outcomes in global terms, as well as upward trends for most of the citation-based bibliometric indices, especially significant from 2010 to 2014. Pain and fatigue have greater growth as PRO concepts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scientific Publication Performance of Turkish Anaesthesia Clinics in High Impact Factor International Journals Between 2005 and 2014: A Bibliometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Hüseyin Oğuz; Babazade, Rovnat; Turan, Oğuz Alp; Babazade, Betül; Koyuncu, Onur; Turan, Alparslan

    2017-01-01

    Objective International scientific publication productivity is a tangible indicator for the accuracy of scientific policies. The quality of scientific publications is not increasing despite the fast increase in the publication count in Turkey. The international publication activities of Turkish anaesthesia clinics have not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the high quality scientific productivity of Turkish anesthesia clinics within the last 10 years. Methods We searched for studies conducted by anaesthesiologists in Turkey within the last 10 years and published in journals listed under the medical subject categories of anaesthesiology and critical care using ‘Thomson Reuters InCites’ and PubMed databases. We recorded publication year, subject, method, citation count and origin of each paper and conducted descriptive analyses. Results There were 630 papers meeting our inclusion criteria. Among those, 525 (83%) were studies on anaesthesia, 66 (10%) were studies on critical care and 39 (6%) were studies on pain. The average citation count was 9.90. There were 376 controlled/randomized controlled trials, 98 observational studies, 66 laboratory studies, 64 case series/reports, 5 reviews and 21 letters to the editor. Studies were conducted by universities (82.4%), by training and research hospitals (15.56%), by state and military hospitals (0.63%) and by physicians in private practice (1.27%). Baskent University had the highest publication count, Istanbul University had the highest citation count and Trakya University had the highest publication count per faculty teaching staff. Conclusion The high-impact scientific productivity of Turkish anesthesia clinics is in a downward trend in the last 10 years, and the average citation count is lower than the global average. PMID:28377836

  15. Tackling the "so what" problem in scientific research: a systems-based approach to resource and publication tracking.

    PubMed

    Harris, Paul A; Kirby, Jacqueline; Swafford, Jonathan A; Edwards, Terri L; Zhang, Minhua; Yarbrough, Tonya R; Lane, Lynda D; Helmer, Tara; Bernard, Gordon R; Pulley, Jill M

    2015-08-01

    Peer-reviewed publications are one measure of scientific productivity. From a project, program, or institutional perspective, publication tracking provides the quantitative data necessary to guide the prudent stewardship of federal, foundation, and institutional investments by identifying the scientific return for the types of support provided. In this article, the authors describe the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research's (VICTR's) development and implementation of a semiautomated process through which publications are automatically detected in PubMed and adjudicated using a "just-in-time" workflow by a known pool of researchers (from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College) who receive support from Vanderbilt's Clinical and Translational Science Award. Since implementation, the authors have (1) seen a marked increase in the number of publications citing VICTR support, (2) captured at a more granular level the relationship between specific resources/services and scientific output, (3) increased awareness of VICTR's scientific portfolio, and (4) increased efficiency in complying with annual National Institutes of Health progress reports. They present the methodological framework and workflow, measures of impact for the first 30 months, and a set of practical lessons learned to inform others considering a systems-based approach for resource and publication tracking. They learned that contacting multiple authors from a single publication can increase the accuracy of the resource attribution process in the case of multidisciplinary scientific projects. They also found that combining positive (e.g., congratulatory e-mails) and negative (e.g., not allowing future resource requests until adjudication is complete) triggers can increase compliance with publication attribution requests.

  16. Scientific Publication Performance of Turkish Anaesthesia Clinics in High Impact Factor International Journals Between 2005 and 2014: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Hüseyin Oğuz; Babazade, Rovnat; Turan, Oğuz Alp; Babazade, Betül; Koyuncu, Onur; Turan, Alparslan

    2017-02-01

    International scientific publication productivity is a tangible indicator for the accuracy of scientific policies. The quality of scientific publications is not increasing despite the fast increase in the publication count in Turkey. The international publication activities of Turkish anaesthesia clinics have not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the high quality scientific productivity of Turkish anesthesia clinics within the last 10 years. We searched for studies conducted by anaesthesiologists in Turkey within the last 10 years and published in journals listed under the medical subject categories of anaesthesiology and critical care using 'Thomson Reuters InCites' and PubMed databases. We recorded publication year, subject, method, citation count and origin of each paper and conducted descriptive analyses. There were 630 papers meeting our inclusion criteria. Among those, 525 (83%) were studies on anaesthesia, 66 (10%) were studies on critical care and 39 (6%) were studies on pain. The average citation count was 9.90. There were 376 controlled/randomized controlled trials, 98 observational studies, 66 laboratory studies, 64 case series/reports, 5 reviews and 21 letters to the editor. Studies were conducted by universities (82.4%), by training and research hospitals (15.56%), by state and military hospitals (0.63%) and by physicians in private practice (1.27%). Baskent University had the highest publication count, Istanbul University had the highest citation count and Trakya University had the highest publication count per faculty teaching staff. The high-impact scientific productivity of Turkish anesthesia clinics is in a downward trend in the last 10 years, and the average citation count is lower than the global average.

  17. Tackling the “So What” Problem in Scientific Research: A Systems-Based Approach to Resource and Publication Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paul A.; Kirby, Jacqueline; Swafford, Jonathan A.; Edwards, Terri L.; Zhang, Minhua; Yarbrough, Tonya R.; Lane, Lynda D.; Helmer, Tara; Bernard, Gordon R.; Pulley, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Peer-reviewed publications are one measure of scientific productivity. From a project, program, or institutional perspective, publication tracking provides the quantitative data necessary to guide the prudent stewardship of federal, foundation, and institutional investments by identifying the scientific return for the types of support provided. In this article, the authors describe the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research’s (VICTR’s) development and implementation of a semi-automated process through which publications are automatically detected in PubMed and adjudicated using a “just-in-time” workflow by a known pool of researchers (from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College) who receive support from Vanderbilt’s Clinical and Translational Science Award. Since implementation, the authors have: (1) seen a marked increase in the number of publications citing VICTR support; (2) captured at a more granular level the relationship between specific resources/services and scientific output; (3) increased awareness of VICTR’s scientific portfolio; and (4) increased efficiency in complying with annual National Institutes of Health progress reports. They present the methodological framework and workflow, measures of impact for the first 30 months, and a set of practical lessons learned to inform others considering a systems-based approach for resource and publication tracking. They learned that contacting multiple authors from a single publication can increase the accuracy of the resource attribution process in the case of multidisciplinary scientific projects. They also found that combining positive (e.g., congratulatory e-mails) and negative (e.g., not allowing future resource requests until adjudication is complete) triggers can increase compliance with publication attribution requests. PMID:25901872

  18. Scientific publications from Arab world in leading journals of Integrative and Complementary Medicine: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M

    2015-09-04

    Bibliometric analysis is increasingly employed as a useful tool to assess the quantity and quality of research performance. The specific goal of the current study was to evaluate the performance of research output originating from Arab world and published in international Integrative and Complementary Medicine (ICM) journals. Original scientific publications and reviews from the 22 Arab countries that were published in 22 international peer-reviewed ICM journals during all previous years up to December 31(st) 2013, were screened using the Web of Science databases. Five hundred and ninety-one documents were retrieved from 19 ICM journals. The h-index of the set of papers under study was 47. The highest h-index was 27 for Morocco, 21 for Jordan, followed by 19 for each Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), and Egypt, and the lowest h-index was 1 for each of Comoros, Qatar, and Syrian Arab Republic. No data related to ICM were published from Djibouti, and Mauritania. After adjusting for economy and population power, Somalia (89), Morocco (32.5), Egypt (31.1), Yemen (21.4), and Palestine (21.2) had the highest research productivity. The total number of citations was 9,466, with an average citation of 16 per document. The study identified 262 (44.3 %) documents with 39 countries in Arab-foreign country collaborations. Arab authors collaborated most with countries in Europe (24.2 %), followed by countries in the Asia-Pacific region (9.8 %). Scientific research output in the ICM field in the Arab world region is increasing. Most of publications from Arab world in ICM filed were driven by societal use of medicinal plants and herbs. Search for new therapies from available low cost medicinal plants in Arab world has motivated many researchers in academia and pharmaceutical industry. Further investigation is required to support these findings in a wider journal as well as to improve research output in the field of ICM from Arab world region by investing in more national and

  19. Influence of PAHO publications on scientific production in the health field in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A

    1996-06-01

    The influence and impact of PAHO publications on scientific production in the field of health in Latin America and the Caribbean was the subject of a study based on a sample of 45 biomedical journals published between 1985 and 1992 in 17 countries of the Region. A total of 8644 works (mostly articles), containing 82,143 citations, were studied. Of these, 3,806 citations were found to refer to works published by PAHO Headquarters in Washington, D.C.-the Boletín de la Oficina Sanitaria Panamericana receiving 1,444 (38% of the total), the English-language Bulletin of PAHO receiving 222 (6%), works in PAHO's Scientific Publications Series receiving 1064 (28%), and works in other PAHO publications receiving 1076 (28%). Overall, PAHO publications appeared to account for a significant share of the citations studied.

  20. Chaos: A New Scientific Paradigm--Or Science by Public Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresden, Max

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of chaos as a major scientific subject and its place in historical, scientific, and technological context. Three sections provide (1) an overview of the scientific paradigm; (2) a review of the ideology of classical mechanics; and (3) examples of classical systems behaving in peculiar, nonintuitive manners. (MDH)

  1. Chaos: A New Scientific Paradigm--Or Science by Public Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresden, Max

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of chaos as a major scientific subject and its place in historical, scientific, and technological context. Three sections provide (1) an overview of the scientific paradigm; (2) a review of the ideology of classical mechanics; and (3) examples of classical systems behaving in peculiar, nonintuitive manners. (MDH)

  2. Are Lipases Still Important Biocatalysts? A Study of Scientific Publications and Patents for Technological Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Daiha, Karina de Godoy; Angeli, Renata; de Oliveira, Sabrina Dias; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    The great potential of lipases is known since 1930 when the work of J. B. S. Haldane was published. After eighty-five years of studies and developments, are lipases still important biocatalysts? For answering this question the present work investigated the technological development of four important industrial sectors where lipases are applied: production of detergent formulations; organic synthesis, focusing on kinetic resolution, production of biodiesel, and production of food and feed products. The analysis was made based on research publications and patent applications, working as scientific and technological indicators, respectively. Their evolution, interaction, the major players of each sector and the main subject matters disclosed in patent documents were discussed. Applying the concept of technology life cycle, S-curves were built by plotting cumulative patent data over time to monitor the attractiveness of each technology for investment. The results lead to a conclusion that the use of lipases as biocatalysts is still a relevant topic for the industrial sector, but developments are still needed for lipase biocatalysis to reach its full potential, which are expected to be achieved within the third, and present, wave of biocatalysis. PMID:26111144

  3. Are Lipases Still Important Biocatalysts? A Study of Scientific Publications and Patents for Technological Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Daiha, Karina de Godoy; Angeli, Renata; de Oliveira, Sabrina Dias; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    The great potential of lipases is known since 1930 when the work of J. B. S. Haldane was published. After eighty-five years of studies and developments, are lipases still important biocatalysts? For answering this question the present work investigated the technological development of four important industrial sectors where lipases are applied: production of detergent formulations; organic synthesis, focusing on kinetic resolution, production of biodiesel, and production of food and feed products. The analysis was made based on research publications and patent applications, working as scientific and technological indicators, respectively. Their evolution, interaction, the major players of each sector and the main subject matters disclosed in patent documents were discussed. Applying the concept of technology life cycle, S-curves were built by plotting cumulative patent data over time to monitor the attractiveness of each technology for investment. The results lead to a conclusion that the use of lipases as biocatalysts is still a relevant topic for the industrial sector, but developments are still needed for lipase biocatalysis to reach its full potential, which are expected to be achieved within the third, and present, wave of biocatalysis.

  4. Scientific publications about DNA structure-function and PCR technique in Costa Rica: a historic view (1953-2003).

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, Federico J

    2004-09-01

    The spreading of knowledge depends on the access to the information and its immediate use. Models are useful to explain specific phenomena. The scientific community accepts some models in Biology after a period of time, once it has evidence to support it. The model of the structure and function of the DNA proposed by Watson & Crick (1953) was not the exception, since a few years later the DNA model was finally accepted. In Costa Rica, DNA function was first mentioned in 1970, in the magazine Biologia Tropical (Tropical Biology Magazine), more than 15 years after its first publication in a scientific journal. An opposite situation occurs with technical innovations. If the efficiency of a new scientific technique is proved in a compelling way, then the acceptance by the community comes swiftly. This was the case of the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR. The first PCR machine in Costa Rica arrived in 1991, only three years after its publication.

  5. 76 FR 76725 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC); Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC); Ozone Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental... a public meeting of the CASAC Ozone Review Panel to conduct a peer review of EPA's Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review...

  6. Group Projects as a Method of Promoting Student Scientific Communication and Collaboration in a Public Health Microbiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kristen L. W.; Baker, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication of scientific and medical information and collaborative work are important skills for students pursuing careers in health professions and other biomedical sciences. In addition, group work and active learning can increase student engagement and analytical skills. Students in our public health microbiology class were required to work…

  7. Utilizing Public Scientific Web Lectures to Teach Contemporary Physics at the High School Level: A Case Study of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development) that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary…

  8. Utilizing Public Scientific Web Lectures to Teach Contemporary Physics at the High School Level: A Case Study of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development) that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary…

  9. Map of Scientific Publication in the Field of Educational Sciences and Teacher Education in Turkey: A Bibliometric Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çiftçi, Serife Koza; Danisman, Sahin; Yalçin, Mikail; Tosuntas, Sule Betül; Ay, Yusuf; Sölpük, Nihan; Karadag, Engin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to create a map for the scientific publications in the field of educational sciences and teacher education in Turkey. A bibliometric analysis was carried out with 7681 articles published in 32 different peer reviewed journals between 2005 and 2014. The findings show that one third of all articles were published in core journals…

  10. Motor neurone disease: diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy L

    2013-02-01

    The misdiagnosis of MND (particularly of the ALS phenotype), is uncommon. Atypical presentations, particularly of focal onset and with pure LMN or UMN signs, present a more difficult diagnostic challenge, although perhaps reassuringly, treatable mimics are rare. A working knowledge of potential alternative conditions and MND diagnostic pitfalls should help to reduce the misdiagnosis rate, particularly if the key points are considered.

  11. The pitfalls of container production

    Treesearch

    Wayne Bell

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes ten of the biggest “pitfalls” or challenges I have encountered in my experience growing southern pine seedlings in containers over the past 30 years. Learning from challenges is an important part of growing successful nursery operations.

  12. [Publication pressure and citation stress; the influence of achievement indicators on scientific practice].

    PubMed

    Tijdink, Joeri K; de Rijcke, Sarah; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Smulders, Yvo M; Wouters, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The journal impact factor (JIF) and the Hirsch index, are two widely used parameters for evaluating scientific achievement. The JIF is a parameter which shows the citation score of a journal over the previous two years. The Hirsch index is a simple index to measure the citation performance of individual scientists. These achievement indicators can be used to evaluate research and are thus an indicator for scientific output. Nevertheless, they should not be used as a measurement of scientific quality. Scientific quality not only depends on citation scores, but also on originality, societal and scientific impact, robust methodology and validity and should therefore be evaluated on these parameters. Little is known about the influence that these factors have on science in general and on scientists but there is some evidence suggesting detrimental effects on scientific practice and quality.

  13. Revista de Saúde Pública in scientific publications on Violence and Health (1967-2015).

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Barros, Claudia; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Peres, Maria Fernanda Tourinho

    2016-11-10

    This article retrieved the publications from the Revista de Saúde Pública journal (from 1967 to 2015) on violence and health, on the SciELO and PubMed bases, by searching for the terms "violence", "suicide", "aggression", "bullying", and "external causes", registered in any part of the text. We found 130 articles (the first one published in 1974). We observed: increase of publications over time, with decrease in the last five years; similar production volume in lethal and non-lethal violence; later publication of the latter; few studies in qualitative research; mostly descriptive production; and visualization of the problem more by the acts than by contexts or motivations and aggressors. Social markers were little approached, appearing, from largest to smallest frequency, social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and generation. Human rights were little used and only recently used as analytical framework, connected more to gender than to social class. Although Revista de Saúde Pública has registered the theme in its publications, consolidating it as scientific production line, there is still great explanatory theoretical rarefaction and little intersectionality between violence, social inequalities, and human rights. RESUMO A produção da Revista de Saúde Pública (de 1967 até 2015) sobre violência e saúde foi recuperada nas bases SciELO e PubMed utilizando-se os termos "violência", "suicídio", "agressões", "bullying" e "causas externas", registrados em qualquer parte do texto. Foram encontrados 130 artigos (o primeiro deles publicado em 1974). Constatou-se: aumento das publicações no tempo, com decréscimo nos últimos cinco anos; volume similar de produção em violência letal e não letal; publicação mais tardia desta última; poucos estudos em pesquisa qualitativa; produção majoritariamente descritiva; e visibilização do problema, mais pelos atos que pelos contextos ou motivações e agressores. Os marcadores sociais foram pouco tematizados

  14. 78 FR 68439 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Rescheduled Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...) to consider and review, Scientific Uncertainties Associated with Corn Rootworm Resistance Monitoring for Bt Corn Plant Incorporated Protectants (PIPs). The meeting was announced in the Federal...

  15. Contribution of Oswaldo Paulo Forattini to public health: analysis of scientific production.

    PubMed

    Reis, Juliana Gonçalves; Kobayashi, Keilla Miki; Ueno, Helene Mariko; Ribeiro, Cristiane Martins; Cardoso, Telma Abdalla de Oliveira

    2016-12-22

    To analyze the main characteristics of the scientific production of Oswaldo Paulo Forattini, researcher and, for 40 years, editor of Revista de Saúde Pública. Descriptive study with bibliometric approach conducted in three steps. (1) identification of bibliographic records using the following search strategy: "Oswaldo Paulo Forattini" OR "Forattini OP" OR "Forattini" up information sources Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed, in July 2016, which retrieved 867 records. (2) composition of research corpus, in which we included 351 bibliographic records of articles, books, book chapters, editorials, book reviews, informative notes and annual reports of the RSP and excluded 516 duplicates and acknowledgement notes, obituary notes, and nonretrievable citations. (3) data organization and analysis, in which we built databases for descriptive analysis and development of the MeSH coauthors and terms networks in VOSviewer software. For analysis of editorials, three reviewers read the full text of each editorial and categorized them according to subject, historical context and perspectives, relating them with historical milestones. Forattini's scientific production occurred from 1946 to 2009, most consisting of articles (n = 218; 62.1%), editorials (n = 43; 12.3%), and books (n = 13; 3.7%). The main subjects were Culicidae (36.8%), Triatominae (12.5%), and Epidemiology (10.0%). The coauthors of articles were his professors, colleagues of his generation, and graduate students. His editorials addressed critical reflections on the production of knowledge, research priorities, and factors that contributed to or hindered progress. The scope of subjects is broad, referring to socioeconomic and scientific development, public health issues in developed countries, or global health. The analysis shows Forattini's commitment with public health, research with vectors, training of researchers, and scientific communication. Analisar as principais características da produ

  16. Scientific visualization of glacier changes for public communication: the example of Findelengletscher, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastner, Philipp; Jörg, Philipp Claudio; Huss, Matthias; Zemp, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The melting of glaciers and ice caps has been recognized as one of the best natural indicators for global climate change. In Switzerland, the early onset of both glacier research and detailed mapping of the country resulted in a wealth of historical material documenting glacier changes over the past 160 years. Fife years ago, the Universities of Zurich and Fribourg, along with the Swiss energy utility Axpo, launched the Glacier Laserscanning Experiment Obervallis (GLAXPO). In this project three laserscanning flights were performed on Findelengletscher in order to create high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM). These DEM provide a precise mapping of the glacier surface topography and serve as reference surface for the co-registration of past DEMs computed from digitized historical maps. In addition to that distributed numerical glacier models were run with ensembles of climate change scenarios in order to calculate glacier changes over the 21st century. The present work makes use of this great data pool for a scientifically correct visualization of 3-dimensional changes of Findelengletscher from AD 1850 to 2100 for public communication. We therefore collected ten different historical maps with the earliest dating from 1862 (plane survey sheet of the Dufour map). The pre-processing included georeferencing and digitalization of contour lines for the creation of different historical DEMs. Afterwards all historical DEMs were co-registered to one of the latest high resolution laserscanning DEM (from 2005). In between years with available DEMs, surface changes were interpolated linearly to create a sequence for the computer animation. For future developments, modeled glacier elevation changes where added/subtracted from the latest DEM (from 2010). Finally, two animations, showing glacier changes from 1850-2010 and 2010-2100, were composed and rendered in the animation program Visual Nature Studio 3. In cooperation with professional booth and model builders, these

  17. Modeling the Uptake of Scientific Information by the Public and Opinion Flow in Society (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowsky, S.; Brown, G. D.; Cook, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved communication of scientific findings requires knowledge not only of how people process information, but also how such information spreads through society and how people's opinions are shaped by those of others. Recent advances in cognitive science have yielded mathematical modeling techniques that permit the detailed analysis of individuals' cognition as well as the behavior of communities in the aggregate. We present two case studies that highlight the insights that can be derived from mathematical models of cognition: We show how rational processing of information (i.e., Bayesian hypothesis revision) can nonetheless give rise to seemingly 'irrational' belief updating, as for example when acceptance of human-caused global warming decreases among conservatives in response to evidence for human-caused global warming. We also show in an agent-based simulation how social norms can lead to polarization of societies. The model assumes that agents located within a social network observe the behavior of neighbours and infer from their behavior the social distribution of particular attitudes (e.g. towards climate change). Agents are assumed to dislike behaviours that are extreme within their neighbourhood (social extremeness aversion), and hence have a tendency to conform. However, agents are also assumed to prefer choices that are consistent with their own true beliefs (authenticity preference). Expression of attitudes reflects a compromise between these opposing principles. The model sheds light on the role of perceived rather than actual social consensus on attitudes to climate change. This is particularly relevant given the widespread perception among those who reject climate science that the percentage of the public that is sharing their beliefs is much higher than it actually is.

  18. Mundane science use in a practice theoretical perspective: Different understandings of the relations between citizen-consumers and public communication initiatives build on scientific claims.

    PubMed

    Halkier, Bente

    2015-08-13

    Public communication initiatives play a part in placing complicated scientific claims in citizen-consumers' everyday contexts. Lay reactions to scientific claims framed in public communication, and attempts to engage citizens, have been important subjects of discussion in the literatures of public understanding and public engagement with science. Many of the public communication initiatives, however, address lay people as consumers rather than citizens. This creates specific challenges for understanding public engagement with science and scientific citizenship. The article compares five different understandings of the relations between citizen-consumers and public issue communication involving science, where the first four types are widely represented in the Public Understanding of Science discussions. The fifth understanding is a practice theoretical perspective. The article suggests how the public understanding of and engagement in science literature can benefit from including a practice theoretical approach to research about mundane science use and public engagement.

  19. 76 FR 55381 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ..., and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review scientific... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Nominations. Nominations of candidates to serve as ad hoc members of FIFRA SAP for.... Please refer to the FIFRA SAP's Web site, http://www.epa.gov/scipoly/SAP for information on how to access...

  20. 75 FR 10255 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review a set of scientific issues related to the Re... Drinking Water Monitoring Frequency. DATES: The meeting will be held on April 26-29, 2010, and will begin... issues for this meeting. Nominees should be identified by name, occupation, position, address,...

  1. The Scientific Creationist Challenge to the Treatment of Evolution in the Public School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kube-McDowell, Michael P.

    The purpose of the study was to identify and analyze the scientific elements of the creationist position, and to provide information and recommendations to educators facing the question of adding creationism to the science curriculum. The claim that creationism is of equal scientific status with evolution is examined in the first part of the…

  2. Apollo telescope mount. A partial listing of scientific publications and presentations, supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. M. (Editor); Snoddy, W. C. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Compilations of bibliographies from the principal investigator groups of the Apollo Telescope Mount (Skylab solar observatory facility) are presented. The publications listed are divided into the following categories: (1) journal publications, (2) journal publications submitted, (3) other publications, (4) presentations - national and international meetings; and (5) other presentations.

  3. Communicating Scientific Findings to Lawyers, Policy-Makers, and the Public (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W.; Velsko, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will summarize the authors' collaborative research on inferential errors, bias and communication difficulties that have arisen in the area of WMD forensics. This research involves analysis of problems that have arisen in past national security investigations, interviews with scientists from various disciplines whose work has been used in WMD investigations, interviews with policy-makers, and psychological studies of lay understanding of forensic evidence. Implications of this research for scientists involved in nuclear explosion monitoring will be discussed. Among the issues covered will be: - Potential incompatibilities between the questions policy makers pose and the answers that experts can provide. - Common misunderstandings of scientific and statistical data. - Advantages and disadvantages of various methods for describing and characterizing the strength of scientific findings. - Problems that can arise from excessive hedging or, alternatively, insufficient qualification of scientific conclusions. - Problems that can arise from melding scientific and non-scientific evidence in forensic assessments.

  4. Submission of scientifically sound and ethical manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals - a reviewer's personal perspective on bioanalytical publications.

    PubMed

    Weng, Naidong

    2012-11-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, bioanalysis is very dynamic and is probably one of the few fields of research covering the entire drug discovery, development and post-marketing process. Important decisions on drug safety can partially rely on bioanalytical data, which therefore can be subject to regulatory scrutiny. Bioanalytical scientists have historically contributed significant numbers of scientific manuscripts in many peer-reviewed analytical journals. All of these journals provide some high-level instructions, but they also leave sufficient flexibility for reviewers to perform independent critique and offer recommendations for each submitted manuscript. Reviewers play a pivotal role in the process of bioanalytical publication to ensure the publication of high-quality manuscripts in a timely fashion. Their efforts usually lead to improved manuscripts. However, it has to be a joint effort among authors, reviewers and editors to promote scientifically sound and ethically fair bioanalytical publications. Most of the submitted manuscripts were well written with only minor or moderate revisions required for further improvement. Nevertheless, there were small numbers of submitted manuscripts that did not meet the requirements for publications because of scientific or ethical deficiencies, which are discussed in this Letter to the Editor.

  5. Does a research group increase impact on the scientific community or general public discussion? Alternative metric-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    De Gregori, Manuela; Scotti, Valeria; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Curti, Moreno; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo; Schatman, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of scientific publications of the Italian SIMPAR (Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research) group by using altmetrics, defined as nontraditional metrics constituting an alternative to more traditional citation-impact metrics, such as impact factor and H-index. By correlating traditional and alternative metrics, we attempted to verify whether publications by the SIMPAR group collectively had more impact than those performed by its individual members, either in solo publications or in publications coauthored by non-SIMPAR group investigators (which for the purpose of this study we will refer to as "individual publications"). For all the 12 members of the group analyzed (pain therapists, biologists, and pharmacologists), we created Open Researcher and Contributor ID and Impact Story accounts, and synchronized these data. Manually, we calculated the level metrics for each article by dividing the data obtained from the research community by those obtained from the public community. We analyzed 759 articles, 18 of which were published by the SIMPAR group. Altmetrics demonstrated that SIMPAR group publications were more likely to be saved (77.8% vs 45.9%), discussed (61.1% vs 1.1%, P<0.0001), and publicly viewed (11.1% vs 1.3%, P=0.05) than individual publications. These results support the importance of multidisciplinary research groups in the impact of scientific literature; the interaction and synergy among the research participants allowed the obtainment of high impact-literature in the field of personalized pain medicine. Finally, our findings demonstrate the potential of altmetrics in estimating the value of the research products of a group.

  6. Recognizing the pitfalls of total quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Laza, R.W.; Wheaton, P.L.

    1990-04-12

    Should utilities be interested in total quality management (TQM) After all, the argument that better quality products should increase the sales and result in higher profits does not readily apply to a public utility operating in a monopolistic environment. Yet, utilities in the US are moving toward a more competitive environment; FPL's success with its TQM programs is forcing most utilities to look at TQM so as not to risk future competitive disadvantage. A few regulatory commissions have already started to inquire as to what steps utilities under their jurisdiction are taking to pursue the benefits of TQM. This article will address two facets of this issue. First, it will define what TQM is and identify the pitfalls that might keep a utility from attaining the full benefits of a well-executed TQM program. Second, it will lay out a simple, straightforward approach that a utility can use to determine whether and how to utilize this new management tool.

  7. [Strengthening Public and Global Health in Germany - an Appraisal of the Statement "Public Health in Germany" by the German Scientific Academies from June 16th 2015].

    PubMed

    Gerhardus, A; Blättner, B; Bolte, G; Dierks, M-L; Dockweiler, C; Faller, G; Gusy, B

    2015-09-01

    In June 2015 the scientific academies "Leopoldina" and "acatech" and the union of the German academies of sciences and humanities published a statement on public and global health in Germany. The statement contains many valuable albeit generic and well-known recommendations. The few specific recommendations focus on centralizing research while weakening the role of universities and on the relative increase of research on public health genomics. These recommendations are not based on empirical or theoretical analyses and risk subverting successful developments of the recent past. To actually strengthen public and global health in Germany the existing institutions need to be backed up while designated funding of public and global health needs to be extended.

  8. Personnel Pitfalls in Cyberworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Thomas E., III

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 administrators in the Austin, Texas, Independent School District learned that Tamara Hoover, an art teacher at Austin High School, was the subject of several explicit photographs that had been posted on Flickr, a public photograph-sharing website. Purportedly these photographs were posted on Flickr by the teacher's partner without her…

  9. Public health nutrition concerns on consumption of red palm-oil (RPO): the scientific facts from literature.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, O E; Amosu, A M

    2010-12-01

    There appears to be a state of uncertainty as far as the health benefits of consumption of Red Palm Oil (RPO) is concerned from public health point of view globally. Literatures are replete with conflicting information on saturated fatty acid content of palm-oil, with caution on the possibility of increasing low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the blood. The implication of this may be subsequent elevation of serum cholesterol when the oil is consumed. This review paper is aimed at providing scientific facts from well referenced journal articles on public health nutrition benefits of RPO. It considers findings from animal and human experiments, to arrive at conclusion based on scientific evidence on the potential health benefits associated with consumption of RPO. Although, the level of saturated fatty acids content may suggest health risk, the presence of carotenoids and other powerful anti-oxidants in RPO makes it one of the best cooking vegetable oils with health promoting properties.

  10. 77 FR 14783 - Notification of a Public Meeting and Two Public Teleconferences for the Clean Air Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...) Lead Review Panel to conduct a peer review of EPA's Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Second... CASAC Lead Review Panel will hold a face-to-face public meeting to peer review EPA's second...

  11. Apollo telescope mount: A partial listing of scientific publications and presentations, supplement 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. M. (Editor); Fields, S. A. (Editor); Snoddy, W. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Compilations of bibliographies from the principal investigator groups of the Skylab solar observatory facility that gathered data from May 28, 1973, to February 8, 1974 are presented. The analysis of these data is presently under way. The publications listed are divided into the following categories: (1) journal publications; (2) journal publications submitted; (3) other publications; (4) presentations-national and international meetings; and (5) other presentations.

  12. Apollo telescope mount: A partial listing of scientific publications and presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. M. (Editor); Snoddy, W. C. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A compilation of bibliographies from the principal investigator groups of the Apollo Telescope Mount (Skylab solar observatory facility) which gathered data from May 28, 1973, to February 8, 1974 is presented. The analysis of these data is presently under way and is expected to continue for several years. The publications listed are divided into the following categories: (1) Journal Publications, (2) Journal Publications Submitted, (3) Other Publications, (4) Presentations - National International Meetings, and (5) Other Presentations. An author index is also included.

  13. Scientific publication productivity of Libyan medical schools: a bibliometric study of papers listed in PubMed, 1988-2007.

    PubMed

    Benamer, H T S; Bredan, A; Bakoush, O

    2009-08-01

    Scientific publication is a vital mission of medical schools and it is important to periodically document how well schools fulfil this mission. This study aimed to analyse the publication record of Libyan medical schools in international journals indexed in PubMed between 1988 and 2007. Medline was searched using PubMed for publications affiliated to Libya during 1988-2007. Out of 417 papers related to Libya, 348 (84%) are affiliated to the medical schools and related hospitals. More than 60% of the 348 papers are affiliated to Al-Arab Medical University, Benghazi, while Al-Fateh Medical University, Tripoli, contributed 103 papers (30%). The rest of the papers (n=25, 7%) were published by medical schools in other parts of the country. The publication rate declined by 3% annually between 1988 and 2007. The decline was mainly due to a decrease in the publication rate by Al-Arab Medical University, Benghazi. Overall, nine departments produced 10 or more papers each. Out of about 1675 staff members, there are only 148 first authors and 207 last authors. The estimated annual publication rate is 0.7 papers per 100 academic staff members. This study reveals that published scholarship of the Libyan medical schools is extremely low, that the publication rate has declined, and that most academic staff have no publications listed in PubMed. This issue needs urgent attention.

  14. 78 FR 56235 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response, (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health... Science and Public Health Practice, Executive Assistant, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600...

  15. 78 FR 15369 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal..., Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR), concerning strategies and goals for the... following topics: Public Health Preparedness and Response Policy Updates; improving critical information...

  16. Explaining the Unexplainable: Translated Scientific Explanations (TSE) in Public Physics Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the features and design of explanations in public physics lectures. It presents the findings from a comparative study of three exemplary public physics lectures, given by practicing physicists who are acknowledged as excellent public lecturers. The study uses three different perspectives: the lecture, the lecturer, and the…

  17. Does a research group increase impact on the scientific community or general public discussion? Alternative metric-based evaluation

    PubMed Central

    De Gregori, Manuela; Scotti, Valeria; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Curti, Moreno; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo; Schatman, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of scientific publications of the Italian SIMPAR (Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research) group by using altmetrics, defined as nontraditional metrics constituting an alternative to more traditional citation-impact metrics, such as impact factor and H-index. By correlating traditional and alternative metrics, we attempted to verify whether publications by the SIMPAR group collectively had more impact than those performed by its individual members, either in solo publications or in publications coauthored by non-SIMPAR group investigators (which for the purpose of this study we will refer to as “individual publications”). For all the 12 members of the group analyzed (pain therapists, biologists, and pharmacologists), we created Open Researcher and Contributor ID and Impact Story accounts, and synchronized these data. Manually, we calculated the level metrics for each article by dividing the data obtained from the research community by those obtained from the public community. We analyzed 759 articles, 18 of which were published by the SIMPAR group. Altmetrics demonstrated that SIMPAR group publications were more likely to be saved (77.8% vs 45.9%), discussed (61.1% vs 1.1%, P<0.0001), and publicly viewed (11.1% vs 1.3%, P=0.05) than individual publications. These results support the importance of multidisciplinary research groups in the impact of scientific literature; the interaction and synergy among the research participants allowed the obtainment of high impact-literature in the field of personalized pain medicine. Finally, our findings demonstrate the potential of altmetrics in estimating the value of the research products of a group. PMID:27358575

  18. Public Response to Scientific Misconduct: Assessing Changes in Public Sentiment Toward the Stimulus-Triggered Acquisition of Pluripotency (STAP) Cell Case via Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background In this age of social media, any news—good or bad—has the potential to spread in unpredictable ways. Changes in public sentiment have the potential to either drive or limit investment in publicly funded activities, such as scientific research. As a result, understanding the ways in which reported cases of scientific misconduct shape public sentiment is becoming increasingly essential—for researchers and institutions, as well as for policy makers and funders. In this study, we thus set out to assess and define the patterns according to which public sentiment may change in response to reported cases of scientific misconduct. This study focuses on the public response to the events involved in a recent case of major scientific misconduct that occurred in 2014 in Japan—stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP) cell case. Objectives The aims of this study were to determine (1) the patterns according to which public sentiment changes in response to scientific misconduct; (2) whether such measures vary significantly, coincident with major timeline events; and (3) whether the changes observed mirror the response patterns reported in the literature with respect to other classes of events, such as entertainment news and disaster reports. Methods The recent STAP cell scandal is used as a test case. Changes in the volume and polarity of discussion were assessed using a sampling of case-related Twitter data, published between January 28, 2014 and March 15, 2015. Rapidminer was used for text processing and the popular bag-of-words algorithm, SentiWordNet, was used in Rapidminer to calculate sentiment for each sample Tweet. Relative volume and sentiment was then assessed overall, month-to-month, and with respect to individual entities. Results Despite the ostensibly negative subject, average sentiment over the observed period tended to be neutral (−0.04); however, a notable downward trend (y=−0.01 x +0.09; R ²=.45) was observed month

  19. Technical pitfalls of patellofemoral surgery.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, R A

    1999-10-01

    The major technical pitfalls in the performance of patellofemoral surgery stem from improper patient selection, unrealistic patient expectations, and inappropriate rehabilitation. Proper patient selection requires the physician to spend additional time in communicating with patients obtaining a comprehensive history, and performing a thorough physical examination. Patients' expectations can be realistic if appropriate time is devoted to patient education. A commitment on behalf of patients to undertake a comprehensive postoperative rehabilitation program before proceeding with any surgical procedure helps to enhance patients' success.

  20. [Generalists or Specialists? Interdisciplinarity in, and Scientific Development of, Public Health in Germany].

    PubMed

    Razum, O; Dockweiler, C

    2015-11-01

    Interdisciplinarity is not only a constitutive element of public health; it also contributes significantly to the solution of complex public health problems. Only through the cooperation of different disciplines and professions can the diverse social and methodological-technical challenges of developing, implementing and evaluating health-related interventions be solved. In this context, public health in Germany is facing challenges in its further development, two of which we discuss here. Firstly, there is a gap between aspiration and reality of interdisciplinary research and teaching of public health. Secondly, related to that, there is an increasingly difficult balance between professional breadth and specialisation in the university education of future public health experts.

  1. 78 FR 938 - Notification of a Public Meeting and a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... holder. Accessibility: For information on access or services for individuals with disabilities, please... Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Third External Review Draft--November 2012) and EPA's Policy...-up public teleconference will take place via telephone only. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  2. Apollo telescope mount: A partial listing of scientific publications, supplement 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. M. (Editor); Snoddy, W. C. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Reports are compilations of bibliographies from the principal investigator groups of the Apollo Telescope Mount (Skylab solar observatory facility) that gathered data from May 28, 1973, to February 8, 1974. The analysis of these data is presently under way and is expected to continue for several years. The publications listed in this report are divided into the following categories: (1) Journal Publications, (2) Journal Publications Submitted, (3) Other Publications, (4) Presentations--National and International Meetings, and (5) Other Presentations. An author index is included together with errata for the first report.

  3. Full text publication rates of studies presented at an international emergency medicine scientific meeting.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jannet W M; Graham, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    The publication rate of full text papers following an abstract presentation at a medical conference is variable, and few studies have examined the situation with respect to international emergency medicine conferences. This retrospective study aimed to identify the publication rate of abstracts presented at the 2006 International Conference on Emergency Medicine (ICEM) held in Halifax, Canada. The full text publication rate was 33.2%, similar to previous emergency medicine meetings. English language barriers may play a role in the low publication rate seen.

  4. Comparative Study of Scientific Publications in Urology and Nephrology Journals Originating from USA, China and Japan (2001–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhi Yong; Mei, Xiao Bin; Yu, Guang; Wu, Hao; Lai, Xue Li; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past decade, scientific research has developed rapidly in China, but the growth seems to vary widely between different disciplines. In this study, we aimed to compare the quantity and quality of publications in urology and nephrology journals from USA, China and Japan. Methods Journals listed in the “Urology and Nephrology” category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were included. Scientific papers in these journals written by researchers from USA, Japan and China were retrieved from the “PubMed” and “Web of Knowledge” online databases. Results The annual number of total scientific articles increased significantly from 2001 to 2010 in China, and has ranked second in the world since 2006. In the field of urology and nephrology, the annual number increased significantly from 2001 to 2010 in USA and China; but not in Japan. The share of articles increased significantly over time in China, decreased significantly in Japan, and remained unchanged in USA. In 2010, USA contributed 32.17% of the total world output in urology and nephrology field and ranked 1st; Japan contributed 5.19% and ranked 5th; China contributed 3.83% and ranked 9th. Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA>Japan>China, p<0.001). No significant difference was found in average IF among the three countries. USA published the most articles in the top 10 urology and nephrology journals (USA(35165)>Japan(6704)>China(2233), p<0.001). Researchers from USA published more clinical trials and randomized controlled trials than Japan and China (USA>Japan>China, p<0.001). Conclusion Although China has undergone significant increase in annual number and percentage of scientific publication in urology and nephrology journals in the past decade, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of urology and nephrology in terms of quantity and quality. PMID:22870301

  5. Comparative study of scientific publications in urology and nephrology journals originating from USA, China and Japan (2001-2010).

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Gao, Xian Hua; Bian, Qi; Guo, Zhi Yong; Mei, Xiao Bin; Yu, Guang; Wu, Hao; Lai, Xue Li; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, scientific research has developed rapidly in China, but the growth seems to vary widely between different disciplines. In this study, we aimed to compare the quantity and quality of publications in urology and nephrology journals from USA, China and Japan. Journals listed in the "Urology and Nephrology" category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were included. Scientific papers in these journals written by researchers from USA, Japan and China were retrieved from the "PubMed" and "Web of Knowledge" online databases. The annual number of total scientific articles increased significantly from 2001 to 2010 in China, and has ranked second in the world since 2006. In the field of urology and nephrology, the annual number increased significantly from 2001 to 2010 in USA and China; but not in Japan. The share of articles increased significantly over time in China, decreased significantly in Japan, and remained unchanged in USA. In 2010, USA contributed 32.17% of the total world output in urology and nephrology field and ranked 1(st); Japan contributed 5.19% and ranked 5(th); China contributed 3.83% and ranked 9(th). Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA>Japan>China, p<0.001). No significant difference was found in average IF among the three countries. USA published the most articles in the top 10 urology and nephrology journals (USA(35165)>Japan(6704)>China(2233), p<0.001). Researchers from USA published more clinical trials and randomized controlled trials than Japan and China (USA>Japan>China, p<0.001). Although China has undergone significant increase in annual number and percentage of scientific publication in urology and nephrology journals in the past decade, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of urology and nephrology in terms of quantity and quality.

  6. 76 FR 26287 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    .... EPA's policy is that all comments received will be included in the docket without change and may be... language for your requested changes. 4. Describe any assumptions and provide any technical information and... scientific analyses and SAP feedback from the previous three SAP meetings by proposing a conceptual...

  7. 77 FR 8856 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... of chemical substances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), FIFRA, and the Food..., among other financial interests, the candidate's employment, stocks and bonds, and where applicable... FIFRA SAP serves as the primary scientific peer review mechanism of EPA's Office of Chemical Safety...

  8. 78 FR 48672 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... of chemical substances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) and FIFRA. Since other... employment, stocks and bonds, and where applicable, sources of research support. The EPA will evaluate the... Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) and is structured to provide scientific...

  9. 78 FR 22873 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... may be required to conduct testing of chemical substances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic..., among other financial interests, the candidate's employment, stocks and bonds, and where applicable... as the primary scientific peer review mechanism of EPA's Office of Chemical Safety and...

  10. 77 FR 20392 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ..., however, be of interest to persons who are or may be required to conduct testing of chemical substances... financial interests, the candidate's employment, stocks and bonds, and where applicable, sources of research... primary scientific peer review mechanism of EPA's Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution...

  11. 78 FR 27234 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ...); Oxides of Nitrogen Primary NAAQS Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) Primary National... reviewing the primary (health-based) NAAQS for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ). Accordingly, the SAB Staff Office...

  12. Analysis of Research Collaboration between Universities and Private Companies in Spain Based on Joint Scientific Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmeda-Gómez, Carlos; Ovalle-Perandones, María Antonia; de Moya-Anegón, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The article presents the results of a study on scientific collaboration between Spanish universities and private enterprise, measured in terms of the co-authorship of papers published in international journals. Method: Bibliometric analysis of papers published in journals listed in Scopus in 2003-2011. Indicators were calculated for…

  13. Golden rice: scientific, regulatory and public information processes of a genetically modified organism.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, A Alan; Pei, Shiqian; Liu, Yinzuo

    2016-01-01

    Historically, agricultural development evolved in three phases. During the first phase the plants were selected on the basis of the availability of a plant with desirable properties at a specific location. The second phase provided the agricultural community with crossbreeding plants to achieve improvement in agricultural production. The evolution of biological knowledge has provided the ability to genetically engineer (GE) crops, one of the key processes within genetically modified organisms (GMO). This article uses golden rice, a species of transgenic Asian rice which contains a precursor of vitamin A in the edible part of the plant as an example of GE/GMO emphasizing Chinese experience in agricultural evolution. It includes a brief review of agricultural evolution to be followed by a description of golden rice development. Golden rice was created as a humanitarian project and has received positive comments by the scientific community and negative voices from certain environmental groups. In this article, we use the Best Available Science (BAS) Concept and Metrics for Evaluation of Scientific Claims (MESC) derived from it to evaluate claims and counter claims on scientific aspects of golden rice. This article concludes that opposition to golden rice is based on belief rather than any of its scientifically derived nutritional, safety or environmental properties.

  14. 76 FR 16410 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ..., Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review a set of.... Nominations of candidates to serve as ad hoc members of FIFRA SAP for this meeting should be provided on or before April 6, 2011. Webcast. This meeting may be webcast. Please refer to the FIFRA SAP's Web...

  15. 75 FR 76457 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review the Chlorpyrifos Physiologically... INFORMATION. Nominations. Nominations of candidates to serve as ad hoc members of FIFRA SAP for this meeting... the FIFRA SAP's Web site, http://www.epa.gov/scipoly/SAP for information on how to access the webcast...

  16. 75 FR 51041 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ..., and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review the Chlorpyrifos... INFORMATION. Nominations. Nominations of candidates to serve as ad hoc members of FIFRA SAP for this meeting... the FIFRA SAP's website, http://www.epa.gov/scipoly/SAP for information on how to access the webcast...

  17. 76 FR 71023 - FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ..., and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) to consider and review Common Effects... of candidates to serve as ad hoc members of FIFRA SAP for this meeting should be provided on or before November 30, 2011. Webcast. This meeting may be webcast. Please refer to the FIFRA SAP's Web site...

  18. Confidence interval or p-value?: part 4 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Hommel, Gerhard; Röhrig, Bernd; Blettner, Maria

    2009-05-01

    An understanding of p-values and confidence intervals is necessary for the evaluation of scientific articles. This article will inform the reader of the meaning and interpretation of these two statistical concepts. The uses of these two statistical concepts and the differences between them are discussed on the basis of a selective literature search concerning the methods employed in scientific articles. P-values in scientific studies are used to determine whether a null hypothesis formulated before the performance of the study is to be accepted or rejected. In exploratory studies, p-values enable the recognition of any statistically noteworthy findings. Confidence intervals provide information about a range in which the true value lies with a certain degree of probability, as well as about the direction and strength of the demonstrated effect. This enables conclusions to be drawn about the statistical plausibility and clinical relevance of the study findings. It is often useful for both statistical measures to be reported in scientific articles, because they provide complementary types of information.

  19. Masters theses from a university medical college: publication in indexed scientific journals.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Upreet; Singh, Navjeevan; Bhatia, Arati

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is an integral part of postgraduate medical education in India. Publication of the results of the thesis in an indexed journal is desirable; it validates the research and makes results available to researchers worldwide. To determine publication rates in indexed journals, of works derived from theses, and factors affecting publication. Postgraduate theses submitted over a five-year period (2001-05) in a university medical college were analyzed in a retrospective, observational study. Data retrieved included name and gender of postgraduate student, names, department and hierarchy of supervisor and co-supervisor(s), year submitted, study design, sample size, and statistically significant difference between groups. To determine subsequent publication in an indexed journal, Medline search was performed up to December 2007. Chi square test was used to compare publication rates based on categorical variables; Student's t-test was used to compare differences based on continuous variables. One hundred and sixty theses were retrieved, forty-eight (30%) were published. Papers were published 8-74 (33.7+/-17.33) months after thesis submission; the postgraduate student was first author in papers from 26 (54%) of the published theses. Gender of the student, department of origin, year of thesis submission, hierarchy of the supervisor, number and department of co-supervisors, and thesis characteristics did not influence publication rates. Rate of publication in indexed journals, of papers derived from postgraduate theses is 30%. In this study we were unable to identify factors that promote publication.

  20. 78 FR 14538 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... wants further information concerning the CASAC's public teleconference may contact Dr. Holly Stallworth, Designated Federal Officer (DFO) via telephone at (202) 564-2073 or email at stallworth.holly@epa.gov... three minutes for public teleconferences. Interested parties should contact Dr. Holly Stallworth,...

  1. Publication and Prestige Mobility of University Departments in Three Scientific Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, Jeffrey; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Examines the relationship between prestige, prestige mobility, and publication in major scholarly journals in the disciplines of chemistry, sociology, and political science. The authors conclude that there are differences in this relationship across disciplines and that publication is more important in disciplines with a well developed scientific…

  2. Returns to scientific publications for pharmaceutical products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Slejko, Julia F; Basu, Anirban; Sullivan, Sean D

    2017-07-10

    Drug-specific clinical and health economic and outcomes research (HEOR) publications have amassed, but their effect on drug sales is largely unknown. We estimated the impact of publications on pharmaceutical sales in 3 markets (statins, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma drugs) with varying generic competition. An event-study approach with fixed effects and difference-in-fixed-effects modeling was used to estimate the causal effects of drug-specific publications on subsequent quarter's drug-specific sales and volume. High-impact clinical and HEOR publications have significant positive effects on sales (mediated through price) and volume in the statin market (high generic competition). High-impact clinical publications have a significant positive effect on sales (mediated through volume) in low-generic competition market (asthma). The effects of publications in the rheumatoid arthritis market (no generic competition) on sales were null. Manufacturers' investment in clinical and HEOR publications needs to be strategic and should be anticipated and complemented by public investments in such studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. 76 FR 18221 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10 (a) (2) of the Federal... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  4. 77 FR 37410 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response; Meeting In accordance with section 10 (a) (2) of the Federal... Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR), concerning... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. 76 FR 53474 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10 (a)(2) of the Federal..., Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR), concerning strategies and goals for the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  6. 76 FR 76416 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  7. 77 FR 20823 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (BSC, OPHPR) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. Tracing the scientific outputs in the field of Ebola research based on publications in the Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fengyun; Yang, Pin; Sheng, Huifeng

    2016-04-15

    Ebola virus disease (hereafter EVD or Ebola) has a high fatality rate. The devastating effects of the current epidemic of Ebola in West Africa have put the global health response in acute focus. In response, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa as a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern". A small proportion of scientific literature is dedicated to Ebola research. To identify global research trends in Ebola research, the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science™ database was used to search for data, which encompassed original articles published from 1900 to 2013. The keyword "Ebola" was used to identify articles for the purposes of this review. In order to include all published items, the database was searched using the Basic Search method. The earliest record of literature about Ebola indexed in the Web of Science is from 1977. A total of 2477 publications on Ebola, published between 1977 and 2014 (with the number of publications increasing annually), were retrieved from the database. Original research articles (n = 1623, 65.5%) were the most common type of publication. Almost all (96.5%) of the literature in this field was in English. The USA had the highest scientific output and greatest number of funding agencies. Journal of Virology published 239 papers on Ebola, followed by Journal of Infectious Diseases and Virology, which published 113 and 99 papers, respectively. A total of 1911 papers on Ebola were cited 61,477 times. This analysis identified the current state of research and trends in studies about Ebola between 1977 and 2014. Our bibliometric analysis provides a historical perspective on the progress in Ebola research.

  9. [Public scientific knowledge distribution in health information, communication and information technology indexed in MEDLINE and LILACS databases].

    PubMed

    Packer, Abel Laerte; Tardelli, Adalberto Otranto; Castro, Regina Célia Figueiredo

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the distribution of international, regional and national scientific output in health information and communication, indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, between 1996 and 2005. A selection of articles was based on the hierarchical structure of Information Science in MeSH vocabulary. Four specific domains were determined: health information, medical informatics, scientific communications on healthcare and healthcare communications. The variables analyzed were: most-covered subjects and journals, author affiliation and publication countries and languages, in both databases. The Information Science category is represented in nearly 5% of MEDLINE and LILACS articles. The four domains under analysis showed a relative annual increase in MEDLINE. The Medical Informatics domain showed the highest number of records in MEDLINE, representing about half of all indexed articles. The importance of Information Science as a whole is more visible in publications from developed countries and the findings indicate the predominance of the United States, with significant growth in scientific output from China and South Korea and, to a lesser extent, Brazil.

  10. Organizing Scientific Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, August

    1997-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: What can go wrong?; 2. The decision: To run or not to run; 3. Scientific and related events: variety delights; 4. Social events: something for every taste and budget; 5. The program: how to accommodate pigs in a poke; 6. Selection of the meeting site: a touch of Russian roulette; 7. The dates of the meeting: you can't win; 8. Publications: cruel and unusual punishment; 9. Selection of participants: how to lose old friends and make new enemies; 10. Committees: you have to live with them; 11. Accompanists: you better love'm; 12. Office and staff: don't take chances; 13. The budget: a jungle with pitfalls; 14. Fund raising: some would rather see their dentist; 15. Allocation of travel support: not much fun either; 16. Schedule of preparations: from dream to reality; 17. Announcements and other information: clarity pays; 18. Design of forms, name tags, tickets, signs and stickers: how about using some common sense?; 19. Satellite meetings: think twice; 20. Checklist of important no-nos; List of appendixes; Appendixes A-R; Index.

  11. Cannabidiol: promise and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E; Luebke, Adrienne; Gidal, Barry E

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, increasing public and political pressure has supported legalization of medical marijuana. One of the main thrusts in this effort has related to the treatment of refractory epilepsy-especially in children with Dravet syndrome-using cannabidiol (CBD). Despite initiatives in numerous states to at least legalize possession of CBD oil for treating epilepsy, little published evidence is available to prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy. This review highlights some of the basic science theory behind the use of CBD, summarizes published data on clinical use of CBD for epilepsy, and highlights issues related to the use of currently available CBD products. Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19(th) century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).

  12. Cannabidiol: Promise and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Welty, Timothy E.; Luebke, Adrienne; Gidal, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, increasing public and political pressure has supported legalization of medical marijuana. One of the main thrusts in this effort has related to the treatment of refractory epilepsy—especially in children with Dravet syndrome—using cannabidiol (CBD). Despite initiatives in numerous states to at least legalize possession of CBD oil for treating epilepsy, little published evidence is available to prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy. This review highlights some of the basic science theory behind the use of CBD, summarizes published data on clinical use of CBD for epilepsy, and highlights issues related to the use of currently available CBD products. Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19th century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1). PMID:25346628

  13. Types of study in medical research: part 3 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Bernd; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Wachtlin, Daniel; Blettner, Maria

    2009-04-01

    The choice of study type is an important aspect of the design of medical studies. The study design and consequent study type are major determinants of a study's scientific quality and clinical value. This article describes the structured classification of studies into two types, primary and secondary, as well as a further subclassification of studies of primary type. This is done on the basis of a selective literature search concerning study types in medical research, in addition to the authors' own experience. Three main areas of medical research can be distinguished by study type: basic (experimental), clinical, and epidemiological research. Furthermore, clinical and epidemiological studies can be further subclassified as either interventional or noninterventional. The study type that can best answer the particular research question at hand must be determined not only on a purely scientific basis, but also in view of the available financial resources, staffing, and practical feasibility (organization, medical prerequisites, number of patients, etc.).

  14. Graphs, tables, and figures in scientific publications: the good, the bad, and how not to be the latter.

    PubMed

    Franzblau, Lauren E; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-03-01

    Graphs, figures, and tables can save readers time and energy, aid their understanding of an article, and reduce the word count of the main text. However, many graphics submitted to and published in scientific journals fail to meet their potential and include mistakes that jeopardize their clarity. Many formats are available for presenting data, as well as a variety of techniques for enhancing interpretability. When the appropriate format is used to depict data, it conveys the greatest amount of information in the clearest fashion, complements the text, and deepens readers' understanding. The aims of this article are to draw attention to the necessity of well-constructed graphs, tables, and figures in scientific publications, and to show how to create them. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bibliography of scientific publications and presentations relating to planetary quarantine: 1966 - 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, F. D.; Nadel, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A bibliography, which is a compilation of citations relating to planetary quarantine, previously listed in similar publications since 1967, is presented to provide a reference for reviewing planetary quarantine research and development.

  16. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the population stock and the marine ecosystem. In determining whether to issue a public display permit... question and the marine ecosystem on the other; and the applicant's qualifications for the proper care and...

  17. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the population stock and the marine ecosystem. In determining whether to issue a public display permit... question and the marine ecosystem on the other; and the applicant's qualifications for the proper care and...

  18. Masters theses from a university medical college: Publication in indexed scientific journals

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Upreet; Singh, Navjeevan; Bhatia, Arati

    2010-01-01

    Background: The thesis is an integral part of postgraduate medical education in India. Publication of the results of the thesis in an indexed journal is desirable; it validates the research and makes results available to researchers worldwide. Aims: To determine publication rates in indexed journals, of works derived from theses, and factors affecting publication. Settings and Design: Postgraduate theses submitted over a five-year period (2001-05) in a university medical college were analyzed in a retrospective, observational study. Materials and Methods: Data retrieved included name and gender of postgraduate student, names, department and hierarchy of supervisor and co-supervisor(s), year submitted, study design, sample size, and statistically significant difference between groups. To determine subsequent publication in an indexed journal, Medline search was performed up to December 2007. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare publication rates based on categorical variables; Student's t-test was used to compare differences based on continuous variables. Results: One hundred and sixty theses were retrieved, forty-eight (30%) were published. Papers were published 8-74 (33.7 ± 17.33) months after thesis submission; the postgraduate student was first author in papers from 26 (54%) of the published theses. Gender of the student, department of origin, year of thesis submission, hierarchy of the supervisor, number and department of co-supervisors, and thesis characteristics did not influence publication rates. Conclusions: Rate of publication in indexed journals, of papers derived from postgraduate theses is 30%. In this study we were unable to identify factors that promote publication. PMID:20195030

  19. Comparative study of scientific publications in orthopedics journals originating from USA, Japan and China (2000-2012).

    PubMed

    Lao, Li-Feng; Daubs, Michael David; Phan, Kevin H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    To compare orthopedics publications from USA, Japan and China. Scientific papers belong to ''Orthopedics'' category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were retrieved from the "PubMed'' and ''Web of Knowledge'' online databases. In the field of orthopedics, the annual number increased significantly from 2000 to 2012 in the three countries (p<0.001). The share of articles increased significantly in China, but decreased significantly in Japan and USA (p<0.05). In 2012, USA contributed 35.3% of the total world output in orthopedics field and ranked 1st; Japan contributed 5.9% and ranked 4th; China contributed 5.2% and ranked 5th. Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA > Japan > China, p<0.001). Average IF from USA was much higher than Japan and China (p<0.001). USA published the most articles in the top ten orthopedics journals (USA (14355) > Japan (1702) > China (487), p<0.01). Although China has undergone significant increase in annual number and percentage of scientific publication in orthopedics journals, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of orthopedics in terms of quantity and quality.

  20. Review: Public perspectives on the utilization of human placentas in scientific research and medicine.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, R S

    2013-01-01

    Placental tissues are frequently utilized by scientists studying pregnancy and reproduction and in diverse fields including immunology, stem cell research, genetics, cancer research, and tissue engineering, as well as by clinicians in many therapies. Though the utilization of the human placenta in science and medicine has benefitted many people, little is known about public perspectives of this phenomenon. This review addresses placental donation, collection, and utilization in science and medicine, focusing on public perspectives. Cultural values and traditions, ethical paradigms and concerns, public understandings of science and medicine, and political considerations may impact perceptions of the utilization of the placenta in science and medicine, but systematic study is lacking. It is argued that knowledge of public views gained from empirical investigation may underpin the development of collection protocols and research projects that are more responsive to public will, spur more extensive utilization in science and medicine of this unique organ, and/or aid in the realization of the mobilization of knowledge about the placenta for clinical and educational ends. New avenues for research on public perspectives of the placenta are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Scientific publications in pediatrics over the last ten years in Turkey and worldwide.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Dabak, Orçun; Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu Övünç

    2015-01-01

    In keeping with the large area of interest comprised within the field of pediatrics, the number and diversity of publications in this field has gradually increased over the last ten years in our country as well as worldwide. The objective of this paper is to offer an analysis of the status of pediatrics publications during those ten years. The publications analyzed were listed in the Thomson Reuters Web of Science and/or published in journals included in the Science Citation Index, the Science Citation Index Expanded and the Social Sciences Citation Index. All of these publications appeared in journals in which at least one pediatrics specialist published between the years 2004 and 2013. It may be seen that Turkey is in fifth place worldwide in terms of the number of studies published in these journals, with 6,134 such publications. The conclusion is that it is necessary for more Turkish studies to be multicenter, to involve international participation and to receive more citations; importance must be attached to the objective of transforming of the knowledge produced by Turkish researchers into a greater number of publications of increased quality.

  2. Scientific publications in gastroenterology and hepatology in Taiwan: An analysis of Web of Science from 1993 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Hwang, I-Hsuan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Han-Chieh; Hou, Ming-Chih; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2017-02-01

    Scientific publications are important for evaluating the achievements of a medical specialty or discipline. Gastroenterology and Hepatology is a medical specialty in great demand in Taiwan, therefore, this study aimed to analyze the Gastroenterology and Hepatology publications from 1993 to 2013 in Taiwan, using the Web of Science (WoS) database. Scientific publications from departments/institutes of gastroenterology and hepatology were retrieved and analyzed from the WoS database, which included articles published in the Science Citation Index Expanded and Social Science Citation Index journals from 1993 to 2013. Among 229,030 articles published from departments/institutes of gastroenterology and hepatology worldwide during 1993-2013, 5061 (2.21%) were published in Taiwan, ranking the country 13(th) in the world. In total, 4759 articles from Taiwan were selected for further analysis, excluding meeting abstracts and corrections. During these two decades, the number of gastroenterology and hepatology publications increased rapidly. There were 440 articles published during 1993-1997, 646 articles during 1998-2002, 1211 articles during 2003-2007, and up to 2462 articles during 2008-2013. However, the mean number of articles cited decreased from 25.35 to 27.25 to 20.64 to 7.28, and the mean impact factor of publishing journals decreased from 5.0 to 4.20 to 4.13 to 4.03 during 1993-1997, 1998-2002, 2003-2007, and 2008-2013, respectively. Most of those publications belong to the subject category gastroenterology and hepatology (2346 articles, 49.30%), followed by surgery (677 articles, 14.23%), medicine, general and internal (358 articles, 7.52%), oncology (316 articles, 6.64%), and pharmacology pharmacy (286 articles, 6.01%). The Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology published the most papers (326 articles, 6.9%), followed by World Journal of Gastroenterology (201 articles, 4.2%), Hepato-Gastroenterology (165 articles, 3.5%), Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (159 articles

  3. The Dublin Principles of cooperation among the beverage alcohol industry, governments, scientific researchers, and the public health community.

    PubMed

    Hannum, H

    1997-01-01

    A 3-day Meeting held in Dublin, Ireland on 26-28 May 1997 was organized by the National College of Industrial Relations of Ireland and the US-based International Center for Alcohol Policies. During this Meeting, the 24 participants representing the beverage alcohol industry, governmental organizations and the scientific and public health communities discussed cooperation among all those concerned with alcohol consumption and its effects. These discussions led to the formulation of the 'Dublin Principles of Cooperation'. This special article describes these Principles and comments on them.

  4. Citizen science or scientific citizenship? Disentangling the uses of public engagement rhetoric in national research initiatives.

    PubMed

    Woolley, J Patrick; McGowan, Michelle L; Teare, Harriet J A; Coathup, Victoria; Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A; Sterckx, Sigrid; Kaye, Jane; Juengst, Eric T

    2016-06-04

    The language of "participant-driven research," "crowdsourcing" and "citizen science" is increasingly being used to encourage the public to become involved in research ventures as both subjects and scientists. Originally, these labels were invoked by volunteer research efforts propelled by amateurs outside of traditional research institutions and aimed at appealing to those looking for more "democratic," "patient-centric," or "lay" alternatives to the professional science establishment. As mainstream translational biomedical research requires increasingly larger participant pools, however, corporate, academic and governmental research programs are embracing this populist rhetoric to encourage wider public participation. We examine the ethical and social implications of this recruitment strategy. We begin by surveying examples of "citizen science" outside of biomedicine, as paradigmatic of the aspirations this democratizing rhetoric was originally meant to embody. Next, we discuss the ways these aspirations become articulated in the biomedical context, with a view to drawing out the multiple and potentially conflicting meanings of "public engagement" when citizens are also the subjects of the science. We then illustrate two uses of public engagement rhetoric to gain public support for national biomedical research efforts: its post-hoc use in the "care.data" project of the National Health Service in England, and its proactive uses in the "Precision Medicine Initiative" of the United States White House. These examples will serve as the basis for a normative analysis, discussing the potential ethical and social ramifications of this rhetoric. We pay particular attention to the implications of government strategies that cultivate the idea that members of the public have a civic duty to participate in government-sponsored research initiatives. We argue that such initiatives should draw from policy frameworks that support normative analysis of the role of citizenry. And

  5. Hubble Space Telescope - Scientific, Technological and Social Contributions to the Public Discourse on Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has unified the world with a sense of awe and wonder for 2 I years and is currently more scientifically powerful than ever. I will present highlights of discoveries made with the Hubble Space Telescope, including details of planetary weather, star formation, extra-solar planets, colliding galaxies, and a universe expanding with the acceleration of dark energy. I will also present the unique technical challenges and triumphs of this phenomenal observatory, and discuss how our discoveries in the cosmos affect our sense of human unity, significance, and wonder.

  6. Publish (in English) or perish: The effect on citation rate of using languages other than English in scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Di Bitetti, Mario S; Ferreras, Julián A

    2017-02-01

    There is a tendency for non-native English scientists to publish exclusively in English, assuming that this will make their articles more visible and cited. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the effect of language on the number of citations of articles published in six natural sciences journals from five countries that publish papers in either English or other languages. We analyzed the effect of language (English vs non-English), paper length, and year of publication on the number of citations. The articles published in English have a higher number of citations than those published in other languages, when the effect of journal, year of publication, and paper length are statistically controlled. This may result because English articles are accessible to a larger audience, but other factors need to be explored. Universities and scientific institutions should be aware of this situation and improve the teaching of English, especially in the natural sciences.

  7. New linked data on research investments: scientific workforce, productivity, and public value.

    PubMed

    Lane, Julia; Owen-Smith, Jason; Rosen, Rebecca; Weinberg, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Longitudinal micro-data derived from transaction level information about wage and vendor payments made by federal grants on multiple U.S. campuses are being developed in a partnership involving researchers, university administrators, representatives of federal agencies, and others. This paper describes the UMETRICS data initiative that has been implemented under the auspices of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. The resulting data set reflects an emerging conceptual framework for analyzing the process, products, and impact of research. It grows from and engages the work of a diverse and vibrant community. This paper situates the UMETRICS effort in the context of research evaluation and ongoing data infrastructure efforts in order to highlight its novel and valuable features. Refocusing data construction in this field around individuals, networks, and teams offers dramatic possibilities for data linkage, the evaluation of research investments, and the development of rigorous conceptual and empirical models. Two preliminary analyses of the scientific workforce and network approaches to characterizing scientific teams ground a discussion of future directions and a call for increased community engagement.

  8. New linked data on research investments: scientific workforce, productivity, and public value

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Julia; Owen-Smith, Jason; Rosen, Rebecca; Weinberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal micro-data derived from transaction level information about wage and vendor payments made by federal grants on multiple U.S. campuses are being developed in a partnership involving researchers, university administrators, representatives of federal agencies, and others. This paper describes the UMETRICS data initiative that has been implemented under the auspices of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. The resulting data set reflects an emerging conceptual framework for analyzing the process, products, and impact of research. It grows from and engages the work of a diverse and vibrant community. This paper situates the UMETRICS effort in the context of research evaluation and ongoing data infrastructure efforts in order to highlight its novel and valuable features. Refocusing data construction in this field around individuals, networks, and teams offers dramatic possibilities for data linkage, the evaluation of research investments, and the development of rigorous conceptual and empirical models. Two preliminary analyses of the scientific workforce and network approaches to characterizing scientific teams ground a discussion of future directions and a call for increased community engagement. PMID:26335785

  9. Conflicting stories about public scientific controversies: Effects of news convergence and divergence on scientists' credibility.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; Hurley, Ryan J

    2012-08-01

    Surveys suggest that approximately one third of news consumers have encountered conflicting reports of the same information. News coverage of science is especially prone to conflict, but how news consumers perceive this situation is currently unknown. College students (N = 242) participated in a lab experiment where they were exposed to news coverage about one of two scientific controversies in the United States: dioxin in sewage sludge or the reintroduction of gray wolves to populated areas. Participants received (a) one news article (control), (b) two news articles that were consistent (convergent), or (c) two news articles that conflicted (divergent). The effects of divergence induced uncertainty differed by news story. Greater uncertainty was associated with increased scientists' credibility ratings for those reading dioxin regulation articles and decreased scientists' credibility ratings for those reading wolf reintroduction articles. Unlike other manifestations of uncertainty in scientific discourse, conflicting stories seem to generate effects that vary significantly by topic. Consistent with uncertainty management theory, uncertainty is embraced or rejected by situation.

  10. Seabird databases and the new paradigm for scientific publication and attribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 300 years, the peer-reviewed journal article has been the principal medium for packaging and delivering scientific data. With new tools for managing digital data, a new paradigm is emerging—one that demands open and direct access to data and that enables and rewards a broad-based approach to scientific questions. Ground-breaking papers in the future will increasingly be those that creatively mine and synthesize vast stores of data available on the Internet. This is especially true for conservation science, in which essential data can be readily captured in standard record formats. For seabird professionals, a number of globally shared databases are in the offing, or should be. These databases will capture the salient results of inventories and monitoring, pelagic surveys, diet studies, and telemetry. A number of real or perceived barriers to data sharing exist, but none is insurmountable. Our discipline should take an important stride now by adopting a specially designed markup language for annotating and sharing seabird data.

  11. Scientific publications in nursing journals from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Wang, Xiaming; Yuan, Xueru; Yang, Li; Xue, Yu; Xie, Qian

    2016-01-01

    China has witnessed remarkable progress in scientific performance in recent years. However, the quantity and quality of nursing publications from three major regions (Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of scientific research productivity from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in the field of nursing. Articles published in the 110 nursing journals originating from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The total number of articles published, the impact factor, and the citation count were analyzed. There were 2,439 publications between 2005 and 2014 from China, including 438 from Mainland China, 1,506 from Taiwan, and 495 from Hong Kong. There was a significant increase in publications for these three regions (p < 0.05), especially for Mainland China, with a 59.50-fold increase experienced. From 2011, the number of publications from Mainland China exceeded that from Hong Kong. Taiwan had the highest total journal impact factor (2,142.81), followed by Hong Kong (720.39) and Mainland China (583.94). The mean journal impact factor from Hong Kong (1.46) was higher than that from Taiwan (1.42) and Mainland China (1.33). Taiwan had the highest total citation count (8,392), followed by Hong Kong (3,785) and Mainland China (1,493). The mean citation count from Hong Kong (7.65) was higher than that from Taiwan (5.57) and Mainland China (3.41). The Journal of Clinical Nursing was the most popular journal in the three regions. Chinese contributions to the field of nursing have significantly increased in the past ten years, particularly from Mainland China. Taiwan is the most productive region in China. Hong Kong had the highest-quality research output, according to mean journal impact factor and mean citation count.

  12. Scientific publications in nursing journals from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: a 10-year survey of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: China has witnessed remarkable progress in scientific performance in recent years. However, the quantity and quality of nursing publications from three major regions (Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of scientific research productivity from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in the field of nursing. Methods: Articles published in the 110 nursing journals originating from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The total number of articles published, the impact factor, and the citation count were analyzed. Results: There were 2,439 publications between 2005 and 2014 from China, including 438 from Mainland China, 1,506 from Taiwan, and 495 from Hong Kong. There was a significant increase in publications for these three regions (p < 0.05), especially for Mainland China, with a 59.50-fold increase experienced. From 2011, the number of publications from Mainland China exceeded that from Hong Kong. Taiwan had the highest total journal impact factor (2,142.81), followed by Hong Kong (720.39) and Mainland China (583.94). The mean journal impact factor from Hong Kong (1.46) was higher than that from Taiwan (1.42) and Mainland China (1.33). Taiwan had the highest total citation count (8,392), followed by Hong Kong (3,785) and Mainland China (1,493). The mean citation count from Hong Kong (7.65) was higher than that from Taiwan (5.57) and Mainland China (3.41). The Journal of Clinical Nursing was the most popular journal in the three regions. Discussion: Chinese contributions to the field of nursing have significantly increased in the past ten years, particularly from Mainland China. Taiwan is the most productive region in China. Hong Kong had the highest-quality research output, according to mean journal impact factor and mean citation count. PMID:26989631

  13. 76 FR 51365 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...) Lead Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office announces a public teleconference of the CASAC Lead Review Panel to discuss its draft letter reviewing EPA's Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (First External...

  14. 77 FR 64334 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ...) Ozone Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office announces a public teleconference of the CASAC Ozone Review Panel to discuss its draft reviews of four EPA documents: Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone...

  15. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the population stock and the marine ecosystem. In determining whether to issue a public display permit... question and the marine ecosystem on the other; and the applicant's qualifications for the proper care and..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MARINE MAMMALS Special Exceptions §...

  16. Scientific Argumentation in Public Physics Lectures: Bringing Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrating public e-lectures on contemporary physics into a traditional high-school syllabus. This approach was used in a long-distance professional development course for in-service physics teachers. Each lecture was related to a specific obligatory syllabus chapter, and was accompanied by learner-centred…

  17. Scientific Argumentation in Public Physics Lectures: Bringing Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrating public e-lectures on contemporary physics into a traditional high-school syllabus. This approach was used in a long-distance professional development course for in-service physics teachers. Each lecture was related to a specific obligatory syllabus chapter, and was accompanied by learner-centred…

  18. Citizen Groups and Scientific Decisionmaking: Does Public Participation Influence Environmental Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dorothy M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the influence of local community groups on agency decisionmaking at hazardous waste sites nationwide. The central purpose of this research is to examine the relative influence of two forms of public participation at Superfund sites: Community Advisory Groups (CAGs) and Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs). When citizens mobilize…

  19. Public Communication of Science in Blogs: Recontextualizing Scientific Discourse for a Diversified Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzón, María José

    2013-01-01

    New media are having a significant impact on science communication, both on the way scientists communicate with peers and on the dissemination of science to the lay public. Science blogs, in particular, provide an open space for science communication, where a diverse audience (with different degrees of expertise) may have access to science…

  20. Public Communication of Science in Blogs: Recontextualizing Scientific Discourse for a Diversified Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzón, María José

    2013-01-01

    New media are having a significant impact on science communication, both on the way scientists communicate with peers and on the dissemination of science to the lay public. Science blogs, in particular, provide an open space for science communication, where a diverse audience (with different degrees of expertise) may have access to science…

  1. Citizen Groups and Scientific Decisionmaking: Does Public Participation Influence Environmental Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dorothy M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the influence of local community groups on agency decisionmaking at hazardous waste sites nationwide. The central purpose of this research is to examine the relative influence of two forms of public participation at Superfund sites: Community Advisory Groups (CAGs) and Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs). When citizens mobilize…

  2. Revisiting the "quiet debut" of the double helix: a bibliometric and methodological note on the "impact" of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Yves

    2010-01-01

    The object of this paper is two-fold: first, to show that contrary to what seem to have become a widely accepted view among historians of biology, the famous 1953 first Nature paper of Watson and Crick on the structure of DNA was widely cited--as compared to the average paper of the time--on a continuous basis from the very year of its publication and over the period 1953-1970 and that the citations came from a wide array of scientific journals. A systematic analysis of the bibliometric data thus shows that Watson's and Crick's paper did in fact have immediate and long term impact if we define "impact" in terms of comparative citations with other papers of the time. In this precise sense it did not fall into "relative oblivion" in the scientific community. The second aim of this paper is to show, using the case of the reception of the Watson-Crick and Jacob-Monod papers as concrete examples, how large scale bibliometric data can be used in a sophisticated manner to provide information about the dynamic of the scientific field as a whole instead of limiting the analysis to a few major actors and generalizing the result to the whole community without further ado.

  3. Public Private Partnerships, Corporate Welfare or Building the Nation's Scientific Infrastructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, C. V.

    1996-03-01

    A debate is taking place in the U.S. concerning the investment of scarce Federal funds in science and technology research. Clouding this discussion is the proliferation of extreme views illustrated in the title of this talk. The impacts of the end of the cold war, the globalization of the economy and the realities of the budget deficit create a situation that cries out for a new social contract between scientists and taxpayers. We need to examine the successes and failures of the last 50 years to form the basis for a set of principles to enable the creation of a new consensus to define the roles of industry, government, universities and national laboratories in the research enterprise. The scientific infrastructure, and by extension, the economic vitality of the U.S., are at risk.

  4. [Pneumonia awareness year, 2004: scientific impact through publications in Archivos de Bronconeumología].

    PubMed

    Rajas Naranjo, Olga; Aspa Marco, Javier

    2006-10-01

    Pneumonia is a common and potentially serious infectious disease. Morbidity and mortality rates continue to be high in spite of major advances and steady progress in diagnosis and treatment. The economic impact of the disease is also great. It is therefore necessary to enlist the public, primary care and emergency physicians, and public policy administrators to join forces to treat and prevent pneumonia for the common good. The annual incidence of pneumonia in the population over the age of 14 years is 1.6 to 2.6 episodes/1000 inhabitants. The mortality rate is 14.1 per 100,000 inhabitants, and the associated costs are 115 million euros annually. The RESPIRA Foundation and the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) declared 2004 to be pneumonia awareness year with the aim of coordinating efforts to raise awareness, distribute information, and foster debate.

  5. [Quality and integrity in the production and publication of scientific results: data trimming, manipulation and (self) plagiarism].

    PubMed

    Lüscher, T F

    2014-08-01

    The publication of scientific manuscripts is an essential part in the research process and in the attempt to produce novel knowledge: only what is published exists. It is the aim of research to produce reproducible and sustainable knowledge. Reproducible knowledge is based on precise observation, the use of modern methodologies and an appropriate statistical analysis. As a consequence, it must be the intention of any scientist to report the truth and nothing but the truth. This principle requires precision and honesty. Deviation from such a behavior may lead to scientific misconduct: It encompasses the use of inappropriate methods and/or statistics, double publication of data, sloppy data presentation and processing, up to data massaging, manipulation, data theft or fabrication. Famous examples can be found throughout the history of research but it appears that such behavior has recently become more common possibly due to excessive competition, the crucial role of grants for scientific productivity and funding as well as promotion. Accordingly, in the training of researchers it seems essential to emphasize the importance of precise data acquisition and analysis to ascertain reproducible data. Similarly, it must be assured that data sets are only published once, that authors have contributed technically and/or intellectually in an important manner and that the work of other scientists is cited appropriately. Editors and reviewers should carefully assess the quality of submitted manuscripts. In fact, it is the aim of the peer review process to assure as much as possible that the quality of submitted manuscripts meets current methodological as well as ethical standards.

  6. [Equally or equitably? Author roles and co-author shares in scientific publication].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2016-03-27

    In the last decades the share of co-authored and, particularly, multi-authored papers has increased immensely. The paper deals with the causes and consequences of this phenomenon, specifically with those connected with scientometric analyses. Possibilities for fractional count of publications and citations, as well as problems of interpreting h-index and self-citation in case of multi-authored papers are focused upon.

  7. From BSE to MDT, scientific opinion and public policy on risks in medical devices.

    PubMed

    Williams, D

    1998-11-01

    Risk management is not always straightforward, especially if it has to be based on inadequate data. When the arguments are fuelled by fears for public health, politicians are forced to take difficult decisions and all too frequently it is the scientists who come into the firing line over the provision of advice. This is the first of two articles that addresses some specific issues that relate to risks with medical devices in the context of the European Commission.

  8. Preparing and Submitting Scientific and Technical Manuscripts and Other Documents for Publication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    explanatory information deemed necessary by the author. ELECTRONIC MEDIA (COMPACT DISKS, DVDs): All Electronic Media products should be submitted...Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 25 Research Product 2005-02 Train-the-Trainer...of alternate text presentation or audio descriptions shall be user- selectable unless permanent. A§ 1194.25 Self contained, closed products . (a) Self

  9. [Ottoman pharmacist Pierre Apéry and his scientifical publications].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    Pierre Apéry, owner of a laboratory and one of the most famous pharmacy in Istanbul, is a model of life quite devoted to his business. His publications (end of 19th/beginning of 20th century), which plaid a major role in the formation and the dissemination of knowledge about health, are a precious testimony about pharmacy and medicine in the Ottoman Empire.

  10. Contemporary Cuban Physics Through Scientific Publications: An Insider’s View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Ernesto

    In a previous paper, the author reached some conclusions on the tendencies of the publications by Cuban physicists in international journals (Altshuler, Rev Cub Fís 22(2):173-182, 2005) and called for a systematic bibliometric study of the subject. Such a study has now been undertaken (a contribution to this volume entitled "Physics in Cuba from the Perspective of Bibliometrics" by Werner Marx and Manuel Cardona, referred to in this paper as Marx and Cardona) and supports the main conclusions of the former work. The scenario of Cuban physics since 1995 has been conditioned by two main facts interacting in a nontrivial way: the serious material shortages affecting local physics laboratories and bibliographic resources, and an increase in the country's international collaboration. As a positive result, the total volume of Cuban publications in international physics journals has increased since 1995, perhaps reaching a peak around the year 2000, while the number of citations of Cuban papers and the impact of the journals in which they were published have continued to increase since the mid-1990s. Theoretical work produced by physicists from a number of Cuban institutions in international collaborations strongly contribute to those numbers. In the last years, international publications suggest a `self-organized' opening of Cuban physics towards interdisciplinary subjects, which is increasing the `bibliometric visibility' of autochthonous experimental work.

  11. Bibliometric analysis of scientific publications on waterpipe (narghile, shisha, hookah) tobacco smoking during the period 2003-2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Waterpipe tobacco smoking has spread worldwide. However, the evaluation of scientific output in the field of waterpipe tobacco smoking has not been studied yet. The main objectives of this study were to analyze worldwide research output in the waterpipe tobacco smoking field, and to examine the authorship pattern and the citations retrieved from the Scopus database for over a decade. Methods Data from January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2012 were searched for documents with specific words regarding waterpipe tobacco smoking as “keywords” in the title. Scientific output was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies: (a) total and trends of contributions in waterpipe tobacco smoking research between 2003 and 2012; (b) authorship patterns and research productivity; (c) collaboration patterns; (d) the citations received by the publications; and (e) areas of interest of the published papers. Results Worldwide there were 334 publications that met the criteria during the study period. The largest number of publications in waterpipe tobacco smoking were from the United States of America (USA) (33.5%), followed by Lebanon (15.3%), and France (10.5%). The total number of citations at the time of data analysis (October 18, 2013) was 4,352, with an average of 13 citations per document and a median (interquartile range) of 4.0 (1.0–16.0). The h-index of the retrieved documents was 34. The highest h-index by country was 27 for the USA, followed by 20 for Syrian Arab Republic and Lebanon. Conclusions The present data reveal a promising rise and a good start for research activity in the field of waterpipe tobacco smoking. More effort is needed to bridge the gap in waterpipe smoking-based research and to promote better evaluation of waterpipe smoking, risks, health effects, or control services worldwide. PMID:24725483

  12. Bibliometric analysis of scientific publications on waterpipe (narghile, shisha, hookah) tobacco smoking during the period 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M

    2014-04-13

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking has spread worldwide. However, the evaluation of scientific output in the field of waterpipe tobacco smoking has not been studied yet. The main objectives of this study were to analyze worldwide research output in the waterpipe tobacco smoking field, and to examine the authorship pattern and the citations retrieved from the Scopus database for over a decade. Data from January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2012 were searched for documents with specific words regarding waterpipe tobacco smoking as "keywords" in the title. Scientific output was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies: (a) total and trends of contributions in waterpipe tobacco smoking research between 2003 and 2012; (b) authorship patterns and research productivity; (c) collaboration patterns; (d) the citations received by the publications; and (e) areas of interest of the published papers. Worldwide there were 334 publications that met the criteria during the study period. The largest number of publications in waterpipe tobacco smoking were from the United States of America (USA) (33.5%), followed by Lebanon (15.3%), and France (10.5%). The total number of citations at the time of data analysis (October 18, 2013) was 4,352, with an average of 13 citations per document and a median (interquartile range) of 4.0 (1.0-16.0). The h-index of the retrieved documents was 34. The highest h-index by country was 27 for the USA, followed by 20 for Syrian Arab Republic and Lebanon. The present data reveal a promising rise and a good start for research activity in the field of waterpipe tobacco smoking. More effort is needed to bridge the gap in waterpipe smoking-based research and to promote better evaluation of waterpipe smoking, risks, health effects, or control services worldwide.

  13. Deficiencies in the publication and reporting of the results of systematic reviews presented at scientific medical conferences.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Sally; Boutron, Isabelle; Altman, Douglas G; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the publication and quality of reporting of abstracts of systematic reviews presented at scientific medical conferences. We included all abstracts of systematic reviews published in the proceedings of nine leading international conferences in 2010. For each conference abstract, we searched PubMed (January 1, 2010, to June 2013) to identify their corresponding full publication. We assessed the extent to which conference abstracts and their corresponding journal abstract reported items included in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis for Abstracts checklist and recorded any important discrepancies between sources. We identified 197 abstracts of systematic reviews, representing <1% of the total number of conference abstracts presented. Of these 53% were published in full, the median time to publication was 14 months (interquartile range, 6.6-20.1 months). Although most conference and journal abstracts reported details of included studies (conference n = 83 of 103; 81% vs. journal n = 81 of 103; 79%), size and direction of effect (76% vs. 75%), and conclusions (79% vs. 81%), many failed to report the date of search (27% vs. 25%), assessment of risk of bias (18% vs. 12%), and the result for the main efficacy outcome(s) including the number of studies (37% vs. 31%) and participants (30% vs. 20%), harms(s) (17% vs. 17%), strengths (17% vs. 13%) and limitations (36% vs. 30%) of the evidence, or funding source (1% vs. 0%). There were discrepancies between journal and corresponding conference abstracts including deletion of studies (13%), changes in reported efficacy (11%), and harm (10%) outcome(s) and changes in the nature or direction of conclusions (24%). Despite the importance of systematic reviews in the delivery of evidence-based health care, very few are presented at scientific conferences and only half of those presented are published in full. Serious deficiencies in the reporting of abstracts of systematic reviews make

  14. Legalization, decriminalization & medicinal use of cannabis: a scientific and public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Svrakic, Dragan M; Lustman, Patrick J; Mallya, Ashok; Lynn, Taylor Andrea; Finney, Rhonda; Svrakic, Neda M

    2012-01-01

    Empirical and clinical studies clearly demonstrate significant adverse effects of cannabis smoking on physical and mental health as well as its interference with social and occupational functioning. These negative data far outweigh a few documented benefits for a limited set of medical indications, for which safe and effective alternative treatments are readily available. If there is any medical role for cannabinoid drugs, it lies with chemically defined compounds, not with unprocessed cannabis plant. Legalization or medical use of smoked cannabis is likely to impose significant public health risks, including an increased risk of schizophrenia, psychosis, and other forms of substance use disorders.

  15. Full publication of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 European Association of Plastic Surgeons annual scientific meetings: a systemic bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Lydia P E; Hage, J Joris; Loonen, Martijn P J; Kon, Moshe

    2004-07-01

    From the multitude of oral presentations at major medical meetings, the most informative and highest-quality studies make it to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. The rate of publication may be regarded as an indicator of the scientific level of the meeting. Study of the publication rates of consecutive annual meetings allows for the evaluation of the consistency of the scientific level of these meetings and for comparison with publication rates of other meetings in the same field of interest. To grade how useful any publication is to other authors, one can furthermore measure how frequently they cite it in their own publications. Finally, the time lag between oral presentation and full publication is of importance to both its authors and the audience at the meeting. The main objectives of this study were to determine the publication rate of papers of various fields of interest as presented at five consecutive annual meetings of the European Association of Plastic Surgeons (EURAPS) and the time lag between these presentations and their publication. The authors compared their overall findings to those reported for other surgical specialties. Moreover, they identified and classified the journals in which the full publications appeared as an indicator of the scientific value of the meeting. They conclude that a greater than average number of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 annual EURAPS meetings went on to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. Among these journals, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was the best source for information presented at the meetings. Although approximately 90 percent of the publications appeared before 3 years had passed after a meeting, additional publications may be expected to appear even more than 6 years after the meeting. Given the high publication rate and the high average normalized impact factor of the journals in which the presentations appeared, the five studied EURAPS meetings overall had high scientific

  16. [Qualitative dimensions of the scientific, technological and innovation production at Public Health].

    PubMed

    Luz, Madel Therezinha; Mattos, Rafael da Silva

    2010-07-01

    This article shows the results of a qualitative evaluation on the expansion of the Collective Health area according with the production of the triennial Collective Health Congresses Annals which happen between 1997 to 2006, promoted by Abrasco - Brazilian Association of Collective Health. The specific objective was to estimate the growth of importance of the area in the scientific as well as in the social Brazilian scenario in the last decennary through the analysis of aspects and substantive dimensions. The methodological strategy of the study was to consider the complexity and data profusion referred to the dimensions of this multidisciplinary field (more and more interdisciplinary) of knowledge and intervention. From this perspective, analysis and interpretations of document sources were done, applying theoretical, methodological and analytical referential of the social science and X statistics techniques. It could be observed that: (1) in the last decade, the Collective Health area expanded into its three subareas (Epidemiology, Planning/Management and Health Services and, Human Sciences); (2) there is a tendency of more interactivity among the programs and with their communities and the institutions; (3) there is a growth in the quantity of authors writing about the field and different authors by article; (4) it is being elaborated a big internal specialization into the subareas.

  17. Revision Trabeculectomy: Pearls and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Crowston, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Revision trabeculectomy is used to describe any surgical intervention subsequent to an existing trabeculectomy. Mostly, it is used to describe resurgery for failure of trabeculectomy, as defined by inadequate pressure control. Revision may also be performed for unsafe, uncomfortable or leaking blebs. Mostly bleb failure occurs within the subconjunctival space, although the flap and ostium may be involved or causative. Clear surgical principles, meticulous surgical technique and scrupulous postoperative care are key to successful revision surgery. This review is an attempt to elucidate the technique of bleb revision for bleb failure. How to cite this article: Coote M, Crowston J. Revision Trabeculectomy: Pearls and Pitfalls. J Current Glau Prac 2012;6(3):131-138. PMID:26997769

  18. Completion publication of abstracts presented at the scientific meetings of the Pan-African Pediatric Surgical Association.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Poenaru, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The expected knowledge translation from discovery into practice occurs when presentations from major scientific meetings are published in peer-reviewed literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of complete publication of peer-reviewed articles arising from presentations at the biennial meetings of the Pan-African Pediatric Surgical Association (PAPSA). All the abstracts accepted for presentation at the biennial meeting of PAPSA between 2006 and 2010 were identified from the conference abstract booklets and published abstracts in the African Journal of Paediatric Surgery. The presentations were searched for publication in Medline/PubMed, Google Scholar, and African Journal OnLine through October 2012, using key words from the abstract title and names of authors listed in the abstracts. A total of 164 abstracts were accepted for presentation, consisting of 118 (72%) oral/podium presentations and 46 (28%) poster presentations. One hundred and thirty-three abstracts (81.1%) came from African countries and 31 (18.9%) from outside Africa. Overall, 49 (29.9%) abstracts resulted in full-text publications in 20 peer-reviewed journals. Thirty-eight of the publications were from Africa (representing 28.6% of abstracts from Africa) and 11 from outside Africa (33.3% of abstracts from outside Africa). The median time to publication was 15 months [interquartile range (IQR) 5-26 months]. The publication rate was statistically significantly correlated to the year of publication (P = 0.016) and the use of comparative statistics in the study (P = 0.005), but not to the study design, study subjects, or institution. The majority of the studies were published in the African Journal of Paediatric Surgery and Pediatric Surgery International (14 and 11 of the 49 reports, respectively). The H-index for international abstracts (median 35, IQR 35-76) was significantly higher than that of African abstracts (14, 3-35) (P = 0.002). Only a third of abstracts presented at

  19. Challenging Expertise: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on democracy, public participation and scientific authority: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on scientific authority and public participation.

    PubMed

    Sorgner, Helene

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares Feyerabend's arguments in Science in a Free Society to the controversial theory of expertise proposed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans as a Third Wave of Science Studies. Is the legitimacy of democratic decisions threatened by the unquestioned authority of scientific advice? Or does, on the contrary, science need protection from too much democratic participation in technical decisions? Where Feyerabend's political relativism envisions democratic society as inherently pluralist and demands equal contribution of all traditions and worldviews to public decision-making, Collins and Evans hold a conception of elective modernism, defending the reality and value of technical expertise and arguing that science deserves a privileged status in modern democracies, because scientific values are also democratic values. I will argue that Feyerabend's political relativism provides a valuable framework for the evaluation of Collins' and Evans' theory of expertise. By constructing a dialog between Feyerabend and this more recent approach in Science and Technology Studies, the aim of this article is not only to show where the two positions differ and in what way they might be reconciled, but also how Feyerabend's philosophy provides substantial input to contemporary debate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Scientific Field during Argentina's Latest Military Dictatorship (1976-1983): Contraction of Public Universities and Expansion of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at some of the traits that characterized Argentina's scientific and university policies under the military regime that spanned from 1976 through 1983. To this end, it delves into a rarely explored empirical observation: financial resource transfers from national universities to the National Scientific and Technological Research…

  1. The Scientific Field during Argentina's Latest Military Dictatorship (1976-1983): Contraction of Public Universities and Expansion of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    This study looks at some of the traits that characterized Argentina's scientific and university policies under the military regime that spanned from 1976 through 1983. To this end, it delves into a rarely explored empirical observation: financial resource transfers from national universities to the National Scientific and Technological Research…

  2. Firearms injuries and deaths: a critical public health issue. American Medical Association Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The prevention of firearm deaths and injuries is one of the most complex and controversial issues facing the public health profession in recent years. Laws have been enacted to control or discourage private gun ownership, and especially to eliminate guns from the hands of criminals, but the laws' effects in reducing crime and firearm-related injuries and deaths have been disappointing. Gunshot wounds are the 12th leading cause of death in the United States and more than half of all suicides are committed with guns. There are virtually no reliable data on the number of nonfatal firearm injuries. One of the most troubling aspects of handgun violence is that children often are the victims. Educational efforts have been attempted to promote the safer use of firearms, but they have not led to a significant reduction in the number of fatalities, since most firearm incidents are intended to do harm. PMID:2495544

  3. Science Concierge: A Fast Content-Based Recommendation System for Scientific Publications.

    PubMed

    Achakulvisut, Titipat; Acuna, Daniel E; Ruangrong, Tulakan; Kording, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Finding relevant publications is important for scientists who have to cope with exponentially increasing numbers of scholarly material. Algorithms can help with this task as they help for music, movie, and product recommendations. However, we know little about the performance of these algorithms with scholarly material. Here, we develop an algorithm, and an accompanying Python library, that implements a recommendation system based on the content of articles. Design principles are to adapt to new content, provide near-real time suggestions, and be open source. We tested the library on 15K posters from the Society of Neuroscience Conference 2015. Human curated topics are used to cross validate parameters in the algorithm and produce a similarity metric that maximally correlates with human judgments. We show that our algorithm significantly outperformed suggestions based on keywords. The work presented here promises to make the exploration of scholarly material faster and more accurate.

  4. Science Concierge: A Fast Content-Based Recommendation System for Scientific Publications

    PubMed Central

    Achakulvisut, Titipat; Acuna, Daniel E.; Ruangrong, Tulakan; Kording, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Finding relevant publications is important for scientists who have to cope with exponentially increasing numbers of scholarly material. Algorithms can help with this task as they help for music, movie, and product recommendations. However, we know little about the performance of these algorithms with scholarly material. Here, we develop an algorithm, and an accompanying Python library, that implements a recommendation system based on the content of articles. Design principles are to adapt to new content, provide near-real time suggestions, and be open source. We tested the library on 15K posters from the Society of Neuroscience Conference 2015. Human curated topics are used to cross validate parameters in the algorithm and produce a similarity metric that maximally correlates with human judgments. We show that our algorithm significantly outperformed suggestions based on keywords. The work presented here promises to make the exploration of scholarly material faster and more accurate. PMID:27383424

  5. Scientific advice and public policy: expert advisers' and policymakers' discourses on boundary work.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Robert

    2009-08-01

    This article reports on considerable variety and diversity among discourses on their own jobs of boundary workers of several major Dutch institutes for science-based policy advice. Except for enlightenment, all types of boundary arrangements/work in the Wittrock-typology (Social knowledge and public policy: eight models of interaction. In: Wagner P (ed) Social sciences and modern states: national experiences and theoretical crossroads. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1991) do occur. 'Divergers' experience a gap between science and politics/policymaking; and it is their self-evident task to act as a bridge. They spread over four discourses: 'rational facilitators', 'knowledge brokers', 'megapolicy strategists', and 'policy analysts'. Others aspire to 'convergence'; they believe science and politics ought to be natural allies in preparing collective decisions. But 'policy advisors' excepted, 'postnormalists' and 'deliberative proceduralists' find this very hard to achieve.

  6. Framing of Uncertainty in Scientific Publications: Towards Recommendations for Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, J. H. A.; Helgeson, C.; Elsawah, S.; Jakeman, A. J.; Kummu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty is recognised as an essential issue in environmental decision making and decision support. As modellers, we notably use a variety of tools and techniques within an analysis, for example related to uncertainty quantification and model validation. We also address uncertainty by how we present results. For example, experienced modellers are careful to distinguish robust conclusions from those that need further work, and the precision of quantitative results is tailored to their accuracy. In doing so, the modeller frames how uncertainty should be interpreted by their audience. This is an area which extends beyond modelling to fields such as philosophy of science, semantics, discourse analysis, intercultural communication and rhetoric. We propose that framing of uncertainty deserves greater attention in the context of decision support, and that there are opportunities in this area for fundamental research, synthesis and knowledge transfer, development of teaching curricula, and significant advances in managing uncertainty in decision making. This presentation reports preliminary results of a study of framing practices. Specifically, we analyse the framing of uncertainty that is visible in the abstracts from a corpus of scientific articles. We do this through textual analysis of the content and structure of those abstracts. Each finding that appears in an abstract is classified according to the uncertainty framing approach used, using a classification scheme that was iteratively revised based on reflection and comparison amongst three coders. This analysis indicates how frequently the different framing approaches are used, and provides initial insights into relationships between frames, how the frames relate to interpretation of uncertainty, and how rhetorical devices are used by modellers to communicate uncertainty in their work. We propose initial hypotheses for how the resulting insights might influence decision support, and help advance decision making to

  7. Examining authentic talk and student authorship of scientific ideas: Public pedagogy and affinity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaton, Adriane McNamara

    One of the great challenges to teachers both historically and contemporarily is to facilitate a classroom as a group of students, while concurrently attending to each individual student. As the profession becomes increasingly aware and sensitive to student (dis)abilities, academic giftedness, pressures of athletics and extra-curricular events, and acknowledges the racial, cultural, sexual, economic, gendered identities of students--- the complexity of each individual student becomes ever more apparent. It is a seemingly insurmountable challenge. This dissertation examines how stem cell unit guided group learning while also attending to the individual learning needs of each student. What makes classroom study unusual in research is that it is completely "usual". This study was not part of a university partnership nor did it take place in an affluent school district. Instead, this unit took place in a large, Midwestern urban high school that was/is often written off as a failing---underscoring that powerful science teaching and learning is occurring in schools society simultaneously portrays as victim and villain in the media. Using a sociocultural lens, this ethnographic study draws upon two frameworks, Wenger's communities of practice (1998) and Hayes and Gee's (2011) public pedagogy, to examine how participation in a debate individualizes and personalizes student knowledge and participation in science. The primary use of a community of practice framework allowed for analysis of the norms, rules, practices, and routines of Classroom 507---to establish the nature of the community of learners in the study. A secondary framework, public pedagogy, allowed for deeper understanding of the practices drawn upon in the classroom through consideration of the design, resources, and an emergent "affinity space". This hybridized analysis led to further understanding of how students and teacher stand to learn, participate, engage and use a classroom lesson, the debate, to serve

  8. Beyond dose assessment: using risk with full disclosure of uncertainty in public and scientific communication.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, F Owen; Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, A Iulian

    2011-11-01

    Evaluations of radiation exposures of workers and the public traditionally focus on assessments of radiation dose, especially annual dose, without explicitly evaluating the health risk associated with those exposures, principally the risk of radiation-induced cancer. When dose is the endpoint of an assessment, opportunities to communicate the significance of exposures are limited to comparisons with dose criteria in regulations, doses due to natural background or medical x-rays, and doses above which a statistically significant increase of disease has been observed in epidemiologic studies. Risk assessment generally addresses the chance (probability) that specific diseases might be induced by past, present, or future exposure. The risk of cancer per unit dose will vary depending on gender, age, exposure type (acute or chronic), and radiation type. It is not uncommon to find that two individuals with the same effective dose will have substantially different risks. Risk assessment has shown, for example, that: (a) medical exposures to computed tomography scans have become a leading source of future risk to the general population, and that the risk would be increased above recently published estimates if the incidence of skin cancer and the increased risk from exposure to x-rays compared with high-energy photons were taken into account; (b) indoor radon is a significant contributor to the baseline risk of lung cancer, particularly among people who have never smoked; and (c) members of the public who were exposed in childhood to I in fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and were diagnosed with thyroid cancer later in life would frequently meet criteria established for federal compensation of cancers experienced by energy workers and military participants at atmospheric weapons tests. Risk estimation also enables comparisons of impacts of exposures to radiation and chemical carcinogens and other hazards to life and health. Communication of risk with

  9. Citation analysis of publications of NASU mechanicians in the database of the Thomson Reuters Institute for Scientific Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, A. N.; Rushchitsky, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    The paper performs a citation analysis of publications of mechanicians of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU) based on information tools developed by the Thomson Reuters Institute for Scientific Information. Two groups of mechanicians are considered: representatives of the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics of the NASU (NASU members, heads of departments) and members (academicians) of the NASU Division of Mechanics. Three elements of the Citation Report (Results Found, Citation Index (Sum of the Times Cited), h-index) are presented for each scientist. This paper may be considered as a follow-up on the papers [6-11] published by Prikladnaya Mekhanika ( International Applied Mechanics) in 2005-2009

  10. Systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses: part 6 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Ressing, Meike; Blettner, Maria; Klug, Stefanie J

    2009-07-01

    Because of the rising number of scientific publications, it is important to have a means of jointly summarizing and assessing different studies on a single topic. Systematic literature reviews, meta-analyses of published data, and meta-analyses of individual data (pooled reanalyses) are now being published with increasing frequency. We here describe the essential features of these methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. This article is based on a selective literature search. The different types of review and meta-analysis are described, the methods used in each are outlined so that they can be evaluated, and a checklist is given for the assessment of reviews and meta-analyses of scientific articles. Systematic literature reviews provide an overview of the state of research on a given topic and enable an assessment of the quality of individual studies. They also allow the results of different studies to be evaluated together when these are inconsistent. Meta-analyses additionally allow calculation of pooled estimates of an effect. The different types of review and meta-analysis are discussed with examples from the literature on one particular topic. Systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses enable the research findings and treatment effects obtained in different individual studies to be summed up and evaluated.

  11. Scientific publication productivity of Korean medical colleges: an analysis of 1988-1999 MEDLINE papers.

    PubMed

    Han, M C; Lee, C S

    2000-02-01

    To identify where the quality research activity has been and is carried out in Korea, and to examine to what extents Korean medical colleges play leading roles in the production of international research papers, we investigated the publication productivity of Korean medical colleges and their medical departments as measured by the number of papers published in foreign journals indexed in MEDLINE. The 12-year period from 1988 to 1999 is covered. A total of 4,881 papers is published in MEDLINE foreign journals by the researchers in Korean medical colleges during the period. The production of MEDLINE papers are concentrated in a few universities. More than 60% of MEDLINE foreign journal papers is published by top five universities 25% by Seoul National University, and 15% by Yonsei University. The newly established medical colleges at the University of Ulsan and Sungkyunkwan University produced outstanding numbers of papers in less than ten years. Radiology has led the internationalization of Korean medical papers. It was the most productive specialty identified in this study. The productivity of Internal medicine is on the rise from the mid-1 990s, and the field began to produce the most number of papers since then.

  12. Operational Earthquake Forecasting and Earthquake Early Warning: The Challenges of Introducing Scientific Innovations for Public Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltz, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Although variants of both earthquake early warning and short-term operational earthquake forecasting systems have been implemented or are now being implemented in some regions and nations, they have been slow to gain acceptance within the disciplines that produced them as well as among those for whom they were intended to assist. To accelerate the development and implementation of these technologies will require the cooperation and collaboration of multiple disciplines, some inside and others outside of academia. Seismologists, social scientists, emergency managers, elected officials and key opinion leaders from the media and public must be the participants in this process. Representatives of these groups come from both inside and outside of academia and represent very different organizational cultures, backgrounds and expectations for these systems, sometimes leading to serious disagreements and impediments to further development and implementation. This presentation will focus on examples of the emergence of earthquake early warning and operational earthquake forecasting systems in California, Japan and other regions and document the challenges confronted in the ongoing effort to improve seismic safety.

  13. A semantic-based method for extracting concept definitions from scientific publications: evaluation in the autism phenotype domain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of informatics approaches have been developed that use information retrieval, NLP and text-mining techniques to identify biomedical concepts and relations within scientific publications or their sentences. These approaches have not typically addressed the challenge of extracting more complex knowledge such as biomedical definitions. In our efforts to facilitate knowledge acquisition of rule-based definitions of autism phenotypes, we have developed a novel semantic-based text-mining approach that can automatically identify such definitions within text. Results Using an existing knowledge base of 156 autism phenotype definitions and an annotated corpus of 26 source articles containing such definitions, we evaluated and compared the average rank of correctly identified rule definition or corresponding rule template using both our semantic-based approach and a standard term-based approach. We examined three separate scenarios: (1) the snippet of text contained a definition already in the knowledge base; (2) the snippet contained an alternative definition for a concept in the knowledge base; and (3) the snippet contained a definition not in the knowledge base. Our semantic-based approach had a higher average rank than the term-based approach for each of the three scenarios (scenario 1: 3.8 vs. 5.0; scenario 2: 2.8 vs. 4.9; and scenario 3: 4.5 vs. 6.2), with each comparison significant at the p-value of 0.05 using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Conclusions Our work shows that leveraging existing domain knowledge in the information extraction of biomedical definitions significantly improves the correct identification of such knowledge within sentences. Our method can thus help researchers rapidly acquire knowledge about biomedical definitions that are specified and evolving within an ever-growing corpus of scientific publications. PMID:23937724

  14. A semantic-based method for extracting concept definitions from scientific publications: evaluation in the autism phenotype domain.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Saeed; O'Connor, Martin J; Das, Amar K

    2013-08-12

    A variety of informatics approaches have been developed that use information retrieval, NLP and text-mining techniques to identify biomedical concepts and relations within scientific publications or their sentences. These approaches have not typically addressed the challenge of extracting more complex knowledge such as biomedical definitions. In our efforts to facilitate knowledge acquisition of rule-based definitions of autism phenotypes, we have developed a novel semantic-based text-mining approach that can automatically identify such definitions within text. Using an existing knowledge base of 156 autism phenotype definitions and an annotated corpus of 26 source articles containing such definitions, we evaluated and compared the average rank of correctly identified rule definition or corresponding rule template using both our semantic-based approach and a standard term-based approach. We examined three separate scenarios: (1) the snippet of text contained a definition already in the knowledge base; (2) the snippet contained an alternative definition for a concept in the knowledge base; and (3) the snippet contained a definition not in the knowledge base. Our semantic-based approach had a higher average rank than the term-based approach for each of the three scenarios (scenario 1: 3.8 vs. 5.0; scenario 2: 2.8 vs. 4.9; and scenario 3: 4.5 vs. 6.2), with each comparison significant at the p-value of 0.05 using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Our work shows that leveraging existing domain knowledge in the information extraction of biomedical definitions significantly improves the correct identification of such knowledge within sentences. Our method can thus help researchers rapidly acquire knowledge about biomedical definitions that are specified and evolving within an ever-growing corpus of scientific publications.

  15. A social way to experience a scientific event: Twitter use at the 7th European Public Health Conference.

    PubMed

    Bert, Fabrizio; Zeegers Paget, Dineke; Scaioli, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have analysed Twitter's use by attendees of scientific meetings and the characteristics of conference-related messages and most active attendees. Despite these previous reports, to date no studies have described the use of Twitter during Public Health conferences. For this reason, we decided to perform an analysis of Twitter's use during the 7th European Public Health (EPH) Conference (Glasgow, November 2014). All the tweets published from 21 July to 2 December 2014 and including the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved and much information (author, date, retweets, favourites, mentions, presence of pictures and/or external links, content type and topics) was analysed. A total of 1066 tweets with the hashtag #ephglasgow were retrieved; 86.3% of these were tweeted during the conference. A total of 209 single accounts tweeted, pictures were present in 29.7% tweets while external links were published in 13.8%. Conference speakers were mentioned in around 30% of tweets. Almost 60% of the tweets had a session-related content. Considering only the session-related tweets, one-third had as the main topic 'Health inequalities and migrant and ethnic minority health', while 20% were 'Health policy and health economics' oriented. The results of this study have demonstrated a massive use of Twitter by conference attendees during the 7th EPH conference, and that conference attendees are willing to share quotes and impressions particularly about conference-related topics. It is mandatory for conference organisers to promote online discussion and knowledge dissemination during conferences, especially in the public health field. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  16. Enhancing Scientific Foundations to Ensure Reproducibility: A New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Terry; Vaickus, Max H; Remick, Daniel G

    2017-09-25

    Progress in science is dependent on a strong foundation of reliable results. The "publish or perish" paradigm in research, coupled with an increase in retracted papers from the peer-reviewed literature, is beginning to erode the trust of both the scientific community and the public. National Institutes of Health (NIH) is combating errors by requiring investigators to follow new guidelines addressing scientific premise, experimental design, biological variables, and authentication of reagents. Here, we discuss how implementation of NIH guidelines will help investigators proactively address pitfalls of experimental design and methodology. Careful consideration of the variables contributing to reproducibility helps ensure robust results. NIH, investigators, and journals must collaborate to ensure that quality science is funded, explored, and published. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. It Ain't (Just) the Heat, It's the Humanity: Increasing Public Understanding of Scientific Consensus and Its Role in Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, P.; Cook, J.; Nuccitelli, D.

    2014-12-01

    An overwhelming scientific consensus exists on the issue of anthropogenic climate change. Unfortunately, public perception of expert agreement remains low- only around 1 in 10 Americans correctly estimates the actual level of consensus on the topic. Moreover, several recent studies have demonstrated the pivotal role that perceived consensus plays in the public's acceptance of key scientific facts about environmental problems, as well as their willingness to support policy to address them. This "consensus gap", between the high level of scientific agreement vs. the public's perception of it, has led to calls for increased consensus messaging. However this call has been challenged by a number of different groups: climate "skeptics" in denial about the existence and validity of the consensus; some social science researchers and journalists who believe that such messages will be ineffective or counterproductive; and even some scientists and science advocates who downplay the value of consensus in science generally. All of these concerns can be addressed by effectively communicating the role of consensus within science to the public, as well as the conditions under which consensus is likely to be correct. Here, we demonstrate that the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change satisfies these conditions, and discuss past examples of purported consensus that failed or succeeded to satisfy them as well. We conclude by discussing the way in which scientific consensus is interpreted by the public, and how consensus messaging can improve climate literacy.

  18. Scientific publications in laboratory medicine from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: A ten-year survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding-Hua; Cui, Wei; Yao, Yun-Tai; Jiang, Qi-Qi

    2010-10-09

    We investigated scientific publications in laboratory medicine originating from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan over the past 10 years. The information about articles published in the included journals were determined by computer-searching on PubMed and data were extracted independently and analyzed in relation to the number of articles. From 2000 to 2009 there were 1166 articles published in laboratory medicine journals from the major Chinese regions (mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan). This exceeded Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France from 2005 onwards. Also, the number of articles from mainland China exceeded those from Hong Kong and Taiwan from 2004 onwards. The average impact factor (IF) from Hong Kong ranked the first, followed by mainland China, and then Taiwan. Clinica Chimica Acta seems to be the most popular laboratory medicine journal among Chinese authors. Over the past 10 years, Chinese authors have been more and more active in the field of laboratory medicine. Mainland China seems to have caught up to Hong Kong and Taiwan regarding publication of papers in this field. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilizing public scientific web lectures to teach contemporary physics at the high school level: A case study of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development) that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary public physics web lecture that was followed by a collaborative generic activity session. The collaborative session involved a guided critical reconstruction of the main arguments in the lecture, and a processing of the key analogical explanations. Then the students watched another exemplary web lecture on a different topic. The participants (N=14) were divided into two groups differing only in the order in which the lectures were presented. The students’ discussions during the activities show that they were able to reason and demonstrate conceptual progress, although the physics ideas in the lectures were far beyond their level in physics. The discussions during the collaborative session contributed significantly to the students’ understanding. We illustrate this point through an analysis of one of these discussions between two students on an analogical explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect that was presented in one of the lectures. The results from the tests that were administered to the participants several times during the intervention further support this contention.

  20. Communicating Ocean Acidification and Climate Change to Public Audiences Using Scientific Data, Interactive Exploration Tools, and Visual Narratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Rossiter, A.; Spitzer, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a hands-on science museum, explores local environmental conditions of San Francisco Bay to connect audiences to the larger global implications of ocean acidification and climate change. The work is centered in the Fisher Bay Observatory at Pier 15, a glass-walled gallery sited for explorations of urban San Francisco and the Bay. Interactive exhibits, high-resolution data visualizations, and mediated activities and conversations communicate to public audiences the impacts of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ocean. Through a 10-year education partnership with NOAA and two environmental literacy grants funded by its Office of Education, the Exploratorium has been part of two distinct but complementary strategies to increase climate literacy beyond traditional classroom settings. We will discuss two projects that address the ways complex scientific information can be transformed into learning opportunities for the public, providing information citizens can use for decision-making in their personal lives and their communities. The Visualizing Change project developed "visual narratives" that combine scientific visualizations and other images with story telling about the science and potential solutions of climate impacts on the ocean. The narratives were designed to engage curiosity and provide the public with hopeful and useful information to stimulate solutions-oriented behavior rather than to communicate despair about climate change. Training workshops for aquarium and museum docents prepare informal educators to use the narratives and help them frame productive conversations with the pubic. The Carbon Networks project, led by the Exploratorium, uses local and Pacific Rim data to explore the current state of climate change and ocean acidification. The Exploratorium collects and displays local ocean and atmosphere data as a member of the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System and as an observing station for NOAA's Pacific

  1. Bibliometric analysis of scientific publications in transplantation journals from Mainland China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan between 2006 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Qiu-Ju; Su, Huai-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the quantity and quality of scientific publications in transplantation fields that were written by researchers from Mainland China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan in the East Asia region. Settings East Asia. Participants and outcome measures Articles except editorials, conference abstracts, letters, news and corrections published in 25 transplantation journals from 2006 to 2015 were screened with the Web of Science database. The number of total and annual articles, article types (study design and transplantation site), impact factor, citations and articles in the high-impact journals was determined to assess the quantity and quality of transplantation research from East Asia. The correlation of socioeconomic factors and annual publications was also analysed. Results From 2006 to 2015, there were 47 141 articles published in transplantation journals, of which researchers from Japan published 3694 articles, followed by Mainland China, South Korea and Taiwan with 2778, 1643 and 951 articles, respectively. Similar trends were observed in accumulated impact factor, accumulated citations, articles in the high-impact journals and articles on transplantation site. Publications from Japan had the highest average impact factor and citation, while those from Mainland China had the lowest. Additionally, in terms of study design, authors from Mainland China contributed to most clinical trials and randomised controlled trials, but authors from Japan contributed to most case reports. The annual numbers of articles from Mainland China and South Korea increased linearly (p<0.05), but those from Japan and Taiwan remained stable for the period studied. The annual numbers of articles from Mainland China and South Korea were positively correlated with gross domestic product (p<0.05). Conclusions Transplantation research productivity in East Asia is highly skewed, with gross domestic product having a significant positive correlation

  2. Publication rates of manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Annual Scientific Conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2011-01-01

    Publication is the ultimate desired end point of scientific research. However, oral manuscript presentations of research studies are often referenced in textbooks, journal articles, and industry white papers, and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery oral manuscript presentations. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the actual publication rates of oral manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) Annual Scientific Conference over 10 years. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference official program between 1999 and 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was hand searched for any oral manuscript presentation, and, when identified, the title and authors were individually searched through electronic internet-based search engines to determine whether an oral manuscript presentation had been followed by publication of a full-text article. Additionally, pertinent journals were hand searched for potential articles. A total of 67.5% (139/206) oral manuscript presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 12 medical journals in a mean of 14.5 months. All journals except one (91.7%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of oral manuscript presentations at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference is similar to or greater than orthopaedic subspecialties, including foot and ankle surgery, publication rates. Based on the above, attendees of the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference should be aware that the majority of oral manuscript material presented at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference can be considered as accurate because they survive the rigors of the peer-review process more than two thirds of the time.

  3. Scientific publications in public, environmental and occupational health journals by authors from China, Japan and Korea in East Asia: A 10-year literature survey from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Li, Meina; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    To compare the number and quality of public, environmental and occupational health articles published in international journals from the 3 major non-English speaking countries of East Asia: China, Japan and Korea. Public, environmental and occupational health articles from China, Japan and Korea that were published in 161 journals from 2003 to 2012 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database. We recorded the numbers of total articles, impact factors (IF), citations, number of articles in top 10 journals, references as well as the article distribution from various regions in China. From 2003 to 2012, China, Japan and Korea published 5713, 3802 and 1967 papers respectively, with accumulated impact factor of 14 934.55, 8758.36 and 6189.25, the average impact factor of 2.61, 2.30 and 3.15 and the average citation numbers per document of 5.08, 6.49 and 5.25. In the top 10 high-impact public, environmental and occupational health journals, China, Japan and Korea accounted for 50.19%, 20.34% and 29.47% of all the papers published in those journals, respectively. Total impact factors of the most popular 10 papers for China, Japan and Korea were: 26.23, 27.08 and 26.91. Distribution of scientific papers among regions was unbalanced in China, for Hong Kong and Taiwan it accounted for 47.31% of the papers from China. From 2003 to 2012, both the quality and number of papers from China published in public, environmental and occupational health journals have greatly improved. China exceeded Japan and Korea in the number, accumulated impact factor, total citation times and the average number of references, while Korea had the highest average impact factor. Japan had the highest journal impact factor among the most popular journals, and the highest average citation number per document. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Impact of GDP, Spending on R&D, Number of Universities and Scientific Journals on Research Publications among Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Masri, Abeer A.; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood; Memon, Almas Naeem; Zaidi, Syed Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the impact of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, spending on Research and Development (R&D), number of universities, and Indexed Scientific Journals on total number of research documents (papers), citations per document and Hirsch index (H-index) in various science and social science subjects among Asian countries. Materials and Methods In this study, 40 Asian countries were included. The information regarding Asian countries, their GDP per capita, spending on R&D, total number of universities and indexed scientific journals were collected. We recorded the bibliometric indicators, including total number of research documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social sciences subjects during the period 1996–2011. The main sources for information were World Bank, SCI-mago/Scopus and Web of Science; Thomson Reuters. Results The mean per capita GDP for all the Asian countries is 14448.31±2854.40 US$, yearly per capita spending on R&D 0.64±0.16 US$, number of universities 72.37±18.32 and mean number of ISI indexed journal per country is 17.97±7.35. The mean of research documents published in various science and social science subjects among all the Asian countries during the period 1996–2011 is 158086.92±69204.09; citations per document 8.67±0.48; and H-index 122.8±19.21. Spending on R&D, number of universities and indexed journals have a positive correlation with number of published documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social science subjects. However, there was no association between the per capita GDP and research outcomes. Conclusion The Asian countries who spend more on R&D have a large number of universities and scientific indexed journals produced more in research outcomes including total number of research publication, citations per documents and H-index in various science and social science subjects. PMID:23840471

  5. Impact of GDP, spending on R&D, number of universities and scientific journals on research publications among Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Masri, Abeer A; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood; Memon, Almas Naeem; Zaidi, Syed Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the impact of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, spending on Research and Development (R&D), number of universities, and Indexed Scientific Journals on total number of research documents (papers), citations per document and Hirsch index (H-index) in various science and social science subjects among Asian countries. In this study, 40 Asian countries were included. The information regarding Asian countries, their GDP per capita, spending on R&D, total number of universities and indexed scientific journals were collected. We recorded the bibliometric indicators, including total number of research documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social sciences subjects during the period 1996-2011. The main sources for information were World Bank, SCI-mago/Scopus and Web of Science; Thomson Reuters. The mean per capita GDP for all the Asian countries is 14448.31±2854.40 US$, yearly per capita spending on R&D 0.64±0.16 US$, number of universities 72.37±18.32 and mean number of ISI indexed journal per country is 17.97±7.35. The mean of research documents published in various science and social science subjects among all the Asian countries during the period 1996-2011 is 158086.92±69204.09; citations per document 8.67±0.48; and H-index 122.8±19.21. Spending on R&D, number of universities and indexed journals have a positive correlation with number of published documents, citations per document and H-index in various science and social science subjects. However, there was no association between the per capita GDP and research outcomes. The Asian countries who spend more on R&D have a large number of universities and scientific indexed journals produced more in research outcomes including total number of research publication, citations per documents and H-index in various science and social science subjects.

  6. The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (1925-1950): From a Health Department Bulletin to a UPR School of Tropical Medicine Scientific Journal.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl

    2016-12-01

    This essay presents a history of the scientific journal of the University of Puerto Rico, School of Tropical Medicine (STM) under the auspices of Columbia University: The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. This is the third article in a historical series about the STM, and includes supporting information relevant to the forthcoming articles on the school's scientific endeavors. This article is conceived as a history from the perspective of the literature of journal genre in the field of tropical medicine. The STM scientific journal, precursor of the Puerto Rico Health Sciences Journal, had five main stages. First (1925-1927), originated as an official bulletin of the Health Department (Porto Rico Health Review). Second (1927-1929), became a project of mutual collaboration between the Health Department and the STM, and the publication's title reflected the fields of public health and tropical medicine. Third (1929-1932), acquired a scientific focus as it changed to a quarterly science publication. Fourth (1932-1942), became a fully bilingual journal and acquired its definitive name. Fifth (1942-1950), the final phase in which the first Puerto Rican Director became the principal editor until the Journal's dissolution. The analysis of authorship and the content analysis of the topics of diseases, public health and basic sciences, clarify the history of tropical medicine during the first half of the 20th century in Puerto Rico. The article highlights major symbolic events that delve into the understanding of a collaborative exemplar of the modernity of medical science.

  7. Pitfalls in the performance and interpretation of clinical immunology tests.

    PubMed

    Lock, R J; Virgo, P F; Unsworth, D J

    2008-12-01

    A broad overview, with examples, of the potential pitfalls encountered in the clinical immunology laboratory is presented. Illustrative examples and case scenarios are provided from autoimmunity, immunochemistry and cellular immunology, looking at both technical and interpretative pitfalls.

  8. Graphs in Scientific Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, William S.

    Two surveys were carried out to help increase knowledge of current graph usage in science. A detailed analysis of all graphs in one volume of the journal "Science" revealed that 30 percent had errors. Graphs are used more in some disciplines than in others; a survey of 57 journals revealed natural science journals use far more graphs…

  9. Scientific publications on portal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome: a global survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xingshun; Jia, Jia; Ren, Weirong; Yang, Man; De Stefano, Valerio; Wang, Juan; Fan, Daiming

    2014-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) are two rare vascular disorders of the liver that can lead to life-threatening complications. We conducted a global survey to systematically analyze the scientific publications in the fields of PVT and BCS. All papers regarding PVT and BCS were identified via the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases. The publication year, country, type of paper, study design, and number of citations were summarized. Good quality papers were defined as those in which a high proportion of homogeneous patients with BCS and/or PVT was observed. We identified 6691 and 4325 papers regarding PVT and BCS, respectively. The number of papers gradually increased over time. Researchers from the USA published the greatest number of papers (PVT: n=1418; BCS: n=888). Clinical studies were the most common type of paper (PVT: n=5395; BCS n=3171), but fewer than half of these observed more than 10 patients (PVT: n=2667/5395; BCS: n=1092/3171). Furthermore, fewer than half of the clinical studies with more than 10 patients were of good quality (PVT: 976/2667; BCS: 466/1092). According to the study design, the good quality papers were classified as cohort studies (PVT: n=865; BCS: n=421), case-control studies (PVT: n=98; BCS: n=45), and randomized controlled trials (PVT: n=13; BCS: n=0). The 5 most frequently cited original articles and guidelines/consensuses were also listed. Despite an increase in the number of papers regarding PVT and BCS over time, most of the papers had a small sample size, suggesting the necessity of large cohort studies or randomized controlled trials.

  10. Publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons annual scientific conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Bradley P; Donnenwerth, Michael P; Borkosky, Sara L; Plovanich, Elizabeth J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    Publication is the desired end point of scientific research. Ultimately, it is desired that research presented in poster format at a scientific conference will be developed into a report and become published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Moreover, poster presentations of research studies are often referenced and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery poster presentations. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the actual publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) annual scientific conference (ASC) during a 10-year period. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS ASC official program from 1999 to 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was manually searched for any poster presentation and, when identified, the authors and title were individually searched using Internet-based search engines to determine whether a poster presentation had been followed by publication. Of the 825 posters, 198 (24%) poster presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 32 medical journals within a weighted mean of 17.6 months. Of the 32 journals, 25 (78.1%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of poster presentations at the ACFAS ASC was less than that of oral manuscripts presented at the same meeting during the same period and was also less than the orthopedic subspecialty poster presentation publication rates. Therefore, attendees of the ACFAS ASC should be aware that only a few of the posters presented at the ACFAS ASC will be valid because they will not survive the rigors of publication 76% of the time. Additionally, more stringent selection criteria should be used so that the selected poster presentations can ultimately withstand the publication process. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pitfalls in wrist and hand ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chiavaras, Mary M; Jacobson, Jon A; Yablon, Corrie M; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review a number of diagnostic pitfalls related to ultrasound evaluation of the hand and wrist. Such pitfalls relate to evaluation of ten-dons (extensor retinaculum, multiple tendon fascicles, tendon subluxation), inflammatory arthritis (incomplete evaluation, misinterpretation of erosions, failure to evaluate for enthesitis), carpal tunnel syndrome (inaccurate measurements, postoperative assessment), ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb (misinterpretation of the adductor aponeurosis and displaced tear), wrist ganglion cysts (incomplete evaluation and misdiagnosis), and muscle variants. Although ultrasound has been shown to be an effective imaging method for assessment of many pathologic conditions of the wrist, knowledge of potential pitfalls is essential to avoid misdiagnosis and achieve high diagnostic accuracy.

  12. [Pitfalls in the treatment of periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Casteyde, J P; Occhiminuti, M A; Achache, S; Netter, J C

    1984-01-01

    The author point out that periodontitis is a disease of multiple aetiology and indicate two types of pitfall: traps in conceiving the plan of treatment and traps in carrying out treatment. The treatment plan may be incomplete. The authors show that the deepest types of vertical alveolysis are always related to occlusal or functional imbalance and that treatment based only upon hygiene and periodontal surgery represents a pitfall. They stress the importance of functional treatment. However such complex functional treatment itself has a number of pitfalls when it is being carried out. It is essential to restore balance of the oro-facial musculature before any treatment of occlusion. These are also types of non-occlusal musculo-dental imbalance which may plan an important role in the course of periodontitis. In conclusion, the authors note that functional treatment of the manducatory apparatus is as important as controlling inflammation. This must not be underestimated nor be allowed to go unrecognised.

  13. Meaningful public participation in scientific research: How to build an effective site-based long-term education program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, L.

    2013-12-01

    Many site-based educators (Wildlife Refuges, nature centers, Cooperative Extension Programs, schools, arboretums) struggle with developing and implementing cohesive long-term scientific monitoring projects into their existing outreach programming. Moreover, projects that are not meaningful to participants often have little or no sustainable long-term impact. Programs proven most effective are those which 1.) engage the participants in the study design and implementation process, 2.) answer a scientific question posed by site leaders; the data collected supports USA-NPN efforts as well as related site management and monitoring questions, 3.) are built into existing outreach and education programs, using phenology as a lens for understanding both natural and cultural history, and 4.) consistently share outcomes and results with the participants. The USA National Phenology Network's (USA-NPN) Education Program provides phenology curriculum and outreach to educators in formal, non-formal, and informal settings. Materials are designed to serve participants in grades 5-12, higher education, and adult learners. Phenology, used as a lens for place-based education, can inform science, environmental, and climate literacy, as well as other subject areas including cultural studies, art, and language arts. The USA-NPN offers consultation with site leaders on how to successfully engage site-based volunteers and students in long-term phenological studies using Nature's Notebook (NN), the professional and citizen science phenology monitoring program. USA-NPN education and educator instruction materials are designed and field-tested to demonstrate how to implement a long-term NN phenology-monitoring program at such sites. These curricula incorporate monitoring for public visitors, long-term volunteers, and school groups, while meeting the goals of USA-NPN and the site, and can be used as a model for other public participation in science programs interested in achieving similar

  14. Inter-observer agreement on a checklist to evaluate scientific publications in the field of animal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Simoneit, Céline; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian P

    2012-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine respondents' inter-observer agreement on a detailed checklist to evaluate three exemplars (one case report, one randomized controlled study without blinding, and one blinded, randomized controlled study) of the scientific literature in the field of bovine reproduction. Fourteen international scientists in the field of animal reproduction were provided with the three articles, three copies of the checklist, and a supplementary explanation. Overall, 13 responded to more than 90% of the items. Overall repeatability between respondents using Fleiss's κ was 0.35 (fair agreement). Combining the "strongly agree" and "agree" responses and the "strongly disagree" and "disagree" responses increased κ to 0.49 (moderate agreement). Evaluation of information given in the three articles on housing of the animals (35% identical answers) and preconditions or pretreatments (42%) varied widely. Even though the overall repeatability was fair, repeatability concerning the important categories was high (e.g., level of agreement=98%). Our data show that the checklist is a reasonable and practical supporting tool to assess the quality of publications. Therefore, it may be used in teaching and practicing evidence-based veterinary medicine. It can support training in systematic and critical appraisal of information and in clinical decision making.

  15. Visualizing Forensic Publication Impacts and Collaborations: Presenting at a Scientific Venue Leads to Increased Collaborations between Researchers and Information Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Makar, Susan; Malanowski, Amanda; Rapp, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The Information Services Office (ISO) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) proactively sought out an opportunity to present the findings of a study that showed the impact of NIST’s forensic research output to its internal customers and outside researchers. ISO analyzed the impact of NIST’s contributions to the peer-reviewed forensic journal literature through citation analysis and network visualizations. The findings of this study were compiled into a poster that was presented during the Forensics@NIST Symposium in December 2014. ISO’s study informed the forensic research community where NIST has had some of the greatest scholarly impact. This paper describes the methodology used to assess the impact of NIST’s forensic publications and shares the results, outcomes, and impacts of ISO’s study and poster presentation. This methodology is adaptable and applicable to other research fields and to other libraries. It has improved the recognition of ISO’s capabilities within NIST and resulted in application of the methodology to additional scientific disciplines. PMID:27956754

  16. Public policy and the social determinants of health: the challenge of the production and use of scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini Filho, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the others published in this thematic issue of the Cadernos de Saúde Pública. The author makes a brief historical review of the concepts, approaches and methodologies used to study the relationships between social determinants and health outcomes. By analyzing the current global movement around social determinants of health he emphasizes that the distinctive feature of this movement is the explicit commitment to action through intersectoral public policies that are based on evidence and implemented with the support and participation of broad segments of society. As this special issue of the Cadernos de Saúde Pública is dedicated to presenting the results of research related to social determinants of health, the author focuses on an analysis of the difficulties in the production and use of scientific evidence that supports the definition, implementation and evaluation of policies to combat health inequities through action on social determinants of health. To conclude, he presents some recommendations for overcoming these difficulties.

  17. Visualizing Forensic Publication Impacts and Collaborations: Presenting at a Scientific Venue Leads to Increased Collaborations between Researchers and Information Professionals.

    PubMed

    Makar, Susan; Malanowski, Amanda; Rapp, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The Information Services Office (ISO) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) proactively sought out an opportunity to present the findings of a study that showed the impact of NIST's forensic research output to its internal customers and outside researchers. ISO analyzed the impact of NIST's contributions to the peer-reviewed forensic journal literature through citation analysis and network visualizations. The findings of this study were compiled into a poster that was presented during the Forensics@NIST Symposium in December 2014. ISO's study informed the forensic research community where NIST has had some of the greatest scholarly impact. This paper describes the methodology used to assess the impact of NIST's forensic publications and shares the results, outcomes, and impacts of ISO's study and poster presentation. This methodology is adaptable and applicable to other research fields and to other libraries. It has improved the recognition of ISO's capabilities within NIST and resulted in application of the methodology to additional scientific disciplines.

  18. Bibliometric analysis of scientific publications in transplantation journals from Mainland China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan between 2006 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Pu, Qiang-Hong; Lyu, Qiu-Ju; Su, Huai-Yu

    2016-08-03

    The aim of this study is to compare the quantity and quality of scientific publications in transplantation fields that were written by researchers from Mainland China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan in the East Asia region. East Asia. Articles except editorials, conference abstracts, letters, news and corrections published in 25 transplantation journals from 2006 to 2015 were screened with the Web of Science database. The number of total and annual articles, article types (study design and transplantation site), impact factor, citations and articles in the high-impact journals was determined to assess the quantity and quality of transplantation research from East Asia. The correlation of socioeconomic factors and annual publications was also analysed. From 2006 to 2015, there were 47 141 articles published in transplantation journals, of which researchers from Japan published 3694 articles, followed by Mainland China, South Korea and Taiwan with 2778, 1643 and 951 articles, respectively. Similar trends were observed in accumulated impact factor, accumulated citations, articles in the high-impact journals and articles on transplantation site. Publications from Japan had the highest average impact factor and citation, while those from Mainland China had the lowest. Additionally, in terms of study design, authors from Mainland China contributed to most clinical trials and randomised controlled trials, but authors from Japan contributed to most case reports. The annual numbers of articles from Mainland China and South Korea increased linearly (p<0.05), but those from Japan and Taiwan remained stable for the period studied. The annual numbers of articles from Mainland China and South Korea were positively correlated with gross domestic product (p<0.05). Transplantation research productivity in East Asia is highly skewed, with gross domestic product having a significant positive correlation. Mainland China still lags far behind Japan in most bibliometric indicators

  19. Common problems and pitfalls in gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1986-01-01

    There are several pitfalls and problems associated with the successful design of a new gear transmission. A new design will require the knowledge and experience of several technical areas of engineering. Most of the pitfalls and problems associated with a new design are related to an inadequate evaluation of several areas, such as, the lubrication and cooling requirements, complete static and dynamic load analysis, evaluation of materials and heat treatment and the latest manufacturing technology. Some of the common problems of the gear design process are discussed with recommendations made for avoiding these conditions.

  20. PET/CT in the thorax: pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Truong, Mylene T; Viswanathan, Chitra; Carter, Brett W; Mawlawi, Osama; Marom, Edith M

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT is widely used in the staging and assessment of therapeutic response in patients with malignancies. Accurate interpretation of PET/CT requires knowledge of the normal physiologic distribution of [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose, artifacts due to the use of CT for attenuation correction of the PET scan and potential pitfalls due to malignancies that are PET negative and benign conditions that are PET positive. Awareness of these artifacts and potential pitfalls is important in preventing misinterpretation that can alter patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Public Participation in Scientific Research: Defining the Field and Assessing Its Potential for Informal Science Education. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonney, Rick; Ballard, Heidi; Jordan, Rebecca; McCallie, Ellen; Phillips, Tina; Shirk, Jennifer; Wilderman, Candie C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing number of collaborations between volunteers and professional scientists, research efforts investigating the impacts of such collaborations, which we have termed Public Participation in Scientific Research (PPSR), have been very limited. Examples of PPSR projects include citizen science, volunteer monitoring, and participatory…

  2. Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data: The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    2010-09-01

    Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data where nobody can claim absolute certainty, due to the current state of scientific knowledge, are studied. The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza are investigated. The first two are of controversial impact while the third is more neutral and resolved. To adopt a cautious balanced attitude based on clear but inconclusive data appears to be a lose-out strategy. In contrast overstating arguments with incorrect claims which cannot be scientifically refuted appears to be necessary but not sufficient to eventually win a public debate. The underlying key mechanisms of these puzzling and unfortunate conclusions are identified using the Galam sequential probabilistic model of opinion dynamics (Galam, 2002 [4], Galam, 2005 [18], Galam and Jacobs, 2007 [19]). It reveals that the existence of inflexible agents and their respective proportions are the instrumental parameters to determine the faith of incomplete scientific data in public debates. Acting on one’s own inflexible proportion modifies the topology of the flow diagram, which in turn can make irrelevant initial supports. On the contrary focusing on open-minded agents may be useless given some topologies. When the evidence is not as strong as claimed, the inflexibles rather than the data are found to drive the opinion of the population. The results shed a new but disturbing light on designing adequate strategies to win a public debate.

  3. Complex systems approach to scientific publication and peer-review system: development of an agent-based model calibrated with empirical journal data.

    PubMed

    Kovanis, Michail; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe; Trinquart, Ludovic

    Scientific peer-review and publication systems incur a huge burden in terms of costs and time. Innovative alternatives have been proposed to improve the systems, but assessing their impact in experimental studies is not feasible at a systemic level. We developed an agent-based model by adopting a unified view of peer review and publication systems and calibrating it with empirical journal data in the biomedical and life sciences. We modeled researchers, research manuscripts and scientific journals as agents. Researchers were characterized by their scientific level and resources, manuscripts by their scientific value, and journals by their reputation and acceptance or rejection thresholds. These state variables were used in submodels for various processes such as production of articles, submissions to target journals, in-house and external peer review, and resubmissions. We collected data for a sample of biomedical and life sciences journals regarding acceptance rates, resubmission patterns and total number of published articles. We adjusted submodel parameters so that the agent-based model outputs fit these empirical data. We simulated 105 journals, 25,000 researchers and 410,000 manuscripts over 10 years. A mean of 33,600 articles were published per year; 19 % of submitted manuscripts remained unpublished. The mean acceptance rate was 21 % after external peer review and rejection rate 32 % after in-house review; 15 % publications resulted from the first submission, 47 % the second submission and 20 % the third submission. All decisions in the model were mainly driven by the scientific value, whereas journal targeting and persistence in resubmission defined whether a manuscript would be published or abandoned after one or many rejections. This agent-based model may help in better understanding the determinants of the scientific publication and peer-review systems. It may also help in assessing and identifying the most promising alternative systems of peer

  4. Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models.

    PubMed

    Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E

    2017-01-01

    In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.

  5. Avoiding common pitfalls in qualitative data collection and transcription.

    PubMed

    Easton, K L; McComish, J F; Greenberg, R

    2000-09-01

    The subjective nature of qualitative research necessitates scrupulous scientific methods to ensure valid results. Although qualitative methods such as grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography yield rich data, consumers of research need to be able to trust the findings reported in such studies. Researchers are responsible for establishing the trustworthiness of qualitative research through a variety of ways. Specific challenges faced in the field can seriously threaten the dependability of the data. However, by minimizing potential errors that can occur when doing fieldwork, researchers can increase the trustworthiness of the study. The purpose of this article is to present three of the pitfalls that can occur in qualitative research during data collection and transcription: equipment failure, environmental hazards, and transcription errors. Specific strategies to minimize the risk for avoidable errors will be discussed.

  6. Public perceptions and scientific evidence for perceived harms/risks of community water fluoridation: An examination of online comments pertaining to fluoridation cessation in Calgary in 2011.

    PubMed

    Podgorny, Paulina C; McLaren, Lindsay

    2015-06-19

    To examine the perceived harms/risks of fluoridation as expressed in online forums relating to cessation and aftermath in Calgary, specifically, 1) which harms/risks are mentioned, 2) for those harms/risks, what kinds of evidence are cited, 3) to what extent is scientific literature cited, and what is its quality, and 4) for a subset of harms/risks, what is known from the broader scientific literature? Relevant online comments were identified through free-text Internet searches, and those explicitly discussing the harms/risks of water fluoridation were extracted. Types of evidence mentioned were identified, and the scientific papers cited were reviewed. Finally, the broader scientific literature on two of the harms/risks was reviewed and synthesized. We identified 17 distinct groups of harms/risks, which spanned human body systems, the environment and non-human organisms. Most often, no evidence was cited. When evidence was cited, types included individuals viewed as authorities and personal experiences. Reference to scientific articles was rare, and those papers (n = 9) had significant methodological concerns. Our review of scientific literature on fluoride and 1) thyroid functioning and 2) phytoplankton revealed some negative effects of fluoride at concentrations exceeding maximum recommended levels (>1.5 ppm). The findings have implications for communication with the public about fluoridation. First, to the extent that the public consults the scientific literature, it is essential that the methodological limitations of a study, as well as its relevance to community water fluoridation, be widely and promptly communicated. Second, scientific evidence is only one component of why some people support or do not support fluoridation, and communication strategies must accommodate that reality.

  7. Pitfalls of CITES implementation in Nepal: a policy gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Dongol, Yogesh; Heinen, Joel T

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of policy involves multiple agencies operating at multiple levels in facilitating processes and actions to accomplish desired results. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was developed and implemented to regulate and control international wildlife trade, but violations of the agreement are widespread and growing worldwide, including in Nepal. This study attempts to understand how domestic CITES policies are translated into action and what effect actions and processes have on compliance. In doing so, this study provides insights into the implementation and enforcement pitfalls of national legislation that explain CITES violations in Nepal. Primarily, we used 26 key informants interviews to learn opinions of experts, and the grounded theory approach for further qualitative data analysis. In addition, we used Najman's (1995) policy implementation analysis framework to explain gaps. Many interrelated variables in the content of the policy, commitment and capacity of the agencies, the roles of clients and coalitions and contextual issues were observed. Variables that emerged suggest pitfalls in the regulatory policy represented by low probability of detection, arrest and punishment. Moreover, redistributive policies in buffer zones of protected areas are needed into perpetuity to benefit locals. Also, conservation organizations' support for building public and political salience is imperative.

  8. Pitfalls of CITES Implementation in Nepal: A Policy Gap Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongol, Yogesh; Heinen, Joel T.

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of policy involves multiple agencies operating at multiple levels in facilitating processes and actions to accomplish desired results. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was developed and implemented to regulate and control international wildlife trade, but violations of the agreement are widespread and growing worldwide, including in Nepal. This study attempts to understand how domestic CITES policies are translated into action and what effect actions and processes have on compliance. In doing so, this study provides insights into the implementation and enforcement pitfalls of national legislation that explain CITES violations in Nepal. Primarily, we used 26 key informants interviews to learn opinions of experts, and the grounded theory approach for further qualitative data analysis. In addition, we used Najman's (1995) policy implementation analysis framework to explain gaps. Many interrelated variables in the content of the policy, commitment and capacity of the agencies, the roles of clients and coalitions and contextual issues were observed. Variables that emerged suggest pitfalls in the regulatory policy represented by low probability of detection, arrest and punishment. Moreover, redistributive policies in buffer zones of protected areas are needed into perpetuity to benefit locals. Also, conservation organizations' support for building public and political salience is imperative.

  9. Archaeology and public perception of a trans-scientific problem; disposal of toxic wastes in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winograd, Isaac Judah

    1986-01-01

    Predicting the effects of toxic-waste disposal on the environment over periods of millenia to hundreds of millenia is a transscientific problem; that is, one not fully addressed by quantitative scientific and engineering endeavors. Archaeology is a pertinent adjunct to such predictions in several ways. First, and foremost, archaeological records demonstrate that delicate, as well as durable, objects buried in thick unsaturated zones of arid and semiarid environments may survive intact for millenia to tens of millenia. This successful preservation of Late Paleolithic to Iron Age artifacts provides independent support for the tentative favorable conclusions of earth scientists regarding the general utility of thick unsaturated zones for toxic-waste isolation. By analogy with the archaeological record, solidified toxic wastes of low solubility that are buried in arid unsaturated zones should remain isolated from the environment indefinitely; modern man presumably should be able to improve upon the techniques used by his ancestors to isolate and preserve their sacred and utilitarian objects. Second, archaeological evidence pertinent to the fate of objects buried in unsaturated zones-although qualitative in nature and subject to the limitations of arguments by analogy-is meaningful to the public and to the courts who, with some scientists and engineers, are reluctant to rely exclusively on computer-generated predictions of the effects of buried toxic wastes on the environment. Third, the archaeological record issues a warning that our descendants may intrude into our waste disposal sites and that we must therefore take special measures to minimize such entry and, if it occurs, to warn of the dangers by a variety of symbols. And fourth, archaeology provides a record of durable natural and manmade materials that may prove to be suitable for encapsulation of our wastes and from which we can construct warning markers that will last for millenia. For these four reasons

  10. Mainstream Issues of Education and Public Awareness of Space Activities and Sciences among universities and Scientific Institutes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balbir

    This paper is an effort to study and analyze several constraints and issues of space technology and education that organizations other than governmental organizations face in awareness program. In recent years, advancements in technologies have made it possible for Volunteer and Technical Communities, non-government organizations, private agencies and academic research institutions to provide increasing support to space education management and emphasis on response efforts. Important cornerstones of this effort and support are the possibility to access and take advantage of satellite imagery as well as the use of other space-based technologies such as telecommunications satellites and global navigation satellite systems included in main curriculum plus the implementation of programs for use of high class sophisticated technologies used by industries to the students and researchers of non-space faring nations. The authors recognize the importance of such new methodologies for education and public Awareness. This paper demonstrates many hurdles universities and scientific institutions face including lack of access in terms of financial and technical resources for better support. A new model for coordinated private sector partnership in response to space sciences and education has been discussed. In depth analysis and techniques need to connect these pioneering communities with the space industry as well as the space governmental agencies, with special emphasis on financial constraints. The paper mandates its role to promote the use of space-based information; its established networks bringing together national institutions responsible for these space based activities, as well as other end users, and space solution experts; and its technical foundation, particularly in the area of information technologies. To help building a tighter cooperation and further understanding among all these communities, paper delivers an intensive report and solutions for future

  11. Avoiding the pitfalls of strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cathy Sullivan; Krentz, Susanna E

    2006-11-01

    Be on guard against these and other strategic planning pitfalls: Moving to the planning stage without an environmental assessment. Developing a plan without senior management involvement. Allowing too little or too much time for planning. Using the plan simply to reinforce the status quo. Lacking clear metrics for defining strategic goals.

  12. Climate change and public health policy: translating the science.

    PubMed

    Braks, Marieta; van Ginkel, Rijk; Wint, William; Sedda, Luigi; Sprong, Hein

    2013-12-19

    Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

  13. A Comparative Study of Scientific Publications in Health Care Sciences and Services from Mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, and India (2007–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yipeng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Xu; Xue, Chen; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Peng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the quantity and quality of publications in health care sciences and services journals from the Chinese mainland, Taiwan, Japan, and India. Journals in this category of the Science Citation Index Expanded were included in the study. Scientific papers were retrieved from the Web of Science online database. Quality was measured according to impact factor, citation of articles, number of articles published in top 10 journals, and the 10 most popular journals by country (area). In the field of health care sciences and services, the annual incremental rates of scientific articles published from 2007 to 2014 were higher than rates of published scientific articles in all fields. Researchers from the Chinese mainland published the most original articles and reviews and had the highest accumulated impact factors, highest total article citations, and highest average citation. Publications from India had the highest average impact factor. In the field of health care sciences and services, China has made remarkable progress during the past eight years in the annual number and percentage of scientific publications. Yet, there is room for improvement in the quantity and quality of such articles. PMID:26712774

  14. A Comparative Study of Scientific Publications in Health Care Sciences and Services from Mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, and India (2007-2014).

    PubMed

    Lv, Yipeng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Xu; Xue, Chen; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Peng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-12-24

    In this study, we aimed to compare the quantity and quality of publications in health care sciences and services journals from the Chinese mainland, Taiwan, Japan, and India. Journals in this category of the Science Citation Index Expanded were included in the study. Scientific papers were retrieved from the Web of Science online database. Quality was measured according to impact factor, citation of articles, number of articles published in top 10 journals, and the 10 most popular journals by country (area). In the field of health care sciences and services, the annual incremental rates of scientific articles published from 2007 to 2014 were higher than rates of published scientific articles in all fields. Researchers from the Chinese mainland published the most original articles and reviews and had the highest accumulated impact factors, highest total article citations, and highest average citation. Publications from India had the highest average impact factor. In the field of health care sciences and services, China has made remarkable progress during the past eight years in the annual number and percentage of scientific publications. Yet, there is room for improvement in the quantity and quality of such articles.

  15. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(3)-1 - Organizations organized and operated for religious, charitable, scientific, testing for public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the tuition for the seminars and lectures on the program conducted by O. O has agreed not to become... school, a college, or a professional or trade school, which has a regularly scheduled curriculum, a... purpose of aiding in the scientific education of college or university students; (2) scientific...

  16. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(3)-1 - Organizations organized and operated for religious, charitable, scientific, testing for public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the tuition for the seminars and lectures on the program conducted by O. O has agreed not to become... school, a college, or a professional or trade school, which has a regularly scheduled curriculum, a... purpose of aiding in the scientific education of college or university students; (2) scientific...

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(3)-1 - Organizations organized and operated for religious, charitable, scientific, testing for public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the tuition for the seminars and lectures on the program conducted by O. O has agreed not to become... school, a college, or a professional or trade school, which has a regularly scheduled curriculum, a... purpose of aiding in the scientific education of college or university students; (2) scientific...

  18. Rate and predictors of the conversion of abstracts presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress scientific meetings to full peer-reviewed publications.

    PubMed

    Abuzeid, Wael; Fosbøl, Emil L; Fosbøl, Philip L; Fosbøl, Marie; Zarinehbaf, Sanaz; Ross, Heather; Ko, Dennis T; Bennell, Maria C; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2013-11-01

    The rate of conversion of abstracts presented at scientific meetings into peer-reviewed published manuscripts is an important metric for medical societies, because it facilitates translation of scientific knowledge into practice. We determined the rate and predictors of conversion of scientific abstracts presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) from 2006 to 2010 into peer-reviewed article publications within 2 years of their initial presentation. Using a previously validated computer algorithm, we searched the International Statistical Institute Web of Science to identify peer-reviewed full manuscript publications of these abstracts. A multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with successful publication. From 2006 to 2010, 3565 abstracts were presented at the CCC. Overall 24.1% of presented abstracts were published within 2 years of the conference. Mean impact factor for publications was 5.2 (range, 0.4-53.2). The type of presentation (for poster vs oral; odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.83; P < 0.001) and category of presentation (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with successful publication. Late breaking abstracts and those related to cancer and clinical sciences were more likely to be published, compared with prevention, vascular biology, and pediatrics. In conclusion, the publication rate at the CCC is only marginally lower than that reported for large international North American and European cardiology conferences (30.6%). Efforts should focus on several identified barriers to improve conversion of abstracts to full report publication. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Jake; Shonkoff, Seth B. C.

    2016-01-01

    The body of science evaluating the potential impacts of unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) has grown significantly in recent years, although many data gaps remain. Still, a broad empirical understanding of the impacts is beginning to emerge amidst a swell of research. The present categorical assessment provides an overview of the peer-reviewed scientific literature from 2009–2015 as it relates to the potential impacts of UNGD on public health, water quality, and air quality. We have categorized all available original research during this time period in an attempt to understand the weight and direction of the scientific literature. Our results indicate that at least 685 papers have been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals that are relevant to assessing the impacts of UNGD. 84% of public health studies contain findings that indicate public health hazards, elevated risks, or adverse health outcomes; 69% of water quality studies contain findings that indicate potential, positive association, or actual incidence of water contamination; and 87% of air quality studies contain findings that indicate elevated air pollutant emissions and/or atmospheric concentrations. This paper demonstrates that the weight of the findings in the scientific literature indicates hazards and elevated risks to human health as well as possible adverse health outcomes associated with UNGD. There are limitations to this type of assessment and it is only intended to provide a snapshot of the scientific knowledge based on the available literature. However, this work can be used to identify themes that lie in or across studies, to prioritize future research, and to provide an empirical foundation for policy decisions. PMID:27096432

  20. Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015.

    PubMed

    Hays, Jake; Shonkoff, Seth B C

    2016-01-01

    The body of science evaluating the potential impacts of unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) has grown significantly in recent years, although many data gaps remain. Still, a broad empirical understanding of the impacts is beginning to emerge amidst a swell of research. The present categorical assessment provides an overview of the peer-reviewed scientific literature from 2009-2015 as it relates to the potential impacts of UNGD on public health, water quality, and air quality. We have categorized all available original research during this time period in an attempt to understand the weight and direction of the scientific literature. Our results indicate that at least 685 papers have been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals that are relevant to assessing the impacts of UNGD. 84% of public health studies contain findings that indicate public health hazards, elevated risks, or adverse health outcomes; 69% of water quality studies contain findings that indicate potential, positive association, or actual incidence of water contamination; and 87% of air quality studies contain findings that indicate elevated air pollutant emissions and/or atmospheric concentrations. This paper demonstrates that the weight of the findings in the scientific literature indicates hazards and elevated risks to human health as well as possible adverse health outcomes associated with UNGD. There are limitations to this type of assessment and it is only intended to provide a snapshot of the scientific knowledge based on the available literature. However, this work can be used to identify themes that lie in or across studies, to prioritize future research, and to provide an empirical foundation for policy decisions.

  1. Analysis of subsequent publication of scientific orally presented abstracts of the French national congress of radiology. Part I: General characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dangouloff-Ros, V; Ronot, M; Lagadec, M; Vilgrain, V

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the publication rate of scientific abstracts orally presented at the annual meeting of the French Society of Radiology (FSR), and to identify factors associated with publication. Abstracts were selected from the books of abstracts of the 2008-2010 annual meetings of the FSR. For each abstract, country of origin, diagnostic/interventional radiology, imaging techniques (plain radiography, angiography, ultrasound [US], computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]), human/experimental study, retrospective/prospective design, number of subjects, oncologic study or not were noted. Publications were searched in Medline-indexed journals and factors associated analyzed by multivariate analysis. Seven hundred and forty-four abstracts lead to 298 publications (publication rate 40%). Most abstracts reported retrospective studies (61%), in humans (94%), diagnostic imaging (85%), from European authors (90%), and oncology (27%). Median number of subject was 39 (19-87). Main imaging techniques were MRI, CT, US (46%, 29%, 21%). Publications were mostly in English (89%), in radiological journals (72%), with a mean 3.5±3.7 impact factor. Publication was associated with a prospective design (OR=1.80), a submission from Europe (OR=1.71), angiography (OR=2.44), and oncology (OR=1.81). The annual meeting of the FSR is in French, but the rate of publication of presented abstracts is high, mostly in English in reputable journals. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Ecoinformatics (Big Data) for Agricultural Entomology: Pitfalls, Progress, and Promise.

    PubMed

    Rosenheim, Jay A; Gratton, Claudio

    2017-01-31

    Ecoinformatics, as defined in this review, is the use of preexisting data sets to address questions in ecology. We provide the first review of ecoinformatics methods in agricultural entomology. Ecoinformatics methods have been used to address the full range of questions studied by agricultural entomologists, enabled by the special opportunities associated with data sets, nearly all of which have been observational, that are larger and more diverse and that embrace larger spatial and temporal scales than most experimental studies do. We argue that ecoinformatics research methods and traditional, experimental research methods have strengths and weaknesses that are largely complementary. We address the important interpretational challenges associated with observational data sets, highlight common pitfalls, and propose some best practices for researchers using these methods. Ecoinformatics methods hold great promise as a vehicle for capitalizing on the explosion of data emanating from farmers, researchers, and the public, as novel sampling and sensing techniques are developed and digital data sharing becomes more widespread.

  3. Analysis of subsequent publication of scientific orally presented abstracts of the French National Congress of Radiology. Part II: Focus on the French abstracts.

    PubMed

    Dangouloff-Ros, V; Ronot, M; Lagadec, M; Vilgrain, V

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the publication rate of scientific abstracts that were presented orally at the 2008, 2009, and 2010 annual meetings of the French Society of Radiology by French radiologists, and to perform a French regional analysis. Orally presented abstracts were identified by examining online abstract books of the 2008, 2009, and 2010 annual meetings of the French Society of Radiology, and cross-checked by reviewing the paper version of abstracts for the same period. Only abstracts from French teams were selected. The administrative region of submission was noted for each abstract and for each region the total population, the number of active radiologists, the number of active members of the French Society of Radiology and the number of academic radiologists were noted. Imaging subspecialties were also noted. 625 abstracts were identified resulting in 268 publications (publication rate: 43%). The median number of presentations and publications per region was 18 (range: 1-255) and 7 (range: 0-101), respectively. The ratio per million inhabitants was 7.5 and 3 respectively. The median number of presentations and publications per 100 active radiologists (respectively members of the FSR) was 7 and 3 (respectively 10 and 4). The median number of presentations and publications per academic radiologist were 2.6, and 1.2, respectively. The regional variations for each indicator were high (40-180%). Three subspecialties had a publication rate of more than 50%: thoracic imaging (58%), abdominal imaging (52%), and genitourinary imaging (51%). The publication rate of orally presented French scientific abstracts was high, with important variations according to the regions of origin and imaging subspecialties. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical research on new drugs (Phase I). Profile of scientific publications: data from the pre-clinical phase and bioethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brick, Vanessa de Souza; Hossne, William Saad; Saad Hossne, Rogério

    2008-01-01

    To trace a profile of scientific publications, phase I, in order to know whether or not they show pre-clinical phase data, emphasizing bioethical aspects. Sixty-one scientific articles, published in 2007, involving research in human beings using new drugs, medicines and vaccines during phase I were analysed. A schedule for data collection was elaborated in which it would be possible to analyse and evaluate those articles. The schedule included items related to the pre-clinical phase associated to the clinical phase, and items related to the sample characteristics. Most of research works were carried out in USA. Taking into consideration that a large number of works have been dedicated to oncologic affections, most of them were carried out in voluntary ill individuals. Information on the pre-clinical phase, phase I, was very poor or absent. Even though some authors consider the phase I research as a promising one and also suggest some future studies on phase II, the reader is not able to consider the same way, as long as there is a shortage of information on the pre-clinical phase. The profile of scientific publications showed that data deserve some reflections and analysis to better evaluate the publications on phase I.

  5. Diagnostic pitfalls in fetal brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Al-Mukhtar, Ali; Kasprian, Gregor; Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Recent technological advances in fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and increased reliability of MRI in depicting abnormalities and lesions, especially in the central nervous system, are increasingly bringing up challenging issues with regard to accurate diagnosis. There are also pitfalls not only attributable to image acquisition but also in clinical interpretation. The misinterpretation of findings because of insufficient knowledge about fetal brain development as visualized by MRI may also be regarded as an important limitation of fetal MRI. We provide an overview of the most common pitfalls experienced in fetal MRI in routine practice, demonstrate how to identify some of the factors that lead to imaging misinterpretation, and suggest ways to tackle these problems, with an emphasis on MR techniques and image calibration.

  6. Pitfalls of predicting complex traits from SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Naomi R.; Yang, Jian; Hayes, Ben J.; Price, Alkes L.; Goddard, Mike E.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The success of genome-wide association studies has led to increasing interest in making predictions of complex trait phenotypes including disease from genotype data. Rigorous assessment of the value of predictors is critical before implementation. Here we discuss some of the limitations and pitfalls of prediction analysis and show how naïve implementations can lead to severe bias and misinterpretation of results. PMID:23774735

  7. Newborn metabolic screening and related pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Mark; Gottesman, Gary S

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening has recently been transformed by our enhanced knowledge of medical disorders and our ability to detect and manage them. The Missouri State Newborn Screening Laboratory incorporated tandem mass spectrometry into the newborn screening protocol in 2005. This review will highlight the new capabilities of the newborn screening laboratory and the pitfalls of screening related to preterm birth, blood transfusion and intravenous fluid administration that complicate the interpretation of screening results.

  8. Pearls and pitfalls in neural CGRP immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2013-06-01

    This review outlines the pearls and pitfalls of calcitonin-gene related protein (CGRP) immunohistochemistry of the brain. In 1985, CGRP was first described in cerebral arteries using immunohistochemistry. Since then, cerebral CGRP (and, using novel antibodies, its receptor components) has been widely scrutinized. Here, we describe the distribution of cerebral CGRP and pay special attention to the surprising reliability of results over time. Pitfalls might include a fixation procedure, antibody clone and dilution, and interpretation of results. Standardization of staining protocols and true quantitative methods are lacking. The use of computerized image analysis has led us to believe that our examination is objective. However, in the steps of performing such an analysis, we make subjective choices. By pointing out these pitfalls, we aim to further improve immunohistochemical quality. Having a clear picture of the tissue/cell morphology is a necessity. A primary morphological evaluation with, for example, hematoxylin-eosin, helps to ensure that small changes are not missed and that background and artifactual changes, which may include vacuoles, pigments, and dark neurons, are not over-interpreted as compound-related changes. The antigen-antibody reaction appears simple and clear in theory, but many steps might go wrong. Remember that methods including the antigen-antibody complex rely on handling/fixation of tissues or cells, antibody shipping/storing issues, antibody titration, temperature/duration of antibody incubation, visualization of the antibody and interpretation of the results. Optimize staining protocols to the material you are using.

  9. Increasing Public Access to Scientific Research through Stakeholder Involvement: Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.; Stephens, S. H.; DeLorme, D. E.; Ruple, D.; Graham, L.

    2013-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) has the potential to have a myriad of deleterious effects on coastal ecology and human infrastructure. Stakeholders, including managers of coastal resources, must be aware of potential consequences of SLR and adjust their plans accordingly to protect and preserve the resources under their care. Members of the public, particularly those who live or work in coastal areas, should also be informed about the results of scientific research on the effects of SLR. However, research results are frequently published in venues or formats to which resource managers and the broader public have limited access. It is imperative for scientists to move beyond traditional publication venues in order to more effectively disseminate the results of their research (Dennison, W. 2007, Estu. Coast. Shelf Sci. 77, 185). One potentially effective way to advance public access to research is to incorporate stakeholder involvement into the research project process in order to target study objectives and tailor communication products toward stakeholder needs (Lemos, M. & Morehouse, B. 2005, Glob. Env. Chg. 15, 57). However, it is important to manage communication and clarify participant expectations during this type of research (Gawith, M. et al. 2009, Glob. Env. Chg. 19, 113). This presentation describes the process being undertaken by an ongoing 5-year multi-disciplinary NOAA-funded project, Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM), to improve accessibility and utility of scientific research results through stakeholder engagement. The EESLR-NGOM project is assessing the ecological risks from SLR along the Mississippi, Alabama and Florida Panhandle coasts, coastal habitats, and floodplains. It has incorporated stakeholder involvement throughout the research process so as to better target and tailor the emerging research products to meet resource managers' needs, as well as to facilitate eventual public dissemination of results. An

  10. [An analysis of the scientific publications of the A. A. Bogomolets Institute of Physiology of the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Zadorozhnyĭ, O H; Khorevin, V I; Kyienko, V M

    1992-01-01

    Scientific publications from three sectors of the Institute have analyzed for the period since 1979 till 1988 inclusive. The analysis is based on data of annual reference books Science Citation Index (SCI) and lists of publications of each researcher of the Institute. It is shown that with almost equal numerical strength of researchers and similar number of publications the sector of molecular physiology contributed 43.6% to cited works 48.2% of these works are included into database of SCI. Such indices for the sectors of neurophysiology and physiology of visceral systems accounted for 33%, 33.4% and 23.4, 18.4% respectively. It is of interest that 47.5% of references to the cited works of the molecular physiology sector were made by foreign scientists and self-citation constituted 17.4%, while for the other sectors such indices had a reverse relationship. The problem on objectification of estimation of research is under discussion.

  11. What is Authorship, and What Should it Be? A Survey of Prominent Guidelines for Determining Authorship in Scientific Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.; Holland, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Before the mid 20th century most scientific writing was solely authored (Claxton, 2005; Greene, 2007) and thus it is only relatively recently, as science has grown more complex, that the ethical and procedural issues around authorship have arisen. Fields as diverse as medicine (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, 2008), mathematics…

  12. [Gender analysis of Spanish scientific publications in the area of substance abuse in biomedicine 1999-2004].

    PubMed

    González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Valderrama-Zurián, Juan Carlos; Navarro-Molina, Carolina; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Bolaños-Pizarro, Máxima; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Concern for encouraging gender equality makes it one of the high priority spheres of action for governments and organisations responsible for instigating scientific policies, with particular importance being placed on including the gender variable in evaluative analyses of scientific and technological activity. A comparative study was made, broken down by gender, of the scientific output of Spanish researchers with a high production in the field of substance abuse. We identified the gender of 338 authors who had published more than four different articles during the period from 1999-2004 and which were indexed in the IME/Indice Médico Español and the SCI/Science Citation Index databases, making a comparative analysis of their output and collaboration patterns, based on the gender variable. In the area of substance abuse, of those with the highest output (> 9 papers), 70% were men compared with 30% women. Among the average producers (5-9 papers), 57% of the authors identified were men and 43% women. Statistically significant differences were observed between men and women with the highest output with regard to the number of published works and those with whom they had collaborated. There is no gender equality in the area of substance abuse, particularly when considering the top researchers. It is essential to make in-depth studies that evaluate scientific output, broken down by gender, in order to adopt the necessary corrective measures to eliminate the disparity between men and women.

  13. What is Authorship, and What Should it Be? A Survey of Prominent Guidelines for Determining Authorship in Scientific Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.; Holland, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Before the mid 20th century most scientific writing was solely authored (Claxton, 2005; Greene, 2007) and thus it is only relatively recently, as science has grown more complex, that the ethical and procedural issues around authorship have arisen. Fields as diverse as medicine (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, 2008), mathematics…

  14. 76 FR 4109 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Notification of a Public Meeting of the Clean Air Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Advisory Committee (CASAC) Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) and Sulfur Oxides (SOX) Secondary Review Panel AGENCY..., of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) and Sulfur Oxides... Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur Oxides Secondary Review Panel meeting will be held on Tuesday, February...

  15. Academic Entrepreneurship in France: The Promotion of Economic Returns of Public Research and Its Political and Scientific Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifet, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    Emphasising the level of the observation of university configurations and the example of academic entrepreneurship, the author analyses the drivers of economic returns of public research in France. Based on the study of national public policy in this field since 1999 and a general survey of the paths of researchers-entrepreneurs, the article…

  16. Investigation of the Public Library as a Linking Agent to Major Scientific, Educational, Social, and Environmental Data Bases. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockheed Research Lab., Palo Alto, CA.

    The DIALIB Project was a 3-year experiment that investigated the potential of the public library as a "linking agent" between the public and the many machine-readable data bases currently accessible via the telephone using online terminals. The study investigated the following questions: (1) Is online search of use to the patrons of a…

  17. Academic Entrepreneurship in France: The Promotion of Economic Returns of Public Research and Its Political and Scientific Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifet, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    Emphasising the level of the observation of university configurations and the example of academic entrepreneurship, the author analyses the drivers of economic returns of public research in France. Based on the study of national public policy in this field since 1999 and a general survey of the paths of researchers-entrepreneurs, the article…

  18. Dominance and leadership in research activities: Collaboration between countries of differing human development is reflected through authorship order and designation as corresponding authors in scientific publications.

    PubMed

    González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Park, Jinseo; Huamaní, Charles; Ramos, José M

    2017-01-01

    Scientific collaboration is an important mechanism that enables the integration of the least developed countries into research activities. In the present study, we use the order of author signatures and addresses for correspondence in scientific publications as variables to analyze the interactions between countries of very high (VHHD), high (HHD), medium (MHD), and low human development (LHD). We identified all documents published between 2011 and 2015 in journals included in the Science Citation Index-Expanded categories' of Tropical Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Parasitology, and Pediatrics. We then classified the countries participating in the publications according to their Human Development Index (HDI), analyzing the international collaboration; positioning and influence of some countries over others in cooperative networks; their leadership; and the impact of the work based on the HDI and the type of collaboration. We observed a high degree of international collaboration in all the areas analyzed, in the case of both LHD and MHD countries. We identified numerous cooperative links between VHHD countries and MHD/LHD countries, reflecting the fact that cooperative links are an important mechanism for integrating research activities into the latter. The countries with large emerging economies, such as Brazil and China stand out due to the dominance they exert in the collaborations established with the United States, the UK, and other European countries. The analysis of the leadership role of the countries, measured by the frequency of lead authorships, shows limited participation by MHD/LHD countries. This reduced participation among less developed countries is further accentuated by their limited presence in the addresses for correspondence. We observed significant statistical differences in the degree of citation according to the HDI of the participating countries. The order of signatures and the address for correspondence in scientific publications are

  19. [Objective evaluation and comparison of the scientific publication from the departments of the Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris: analysis of the SIGAPS score].

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, J H; Faron, M; Drouin, S J; Glanard, A; Chartier-Kastler, E; Parc, Y; Rouprêt, M

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the results of the bibliometric system (SIGAPS score) of scientific publications in the Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) and to compare the scientific production among the various medical and surgical specialties of the academic hospitals of Paris. All the publications imported from Pubmed between 2006 and 2008 were included. The following data were taken into account and analysed: the hospital department of origin, the number of articles published, the number of full-time physicians, the SIGAPS score. Thirty-eight thousand, seven hundred and nine publications were included. The departments were consisted of 747 full-time practitioners 5719 (1895 Professors [33.1%], 2772 Assistant Professors [48.4%] and 1052 fellows [18.4%]). The average number of full-time practitioner by department was 7.7±6.7 (range 1-69). The average total number of articles published in a department was 51.8±49.4 (range 1-453). The average SIGAPS score was more important in medicine than in surgery (621.2±670.1 vs. 401±382.2; P=0.01) but not the average number of article per practitioner (8.1±8.3 vs. 6.6±6.2; P=0.0797). The mean number of publication by full-time practitioner was 7.9±7.8 (1-45), or an average of 2.7±2.6 for each full-time practitioner each year. Academic hospitals in Paris have a reasonably scientific output but with a mean of 2.7 articles per full-time practitioner per year. No major differences between medical and surgical disciplines were observed. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [The impact of the annual scientific meetings of the Israel Society of Rheumatology as measured by publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals].

    PubMed

    Perez, Shira; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2004-04-01

    We aimed to examine the impact and quality of the research presented in the Israel Society of Rheumatology (ISR) annual scientific meetings by measuring publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and investigating the factors that influenced publication. We examined the outcome of all 79 abstracts submitted to the ISR for the 1998-2000 annual meetings. A MEDLINE search of all abstracts, by authors, topics and keywords was performed. Senior authors of abstracts not found to be published in this search were interviewed regarding publication and factors influencing submission. We described the effect of variable factors on the rate of publication. As of September 2002, 63 (80%) abstracts were published in peer-reviewed journals or are currently in-press. Most abstracts were published in prominent journals (with a high impact factor). The majority of the abstracts (61%) were published in rheumatologic journals, 65% of the studies originated from tertiary centers and 19% of the studies were multicenter. The most common diseases studied were antiphospholipid syndrome (20%), systemic lupus erythematosus (19%) and inflammatory arthritis (18%). Most of the studies were of disease pathogenesis (35%) and clinical manifestations (33%). The most common study designs were basic science (34%). An overall 57% of the studies reported "positive" results and 9% reported "negative" results. None of the factors studied were associated with publication or non-publication. The main cause cited by authors for not publishing their abstract was lack of time to prepare a full paper or a desire to further expand the study. Within this group of 16 authors of abstracts, 11 authors still plan to submit a paper. The ISR annual meetings have an important clinical scientific impact as measured by the high rate of abstracts published as full length articles in leading peer-reviewed journals.

  1. Leading US nano-scientists' perceptions about media coverage and the public communication of scientific research findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Youngjae; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the significant increase in the use of nanotechnology in academic research and commercial products over the past decade, there have been few studies that have explored scientists' perceptions and attitudes about the technology. In this article, we use survey data from the leading U.S. nano-scientists to explore their perceptions about two issues: the public communication of research findings and media coverage of nanotechnology, which serves as one relatively rapid outlet for public communication. We find that leading U.S. nano-scientists do see an important connection between the public communication of research findings and public attitudes about science. Also, there is a connection between the scientists' perceptions about media coverage and their views on the timing of public communication; scientists with positive attitudes about the media are more likely to support immediate public communication of research findings, while others believe that communication should take place only after research findings have been published through a peer-review process. We also demonstrate that journalists might have a more challenging time getting scientists to talk with them about nanotechnology news stories because nano-scientists tend to view media coverage of nanotechnology as less credible and less accurate than general science media coverage. We conclude that leading U.S. nano-scientists do feel a sense of responsibility for communicating their research findings to the public, but attitudes about the timing and the pathway of that communication vary across the group.

  2. Are some categories of scientific publication more equal than others? On the ambiguous use of the label "original work".

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2009-03-01

    The problem addressed here is the observation that numerous people in academia attach differential value to publication category or format rather than publication contents alone. This can be formally visible in academic tenure procedures where the record of research regularly favours an imbalance of loosely called "original work" versus "other". Such practice is a recipe for the devaluation of some of the best and fine thinking and work included in "other" publications such as reviews, perspective papers, hypotheses, editorials and correspondence. In this vein, issue is taken with the label "original" being attached to "new results" from an "individual study" alone rather than being a criterion of or expectation in any, or at least many, publications beyond individual studies or experiments.

  3. Publication rate of scientific papers presented at the XXVI Annual Convention of National Neonatology Forum (NEOCON 2006).

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Solanki, Priyanka; Mishra, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    To document the publication rate of papers presented at the Annual Convention of National Neonatology Forum of India (NNF), and study the factors associated with their subsequent publication. All papers presented at the NEOCON 2006, the XXVI annual convention of NNF at Varanasi, India, were searched for subsequent full publication, by an internet-based search using Pubmed, Google Scholar and Indmed. Publication of the presented paper was looked for in English language, peer-reviewed, indexed journals over the next five years (1st January 2007 to 31st December, 2011). The full published papers were compared with the abstract and differences noted. One hundred and two papers and posters were presented at the conference and 14 (13.7 %) of these were published in the next five years. None was published in any un-indexed journal. The highest percentage of paper publication was from the Award paper category (83.3 %) and least from Innovation category (none). The only factor significantly associated with subsequent publication was presentation as an Award paper (P < 0.001). On comparison of the presented abstracts and the published papers, there was a change in authors in 78.5 %, title in 42.8 %, and the data in 35.7 %. The subsequent publication of conference abstracts as a full-paper is sub-optimal in the field of neonatology. Further research is needed to identify the factors responsible for the poor subsequent publication, and efforts need to be made to address them both at the institutional and the researchers' level.

  4. The survival of 19th-century scientific optimism: the public discourse on science in Belgium in the aftermath of the Great War (ca. 1919-1930).

    PubMed

    Onghena, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    In historiography there is a tendency to see the Great War as marking the end of scientific optimism and the period that followed the war as a time of discord. Connecting to current (inter)national historiographical debate on the question of whether the First World War meant a disruption from the pre-war period or not, this article strives to prove that faith in scientific progress still prevailed in the 1920s. This is shown through the use of Belgium as a case study, which suggests that the generally adopted cultural pessimism in the post-war years did not apply to the public rhetoric of science in this country. Diverse actors -- scientists, industrialists, politicians, the public opinion, and the military staff -- declared a confidence in science, enhanced by wartime results. Furthermore, belief in science in Belgium was not affected by public outcry over the use of mustard gas, unlike in the former belligerent countries where the gas became an unpleasant reminder of how science was used during the war. Even German science with its industrial applications remained the norm after 1918. In fact, the faith in science exhibited during the pre-war years continued to exist, at least until the 1920s, despite anti-German sentiments being voiced by many sections of Belgian society in the immediate aftermath of the war.

  5. [Bibliometric study of scientific output published by the Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública/Pan American Journal of Public Health from 1997-2012].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Valero, Javier; Casterá, Vicente Tomás; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2014-02-01

    To characterize the scientific output of the Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública/Pan American Journal of Public Health (RPSP) as a scientific publication of reference in the public health sector in the Americas. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted based on the articles published in the RPSP from 1997-2012. Bibliometric indicators of productivity (documents published, languages, authorship, and indices of productivity and collaboration); impact (impact factor according to the SciELO Network, Journal Citation Report and SCImago); key words; and bibliographic references, their structure (document type and main nucleus of Bradford) and degree of obsolescence (Burton and Kebler half-life, and Price index), were analyzed. A total of 2 815 articles with a median of 3 authors and 2 institutions per article were published. The percentage of original research articles increased in 2008-2012 compared to 2003-2007 and 1997-2002 (P < 0.001). The predominant language was Spanish, displaced by English in the last 5 years. A total of 88.76% of the key words referred to the Health Sciences Descriptors (DeCS) and had a public health and community orientation related to the Americas. The Burton and Kebler half-life of bibliographic references was 8 years, although it decreased to 5 years in 2012. The Price index was 20.47% and the nucleus of Bradford was made up of 20 mainstream journals. The percentage of self-citation was low (2.07%). The RPSP is an international publication with bibliometric indicators similar to those of the most representative Latin American health science journals, with improvements in the recent years studied that lead it to fully meet international publishing criteria.

  6. "Everybody knows psychology is not a real science": Public perceptions of psychology and how we can improve our relationship with policymakers, the scientific community, and the general public.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    In a recent seminal article, Lilienfeld (2012) argued that psychological science is experiencing a public perception problem that has been caused by both public misconceptions about psychology, as well as the psychological science community's failure to distinguish itself from pop psychology and questionable therapeutic practices. Lilienfeld's analysis is an important and cogent synopsis of external problems that have limited psychological science's penetration into public knowledge. The current article expands upon this by examining internal problems, or problems within psychological science that have potentially limited its impact with policymakers, other scientists, and the public. These problems range from the replication crisis and defensive reactions to it, overuse of politicized policy statements by professional advocacy groups such as the American Psychological Association (APA), and continued overreliance on mechanistic models of human behavior. It is concluded that considerable problems arise from psychological science's tendency to overcommunicate mechanistic concepts based on weak and often unreplicated (or unreplicable) data that do not resonate with the everyday experiences of the general public or the rigor of other scholarly fields. It is argued that a way forward can be seen by, on one hand, improving the rigor and transparency of psychological science, and making theoretical innovations that better acknowledge the complexities of the human experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Publications

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI publications including PDQ cancer information for patients and health professionals, patient-education publications, fact sheets, dictionaries, NCI blogs and newsletters and major reports.

  8. Pitfalls of Personal Development Plans--The User Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate which pitfalls users of personal development plans (PDPs) perceive in business and governmental organisations with mandatory PDP use. Hundred and thirty-one written statements of PDP users across three Dutch organisations were analysed and categorised into nine pitfalls. Next to an overall lack of use and…

  9. Pitfalls of Personal Development Plans--The User Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate which pitfalls users of personal development plans (PDPs) perceive in business and governmental organisations with mandatory PDP use. Hundred and thirty-one written statements of PDP users across three Dutch organisations were analysed and categorised into nine pitfalls. Next to an overall lack of use and…

  10. Applied statistics in ecology: common pitfalls and simple solutions

    Treesearch

    E. Ashley Steel; Maureen C. Kennedy; Patrick G. Cunningham; John S. Stanovick

    2013-01-01

    The most common statistical pitfalls in ecological research are those associated with data exploration, the logic of sampling and design, and the interpretation of statistical results. Although one can find published errors in calculations, the majority of statistical pitfalls result from incorrect logic or interpretation despite correct numerical calculations. There...

  11. Scientific publications in critical care medicine journals from East Asia: A 10-year survey of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhenyu; Ou, Chongyang; Teng, Hongfei; Liu, Xiguang; Tang, Hongxin

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of publications in critical care medicine from East Asia haven't been reported. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of publications from East Asia. Articles from China, Japan and South Korea in 2005 to 2014 were retrieved from Web of Science and Pubmed. The number of publications, impact factor, citation, and article types were analyzed. There were 3076 publications from East Asia (1720 from China, 913 from Japan, and 443 from South Korea). There were a significant decrease in publications from Japan (p = 0.024) and significant increases from China (p = 0.000) and South Korea (p = 0.009). From 2006, the number of articles from China exceed Japan. China had the highest total impact factor (6618.48) and citation (18416), followed by Japan (4566.03; 15440) and South Korea (1998.19; 5599). Japan had the highest mean impact factor (5.00) and citations (16.91), followed by South Korea (4.51; 12.64) and China (3.85; 10.71). China and South Korea`s contributions to critical care medicine had significant increases during the past 10 years, while Japan had a significant decrease. China was the most productive region in East Asia since 2006. Japan had the highest quality research output.

  12. Scientific publications in critical care medicine journals from East Asia: A 10-year survey of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenyu; Ou, Chongyang; Teng, Hongfei; Liu, Xiguang; Tang, Hongxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The quantity and quality of publications in critical care medicine from East Asia haven’t been reported. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of publications from East Asia. Methods: Articles from China, Japan and South Korea in 2005 to 2014 were retrieved from Web of Science and Pubmed. The number of publications, impact factor, citation, and article types were analyzed. Results: There were 3076 publications from East Asia (1720 from China, 913 from Japan, and 443 from South Korea). There were a significant decrease in publications from Japan (p = 0.024) and significant increases from China (p = 0.000) and South Korea (p = 0.009). From 2006, the number of articles from China exceed Japan. China had the highest total impact factor (6618.48) and citation (18416), followed by Japan (4566.03; 15440) and South Korea (1998.19; 5599). Japan had the highest mean impact factor (5.00) and citations (16.91), followed by South Korea (4.51; 12.64) and China (3.85; 10.71). Conclusions: China and South Korea`s contributions to critical care medicine had significant increases during the past 10 years, while Japan had a significant decrease. China was the most productive region in East Asia since 2006. Japan had the highest quality research output. PMID:27182223

  13. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  14. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  15. Sea otters in captivity: applications and implications of husbandry development, public display, scientific research and management, and rescue and rehabilitation for sea otter conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanBlaricom, Glenn R.; Belting, Traci F.; Triggs, Lisa H.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sea otters in captivity began in 1932, producing important insights for conservation. Soviet (initiated in 1932) and United States (1951) studies provided information on captive otter husbandry, setting the stage for eventual large-scale translocations as tools for population restoration. Early studies also informed effective housing of animals in zoos and aquaria, with sea otters first publicly displayed in 1954. Surveys credited displayed otters in convincing the public of conservation values. After early studies, initial scientific data for captive sea otters in aquaria came from work initiated in 1956, and from dedicated research facilities beginning in 1968. Significant achievements have been made in studies of behavior, physiology, reproduction, and high-priority management issues. Larger-scale projects involving translocation and oil spill response provided extensive insights into stress reactions, water quality issues in captivity, and effects of oil spills.

  16. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, H

    2005-12-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis-obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs-seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859-1924), the founding father of artificial parthenogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research.

  17. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fangerau, H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis—obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs—seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859–1924), the founding father of artificial parthogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  18. The evolution of peer review as a basis for scientific publication: directional selection towards a robust discipline?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Catarina; Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Bennett, Amanda M; Ellington, E Hance; Terwissen, Christine; Austin, Cayla; Borlestean, Adrian; Boudreau, Melanie R; Chan, Kevin; Forsythe, Adrian; Hossie, Thomas J; Landolt, Kristen; Longhi, Jessica; Otis, Josée-Anne; Peers, Michael J L; Rae, Jason; Seguin, Jacob; Watt, Cristen; Wehtje, Morgan; Murray, Dennis L

    2016-08-01

    Peer review is pivotal to science and academia, as it represents a widely accepted strategy for ensuring quality control in scientific research. Yet, the peer-review system is poorly adapted to recent changes in the discipline and current societal needs. We provide historical context for the cultural lag that governs peer review that has eventually led to the system's current structural weaknesses (voluntary review, unstandardized review criteria, decentralized process). We argue that some current attempts to upgrade or otherwise modify the peer-review system are merely sticking-plaster solutions to these fundamental flaws, and therefore are unlikely to resolve them in the long term. We claim that for peer review to be relevant, effective, and contemporary with today's publishing demands across scientific disciplines, its main components need to be redesigned. We propose directional changes that are likely to improve the quality, rigour, and timeliness of peer review, and thereby ensure that this critical process serves the community it was created for. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  19. Museum Exhibition on Testing and Measurement: Scientific Principles, Social Impact of Testing, and Dialogue with the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allalouf, Avi; Alderoqui-Pinus, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a pioneering project currently being developed, namely, the Exhibition on Testing and Measurement. This interactive traveling exhibition will be presented in science museums in Israel, the United States, and other countries. It has been conceived as an innovative means of familiarizing the public with educational…

  20. Museum Exhibition on Testing and Measurement: Scientific Principles, Social Impact of Testing, and Dialogue with the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allalouf, Avi; Alderoqui-Pinus, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a pioneering project currently being developed, namely, the Exhibition on Testing and Measurement. This interactive traveling exhibition will be presented in science museums in Israel, the United States, and other countries. It has been conceived as an innovative means of familiarizing the public with educational…