Science.gov

Sample records for scintillating guides screen

  1. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  2. Optimization of screening for radioactivity in urine by liquid scintillation.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Reese, Robert P.; Preston, Rose T.

    2007-08-01

    Numerous events have or could have resulted in the inadvertent uptake of radionuclides by fairly large populations. Should a population receive an uptake, valuable information could be obtained by using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques to quickly screen urine from a sample of the affected population. This study investigates such LSC parameters as discrimination, quench, volume, and count time to yield guidelines for analyzing urine in an emergency situation. Through analyzing variations of the volume and their relationships to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), the optimum ratio of sample size to scintillating chemical cocktail was found to be 1:3. Using this optimum volume size, the alpha MDA varied from 2100 pCi/L for a 30-second count time to 35 pCi/L for a 1000-minute count time. The typical count time used by the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Protection Sample Diagnostics program is 30 minutes, which yields an alpha MDA of 200 pCi/L. Because MDA is inversely proportional to the square root of the count time, count time can be reduced in an emergency situation to achieve the desired MDA or response time. Note that approximately 25% of the response time is used to prepare the samples and complete the associated paperwork. It was also found that if the nuclide of interest is an unknown, pregenerated discriminator settings and efficiency calibrations can be used to produce an activity value within a factor of two, which is acceptable for a screening method.

  3. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  4. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  5. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  6. Lu2O3:Eu scintillator screen for x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stuart R.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Tipnis, Sameer V.; Shestakova, Irina; Brecher, Charles; Lempicki, Alexander; Lingertat, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    We report on a new x-ray converter screen based on the powdered Lu2O3:Eu scintillator. Lu2O3:Eu offers high density (9.4 g/cm3), high average atomic number (63), and a peak emission of 610 nm. The high density of the material and a high packing fraction of the coating provide higher x-ray absorption efficiency, even with thin screens. As a result Lu2O3:Eu screens are expected to provide superior spatial resolution and x-ray stopping power compared to commercial powdered screens. This newly developed screen has excellent imaging performance and offers several practical advantages such as ease of fabrication, low cost, and durability. This paper will discuss preliminary results of the imaging performance of this novel screen.

  7. Ionospheric scintillation by a random phase screen Spectral approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufenach, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The theory developed by Briggs and Parkin, given in terms of an anisotropic gaussian correlation function, is extended to a spectral description specified as a continuous function of spatial wavenumber with an intrinsic outer scale as would be expected from a turbulent medium. Two spectral forms were selected for comparison: (1) a power-law variation in wavenumber with a constant three-dimensional index equal to 4, and (2) Gaussian spectral variation. The results are applied to the F-region ionosphere with an outer-scale wavenumber of 2 per km (approximately equal to the Fresnel wavenumber) for the power-law variation, and 0.2 per km for the Gaussian spectral variation. The power-law form with a small outer-scale wavenumber is consistent with recent F-region in-situ measurements, whereas the gaussian form is mathematically convenient and, hence, mostly used in the previous developments before the recent in-situ measurements. Some comparison with microwave scintillation in equatorial areas is made.

  8. Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET) Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Layne Pincock

    2014-10-01

    This document is the users guide to using the Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET). SET is a tool for comparing multiple fuel cycle options against a common set of criteria and metrics. It does this using standard multi-attribute utility decision analysis methods.

  9. Arrays of Segmented, Tapered Light Guides for Use with Large, Planar Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Vaigneur, Keith; Stolin, Alexander V.; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. Our group has previously developed a high-resolution positron emission tomography imaging and biopsy device (PEM-PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. Initial testing revealed that the imaging field-of-view (FOV) of the scanner was smaller than the physical size of the detector’s active area, which could hinder sampling of breast areas close to the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to utilize segmented, tapered light guides for optically coupling the scintillator arrays to arrays of position-sensitive photomultipliers to increase both the active FOV and identification of individual scintillator elements. Testing of the new system revealed that the optics of these structures made it possible to discern detector elements from the complete active area of the detector face. In the previous system the top and bottom rows and left and right columns were not identifiable. Additionally, use of the new light guides increased the contrast of individual detector elements by up to 129%. Improved element identification led to a spatial resolution increase by approximately 12%. Due to attenuation of light in the light guides the detector energy resolution decreased from 18.5% to 19.1%. Overall, these improvements should increase the field-of-view and spatial resolution of the dedicated breast-PET system. PMID:26538685

  10. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a β- detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting β- emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting β- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  11. Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  12. Scintillation dosimeter arrays using air core light guides: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Pourandokht; Suchowerska, Natalka; McKenzie, David R

    2010-06-21

    The performance of a scintillation dosimeter that uses a silvered air core light guide is examined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and by experiment to determine its suitability for array dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy. The air core light guide avoids the generation of the Cerenkov background that is produced in a conventional optical fibre. MC simulations using a 6 MV photon beam showed that silver thicknesses of less than 1 microm compensated for the effects of the other material components, to give the dosimeter water equivalence within 0.5%. A second dosimeter located adjacent to the primary dosimeter in any direction affected the dose measurement by less than 1.5%, when the centre-to-centre spacing was 1.3 mm or greater. When the dosimeter array is located perpendicular to the beam central axis, with a spacing of 2.5 mm, the calculated deviation from the dose deposited in water was less than 2%. When the dosimeter array is located parallel to the beam central axis with a spacing of 10 mm, the calculated dose readings deviated from water by less than 2.5%. The simulation results were confirmed with experiment for two neighbouring dosimeters and a small densely packed array. No proximity effects were measured within the experimental error of +/-1.5%. These results confirm the dosimetric accuracy of the air core dosimeter design without the need for correction factors. The dosimeter has excellent potential for use in arrays.

  13. Cholesterol Screening: A Practical Guide to Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    Dry-chemistry cholesterol analysis has made screening feasible in a variety of settings. The article provides practical tips for the implementation of mass cholesterol screening using a portable dry-chemistry analyzer and discusses issues involved in conducting effective cholesterol screening programs from start to finish. (SM)

  14. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  15. HYDROCARBON SPILL SCREENING MODEL (HSSM) VOLUME 1: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This users guide describes the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The model is intended for simulation of subsurface releases of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The model consists of separate modules for LNAPL flow through the vadose zone, spreading in the capil...

  16. Development of a scintillation proximity binding assay for high-throughput screening of hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase.

    PubMed

    Meleza, Cesar; Thomasson, Bobbie; Ramachandran, Chidambaram; O'Neill, Jason W; Michelsen, Klaus; Lo, Mei-Chu

    2016-10-15

    Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PGDS) catalyzes the isomerization of prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). PGD2 produced by hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase (H-PGDS) in mast cells and Th2 cells is proposed to be a mediator of allergic and inflammatory responses. Consequently, inhibitors of H-PGDS represent potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Due to the instability of the PGDS substrate PGH2, an in-vitro enzymatic assay is not feasible for large-scale screening of H-PGDS inhibitors. Herein, we report the development of a competition binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) in a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) format. This assay was used to screen an in-house compound library of approximately 280,000 compounds for novel H-PGDS inhibitors. The hit rate of the H-PGDS primary screen was found to be 4%. This high hit rate suggests that the active site of H-PGDS can accommodate a large diversity of chemical scaffolds. For hit prioritization, these initial hits were rescreened at a lower concentration in SPA and tested in the LAD2 cell assay. 116 compounds were active in both assays with IC50s ranging from 6 to 807 nM in SPA and 82 nM to 10 μM in the LAD2 cell assay. PMID:27485270

  17. Short interfering RNA guide strand modifiers from computational screening.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Ibarra-Soza, José M; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J; Beal, Peter A

    2013-11-13

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered "undruggable". However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development, and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5'-end using computational screening with the high-resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5'-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5'-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5'-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5'-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogues for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  18. Scintillating screen CCD camera using fast analog on-chip storage for time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Hagelstein, Michael; San Miguel, Alfonso; Fontaine, Alain; Ressler, Thorsten

    1995-03-01

    Serial readout of cooled, linear Si-photodiode arrays or CCDs offer a high dynamic range but only at moderate pixel readout rates. Recording spectroscopic information, i.e. 1D images, requires only a few sensitive lines of a 2D CCD array. A camera is presented where the unexposed part of the CCD is used as a buffer to store successive spectra with high frame rates. In this 'streak mode' the time resolution for data acquisition depends only on the line shift time of the CCD and no longer on the slow pixel readout time. A frame rate of 10 kHz for X-ray absorption spectra has been achieved. The CCD is part of an X-ray camera consisting of a scintillating screen lens-coupled to the CCD. The camera provides a high dynamic range of 17 bit, a spatial resolution of 60 micrometers (FWHM) and a high detective quantum efficiency of > 40% for x- ray energies between 4 keV and 25 keV. The camera is used for time- resolved energy-dispersive XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) experiments. This technique permits the study of time-dependent variations of electronic properties and the local environment of atoms under induced external perturbation.

  19. The potential for CYP2D6 inhibition screening using a novel scintillation proximity assay-based approach.

    PubMed

    Delaporte, E; Slaughter, D E; Egan, M A; Gatto, G J; Santos, A; Shelley, J; Price, E; Howells, L; Dean, D C; Rodrigues, A D

    2001-08-01

    High throughput inhibition screens for human cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are being used in preclinical drug metabolism to support drug discovery programs. The versatility of scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has enabled the development of a homogeneous high throughput assay for cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) inhibition screen using [O-methyl-(14)C]dextromethorphan as substrate. The basis of the assay was the trapping of the O-demethylation product, [(14)C]HCHO, on SPA beads. Enzyme kinetics parameters V(max) and apparent K(m), determined using pooled human liver microsomes and microsomes from baculovirus cells coexpressing human CYP2D6 and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, were 245 pmol [(14)C]HCHO/min/mg protein and 11 microM, and 27 pmol [(14)C]HCHO/min/pmol and 1.6 microM, respectively. In incubations containing either pooled microsomes or recombinant CYP2D6, [(14)C]dextromethorphan O-demethylase activity was inhibited in the presence of quinidine (IC(50) = 1.0 microM and 20 nM, respectively). By comparison, inhibitors selective for other CYP isoforms were relatively weak (IC(50) > 25 microM). In agreement, a selective CYP2D6 inhibitory monoclonal antibody caused greater than 90% inhibition of [(14)C]dextromethorphan O-demethylase activity in human liver microsomes, whereas CYP2C9/19- and CYP3A4/5-selective antibodies elicited a minimal inhibitory effect. SPA-based [(14)C]dextromethorphan O-demethylase activity was also shown to correlate (r(2) = 0.6) with dextromethorphan O-demethylase measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in a bank of human liver microsomes (N = 15 different organ donors). In a series of known CYP2D6 inhibitors/substrates, the SPA-based assay resolved potent inhibitors (IC(50) < 2 microM) from weak inhibitors (IC(50) >or= 20 microM). It is concluded that the SPA-based assay described herein is suitable for CYP2D6 inhibition screening using either native human liver microsomes or cDNA-expressed CYP2D6. PMID:11689122

  20. Simulating the effects of scintillation on transionospheric signals with a two-way phase screen constructed from ALTAIR phase-derived TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, R. G.; Carrano, C. S.; Alcala, C. M.; Groves, K. M.; Beach, T.; Sponseller, D.

    2009-02-01

    Severe scintillation on transionospheric radio signals caused by small-scale plasma irregularities can greatly disrupt wideband communication, surveillance, and navigation systems. Development of techniques to mitigate the effects of scintillation requires accurate characterization of the ionospheric propagation channel. To achieve this goal, multiple campaigns were conducted as part of the joint U.S. -UK Wideband Ionospheric Distortion Experiment to obtain ionospheric signatures from various instruments located on Kwajalein Atoll. We use tracking data from the VHF/UHF Advanced Research Project Agency Long-Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar for overflights of passive calibration spheres in low-Earth orbit to demonstrate the validity of a one-dimensional (1-D) phase screen model to represent the propagation channel through a disturbed ionosphere. The 1-D phase screen is constructed from radar phase-derived estimates of the total electron content. We present a detailed comparison of simulated radar cross section after propagation through the phase screen with observed radar returns under both disturbed and quiet ionospheric conditions. Successful reproduction of radar amplitude enhancements and fades adds to our understanding of small-scale plasma irregularities and moves us toward our goal of providing precise predictions of radar system performance. Doing so will allow for the development of better mitigation/compensation algorithms for detrimental ionospheric effects. Result from this study also provide an assessment of the tools required for incorporating in situ density measurements along with phase screen theory into situational awareness products to offer an accurate nowcast/forecast of system impacts to users in the communication, navigation, and surveillance communities.

  1. Screening for cancer: when to stop?: A practical guide and review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Soung, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Deciding when to stop cancer screening in older adults is a complex challenge that involves multiple factors: individual health status and life expectancy; risks and benefits of screening, which vary with age and comorbidity; and individual preferences and values. This article examines current cancer screening practices and reviews the risks and benefits of cancer screening for colorectal, breast, lung, prostate, and cervical cancer, particularly in older individuals and those with multiple comorbidities. Tools for estimating life expectancy are reviewed, and a practical framework is presented to guide discussions on when the harms of screening likely outweigh the benefits.

  2. Gesell Screening Guide. The Best of BES--Basic Educational Skills Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauvin, Anne

    The six sections of this guide offer information to teachers about the Gesell Screening and Developmental Placement Program for children entering kindergarten at Lincoln School, Toppenish, Washington. After a brief description of the Gesell program, Section I outlines aspects of planning the screening program, specifically discussing the…

  3. On the response of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce (YAG: Ce) powder scintillating screens to medical imaging X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Sianoudis, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Episkopakis, A.; Linardatos, D.; Margetis, D.; Nirgianaki, E.; Roussou, M.; Melissaropoulos, P.; Kalivas, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Kourkoutas, K.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Louizi, A.; Nomicos, C.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce (also known as YAG:Ce) powder scintillator under X-ray imaging conditions. This material shows a very fast scintillation decay time and it has never been used in X-ray medical imaging. In the present study various scintillator layers (screens) with coating thickness ranging from 13 to 166 mg/cm 2 were prepared in our laboratory by sedimentation of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce powder. Optical emission spectra and light emission efficiency (spectrum area over X-ray exposure) of the layers were measured under X-ray excitation using X-ray tube voltages (80-120 kVp) often employed in general medical radiography and fluoroscopy. Spectral compatibility with various optical photon detectors (photodiodes, photocathodes, charge coupled devices, films) and intrinsic conversion efficiency values were determined using emission spectrum data. In addition, parameters related to X-ray detection, energy absorption efficiency and K-fluorescence characteristic emission were calculated. A theoretical model describing radiation and light transfer through scattering media was used to fit experimental data. Intrinsic conversion efficiency (η≈0.03-0.05) and light attenuation coefficients (σ≈26.5 cm/g) were derived through this fitting. Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed peak emission in the wavelength range 530-550 nm. The light emission efficiency was found to be maximum for the 107 mg/cm 2 layer. Due to its "green" emission spectrum, Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed excellent compatibility (of the order of 0.9) with the sensitivity of many currently used photodetectors. Taking into account its very fast response Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce could be considered for application in X-ray imaging especially in various digital detectors.

  4. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  5. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  8. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  9. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Chung, M; Freemire, B; Hanlet, P; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Palmer, M; Schwarz, T; Tollestrup, A; Torun, Y; Yonehara, K

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and∕or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  10. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  11. USER S GUIDE FOR THE RANDOM DRUG SCREENING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    McNeany, Karen I

    2013-12-01

    The Random Drug Screening System (RDSS) is a desktop computing application designed to assign nongameable drug testing dates to each member in a population of employees, within a specific time line. The program includes reporting capabilities, test form generation, unique test ID number assignment, and the ability to flag high-risk employees for a higher frequency of drug testing than the general population.

  12. Large-Scale Single-Guide RNA Library Construction and Use for Genetic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to systematically disrupt genes serves as a powerful tool for understanding their function. The programmable Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system enables efficient targeting of large numbers of genes through the use of single-guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries. In cultured mammalian cells, collections of knockout mutants can be readily generated via transduction of Cas9/sgRNA lentiviral pools, screened for a phenotype of interest, and tracked using high-throughput DNA sequencing. This technique represents the first general method for undertaking systematic loss-of-function genetic screens in mammalian cells. In this chapter, we outline the steps for conducting CRISPR-based screens from the initial library design to final data analysis and provide guidelines for developing an appropriate screening strategy. PMID:26933254

  13. High-throughput RNAi screening in cultured cells: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Christophe J; Perrimon, Norbert

    2006-05-01

    RNA interference has re-energized the field of functional genomics by enabling genome-scale loss-of-function screens in cultured cells. Looking back on the lessons that have been learned from the first wave of technology developments and applications in this exciting field, we provide both a user's guide for newcomers to the field and a detailed examination of some more complex issues, particularly concerning optimization and quality control, for more advanced users. From a discussion of cell lines, screening paradigms, reagent types and read-out methodologies, we explore in particular the complexities of designing optimal controls and normalization strategies for these challenging but extremely powerful studies.

  14. Shared decision-making about colorectal cancer screening: A conceptual framework to guide research

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a conceptual framework to guide research on shared decision-making about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among persons at average risk and their providers. Methods Based upon a comprehensive review of empirical literature and relevant theories, a conceptual framework was developed that incorporated patient characteristics, cultural beliefs, provider/health care system, health beliefs/stage of adoption, and shared decision-making between patients and providers that may predict behavior. Relationships among concepts in the framework, shared decision-making process and outcomes, and CRC screening behavior were proposed. Directions for future research were presented. Results Many of the concepts in the proposed framework have been examined in prior research. However, these elements have not been combined previously to explain shared decision-making about CRC screening. Conclusion Research is needed to test the proposed relationships and hypotheses and to refine the framework. Practice Implications Findings from future research guided by the proposed framework may inform clinical practice to facilitate shared decision-making about CRC screening. PMID:23419327

  15. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Screening & Grinding Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the screening and grinding process of wastewater treatment facilities. The objective of this process is the removal of coarse materials from the raw waste stream for the protection of subsequent equipment and processes. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for safety inspection,…

  16. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  17. Molecular Shape Analysis-Guided Virtual Screening Platform for Adenosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bhutoria, Savita; Das, Ballari; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new application of molecular shape descriptors in hierarchical selection during virtual screening (VS). Here, a structure-based pharmacophore and docking-guided VS protocol have been evolved to identify inhibitors against adenosine kinase (AK). The knowledge gained on the shape requirements has been extrapolated in classifying active and inactive molecules against this target. This classification enabled us to pick the appropriate ligand conformation in the binding site. We have suggested a set of hierarchical filters for VS, from a simple molecular shape analysis (MSA) descriptor-based recursive models to docking scores. This approach permits a systematic study to understand the importance of spatial requirements and limitations for inhibitors against AK. Finally, the guidelines on how to select compounds for AK to achieve success have been highlighted. The utility of this approach has been suggested by giving an example of database screening for plausible active compounds. PMID:27478367

  18. Molecular Shape Analysis-Guided Virtual Screening Platform for Adenosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bhutoria, Savita; Das, Ballari; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new application of molecular shape descriptors in hierarchical selection during virtual screening (VS). Here, a structure-based pharmacophore and docking-guided VS protocol have been evolved to identify inhibitors against adenosine kinase (AK). The knowledge gained on the shape requirements has been extrapolated in classifying active and inactive molecules against this target. This classification enabled us to pick the appropriate ligand conformation in the binding site. We have suggested a set of hierarchical filters for VS, from a simple molecular shape analysis (MSA) descriptor-based recursive models to docking scores. This approach permits a systematic study to understand the importance of spatial requirements and limitations for inhibitors against AK. Finally, the guidelines on how to select compounds for AK to achieve success have been highlighted. The utility of this approach has been suggested by giving an example of database screening for plausible active compounds. PMID:27478367

  19. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  20. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A Sam; Roy, René; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-01

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  1. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  2. A Guide to Dental Care for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Roy L.; Young, Wesley O.

    This guide has been developed to assist administrators, providers of dental care, and others involved in carrying out the dental care provisions of the EPSDT program (Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program). It is intended to assist in the development of programs concerned with the unique characteristics of dental diseases…

  3. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  4. Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure: The Greatest Survival Story of All Time. Teacher's Guide To Accompany the Giant-Screen Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Reen

    This teacher's guide was developed to accompany the giant-screen film, "Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure". The activities featured use a multidisciplinary approach and target students ages 7 through 14. Teacher pages include background information and student pages include instructions and additional information for understanding the activity.…

  5. Taking It to the Pews: A CBPR-Guided HIV Awareness and Screening Project with Black Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Hawes, Starlyn; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Martinez, David; Goggin, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is a potentially effective strategy for exploring the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV interventions in African American churches. This CBPR-guided study describes a church-based HIV awareness and screening intervention (Taking It to the Pews [TIPS]) that fully…

  6. Incremental Validity Analyses of the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version in a Civil Psychiatric Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, John F.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares two instruments frequently used to assess risk for violence, the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), in a large sample of civil psychiatric patients. Despite a strong bivariate relationship with community violence, the VRAG could not improve on the predictive validity…

  7. Using adverse outcome pathway analysis to guide development of high-throughput screening assays for thyroid-disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Adverse Outcome Pathway Analysis to Guide Development of High-Throughput Screening Assays for Thyroid-Disruptors Katie B. Paul1,2, Joan M. Hedge2, Daniel M. Rotroff4, Kevin M. Crofton4, Michael W. Hornung3, Steven O. Simmons2 1Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Post...

  8. Usefulness of previous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening results in guiding empirical therapy for S aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Anthony D; Burry, Lisa; Showler, Adrienne; Steinberg, Marilyn; Ricciuto, Daniel; Fernandes, Tania; Chiu, Anna; Raybardhan, Sumit; Tomlinson, George A; Bell, Chaim M; Morris, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) screening is performed on hospitalized patients for infection control purposes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the usefulness of past MRSA screening for guiding empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study examined consecutive patients with confirmed SAB and previous MRSA screening swab from six academic and community hospitals between 2007 and 2010. Diagnostic test properties were calculated for MRSA screening swab for predicting methicillin resistance of SAB. RESULTS: A total of 799 patients underwent MRSA screening swabs before SAB. Of the 799 patients, 95 (12%) had a positive and 704 (88%) had a negative previous MRSA screening swab. There were 150 (19%) patients with MRSA bacteremia. Overall, previous MRSA screening swabs had a positive likelihood ratio of 33 (95% CI 18 to 60) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.45 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.54). Diagnostic accuracy differed depending on mode of acquisition (ie, community-acquired, nosocomial or health care-associated infection) (P<0.0001) and hospital (P=0.0002). At best, for health care-associated infection, prior MRSA screening swab had a positive likelihood ratio of 16 (95% CI 9 to 28) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.27 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: A negative prior MRSA screening swab cannot reliably rule out MRSA bacteremia and should not be used to guide empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. A positive prior MRSA screening swab greatly increases likelihood of MRSA, necessitating MRSA coverage in empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. PMID:26361488

  9. A Guide to Screening for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenburg, William K.; North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    The manual was designed to help public officials, physicians, nurses, and others to plan and implement an Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program under Medicaid. Procedures for carrying out components of an EPSDT program are recommended. Part 1 discusses organization and administration of screening, diagnosis, and…

  10. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  11. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  12. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  13. Focused Decision Support: a Data Mining Tool to Query the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Dataset and Guide Screening Management for the Individual Patient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Hostetter, Jason; Morrison, James; Wang, Kenneth; Siegel, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial enrolled ~155,000 participants to determine whether certain screening exams reduced mortality from prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer. Repurposing the data provides an unparalleled resource for matching patients with the outcomes of demographically or diagnostically comparable patients. A web-based application was developed to query this subset of patient information against a given patient's demographics and risk factors. Analysis of the matched data yields outcome information which can then be used to guide management decisions and imaging software. Prognostic information is also estimated via the proportion of matched patients that progress to cancer. The US Preventative Services Task Force provides screening recommendations for cancers of the breast, colorectal tract, and lungs. There is wide variability in adherence of clinicians to these guidelines and others published by the Fleischner Society and various cancer organizations. Data mining the PLCO dataset for clinical decision support can optimize the use of limited healthcare resources, focusing screening on patients for whom the benefit to risk ratio is the greatest and most efficacious. A data driven, personalized approach to cancer screening maximizes the economic and clinical efficacy and enables early identification of patients in which the course of disease can be improved. Our dynamic decision support system utilizes a subset of the PLCO dataset as a reference model to determine imaging and testing appropriateness while offering prognostic information for various cancers. PMID:26385814

  14. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  15. Modelling plastic scintillator response to gamma rays using light transport incorporated FLUKA code.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar Kohan, M; Etaati, G R; Ghal-Eh, N; Safari, M J; Afarideh, H; Asadi, E

    2012-05-01

    The response function of NE102 plastic scintillator to gamma rays has been simulated using a joint FLUKA+PHOTRACK Monte Carlo code. The multi-purpose particle transport code, FLUKA, has been responsible for gamma transport whilst the light transport code, PHOTRACK, has simulated the transport of scintillation photons through scintillator and lightguide. The simulation results of plastic scintillator with/without light guides of different surface coverings have been successfully verified with experiments.

  16. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  17. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  18. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  19. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  20. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  1. Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus (PRV) Expressing Firefly Luciferase Effectively Screened for CRISPR/Cas9 Single Guide RNAs and Antiviral Compounds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Wang, Tong-Yun; Sun, Ming-Xia; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-04-01

    A Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has emerged in China since 2011 that is not protected by commercial vaccines, and has not been well studied. The PRV genome is large and difficult to manipulate, but it is feasible to use clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology. However, identification of single guide RNA (sgRNA) through screening is critical to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and is traditionally time and labor intensive, and not suitable for rapid and high throughput screening of effective PRV sgRNAs. In this study, we developed a recombinant PRV strain expressing firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter virus for PRV-specific sgRNA screens and rapid evaluation of antiviral compounds. Luciferase activity was apparent as soon as 4 h after infection and was stably expressed through 10 passages. In a proof of the principle screen, we were able to identify several PRV specific sgRNAs and confirmed that they inhibited PRV replication using traditional methods. Using the reporter virus, we also identified PRV variants lacking US3, US2, and US9 gene function, and showed anti-PRV activity for chloroquine. Our results suggest that the reporter PRV strain will be a useful tool for basic virology studies, and for developing PRV control and prevention measures. PMID:27043610

  2. Genome-wide recessive genetic screening in mammalian cells with a lentiviral CRISPR-guide RNA library.

    PubMed

    Koike-Yusa, Hiroko; Li, Yilong; Tan, E-Pien; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Yusa, Kosuke

    2014-03-01

    Identification of genes influencing a phenotype of interest is frequently achieved through genetic screening by RNA interference (RNAi) or knockouts. However, RNAi may only achieve partial depletion of gene activity, and knockout-based screens are difficult in diploid mammalian cells. Here we took advantage of the efficiency and high throughput of genome editing based on type II, clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems to introduce genome-wide targeted mutations in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We designed 87,897 guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting 19,150 mouse protein-coding genes and used a lentiviral vector to express these gRNAs in ESCs that constitutively express Cas9. Screening the resulting ESC mutant libraries for resistance to either Clostridium septicum alpha-toxin or 6-thioguanine identified 27 known and 4 previously unknown genes implicated in these phenotypes. Our results demonstrate the potential for efficient loss-of-function screening using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

  3. Risk assessment to guide cervical screening strategies in a large Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Hui; Hu, Shang-Ying; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xun; Pan, Qin-Jing; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Gage, Julia C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Castle, Philip E; Qiao, You-Lin; Katki, Hormuzd A; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Three different cervical screening methods [cytology, human papillomavirus(HPV) testing and visual inspection with acetic acid(VIA)] are being considered in China for the national cervical screening program. Comparing risks of CIN3 and cervical cancer (CIN3+) for different results can inform test choice and management guidelines. We evaluated the immediate risk of CIN3+ for different screening results generated from individual and combined tests. We compared tests using a novel statistic designed for this purpose called Mean Risk Stratification (MRS), in a pooled analysis of 17 cross sectional population-based studies of 30,371 Chinese women screened with all 3 methods and diagnosed by colposcopically-directed biopsies. The 3 tests combined powerfully distinguished CIN3+ risk; triple-negative screening conferred a risk of 0.01%, while HPV-positive HSIL+ that was VIA-positive yielded a risk of 57.8%. Among the three screening tests, HPV status most strongly stratified CIN3+ risk. Among HPV-positive women, cytology was the more useful second test. In HPV-negative women, the immediate risks of CIN3+ ranged from 0.01% (negative cytology), 0.00% (ASC-US), 1.1% (LSIL), to 6.6 (HSIL+). In HPV-positive women, the CIN3+ risks were 0.9% (negative cytology), 3.6% (ASC-US), 6.3% (LSIL) and 38.5% (HSIL+). VIA results did not meaningful stratify CIN3+ risk among HPV-negative women with negative or ASC-US cytology; however, positive VIA substantially elevated CIN3+ risk for all other, more positive combinations of HPV and cytology compared with a negative VIA. Because all 3 screening tests had independent value in defining risk of CIN3+, different combinations can be optimized as pragmatic strategies in different resource settings. PMID:26800481

  4. NMR screening in fragment-based drug design: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hai-Young; Wyss, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) comprises both fragment-based screening (FBS) to find hits and elaboration of these hits to lead compounds. Typical fragment hits have lower molecular weight (<300-350 Da) and lower initial potency but higher ligand efficiency when compared to those from high-throughput screening. NMR spectroscopy has been widely used for FBDD since it identifies and localizes the binding site of weakly interacting hits on the target protein. Here we describe ligand-based NMR methods for hit identification from fragment libraries and for functional cross-validation of primary hits. PMID:25618347

  5. Alpha counting and spectrometry using liquid scintillation methods

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W J

    1986-01-01

    The material in this report is intended to be a practical introduction and guide to the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. Other works devoted to the development of the theory of liquid scintillation exist and a minimum of such material is repeated here. Much remains to be learned and many improvements remain to be made in the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. It is hoped that this modest work will encourage others to continue development in the field.

  6. A practical guide to Quantative Interactotr Screening with Next Generation Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeast two-hybrid screens are a powerful approach to identify protein-protein interactions; however, they are typically limited in the number of interactions identified, and lack quantitative values to ascribe confidence scores to the interactions that are obtained. We have developed a high-throughpu...

  7. Tubulin inhibitor identification by bioactive conformation alignment pharmacophore-guided virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shanthi; Choi, Min Jeong; Cho, Yong Seo; Min, Sun-Joon; Keum, Gyochang; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Chang Sik; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules are important cellular component that are critical for proper cellular function. Microtubules are synthesized by polymerization of αβ tubulin heterodimers called protofilaments. Microtubule dynamics facilitate proper cell division during mitosis. Disruption of microtubule dynamics by small-molecule agents inhibits mitosis, resulting in apoptotic cell death and preventing cell cycle progression. To identify a novel small molecule that binds the αβ tubulin interface to affect microtubule dynamics, we developed a bioactive conformation alignment pharmacophore (BCAP) model to screen tubulin inhibitors from a huge database. The application of BCAP model generated based on the known αβ-tubulin interface binders enabled us to identify several small-molecules that cause apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Virtual screening combined with an in vitro assay yielded 15 cytotoxic molecules. In particular, ethyl 2-(4-(5-methyl-3-nitro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)butanamido)-4-phenylthiophene-3-carboxylate (H05) inhibited tubulin polymerization with an IC50 of 17.6 μm concentration. The virtual screening results suggest that the application of an unbiased BCAP pharmacophore greatly eliminates unlikely compounds from a huge database and maximizes screening success. From the limited compounds tested in the tubulin polymerization inhibitor (TPI) assay, compound H05 was discovered as a tubulin inhibitor. This compound requires further structure activity optimization to identify additional potent inhibitors from the same class of molecules.

  8. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, S.J.; Eli, M.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

  9. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  10. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  11. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  12. Liquid Scintillator Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Y.

    2005-09-08

    The KamLAND collaboration has studied background requirements and purification methods needed to observe the 7Be neutrino from the sun. First we will discuss the present background situation in KamLAND where it is found that the main background components are 210Pb and 85Kr. It is then described how to purify the liquid scintillator. The present status and results on how to remove 210Pb from the liquid scintillator are discussed. Specifically, the detailed analysis of the effects of distillation and adsorption techniques are presented.

  13. Testing Scintillators for Homeland Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, James; Brandt, Andrew; Kenarangui, Rasool; Weiss, Alex; Chen, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Scintillating nanoparticles have a bright future in radiation detection, especially in the area of detecting nuclear devices. As part of a UTA nanoparticle scintillator development team funded by the Department of Homeland Security, I have been developing a scintillator test stand using various radioactive sources and a Hamamatsu S3590 photodiode. I will present initial test results.

  14. FEDS user`s guide: Facility energy screening. Release 2.10

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) and the US Army Construction Engineering REsearch Laboratory (USA-CERL). FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, which is a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities, and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. The basic intent of the model is to provide an installation with the information necessary to determine the minimum life-cycle cost (LCC) configuration of the installation`s energy generation and consumption infrastructure. The model has no fuel or technology bias; it simply selects the technologies that will provide an equivalent or superior level of service (e.g., heating, cooling, illumination) at the minimum LCC.

  15. Expression of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene of Dirofilaria immitis guided by transcriptomic screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  16. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) Gene of Dirofilaria immitis Guided by Transcriptomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  17. Expression of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene of Dirofilaria immitis guided by transcriptomic screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose.

  18. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  19. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  20. Boron loaded scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Brown, Gilbert Morris [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon [Knoxville, TN; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  1. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  2. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric; Beddar, A Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-01

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity. PMID:17022248

  3. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  4. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  5. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  6. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  7. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  8. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector

  10. High Latitude Scintillations during the ICI-4 Rocket Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Moen, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first results from the Norwegian ICI-4 sounding rocket campaign in February 2015. The ICI-4 was launched into F-region auroral blobs from the Andøya Space Center. The multi needle langmuir probe (m-NLP) on board the rocket sampled the ionospheric density structures at a sub-meter spatial resolution. A multi-phase screen model has been developed to estimate the scintillations from the density measurements acquired on-board spacecrafts. The phase screen model is validated and the comparison of the estimated values with scintillations measured by ground receivers during the campaign will be presented. A combination of scintillation receivers in Svalbard and surrounding areas as well as all sky imagers at Ny Ålesund, Longyerbyen, and Skibotn are used to improve the performance of the model.

  11. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-01-01

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  12. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-12-31

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  13. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  14. Radiation damage by neutrons to plastic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, G.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Wick, K.

    1995-08-01

    Polystyrene based scintillator SCSN38, wavelength shifter Y7 with polymethylmethacrylate matrix and pure PM-MA light guide GS218 have been irradiated in the mixed radiation field of a pool reactor. About 77% of the dose released in SCSN38 was caused by the {gamma}-field, 23% by fast neutrons. The total dose ranged from 2 to 105 kGy. The dose measurements were made using alanine dosimeters. Transmission and fluorescence of the samples have been measured before and several times after irradiation. The radiation damage results shown o differences to irradiations in pure {gamma}-fields with corresponding released doses.

  15. User's Guide to the Water-Analysis Screening Tool (WAST): A Tool for Assessing Available Water Resources in Relation to Aquatic-Resource Uses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.; Kiesler, James L.

    2008-01-01

    A water-analysis screening tool (WAST) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to provide an initial screening of areas in the state where potential problems may exist related to the availability of water resources to meet current and future water-use demands. The tool compares water-use information to an initial screening criteria of the 7-day, 10-year low-flow statistic (7Q10) resulting in a screening indicator for influences of net withdrawals (withdrawals minus discharges) on aquatic-resource uses. This report is intended to serve as a guide for using the screening tool. The WAST can display general basin characteristics, water-use information, and screening-indicator information for over 10,000 watersheds in the state. The tool includes 12 primary functions that allow the user to display watershed information, edit water-use and water-supply information, observe effects downstream from edited water-use information, reset edited values to baseline, load new water-use information, save and retrieve scenarios, and save output as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

  16. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  17. Bioassay-guided discovery of antibacterial agents: in vitro screening of Peperomia vulcanica, Peperomia fernandopoioana and Scleria striatinux

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The global burden of bacterial infections is high and has been further aggravated by increasing resistance to antibiotics. In the search for novel antibacterials, three medicinal plants: Peperomia vulcanica, Peperomia fernandopoioana (Piperaceae) and Scleria striatinux (Cyperaceae), were investigated for antibacterial activity and toxicity. Methods Crude extracts of these plants were tested by the disc diffusion method against six bacterial test organisms followed by bio-assay guided fractionation, isolation and testing of pure compounds. The minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum bactericidal (MBC) concentrations were measured by the microdilution method. The acute toxicity of the active extracts and cytotoxicity of the active compound were performed in mice and mammalian cells, respectively. Results The diameter of the zones of inhibition (DZI) of the extracts ranged from 7–13 mm on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus of which the methylene chloride:methanol [1:1] extract of Scleria striatinux recorded the highest activity (DZI = 13 mm). Twenty-nine pure compounds were screened and one, Okundoperoxide, isolated from S. striatinux, recorded a DZI ranging from 10–19 mm on S. aureus. The MICs and MBCs indicated that the Peperomias had broad-spectrum bacteriostatic activity. Toxicity tests showed that Okundoperoxide may have a low risk of toxicity with an LC50 of 46.88 μg/mL. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of these plants supports their use in traditional medicine. The pure compound, Okundoperoxide, may yield new antibacterial lead compounds following medicinal chemistry exploration. PMID:22549052

  18. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  19. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  20. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  1. Coherence properties of wideband satellite signals caused by ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufenach, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Radio scintillation on satellite signals caused by small-scale irregularities in F-region ionospheric electron density can be an important limitation on earth-satellite communication and navigation systems. Scintillation imposes distortion in both amplitude and phase on wideband signals. In the present work, the shallow-modulated phase screen theory is developed in terms of coherence bandwidth including a model based on a turbulent-like power-law description of the irregularities. The model results usually show a greater coherence bandwidth in the signal phase than in the signal amplitude. Therefore, systems that require phase coherence over a large bandwidth should be less affected than those requiring amplitude coherence.

  2. Computer model of high-latitude scintillation. [WBMOD program

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The DNA Wideband satellite experiment provided extensive data on scintillation produced in high-altitude structured plasmas. A computer program, WBMOD, is being developed to summarize those data in an applications-oriented way. The program contains the phase-screen scattering theory of Rino and a morphological description of ionospheric irregularities (thus far only at auroral latitudes) based on Wideband observations. It permits a user to compute scintillation indices for both phase and intensity as a function of system operating parameters and solar-ionospheric disturbance level. Correction is made for multiple scatter, and the user may choose either one-way (communication) or two-way (radar) propagation.

  3. The Transport of Photons through Light Guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell

    2000-10-01

    We have designed and optimized the light collection a set of light guides, which couple the scintillator to the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of an instrumented collimator. This collimator will be used with the experiments employing linearly-polarized photons in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in the spring of 2001. Using the Monte-Carlo simulation package, Guidem V1.0, we were able to simulate a scintillator-light guide-PMT construction. The scintillators were simulated to emit photons isotropically through out the whole volume of the scintillator. Parameters varied in the simulation were: radius of curvature of the bend, wrapping reflectivities, attenuation length, ripple angle(smoothness of the light guide surface), metal crumple angle(crumple of the aluminum wrapping), and the optical glue interfaces. Also investigated were the indices of refraction for the scintillator-light guide interface as well as the light guide-PMT interface. Given a bent geometry, our studies concluded that a curved elbow shape, 6 cm in length, with a radius of curvature of at least 1.4 cm, will produce a transmission efficiency between 54-55% with reference to the total light created in the scintillator. These light guides should have a ripple angle between 0^circ-3^circ and a PMT index of refraction between 1.3-1.5. The light guide should be wrapped in aluminum and the scintillator should be wrapped a paper with reflectivity around 0.1 to prevent smudging of the plastic.

  4. A Perspective on the Future of High-Throughput RNAi Screening: Will CRISPR Cut Out the Competition or Can RNAi Help Guide the Way?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jessica; Woodcock, Simon

    2015-09-01

    For more than a decade, RNA interference (RNAi) has brought about an entirely new approach to functional genomics screening. Enabling high-throughput loss-of-function (LOF) screens against the human genome, identifying new drug targets, and significantly advancing experimental biology, RNAi is a fast, flexible technology that is compatible with existing high-throughput systems and processes; however, the recent advent of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas, a powerful new precise genome-editing (PGE) technology, has opened up vast possibilities for functional genomics. CRISPR-Cas is novel in its simplicity: one piece of easily engineered guide RNA (gRNA) is used to target a gene sequence, and Cas9 expression is required in the cells. The targeted double-strand break introduced by the gRNA-Cas9 complex is highly effective at removing gene expression compared to RNAi. Together with the reduced cost and complexity of CRISPR-Cas, there is the realistic opportunity to use PGE to screen for phenotypic effects in a total gene knockout background. This review summarizes the exciting development of CRISPR-Cas as a high-throughput screening tool, comparing its future potential to that of well-established RNAi screening techniques, and highlighting future challenges and opportunities within these disciplines. We conclude that the two technologies actually complement rather than compete with each other, enabling greater understanding of the genome in relation to drug discovery.

  5. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  6. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  7. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  8. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  9. Scintillation detector for carbon-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, G. F.; Rogers, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Detector consists of plastic, cylindrical double-wall scintillation cell, which is filled with gas to be analyzed. Thin, inner cell wall is isolated optically from outer (guard) scintillator wall by evaporated-aluminum coating. Bonding technique provides mechanical support to cell wall when device is exposed to high temperatures.

  10. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Scintillator based beta batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  12. Scintillation Proximity Assay of Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang; Xie, Nan; Feng, You; Zheng, Y. George

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of arginine residues, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), is one important protein post-translational modification involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. A fast and effective assay for PRMT can provide valuable information for dissecting the biological functions of PRMTs, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of arginine methylation. Currently, among the methods used for PRMT activity measurement, many contain laborious separation procedures, which restrict the applications of these assays for high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery. The authors report here a mix-and-measure method to measure PRMT activity based on the principle of scintillation proximity assay (SPA). In this assay, 3H-AdoMet was used as methyl donor, and biotin-modified histone H4 peptide served as a methylation substrate. Following the methylation reaction catalyzed by PRMTs, streptavidin-coated SPA beads were added to the reaction solution, and SPA signals were detected by a MicroBeta scintillation counter. No separation step is needed, which simplifies the assay procedure and greatly enhances the assay speed. Particularly, the miniaturization and robustness suggest that this method is suited for HTS of PRMT inhibitors. PMID:21821785

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening for Patients on the Female-to-Male Spectrum: a Narrative Review and Guide for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, Jennifer; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Bernstein, Ida; Reisner, Sari L; Alizaga, Natalie M; Agénor, Madina; Pardee, Dana J

    2015-12-01

    Guidelines for cervical cancer screening have evolved rapidly over the last several years, with a trend toward longer intervals between screenings and an increasing number of screening options, such as Pap/HPV co-testing and HPV testing as a primary screening. However, gynecological recommendations often do not include clinical considerations specific to patients on the female-to-male (FTM) spectrum. Both patients and providers may not accurately assess risk for HPV and other sexually transmitted infections, understand barriers to care, or be aware of recommendations for cervical cancer screening and other appropriate sexual and reproductive health services for this patient population. We review the evidence and provide guidance on minimizing emotional discomfort before, during, and after a pelvic exam, minimizing physical discomfort during the exam, and making adaptations to account for testosterone-induced anatomical changes common among FTM patients.

  14. Integration of Microfractionation, qNMR and zebrafish screening for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and quantitative bioactivity analysis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Bohni, Nadine; Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Maes, Jan; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Marcourt, Laurence; Munck, Sebastian; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R; Moshi, Mainen J; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are an attractive source of chemical diversity for small-molecule drug discovery. Several challenges nevertheless persist with respect to NP discovery, including the time and effort required for bioassay-guided isolation of bioactive NPs, and the limited biomedical relevance to date of in vitro bioassays used in this context. With regard to bioassays, zebrafish have recently emerged as an effective model system for chemical biology, allowing in vivo high-content screens that are compatible with microgram amounts of compound. For the deconvolution of the complex extracts into their individual constituents, recent progress has been achieved on several fronts as analytical techniques now enable the rapid microfractionation of extracts, and microflow NMR methods have developed to the point of allowing the identification of microgram amounts of NPs. Here we combine advanced analytical methods with high-content screening in zebrafish to create an integrated platform for microgram-scale, in vivo NP discovery. We use this platform for the bioassay-guided fractionation of an East African medicinal plant, Rhynchosia viscosa, resulting in the identification of both known and novel isoflavone derivatives with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. Quantitative microflow NMR is used both to determine the structure of bioactive compounds and to quantify them for direct dose-response experiments at the microgram scale. The key advantages of this approach are (1) the microgram scale at which both biological and analytical experiments can be performed, (2) the speed and the rationality of the bioassay-guided fractionation - generic for NP extracts of diverse origin - that requires only limited sample-specific optimization and (3) the use of microflow NMR for quantification, enabling the identification and dose-response experiments with only tens of micrograms of each compound. This study demonstrates that a complete in vivo bioassay-guided

  15. Integration of Microfractionation, qNMR and Zebrafish Screening for the In Vivo Bioassay-Guided Isolation and Quantitative Bioactivity Analysis of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Jan; Siverio-Mota, Dany; Marcourt, Laurence; Munck, Sebastian; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R.; Moshi, Mainen J.; Esguerra, Camila V.; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Crawford, Alexander D.; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are an attractive source of chemical diversity for small-molecule drug discovery. Several challenges nevertheless persist with respect to NP discovery, including the time and effort required for bioassay-guided isolation of bioactive NPs, and the limited biomedical relevance to date of in vitro bioassays used in this context. With regard to bioassays, zebrafish have recently emerged as an effective model system for chemical biology, allowing in vivo high-content screens that are compatible with microgram amounts of compound. For the deconvolution of the complex extracts into their individual constituents, recent progress has been achieved on several fronts as analytical techniques now enable the rapid microfractionation of extracts, and microflow NMR methods have developed to the point of allowing the identification of microgram amounts of NPs. Here we combine advanced analytical methods with high-content screening in zebrafish to create an integrated platform for microgram-scale, in vivo NP discovery. We use this platform for the bioassay-guided fractionation of an East African medicinal plant, Rhynchosia viscosa, resulting in the identification of both known and novel isoflavone derivatives with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. Quantitative microflow NMR is used both to determine the structure of bioactive compounds and to quantify them for direct dose-response experiments at the microgram scale. The key advantages of this approach are (1) the microgram scale at which both biological and analytical experiments can be performed, (2) the speed and the rationality of the bioassay-guided fractionation – generic for NP extracts of diverse origin – that requires only limited sample-specific optimization and (3) the use of microflow NMR for quantification, enabling the identification and dose-response experiments with only tens of micrograms of each compound. This study demonstrates that a complete in vivo bioassay-guided

  16. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  17. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  18. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  19. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  20. A theory of scintillation for two-component power law irregularity spectra: Overview and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Rino, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the power law phase screen theory for ionospheric scintillation to account for the case where the refractive index irregularities follow a two-component inverse power law spectrum. The two-component model includes, as special cases, an unmodified power law and a modified power law with spectral break that may assume the role of an outer scale, intermediate break scale, or inner scale. As such, it provides a framework for investigating the effects of a spectral break on the scintillation statistics. Using this spectral model, we solve the fourth moment equation governing intensity variations following propagation through two-dimensional field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere. A specific normalization is invoked that exploits self-similar properties of the structure to achieve a universal scaling, such that different combinations of perturbation strength, propagation distance, and frequency produce the same results. The numerical algorithm is validated using new theoretical predictions for the behavior of the scintillation index and intensity correlation length under strong scatter conditions. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to investigate the morphologies of the intensity spectrum, scintillation index, and intensity correlation length as functions of the spectral indices and strength of scatter; retrieve phase screen parameters from intensity scintillation observations; explore the relative contributions to the scintillation due to large- and small-scale ionospheric structures; and quantify the conditions under which a general spectral break will influence the scintillation statistics.

  1. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  2. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  3. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators wasmore » modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.« less

  4. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  5. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  6. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  7. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min; Wiggins, Brenden; Trtik, Pavel; Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen; Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina; Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu; Stowe, Ashley C.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu):6LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  8. OPTIMAL WELL LOCATOR (OWL): A SCREENING TOOL FOR EVALUATING LOCATIONS OF MONITORING WELLS: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 1.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Optimal Well Locator ( OWL) program was designed and developed by USEPA to be a screening tool to evaluate and optimize the placement of wells in long term monitoring networks at small sites. The first objective of the OWL program is to allow the user to visualize the change ...

  9. Patent foramen ovale and scuba diving: a practical guide for physicians on when to refer for screening.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Oliver; Clark, James E

    2013-01-01

    Divers are taught some basic physiology during their training. There is therefore some underlying knowledge and understandable concern in the diving community about the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) as a cause of decompression illness (DCI). There is an agreement that PFO screening should not be done routinely on all divers; however, when to screen selected divers is not clear. We present the basic physiology and current existing guidelines for doctors, advice on the management and identify which groups of divers should be referred for consideration of PFO screening. Venous bubbles after diving and right to left shunts are common, but DCI is rare. Why this is the case is not clear, but the divers look to doctors for guidance on PFO screening and closure; both of which are not without risks. Ideally, we should advise and apply guidelines that are consistent and based on best available evidence. We hope this guideline and flow chart helps address these issues with regard to PFOs and diving.

  10. What ethical and legal principles should guide the genotyping of children as part of a personalised screening programme for common cancer?

    PubMed

    Hall, Alison Elizabeth; Chowdhury, Susmita; Pashayan, Nora; Hallowell, Nina; Pharoah, Paul; Burton, Hilary

    2014-03-01

    Increased knowledge of the gene-disease associations contributing to common cancer development raises the prospect of population stratification by genotype and other risk factors. Individual risk assessments could be used to target interventions such as screening, treatment and health education. Genotyping neonates, infants or young children as part of a systematic programme would improve coverage and uptake, and facilitate a screening package that maximises potential benefits and minimises harms including overdiagnosis. This paper explores the potential justifications and risks of genotyping children for genetic variants associated with common cancer development within a personalised screening programme. It identifies the ethical and legal principles that might guide population genotyping where the predictive value of the testing is modest and associated risks might arise in the future, and considers the standards required by population screening programme validity measures (such as the Wilson and Jungner criteria including cost-effectiveness and equitable access). These are distinguished from the normative principles underpinning predictive genetic testing of children for adult-onset diseases-namely, to make best-interests judgements and to preserve autonomy. While the case for population-based genotyping of neonates or young children has not yet been made, the justifications for this approach are likely to become increasingly compelling. A modified evaluative and normative framework should be developed, capturing elements from individualistic and population-based approaches. This should emphasise proper communication and genuine parental consent or informed choice, while recognising the challenges associated with making unsolicited approaches to an asymptomatic group. Such a framework would be strengthened by complementary empirical research.

  11. The response of a fast scintillator screen (YAP:Ce) to low energy ions (0-40 keV) and its use to detect fast-ion-loss in stellarator TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Malo, M.; Crespo, M. T.; Muñoz, D.

    2016-11-01

    A systematic study of scintillation materials was undertaken to improve the time resolution of the fast ion diagnostic currently installed at TJ-II stellarator. It was found that YAP:Ce (formula YAlO3:Ce, Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite doped with Cerium) ionoluminescence offers better sensitivity and time response compared to the standard detector material, SrGa2S4:Eu (TG-Green), currently used in TJ-II. A comparison between both materials was carried out by irradiating them with H+ ions of up to 40 keV using a dedicated laboratory setup. It is found that for the low energy ions of interest at TJ-II, YAP:Ce offers 20 times higher sensitivity than TG-Green and much faster decay time, 27 ns versus 540 ns. It is expected that the use of YAP:Ce in combination with a faster data acquisition and an ion counting software as part of the TJ-II ion luminescent probe will provide 20 times faster data on ion loss.

  12. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  13. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  14. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  15. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  16. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  17. Scintillation at two optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W B; Reitsema, H J

    1981-09-15

    Stellar scintillation data were obtained on a single night at a variety of zenith distances and azimuths, using a photon-counting photometer recording at 100 Hz simultaneously at wavelengths of 0.475 microm and 0.870 microm. Orientable apertures of 42-cm diam separated by 1 m were used to establish the average upper atmosphere wind direction and velocity. Dispersion in the earth's atmosphere separate the average optical paths at the two wavelengths, permitting a reconstruction of the spatial cross-correlation function for scintillations, independent of assumptions about differential fluid motions. Although there is clear evidence of a complicated velocity field, scintillation power was predominantly produced by levels at pressures of 130 +/- 30 mbar. The data are not grossly inconsistent with layers of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence, but there is some evidence for deviation from the Kolmogorov spectral index and/or anisotropy.

  18. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  19. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  20. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  1. Dual targets guided screening and isolation of Kukoamine B as a novel natural anti-sepsis agent from traditional Chinese herb Cortex lycii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zheng, Xinchuan; Long, Yupeng; Cao, Hongwei; Wang, Ning; Lu, Yongling; Zhao, Kecen; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Treating sepsis remains challenging at present. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial DNA/CpG DNA are important pathogenic molecules and drug targets for sepsis. It is thus a promising strategy to treat sepsis by discovering agents that neutralize LPS and CpG DNA simultaneously. In this study, we present evidences of the biosensor based screening and isolation of active anti-sepsis fractions and monomers from traditional Chinese herbs using dual targets (LPS and CpG DNA) guided drug discovery strategy. Firstly, LPS or CpG DNA was immobilized on surfaces of cuvettes in the biosensor to establish a screening platform. Then, Cortex lycii with both highest affinities was selected out from one hundred and fourteen traditional Chinese herbs. In subsequent experiments, chromatography was utilized and coupled with the biosensor to purify fractions with a higher affinity for LPS and CpG DNA. In line with affinity assay, these fractions were shown to neutralize LPS and CpG DNA and inhibit their activity in vitro and in vivo. Lastly, the contributing monomer Kukoamine B (KB) was purified. KB neutralized LPS and CpG DNA in vitro. It inhibited TLR4, TLR9 and MyD88 mRNA expressions up-regulated by LPS and CpG DNA, and also attenuated the LPS and CpG DNA elicited nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 protein in RAW264.7 cells. It also protected mice from lethal challenge of heat-killed E. coli, a mixture of LPS and CpG DNA. In conclusion, we presented a dual target guided discovery of a novel anti-sepsis agent KB from traditional Chinese herbs via combination of biosensor technology and chromatography methods. PMID:21073991

  2. Three-dimensional printing of scintillating materials.

    PubMed

    Mishnayot, Y; Layani, M; Cooperstein, I; Magdassi, S; Ron, G

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of three-dimensional printing techniques to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report on the development of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various applications.

  3. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  4. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  5. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  6. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  7. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  8. Cas-Database: web-based genome-wide guide RNA library design for gene knockout screens using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongbin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: CRISPR-derived RNA guided endonucleases (RGENs) have been widely used for both gene knockout and knock-in at the level of single or multiple genes. RGENs are now available for forward genetic screens at genome scale, but single guide RNA (sgRNA) selection at this scale is difficult. Results: We develop an online tool, Cas-Database, a genome-wide gRNA library design tool for Cas9 nucleases from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9). With an easy-to-use web interface, Cas-Database allows users to select optimal target sequences simply by changing the filtering conditions. Furthermore, it provides a powerful way to select multiple optimal target sequences from thousands of genes at once for the creation of a genome-wide library. Cas-Database also provides a web application programming interface (web API) for advanced bioinformatics users. Availability and implementation: Free access at http://www.rgenome.net/cas-database/. Contact: sangsubae@hanyang.ac.kr or jskim01@snu.ac.kr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153724

  9. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  10. EUV Scintillator for Localization and Detection of Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Nils; Urabanski, Lukasz; Malm, Eric; Brown, Christopher; Marconi, Mario

    2011-10-01

    We set out to find a means of detecting and locating an EUV laser beam at the wavelength of 46.9 nm in real time. This will facilitate the alignment of our experiments in nano-patterning, nano-fabrication, and holography, consequently allowing multiple experiments to be aligned simultaneously. Methods of detection are either CCD cameras or prints made with Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on a coated wafer, neither of which are efficient to operate. We describe the implementation of an alternative imaging method which combines a phosphor scintillator and a web-cam. Using a phosphor scintillator screen provided by Applied Scintillations Technologies Limited the detection and localization of the EUV laser beam at 46.9 nm was seen consistently through reflection providing a distinct image of the beam in the initial tests. We were able to capture an image of the beam using the webcam through the use of a user interface developed in labview which allowed a snap shot to be taken at the exact moment the beam past through the screen.

  11. Response of liquid scintillator assemblies as a function of angular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, S. F.; Scarpelli, M.; Miller, E.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid scintillator detector assemblies contain an inert nitrogen expansion volume to allow for expansion of the liquid with changing temperature. Measurements and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the dependence of pulse height distribution shapes as a function of detector angle for two liquid scintillators assemblies filled with 97% organic-liquid cocktail and a 3% expansion volume. A 12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long and a 7.6-cm diameter by 9.1-cm long EJ-309 liquid scintillator assemblies are investigated using a 137Cs gamma-ray source. Aside from the differences in dimensions, the detector assemblies also differed in the design of the active detector volume: there is no light guide in the 12.7-cm-diameter detector assembly, whereas the 7.6-cm-diameter detector contains a BK7 light guide between the scintillation liquid and optical coupling to the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 12.7-cm-diameter detector show a decrease in the position of the Compton edge ranges from 4% to 40% at detector orientations where the expansion volume exists between scintillating medium and the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 7.6-cm-diameter detector show that the position of the Compton edge is relatively unaffected at all detector orientations due to the presence of light guide.

  12. Efficient screening of fungal cellobiohydrolase class I enzymes for thermostabilizing sequence blocks by SCHEMA structure-guided recombination.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Komor, Russell; Kanaan, Arvind; Romero, Philip; Yu, Xinlin; Mohler, Shannon; Snow, Christopher; Arnold, Frances

    2010-11-01

    We describe an efficient SCHEMA recombination-based approach for screening homologous enzymes to identify stabilizing amino acid sequence blocks. This approach has been used to generate active, thermostable cellobiohydrolase class I (CBH I) enzymes from the 390 625 possible chimeras that can be made by swapping eight blocks from five fungal homologs. Constructing and characterizing the parent enzymes and just 32 'monomeras' containing a single block from a homologous enzyme allowed stability contributions to be assigned to 36 of the 40 blocks from which the CBH I chimeras can be assembled. Sixteen of 16 predicted thermostable chimeras, with an average of 37 mutations relative to the closest parent, are more thermostable than the most stable parent CBH I, from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii. Whereas none of the parent CBH Is were active >65°C, stable CBH I chimeras hydrolyzed solid cellulose at 70°C. In addition to providing a collection of diverse, thermostable CBH Is that can complement previously described stable CBH II chimeras (Heinzelman et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 2009;106:5610-5615) in formulating application-specific cellulase mixtures, the results show the utility of SCHEMA recombination for screening large swaths of natural enzyme sequence space for desirable amino acid blocks.

  13. Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Chung, Esther K; Siegel, Benjamin S; Garg, Arvin; Conroy, Kathleen; Gross, Rachel S; Long, Dayna A; Lewis, Gena; Osman, Cynthia J; Jo Messito, Mary; Wade, Roy; Shonna Yin, H; Cox, Joanne; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 20% of all children in the United States live in poverty, which exists in rural, urban, and suburban areas. Thus, all child health clinicians need to be familiar with the effects of poverty on health and to understand associated, preventable, and modifiable social factors that impact health. Social determinants of health are identifiable root causes of medical problems. For children living in poverty, social determinants of health for which clinicians may play a role include the following: child maltreatment, child care and education, family financial support, physical environment, family social support, intimate partner violence, maternal depression and family mental illness, household substance abuse, firearm exposure, and parental health literacy. Children, particularly those living in poverty, exposed to adverse childhood experiences are susceptible to toxic stress and a variety of child and adult health problems, including developmental delay, asthma and heart disease. Despite the detrimental effects of social determinants on health, few child health clinicians routinely address the unmet social and psychosocial factors impacting children and their families during routine primary care visits. Clinicians need tools to screen for social determinants of health and to be familiar with available local and national resources to address these issues. These guidelines provide an overview of social determinants of health impacting children living in poverty and provide clinicians with practical screening tools and resources. PMID:27101890

  14. Breast Cancer Detection with Short-Interval Follow-up Compared with Return to Annual Screening in Patients with Benign Stereotactic or US-guided Breast Biopsy Results

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alisa K.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Geller, Berta M.; Hotaling, Elise N.; Herschorn, Sally D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cancer detection rate and stage after benign stereotactic or ultrasonography (US)–guided core breast biopsy between patients with short-interval follow-up (SIFU) and those who return to annual screening. Materials and Methods The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registry and the BCSC Statistical Coordinating Center received institutional review board approval for active and passive consent processes and a waiver of consent. All procedures were HIPAA compliant. BCSC data for 1994–2010 were used to compare ipsilateral breast cancer detection rates and tumor characteristics for diagnoses within 3 months after SIFU (3–8 months) versus return to annual screening (RTAS) mammography (9–18 months) after receiving a benign pathology result from image-guided breast biopsy. Results In total, 17 631 biopsies with benign findings were identified with SIFU or RTAS imaging. In the SIFU group, 27 ipsilateral breast cancers were diagnosed in 10 715 mammographic examinations (2.5 cancers per 1000 examinations) compared with 16 cancers in 6916 mammographic examinations in the RTAS group (2.3 cancers per 1000 examinations) (P = .88). Sixteen cancers after SIFU (59%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39%, 78%) were invasive versus 12 after RTAS (75%; 95% CI: 48%, 93%). The invasive cancer rate was 1.5 per 1000 examinations after SIFU (95% CI: 0.9, 2.4) and 1.7 per 1000 examinations (95% CI: 0.9, 3.0) after RTAS (P = .70). Among invasive cancers, 25% were late stage (stage 2B, 3, or 4) in the SIFU group (95% CI: 7%, 52%) versus 27% in the RTAS group (95% CI: 6%, 61%). Positive lymph nodes were found in seven (44%; 95% CI: 20%, 70%) invasive cancers after SIFU and in three (25%; 95% CI: 5%, 57%) invasive cancers after RTAS. Conclusion Similar rates of cancer detection were found between SIFU and RTAS after benign breast biopsy with no significant differences in stage, tumor size, or nodal status, although the present study was limited by sample size

  15. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  16. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  17. Scintillation materials for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lempicki, A.; Wojtowicz, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillators are beginning to attract renewed attention because modern High Energy Physics accelerators are placing unprecedented demands of quantity and quality of detector materials and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), used by the medical field. Both applications required materials for scintillator detectors with properties beyond those delivered by traditional scintillators. Thallium doped halides are very efficient, but slow and chemically unstable. Two modern developments, namely the very fast BaF[sub 2], which owed its success to the newly discovered crossover transitions, and CeF[sub 3], which carried a promise of fast components, more practical wavelengths and attractive efficiency. Since traditional scintillators (Tl doped halides) are very efficient, and could be even more efficient at larger concentrations of Tl, if it were not for concentration quenching. However Tl transitions are spin forbidden and slow. Both ills could be remedied by replacing Tl with Ce, whose transitions are allowed and which is known to form fully concentrated compounds of high photoluminescent efficiency and no quenching. These materials, plus new Ce-doped materials, exhibiting highly promising properties for medical applications, became the target of our studies.

  18. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  19. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  20. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moszyński, M.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  1. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  2. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using thick, segmented scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-03-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ~11 mm thick CsI:Tl and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ~0.28 to ~1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ~4 cGy--a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ~2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast

  3. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  4. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  5. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  6. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  7. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  8. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  9. Neutron position-sensitive scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, Michael G.; Brenner, Raul

    1984-01-01

    A device is provided for mapping one- and two-dimensional distributions of neutron-positions in a scintillation detector. The device consists of a lithium glass scintillator coupled by an air gap and a light coupler to an array of photomultipliers. The air gap concentrates light flashes from the scintillator, whereas the light coupler disperses this concentrated light to a predetermined fraction of the photomultiplier tube array.

  10. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  11. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  12. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  13. Scintillation properties of lead sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. ); Shlichta, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    We report on the scintillation properties of lead sulfate (PbSO{sub 4}), a scintillator that show promise as a high energy photon detector. It physical properties are well suited for gamma detection, as its has a density of 6.4 gm/cm{sup 3}, a 1/e attenuation length for 511 keV photons of 1.2 cm, is not affected by air or moisture, and is cut and polished easily. In 99.998% pure PbSO{sub 4} crystals at room temperature excited by 511 keV annihilation photons, the fluorescence decay lifetime contains significant fast components having 1.8 ns (5%) and 19 ns (36%) decay times, but with longer components having 95 ns (36%) and 425 ns (23%) decays times. The peak emission wavelength is 335 nm, which is transmitted by borosilicate glass windowed photomultiplier tubes. The total scintillation light output increases with decreasing temperature fro 3,200 photons/MeV at +45{degrees}C to 4, 900 photons/MeV at room temperature (+25{degrees}C) and 68,500 photons/MeV at {minus}145{degrees}C. In an imperfect, 3 mm cube of a naturally occurring mineral form of PbSO{sub 4} (anglesite) at room temperature, a 511 keV photopeak is seen with a total light output of 60% that BGO. There are significant sample to sample variations of the light output among anglesite samples, so the light output of lead sulfate may improve when large synthetic crystals become available. 10 refs.

  14. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  15. Ameliorating calculation of ionospheric amplitude scintillation index from under-sampled phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yue, Jiguang; Su, Yongqing; Zhan, Xingqun

    2016-11-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data have been used in ionospheric irregularity and scintillation research for decades. However, routine GNSS data lacks raw amplitude data. To deal with the absence of the raw amplitude data, phase data can be used to estimate amplitude scintillation index S4 by phase screen model. The accuracy of the estimation depends on the phase screens constructed from sufficiently sampled phase data. Nevertheless, routine GNSS phase data and equivalent total electron content (TEC) data are all under-sampled. In order to exploit 1-Hz TEC data for accurate S4 estimations, a multiple phase screen compensation method is developed in this paper to compensate for the deficiencies in sampling rates. The multiple screen configuration technique involved in the compensation method determines whether the estimated S4 from the compensation results approximates to the measured S4 . As for the quasi-measured screens from the TEC data, both the line screen in one-dimension (1-D) and the square screen in two-dimension (2-D) have fine S4 estimations by means of the compensation method. Furthermore, power law phase screen simulations are introduced into the validation of the compensation method. The performance of artificially decimated power law screens in terms of S4 estimations is improved by the compensation method as well. In view of the TEC data involved in this paper, the compensation method identifies and fills a gap in the utilization of the under-sampled second-level phase data for estimating S4 , and thus enables routine GNSS phase measurement to trace the ionospheric irregularities at a small or intermediate scale. The multiple screen configuration, meanwhile, renders the compensation method appropriate to weak or moderate scintillations.

  16. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  17. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  18. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  19. Evaluation of different scintillators for 1MV NDE x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Visrshup, Gary

    2014-03-01

    X-ray radiography is an important and frequently used NDE method of testing metal structures, such as tube welding quality, cracks and voids in cast iron or other metals. It gives fast and visible answer for structural defects. The Varian high energy portal imagers on Clinacs used in cancer treatment were tested for this purpose. We compared the traditional Gadox (LANEX) screen with and without a 1mm Cu buildup plate as used clinically. We also tested different hybrid scintillators, which consisted of different phosphor layers deposited onto fiberoptic plates. The last screen tested was a 2cm thick fiberoptic plate which contained scintillating fibers. The sensitivity (ADU = number of digital counts per a given X-ray dose), the resolution (MTF - modulation transfer function) and the DQE (detective quantum efficiency) were compared, with a 1 MV source, for these X-ray conversion screens. We found that the additional 1mm Cu plate, which improves the absorption and the contrast at 6 or higher energy MeV imaging, does not improve the image quality at 1MV. Rather it attenuates the X-rays, resulting in lower sensitivity and a lower DQE(0) of 2.2% with the additional Cu plate compared to DQE(0) of ~4% without the Cu plate. The hybrid scintillators with evaporated phosphors on fiberoptic plates tested were too thin resulting in low sensitivity. The best results were obtained from the thick scintillating fiberoptic screens, which provided the best DQE and high resolution with the 1MV X-ray beam. Further optimization is planned by changing the thickness of the scintillating fiber optic plate.

  20. Extruded scintillator for the Calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.

    2006-10-27

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R and D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  1. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  2. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  3. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  4. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  5. 4/6-GHz ionospheric scintillation measurements during the peak of sunspot cycle 21

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D.J.; Pontes, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of power spectral density confirm an f to the -3 dependence for weak scintillations, which, it is noted, can be explained by the conventional weak scattering theory for a thick screen with a power law electron density fluctuation spectrum of p equals 4. Data gathered from 1977 to 1980 at the Hong Kong Earth Station provide further insight into 4- and 6-GHz scintillations during maximum solar activity. Such characteristics as occurrence frequencies, durations, global scales, and spectral roll-off slopes are unique in that they had not been observed in previous years. Peak-to-peak fluctuations of up to 14-dB magnitude are observed for which the f to the -3 power spectrum dependence is no longer valid. In terms of cumulative statistics, a model of scintillation increase as a function of solar activities is developed for engineering applications.

  6. Spectral analysis of scintillation data taken from an aircraft. Part I. Final report Oct 76-Oct 79

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, T.B.

    1980-02-01

    This report provides theoretical background material for the development of a thin phase screen model for radio scintillation. This model is then used to derive an expression for the expected amplitude scintillation spectra (spectral density funciton) which might be observed in a geometry which includes a satellite based transmitter, an aircraft based receiver and a 'thin', intermediate scintillation-producing medium. A computer procedure was developed for testing the model under various geometries and for various parameters describing the 'bulk' properties statistical properties of the medium. In addition to the development of a theoretical model, this report includes material on experimental spectral analysis and, in particular, details on a spectral analysis procedure which was used on amplitude scintillation and data gathered from an aircraft in geomagnetic equatorial regions.

  7. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  8. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  9. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  10. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  11. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  12. Scintillation observations near the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Scott, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the electron density spectrum, the random velocity and the mean velocity of the solar wind in the region from 5 to 100 solar radii are presented. Results are based on intensity scintillations of incoherent radio sources at different locations and different radio frequencies. The shape of the electron density irregularity spectrum is shown to be well modeled by a power law in wavenumber with a slope that abruptly steepens at higher wavenumbers. This two slope power law model is shown to have a break (defined as the wavenumber of the change of slope) that increases with decreasing distance from the Sun. The fractional random velocity is shown to be insignificant at distances of greater than 40 solar radii, but shows a steady increase with decreasing solar distance inside of 40 solar radii.

  13. New Organic Scintillators for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanowska, Joanna; Szczeniak, Tomasz

    2010-01-05

    This paper present the current work on neutron detection in Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies. Lately, we have focused our research on the development of new organic scintillators including liquid scintillators for neutron detection and associated measurements. We measured liquid scintillators (also {sup 10}B-doped for thermal neutron detection){sup 3}He tubes, composites, etc. Response of the following detectors on thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma radiation - the pulse shape discrimination (PSD)- has been mainly performed by means of a zero-crossing (ZC) method.

  14. Photodiode scintillation detector for radiac instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirschl, Joseph C.

    1984-10-01

    Scintillation detectors have traditionally employed photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with the attendant drawback of relatively high cost and need for a high voltage supply. This article reviews evaluation of a photodiode type scintillation detector, which exhibits promising features (small size and low power) for radiation survey meter application. Gamma radiation response characteristics, both for pulse and dc-mode of detector operation are presented, along with an example of a simple, high-range digital radiacmeter (breadboard design), utilizing this photodiode scintillation detector in conjunction with a single-chip A/D converter/LCD display driver and featuring low power demand (15 mW).

  15. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    SciTech Connect

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-09-15

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection.

  16. New observations of scintillation climatology from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Caton, R. G.; Wiens, K.; Groves, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) was established with three ground sites in the mid-1990's by the Air Force Research Laboratory and has continued to grow into a global scintillation observation network. This system consists of an array of VHF and GPS receivers which continually measure scintillation in the equatorial region. In the past few years, the extended network of ground stations has expanded into the African sector. Initial results from yearly scintillation data obtained from two VHF receivers in Narobi, Kenya and Bahir Dar, Ethiopia in 2011 indicate the presence of scintillation activity throughout the June-July -August (northern summer) season which is inconsistent with current state-of-the-art ionospheric climatology models. It is well known that seasonal equatorial scintillation patterns vary with longitude based on geographical location. For example, the scintillation activity at VHF frequencies are absent in the Pacific sector during the months of November to February while observations from South America show nearly continuous scintillation during this same time period. With little to no ground-based observations, the scintillation climatology over the African region has not been well understood. In the paper, we will present S4 measurements various longitudinal sectors, including the first look at solar maximum type conditions over the African sector, and provide comparisons with output from a global climatology model.

  17. The transport of photons through short light guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell; Gisel Olave, Rocio; Cole, Philip L.

    2000-10-01

    We have designed and optimized the light collection from a set of light guides, which couple the scintillator to the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of an instrumented collimator, which was designed and built by the University of Texas at El Paso and the Institut de Physique Nucléaire at Orsay. This collimator will be used with the experiments employing a beam of linearly-polarized photons in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in the spring of 2001 (E94-109, E98-109, and E99-013). Using the Monte-Carlo simulation package, Guidem V1.0, we were able to simulate a scintillator-light guide-PMT construction. The scintillators were simulated to emit photons isotropically throughout the whole volume of the scintillator. Parameters varied in the simulation were: radius of curvature of the bend, wrapping reflectivities, attenuation length, ripple angle (smoothness of the light guide surface), metal crumple angle (crumple of the aluminum wrapping), and the optical glue interfaces. Also investigated were the indices of refraction for the scintillator-light guide interface as well as the light guide-PMT interface. Given a bent geometry, our studies concluded that a curved elbow shape, 6 cm in length, with a radius of curvature of at least 1.4 cm, will produce a transmission efficiency between 54-55% with reference to the total light created in the scintillator. These light guides should have a ripple angle between 0 and 3 degrees, and have a PMT index of refraction between 1.3 and 1.5. The light guide should be wrapped in aluminum and the scintillator should be wrapped a paper with reflectivity around 0.1 to prevent smudging of the plastic.

  18. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  19. Scintillations of partially coherent Laguerre Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüceer, M.; Eyyuboğlu, H. T.; Lukin, I. P.

    2010-12-01

    Scintillations of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams for weak atmospheric turbulence conditions are derived for on-axis receiver positions by using Huygens-Fresnel (HF) method in semi-analytic fashion. Numerical evaluations indicate that at the fully coherent limit, higher values of radial mode numbers will give rise to more scintillations, at medium and low partial coherence levels, particularly at longer propagation distances, scintillations will fall against rises in radial mode numbers. At small source sizes, the scintillations of LG beams having full coherence will initially rise, reaching saturation at large source sizes. For LG beams with low partial coherence levels, a steady fall toward the larger source sizes is observed. Partially coherent beams of medium levels generally exhibit a rising trend toward the large source sizes, also changing the respective positions of the related curves. Beams of low coherence levels will be less affected by the variations in the refractive index structure constant.

  20. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  1. Current status on plastic scintillators modifications.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien

    2014-11-24

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from 2000 to March 2014, distributed in two different chapters. First chapter deals with the chemical modifications of the polymer backbone, whereas modifications of the fluorescent probe are presented in the second chapter. All examples are provided with the scope of detection of various radiation particles. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. PMID:25335882

  2. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  3. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  4. GNSS station characterisation for ionospheric scintillation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Vincenzo; Spogli, Luca; Aquino, Marcio; Dodson, Alan; Hancock, Craig; Forte, Biagio

    2013-10-01

    Ionospheric scintillations are fluctuations in the phase and amplitude of the signals from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) occurring when they cross regions of electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Such disturbances can cause serious degradation of several aspects of GNSS system performance, including integrity, accuracy and availability. The two indices adopted worldwide to characterise ionospheric scintillations are: the amplitude scintillation index, S4, which is the standard deviation of the received power normalised by its mean value, and the phase scintillation index, σΦ, which is the standard deviation of the de-trended carrier phase. Collaborative work between NGI and INGV supports a permanent network of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor) receivers that covers a wide range of latitudes in the northern European sector. Data from this network has contributed significantly to several papers during the past few years (see e.g. De Franceschi et al., 2008; Aquino et al., 2009; Spogli et al., 2009, 2010; Alfonsi et al., 2011). In these investigations multipath effects and noise that contaminate the scintillation measurements are largely filtered by applying an elevation angle threshold. A deeper analysis of the data quality and the development of a more complex filtering technique can improve the results obtained so far. The structures in the environment of each receiver in the network which contaminate scintillation measurements should be identified in order to improve the quality of the scintillation and TEC data by removing error sources due to the local environment. The analysis in this paper considers a data set characterised by quiet ionospheric conditions of the mid-latitude station located in Nottingham (UK), followed by a case study of the severe geomagnetic storm, which occurred in late 2003, known generally as the "Halloween Storm".

  5. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  6. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  7. Ionospheric scintillation effects on single frequency GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C. G.; Groves, K. M.

    2008-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active within, although not limited to, a belt encircling the Earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increase, so does the potential for degraded precision and availability from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning 7 years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/American longitudinal sector as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K. in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at 1 min resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  8. Design considerations for a scintillating plate calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Job, P. K.; Price, L. E.; Proudfoot, J.; Handler, T.; Gabriel, T. A.

    1992-06-01

    Results of the simulation studies for the design of a scintillating plate calorimeter for an SSC detector are presented. These simulation studies have been carried out with the CALOR89 code. The results show that both lead and uranium can yield good compensation in practical sampling geometries. However, the significant delayed energy release in the uranium systems can lead to a serious pile up problem at high rates. In the energy range under consideration, an iron-scintillator system is not compensating at any absorber to scintillator ratio. An inhomogeneous calorimeter with 4γ of lead-scintillator in a compensating configuration followed by 4γ of iron-scintillator with moderate sampling is found to perform as well as a homogeneous lead-scintillator compensating calorimeter. In such inhomogeneous systems the hadronic signal from different segments are weighted by a scheme based on minimum ionizing d E/d X. We show that, in a properly optimised three segment, compensation and good hadronic resolution can be achieved by appropriately weighting the signal from the segments.

  9. Scattering height estimation using scintillating Wide Area Augmentation System/Satellite Based Augmentation System and GPS satellite signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerruti, A. P.; Ledvina, B. M.; Kintner, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    An experiment to measure equatorial amplitude scintillations on the geostationary Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) signal was conducted in Cachoeira Paulista (22.70°S, 45.01°W geographic coordinates; -17.74°N, 21.74°E geomagnetic coordinates), Brazil from December 2003 through February 2004. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the scattering height of the irregularities using the WAAS signal scintillations as compared to nearby Global Positioning System (GPS) signal scintillations. Estimating the scattering height is important because the calculated zonal drift velocity of the irregularities using the measured scintillation pattern velocity on the ground is height dependent. Accurate height estimation is also required if one wishes to develop phase screen scintillation models. The difference in the pattern velocities is due to the different signal puncture point velocities with respect to the ionospheric drift. Two east-west receivers are used to measure the scintillation pattern drift velocity and to compare the results of the geostationary WAAS satellite signal to that of a GPS satellite signal, which has a nonzero ionospheric signal puncture point velocity. By varying the assumed scattering height for the measurements from the nearby GPS signal, the zonal velocity measurements from the GPS scintillations can be matched to those of the WAAS scintillations, and a scattering height estimate can be made. When the puncture points have minimal separation, the inferred ionospheric irregularity zonal velocities should be equal. On the two nights for which data are available, scattering height estimates of 669 ± 209 km for the first night and 388 ± 139 km for the second night were obtained. On the second night, the reported mean hmF2 as calculated using a collocated Digisonde was 385 ± 17 km over the same period as the GPS/WAAS scattering height estimate. The geometry of this experiment was not optimal, but

  10. Ionosphere scintillations associated with features of equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of radio beacons aboard the ATS-6 satellite on 40 MHz, 140 MHz and 360 MHz recorded during the ATS-6 phase II at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for scintillation activity. Only sporadic E events, other than Es-q, Es-c or normal E are found to be associated with intense daytime scintillations. Scintillations are also observed during night Es conditions. The amplitude spread is associated with strong scintillations on all frequencies while frequency spread causes weaker scintillations and that mainly at 40 MHz.

  11. Scintillation gamma spectrometer for analysis of hydraulic fracturing waste products.

    PubMed

    Ying, Leong; O'Connor, Frank; Stolz, John F

    2015-01-01

    Flowback and produced wastewaters from unconventional hydraulic fracturing during oil and gas explorations typically brings to the surface Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), predominantly radioisotopes from the U238 and Th232 decay chains. Traditionally, radiological sampling are performed by sending collected small samples for laboratory tests either by radiochemical analysis or measurements by a high-resolution High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. One of the main isotopes of concern is Ra226 which requires an extended 21-days quantification period to allow for full secular equilibrium to be established for the alpha counting of its progeny daughter Rn222. Field trials of a sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector offers a more economic solution for rapid screenings of radiological samples. To achieve the quantification accuracy, this gamma spectrometer must be efficiency calibrated with known standard sources prior to field deployments to analyze the radioactivity concentrations in hydraulic fracturing waste products. PMID:25734826

  12. [Chemical databases and virtual screening].

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier; Bonnet, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    A prerequisite to any virtual screening is the definition of compound libraries to be screened. As we describe here, various sources are available. The selection of the proper library is usually project-dependent but at least as important as the screening method itself. This review details the main compound libraries that are available for virtual screening and guide the reader to the best possible selection according to its needs. PMID:25537046

  13. Radar detection during scintillation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Knepp, D.L.; Reinking, J.T.

    1990-04-01

    Electromagnetic signals that propagate through a disturbed region of the ionosphere can experience scattering which can cause fluctuations in the received amplitude, phase, and angle-of-arrival. This report considers the performance of a radar that must operate through a disturbed propagation environment such as might occur during strong equatorial scintillation, during a barium release experiment or after a high altitude nuclear detonation. The severity of the channel disturbance is taken to range from weak scattering where the signal quadrature components are uncorrelated Gaussian variates. The detection performance of noncoherent combining is compared to that of double threshold (M out of N) combining under various levels of scintillation disturbance. Results are given for detection sensitivity as a function of the scintillation index and the ratio of the radar hopping bandwidth to the channel bandwidth. It is shown that both types of combining can provide mitigation of fading, and that noncoherent combining generally enjoys an advantage in detection sensitivity of about 2 dB. This work serves as a quantitative guideline to the advantages and disadvantages of certain types of detection strategies during scintillation and is, therefore, useful in the radar design process. However, a detailed simulation of the radar detection algorithms is necessary to evaluate a radar design strategy to predict performance under scintillation conditions.

  14. Thallium bromide photodetectors for scintillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Muroi, O.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.; Ishibashi, H.; Ishii, M.

    2000-07-01

    A wide bandgap compound semiconductor, TlBr, has been investigated as a blue sensitive photodetector material for scintillation detection. The TlBr photodetectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals grown by the TMZ method using materials purified by many pass zone refining. The performance of the photodetectors has been evaluated by measuring their leakage current, quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity, direct X-ray detection and scintillation detection characteristics. The photodetectors have shown high quantum efficiency for the blue wavelength region and high spatial uniformity for their optical response. In addition, good direct X-ray detection characteristics with an energy resolution of 4.5 keV FWHM for 22 keV X-rays from a 109Cd radioactive source have been obtained. Detection of blue scintillation from GSO and LSO scintillators irradiated with a 22Na radioactive source has been done successfully by using the photodetectors at room temperature. A clear full-energy peak for 511 keV γ-rays has been obtained with the TlBr photodetector coupled to the LSO scintillator with an energy resolution of 40% FWHM.

  15. Efficiency and timing resolution of scintillator tiles read out with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooth, O.; Weingarten, S.; Weinstock, L.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are semiconductor photo sensors that have the potential to replace photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in various fields of application. We present detectors consisting of 30 × 30 × 0.5 cm3 fast plastic scintillator tiles read out with SiPMs. The detectors offer great electronic and mechanical advantages over the classical PMT-scintillator combination. SiPMs are very compact devices that run independent of magnetic fields at low voltages and no light guides between the scintillator and the SiPM are necessary in the presented layouts. Three prototypes, two of which with integrated wavelength shifting fibres, have been tested in a proton beam at the COSY accelerator at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The different layouts are compared in terms of most probable pulse height, detection efficiency and noise behaviour as well as timing resolution. The spatial distributions of these properties across the scintillator surface are presented. The best layout can be operated at a mean efficiency of bar epsilon=99.9 % while sustaining low noise rates in the order of 10 Hz with a timing resolution of less than 3 ns. Both efficiency and timing resolution show good spatial homogeneity.

  16. Equatorial scintillation model. Technical report, 1 February 1983-30 April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.; Robins, R.E.

    1985-09-30

    Radiowave scintillation in the presence of natural and/or high-altitude nuclear disturbances has the potential to disrupt numerous transionospheric radio and radar systems. This report develops a model characterizing the plasma-density irregularities that produce scintillation in the naturally disturbed equatorial F layer. The model is incorporated into Program WBMOD along with subroutines for computing both link geometry and scintillation indices, the latter by means of phase screen diffraction theory. The model is based on similarly extensive analysis of wideband data from two equatorial stations. It describes irregularities at an effective height of 350 km that are isotropic across the geomagnetic field and elongated by a factor of 50 along the field and whose one-dimensional spatial power spectrum obeys a single-regime power law with a (negative) spectral index of 1.5. The height-integrated spectral strength of the irregularities is modeled as a function of solar epoch (sunspot number), the angle between the sunset terminator and the geomagnetic field line through the equatorial F layer point in question (a measure of seasonal and longitudinal variation), time after E-layer sunset on that field line, and the F-layer magnetic apex latitude of the point. The report also highlights a factor missing from complete characterization of the joint seasonal/longitudinal variation of scintillation, thought to depend upon thermospheric neutral winds.

  17. Mid-latitude scintillation model. Technical report, 1 November 1985-31 October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, R.E.; Secan, J.A.; Fremouw, E.J.

    1986-10-31

    Radiowave scintillation in the presence of ionospheric disturbances has the potential to disrupt numerous transionospheric radio and radar systems. This report describes development of a model characterizing the plasma density irregularities that produce scintillation in the naturally disturbed mid-latitude F layer. The model will be incorporated into Program WBMOD, which includes subroutines for computing both link geometry and scintillation indices, the latter by means of phase screen diffraction theory. Earlier versions of WBMOD, were based on extensive analysis of scintillation data collected in the auroral and equatorial zones in Wideband Satellite Mission. The model described herein is based on similarly extensive analysis of Wideband data from one mid latitude station and of data collected from HiLat satellite at another mid latitude station. The model describes irregularities at an effective height of 350 km that are isotropic across the geomagnetic field and elongated by a factor of 10 along the field and whose one-dimensional spatial power spectrum obeys a single regime power law with a (negative) spectral index of 1.5. The height-integrated spectral strength of the irregularities is modeled as a function apex latitude of the point. The report highlights a disagreement by a factor of approximately three between irregularity strength inferred from the two satellites in a region of overlap between the two mid-latitude stations.

  18. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  19. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Goulding, Frederick S.; Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  20. Testing Gravity Using Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-03-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 104 ~105 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. The self-noise from pulsar also does not affect the interference pattern, where the data acquisition timescale is 103 seconds instead of years. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background and measuring gravitational-wave speed, in which cases the sensitivities are greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  1. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  2. New Efficient Organic Scintillators Derived from Pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Valery N; Seliman, Ayman F; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; DeVol, Timothy A

    2016-05-25

    We report on the synthesis, spectroscopic and scintillation properties of three new pyrazoline core based fluorophores. Fluorescence properties of the fluorophores have been studied both in a solution state and in a solid polyvinyltoluene (PVT) resin matrix of different porosity. The synthesized fluorophores were found to be promising candidates for application in plastic scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta particles, γ rays and neutrons) and demonstrated superior efficiency in comparison to the existing commercially used fluorophores (2-(1-naphthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (αNPO), 9,10-diphenylanthracene, etc.). Moreover, the suggested synthetic route allows functionalization of the fluorophores with a vinyl group for further covalent bound to the PVT or other vinyl polymer matrices, which dramatically improves chemical stability of the system simultaneously improving the photoluminescence quantum yield. Possible mechanisms of the enhanced scintillation properties are discussed based on preliminary quantum mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of the fluorophores under study. PMID:27163887

  3. Refractive scintillation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Codona, J. L.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1987-04-01

    The slow variation in the apparent intensity of pulsars on time scales of days to months was recently shown to be due to a large-scale component of interstellar scintillation (Rickett, Coles, and Bourgois). These variations are greater than one would expect if the turbulence spectrum were a simple Kolmogorov power law. It is shown that this large-scale component can be greatly enhanced when the turbulence spectrum has a limiting "inner scale" of the order of 109m. The authors present a solution for the covariance of refractive scintillation of an extended source in an extended medium. The results show that refractive scintillations are also responsible for slow variations in "low-frequency variables".

  4. On the scintillation efficiency of carborane-loaded liquid scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Okoye, Nkemakonam C.; Urffer, Matthew J.; Green, Alexander D.; Childs, Kyle E.; Miller, Laurence F.

    2015-01-01

    The scintillation efficiency in response to thermal neutrons was studied by loading different concentrations of carborane (0-8.5 wt%) and naphthalene (0 and 100 g/L) in five liquid organic scintillators. The sample was characterized in Pb and Cd shields under the irradiation of the thermal neutrons from a 252Cf source. A method was developed to extract the net neutron response from the pulse-height spectra. It was found that the order of scintillation efficiencies for both γ-rays and thermal neutrons is as follows: diisopropylnaphthalene>toluene (concentrated solutes)>toluene~pseudocumene~m-xylene. The quench constants, obtained by fitting the Stern-Volmer model to the plots of light output versus carborane concentration, are in the range of 0.35-1.4 M-1 for all the scintillators. The Birks factors, estimated using the specific energy loss profiles of the incident particles, are in the range of 9.3-14 mg cm-2 MeV-1 for all the samples. The light outputs are in the range of 63-86 keV electron equivalents (keVee) in response to thermal neutrons. Loading naphthalene generally promotes the scintillation efficiency of the scintillator with a benzene derivative solvent. Among all the scintillators tested, the diisopropylnaphthalene-based scintillator shows the highest scintillation efficiency, lowest Birks factor, and smallest quench constants. These properties are primarily attributed to the double fused benzene-ring structure of the solvent, which is more efficient to populate to the excited singlet state under ionizing radiation and to transfer the excitation energy to the fluorescent solutes.

  5. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  6. The evolution of scintillating medical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.; Mattern, D.

    2000-11-01

    The principle of scintillation detectors has been among the first realizations of radiation detectors. Despite ongoing attempts to switch to direct converting detectors, scintillators have shown great persistence in the field of medical imaging. In radiography, computer tomography and nuclear medicine, a variety of scintillating devices are the 'workhorses' of the clinician today. For radiography, flat X-ray detectors (FDs) with evaporated scintillation layers are at the level of product introduction. However, X-ray image intensifier tubes (XIIs) are competitive and still have features that will be hard to beat in the near future. Although XIIs have disadvantages, they have experienced a significant evolution in robust image quality and cost reduction over the decades. The so-called 'offline' detectors from film to storage phosphors seemed to have reached a plateau since the late 1970s. However, the distinction between on- and offline may soften in the future, because of new readout concepts. Detectors in computer tomography (CT) have evolved from scintillators to gaseous direct converters back to scintillators. Extreme timing requirements and detector modularity have ruled out designs that would rank as `high performance' in other fields. Modern ultra-fast ceramic scintillation detectors are a prerequisite of subsecond CT and leave breathing room for future scan times even below 0.5 s. The field of nuclear medicine is a good example of how difficult it is, to replace a cheap and reliable technology. Since many years, direct converters like CdTe and the likes are discussed to overthrow the regime of NaI:Tl in combination with photomultipliers (PMTs). Both components are well known since the 1950s and have shown remarkable staying power. Still the scintillator with the highest light output, NaI:Tl in combination with the basically noiseless PMT is almost unbeatable in low cost. In combination with modern digital electronics, drawbacks of analog circuitry like

  7. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  8. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  9. New Structured Scintillators for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, V. V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Bhandari, H. B.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; More, M. J.; Riedel, R. A.; Miller, S. R.

    We report on the development of novel neutron scintillators fabricated in microcolumnar formats using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. Such structures mitigate the conventional trade-off between spatial resolution and detection efficiency by channelling the scintillation light towards the detector while minimizing lateral spread in the film. Consequently, high resolution and high contrast neutron images can be acquired in a time efficient manner. In this paper, we discuss methods and characterization for scintillator films made from three distinct compositions, Thallium (Tl) or Europium (Eu) doped Lithium CesiumIodide (Li3Cs2I5:Tl,Eu, referred to as LCI), Tl or Eudoped Lithium Sodium Iodide (LixNa1-xI:Tl,Eu, referred to as LNI), and Cerium (Ce)-doped Gadolinium Iodide (GdI3:Ce, referred to as GDI). LCI and LNI scintillators are derived from the well-known CsI and NaI scintillators by the incorporation of 6Li into their lattice. Based on our measurements reported here, LCI/LNI scintillators have shown to exhibit bright emissions, fast, sub-microsecond decay, and an ability to effectively discriminate between neutron and gamma interactions using pulse shape (PSD) and/or pulse height (PHD) discrimination. LCI has a density of 4.5 g/cm3, a measured peak emission wavelength of 460 nm (doped with Eu), and a light yield of ∼50,000 photons/thermal neutron. LNI has a density of 3.6 g/cm3, an emission peak measured at 420 nm, and a light yield of ∼100,000 photons/thermal neutron. The recently discovered GDI exhibits excellent scintillation properties including a bright emission of up to 5,000 photons/thermal neutron interaction, 550 nm green emission, a rise time of ∼0.5 ns and a primary decay time of ∼38 ns (Glodo et al., 2006). Its high thermal neutron cross-section of ∼255 kb makes it an attractive candidate for neutron detection and imaging. Although it has high density of 5.2 gm/cm3 and effective atomic number of 57, its gamma sensitivity can be

  10. Simulation of optical configurations and signal processing methods in Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, C.T.; Strauss, M.G.; Brenner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial linearity and resolution of Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detectors are studied using a semi-empirical model. Detector optics with either an air gap or optical grease between the scintillator and the dispersive light guide are considered. Three signal processing methods which truncate signals from PMT's distant from the scintillation are compared with the linear resistive weighting method. Air gap optics yields a 15% improvement in spatial resolution and 50% reduction in differential and integral nonlinearity relative to grease coupled optics, using linear processing. Using signal truncation instead of linear processing improves the resolution 15-20% for the air gap and 20-30% for the grease coupling case. Thus, the initial discrepancy in the resolution between the two optics nearly vanished, however the linearity of the grease coupled system is still significantly poorer.

  11. Simulation of optical configurations and signal processing methods in Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, C. T.; Strauss, M. G.; Brenner, R.

    The spatial linearity and resolution of Anger type neutron position scintillation detectors were studied as a semi-empirical model. Detector optics with either an air gap or optical grease between the scintillator and the dispersive light guide are considered. Three signal processing methods which truncate signals from PMT's distant from the scintillation are compared with the linear resistive weighting method. Air gap optics yields a 15% improvement in spatial resolution and 50% reduction in differential and integral nonlinearity relative to grease coupled optics, using linear processing. Using signal truncation instead of linear processing improves the resolution 15% to 20% for the air gap and 20% to 30% for the grease coupling case. The initial discrepancy in the resolution between the two optics nearly vanished, however, the linearity of the grease coupled system is still significantly poorer.

  12. Combination of preparative HPLC and HSCCC methods to separate phosphodiesterase inhibitors from Eucommia ulmoides bark guided by ultrafiltration-based ligand screening.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shu-Yun; Peng, Mi-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are widely used because of their various pharmacological properties, and natural products are considered the most productive source of PDE inhibitors. In this work, a new ultrafiltration-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode-array detection-mass spectrometry based ligand screening was developed for the first screening of PDE inhibitors from Eucommia ulmoides bark, and then the target bioactive compounds were prepared by combination of stepwise preparative HPLC and high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) methods. Experiments were conducted to optimize the parameters in ultrafiltration, stepwise preparative HPLC, and HSCCC to allow rapid and effective screening and isolation of active compounds from complex mixtures. Seven lignans with purity over 97 % were isolated and identified by their UV, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and NMR data as (+)-pinoresinol-4,4'-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), (+)-pinoresinol-4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), (+)-medioresinol-4,4'-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), (+)-syringaresinol-4,4'-di-O- β-D-glucopyranoside (4), (-)-olivil-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), (-)-olivil-4-O-β-D- glucopyranoside (6), and (+)-pinoresinol-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7). Compound 2 was first isolated from the genus Eucommia. Lignan diglucopyranosides (compounds 1-4) shower a greater inhibitory effect than lignan monoglucopyranosides (compounds 5-7). The method developed could be widely applied for high-throughput screening and preparative isolation of PDE inhibitors from natural products.

  13. New liquid scintillators for fiber-optic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S.S.; Franks, L.A.; Flournoy, J.M.; Lyons, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    New long-wavelength-emitting, high-speed, liquid scintillators have been developed and tailored specifically for plasma diagnostic experiments employing fiber optics. These scintillators offer significant advantages over commercially available plastic scintillators in terms of sensitivity and bandwidth. FWHM response times as fast as 350 ps have been measured. Emission spectra, time response data, and relative sensitivity information are presented.

  14. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  15. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  16. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  17. Monte Carlo investigations of the effect of beam divergence on thick, segmented crystalline scintillators for radiotherapy imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua

    2010-01-01

    The use of thick segmented scintillators in electronic portal imagers offers the potential for significant improvement in x-ray detection efficiency compared to conventional phosphor screens. Such improvement substantially increases the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), leading to the possibility of achieving soft-tissue visualization at clinically-practical (i.e. low) doses using megavoltage (MV) cone-beam computed tomography. While these DQE increases are greatest at zero spatial frequency, they are diminished at higher frequencies as a result of degradation of spatial resolution due to lateral spreading of secondary radiation within the scintillator – an effect that is more pronounced for thicker scintillators. The extent of this spreading is even more accentuated for radiation impinging the scintillator at oblique angles of incidence due to beam divergence. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport, performed to investigate and quantify the effects of beam divergence on the imaging performance of MV imagers based on two promising scintillators (BGO and CsI:T1), are reported. In these studies, 10 – 40 mm thick scintillators, incorporating low-density polymer, or high-density tungsten septal walls were examined for incident angles corresponding to that encountered at locations up to ~15 cm from the central beam axis (for an imager located 130 cm from a radiotherapy x-ray source). The simulations demonstrate progressively more severe spatial resolution degradation (quantified in terms of the effect on modulation transfer function) as a function of increasing angle of incidence (as well as of scintillator thickness). Since the noise power behavior was found to be largely independent of incident angle, the dependence of the DQE on incident angle is therefore primarily determined by the spatial resolution. The observed DQE degradation suggests that 10 mm thick scintillators are not strongly affected by beam divergence for detector areas up

  18. Optimization of the design of thick, segmented scintillators for megavoltage cone-beam CT using a novel, hybrid modeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Langechuan; Antonuk, Larry E. El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) incorporating thick, segmented scintillators have demonstrated order-of-magnitude improvements in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at radiotherapy energies compared to systems based on conventional phosphor screens. Such improved DQE values facilitate megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) imaging at clinically practical doses. However, the MV CBCT performance of such AMFPIs is highly dependent on the design parameters of the scintillators. In this paper, optimization of the design of segmented scintillators was explored using a hybrid modeling technique which encompasses both radiation and optical effects. Methods: Imaging performance in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of various hypothetical scintillator designs was examined through a hybrid technique involving Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in combination with simulation of optical gain distributions and optical point spread functions. The optical simulations employed optical parameters extracted from a best fit to measurement results reported in a previous investigation of a 1.13 cm thick, 1016μm pitch prototype BGO segmented scintillator. All hypothetical designs employed BGO material with a thickness and element-to-element pitch ranging from 0.5 to 6 cm and from 0.508 to 1.524 mm, respectively. In the CNR study, for each design, full tomographic scans of a contrast phantom incorporating various soft-tissue inserts were simulated at a total dose of 4 cGy. Results: Theoretical values for contrast, noise, and CNR were found to be in close agreement with empirical results from the BGO prototype, strongly supporting the validity of the modeling technique. CNR and spatial resolution for the various scintillator designs demonstrate complex behavior as scintillator thickness and element pitch are varied—with a clear trade-off between these two imaging metrics up to a thickness of ∼3 cm. Based on these results, an

  19. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  20. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  1. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22°C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence. PMID:23574889

  2. Ionospheric scintillations associated with equatorial E-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations at 40, 140, and 360 MHz recorded at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) during the ATS-6 phase II and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for the scintillation activity. Various sporadic E events, but not the Es-q, are associated with intense daytime scintillations. There are no scintillations at times of normal E-layer or cusp type of Es. Scintillations are also present at times of night Es.

  3. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  4. Speeding up directed evolution: Combining the advantages of solid-phase combinatorial gene synthesis with statistically guided reduction of screening effort.

    PubMed

    Hoebenreich, Sabrina; Zilly, Felipe E; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Zilly, Matías; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-03-20

    Efficient and economic methods in directed evolution at the protein, metabolic, and genome level are needed for biocatalyst development and the success of synthetic biology. In contrast to random strategies, semirational approaches such as saturation mutagenesis explore the sequence space in a focused manner. Although several combinatorial libraries based on saturation mutagenesis have been reported using solid-phase gene synthesis, direct comparison with traditional PCR-based methods is currently lacking. In this work, we compare combinatorial protein libraries created in-house via PCR versus those generated by commercial solid-phase gene synthesis. Using descriptive statistics and probabilistic distributions on amino acid occurrence frequencies, the quality of the libraries was assessed and compared, revealing that the outsourced libraries are characterized by less bias and outliers than the PCR-based ones. Afterward, we screened all libraries following a traditional algorithm for almost complete library coverage and compared this approach with an emergent statistical concept suggesting screening a lower portion of the protein sequence space. Upon analyzing the biocatalytic landscapes and best hits of all combinatorial libraries, we show that the screening effort could have been reduced in all cases by more than 50%, while still finding at least one of the best mutants. PMID:24921161

  5. Virtual screening workflow development guided by the "receiver operating characteristic" curve approach. Application to high-throughput docking on metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4.

    PubMed

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Acher, Francine; Brabet, Isabelle; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier

    2005-04-01

    The "receiver operating characteristic" (ROC) curve method is a well-recognized metric used as an objective way to evaluate the ability of a given test to discriminate between two populations. This facilitates decision-making in a plethora of fields in which a wrong judgment may have serious consequences including clinical diagnosis, public safety, travel security, and economic strategies. When virtual screening is used to speed-up the drug discovery process in pharmaceutical research, taking the right decision upon selecting or discarding a molecule prior to in vitro evaluation is of paramount importance. Characterizing both the ability of a virtual screening workflow to select active molecules and the ability to discard inactive ones, the ROC curve approach is well suited for this critical decision gate. As a case study, the first virtual screening workflow focused on metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4R) agonists is reported here. Six compounds out of 38 selected and tested in vitro were shown to have agonist activity on this target of therapeutic interest.

  6. Outward atmospheric scintillation effects and inward atmospheric scintillation effects comparisons for direct detection ladar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces intensity modulation or "scintillation" effects on both on the outward laser-mode path and on the return backscattered radiation path. These both degrade laser radar (ladar) target acquisition, ranging, imaging, and feature estimation. However, the finite sized objects create scintillation averaging on the outgoing path and the finite sized telescope apertures produce scintillation averaging on the return path. We expand on previous papers going to moderate to strong turbulence cases by starting from a 20kft altitude platform and propagating at 0° elevation (with respect to the local vertical) for 100km range to a 1 m diameter diffuse sphere. The outward scintillation and inward scintillation effects, as measured at the focal plane detector array of the receiving aperture, will be compared. To eliminate hard-body surface speckle effects in order to study scintillation, Goodman's M-parameter is set to 106 in the analytical equations and the non-coherent imaging algorithm is employed in Monte Carlo realizations. The analytical equations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRp), or mean squared signal over a variance, for a given focal plane array pixel window of interest will be summarized and compared to Monte Carlo realizations of a 1m diffuse sphere.

  7. Cross beam scintillations in non-Kolmogorov medium.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Yahya

    2014-10-01

    For the collimated and focused cross beams, the on-axis scintillation index is evaluated when these beams propagate in weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence. In the limiting cases, our solution correctly reduces to the known Gaussian beam scintillations in Kolmogorov turbulence. For both the collimated and the focused cross beams, large power law exponent of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence is found to result in larger scintillations. Evaluating at a fixed power law exponent, the scintillation index of the collimated (focused) cross beam is higher (lower) than the collimated (focused) Gaussian beam scintillation index. When the asymmetry of the collimated (focused) cross beam increases, the scintillations increase (decrease). At a given cross beam configuration, change in the turbulence parameters varies the scintillations in the same manner for all power law exponent values.

  8. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  9. Characterizing energy dependence and count rate performance of a dual scintillator fiber-optic detector for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, Matthew R. Stepusin, Elliott J.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Kilovoltage (kV) x-rays pose a significant challenge for radiation dosimetry. In the kV energy range, even small differences in material composition can result in significant variations in the absorbed energy between soft tissue and the detector. In addition, the use of electronic systems in light detection has demonstrated measurement losses at high photon fluence rates incident to the detector. This study investigated the feasibility of using a novel dual scintillator detector and whether its response to changes in beam energy from scatter and hardening is readily quantified. The detector incorporates a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, which has a higher sensitivity to scatter x-rays. Methods: The detector was constructed by coupling two scintillators: (1) small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 μm in diameter and 2 mm in length, and (2) 100 micron sheet of gadolinium oxysulfide 500 μm in diameter, each to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube. Count rate linearity data were obtained from a wide range of exposure rates delivered from a radiological x-ray tube by adjusting the tube current. The data were fitted to a nonparalyzable dead time model to characterize the time response. The true counting rate was related to the reference free air dose air rate measured with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Radcal{sup ®} thimble chamber as described in AAPM Report No. 111. Secondary electron and photon spectra were evaluated using Monte Carlo techniques to analyze ionization quenching and photon energy-absorption characteristics from free-in-air and in phantom measurements. The depth/energy dependence of the detector was characterized using a computed tomography dose index QA phantom consisting of nested adult head and body segments. The phantom provided up to 32 cm of acrylic with a compatible 0.6 cm{sup 3} calibrated

  10. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  11. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  12. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  13. Application of the Strong Scatter Theory to the Interpretation of Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements along Geostationary Satellite Links at VHF and L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Basu, S.; Mackenzie, E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that ionospheric turbulence parameters may be inferred from amplitude scintillations well into in the strong scatter regime [Carrano et al., International Journal of Geophysics, 2012]. This technique, called Iterative Parameter Estimation (IPE), uses the strong scatter theory and numerical inversion to estimate the parameters of an ionospheric phase screen (turbulent intensity, phase spectral index, and irregularity zonal drift) consistent with the observed scintillations. The optimal screen parameters are determined such that the theoretical intensity spectrum on the ground best matches the measured intensity spectrum in a least squares sense. We use this technique to interpret scintillation measurements collected during a campaign at Ascension Island (7.96°S, 14.41°W) in March 2000, led by Santimay Basu and his collaborators from Air Force Research Laboratory. Geostationary satellites broadcasting radio signals at VHF and L-band were monitored along nearly co-linear links, enabling a multi-frequency analysis of scintillations with the same propagation geometry. The VHF data were acquired using antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction, which enabled direct measurement of the zonal irregularity drift. We show that IPE analysis of the VHF and L-Band scintillations, which exhibited very different statistics due to the wide frequency separation, yields similar estimates of the phase screen parameters that specify the disturbed ionospheric medium. This agreement provides confidence in our phase screen parameter estimates. It also suggests a technique for extrapolating scintillation measurements to frequencies other than those observed that is valid in the case of strong scatter. We find that IPE estimates of the zonal irregularity drift, made using scintillation observations along single space-to-ground link, are consistent with those measured independently using the spaced antenna technique. This encouraging result

  14. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, atmore » least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.« less

  15. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the

  16. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-06-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles-so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  17. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  18. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  19. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  20. Fast scintillation counter system and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, H.; Nishioka, A.; Ohmori, N.; Kusumose, M.; Nakatsuka, T.; Horiki, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of the fast scintillation counter (FS) system to observe a shower disk structure at Mt. Norikura is described, especially the system performance and a pulse wave-form by a single charge particles. The photomultiplier tube (PT) pulse appears at the leading edge of the main pulse. To remove this PT-pulse from the main pulse, the frame of the scintillator vessel was changed. The fast triggering system was made to decrease the dead time which came from the use of the function of the self triggering of the storage oscilloscope (OSC). To provide a new field on the multi-parameter study of the cosmic ray showers, the system response of the FS system also improved as a result of many considerations.

  1. Internet access to data for scintillation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; West, A.C.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    The LBL Pulsed X-Ray Facility has scintillation data on a large variety of inorganic scintillators. We offer this information on all compounds that we have tested. The only restrictions/favors that we ask users of this data are: (1) The data is intended for research use and may not be sold; (2) If any portion of the data is used in a publication, that the following text appear somewhere in the publication: {open_quotes}This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098, and in part by Public Health Service Grant No. R01 CA48002 awarded by the National Cancer Institutes, Department of Health and Human Services.{close_quotes}.

  2. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2008-07-29

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  3. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  4. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  5. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  6. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  7. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  8. Studies of NICADD Extruded Scintillator Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dychkant, Alexandre; et al.

    2005-03-01

    About four hundred one meter long, 10 cm wide and 5 mm thick extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. The results of measurements strip responses to a radioactive source {sup 90}Sr are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. This work was essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  9. Sorohalide scintillators, phosphors, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Pin; Deng, Haoran; Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiaowang

    2016-05-10

    The present invention relates to sorohalide compounds having formula A.sub.3B.sub.2X.sub.9, where A is an alkali metal, B is a rare earth metal, and X is a halogen. Optionally, the sorohalide includes a dopant D. Such undoped and doped sorohalides are useful as scintillation materials or phosphors for any number of uses, including for radiation detectors, solid-state light sources, gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, and drilling applications.

  10. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  11. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  12. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  13. GPS scintillations over Vietnam on April 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Lucilla; Spogli, Luca; Tong, Jenna R.; de Franceschi, Giorgiana; Romano, Vincenzo; Bourdillon, Alain; Le Huy, Minh; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2010-05-01

    In Vietnam, at Hue (16.4°N, 107.6°E) and Hoc Mon (10.9°N, 106.6°E), are located two GPS receivers specially modified for recording, at a sampling rate of 50 Hz, the phase and the amplitude of the L1 signal and the Total Electron Content (TEC) from L1 and L2. In April 2006 both the receivers have observed post-sunset scintillation inhibition when moderate magnetic storms occurred. These measurements together with a 3D plus time imaging of the ionosphere produced by the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) have revealed interesting features that will be described in the present paper. In particular, the results confirm the role of the ring current on the generation of the equatorial F layer irregularities of scale size from less than a hundred meters to a few kilometers, highlighting also its important role in inhibiting scintillation during the storm. The characterization of the different conditions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) will be illustrated, as well, to attempt a description of the scintillation effects over a region scarcely investigated in the open literature.

  14. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  15. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  16. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  17. Sillicon Photomultiplier and Scintillator Bar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To analyze extraterrestrial cosmic rays via precise measurements of airshower axes directions of penetrating particles such as muons, we constructed a model detector consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is fitted with green wavelength shifting fibers to modulate input for two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the performance of these devices. Two makes of SiPMs were evaluated - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. In order to filter out noise, timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detector arrays in self-triggered mode. The DRS4 Digitizer 4-channel fast waveform sampler digitized SiPM detector waveforms. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. The speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules was found to be approximately 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  18. Interstellar Scintillation of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    1998-05-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS) causes a Galactic seeing problem for radio astronomy. Thus the flux density from a very compact radio source appears to scintillate on a time scale that ranges from days to minutes depending on the wavelength and Galactic path length. I will review the observed variations from various sources, which are among the most compact cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ISS interpretation of the observed variations yields estimates of the source sizes in the range 0.01 to 10 milliarcsec, often much smaller than the resolution from earth-based VLBI. The recognition of such variations as apparent reduces the implied brightness temperature by a factor as large as one million, compared to the extreme values deduced by interpreting the variations as intrinsic. Some such intraday variable sources also exhibit partially correlated variations in their polarized flux and angle. The changes in interstellar Faradya rotation are too slow to cause such variations by many orders of magnitude. I will report on attempts to model the polarized flux variations as due to independent ISS from polarized components with intrinsic polarization structure in the source at a level of tens of microarcseconds. I will also discuss how Frail et al. (Nature, 389, 261, 1997) used interstellar scintillation to estimate the size of the expanding fireball in the radio afterglow of gamma-ray burst 970508.

  19. Characterization of Ionospheric Scintillation Using Simultaneous Formosat-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations and AFRL SCINDA Ground Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M. J.; Lin, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Basu, S.; Syndergaard, S.; Rocken, C.

    2007-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation at low latitudes has been studied using ionospheric radio occultation (RO) measurements by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC micro-satellites in conjunction with ground-based data from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) station at Kwajalein Atoll. The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed the SCINDA network for monitoring low-latitude ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillation associated with equatorial spread F. The network currently consists of sixteen stations distributed around the globe and the data have been used to conduct numerous studies on the characteristics and climatology of equatorial scintillation. The present study focuses on COSMIC RO and SCINDA data during the three COSMIC campaigns in 2006. Radio occultation events are selected by requiring that ionospheric scintillation was detected by the SCINDA VHF scintillation monitor at Kwajalein, and that the occultation ray path intersected the Kwajalein longitude below the satellite altitude, which varied from 500 to 800 km for the six FORMOSAT-3 satellites. In order to exclude tropospheric effects, only GPS signal amplitudes from FORMOSAT-3 with ray path tangent altitudes above 100 km are considered. Locations of ionospheric scintillation are estimated by triangulation using the satellites and the SCINDA ground station. Airglow images at Kwajalein are also used to confirm occurrence of equatorial ionospheric scintillations. For the selected events, large amplitude L1 and L2 scintillations tend to occur at altitudes below 200 km at frequencies around 0.5 Hz. The results are discussed as a potential path toward better specifying the occurrence of equatorial scintillations.

  20. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.; Caton, R.

    2014-03-01

    This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF) equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity), and 2011 (moderate solar activity). In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20) min (most frequent lead times). Using several years (seasons and solar cycle) of lead (or lag) and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  1. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  2. Separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mohan; Guo, Ziyi; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-09-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay experiments. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator currently under development. In this paper we report on the separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights observed in an LAB sample. The rise and decay times of the scintillation light are measured to be (7.7 ± 3.0) ns and (36.6 ± 2.4) ns , respectively, while the full width [-3σ, 3σ] of the Cherenkov light is 12 ns and is dominated by the time resolution of the photomultiplier tubes. The scintillation light yield was measured to be (1.01 ± 0.12) ×103 photons / MeV .

  3. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Mellott, Kerry

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  4. Statistical properties of finite-bandwidth radiation scattered by random amplitude screens and random phase screens.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Kevin D; Jakeman, Eric

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the effect of finite bandwidth of the incident radiation on scattering by thin layers that introduce random phase or amplitude variations. In particular, we calculate the scintillation index of the propagating radiation for smoothly varying and fractal phase screens and for random telegraph wave and checkerboard amplitude screens. Increasing the bandwidth of the incident radiation reduces the fluctuations of the scattered intensity over the whole propagation path, except in the case of the smoothly varying phase screen, where geometrical optics features in the pattern persist in the focusing region. PMID:21068869

  5. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  6. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hetong; Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang; Guan, Xingyin

    2013-07-15

    Barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X/gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF{sub 2} has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF{sub 2} has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF{sub 2} scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands.

  7. Scintillating Quantum Dots for Imaging X-rays (SQDIX) for Aircraft Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric (Principal Investigator); Williams, Phillip (Principal Investigator); Dehaven, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Scintillation is the process currently employed by conventional x-ray detectors to create x-ray images. Scintillating quantum dots or nano-crystals (StQDs) are a novel, nanometer-scale material that upon excitation by x-rays, re-emit the absorbed energy as visible light. StQDs theoretically have higher output efficiency than conventional scintillating materials and are more environmental friendly. This paper will present the characterization of several critical elements in the use of StQDs that have been performed along a path to the use of this technology in wide spread x-ray imaging. Initial work on the SQDIX system has shown great promise to create state-of-the-art sensors using StQDs as a sensor material. In addition, this work also demonstrates a high degree of promise using StQDs in microstructured fiber optics. Using the microstructured fiber as a light guide could greatly increase the capture efficiency a StQDs based imaging sensor.

  8. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  9. Discriminated neutron and X-ray radiography using multi-color scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittoh, Koichi; Takahara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tamura, Toshiyuki

    1999-06-01

    A new conversion screen Gd 2O 2S:Eu is developed, which emits red light on irradiation by thermal neutrons. By applying this in combination with the currently used Gd 2O 2S:Tb, a green-light scintillator, in the radiography under a neutron + X-ray coexisting field, we can easily separate the neutron image and the X-ray image by simple color-image processing. This technique enables a non-destructive and detailed inspection of industrial products composed both of light elements (water, plastics, etc.) and heavy elements (metals), widening the horizon of new applications.

  10. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  11. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  12. Scintillation near the F-layer trough over Northern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S.E.; Russell, C.D.

    1990-05-03

    Results are presented of scintillation observations made during a two and a half year period at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands using more than 19000 passes of NNSS satellites. Examples of scintillation morphology, in the region near the scintillation boundary and the F-layer trough, for both amplitude and phase are discussed using exceedence levels for the S sub 4 and sigma sub psi indices respectively. The equatorwards advancement of the scintillation boundary in response to enhanced solar activity during the increasing phase of the solar cycle is shown to be a dominant feature in the observations.

  13. Chaotic behavior of ionospheric turbulence from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Ionospheric amplitude and phase scintillation data have been analyzed to estimate the information dimension associated with the attractor of the system. For weak scintillations, both amplitude and phase data yield identical results which demonstrate that spatial fluctuations of electron density in the ionosphere may be characterized by a few degrees of freedom. Stronger scintillations are attributed to steepened density irregularities which cause focusing of the incident radio wave. This results in the amplitude scintillations exhibiting higher dimensional chaos but spatial fluctuations in ionospheric density still involve low dimensional chaos.

  14. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Mume, Eskender; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-27

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  15. Phase and coherence of longitudinally separated equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the first calculation of phase and coherence of cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated VHF and L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation. The cross-wavelet analysis has utilized scintillation observations made over equatorial South America and Christmas Island. Part of the results of this study has been reported recently in the Geophysical Research Letters by Shume and Mannucci (2013). The phase and coherence analysis were employed on pairs of scintillation observations separated by longitudes thereby to develop VHF and L-band scintillation (and equatorial spread F) forecast tools west of observation sites.

  16. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  17. Composite solid-state scintillators for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung; Pawel, Michelle D.

    2006-09-12

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator for neutron detection comprising a matrix material fabricated from an inorganic sol-gel precursor solution homogeneously doped with a liquid scintillating material and a neutron absorbing material. The neutron absorbing material yields at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment when the neutron absorbing material absorbs a neutron. The composite scintillator further comprises a liquid scintillating material in a self-assembled micelle formation homogeneously doped in the matrix material through the formation of surfactant-silica composites. The scintillating material is provided to scintillate when traversed by at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment. The scintillating material is configured such that the matrix material surrounds the micelle formation of the scintillating material. The composite scintillator is fabricated and applied as a thin film on substrate surfaces, a coating on optical fibers or as a glass material.

  18. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  19. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  20. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Mume, Eskender; Jackson, Timothy W.; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  1. Measurement accuracy and Cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc

    2006-01-15

    With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques--background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal--in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm{sup 3} plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation.

  2. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as ‘the gold standard.’ However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  3. Screening for drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary mouse hepatocytes using acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin a as model compounds: an omics-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Mariman, Edwin C M

    2013-02-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as 'the gold standard.' However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development.

  4. Probing the gamma-scintillation process in semiconductor nanomaterials using ultrafast transient cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Padilha, Lazaro A.; Bae, Wan Ki; Klimov, Victor I.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2013-05-01

    Energy-resolving gamma-ray detectors are of particular interest for the detection of illicit radioactive materials at border crossings and other portals because they offer fast, contactless screening that can discriminate between dangerous and benign materials. Among detector classes, scintillators offer an intriguing balance between cost and performance, but current technologies rely on single-crystal materials that are not scalable to portal-relevant detector sizes. Thus, there is a recognized need for novel, processible, high-performance scintillating materials or composites. Composites based on semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) are of interest because of their potentially high gamma-stopping power, high emission quantum yields, and low-cost solution synthesis and processing. Yet the performance of these and other granular nanomaterials has not met expectations. We suggest that this is due to the general lack of insight into the gamma-to-photons transduction process within these inherently more complex materials, which reduces the development and refinement of candidates to simple trial-and-error. Here, we describe the development of ultrafast transient cathodoluminescence as a unique spectroscopic tool for probing the population of excited states formed within a material during scintillation, and thus determining the major sources of energy loss. Our analysis shows that in the case of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs, any efficiency loss due to previously blamed factors of low-stopping power and high reabsorptive losses are likely dwarfed by the losses attributable to efficient, non-radiative Auger recombination. We examine how we reached this conclusion, and how this insight defines the characteristics needed in the next generation of scintillating QD composites.

  5. Separation and purification of α-glucosidase inhibitors from Polygonatum odoratum by stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography combined with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography target-guided by ultrafiltration-HPLC screening.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Liang, Junsheng; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Huading; Guo, Ying; Shi, Shuyun

    2015-03-15

    Although Polygonatum odoratum has been widely used as medicinal plant and food supplement for treating diabetes, little is known regarding its bioactive components. In this study, ultrafiltration-HPLC based ligand screening was developed to screen α-glucosidase inhibitors from P. odoratum for the first time. Then bioactive components were target-guided separated by combining stepwise high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) using petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:4:0.8:4.2, v/v/v/v), (1:4:1.8:3.2, v/v/v/v) and (1:4:2.3:2.7, v/v/v/v) as solvent systems with Sephadex LH-20 chromatography eluted by MeCN-MeOH (1:1, v/v). Five phenethyl cinnamides, N-cis-feruloyloctopamine (1); N-trans-p-coumaroyloctopamine (2), N-trans-feruloyloctopamine (3), N-trans-p-coumaroyltyramine (4) and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (5), and four homoisoflavanones, (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-3-(2',4'-dihydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (6), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (7), (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6-methyl-8-methoxyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one (8); and (3R)-5,7-dihydroxyl-6,8-dimethyl-3-(4'-hydroxylbenzyl)-chroman-4-one) (9), with purity over 98.5% were purified, and their structures were identified by UV, MS, and (1)H NMR. Notably, compounds 2 and 4 were first reported in genus Polygonatum, while compound 1 was first obtained from family Liliaceae. In addition, α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of compounds 1-9 were evaluated, and compounds 2 and 4 exhibited stronger α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 2.3 and 2.7μM. The results suggested the potential medicinal use of P. odoratum, and the technology could be widely applied for rapid screening and preparative separation of a group of bioactive compounds from complex matrix.

  6. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  7. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  8. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1).

  9. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  10. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  11. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  12. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  13. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric scintillation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kangkang; Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Li, Hongke

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) L-band ionospheric scintillation produced by electron density irregularities in the ionospheric E- and F-regions, is mainly a low- and high-latitude phenomenon. In this study, the statistical behavior of GPS ionospheric scintillation over a Chinese low-latitude station Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E; dip lat: 12.8°N) has been investigated. A detailed study on the seasonal and solar activity dependence of scintillation occurrence during July 2004-December 2012 show that the amplitude scintillation pattern, with a maximum occurrence during equinox of solar maximum, agrees with plasma bubble observations by in situ satellites in this longitude. A few daytime periodic scintillation events are found during June solstice months of solar minimum. Interestingly, a significant equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation onset time is found in 2011-2012. The initiation of scintillation during September-October is on average earlier than that of March-April about 25 min. Meanwhile, the zonal drifts of irregularities estimated using two spatially separated GPS receivers over Sanya show a similar behavior during the two equinoxes, slowly decreasing from 150 m/s at post-sunset to 50 m/s near midnight. The possible mechanisms responsible for the occurrence characteristics of GPS scintillation over Sanya, and relevant aspects of the zonal drifts of the irregularities are discussed.

  14. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  15. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  16. Statistics of ionospheric scintillation occurrence over European high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid fluctuation in the amplitude and phase of transionospheric radio signals caused by small scale ionospheric plasma density irregularities is known as scintillation. Over the high latitudes, irregularities causing scintillation are associated with large scale plasma structures and scintillation occurrence is mainly enhanced during geomagnetic storms. This paper presents a statistical analysis of scintillation occurrence on GPS L1C/A signal at a high latitude station located in Bronnoysund (geographic latitude 65.5°N, geographic longitude 12.2°E; corrected geomagnetic (CGM) latitude 62.77°N), Norway, during the periods around the peaks of solar cycles 23 (2002-2003) and 24 (2011-2013). The analysis revealed that the scintillation occurrence at Bronnoysund during both the solar maximum periods maximises close to the midnight magnetic local time (MLT) sector. A higher occurrence of scintillation is observed on geomagnetically active days during both the solar maximum periods. The seasonal pattern of scintillation occurrence indicated peaks during the summer and equinoctial months. A comparison with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components By and Bz showed an association of scintillation occurrence with the southward IMF Bz conditions.

  17. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  18. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-08

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of {sup 136}Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  19. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Perasso, S.; Franco, D.; Tonazzo, A.; Consolati, G.; Hans, S.; Yeh, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.

    2013-08-08

    Pulse shape discrimination in liquid scintillator detectors is a well-established technique for the discrimination of heavy particles from light particles. Nonetheless, it is not efficient in the separation of electrons and positrons, as they give rise to indistinguishable scintillator responses. This inefficiency can be overtaken through the exploitation of the formation of ortho-Positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants currently used in neutrino experiments, Gd and Nd. Further measurements for Li-loaded and Tl-loaded liquid scintillators are foreseen. We found that the o-Ps properties are suitable for enhancing the electron-positron discrimination.

  20. Comparison of tropospheric scintillation prediction models of the Indonesian climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng Yee; Singh, Mandeep Jit

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric scintillation is a phenomenon that will cause signal degradation in satellite communication with low fade margin. Few studies of scintillation have been conducted in tropical regions. To analyze tropospheric scintillation, we obtain data from a satellite link installed at Bandung, Indonesia, at an elevation angle of 64.7° and a frequency of 12.247 GHz from 1999 to 2000. The data are processed and compared with the predictions of several well-known scintillation prediction models. From the analysis, we found that the ITU-R model gives the lowest error rate when predicting the scintillation intensity for fade at 4.68%. However, the model should be further tested using data from higher-frequency bands, such as the K and Ka bands, to verify the accuracy of the model.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  2. The scintillating optical fiber calorimeter (SOFCAL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, Thomas A.; Roberts, F. E.; Benson, C.; Berry, Fred A.; Gregory, J. C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-10-01

    A hybrid detector system is being developed for measuring the cosmic ray elemental composition and energy spectra above approximately GeV/nucleon. This system employs both a conventional 'passive' emulsion chamber and an 'active' ionization calorimeter incorporating scintillating fibers. Emulsion chambers have a proton energy threshold approximately greater than 5 TeV for detectable dark spots in the x-ray films which are used as a visual 'trigger.' The central element of this hybrid system is a calorimeter which has 10 x-y hodoscopic layers of 0.5 mm scintillating fibers interspersed with 4 mm lead plates. The fibers sample the hadronic and electromagnetic showers (cascades) initiated by interactions in the overlying emulsion chamber. The cascades are recorded by two image-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras which view the ends of the fibers to present orthogonal views. These showers are located and traced with microscopes in the emulsion chamber to provide an energy calibration through standard emulsion chamber methods, and an independent confirmation of the primary particle's charge (which is also measured with a Cerenkov counter above the emulsion chamber). The hybrid system will be used this fall for a balloon-borne measurement of the cosmic ray proton and helium spectra from approximately 400 GeV/n to approximately 10 TeV/n. An 8-hour test flight was performed in September 1995. Details of the detector system and sample results from the test flight are presented.

  3. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  4. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  5. SDC conceptual design: Scintillating fiber outer tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bird, F.; SDC Collaboration

    1992-01-22

    The authors propose an all-scintillating fiber detector for the purpose of outer tracking for the SDC. The objectives of this tracking system are to: (1) provide a first level trigger for {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} < 2.3 with sharp p{sub T} threshold with the ability to resolve individual beam crossings; (2) provide pattern recognition capability and momentum resolution which complements and extends the capabilities of the inner silicon tracking system; (3) provide three dimensional linkage with outer detection systems including the shower maximum detector, muon detectors, and calorimetry; (4) provide robust tracking and track-triggering at the highest luminosities expected at the SSC. The many attractive features of a fiber tracker include good position resolution, low occupancy, low mass in the active volume, and excellent resistance to radiation damage. An additional important feature, especially at the SSC, is the intrinsically prompt response time of a scintillating fiber. This property is exploited in the construction of a level 1 trigger sensitive to individual beam crossings.

  6. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Conti, V.; Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD).

  7. Scintillating bolometers for the LUCIFER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, L.; LUCIFER Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature and masses of neutrinos. In order to explore the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region a further improvement on the upcoming 0vββ experiment is needed. In this respect, scintillating bolometers are the suitable technology for achieving such goal: they ensure excellent energy resolution and highly efficient particle discrimination. The LUCIFER project aims at deploying the first array of enriched scintillating bolometers for the investigation of 0vββ of 82Se. The matrix which embeds the source is an array of Zn 82Se crystals, where enriched 82Se is used as decay isotope. Taking advantage of the large Q-value (2997 keV) and of the particle discrimination, the expected background rate in the region of interest is as low as 10-3 c/keV/kg/y. The foreseen sensitivity after 2 years of live time will be 1.8×1025 years. We will report on the potential of such technology and on the present status of the project.

  8. Measuring scintillation light using Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, Alvaro

    2006-11-01

    A new search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) using ultra cold neutrons proposes an improvement on the neutron EDM by two orders of magnitude over the current limit (to 10-28 e*cm). Detection of scintillation light in superfluid ^4He is at the heart of this experiment. One possible scheme to detect this light is to use wavelength-shifting fibers in the superfluid ^4He to collect the scintillation light and transport it out of the measuring cell. The fiber terminates in a visible light photon counter (VLPC). VLPCs are doped, silicon based, solid state photomultipliers with high quantum efficiency (up to 80%) and high gain ( 40000 electrons per converted photon). Moreover, they are insensitive to magnetic fields and operate at temperatures of 6.5K. A test setup has been assembled at Duke University using acrylic cells wrapped in wavelength-shifting fibers that terminate on VLPCs. This setup is being used to evaluate the feasibility of this light detection scheme. The results obtained in multiple experiments done over the past summer (2006) and the current status of the project will be presented at the conference.Reference:A New Search for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment, funding pre-proposal by the EDM collaboration; R. Golub and S. Lamoreaux, Phys. Rep. 237, 1 (1994).

  9. HF produced ionospheric electron density irregularities diagnosed by UHF radio star scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred, F.

    1982-01-01

    HF-waves incident on an overdense (HF-frequency < penetration frequency) ionosphere are known to produce large scale electron density irregularities. It is predicted that similar irregularities are formed during underdense HF-modification. The propagation of UHF radio waves originating from radio stars will be affected by such irregularities in the ionosphere. The interest in a scintillation experiment is twofold. One may obtain information on the electron density irregularies and one may learn about the propagation of radio waves through such a perturbed medium. A thin screen (diffractive) theory is derived which allows to draw conclusons on the electron density irregularities from the intensity fluctuations measured on the ground if the phase perturbations are much less than one radian. Since radio stars suitable for scintillation measurements at UHF are very faint an antenna with a large collection area is required. The observations reported in this dissertation were performed with the 300m diameter spherical reflector of the Arecibo Observatory. Successful observations were performed at 430 MHz and at 1400 MHz. Intensity fluctuations at such high frequencies measured with a large antenna suffer severe filtering in the thin phase screen regime. The theory presented in this dissertation includes these filtering effects. Many observations agree with the predictions of that theory. Some observations indicate that refraction effects have to be included to explain the data. HF-induced electron density irregularities were only observed during overdense heating.

  10. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  11. Health Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they're easier ... Overweight and obesity Prostate cancer in men Which tests you need depends on your age, your sex, ...

  12. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? MRSA Screening Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a Glance ...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic as a nanocomposite scintillator for x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Struebing, Christian; Wagner, Brent; Summers, Christopher; Ding, Yong; Bryant, Alex; Thadhani, Naresh; Shedlock, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-05-01

    Transparent glass ceramics with embedded light-emitting nanocrystals show great potential as low-cost nanocomposite scintillators in comparison to single crystal and transparent ceramic scintillators. In this study, cubic structure BaGdF5:Tb nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix are reported for potential high performance MeV imaging applications. Scintillator samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared by a simple conventional melt-quenching method followed by annealing. Optical, structural and scintillation properties were characterized to guide the design and optimization of selected material systems, aiming at the development of a system with higher crystal volume and larger crystal size for improved luminosity. It is observed that enhanced scintillation performance was achieved by tuning the glass matrix composition and using GdF3 in the raw materials, which served as a nucleation agent. A 26% improvement in light output was observed from a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic with addition of GdF3.

  14. A Generic Receiver Tracking Model for GPS Ionospheric Amplitude Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D.; Perrella, W. J.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillations result in rapid variations in phase and amplitude of the radio signal, which propagates through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, the scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Scintillations affect the receiver performance, specially the tracking loop level. Depending on the scintillation level, the receiver might increase the measurement errors or even can lead to a loss of lock of the carrier and code loops. In extreme cases, the scintillation can result in full disrupting of the receiver. In this work we introduce a generic model to evaluate the effects of ionospheric amplitude scintillation on GPS receiver tracking loops. This model is based on α-μ distribution, which can be seen as a generalized fading model, that includes a variety of distributions such as Gamma, Nakagami-m, Exponential, Weibull, one-sided Gaussian and Rayleigh. Differently from the model based only on Nakagami-m, this one is not limited to S4< 0,71 which allows using it to predict amplitude scintillation effects for stronger scenarios. The estimation of α-μ coefficients, the empirical parameterization based on field measurements and the typical values estimated based on observations made during the last solar maximum are presented and discussed.

  15. Cathodoluminescence studies of commercial and nano-structured scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDoanld, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators have applications in fundamental research and in consumer products, e.g. detectors, scanners, and televisions. This research focused on analyzing the cathodoluminescence of different single-crystal scintillators with an originally developed method for evaluation of their performance, which allows for a direct comparison of different scintillators. We have studied yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillators, zinc oxide single crystal, zinc tungstate single crystal, zinc oxide nanowires, and zinc tungstate film. The commercial scintillators are covered with conductive film which prevents low energy electrons from effectively interacting with the scintillator. We have varied the voltage accelerating the electrons with the intention of finding the threshold below which this effect will impact the performance of the scintillators. The same procedure was followed for the nanowires and zinc tungstate film which have enough conductivity and don't require a top conducting film. The threshold was established to be around 3 kV for the YAG and there is no threshold for the films, which perform much better at these low voltages. This property of the films has the potential for application in desktop scanning electron microscopes, where the accelerating voltage is low. The voltage dependence of the cathodoluminescence intensity follows an exponential trend and we present a model explaining it.

  16. Electronic Structure Engineering of Elpasolites for Brighter and Faster Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Biswas, Koushik

    2013-03-01

    Utilization of scintillator materials is one of the primary methods for radiation detection. Elpasolites are a large family of quaternary halides that have attracted considerable interest for their potential applications as γ-ray and neutron scintillators. However, many elpasolite scintillator materials currently under development suffer from low light yield and long scintillation decay time. The low light yield is partially due to a large band gap while the long scintillation decay time is a result of slow carrier transport to Ce dopants, where electrons and holes recombine to emit photons. We suggest that these problems may be mitigated by optimizing the band gap and carrier mobility by selecting constituent elements of proper electronegativity. For example, cations with lower electronegativity may lower the conduction band and increase the conduction band dispersion simultaneously, resulting in higher light yield and faster scintillation. First-principles calculations of electronic structure, small polarons, and Ce dopants in Cs2LiYCl6 and Cs2AgYCl6 compounds show that the strategy of manipulating electronegativity can lead to brighter and faster elpasolite-based scintillators. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA22.

  17. Development of scintillation materials for medical imaging and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C. L.

    2013-02-05

    Scintillation materials that produce pulses of visible light in response to the absorption of energetic photons, neutrons, and charged particles, are widely used in various applications that require the detection of radiation. The discovery and development of new scintillators has accelerated in recent years, due in large part to their importance in medical imaging as well as in security and high energy physics applications. Better understanding of fundamental scintillation mechanisms as well as the roles played by defects and impurities have aided the development of new high performance scintillators for both gamma-ray and neutron detection. Although single crystals continue to dominate gamma-ray based imaging techniques, composite materials and transparent optical ceramics potentially offer advantages in terms of both synthesis processes and scintillation performance. A number of promising scintillator candidates have been identified during the last few years, and several are currently being actively developed for commercial production. Purification and control of raw materials and cost effective crystal growth processes can present significant challenges to the development of practical new scintillation materials.

  18. A slanting light-guide analog decoding high resolution detector for positron emission tomography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Jing, M.; Bendriem, B.; Hartz, R.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Michel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Current high resolution PET cameras require the scintillation crystals to be much narrower than the smallest available photomultipliers. In addition, the large number of photomultiplier channels constitutes the major component cost in the camera. Recent new designs use the Anger camera type of analog decoding method to obtain higher resolution and lower cost by using the relatively large photomultipliers. An alternative approach to improve the resolution and cost factors has been proposed, with a system of slanting light-guides between the scintillators and the photomultipliers. In the Anger camera schemes, the scintillation light is distributed to several neighboring photomultipliers which then determine the scintillation location. In the slanting light-guide design, the scintillation is metered and channeled to only two photomultipliers for the decision making. This paper presents the feasibility and performance achievable with the slanting light-guide detectors. With a crystal/photomultiplier ratio of 6/1, the intrinsic resolution was found to be 4.0 mm using the first non-optimized prototype light-guides on BGO crystals. The axial resolution will be about 5-6 mm.

  19. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Lowell; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  20. Scintillation properties of N2 and CF4 and performances of a scintillating ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehaut, G.; Salvador, S.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we studied the emission yields, decay times and coincidence resolving times (CRT) of two gases, nitrogen (N2) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), used for particle detection in the context of fission products measurement. The set-up was made of an ionization chamber and two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) placed front-to-front on each side of the active zone of the chamber. Using the photomultiplier tubes, the number of photoelectrons (phe) converted at the photocathodes from the scintillation processes in each gas was quantified and the scintillation time spectra were recorded. A scintillation emission yield of 24 phe MeV-1 with a decay time of τd = 2.5 ns in N2, and 225 phe MeV-1 with τd = 6.2 ns for CF4, has been measured. With our set-up, the coincidence resolving time (σ values) between the two PMTs have been measured using alpha particles at 1.4 ns and 0.34 ns for N2 and CF4, respectively.

  1. Equatorial anomaly effects on GPS scintillations in brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, E. R.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Iyer, K. N.; Kantor, I. J.; Abdu, M. A.; Kintner, P. M.; Ledvina, B. M.; Kil, H.

    In a collaborative study, INPE and Cornell University have installed several Global Positioning System (GPS) based scintillation monitors over the Brazilian territory in order to study L Band scintillation. These scintillation monitors were developed by Cornell University to measure the amplitude scintillation observed at L1 (1.575 GHz) GPS signal and are sensitive to ionospheric irregularities of about 400 meters scale size. This paper describes some characteristics of the intensity of scintillations observed at three observation sites in Brazil: (1) São Luís (2.33 ° S, 44 ° W, dip latitude 1.3 ° S), located at magnetic equator, (2) São José dos Campos (23.21 ° S, 45.86 ° W, dip latitude 17.8 ° S), located under the equatorial anomaly peak and (3) Cuiabá (15.33 ° S, 56.46 ° W, dip latitude 6.1 ° S), an intermediate observation site located in between the magnetic equator and the equatorial anomaly peak. Analysis of data from January to March of 2000 showed that the occurrence percentage as well as the magnitude of the L Band scintillation increase with latitude from the magnetic equator to the equatorial anomaly crest as previously reported by Basu et al. (1988). Strong scintillation with S 4 index exceeding 0.5 only has been observed under equatorial anomaly peak while at magnetic equator scintillation intensity (S 4 index) did not exceed 0.3. Such studies from the network of stations set up by INPE and Cornell University in Brazil, where the effect of large declination controls the ESF statistics, will be very useful for developing a regional scintillation model for use in IRI.

  2. Scintillating glass fiber-optic neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.

    1994-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers, which, as produced, typically have a transmission length (e(sup -1) length) of greater than 2 meters, are found to undergo aging when subjected to room air. The aging, which is complete in a few weeks, reduces the transmission length to the order of 0.5 meter. Because of the high alkali content of the glass (on the order of 20-30 mole percent lithia), we have attributed this aging to aqueous corrosion at the polymer cladding/glass interface. Changes in transmission with chemical treatment of the surface support the corrosion model. Fiber transmission performance has been preserved by modifying the hot-downdraw to a double crucible to produce glass-on-glass waveguides.

  3. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment - Instrument description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hillis, D. A.; Jung, G. V.; Cameron, R. A.

    1993-06-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite uses four actively shielded NaI (Tl)-CsI(Na) phoswich detectors to provide gamma-ray line and continuum detection capability in the 0.05-10 MeV energy range. The instrument includes secondary capabilities for gamma-ray and neutron detection between 10 and 250 MeV. The detectors have 3.8 deg x 11.04 deg (FWHM) fields of view defined by tungsten collimators. Each detector has an independent, single-axis orientation system which permits offset pointing from the spacecraft Z-axis for background measurements and multitarget observations. The instrument, and its calibration and performance, are described.

  4. Bulk semiconducting scintillator device for radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2016-08-30

    A bulk semiconducting scintillator device, including: a Li-containing semiconductor compound of general composition Li-III-VI.sub.2, wherein III is a Group III element and VI is a Group VI element; wherein the Li-containing semiconductor compound is used in one or more of a first mode and a second mode, wherein: in the first mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to an electrical circuit under bias operable for measuring electron-hole pairs in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of neutrons and the Li-containing semiconductor compound is also coupled to current detection electronics operable for detecting a corresponding current in the Li-containing semiconductor compound; and, in the second mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to a photodetector operable for detecting photons generated in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of the neutrons.

  5. SSPM Scintillator Readout for Gamma Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S A; Wendelberger, B; Young, J A; Green, J A; Guise, R E; Franks, L; Staples, C

    2011-09-01

    Silicon-based photodetectors offer several benefits relative to photomultiplier tube–based scintillator systems. Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPM) can realize the gain of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) with the quantum efficiency of silicon. The advantages of the solid-state approach must be balanced with adverse trade-offs, for example from increased dark current, to optimize radiation detection sensitivity. We are designing a custom SSPM that will be optimized for green emission of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)). A typical field gamma radiation detector incorporates thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and a radiation converter with a PMT. A PMT’s sensitivity peaks in the blue wavelengths and is well matched to NaI(Tl). This paper presents results of photomultiplier sensitivity relative to conventional SSPMs and discusses model design improvements. Prototype fabrications are in progress.

  6. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  7. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  8. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  9. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-04-11

    In this study, a time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  10. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven; Stephan, Andrew C.; Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  11. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  12. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiang Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-15

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  13. Angle scintillations in the laser return from a retroreflector.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J P; Madhu, S

    1972-02-01

    Angle scintillations of the laser return from a retroreflector were observed to exceed the value expected because of atmospheric turbulence. The observations and a theoretical analysis of a possible mechanism are presented. The experimental work was performed with a pulsed, 1.06-micro laser illuminating a corner cube. Angular scintillations of the laser return were measured to be eight times greater than that of a reference beacon. The theoretical analysis assumes phase fluctuations in the illuminating laser beam. An expression is derived for the scintillation angle as a function of a phase fluctuation parameter.

  14. Calibration of Small Plastic Scintillators for Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.

    2005-01-19

    This report presents the results of measurements and simulations performed with 12 small plastic scintillation detectors manufactured by Scionix for imaging applications. The scintillator is equivalent to a Bicron BC-420 plastic scintillator. A gamma calibration is presented to determine the voltage to be applied on each detector to ensure uniform detector operation. Time of flight measurements performed with a Cf-252 source are also presented. Comparisons between experimental data and data from the Monte Carlo simulations show good agreement for time lags of 0 to 70 ns.

  15. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    . The solid angle subtended by the fiber is ∼2.2 × 10-5 sr. The final element is a compact and high sensitive spectrometer, QE6500 (Ocean Optics Inc.) with a 2D area detector which allow us to measure simultaneously in the range of 200-1100 nm with a spectral resolution ∼1-2 nm. The measured signals were analyzed and stored with the SpectraSuite software [6]. The absolute calibration of the optical system described above was carried out with a HL-2000-CAL Tungsten Halogen Calibration Standard light source which provides absolute intensity values (in μW/cm2/nm) at the fiber port at wavelengths from 360-1050 nm.The beam fluxes used to irradiate the phosphors were ∼ 1012 p/cm2s- for the IL yields determination, and up to ten times higher for the degradation analyses.The Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) measurements of the screens were accomplished in the same vacuum chamber using protons at 3 MeV and 5 MeV. Two different energies were employed due to the large difference between the thicknesses of the samples. The proton beam intensity was 10 nA and the beam size 1 mm of diameter. The analysis were performed with a Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector of 300 mm2, positioned at 150° and with a 10 μm thick aluminized mylar foil placed at the detector surface to avoid the light emitted by the scintillators. The RBS spectra were analyzed using the SIMNRA code [7].The scintillators investigated in this work were selected according to their availability, radiation hardness, fast response, and/or prior use in plasma diagnostics. In this paper, three different kinds of materials have been analyzed. The TG-Green (so called by the manufacturer, Sarnoff Corporation, USA) is a Eu doped SrGa2S4 powder substrate with density of 3.65 g/cm3, and presents an emission at 540 nm with a very short decay time.≈490 ns [8]. A TG-Green scintillator coating has been applied, for the first time, to a fusion plasma diagnostics for the detection of fast

  16. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  17. Encapsulated scintillators monitor /sup 3/H-solute concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, G.; Gruner, S.

    1982-02-01

    The short range of the /sup 3/H beta allows shielding of microbeds of scintillator by a several um thick coating of a water based gel. Gels may be used which are permeable to a wide variety of tritiated molecules. Thus, the light output of a mixture of the coated beads and a solution of the tritiated compound is proportional to the solution concentration of the tritiated substance. The mixture may also contain particles to which the gel is impermeable, such as cells, vesicles, large proteins, etc., but which can alter the concentration of the tritiated compound by uptake or release. In this case, the light output monitors the fractional uptake of the tritiated material. The design criteria for encapsulating the scintillators and dynamically monitoring the scintillation output are discussed. A simple method for encapsulating plastic scintillator microbeads, suitable for monitoring slow concentration changes, is described and tested.

  18. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O'Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  19. Radiowave Phase Scintillation and Precision Doppler Tracking of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Phase scintillation cause by propagation through irregularities in the solar wind, ionosphere, and tropospher, introduces noise in spacecraft radio science experiments. The observations reported here are uses to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes.

  20. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  1. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  2. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-17

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with {sup 130}Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include...

  5. A fundamental limit on timing performance with scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Petrick, N.A.; Rogers, W.L. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Hero, A.O. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1990-04-01

    A new lower bound on the mean-squared error of post-detection {gamma}-ray time-of-flight estimators have been derived. Previously, the Cramer-Rao bound has been applied, but for nearly exponentially decaying scintillation pulses it gives an extremely optimistic picture of the achievable performance, depending critically on the dark current and photomultiplier characteristics. The new bound has been derived under the assumption that excited states in the scintillator leading to the emission of scintillation photons have an exponential lifetime density. The bound is a function of the mean state lifetime, the spectrum of energy deposited, and the energy conversion efficiency of the scintillator, and is exact for the observation of a mono-exponentially decaying photoelectron rate at the first dynode of the PMT given the {gamma}-ray arrival time.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include...

  7. A fine grained electromagnetic lead-liquid scintillator calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, L.; Bonesini, M.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Fischer, J.; Fluri, L.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Mandelli, L.; Martin, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mermod, R.; Pensotti-Rancoita, S.; Perrin, D.; Rosselet, L.; Rutschmann, J.; Tamborini, M.; Vuilleumier, J. M.; Werlen, M.

    1983-02-01

    A new technique using liquid scintillator contained in teflon tubes to build a low cost high spatial resolution electromagnetic sampling calorimeter is described. Test results and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation are presented.

  8. Cosmic-ray scintillation at the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.; Duller, N.M.; Green, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    The theory of cosmic-ray scintillations has developed rapidly over the past few years. Cosmic-ray scintillations arise from various irregularities in the magnetic fields through which cosmic-ray particles must travel before being observed. These scintillations are characterized by broad-band fluctuations in intensity over time. We have undertaken a study of the cosmic-ray background as observed with the Rice University Suprathermal Ion Detector Experimental (SIDE) that was deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 14 mission. The energy threshold for cosmic-ray protons was approximately 25 MeV in one sensor and 50 MeV in another. We find that the interplanetary cosmic-ray scintillations are observed with the SIDE and these observations are consistent with current theoretical models and with other experimental results.

  9. The response of scintillators to heavy ions: 1, Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The response of various scintillator detectors to ions of A = 1-84 and energies E/A = 5 to 30 MeV have been measured, and are found to be linear above an energy of 100 MeV. Results are presented for a typical organic plastic scintillator including parametrizations of the data as a function of Z, A, and energy. These results can be used by anyone using scintillators as heavy ion detectors, with one calibration point giving a normalization that allows use of the whole set of curves. The response functions are compared to previous parametrizations at lower energies and discussed in terms of the theory of delta-ray formation in the scintillator.

  10. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  11. The Use of Scintillation for Astronomical Site Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, M. S.; Tokovinin, A.

    2009-09-01

    When site testing for future astronomical facilities (Extremely Large Telescopes, ELT), teams around the world use scintillation to locate the optically turbulent layers within the atmosphere. Several dedicated instruments are described which have been developed to retrieve the whole vertical Cn2 profile from close to the ground up to about 20km. MASS (Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor) high altitude profilers in particular, when used in a network, can provide a 3D tracking of clear air turbulence during nighttime over large areas.

  12. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of

  13. Quasiperiodic scintillation and data interpretation: Nongeophysical GPS amplitude fluctuations due to intersatellite interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Theodore L.; Baragona, Curtis A.

    2007-06-01

    Spectrograms of high-rate Global Positioning System (GPS) power data at the L1 frequency (1.57542 GHz) commonly show patterns of fluctuation frequency with respect to time that resemble quasiperiodic scintillation observations. These fluctuation patterns have probably not been noted in the past because of the low sampling frequencies and coarse quantization of power measurements in most GPS receivers. We demonstrate that the source of these fluctuations is usually not edge-type diffraction from steep ionospheric gradients, as is often hypothesized for quasiperiodic scintillation, despite some features consistent with ionospheric generation. Instead, in most cases these spectrogram patterns derive from intersatellite signal interference between pairs of coarse/acquisition (C/A) codes broadcast on L1. As evidence of this mechanism, we show that most spectrogram features appear on pairs of satellite tracking channels and that the patterns can be reproduced using a multisatellite GPS simulator. We also model the spectrogram patterns, both with regard to the basic GPS C/A code correlation process and the differential Doppler shift conditions that cause the fluctuations. In this latter respect, the GPS quasiperiodic scintillation observations bear resemblance to a mechanism discussed by L. A. Hajkowicz for traditional satellite beacons. Despite the complex nature of the intersatellite interference phenomenon, we can model when the spectrogram patterns are expected to appear. Thus one can screen out these time-varying interference patterns to find potential occurrences of actual ionospheric edge diffraction in spectrograms. The intersatellite interference phenomenon is also of general interest to GPS radio engineering.

  14. The space weather of the global ionosphere S4 scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq; Chen, Shih-Ping; Yeh, Wen-Hao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a method is introduced which converts S4 index observations by radio occultation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) to the scintillation on the ground. To carry out the conversion, three dimensional (3D) structures of S4max, the maximum value on each profile probed by F3/C, are constructed, which allows us to understand GPS scintillation variations at various local times, seasons, and solar activity conditions, as well as the geographical distribution from the space-based point of view. By applying the method to data of the 3D structure, maps of the worst case scenario on the ground as functions of geomagnetic local time and geographic coordinates are constructed and reported here. The converted S4max for the first time estimates the global distribution of ionospheric scintillations in the GPS L1 band C/A code signal on the ground. The results show that the worst-case scintillations appear within the low latitude region of ±30°N, peaking around ±20°N magnetic latitude; they begin at 1900 MLT, reach their maximum at 2100 MLT, and vanish by about 0200-0300 MLT. The most pronounced low-latitude scintillation occurs over the South American and African sectors. Finally, based on the above the above data, an empirical model is constructed. For a given time, location, and solar activity, the model forecasts the ionospheric S4 scintillation in the L1 band signal on the ground.

  15. Broadband meter-wavelength observations of ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Coles, W. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Vierinen, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Postila, M.; Ulich, Th.; Enell, C.-F.; Kero, A.; Iinatti, T.; Lehtinen, M.; Orispää, M.; Raita, T.; Roininen, L.; Turunen, E.; Brentjens, M.; Ebbendorf, N.; Gerbers, M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Stuurwold, K.

    2014-12-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally, these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a three-octave bandwidth. "Parabolic arcs," which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broadband observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250 MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disappeared after transit although scintillations continued to be obvious during the entire observation. We show that this can be attributed to the structure of Cygnus-A. Initial results from modeling these scintillation arcs are consistent with simultaneous ionospheric soundings taken with other instruments and indicate that scattering is most likely to be associated more with the topside ionosphere than the F region peak altitude. Further modeling and possible extension to interferometric observations, using international LOFAR stations, are discussed.

  16. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  17. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  18. Study of cosmic ray scintillations from 5-minute data of the scintillations telescope Izmran and world-wide network stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulinsky, O. V.; Dorman, L. I.; Libin, I. Y.; Prilutsky, R. E.; Yudakhin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    During cosmic ray propagation in interplanetary space there appear characteristic cosmic-ray intensity scintillations which are due to charged particle scattering on random inhomogeneities of the interplanetary magnetic field. The power spectra of cosmic ray scintillations on the Earth during some intervals from 1977 to 1982 (for quiet periods, for solar flares and Forbush decreases due to power shock waves) have been calculated from five-minute, one and two-hour values of the cosmic-ray intensity measured by the scintillator supertelescope IZMIRAN. The spectra were estimated by the methods of spectral analysis and by autoregressive methods which mutually control each other and make it possible not only to analyze scintillation powers at distinguished frequencies, but also to determine the behavior of spectrum slopes in some frequency ranges.

  19. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  20. Bone Density Screening and Re-screening in Postmenopausal Women and Older Men.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Overman, Robert A; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines universally recommend bone mineral density (BMD) screening to identify osteoporosis in women aged 65 years and older. Risk assessment is recommended to guide BMD screening in postmenopausal women under age 65. Insufficient data are available to inform standard ages to start and stop BMD screening in postmenopausal women. Based on longitudinal studies of incident osteoporosis and fracture in postmenopausal women, an initial BMD test should be ordered for all women aged 65, and the frequency of re-screening should be based on age and BMD T score (more frequent testing for older age and lower T score). Although clinical practice guidelines recommend BMD screening according to risk factors for fracture in postmenopausal women under age 65, no standard approach to risk assessment exists. Minimal evidence is available to guide osteoporosis screening in men, but some experts recommend initiation of BMD screening in men at age 70. PMID:26408154

  1. Comparison of scintillators for single shot imaging of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    The application of intense laser pulses incident on specialized targets provides exciting new means for generating energetic beams of protons and ions. Recent work has demonstrated the utility of these beams of particles in a variety of applications, from inertial confinement fusion to radiation therapy. These applications require precise control, and subsequently precise feedback from the beam. Imaging techniques can provide the necessary shot-to-shot characterization to be effective as diagnostics. However, the utility of imaging methods scales with the capability of scintillating materials to emit well characterized and consistent radiation upon irradiance by a charged particle beam. We will discuss three candidates for an ideal diagnostic for MeV range protons and light ions. CsI:Tl^+ and Al2O3:Cr^3+ are two inorganic scintillators which exhibit excellent response to hadrons in this energy range. They are compared with the combination diagnostic micro-channel plate with a P43 phosphor screen, which offers advantages in refresh rate and resolution over direct exposure methods. Ultimately we will determine which candidate performs optimally as part of a robust, inexpensive diagnostic for laser accelerated protons and light ions.

  2. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  3. Progress with the MICE scintillating fiber trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overton, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a proof of principle demonstration of ionization cooling, for application in a future neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), where a dedicated beam line has been commissioned to transport particles produced inside the ISIS accelerator facility. The beam emittance will be measured using two scintillating fiber trackers on each side of the cooling channel, which will be mounted inside a 4 T solenoid. As particles pass through the tracker, their position will be measured at 5 stations, each of which provides a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm. The fiber trackers have been validated using cosmic ray tests, which have allowed the light yield to be found. In addition, a spare tracking station was exposed to the MICE beam, which has enabled the tracker readout to be integrated with the MICE DAQ for the first time. This test required the integration gate on the D0 AFE-IIt readout boards to be synchronized with particle arrival by using diagnostic signals from the ISIS accelerator.

  4. Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-10-07

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

  5. sPHENIX Hadronic Calorimeter Scintillator Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Reuben; Sphenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A new form of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) was discovered with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). PHENIX is an experiment at RHIC that helped with this discovery, but plans are being made to replace it with a new spectrometer with different capabilities. The sPHENIX detector will consist of a superconducting solenoid magnet, hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry and charged particle tracking. sPHENIX will enable a rich jet physics program that will address fundamental questions about of the nature of the QGP. The new detector will provide full azimuthal coverage and +/- 1.1 in pseudorapidity. The Hadronic Calorimeter is a major subsystem in this detector. It is made of alternating layers of scintillating tiles and steel plates. In the current prototype the tiles are covered with a reflective coating and contain wavelength shifting fibers. As the second round of prototypes are developed for an upcoming beam test, special care is being taken to provide uniform light collection efficiency across the detector. Studies are being conducted to ensure this by careful alignment of the silicon photomultipliers to the fibers and varying coatings on the tiles. The effects of the coating will be presented along with the current status and ongoing plans.

  6. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  7. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-01

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K = 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt γ-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the γ-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 1011 pps.

  8. A Guide to Desktop Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maring, Gerald H.; Levy, Erik W.

    This document presents a step-by-step guide to using three desktop videoconferencing applications: CU-SeeMe, iVisit, and NetMeeting. First, hardware and software recommendations for PC-based and Macintosh systems are provided. Illustrations of sample screens accompany the text for each application. The following additional considerations for…

  9. Observation and Modeling of Ionospheric Scintillation Associated with Irregularities in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ma, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Zanyang, X.

    2015-12-01

    It is well understood that Ionospheric scintillation is a consequence of random electron density fluctuations present in the ionosphere. They appear at all local time of the polar regions therefore, it is essential to understand their evolution and dynamics. Using Madrigal database and South Pole Scintillation Receiver data an empirical model of ionospheric scintillation has been proposed for South Pole. Model has been validated and compared with the observations. We have investigated some interesting scintillation patterns associated with polar patches and structured flux of precipitated electrons. Our results illustrate well the irregularity structures causing ionospheric scintillation at the polar ionosphere. Limitations of our modeling approach is discussed. Keywords: Ionospheric irregularities, polar patches, scintillation.

  10. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  11. HF produced ionospheric electron density irregularities diagnosed by UHF radio star scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, A.; Gordon, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Three observations of radio star intensity fluctuations at UHF are reported for HF ionospheric modification experiments carried out at the Arecibo Observatory. Two observations at 430 MHz and one at 1400 MHz suggest that the the thin phase screen theory is a good approximation to the observed power spectra. It is noted, however, that the theory has to be extended to include antenna filtering. This type of filtering is important for UHF radio star scintillations since the antenna usually has a narrow beamwidth. HF power densities of less than 37 microwatts/sq m incident on the ionosphere give rise to electron density irregularities larger than 13% of the ambient density (at 260 km) having scale sizes of approximately 510 m perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The irregularities are found to form within 20-25 s after the HF power is turned on. The drift velocities of the irregularities can be estimated from the observed power spectra.

  12. Streptococcal screen

    MedlinePlus

    A negative strep screen most often means group A streptococcus is not present. It is unlikely that you have strep throat. If your provider still thinks that you may have strep throat, a throat culture will be done.

  13. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  14. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  15. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it can also ... to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections may ...

  16. Get Screened

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Ready 3 of 4 sections Take Action: Cost and Insurance What about cost? Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get screening tests at no cost to you. Most insurance plans, including Medicaid and ...

  17. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources For Lab Professionals Data and Reports Laboratory Reports National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) Resources ...

  18. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  19. Radar measurement of ionospheric scintillation in the polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepp, Dennis L.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers several estimators that use radar data to measure the S4 scintillation index that characterizes the severity of amplitude scintillation that may occur during RF propagation through ionospheric irregularities. S4 is defined to be the standard deviation of the fluctuations in received power normalized by division by the mean power. Estimates of S4 are based on radar returns obtained during track of targets which may themselves have intrinsic radar cross-section fluctuations. Key to this work is the consideration of thresholding, which is used in many radars to remove (from further processing) signals whose SNR is considered too low. We consider several estimators here. The "direct" estimator attempts to estimate S4 through the direct calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the SNR from a number of radar returns. The maximum likelihood (ML) estimator uses multiple hypothesis testing and the assumption of Nakagami-m statistics to estimate the scintillation index that best fits the radar returns from some number of pulses. The ML estimator has perfect knowledge of the number of radar returns that are below the threshold. The direct estimator is accurate for the case where there is no threshold and there are many returns or samples from which to estimate S4. However, the direct estimator is flawed (especially for strong scintillation) if deep fades that fall below the radar threshold are ignored. The modified ML estimator here is based on the ML technique but is useful if the count of missed returns is unavailable. We apply the modified ML estimator to several years of radar tracks of large calibration satellites to obtain the statistics of UHF scintillation as viewed from the early warning radar at Thule, Greenland. One-way S4 was measured from 5000 low Earth orbit tracks during the 3 year period after solar maximum in May 2000. The data are analyzed to quantify the exceedance or the level of scintillation experienced at various

  20. Neutron detector based on Particles of 6Li glass scintillator dispersed in organic lightguide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianakiev, K. D.; Hehlen, M. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Favalli, A.; Iliev, M. L.; Lin, T. C.; Bennett, B. L.; Barker, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Most 3He replacement neutron detector technologies today have overlapping neutron-gamma pulse-height distributions, which limits their usefulness and performance. Different techniques are used to mitigate this shortcoming, including Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) or threshold settings that suppress all gammas as well as much of the neutrons. As a result, count rates are limited and dead times are high when PSD is used, and the detection efficiency for neutron events is reduced due to the high threshold. This is a problem in most applications where the neutron-gamma separation of 3He detectors had been essential. This challenge is especially severe for neutron coincidence and multiplicity measurements that have numerous conflicting requirements such as high detection efficiency, short die-away time, short dead time, and high stability. 6Li-glass scintillators have excellent light output and a single peak distribution, but they are difficult to implement because of their gamma sensitivity. The idea of reducing the gamma sensitivity of 6Li-glass scintillators by embedding small glass particles in an organic light-guide medium was first presented by L.M. Bollinger in the early 60s but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reduced to practice. We present a proof of principle detector design and experimental data that develop this concept to a large-area neutron detector. This is achieved by using a multi-component optical medium (6Li glass particles attached to a glass supporting structure and a mineral oil light guide) which matches the indices of refraction and minimizes the absorption of the 395 nm scintillator light. The detector design comprises a 10 in. long tube with dual end readout with about 3% volume density of 6Li glass particles installed. The presented experimental data with various neutron and gamma sources show the desired wide gap between the neutron and gamma pulse height distributions, resulting in a true plateau in the counting

  1. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  2. Angular correlation of the stellar scintillation for large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.

    2012-09-01

    Stellar scintillation is one of the fundamental limitations to the precision of ground-based photometry. This paper examines the problem of the correlation of the scintillation of two close stars at the focus of a large telescope. The derived correlation functions were applied to data from the long-term study of the optical turbulence (OT) in the Northern Caucasus with the MASS (Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor) instrument in order to predict the angular correlation of the scintillation at the Sternberg institute 2.5-m telescope currently in construction. A median angular radius of the correlation as large as 20 arcsec was found for the case of Kolmogorov OT. On the basis of the obtained relations we also analyse the impact of correlation in ensemble photometry and conjugate plane photometry. It is shown that a reduction of the scintillation noise by up to 8 times can be achieved when using a crowded ensemble of comparison stars. The calculation of the angular correlation can be applied for any large telescope at a site where the OT vertical profiles are known.

  3. The uniformity and imaging properties of some new ceramic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chac, George T. L.; Miller, Brian W.; Shah, Kanai; Baldoni, Gary; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Bora, Vaibhav; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Seeley, Zachary; Barber, H. Bradford

    2012-10-01

    Results are presented of investigations into the composition, uniformity and gamma-ray imaging performance of new ceramic scintillators with synthetic garnet structure. The ceramic scintillators were produced by a process that uses flame pyrolysis to make nanoparticles which are sintered into a ceramic and then compacted by hot isostatic compression into a transparent material. There is concern that the resulting ceramic scintillator might not have the uniformity of composition necessary for use in gamma-ray spectroscopy and gamma-ray imaging. The compositional uniformity of four samples of three ceramic scintillator types (GYGAG:Ce, GLuGAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr) was tested using an electron microprobe. It was found that all samples were uniform in elemental composition to the limit of sensitivity of the microprobe (few tenths of a percent atomic) over distance scales from ~ 1 cm to ~ 1 um. The light yield and energy resolution of all ceramic scintillator samples were mapped with a highly collimated 57Co source (122 keV) and performance was uniform at mapping scale of 0.25 mm. Good imaging performance with single gamma-ray photon detection was demonstrated for all samples using a BazookaSPECT system, and the imaging spatial resolution, measured as the FWHM of a LSF was 150 um.

  4. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Guss, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We performed a number of comparative MCNPX simulations of gamma energy depositions of scintillation crystals with smooth and rough surfaces. In the study, nine surface patterns (8 micro-roughness + 1 smooth) were coupled with eight common scintillation crystals for a total of 72 possible combinations. Although this was a preliminary study, the outcome was counterintuitive; results generally favored surfaces with micro-roughness over a conventional smooth surface as measured in terms of average energy depositions. The advantage gained through surface roughness is less significant for CdSe and LaCl3, but is most significant for the common NaI and the glass-like SiO2 scintillators. Based on the results of the 64 rough-surface coupled MCNPX simulations, 57 of the 64 (~89%) simulations showed some improvement in energy deposition. The mean improvement in energy deposition was 2.52%. The maximum improvement was about 8.75%, which was achieved when roughening the surface of a SiO2 scintillator using a micro cutting pattern. Further, for a conventional NaI scintillator, MCNPX results suggest that any roughness pattern would improve the energy deposition, with an average improvement of 3.83%. Although the likely causes remain unclear, we intend to focus on presenting simulation results instead of offering a sound explanation of the underlying physics.

  5. Ionosphere Scintillation at Low and High Latitudes (Modelling vs Measurement)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béniguel, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    This paper will address the problem of scintillations characteristics, focusing on the parameters of interest for a navigation system. Those parameters are the probabilities of occurrence of simultaneous fading, the bubbles surface at IPP level, the cycle slips and the fades duration statistics. The scintillation characteristics obtained at low and high latitudes will be compared. These results correspond to the data analysis performed after the ESA Monitor ionosphere measurement campaign [1], [2]. A second aspect of the presentation will be the modelling aspect. It has been observed that the phase scintillation dominates at high latitudes while the intensity scintillation dominates at low latitudes. The way it can be reproduced and implemented in a propagation model (e.g. GISM model [3]) will be presented. Comparisons of measurements with results obtained by modelling will be presented on some typical scenarios. References [1] R. Prieto Cerdeira, Y. Beniguel, "The MONITOR project: architecture, data and products", Ionospheric Effects Symposium, Alexandria (Va), May 2011 [2] Y. Béniguel, R Orus-Perez , R. Prieto-Cerdeira , S. Schlueter , S. Scortan, A. Grosu "MONITOR 2: ionospheric monitoring network in support to SBAS and other GNSS and scientific purposes", IES Conference, Alexandria (Va), May 2015-05-22 [3] Y. Béniguel, P. Hamel, "A Global Ionosphere Scintillation Propagation Model for Equatorial Regions", Journal of Space Weather Space Climate, 1, (2011), doi: 10.1051/swsc/2011004

  6. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used

  7. Preparation and characterization of a novel UV-curable plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yunyu; Zhu, Jiayi; Qi, Di; Su, Ming; Xu, Yewei; Bi, Yutie; Lin, Runxiong; Zhang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    A novel UV-curable plastic scintillator was first prepared by using the technology of photosensitivity rapid prototyping. It used the copolymer of 621A-80, TPGDA and styrene as the matrix doped with PPO and POPOP. Its fluorescence spectra displayed a maximum emission wavelength at 428 nm. The light yield of the plastic scintillator was approximately 7.1% of anthracene on the basis of a comparison with the commercially available scintillator (ST-401). The as-prepared plastic scintillator also displayed a fast scintillation decay. Its decay time is 2.6 ns approximately. Importantly, through the technology of photosensitivity rapid prototyping, the plastic scintillator could be prepared in a short period of time at low temperature. What's more, this preparation method provides the possibility of combining the plastic scintillator with 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expanded greatly.

  8. Evaluate Scintillation Response Over a Continuous Energy Region

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Elfman, Mikael; Milbrath, Brian D.; Weber, William J.

    2008-06-26

    A recently developed fast analysis technique utilizing a time of flight (TOF) telescope is demonstrated to obtain relevant quantitative data on material scintillation response to energetic He particles. With superior energy resolution and fast response of the TOF telescope, energy of individual particle before impinging on a scintillating crystal can be determined with a high counting rate, which allows quantitative study of material performance over a continuous energy range in a relatively short time. Scintillation performances in terms of light output, nonlinearity and energy resolution in bismuth germinate (BGO) and europium-doped calcium fluoride (CaF2:Eu) Crystals are demonstrated, and the corresponding energy resolution is compared with gamma-ray tests on the same crystals.

  9. Scintillator-based fast ion loss measurements in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. F.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Huang, J.; Wu, C. R.; Xu, Z.; Jin, Z.; Lin, S. Y.; Hu, L. Q.

    2016-11-01

    A new scintillator-based fast ion loss detector (FILD) has been installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to investigate the fast ion loss behavior in high performance plasma with neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). A two dimensional 40 mm × 40 mm scintillator-coated (ZnS:Ag) stainless plate is mounted in the front of the detector, capturing the escaping fast ions. Photons from the scintillator plate are imaged with a Phantom V2010 CCD camera. The lost fast ions can be measured with the pitch angle from 60° to 120° and the gyroradius from 10 mm to 180 mm. This paper will describe the details of FILD diagnostic on EAST and describe preliminary measurements during NBI and ICRH heating.

  10. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  11. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  12. Scintillation Properties of Eu2+-Activated Barium Fluoroiodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2009-11-18

    The scintillation properties of powders and single-crystals of BaFI doped with Eu2+ are presented. Single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. Under optical and X-ray excitation, the samples exhibit a narrow E2+ 5d-4f transition emission centered at 405 nm. The scintillation light output is estimated to be 55,000+-5,000 photons/MeV at 662 keV with 85percent of the light decaying within 600 ns. An energyresolution of 8.5percent full width at half maximum (FWHM) has been achieved using this scintillator for 662 keV excitation (137Cs source) at room temperature.

  13. Radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS for radiography conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Soongpyung; Kang, Dong-Won; Kim, Dong-Kie

    2006-11-01

    Under industrial radiography conditions, we analyzed short-term radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS (hereinafter SC CMOS APS). By means of experimentation, the contribution of the transmitted X-ray through the scintillator to the properties of the CMOS APS and the afterimage, generated in the acquired image even at low dose condition, were investigated. To see the transmitted X-ray effects on the CMOS APS, Fein focus™ X-ray machine, two scintillators of Lanex™ Fine and Regular, and two CMOS APS array of RadEye™ were used under the conditions of 50 kV p/1 mAs and 100 kV p/1 mAs. By measuring the transmitted X-ray on signal and Noise Power Spectrum, we analytically examined the generation mechanism of the afterimage, based on dark signal or dark current increase in the sensor, and explained the afterimage in the SC CMOS APS.

  14. A potential base substrate for deformable scintillation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2016-05-01

    Deformable scintillation materials for radiation detection are an original concept that will impact many applications. Here we reveal the optical characteristics of readily available, transparent grease that consists of adhesive aromatic ring polymers. The aromatic ring polymer is methyl phenyl polysiloxane, commonly used in cosmetics, lubrication, heat conduction, and mechanical damping. It has a 285-nm excitation maximum and emits short wavelength light that peaks at 315 nm. The stopping power for 1 MeV electrons is 1.78 MeV cm2/g. The light-yield distribution has distinct peaks at 976 keV from internal conversion electrons and at 5486 keV from alpha particles. In addition, this particular methyl phenyl polysiloxane is safe for use and disposal, which is an excellent advantage. These aromatic ring polymers are potential base substrates for deformable scintillation materials and make an important addition to the categories of scintillation materials.

  15. Neutron imaging using the anisotropic response of crystalline organic scintillators.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.

    2010-11-01

    An anisotropy in a scintillator's response to neutron elastic scattering interactions can in principle be used to gather directional information about a neutron source using interactions in a single detector. In crystalline organic scintillators, such as anthracene, both the amplitude and the time structure of the scintillation light pulse vary with the direction of the proton recoil with respect to the crystalline axes. Therefore, we have investigated the exploitation of this effect to enable compact, high-efficiency fast neutron detectors that have directional sensitivity via a precise measurement of the pulse shape. We report measurements of the pulse height and shape dependence on proton recoil angle in anthracene, stilbene, p-terphenyl, diphenyl anthracene (DPA), and tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Image reconstruction for simulated neutron sources is demonstrated using maximum likelihood methods for optimal directional sensitivity.

  16. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  17. A Novel Particle Detector: Quantum Dot Doped Liquid Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Lindley; Conrad, Janet; Jerry, Ruel

    2010-02-01

    Quantum dots are semiconducting nanocrystals. When excited by light shorter then their characteristic wavelength, they re-emit in a narrow band around this wavelength. The size of the quantum is proportional to the characteristic wavelength so they can be tuned for many applications. CdS quantum dots are made in wavelengths from 360nm to 460nm, a perfect range for the sensitivity of photo-multiplier tubes. The synthesis of quantum dots automatically leaves them in toluene, a good organic scintillator and Cd is a particularly interesting material as it has one of the highest thermal neutron cross sections and has several neutrinoless double beta decay and double electron capture isotopes. The performance of quantum dot loaded scintillator compared to standard scintillators is measured and some unique properties presented. )

  18. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  19. Tilt Estimation in Moderate-to-Strong Scintillation.

    PubMed

    Burl, J B; Roggemann, M C; Welsh, B

    2001-06-20

    Adaptive optics systems are being applied in ever more challenging environments, for example, the projection of lasers over long horizontal paths through the atmosphere. These long atmospheric paths corrupt the signal received from the beacon and typically yield highly scintillated received wave fronts. Tilt estimation for controlling the fast steering mirror in these systems is complicated by the presence of branch points in the scintillated received wave fronts. In particular, correlation between the tilt and the projected beam's centroid error at the target has been observed in horizontal laser beam projection experiments. The presence of this correlation indicates that better tracking performance should be achievable. We compare the performance of four estimation schemes applied to tilt estimation in a horizontal laser projection system. It is demonstrated that all four schemes underestimate the tilt required to return the laser beam to a target in highly scintillated environments. A method of correcting this tilt is presented, and the expected performance improvement is quantified.

  20. Characterizing and validating the PROSPECT segmented scintillator detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcini, Danielle; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will use two segmented liquid scintillator detectors positioned 7-20m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to perform a search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos and measure the antineutrino spectrum of uranium-235. A multi-year R&D program focused on background studies at the HFIR reactor, lithium-loaded liquid scintillator development, and characterization of multiple prototype detectors has culminated in the design of a segmented, 3-ton liquid scintillator detector for PROSPECT Phase I. This detector design is being validated with a 50 liter, 2-segment prototype detector, PROSPECT-50. We will report results of on-going performance and calibration studies and discuss implications for the PROSPECT physics program.

  1. Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yi; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao Qihua; Sawant, Amit; Du Hong

    2008-01-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only {approx}2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to {approx}6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of {approx}2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density septal walls

  2. Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Sawant, Amit; Du, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MY CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only ~2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick, segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness, as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to ~6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of ~2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density septal walls exhibit higher contrast

  3. RADTRAN 5 user guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, Frances L.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde

    2003-07-01

    This User Guide for the RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis describes basic risk concepts and provides the user with step-by-step directions for creating input files by means of either the RADDOG input file generator software or a text editor. It also contains information on how to interpret RADTRAN 5 output, how to obtain and use several types of important input data, and how to select appropriate analysis methods. Appendices include a glossary of terms, a listing of error messages, data-plotting information, images of RADDOG screens, and a table of all data in the internal radionuclide library.

  4. Quenching correction for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution, three-dimensional radiation dosimetry. However, scintillators exhibit a nonlinear response at the high linear energy transfer (LET) values characteristic of proton Bragg peaks. The purpose of this study was to develop a quenching correction method for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams. Scintillation light from a miniature liquid scintillator detector was measured along the central axis of a 161.6 MeV proton pencil beam. Three-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated for 85.6, 100.9, 144.9 and 161.6 MeV beams using a validated Monte Carlo model. LET values were also calculated using an analytical formula. A least-squares fit to the data established the empirical parameters of a quenching correction model. The light distribution in a tank of liquid scintillator was measured with a CCD camera at all four beam energies. The quenching model and LET data were used to correct the measured light distribution. The calculated and measured Bragg peak heights agreed within ±3% for all energies except 85.6 MeV, where the agreement was within ±10%. The quality of the quenching correction was poorer for sharp low-energy Bragg peaks because of blurring and detector size effects. The corrections performed using analytical LET values resulted in doses within 1% of those obtained using Monte Carlo LET values. The proposed method can correct for quenching with sufficient accuracy for dosimetric purposes. The required LET values may be computed effectively using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Future detectors should improve blurring correction methods and optimize the pixel size to improve accuracy for low-energy Bragg peaks.

  5. Correlation analysis between ionospheric scintillation levels and receiver tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Elmas, Z. G.; Forte, B.

    2012-06-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a transionospheric radio signal caused by small scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere are known as scintillation. Scintillation can seriously impair a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) receiver tracking performance, thus affecting the required levels of availability, accuracy and integrity, and consequently the reliability of modern day GNSS based applications. This paper presents an analysis of correlation between scintillation levels and tracking performance of a GNSS receiver for GPS L1C/A, L2C and GLONASS L1, L2 signals. The analyses make use of data recorded over Presidente Prudente (22.1°S, 51.4°W, dip latitude ˜12.3°S) in Brazil, a location close to the Equatorial Ionisation Anomaly (EIA) crest in Latin America. The study presents for the first time this type of correlation analysis for GPS L2C and GLONASS L1, L2 signals. The scintillation levels are defined by the amplitude scintillation index, S4 and the receiver tracking performance is evaluated by the phase tracking jitter. Both S4 and the phase tracking jitter are estimated from the post correlation In-Phase (I) and Quadra-Phase (Q) components logged by the receiver at a high rate. Results reveal that the dependence of the phase tracking jitter on the scintillation levels can be represented by a quadratic fit for the signals. The results presented in this paper are of importance to GNSS users, especially in view of the forthcoming high phase of solar cycle 24 (predicted for 2013).

  6. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  7. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  8. Applications for Large Solid Scintillator Detectors in Neutrino and Particle Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, Alan D.

    2012-08-01

    Applications for solid scintillator have expanded tremendously over the last decade due, in part, to the development of extruded plastic scintillator. In addition, the rapid development of new solid-state photo detectors over the last few years has further expanded the possibilities for this type of detector. This talk will review the state-of-the-art in solid scintillator detectors focusing on applications in neutrino physics, and will present some new possibilities for inorganic scintillator use in particle astrophysics experiments.

  9. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  10. Effects of multiple scattering on scintillation of transionospheric radio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Yeh, K. C.; Youakim, M. Y.; Wernik, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recent development in the optical scintillation theory has been adapted to the ionospheric geometry in order to study the ionospheric scintillation phenomenon in the presence of multiple scattering. Under approximations well satisfied in typical ionospheres for a frequency above about 20 MHz, the first through fourth moment equations have been derived and some analytic solutions given. The fourth moment equation has also been solved numerically. The numerical results show clearly the occurrence of focusing and saturation phenomena. The new multiple-scatter effects are emphasized.

  11. Evaluating Small Scintillating Cells for Digital Hadron Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This thesis discusses the use of scintillator cells with digital electronics as a basis for a digital hadron calorimeter. The detection of a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), analysis of crosstalk, and determination of light yield for the array of scintillating cells are described. The cells were found to have a light yield (in terms of single photoelectrons per MIP) of 7 to 13. Crosstalk due to transfer of light between adjacent cells or photomultiplier tube channels can reach 45%. Rejection versus efficiency studies show that single-channel thresholds can be set that reject noise while accepting MIP signals.

  12. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  13. Scintillating optical fibers for fine-grained hodoscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fast detectors with fine spatial resolution will be needed to exploit high event rates at ISABELLE. Scintillating optical fibers for fine grained hodoscopes have been developed by the authors. A commercial manufacturer of optical fibers has drawn and clad PVT scintillator. Detection efficiencies greater than 99% have been achieved for a 1 mm fiber with a PMT over lengths up to 60 cm. Small diameter PMT's and avalanche photodiodes have been tested with the fibers. Further improvements are sought for the fiber and for the APD's sensitivity and coupling efficiency with the fiber.

  14. Data Analysis for the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    The scintillating optical fiber calorimeter is a hybrid instrument with both active and passive components for measuring the proton and helium cosmic ray spectra from 0.2 to IO TeV kinetic energy. A thin emulsion/x-ray film chamber is situated between a cerenkov counter and an imaging calorimeter. Scintillating optical fibers sample the electromagnetic showers that develop in the calorimeter and identify the trajectory of cosmic rays that interact in SOFCAL. The emulsion/x-ray film data provide an in flight calibration for SOFCAL. The data reduction techniques used will be discussed and interim results of the analysis from a 20 hour balloon flight will be presented.

  15. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Instrument Performance (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Benson, C. M.; Berry, F. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J. S.; Munroe, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    SOFCAL is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the P-He cosmic ray spectra from about 200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. SOFCAL uses a thin lead and scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter to measure the cascades produced by cosmic rays interacting in the hybrid detector system. Above the fiber calorimeter is an emulsion chamber that provides the interaction target, primary particle identification and in-flight energy calibration for the scintillating fiber data. The energy measurement technique and its calibration are described, and the present results from the analysis of a 1 day balloon flight will be presented.

  16. Higher order mode laser beam scintillations in oceanic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    In a horizontal oceanic optical wireless communication link, the scintillation index (the measure for the intensity fluctuations) of the received intensity caused by the oceanic turbulence is formulated and evaluated when the source is a higher order mode laser. Variations in the scintillation index vs. the underwater turbulence parameters, size of the higher order mode laser source, link length, and the wavelength are examined. Underwater turbulence parameters are the ratio that determines the relative strength of temperature and salinity in driving the index fluctuations, the rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy, and the Kolmogorov microscale length.

  17. Scintillation characterization of thallium-doped lithium iodide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajid; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2015-09-01

    The paper discusses scintillation and luminescence properties of thallium-doped LiI crystals, grown by the Bridgman technique. X-ray induced emission spectrum is obtained between 380 nm and 600 nm, and is attributed to the Tl+ ion. The photoluminescence measurement with the excitation wavelength of 305 nm revealed a similar emission spectrum. Light yield, energy resolution and scintillation decay time profiles were studied under 662 keV (137Cs) γ-ray excitation. A maximum light yield of 14,000±1400 ph/MeV and two exponential decay time components were obtained.

  18. Design, fabrication, and test of a fast scintillation detector preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezboruah, T.; Boruah, K.; Boruah, P. K.

    2002-07-01

    A fast scintillation detector preamplifier is designed, which uses an operational video amplifier (type: LM733). Despite its simplicity, the preamplifier exhibits good noise and speed parameters. The amplifier is specially designed for an extensive air shower experiment [T. Bezboruh, K. Boruah, and P. K. Boruah, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 410, 206 (1998); Astropart. Phys. 11, 395 (1999)], Gauhati University, Assam, India. Plastic scintillators and fast photomultiplier tubes are used in the experiment to detect ultra high energy cosmic ray events. Here we report the characteristics of the amplifier including the hardware and its performances in the experiment.

  19. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  20. Silica scintillating materials prepared by sol-gel methods

    SciTech Connect

    Werst, D.W.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Cromack, K.R.; Lin, Y.; Tartakovsky, E.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    Silica was investigated as a rad-hard alternative to organic polymer hosts for organic scintillators. Silica sol-gels were prepared by hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in alcohol solutions. organic dyes were incorporated into the gels by dissolving in methanol at the sol stage of gel formation. The silica sol-gel matrix is very rad-hard. The radiation stability of silica scintillators prepared by this method is dye-limited. Transient radioluminescence was measured following excitation with 30 ps pulses of 20 MeV electrons.

  1. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  2. Development of lithium-loaded liquid scintillator for PROSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcini, Danielle; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will use a segmented detector positioned 7-20m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor core to measure the antineutrino spectrum of uranium-235 and perform a sterile neutrino search. Such measurements require the use of liquid scintillator with the capability to distinguish prompt and delayed signals from inverse beta decay events. The characterization of light yield, pulse shape discrimination performance, and neutron capture properties of the lithium-loaded scintillator have been studied with a test detector at Yale. These results will be discussed in the context of their application to antineutrino detection with the PROSPECT experiment. on behalf of the PROSPECT collaboration.

  3. The Plastic Scintillator Detector of the DAMPE space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Explorer (DAMPE) is a satellite based experiment aiming for dark matter search and many other topics astronomy interested. The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) gives DAMPE the ability to measure charge of the crossing particles and separate gamma from electrons, which are necessary for achieving the goals of the experiment. The PSD is composed by 82 scintillator counters and read at both ends by a total of 162 photomultiplier tubes. In this paper, we describe the final design of DAMPE-PSD, the expected performances, and shows some results of the beam test carried on at CERN.

  4. Methods of alleviation of ionospheric scintillation effects on digital communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The degradation of the performance of digital communication systems because of ionospheric scintillation effects can be reduced either by diversity techniques or by coding. The effectiveness of traditional space-diversity, frequency-diversity and time-diversity techniques is reviewed and design considerations isolated. Time-diversity signaling is then treated as an extremely simple form of coding. More advanced coding methods, such as diffuse threshold decoding and burst-trapping decoding, which appear attractive in combatting scintillation effects are discussed and design considerations noted. Finally, adaptive coding techniques appropriate when the general state of the channel is known are discussed.

  5. RNAi Screening in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhanita; Singh, Gatikrushna; Sachdev, Bindiya; Kumar, Ajit; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a potent and precise reverse genetic approach to carryout large-scale functional genomic studies in a given organism. During the past decade, RNAi has also emerged as an important investigative tool to understand the process of viral pathogenesis. Our laboratory has successfully generated transgenic reporter and RNAi sensor line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cells and developed a reversal of silencing assay via siRNA or shRNA guided screening to investigate RNAi factors or viral pathogenic factors with extraordinary fidelity. Here we describe empirical approaches and conceptual understanding to execute successful RNAi screening in Spodoptera frugiperda 21-cell line. PMID:27581295

  6. GPS scintillation and TEC depletion near the northern crest of equatorial anomaly over South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Baichang; Huang, Jiang; Liu, Weifeng; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lingfeng

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a statistical analysis of GPS L-band scintillation with data observed from July 2008 to March 2012 at the northern crest of equatorial anomaly stations in Guangzhou and Shenzhen of South China. The variations of the scintillation with local time, season, solar activity and duration of scintillation patches were investigated. The relationship between the scintillation and TEC depletion was also reported. Our results revealed that GPS scintillation occurred from 19:30 LT (pre-midnight) to 03:00 LT (post-midnight). During quiet solar activity years, the scintillation was only observed in pre-midnight hours of equinox months and patches durations were mostly less than 60 min. During high solar activity years, more scintillation occurred in the pre-midnight hours of equinox and winter months; and GPS scintillation started to occur in the post-midnight hours of summer and winter. The duration of scintillation patches extended to 180 min in high solar activity years. Solar activity had a larger effect to strong scintillations (S4 > 0.6) than to weak scintillations (0.6 ⩾ S4 > 0.2). Strong scintillations were accompanied by TEC depletion especially in equinox months. We also discussed the relationship between TEC depletion and plasma bubble.

  7. Optical design considerations for efficient light collection from liquid scintillation counters.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L; Fuller, Erin S; Keillor, Martin E; Morley, Shannon M; Mullen, Crystal A; Orrell, John L; Panisko, Mark E; Warren, Glen A; Wright, Michael E

    2015-03-20

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation. For reliable operation, the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low-background liquid scintillation counters, additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material present in the laboratory and within the instrument's construction materials. Low-background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) in a low-background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low-background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high-sensitivity LSC system. PMID:25968530

  8. Simulation results of liquid and plastic scintillator detectors for reactor antineutrino detection - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V. K. S.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation study of two kinds of scintillation detectors has been done using GEANT4. We compare plastic scintillator and liquid scintillator based designs for detecting electron antineutrinos emitted from the core of reactors. The motivation for this study is to set up an experiment at the research reactor facility at BARC for very short baseline neutrino oscillation study and remote reactor monitoring.

  9. Lithium-containing scintillators for thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma detection

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Carman, M. Leslie; Faust, Michelle A.

    2016-03-01

    In one embodiment, a scintillator includes a scintillator material; a primary fluor, and a Li-containing compound, where the Li-containing compound is soluble in the primary fluor, and where the scintillator exhibits an optical response signature for thermal neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  10. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors—a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  11. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  12. Methods of Fabricating Scintillators with Radioisotopes for Beta Battery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Squillante, Michael R.; Tieman, Timothy C.; Higgins, William; Shiriwadkar, Urmila

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been developed for a class of self-contained, long-duration power sources called beta batteries, which harvest the energy contained in the radioactive emissions from beta decay isotopes. The new battery is a significant improvement over the conventional phosphor/solar cell concept for converting this energy in three ways. First, the thin phosphor is replaced with a thick scintillator that is transparent to its own emissions. By using a scintillator sufficiently thick to completely stop all the beta particles, efficiency is greatly improved. Second, since the energy of the beta particles is absorbed in the scintillator, the semiconductor photodetector is shielded from radiation damage that presently limits the performance and lifetime of traditional phosphor converters. Finally, instead of a thin film of beta-emitting material, the isotopes are incorporated into the entire volume of the thick scintillator crystal allowing more activity to be included in the converter without self-absorption. There is no chemical difference between radioactive and stable strontium beta emitters such as Sr-90, so the beta emitter can be uniformly distributed throughout a strontium based scintillator crystal. When beta emitter material is applied as a foil or thin film to the surface of a solar cell or even to the surface of a scintillator, much of the radiation escapes due to the geometry, and some is absorbed within the layer itself, leading to inefficient harvesting of the energy. In contrast, if the emitting atoms are incorporated within the scintillator, the geometry allows for the capture and efficient conversion of the energy of particles emitted in any direction. Any gamma rays associated with secondary decays or Bremsstrahlung photons may also be absorbed within the scintillator, and converted to lower energy photons, which will in turn be captured by the photocell or photodiode. Some energy will be lost in this two-stage conversion process (high-energy particle

  13. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  14. On The Collocation of the Cusp Aurora and the GPS Phase Scintillation: A Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Moen, J.; Miloch, W.

    2015-12-01

    The climatology map of the GPS phase scintillation identifies two regions of high scintillation occurrences at high latitudes: around magnetic noon and around magnetic midnight. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher around magnetic noon, while the scintillation level is stronger around magnetic midnight. This study focuses on the dayside scintillation region. In order to resolve the role of the cusp auroral processes in the production of irregularities, we put the GPS phase scintillation in the context of the observed auroral morphology. Results show that the occurrence rate of the GPS phase scintillation is highest inside the auroral cusp, regardless of the scintillation strength and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). On average the scintillation occurrence rate in the cusp region is about 5 times as high as in the region immediately poleward of it. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher when the IMF BZ is negative. When partitioning the scintillation data by the IMF BY, the distribution of the scintillation occurrence rate around magnetic noon is similar to that of the poleward moving auroral form (PMAF) statistics: there is a higher occurrence rate at earlier (later) magnetic local time when the IMF BY is positive (negative). This indicates that the irregularities which give rise to scintillations follow the IMF BY controlled East-West motion of the aurora and plasma. Furthermore, the scintillation occurrence rate is higher when IMF BY is positive when the cusp is shifted towards the post-noon sector where it may get easier access to the higher density plasma. This suggests that the combined auroral activities (e.g., PMAF) and the density of the intake solar EUV ionized plasma are crucial for the production of scintillations.

  15. Geant4 simulation of zinc oxide nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide template as a low energy X-ray scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Ali; Saramad, Shahyar; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    In this work, ZnO nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide nanoporous template are proposed as an architecture for development of new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers. The optical response of crystalline ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous anodized aluminum oxide template under 20 keV X-ray illumination is simulated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The results show that anodized aluminum oxide template has a special impact as a light guide to conduct the optical photons induced by X-ray toward the detector thickness and to decrease the light scattering in detector volume. This inexpensive and effective method can significantly improve the spatial resolution in scintillator based X-ray imagers, especially in medical applications.

  16. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillator detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts.

  17. Direct determination of lead-210 by liquid-scintillation counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairman, W. D.; Sedlet, J.

    1969-01-01

    Soft betas, the internal conversion electrons, and unconverted gamma rays from lead-210 are efficiently detected in a liquid scintillation counting system with efficiency of 97 percent. The counter is interfaced with a multichannel pulse height analyzer. The spectra obtained is stored on paper tape and plotted on an x-y plotter.

  18. Ionospheric and tropospheric scintillation as a form of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremouw, E. J.; Rino, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent tests of signals observed through the ionosphere, the solar wind, and a laboratory plasma have revealed a surprising consistency in parameters describing the first order statistics of a signal caused to scintillate by a randomly structured plasma. This paper describes a means for exploiting these new findings in a transionospheric communication channel model.

  19. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillation detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts. PMID:24321820

  20. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such "medium-resolution" spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen.

  1. Optical and scintillation properties of Nd-doped complex garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Sato, Hiroki

    2014-12-01

    Nd 1% doped complex garnet scintillators were prepared by Furukawa and their optical and scintillation properties were investigated on a comparison with previously reported Nd-doped YAG. Chemical compositions of newly developed complex garnets were Lu2Y1Al5O12, Lu2Y1Ga3Al2O12, Lu2Gd1Al5O12, Lu2Gd1Ga3Al2O12, Gd1Y2Al5O12, Gd1Y2Ga3Al2O12, and Gd3Ga3Al2O12. They all showed 50-80% transmittance from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths with several absorption bands due to Gd3+ or Nd3+ 4f-4f transition. In X-ray induced radioluminescence spectra, all samples exhibited intense lines at 310 nm due to Gd3+ or 400 nm due to Nd3+ depending on their chemical composition. Among them, the highest scintillation light yield was achieved by Lu2Y1Al5O12. Typical scintillation decay times of them resulted 1.5-3 μs. Thermally stimulated glow curve after 1 Gy exposure and X-ray induced afterglow were also investigated.

  2. Event Localization in Bulk Scintillator Crystals Using Coded Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Braverman, Joshua B.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Harrison, Mark J.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Newby, Jason

    2015-06-01

    The localization of radiation interactions in bulk scintillators is generally limited by the size of the light distribution at the readout surface of the crystal/light-pipe system. By finding the centroid of the light spot, which is typically of order centimeters across, practical single-event localization is limited to ~2 mm/cm of crystal thickness. Similar resolution can also be achieved for the depth of interaction by measuring the size of the light spot. Through the use of near-field coded-aperture techniques applied to the scintillation light, light transport simulations show that for 3-cm-thick crystals, more than a five-fold improvement (millimeter spatial resolution) can be achieved both laterally and in event depth. At the core of the technique is the requirement to resolve the shadow from an optical mask placed in the scintillation light path between the crystal and the readout. In this paper, experimental results are presented that demonstrate the overall concept using a 1D shadow mask, a thin-scintillator crystal and a light pipe of varying thickness to emulate a 2.2-cm-thick crystal. Spatial resolutions of ~ 1 mm in both depth and transverse to the readout face are obtained over most of the crystal depth.

  3. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Weiss, Steven; Parsons, Ann; Lin, Robert P.; Smith, Garth

    1988-01-01

    Results for a prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber are presented. Its operation is discussed using two types of light detection schemes: one based on an Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave-shifting light fibers. The results are judged to demonstrate the instrument's potential.

  4. Organic scintillator detector response simulations with DRiFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, M. T.; Bates, C. R.; McKigney, E. A.; Solomon, C. J.; Sood, A.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the organic scintillation simulation capabilities of DRiFT, a post-processing Detector Response Function Toolkit for MCNP® output. DRiFT is used to create realistic scintillation detector response functions to incident neutron and gamma mixed-field radiation. As a post-processing tool, DRiFT leverages the extensively validated radiation transport capabilities of MCNP® 6 , which also provides the ability to simulate complex sources and geometries. DRiFT is designed to be flexible, it allows the user to specify scintillator material, PMT type, applied PMT voltage, and quenching data used in simulations. The toolkit's capabilities, which include the generation of pulse shape discrimination plots and full-energy detector spectra, are demonstrated in a comparison of measured and simulated neutron contributions from 252Cf and PuBe, and photon spectra from 22Na and 228Th sources. DRiFT reproduced energy resolution effects observed in EJ-301 measurements through the inclusion of scintillation yield variances, photon transport noise, and PMT photocathode and multiplication noise.

  5. Positronium signature in organic liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, D.; Consolati, G.; Trezzi, D.

    2011-01-15

    Electron antineutrinos are commonly detected in liquid scintillator experiments via inverse {beta} decay by looking at the coincidence between the reaction products: neutrons and positrons. Prior to positron annihilation, an electron-positron pair may form an orthopositronium (o-Ps) state, with a mean lifetime of a few nanoseconds. Even if the o-Ps decay is speeded up by spin-flip or pick-off effects, it may introduce distortions in the photon emission time distribution, crucial for position reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination algorithms in antineutrino experiments. Reversing the problem, the o-Ps-induced time distortion represents a new signature for tagging antineutrinos in liquid scintillator. In this article, we report the results of measurements of the o-Ps formation probability and lifetime for the most used solvents for organic liquid scintillators in neutrino physics (pseudocumene, linear alkyl benzene, phenylxylylethane, and dodecane). We characterize also a mixture of pseudocumene +1.5 g/l of 2,5-diphenyloxazole, a fluor acting as wavelength shifter. In the second part of the article, we demonstrate that the o-Ps-induced distortion of the scintillation photon emission time distributions represent an optimal signature for tagging positrons on an event by event basis, potentially enhancing the antineutrino detection.

  6. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D.; Yu, S. W.; Zhou, F.

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  7. [Automatic collection system of waste scintillator solution using micro robots].

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Yamada, R

    1985-12-01

    Industrial micro-robots are now being applied to hazardous jobs or tedious jobs. These in-house micro-robots (MELFA, RM-501, Mitsubishi Electric Inc.) were used to make a collection system of waste scintillator solution on the experimental basis. Newly developed were hands, vial holders and a system soft ware, and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  8. Bulk crystal growth of scintillator materials for gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan

    2008-10-01

    Within the past few years, it has been demonstrated that several new rare earth halide scintillation detector crystals such as cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) have high output and improved energy deposit to light linearity and thus they can substantially enhance the performance of the next generation of gamma ray detectors. These detectors have a variety of applications in NASA hard x-ray and gamma ray missions, high energy physics, home land security and medical imaging applications. This cerium doped lanthanum bromide crystal has ˜1100% the light output of BGO, resulting in better energy resolution than conventional scintillators. This is equivalent to 60000 photons per MeV of deposited energy. This new series of scintillator materials promise to usher a breakthrough in the field, if sufficiently large and clear crystals of this material can be grown. These halides however are highly hygroscopic and hence pose some difficulty in growing crystals. Efforts are being made to grow this and other materials in this family of crystals and successful results have been achieved. An overview of the challenges encountered during the synthesis and melt crystal growth of these rare earth halide scintillators shall be presented.

  9. Ca2+-Doped CeBr3 Scintillating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Foster, Michael E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Doty, F. Patrick; Shah, Kanai; Squillante, Michael R.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Hawrami, Rastgo; Tower, Josh; Yuan, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Despite the outstanding scintillation performance characteristics of cerium tribromide (CeBr3) and cerium-activated lanthanum tribromide, their commercial availability and application are limited due to the difficulties of growing large, crack-free single crystals from these fragile materials. This investigation employed aliovalent doping to increase crystal strength while maintaining the optical properties of the crystal. One divalent dopant (Ca2+) was used as a dopant to strengthen CeBr3 without negatively impacting scintillation performance. Ingots containing nominal concentrations of 1.9% of the Ca2+ dopant were grown. Preliminary scintillation measurements are presented for this aliovalently doped scintillator. Ca2+-doped CeBr3 exhibited little or no change in the peak fluorescence emission for 371 nm optical excitation for CeBr3. The structural, electronic, and optical properties of CeBr3 crystals were studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy band structures and density of states were obtained. The optical properties of CeBr3, including the dielectric function, were calculated.

  10. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  11. A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Noriko; Kato, Yuka; Tomozoe, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets (PS-pellets) by using a conventional liquid scintillation counter was developed. The PS-pellets used were 3 mm in both diameter and length. A low potassium glass vial was filled full with the pellets, and tritiated water was applied to the vial from 5 to 100 μl. Then, the sample solution was scattered in the interstices of the pellets in a vial. This method needs no liquid scintillator, so no liquid organic waste fluid is generated. The counting efficiency with the pellets was approximately 48 % when a 5 μl solution was used, which was higher than that of conventional measurement using liquid scintillator. The relationship between count rate and activity showed good linearity. The pellets were able to be used repeatedly, so few solid wastes are generated with this method. The PS-pellets are useful for tritiated water measurement; however, it is necessary to develop a new device which can be applied to a larger volume and measure low level concentration like an environmental application. PMID:26856930

  12. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the body by means of a photon radiation detector. This generic type of device may include...

  14. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  15. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  16. A study of liquid scintillator and fiber materials for use in a fiber calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Altice, P.P. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    This reports an investigation into the performance of selected scintillation oils and fiber materials to test their applicability in high energy, liquid scintillator calorimetry. Two scintillating oils, Bicron BC-517 and an oil mixed for the MACRO experiment, and two fiber materials, Teflon and GlassClad PS-252, were tested for the following properties: light yield, attenuation length and internal reflection angle. The results of these tests indicated that the scintillation oils and the fiber materials had an overall good performance with lower energies and would meet the requirements of liquid scintillator detection at SSC energies. 6 refs.

  17. Comparison of Ground Scintillation Spectra with Density Irregularities Observed in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. Y.; Su, S. Y.; Liu, C. H.

    The embedded Quasi-Periodic diffraction patterns are extracted from the scintillation data taken at Ascension Island and analyzed with a newly developed time-frequency analysis method of Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT). The scintillation spectra are studied for cases of strong and weak scintillations and compared with the spectra of plasma density irregularities observed by ROCSA-1/IPEI at 600 km altitude. Interesting results are obtained for the relationships between the locations of the irregularity density structure and the scintillation echoes during weak and strong scintillations.

  18. Review of plastic and liquid scintillation dosimetry for photon, electron, and proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam

    2016-10-01

    While scintillation dosimetry has been around for decades, the need for a dosimeter tailored to the reality of modern radiation therapy—in particular a real-time, water-equivalent, energy-independent dosimeter with high spatial resolution—has generated renewed interest in scintillators over the last 10 years. With the advent of at least one commercial plastic scintillation dosimeter and the ever-growing scientific literature on this subject, this topical review is intended to provide the medical physics community with a wide overview of scintillation physics, related optical concepts, and applications of plastic scintillation dosimetry.

  19. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  20. High latitude scintillation effects on very high frequency /vhf/ and S-band satellite transmissions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    A scintillation study was conducted with the purpose to define the extent of scintillation activity in the S-band region, and to determine if such activities at higher frequencies are caused by ionospheric irregularities similar to those causing scintillations at vhf and lower frequencies. Simultaneous transmissions at 137 and 1695 MHz from polar orbiting satellites were used in this study. Scintillations were found to be present at S-band frequencies in the polar regions; it is concluded that they are caused by ionospheric characteristics similar to those causing scintillations at lower frequencies.

  1. A comparison of TEC fluctuations and scintillations at Ascension Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Groves, K. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Doherty, P.

    1999-11-01

    With increasing reliance on space-based platforms for global navigation and communication, concerns about the impact of ionospheric scintillation on these systems have become a high priority. Recently, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) performed amplitude scintillation measurements of L1 (1.575 MHz) signals from GPS satellites at Ascension Island (14.45° W, 7.95° S; magnetic latitude 16° S) during February-April, 1998, to compare amplitude scintillations with fluctuations of the total electron content (TEC). Ascension Island is located in the South Atlantic under the southern crest of the equatorial anomaly of F2 ionization where scintillations will be much enhanced during the upcoming solar maximum period. Ascension Island is included in the global network of the International GPS Service (IGS) and the GPS receivers in this network report the carrier to noise (C/N) ratio, the dual frequency carrier phase and pseudorange data at 30-s intervals. Such data with a sampling interval of 30 s were analyzed to determine TEC, the rate of change of TEC (ROT) and also ROTI, defined as the standard deviation of ROT. The spatial scale of ROTI, sampled at 30 s interval, will correspond to 6 km when the vector sum of the ionospheric projection of the satellite velocity and the irregularity drift orthogonal to the propagation path is of the order of 100 m/s. On the other hand, the scale-length of the amplitude scintillation index corresponds to the Fresnel dimension which is about 400 m for the GPS L1 frequency and an ionospheric height of 400 km. It is shown that, in view of the co-existence of large and small scale irregularities in equatorial irregularity structures, during the early evening hours, and small magnitude of irregularity drifts, ROTI measurements can be used to predict the presence of scintillation causing irregularities. The quantitative relationship between ROTI and S4, however, varies considerably due to variations of the ionospheric projection of the

  2. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Christoph W.; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the 30× 30 scintillator pixel array with an 8× 8 SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner’s spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner’s overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time.

  3. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Christoph W; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-21

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the 30 × 30 scintillator pixel array with an 8 × 8 SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner's spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner's overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time. PMID:26836394

  4. NEXT GENERATION NEUTRON SCINTILLATORS BASED ON SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Cai-Lin Wang

    2008-06-30

    The results reported here successfully demonstrate the technical feasibility of ZnS QDs/{sup 6}LiF/polymer composites as thermal neutron scintillators. PartTec has obtained stable ZnS QDs with a quantum yield of 17% induced by UV light, and light pulse decay lifetimes of 10-30 ns induced by both UV and neutrons. These lifetime values are much shorter than those of commercial ZnS microparticle and {sup 6}Li-glass scintillators. Clear pulse height peaks induced by neutron irradiation were seen for PartTec's ZnS nanocomposites. By adjusting the concentrations, particle size and degree of dispersion of ZnS QD/{sup 6}LiF in a PVA matrix, the light absorption and light yield of films at 420-440 nm can be optimized. PartTec's novel scintillators will replace traditional {sup 6}Li-glass and ZnS/{sup 6}LiF:Ag scintillators if the PL quantum yield can be improved above 30%, and/or increase the transparency of present nanoscintillators. Time and resources inhibited PartTec's total success in Phase I. For example, bulk doping preparations of ZnS QDs with Ag{sup +}, Eu{sup 3+} or Ce{sup 3+} QDs was impractical given those constraints, nor did they permit PartTec to measure systematically the change of PL decay lifetimes in different samples. PartTec will pursue these studies in the current proposal, as well as develop a better capping and dopant along with developing brighter and faster ZnS QD scintillators.

  5. Comparison of the scintillation noise above different observatories measured with MASS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.; Sarazin, M.; Tokovinin, A.; Travouillon, T.; Voziakova, O.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: Scintillation noise is a major limitation of ground-based photometric precision. Methods: An extensive dataset of stellar scintillation collected at 11 astronomical sites world-wide with MASS instruments was used to estimate the scintillation noise of large telescopes in the fast photometry and traditional long-exposure regime. Results: Statistical distributions of the corresponding parameters are given. The scintillation noise is mostly determined by turbulence and wind in the upper atmosphere and is comparable at all sites, with slightly lower values at Mauna Kea and the highest noise at Tolonchar in Chile. We show that the classical Young's formula underestimates the scintillation noise. The temporal variations of the scintillation noise are also similar at all sites, showing short-term variability at time scales of 1 - 2 h and slower variations, including marked seasonal trends (stronger scintillation and less clear sky during local winter). Some correlation was found between nearby observatories.

  6. N-(2-Ethylhexyl)carbazole: A New Fluorophore Highly Suitable as a Monomolecular Liquid Scintillator.

    PubMed

    Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien; Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Magnier, Élodie; Coulon, Romain; Pansu, Robert B; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis, photophysical properties, and applications in scintillation counting of N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz) are reported. This molecule displays all of the required characteristics for an efficient liquid scintillator (emission wavelength, scintillation yield), and can be used without any extra fluorophores. Thus, its scintillation properties are discussed, as well as its fast neutron/gamma discrimination. For the latter application, the material is compared with the traditional liquid scintillator BC-501 A, and other liquid fluorescent molecules classically used as scintillation solvents, such as xylene, pseudocumene (PC), linear alkylbenzenes (LAB), diisopropylnaphthalene (DIN), 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MeNapht), and 4-isopropylbiphenyl (iPrBiph). For the first time, an excimeric form of a molecule has been advantageously used in scintillation counting. A moderate discrimination between fast neutrons and gamma rays was observed in bulk EHCz, with an apparent neutron/gamma discrimination potential half of that of BC-501 A. PMID:27406840

  7. Numerical evaluation of the light transport properties of alternative He-3 neutron detectors using ceramic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzu, A.; Takase, M.; Haruyama, M.; Kurata, N.; Kobayashi, N.; Kureta, M.; Nakamura, T.; Toh, K.; Sakasai, K.; Suzuki, H.; Soyama, K.; Seya, M.

    2015-10-01

    The light transport properties of scintillator light inside alternative He-3 neutron detectors using scintillator sheets have been investigated by a ray-tracing simulation code. The detector consists of a light-reflecting tube, a thin rectangular ceramic scintillator sheet laminated on a glass plate, and two photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) mounted at both ends of the detector tube. The flashes of light induced on the surface of the scintillator sheet via nuclear interaction between the scintillator and neutrons are detected by the two PMTs. The light output at both ends of various detectors in which the scintillator sheets are installed with several different arrangements were examined and evaluated in comparison with experimental results. The results derived from the simulation reveal that the light transport property is strongly dependent on the arrangement of the scintillator sheet inside the tube and the shape of the tube.

  8. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana; Kelar, Jakub; Kučera, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications.

  9. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  10. Development and characterization of a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator based dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Petric, M P; Robar, J L; Clark, B G

    2006-01-01

    High precision techniques in radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy, offer the potential for improved target coverage and increased normal tissue sparing compared with conformal radiotherapy. The complex fluence maps used in many of these techniques, however, often lead to more challenging quality assurance with dose verification being labor-intensive and time consuming. A prototype dose verification system has been developed using a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator that provides easy-to-acquire, rapid, digital dose measurements in a plane perpendicular to the beam. The system consists of a water-filled Lucite phantom with a scintillator screen built into the top surface. The phantom contains a silver coated plastic mirror to reflect scintillation light towards a viewing window where it is captured using a charge coupled device camera and a personal computer. Optical photon spread is removed using a microlouvre optical collimator and by deconvolving a glare kernel from the raw images. A characterization of the system was performed that included measurements of linear output response, dose rate dependence, spatial linearity, effective pixel size, signal uniformity and both short- and long-term reproducibility. The average pixel intensity for static, regular shaped fields between 3 cm X 3 cm and 12 cm x 12 cm imaged with the system was found to be linear in the dose delivered with linear regression analysis yielding a correlation coefficient r2 > 0.99. Effective pixel size was determined to be 0.53 mm/pixel. The system was found to have a signal uniformity of 5.6% and a long-term reproducibility/stability of 1.7% over a 6 month period. The system's ability to verify a dynamic treatment field was evaluated using 60 degrees dynamic wedged fields and comparing the results to two-dimensional film dosimetry. Results indicate agreement with two-dimensional film dosimetry distributions within 8% inside the field edges. With further

  11. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, Chao; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-11-24

    Complex doping schemes in R3Al5O12 (where R is the rare-earth element) garnet compounds have recently led to pronounced improvements in scintillator performance. Specifically, by admixing lutetium and yttrium aluminate garnets with gallium and gadolinium, the band gap is altered in a manner that facilitates the removal of deleterious electron trapping associated with cation antisite defects. Here, we expand upon this initial work to systematically investigate the effect of substitutional admixing on the energy levels of band edges. Density-functional theory and hybrid density-functional theory (HDFT) are used to survey potential admixing candidates that modify either the conduction-band minimum (CBM) or valence-bandmore » maximum (VBM). We consider two sets of compositions based on Lu3B5O12 where B is Al, Ga, In, As, and Sb, and R3Al5O12, where R is Lu, Gd, Dy, and Er. We find that admixing with various R cations does not appreciably affect the band gap or band edges. In contrast, substituting Al with cations of dissimilar ionic radii has a profound impact on the band structure. We further show that certain dopants can be used to selectively modify only the CBM or the VBM. Specifically, Ga and In decrease the band gap by lowering the CBM, while As and Sb decrease the band gap by raising the VBM, the relative change in band gap is quantitatively validated by HDFT. These results demonstrate a powerful approach to quickly screen the impact of dopants on the electronic structure of scintillator compounds, identifying those dopants which alter the band edges in very specific ways to eliminate both electron and hole traps responsible for performance limitations. Furthermore, this approach should be broadly applicable for the optimization of electronic and optical performance for a wide range of compounds by tuning the VBM and CBM.« less

  12. Characteristics of High-latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillation of GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, several years of multi-constellation global navigation satellite scintillation data collected at Alaska, Peru, and Ascension Island are analyzed to characterize scintillation features observed at high latitude and equatorial locations during the current solar maximum. Recognizing that strong scintillation data are often lost due to the lack of robustness in conventional GPS receivers used for ionosphere scintillation monitoring (ISM), an autonomous event driven scintillation data collection system using software-defined raw RF sampling devices have been developed deployed at a number of strategically selected high latitude and equatorial locations since 2009. This unique scintillation data recording system is triggered by indicators computed from a continuously operating ISM receiver and the raw RF data is post processed using advanced receiver signal processing algorithms designed to minimize carrier phase cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillations. Based on scintillation events extracted from the raw data, several statistical distributions are established to characterize the intensity, duration and occurrence frequency of scintillation. Results confirm that scintillation at low latitudes is generally more intense and longer lasting, while high-latitude scintillation is milder and usually dominated by phase fluctuations. Results also reveal the impacts of solar activity, geomagnetic activity and seasons on scintillation in different areas. Combining measurements from a co-located geo-magnetometer and corresponding global geomagnetic activities, qualitative and quantitative correlations between scintillation and both local and global geomagnetic activities have been obtained. Results show that in Alaska, the occurrence frequency and intensity of scintillation, especially phase fluctuations, have strong correlations with geomagnetic field intensity disturbances, while in equatorial stations, the correlation is not obvious.

  13. Ocular Emergencies: Screening Tool and Alert Protocol.

    PubMed

    Coronica, Rolly; Murty, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    Ocular emergencies such as central retinal artery occlusion, open globe injuries, eye chemical burns, retrobulbar hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and acute angle-closure glaucoma can result in vision loss. Diagnosis is based on astute screening, which can be guided by the OAP screening tool used by ophthalmic nurses engaged in triaging patients presenting with symptoms indicative of emergent vision or eye changes. The OAP provides direction to ophthalmic team members for treatment and management of ocular emergencies.

  14. A wearable sensor based on CLYC scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Benjamin S.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Zalavadia, Mital A.; Smart, John E.; Willett, Jesse A.; Landgren, Peter C.; Greulich, Christopher R.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a wearable radiation sensor using Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) for simultaneous gamma-ray and neutron detection. The system includes two ∅ 2.5 × 2.5cm3 crystals coupled to small, metal-body photomultiplier tubes. A custom, low-power electronics base digitizes the output signal at three time points and enables both pulse height and pulse shape discrimination of gamma rays and neutrons. The total counts, anomaly detection metrics, and identified isotopes are displayed on a small screen. Users may leave the device in unattended mode to collect long-dwell energy spectra. The system stores up to 18 h of one-second data, including energy spectra, and may transfer the data to a remote computer via a wired or wireless connection. The prototype is 18 × 13 × 7.5cm3, weighs 1.3 kg, not including the protective pouch, and runs on six AA alkaline batteries for 29 h with the wireless link active, or 41 h with the wireless link disabled. In this paper, we summarize the system design and present characterization results from the detector modules. The energy resolution is about 6.5% full width at half maximum at 662 keV due to the small photomultiplier tube selected, and the linearity and pulse shape discrimination performance are very good.

  15. Internal anisotropy of the turbulent scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a new concept of the Internal Anisotropy (IA) for the homogeneous and isotropic random fields. IA reflects the hidden structures that can exist in the samples of the random field, and are not revealed by the simplest, single and two-point statistical moments. There is presently no established theory of the IA, and no quantitative metrics of IA are available. It is understood, however, that IA cannot be present in any stationary isotropic Gaussian random field, or any single-point transformations of it. We illustrate the IA concept on a simple toy model of two-dimensional random field, and show that IA can affect the third and higher-order multipoint statistical moments. We generate samples of the random irradiance distributions for the plane wave passed through a phase screen with the quasi- Kolmogorov statistics. Visual evaluation suggests the presence of the IA in the irradiance samples. The statistical analysis reveals that the three-point third moment of irradiance exhibit the features consistent with the IA, especially in the focusing conditions. Conditional probabilities of the irradiance gradient components also proved to be sensitive to the IA. We discuss the role of the IA for optimal placement of the multiple receivers of the FSO system using the spatial diversity for fade mitigation.

  16. Medication Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quit Smoking Benefits of Quitting Health Effects of Smoking Secondhand Smoke Withdrawal Ways to Quit QuitGuide Pregnancy & Motherhood Pregnancy & Motherhood Before Your Baby is Born From Birth to 2 Years Quitting for Two SmokefreeMom Healthy Kids Parenting & ... Weight Management Weight Management ...

  17. Homebuyer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  18. Freestyle Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This booklet serves as an introduction to the concept of Freestyle, a career awareness project designed to encourage nine- to twelve-year-olds to freely explore their interests, develop their skills, and choose their career paths. The booklet includes an explanation of the Freestyle project, goals, and components (t.v. programs, project guide,…

  19. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsky, Ronald B.; Schnitger, Ronald L.

    This guide provides teachers with copies of the materials given to students participating in the oceanography program of the Orange County Floating Laboratory Program and provides information concerning colleges and universities offering courses in oceanography and marine science, source of films, and sources of publications concerning the Navy's…

  20. Ultrasonography-guided punctures-with and without puncture guide.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mahesh

    2009-10-01

    The key requisite of any percutaneous nephrolithotomy technique is access to the collecting system. The kidney has a high degree of vascular network and is liable for vascular injury. Therefore, for an ideal puncture, a percutaneous tract would be developed that leads straight from the skin through a papilla and the target calix into the renal pelvis. Percutaneous renal access can be achieved under fluoroscopic control or using an ultrasonography (US)-guided puncture. The shortcomings and side effects of extensive radiation during therapeutic procedures are well known. The choice of method for the type of access depends on training and personal preference. The advantages of US-guided puncture are avoidance of radiation, avoiding adjacent and visceral injury and, most importantly, intrarenal vascular injury. US offers the shortest and straight access to the collecting system with minimal morbidity. US-guided access is of particular importance in the pediatric population and in special situations in which the procedure is performed with the patient in the supine position. I believe US-guided puncture has a significant reduction in complications. The available ultrasound probes come with a puncture attachment and, on US scanning, the puncture pathway is represented by an electronic dotted line on the scanner screen, which facilitates exact placement of the needle. US-guided access is optimal with a needle guide, because the electronic dotted line helps in assessing the depth and plane of the puncture needle. This helps in reaching the desired calix in the most accurate way. US access without a needle guide is useful in bedside procedures, in grossly hydronephrotic systems, and nonavailability of an electronic guide. We think the punctures with this technique are suboptimal. Both methods need a certain degree of training and orientation. The training in US should be structured.