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Sample records for sclerosis lesion detection

  1. Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Detection Using Constrained GMM and Curve Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Freifeld, Oren; Greenspan, Hayit; Goldberger, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the detection and segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in magnetic resonance (MRI) brain images. To capture the complex tissue spatial layout, a probabilistic model termed Constrained Gaussian Mixture Model (CGMM) is proposed based on a mixture of multiple spatially oriented Gaussians per tissue. The intensity of a tissue is considered a global parameter and is constrained, by a parameter-tying scheme, to be the same value for the entire set of Gaussians that are related to the same tissue. MS lesions are identified as outlier Gaussian components and are grouped to form a new class in addition to the healthy tissue classes. A probability-based curve evolution technique is used to refine the delineation of lesion boundaries. The proposed CGMM-CE algorithm is used to segment 3D MRI brain images with an arbitrary number of channels. The CGMM-CE algorithm is automated and does not require an atlas for initialization or parameter learning. Experimental results on both standard brain MRI simulation data and real data indicate that the proposed method outperforms previously suggested approaches, especially for highly noisy data. PMID:19756161

  2. detecting multiple sclerosis lesions with a fully bioinspired visual attention model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon-Reina, Julio; Gutierrez-Carvajal, Ricardo; Thompson, Paul M.; Romero-Castro, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    The detection, segmentation and quantification of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions on magnetic resonance images (MRI) has been a very active field for the last two decades because of the urge to correlate these measures with the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment. A myriad of methods has been developed and most of these are non specific for the type of lesions and segment the lesions in their acute and chronic phases together. On the other hand, radiologists are able to distinguish between several stages of the disease on different types of MRI images. The main motivation of the work presented here is to computationally emulate the visual perception of the radiologist by using modeling principles of the neuronal centers along the visual system. By using this approach we are able to detect the lesions in the majority of the images in our population sample. This type of approach also allows us to study and improve the analysis of brain networks by introducing a priori information.

  3. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-07

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  4. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  5. Robust detection of multiple sclerosis lesions from intensity-normalized multi-channel MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpate, Yogesh; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with heterogeneous evolution among the patients. Quantitative analysis of longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) provides a spatial analysis of the brain tissues which may lead to the discovery of biomarkers of disease evolution. Better understanding of the disease will lead to a better discovery of pathogenic mechanisms, allowing for patient-adapted therapeutic strategies. To characterize MS lesions, we propose a novel paradigm to detect white matter lesions based on a statistical framework. It aims at studying the benefits of using multi-channel MRI to detect statistically significant differences between each individual MS patient and a database of control subjects. This framework consists in two components. First, intensity standardization is conducted to minimize the inter-subject intensity difference arising from variability of the acquisition process and different scanners. The intensity normalization maps parameters obtained using a robust Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) estimation not affected by the presence of MS lesions. The second part studies the comparison of multi-channel MRI of MS patients with respect to an atlas built from the control subjects, thereby allowing us to look for differences in normal appearing white matter, in and around the lesions of each patient. Experimental results demonstrate that our technique accurately detects significant differences in lesions consequently improving the results of MS lesion detection.

  6. Objective detection and localization of multiple sclerosis lesions on magnetic resonance brainstem images: validation with auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Stufflebeam, S M; Levine, R A; Gardner, J C; Fullerton, B C; Furst, M; Rosen, B R

    2000-01-01

    To develop an objective method for detecting multiple sclerosis (MS) brainstem lesions, magnetic resonance (MR) images (multiple planar, spin-echo, acquired in three planes of section) of sixteen MS patients and fourteen normal subjects were analyzed with an algorithm that detected regions with a relatively increased intensity on both a spin-echo image and a T2 image. To be considered a lesion, such regions had to overlap in at least two orthogonal planes. Using a digitized atlas of the human brainstem, the lesion locations were mapped with respect to the brainstem anatomy. This method was evaluated by comparing the location of MS lesions with the brainstem auditory evoked potentials obtained from these subjects. Brainstem lesions were detected in five MS patients; four had lesions impinging upon the auditory system and one did not. All four had abnormal evoked potentials. The fourteen normal subjects, the one MS patient with brainstem lesions outside the auditory pathway, and the eleven other MS patients with no brainstem lesions all had normal evoked potentials. The requirement that lesions be detected in at least two planes of section greatly improved the specificity of the algorithm. The consistency between the MR and brainstem auditory evoked potentials results supports the validity of this imaging analysis algorithm for objectively localizing brainstem lesions.

  7. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: detection of clinically silent lesions by multimodal evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Treiber-Held, Stephanie; Brockmann, Knut; Gärtner, Jutta; Hanefeld, Folker

    2006-07-01

    Pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently do not meet MRI criteria for diagnosis because of lack of evidence of dissemination in space. We assessed the diagnostic utility of multimodal evoked potentials (EP). In 46% of 85 childhood patients with MS, spatial dissemination was detected by EP before the second clinical attack. EP may constitute an important tool for earlier diagnosis of pediatric MS.

  8. IMaGe: Iterative Multilevel Probabilistic Graphical Model for Detection and Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Subbanna, Nagesh; Precup, Doina; Arnold, Douglas; Arbel, Tal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present IMaGe, a new, iterative two-stage probabilistic graphical model for detection and segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions. Our model includes two levels of Markov Random Fields (MRFs). At the bottom level, a regular grid voxel-based MRF identifies potential lesion voxels, as well as other tissue classes, using local and neighbourhood intensities and class priors. Contiguous voxels of a particular tissue type are grouped into regions. A higher, non-lattice MRF is then constructed, in which each node corresponds to a region, and edges are defined based on neighbourhood relationships between regions. The goal of this MRF is to evaluate the probability of candidate lesions, based on group intensity, texture and neighbouring regions. The inferred information is then propagated to the voxel-level MRF. This process of iterative inference between the two levels repeats as long as desired. The iterations suppress false positives and refine lesion boundaries. The framework is trained on 660 MRI volumes of MS patients enrolled in clinical trials from 174 different centres, and tested on a separate multi-centre clinical trial data set with 535 MRI volumes. All data consists of T1, T2, PD and FLAIR contrasts. In comparison to other MRF methods, such as, and a traditional MRF, IMaGe is much more sensitive (with slightly better PPV). It outperforms its nearest competitor by around 20% when detecting very small lesions (3-10 voxels). This is a significant result, as such lesions constitute around 40% of the total number of lesions.

  9. Fibronectin in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, R. A.; Mitchell, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cryostat sections of central nervous system (CNS) tissues of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other CNS diseases were stained with antibodies to fibronectin, a macrophage fibronectin receptor component, fibrin/fibrinogen, and albumin using immunoperoxidase. In active, but not inactive, MS plaques vessel fibronectin was increased (to approximately 57% of Factor VIII+ vessels) over uninvolved MS and normal control white matter (P less than 0.001 for both). Fibronectin was primarily localized to vessel walls and amount of staining correlated with degree of inflammation. Active plaques and necrotic lesions also had extracellular fibronectin and fibrin/ogen. These molecules and the fibronectin receptor were found on macrophages. Albumin was more widely and diffusely distributed in lesions than fibronectin. Thus, in addition to extravasation from damaged vessels, fibronectin may be deposited on or synthesized by endothelial cells and macrophages in the CNS. Fibronectin could facilitate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell luminal surfaces, promote migration of mononuclear cells, and enhance myelin phagocytosis in MS lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2528301

  10. Increasing the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of multiple sclerosis lesions by long axial coverage of the spinal cord: a prospective study in 119 patients.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Gradl, Johann; Hähnel, Stefan; Hielscher, Thomas; Wildemann, Brigitte; Diem, Ricarda; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging criteria of multiple sclerosis (MS) include the spatial and temporal dissemination of cerebral and/or spinal cord lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up disease monitoring. Current guidelines for spinal MRI recommend sagittal imaging of the spinal cord and lesion confirmation on axial planes if lesions are detected. Sagittal imaging is, however, hampered by technical (e.g. partial volume effects, motion artifacts) and anatomical (e.g. scoliosis) limitations. We hypothesized that long coverage of the spinal cord by axial image acquisition has superior diagnostic performance compared to sagittal imaging and can identify otherwise undetected lesions. Our prospective clinical study included 119 MS patients. Axial MRI revealed ~2.5-fold more lesions than the sagittal angulation (axial lesion load: 4.0 ± 2.4 vs. 1.6 ± 1.2 lesions on sagittal planes, p < 0.001). Importantly, 20 patients (17%) with normal sagittal MRI scans had unequivocal lesions only visible on axial planes (mean lesion number on axial planes in these patients: 2.0 ± 1.3). Moreover, 45 patients (38%) showed a discrepancy of ≥3 lesions that were found additionally on axial scans (mean difference 4.4 ± 1.7). Additionally identified lesions were on average smaller in size and located more laterally within the spinal cord. No lesion on sagittal images was missed on the axial angulation. Our study demonstrates that imaging of small axial segments for lesion confirmation is insufficient in spinal imaging. We recommend implementing a long coverage axial MRI sequence for spinal imaging of MS patients.

  11. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  12. Oxidative damage in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Fischer, Marie T; Frischer, Josa M; Bauer, Jan; Höftberger, Romana; Botond, Gergö; Esterbauer, Harald; Binder, Christoph J; Witztum, Joseph L; Lassmann, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are currently poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Since mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, we analysed by immunocytochemistry the presence and cellular location of oxidized lipids and oxidized DNA in lesions and in normal-appearing white matter of 30 patients with multiple sclerosis and 24 control patients without neurological disease or brain lesions. As reported before in biochemical studies, oxidized lipids and DNA were highly enriched in active multiple sclerosis plaques, predominantly in areas that are defined as initial or 'prephagocytic' lesions. Oxidized DNA was mainly seen in oligodendrocyte nuclei, which in part showed signs of apoptosis. In addition, a small number of reactive astrocytes revealed nuclear expression of 8-hydroxy-d-guanosine. Similarly, lipid peroxidation-derived structures (malondialdehyde and oxidized phospholipid epitopes) were seen in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and some astrocytes. In addition, oxidized phospholipids were massively accumulated in a fraction of axonal spheroids with disturbed fast axonal transport as well as in neurons within grey matter lesions. Neurons stained for oxidized phospholipids frequently revealed signs of degeneration with fragmentation of their dendritic processes. The extent of lipid and DNA oxidation correlated significantly with inflammation, determined by the number of CD3 positive T cells and human leucocyte antigen-D expressing macrophages and microglia in the lesions. Our data suggest profound oxidative injury of oligodendrocytes and neurons to be associated with active demyelination and axonal or neuronal injury in multiple sclerosis.

  13. Multiple sclerosis lesions of the auditory pons are not silent.

    PubMed

    Levine, R A; Gardner, J C; Fullerton, B C; Stufflebeam, S M; Furst, M; Rosen, B R

    1994-10-01

    To understand the relationship between brainstem lesions and auditory neurology in patients with multiple sclerosis, we compared behavioural, electrophysiological and imaging data in 38 patients with probable or definite multiple sclerosis and normal or near normal hearing. Behavioural measures included (i) general hearing tests (audiogram, speech discrimination) and (ii) hearing tests likely to be critically dependent upon brainstem processing (masking level difference, interaural time and level discrimination). Brainstem auditory evoked potentials provided the electrophysiological data. Multiplanar high-resolution MRI of the brainstem provided the anatomical data. Interaural time discrimination for high-frequency sounds was by far the most sensitive of all tests with abnormalities in 71% of all subjects. Whenever any other test was abnormal this test was always abnormal. Interaural time discrimination for low-frequency sounds and evoked potentials were closely related and next most sensitive with abnormalities in approximately 40% of all subjects. Interaural level discrimination and masking level difference were least sensitive with abnormalities in < 10% of subjects. Speech discrimination scores correlated significantly with the masking level differences, as well as with interaural time discrimination for high-frequency sounds. Pontine lesions were found in five of the 16 patients, in whom an objective method for detecting magnetic resonance lesions could be applied. All four with lesions involving the pontine auditory pathway had marked abnormalities in interaural time discrimination and evoked potentials. None of the other 12 had evoked potentials abnormalities. We conclude that neurological tests requiring precise neural timing can reveal behavioural deficits for multiple sclerosis lesions of the auditory pons that are otherwise 'silent'. Of all neurological systems the auditory system at the level of the pons is probably the most sensitive to multiple

  14. Improved spatial regression analysis of diffusion tensor imaging for lesion detection during longitudinal progression of multiple sclerosis in individual subjects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilan; Qiu, Xing; Zhu, Tong; Tian, Wei; Hu, Rui; Ekholm, Sven; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific longitudinal DTI study is vital for investigation of pathological changes of lesions and disease evolution. Spatial Regression Analysis of Diffusion tensor imaging (SPREAD) is a non-parametric permutation-based statistical framework that combines spatial regression and resampling techniques to achieve effective detection of localized longitudinal diffusion changes within the whole brain at individual level without a priori hypotheses. However, boundary blurring and dislocation limit its sensitivity, especially towards detecting lesions of irregular shapes. In the present study, we propose an improved SPREAD (dubbed improved SPREAD, or iSPREAD) method by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filtering method, which provides edge-preserving image smoothing through a nonlinear scale space approach. The statistical inference based on iSPREAD was evaluated and compared with the original SPREAD method using both simulated and in vivo human brain data. Results demonstrated that the sensitivity and accuracy of the SPREAD method has been improved substantially by adapting nonlinear anisotropic filtering. iSPREAD identifies subject-specific longitudinal changes in the brain with improved sensitivity, accuracy, and enhanced statistical power, especially when the spatial correlation is heterogeneous among neighboring image pixels in DTI.

  15. Improved spatial regression analysis of diffusion tensor imaging for lesion detection during longitudinal progression of multiple sclerosis in individual subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilan; Qiu, Xing; Zhu, Tong; Tian, Wei; Hu, Rui; Ekholm, Sven; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-03-01

    Subject-specific longitudinal DTI study is vital for investigation of pathological changes of lesions and disease evolution. Spatial Regression Analysis of Diffusion tensor imaging (SPREAD) is a non-parametric permutation-based statistical framework that combines spatial regression and resampling techniques to achieve effective detection of localized longitudinal diffusion changes within the whole brain at individual level without a priori hypotheses. However, boundary blurring and dislocation limit its sensitivity, especially towards detecting lesions of irregular shapes. In the present study, we propose an improved SPREAD (dubbed improved SPREAD, or iSPREAD) method by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filtering method, which provides edge-preserving image smoothing through a nonlinear scale space approach. The statistical inference based on iSPREAD was evaluated and compared with the original SPREAD method using both simulated and in vivo human brain data. Results demonstrated that the sensitivity and accuracy of the SPREAD method has been improved substantially by adapting nonlinear anisotropic filtering. iSPREAD identifies subject-specific longitudinal changes in the brain with improved sensitivity, accuracy, and enhanced statistical power, especially when the spatial correlation is heterogeneous among neighboring image pixels in DTI.

  16. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  17. Reliability of cortical lesion detection on double inversion recovery MRI applying the MAGNIMS-Criteria in multiple sclerosis patients within a 16-months period

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christian; Ceyrowski, Tim; Broocks, Gabriel; Treffler, Natascha; Sedlacik, Jan; Stürner, Klarissa; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), Double Inversion Recovery (DIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify cortical lesions (CL). We sought to evaluate the reliability of CL detection on DIR longitudinally at multiple subsequent time-points applying the MAGNIMs scoring criteria for CLs. Methods 26 MS patients received a 3T-MRI (Siemens, Skyra) with DIR at 12 time-points (TP) within a 16 months period. Scans were assessed in random order by two different raters. Both raters separately marked all CLs on each scan and total lesion numbers were obtained for each scan-TP and patient. After a retrospective re-evaluation, the number of consensus CLs (conL) was defined as the total number of CLs, which both raters finally agreed on. CLs volumes, relative signal intensities and CLs localizations were determined. Both ratings (conL vs. non-consensus scoring) were compared for further analysis. Results A total number of n = 334 CLs were identified by both raters in 26 MS patients with a first agreement of both raters on 160 out of 334 of the CLs found (κ = 0.48). After the retrospective re-evaluation, consensus agreement increased to 233 out of 334 CL (κ = 0.69). 93.8% of conL were visible in at least 2 consecutive TP. 74.7% of the conL were visible in all 12 consecutive TP. ConL had greater mean lesion volumes and higher mean signal intensities compared to lesions that were only detected by one of the raters (p<0.05). A higher number of CLs in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobe were identified by both raters than the number of those only identified by one of the raters (p<0.05). Conclusions After a first assessment, slightly less than a half of the CL were considered as reliably detectable on longitudinal DIR images. A retrospective re-evaluation notably increased the consensus agreement. However, this finding is narrowed, considering the fact that retrospective evaluation steps might not be practicable in clinical routine

  18. A flexible mixed-effect negative binomial regression model for detecting unusual increases in MRI lesion counts in individual multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yumi; Zhao, Yinshan; Petkau, John

    2015-06-15

    We develop a new modeling approach to enhance a recently proposed method to detect increases of contrast-enhancing lesions (CELs) on repeated magnetic resonance imaging, which have been used as an indicator for potential adverse events in multiple sclerosis clinical trials. The method signals patients with unusual increases in CEL activity by estimating the probability of observing CEL counts as large as those observed on a patient's recent scans conditional on the patient's CEL counts on previous scans. This conditional probability index (CPI), computed based on a mixed-effect negative binomial regression model, can vary substantially depending on the choice of distribution for the patient-specific random effects. Therefore, we relax this parametric assumption to model the random effects with an infinite mixture of beta distributions, using the Dirichlet process, which effectively allows any form of distribution. To our knowledge, no previous literature considers a mixed-effect regression for longitudinal count variables where the random effect is modeled with a Dirichlet process mixture. As our inference is in the Bayesian framework, we adopt a meta-analytic approach to develop an informative prior based on previous clinical trials. This is particularly helpful at the early stages of trials when less data are available. Our enhanced method is illustrated with CEL data from 10 previous multiple sclerosis clinical trials. Our simulation study shows that our procedure estimates the CPI more accurately than parametric alternatives when the patient-specific random effect distribution is misspecified and that an informative prior improves the accuracy of the CPI estimates.

  19. An updated histological classification system for multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Ludwin, Samuel; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex and heterogeneous, most likely autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although a number of histological classification systems for CNS lesions have been used by different groups in recent years, no uniform classification exists. In this paper, we propose a simple and unifying classification of MS lesions incorporating many elements of earlier histological systems that aims to provide guidelines for neuropathologists and researchers studying MS lesions to allow for better comparison of different studies performed with MS tissue, and to aid in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on the presence/absence and distribution of macrophages/microglia (inflammatory activity) and the presence/absence of ongoing demyelination (demyelinating activity), we suggest differentiating between active, mixed active/inactive, and inactive lesions with or without ongoing demyelination. Active lesions are characterized by macrophages/microglia throughout the lesion area, whereas mixed active/inactive lesions have a hypocellular lesion center with macrophages/microglia limited to the lesion border. Inactive lesions are almost completely lacking macrophages/microglia. Active and mixed active/inactive lesions can be further subdivided into lesions with ongoing myelin destruction (demyelinating lesions) and lesions in which the destruction of myelin has ceased, but macrophages are still present (post-demyelinating lesions). This distinction is based on the presence or absence of myelin degradation products within the cytoplasm of macrophages/microglia. For this classification of MS lesions, identification of myelin with histological stains [such as luxol fast blue-PAS] or by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against myelin basic-protein (MBP) or proteolipid-protein (PLP), as well as, detection of macrophages/microglia by, e.g., anti-CD68 is sufficient. Active and demyelinating lesions may be further

  20. Putaminal alteration in multiple sclerosis patients with spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Hilga; Rolfsnes, Hans O; Montag, Swantje; Wilting, Janine; Droby, Amgad; Reuter, Eva; Gawehn, Joachim; Zipp, Frauke; Gröger, Adriane

    2015-10-01

    Typical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions occur in the brain as well as in the spinal cord. However, two extreme magnetic resonance imaging phenotypes appear occasionally: those with predominantly spinal cord lesions (MS + SL) and those with cerebral lesions and no detectable spinal lesions (MS + CL). We assessed whether morphological differences can be found between these two extreme phenotypes. We examined 19 patients with MS + SL, 18 with MS + CL and 20 controls. All subjects were examined using magnetic resonance imaging, including anatomical and diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Voxel-based morphologic and regions of interest-based analyses and tract-based spatial statistics were performed. Patients also underwent neuropsychological testing. Demographic, clinical and neuropsychological characteristics did not differ between MS + SL and MS + CL patients. Patients with MS + SL showed significantly larger putamen volumes than those with MS + CL which correlated negatively with disability. Compared to controls, only MS + CL revealed clear cortical and deep gray matter atrophy, which correlated with cerebral lesion volume. Additionally, extensive white matter microstructural damage was found only in MS + CL compared to MS + SL and controls in the tract-based spatial statistics. Higher putamen volumes in MS + SL could suggest compensatory mechanisms in this area responsible for motor control. Widely reduced fractional anisotropy values in MS + CL were caused by higher cerebral lesion volume and thus presumably stronger demyelination, which subsequently leads to higher global gray matter atrophy.

  1. An SPM12 extension for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Cabezas, Mariano; Valverde, Sergi; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís.; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging is nowadays the hallmark to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS), characterized by white matter lesions. Several approaches have been recently presented to tackle the lesion segmentation problem, but none of them have been accepted as a standard tool in the daily clinical practice. In this work we present yet another tool able to automatically segment white matter lesions outperforming the current-state-of-the-art approaches. Methods: This work is an extension of Roura et al. [1], where external and platform dependent pre-processing libraries (brain extraction, noise reduction and intensity normalization) were required to achieve an optimal performance. Here we have updated and included all these required pre-processing steps into a single framework (SPM software). Therefore, there is no need of external tools to achieve the desired segmentation results. Besides, we have changed the working space from T1w to FLAIR, reducing interpolation errors produced in the registration process from FLAIR to T1w space. Finally a post-processing constraint based on shape and location has been added to reduce false positive detections. Results: The evaluation of the tool has been done on 24 MS patients. Qualitative and quantitative results are shown with both approaches in terms of lesion detection and segmentation. Conclusion: We have simplified both installation and implementation of the approach, providing a multiplatform tool1 integrated into the SPM software, which relies only on using T1w and FLAIR images. We have reduced with this new version the computation time of the previous approach while maintaining the performance.

  2. Diffuse systemic sclerosis with bullous lesions without systemic manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Paula Renaux Wanderley Caratta; Mota, Amanda Nascimento Cavalleiro de Macedo; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos; Alves, Maria de Fatima Guimarães Scotelaro; Klumb, Evandro Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe an atypical case of systemic sclerosis in its diffuse cutaneous form with acute and rapid progression of the cutaneous condition, without any systemic manifestations and the infrequent formation of bullae, showing the importance of diagnosis and early treatment in such cases. This case also shows that special measures should be taken for bullous cutaneous lesions and ulcerations resulting from serious sclerosis, which are entry points and increase morbidity and risk of death. Other prognostic factors include age, ESR and renal and pulmonary involvement. Capillaroscopies can be useful predictors of greater severity of systemic scleroderma, revealing a greater link with systemic, rather than cutaneous, involvement. PMID:24346886

  3. Spinal cord lesions and disability in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, L.; Lerner, A.; Ledezma, K.; Conti, D.; Law, M.; Weiner, L.; Langer-Gould, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) are believed to occur predominantly with opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS) and are associated with disability. Objective To describe the prevalence and patterns of spinal cord lesions in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis (MS) and OSMS and their association with disability. Methods Cross-sectional study of 164 patients with complete MRIs. Spinal cord was classified: LESCLs, scattered spinal cord lesions (sSCLs) or no spinal cord lesions (noSCLs). Clinical course was defined as classical MS or OSMS. Risk of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≥4.0) was adjusted for age, disease duration and sex using logistic regression. Results 125/164(73%) MS patients had spinal cord lesions (sSCLs, 57%; LESCLs, 19%) but only 11(7%) had OSMS. LESCLs were associated with disability (p<0.0001), longer disease duration (p<0.0001) and MS (n=21 vs. n=10 OSMS; p<0.0001). LESCLs was associated with the greatest risk to disability (OR 7.3, 95% CIs1.9-26.5; p=0.003; sSCLs OR 2.5, 95% CIs0.9-7.1; p=0.09) compared with noSCLs. Conclusion LESCLs are more common than OSMS and are associated with worse disability even in patients with MS. These results suggest that LESCLs are a more important marker of disability in MS than OSMS and may be an early indicator of more aggressive disease in this population. PMID:23912723

  4. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry analysis-A new approach for protein mapping in multiple sclerosis brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Nischwitz, Sandra; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hornung, Joachim; König, Fatima Barbara; Stadelmann, Christine; Turck, Christoph W; Weber, Frank

    2017-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by recurrent inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the early disease stage. Lesion formation and mechanisms leading to lesion remyelination are not fully understood. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry imaging (MALDI-IMS) is a technology which analyses proteins and peptides in tissue, preserves their spatial localization, and generates molecular maps within the tissue section. In a pilot study we employed MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to profile and identify peptides and proteins expressed in normal-appearing white matter, grey matter and multiple sclerosis brain lesions with different extents of remyelination. The unsupervised clustering analysis of the mass spectra generated images which reflected the tissue section morphology in luxol fast blue stain and in myelin basic protein immunohistochemistry. Lesions with low remyelination extent were defined by compounds with molecular weight smaller than 5300Da, while more completely remyelinated lesions showed compounds with molecular weights greater than 15,200Da. An in-depth analysis of the mass spectra enabled the detection of cortical lesions which were not seen by routine luxol fast blue histology. An ion mass, mainly distributed at the rim of multiple sclerosis lesions, was identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry as thymosin beta-4, a protein known to be involved in cell migration and in restorative processes. The ion mass of thymosin beta-4 was profiled by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry in brain slides of 12 multiple sclerosis patients and validated by immunohistochemical analysis. In summary, our results demonstrate the ability of the MALDI-IMS technology to map proteins within the brain parenchyma and multiple sclerosis lesions and to identify potential markers involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis and/or remyelination.

  5. Spinal cord lesions and disability in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amezcua, L; Lerner, A; Ledezma, K; Conti, D; Law, M; Weiner, L; Langer-Gould, A

    2013-11-01

    Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) are believed to occur predominantly with opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS) and are associated with disability. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and patterns of spinal cord lesions in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis (MS) and OSMS and their association with disability. A cross-sectional study of 164 patients with complete MRIs was used. In each case the spinal cord was classified: LESCLs, scattered spinal cord lesions (sSCLs) or no spinal cord lesions (noSCLs). Clinical course was defined as classical MS or OSMS. Risk of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≥4.0) was adjusted for age, disease duration and sex using logistic regression. A total of 125/164 (73 %) MS patients had spinal cord lesions (sSCLs, 57 %; LESCLs, 19 %), but only 11 (7 %) had OSMS. LESCLs were associated with disability (p < 0.0001), longer disease duration (p < 0.0001) and MS (n = 21 vs. n = 10 OSMS; p < 0.0001). LESCLs were also associated with the greatest risk to disability (OR 7.3, 95 % CIs 1.9-26.5; p = 0.003; sSCLs OR 2.5, 95 % CIs 0.9-7.1; p = 0.09) compared with noSCLs. LESCLs are more common than OSMS and are associated with worse disability even in patients with MS. These results suggest that LESCLs are a more important marker of disability in MS than OSMS and may be an early indicator of more aggressive disease in this population.

  6. Pathologic Heterogeneity Persists in Early Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Weigand, Stephen D; Popescu, Bogdan F G; Frischer, Josa M; Parisi, Joseph E; Guo, Yong; Lassmann, Hans; Brück, Wolfgang; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions demonstrate immunopathological heterogeneity in patterns of demyelination. Previous cross-sectional studies reported immunopatterns of demyelination were identical among multiple active demyelinating lesions from the same individual, but differed between individuals, leading to the hypothesis of intraindividual pathological homogeneity and interindividual heterogeneity. Other groups suggested a time-dependent heterogeneity of lesions. The objective of our present study was to analyze tissue samples collected longitudinally to determine whether patterns of demyelination persist over time within a given patient. Methods Archival tissue samples derived from patients with pathologically confirmed CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease who had undergone either diagnostic serial biopsy or biopsy followed by autopsy, were analyzed immunohistochemically. Inclusion criteria was the presence of early active demyelinating lesions - required for immunopattern classification - obtained from the same patient at two or more time points. Results Among 1321 surgical biopsies consistent with MS, 22 cases met study inclusion criteria. Twenty-one patients (95%) showed a persistence of immunopathological patterns in tissue sampled from different time points. This persistence was demonstrated for all major patterns of demyelination. A single patient showed features suggestive of both pattern II and pattern III on biopsy, but only pattern II among all active lesions examined at autopsy. Interpretation These findings continue to support the concept of patient-dependent immunopathological heterogeneity in early MS and suggest that the mechanisms and targets of tissue injury may differ among patient subgroups. These observations have potentially significant implications for individualized therapeutic approaches. PMID:24771535

  7. Heterogeneity of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Multislice Myelin Water Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Faizy, Tobias Djamsched; Thaler, Christian; Kumar, Dushyant; Sedlacik, Jan; Broocks, Gabriel; Grosser, Malte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess neuroprotection and remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), we applied a more robust myelin water imaging (MWI) processing technique, including spatial priors into image reconstruction, which allows for lower SNR, less averages and shorter acquisition times. We sought to evaluate this technique in MS-patients and healthy controls (HC). Materials and Methods Seventeen MS-patients and 14 age-matched HCs received a 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examination including MWI (8 slices, 12 minutes acquisition time), T2w and T1mprage pre and post gadolinium (GD) administration. Black holes (BH), contrast enhancing lesions (CEL) and T2 lesions were marked and registered to MWI. Additionally, regions of interest (ROI) were defined in the frontal, parietal and occipital normal appearing white matter (NAWM)/white matter (WM), the corticospinal tract (CST), the splenium (SCC) and genu (GCC) of the corpus callosum in patients and HCs. Mean values of myelin water fraction (MWF) were determined for each ROI. Results Significant differences (p≤0.05) of the MWF were found in all three different MS-lesion types (BH, CEL, T2 lesions), compared to the WM of HCs. The mean MWF values among the different lesion types were significantly differing from each other. Comparing MS-patients vs. HCs, we found a significant (p≤0.05) difference of the MWF in all measured ROIs except of GCC and SCC. The mean reduction of MWF in the NAWM of MS-patients compared to HCs was 37%. No age, sex, disability score and disease duration dependency was found for the NAWM MWF. Conclusion MWF measures were in line with previous studies and lesions were clearly visible in MWI. MWI allows for quantitative assessment of NAWM and lesions in MS, which could be used as an additional sensitive imaging endpoint for larger MS studies. Measurements of the MWF also differ between patients and healthy controls. PMID:26990645

  8. Longitudinal multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation: Resource and challenge.

    PubMed

    Carass, Aaron; Roy, Snehashis; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Magrath, Elizabeth; Gherman, Adrian; Button, Julia; Nguyen, James; Prados, Ferran; Sudre, Carole H; Jorge Cardoso, Manuel; Cawley, Niamh; Ciccarelli, Olga; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Ourselin, Sébastien; Catanese, Laurence; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Maurel, Pierre; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian; Tomas-Fernandez, Xavier; Warfield, Simon K; Vaidya, Suthirth; Chunduru, Abhijith; Muthuganapathy, Ramanathan; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Jesson, Andrew; Arbel, Tal; Maier, Oskar; Handels, Heinz; Iheme, Leonardo O; Unay, Devrim; Jain, Saurabh; Sima, Diana M; Smeets, Dirk; Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Platel, Bram; Birenbaum, Ariel; Greenspan, Hayit; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Calabresi, Peter A; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Ellingsen, Lotta M; Reich, Daniel S; Prince, Jerry L; Pham, Dzung L

    2017-03-01

    In conjunction with the ISBI 2015 conference, we organized a longitudinal lesion segmentation challenge providing training and test data to registered participants. The training data consisted of five subjects with a mean of 4.4 time-points, and test data of fourteen subjects with a mean of 4.4 time-points. All 82 data sets had the white matter lesions associated with multiple sclerosis delineated by two human expert raters. Eleven teams submitted results using state-of-the-art lesion segmentation algorithms to the challenge, with ten teams presenting their results at the conference. We present a quantitative evaluation comparing the consistency of the two raters as well as exploring the performance of the eleven submitted results in addition to three other lesion segmentation algorithms. The challenge presented three unique opportunities: (1) the sharing of a rich data set; (2) collaboration and comparison of the various avenues of research being pursued in the community; and (3) a review and refinement of the evaluation metrics currently in use. We report on the performance of the challenge participants, as well as the construction and evaluation of a consensus delineation. The image data and manual delineations will continue to be available for download, through an evaluation website(2) as a resource for future researchers in the area. This data resource provides a platform to compare existing methods in a fair and consistent manner to each other and multiple manual raters.

  9. Lesion heterogeneity on high-field susceptibility MRI is associated with multiple sclerosis severity

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Daniel M.; Li, Xu; Liu, Hongjun; Jones, Craig K.; Caffo, Brian; Calabresi, Peter A.; van Zijl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Susceptibility MRI contrast variations reflect alterations in brain iron and myelin content- making this imaging tool relevant to studies of multiple sclerosis lesion heterogeneity. In this study we aimed to characterize the relationship of high-field, susceptibility contrasts in multiple sclerosis lesions to clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods Twenty-four subjects with multiple sclerosis underwent 7-tesla MRI of the brain, disability exams, and a fatigue inventory. R2*, frequency, and relative susceptibility (from quantitative susceptibility mapping) were analyzed in 306 white matter lesions. Results Most lesions were hypointense on R2* (88% without a rim, 5% with). Lesions that were hyperintense on quantitative susceptibility mapping were more frequent in relapsing-remitting than progressive multiple sclerosis (54% vs. 35%, p = 0.018). Hyperintense lesion rims on quantitative susceptibility maps were more common in progressive multiple sclerosis and higher levels of disability and fatigue. Mean lesion R2* was inversely related to disability and fatigue and significantly reduced in progressive multiple sclerosis. Relative susceptibility was lower lesions in progressive multiple sclerosis (median -0.018 ppm, range -0.070 – 0.022) than relapsing-remitting (median -0.010 ppm, range -0.062 – 0.052, p = 0.003). Conclusion A progressive clinical phenotype, greater disability, and fatigue were associated with lower R2* and relative susceptibility values (suggestive of low iron due to oligodendrocyte loss) and rimmed lesions (suggestive of chronic inflammation) in this multiple sclerosis cohort. Lesion heterogeneity on susceptibility MRI may help explain disability in multiple sclerosis and provide a window into the processes of demyelination, oligodendrocyte loss, and chronic lesion inflammation. PMID:26939635

  10. OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation, with applications to multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Shinohara, Russell T; Shiee, Navid; Mateen, Farrah J; Chudgar, Avni A; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Calabresi, Peter A; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect lesions in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and is essential for diagnosing the disease and monitoring its progression. In practice, lesion load is often quantified by either manual or semi-automated segmentation of MRI, which is time-consuming, costly, and associated with large inter- and intra-observer variability. We propose OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation (OASIS), an automated statistical method for segmenting MS lesions in MRI studies. We use logistic regression models incorporating multiple MRI modalities to estimate voxel-level probabilities of lesion presence. Intensity-normalized T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and proton density volumes from 131 MRI studies (98 MS subjects, 33 healthy subjects) with manual lesion segmentations were used to train and validate our model. Within this set, OASIS detected lesions with a partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for clinically relevant false positive rates of 1% and below of 0.59% (95% CI; [0.50%, 0.67%]) at the voxel level. An experienced MS neuroradiologist compared these segmentations to those produced by LesionTOADS, an image segmentation software that provides segmentation of both lesions and normal brain structures. For lesions, OASIS out-performed LesionTOADS in 74% (95% CI: [65%, 82%]) of cases for the 98 MS subjects. To further validate the method, we applied OASIS to 169 MRI studies acquired at a separate center. The neuroradiologist again compared the OASIS segmentations to those from LesionTOADS. For lesions, OASIS ranked higher than LesionTOADS in 77% (95% CI: [71%, 83%]) of cases. For a randomly selected subset of 50 of these studies, one additional radiologist and one neurologist also scored the images. Within this set, the neuroradiologist ranked OASIS higher than LesionTOADS in 76% (95% CI: [64%, 88%]) of cases, the neurologist 66% (95% CI: [52%, 78

  11. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  12. Pathological differences between white and grey matter multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Prins, Marloes; Schul, Emma; Geurts, Jeroen; van der Valk, Paul; Drukarch, Benjamin; van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease characterized by demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in widespread formation of white matter lesions (WMLs) and grey matter lesions (GMLs). WMLs are pathologically characterized by the presence of immune cells that infiltrate the CNS, whereas these immune cells are barely present in GMLs. This striking pathological difference between WMLs and GMLs raises questions about the underlying mechanism. It is known that infiltrating leukocytes contribute to the generation of WMLs; however, since GMLs show a paucity of infiltrating immune cells, their importance in GML formation remains to be determined. Here, we review pathological characteristics of WMLs and GMLs, and suggest some possible explanations for the observed pathological differences. In our view, cellular and molecular characteristics of WM and GM, and local differences within WMLs and GMLs (in particular, in glial cell populations and the molecules they express), determine the pathway to demyelination. Further understanding of GML pathogenesis, considered to contribute to chronic MS, may have a direct impact on the development of novel therapeutic targets to counteract this progressive neurological disorder.

  13. Effects of multiple sclerosis brainstem lesions on sound lateralization and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Levine, R A; Gardner, J C; Fullerton, B C; Stufflebeam, S M; Carlisle, E W; Furst, M; Rosen, B R; Kiang, N Y

    1993-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and tests of interaural time and level discrimination were performed on sixteen subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective criteria were used to define MR lesions. Of the eleven subjects in whom no pontine lesions were detected and the one subject who had pontine lesions that did not encroach upon the auditory pathways, all had normal BAEPs and interaural level discrimination, although a few had abnormal interaural time discrimination. Of four subjects with lesions involving the pontine auditory pathway, all had both abnormal BAEPs and abnormal interaural time discrimination; one also had abnormal interaural level discrimination. Analysis of the data suggest the following: waves I and II are generated peripheral to the middle of the ventral acoustic stria (VAS); wave III is generated ipsilaterally in the region of the rostral VAS, caudal superior olivary complex (SOC) and trapezoid body (TB); and waves V and L are generated contralaterally, rostral to the SOC-TB. The region of the ipsilateral rostral SOC-TB is implicated as part of the pathway involved in the generation of waves V and L. Interaural time discrimination of both high and low frequency stimuli were affected by all brainstem lesions that encroached on auditory pathways. A unilateral lesion in the region of the LL affected interaural time discrimination for low-frequency stimuli less severely than bilateral lesions of the LL or a unilateral lesion of the VAS. The only interaural level discrimination abnormality occurred for a subject with a unilateral lesion involving the entire rostral VAS. It appears that detailed analysis of lesion locations coupled with electrophysiological and psychophysical data holds promise for testing hypotheses concerning the function of various human auditory brainstem structures.

  14. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  15. Astrocytes within multiple sclerosis lesions upregulate sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Black, Joel A; Newcombe, Jia; Waxman, Stephen G

    2010-03-01

    Astrocytes are prominent participants in the response of the central nervous system to injury, including neuroinflammatory insults. Rodent astrocytes in vitro have been shown to express voltage-gated sodium channels in a dynamic manner, with a switch in expression of tetrodotoxin-sensitive to tetrodotoxin-resistant channels in reactive astrocytes. However, the expression of sodium channels in human astrocytes has not been studied, and it is not known whether there are changes in the expression of sodium channels in reactive astrocytes of the human central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate a focal and robust upregulation of sodium channel Nav1.5 in reactive astrocytes at the borders of, and within, active and chronic multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was only detectable at very low levels in astrocytes within multiple sclerosis macroscopically normal-appearing white matter or in normal control brain. Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 showed little or no expression in astrocytes within normal control tissue and limited upregulation in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was also expressed at high levels in astrocytes in tissue surrounding new and old cerebrovascular accidents and brain tumours. These results demonstrate the expression of Nav1.5 in human astrocytes and show that Nav1.5 expression is dynamic in these cells. Our observations suggest that the upregulated expression of Nav1.5 in astrocytes may provide a compensatory mechanism, which supports sodium/potassium pump-dependent ionic homoeostasis in areas of central nervous system injury.

  16. Measuring the lesion load of multiple sclerosis patients within the corticospinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jan; Hanken, Katrin; Koceva, Jasna; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a framework for reliable determination of the lesion load within the corticospinal tract (CST) of multiple sclerosis patients. The basis constitutes a probabilistic fiber tracking approach which checks possible parameter intervals on the fly using an anatomical brain atlas. By exploiting the range of those intervals, the algorithm is able to resolve fiber crossings and to determine the CST in its full entity although it can use a simple diffusion tensor model. Another advantage is its short running time, tracking the CST takes less than a minute. For segmenting the lesions we developed a semi-automatic approach. First, a trained classifier is applied to multimodal MRI data (T1/FLAIR) where the spectrum of lesions has been determined in advance by a clustering algorithm. This leads to an automatic detection of the lesions which can be manually corrected afterwards using a threshold-based approach. For evaluation we scanned 46 MS patients and 16 healthy controls. Fiber tracking has been performed using our novel fiber tracking and a standard defection based algorithm. Regression analysis of the old and new version of the algorithm showed a highly significant superiority of the new algorithm for disease duration. Additionally, a low correlation between old and new approach supports the observation that standard DTI fiber tracking is not always able to track and quantify the CST reliably.

  17. Brain microbiota disruption within inflammatory demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Branton, W. G.; Lu, J. Q.; Surette, M. G.; Holt, R. A.; Lind, J.; Laman, J. D.; Power, C.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities reside in healthy tissues but are often disrupted during disease. Bacterial genomes and proteins are detected in brains from humans, nonhuman primates, rodents and other species in the absence of neurological disease. We investigated the composition and abundance of microbiota in frozen and fixed autopsied brain samples from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and age- and sex-matched nonMS patients as controls, using neuropathological, molecular and bioinformatics tools. 16s rRNA sequencing revealed Proteobacteria to be the dominant phylum with restricted diversity in cerebral white matter (WM) from MS compared to nonMS patients. Both clinical groups displayed 1,200–1,400 bacterial genomes/cm3 and low bacterial rRNA:rDNA ratios in WM. RNAseq analyses showed a predominance of Proteobacteria in progressive MS patients’ WM, associated with increased inflammatory gene expression, relative to a broader range of bacterial phyla in relapsing-remitting MS patients’ WM. Although bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and RNA polymerase beta subunit immunoreactivities were observed in all patients, PGN immunodetection was correlated with demyelination and neuroinflammation in MS brains. Principal component analysis revealed that demyelination, PGN and inflammatory gene expression accounted for 86% of the observed variance. Thus, inflammatory demyelination is linked to an organ-specific dysbiosis in MS that could contribute to underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:27892518

  18. A genome-wide association study of brain lesion distribution in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sdika, Michael; Khankhanian, Pouya; Henry, Roland G; Beheshtian, Azadeh; Matthews, Paul M; Hauser, Stephen L; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Pelletier, Daniel; Baranzini, Sergio E

    2013-04-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging is widely used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in multiple sclerosis and provides a non-invasive, sensitive and reproducible way to track the disease. Topological characteristics relating to the distribution and shape of lesions are recognized as important neuroradiological markers in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, although these have been much less well characterized quantitatively than have traditional measures such as T2 hyperintense or T1 hypointense lesion volumes. Here, we used voxel-level 3 T magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted scans to reconstruct the 3D topology of lesions in 284 subjects with multiple sclerosis and tested whether this is a heritable phenotype. To this end, we extracted the genotypes from a published genome-wide association study on these same individuals and searched for genetic associations with lesion load, shape and topological distribution. Lesion probability maps were created to identify frequently affected areas and to assess the overall distribution of T1 lesions in the subject population as a whole. We then developed an original algorithm to cluster adjacent lesional voxels (cluxels) in each subject and tested whether cluxel topology was significantly associated with any single-nucleotide polymorphism in our data set. To focus on patterns of lesion distribution, we computed the first 10 principal components. Although principal component 1 correlated with lesion load, none of the remaining orthogonal components correlated with any other known variable. We then conducted genome-wide association studies on each of these and found 31 significant associations (false discovery rate <0.01) with principal component 8, which represents a mode of variation of lesion topology in the population. The majority of the loci can be linked to genes related to immune cell function and to myelin and neural growth; some (SYK, MYT1L, TRAPPC9, SLITKR6 and RIC3) have been previously associated with the

  19. Characterization of Microcirculation in Multiple Sclerosis Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis (DTPA)

    PubMed Central

    Heldner, Mirjam Rahel; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Kottke, Raimund; Ozdoba, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Kamm, Christian Philipp; Wiest, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Objective Texture analysis is an alternative method to quantitatively assess MR-images. In this study, we introduce dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA), a novel technique to investigate the temporal evolution of texture parameters using dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSCE) imaging. Here, we aim to introduce the method and its application on enhancing lesions (EL), non-enhancing lesions (NEL) and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We investigated 18 patients with MS and clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), according to the 2010 McDonald's criteria using DSCE imaging at different field strengths (1.5 and 3 Tesla). Tissues of interest (TOIs) were defined within 27 EL, 29 NEL and 37 NAWM areas after normalization and eight histogram-based texture parameter maps (TPMs) were computed. TPMs quantify the heterogeneity of the TOI. For every TOI, the average, variance, skewness, kurtosis and variance-of-the-variance statistical parameters were calculated. These TOI parameters were further analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by multiple Wilcoxon sum rank testing corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Tissue- and time-dependent differences were observed in the dynamics of computed texture parameters. Sixteen parameters discriminated between EL, NEL and NAWM (pAVG = 0.0005). Significant differences in the DTPA texture maps were found during inflow (52 parameters), outflow (40 parameters) and reperfusion (62 parameters). The strongest discriminators among the TPMs were observed in the variance-related parameters, while skewness and kurtosis TPMs were in general less sensitive to detect differences between the tissues. Conclusion DTPA of DSCE image time series revealed characteristic time responses for ELs, NELs and NAWM. This may be further used for a refined quantitative grading of MS lesions during their evolution from acute to chronic state. DTPA discriminates lesions beyond features of enhancement or T2

  20. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  1. Detailing intra-lesional venous lumen shrinking in multiple sclerosis investigated by sFLAIR MRI at 7-T.

    PubMed

    Müller, Katharina; Kuchling, Joseph; Dörr, Jan; Harms, Lutz; Ruprecht, Klemens; Niendorf, Thoralf; Wuerfel, Jens; Paul, Friedemann; Sinnecker, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Intra-lesional venous lumen shrinking detectable by MRI was suggested as an in vivo marker of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS). In our study mean diameters of pre-, post- and intra-lesional venous sections were determined in 49 patients with MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) using a pixel-wise analysis on susceptibility-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (sFLAIR) images and T2*-weighted (T2*w) imaging at 7 Tesla (T). We observed post-to-intra-lesional venous lumen shrinking on T2*w images (p = 0.036) in an analysis of 338 venous sections. Pre-to-intra-lesional venous lumen reduction was only detectable in less than 50% of lesions and failed statistical significance when analysing T2*w (p = 0.325) and sFLAIR images (p = 0.258). In conclusion, thinning of intra-lesional veins in MS is--if detectable at all--probably less severe than previously reported, and affects only a minority of MS lesions.

  2. Occurrence and long-term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, C; Splendiani, A; Torlone, S; Patriarca, L; Carrocci, C; Sciamanna, S; Marini, C; Carolei, A

    2016-07-01

    Although tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a well recognized variant of multiple sclerosis, prognostic uncertainty still exists about long term prognosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and long term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients. We reviewed brain MRI of 443 patients referred to our MS clinic. All patients meeting the McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis and showing at least one TDL were included. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival in patient cohort were compared with control group without TDLs using a log-rank test. Seven cases with TDLs were identified (occurrence 1.58 %). Tumefactive demyelinating lesion recurrence was 16.6 %. Cumulative proportion of patients free from clinical relapse and from new T2 lesions was lower in the control group although not reaching statistical significance (30 vs 50 %; P = 0.666 and 21.7 vs 33.3 %; P = 0.761, respectively). Disability progression analysis showed a not significant trend towards lower probability of remaining progression free for TDL patients (50 vs 61 %; P = 0.295). Occurrence of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in our cohort was higher than those reported in other studies. Overall, TDLs were not predictive of poor outcome in terms of disability progression.

  3. Progressive oil-spot-like lesion in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, A

    1981-01-01

    The demyelinating lesion in MS being characterised by an evolutive polymorphism, led to different opinions about the identification of the hypercellularity. The present work deals with data concerning the abundance and the early appearance of macrophages (M) within the lesion, studied with lipid histochemistry methods. The disposition of 3 various types of previously described M, with different lipid content, demonstrates the progressive centrifugal evolution of the recent lesion. At the edge the M are filled exclusively with intensely Baker (phospholipids) stained myelinic granules whereas inside they have a mixed myelinic and sudano-osmiophylic (esterocholesterolic) composition as revealed by Sudan red, Oil rd, Otan and Schultz methods. Surrounding vessels, in the centre of the lesion, M contain exclusively sudano-osmiophylic (esterocholesterolic) granules and crystals. This arrangement of M as to AGE is due to the progressive disintegrative cycle of phagocyted myelin: the youngest at the edge and those undergoing myelin disintegration towards the centre. It is demonstrative for the progressive and centrifugally oil-spot-like extension of the lesion and might explain the round-shape of the small lesions which stop their extension without any morphological correlations.

  4. A case of pediatric multiple sclerosis presenting with a tumefactive demyelinating lesion.

    PubMed

    Majima, Hisakazu; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Koyama, Norihisa

    2017-02-25

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis accompanied by a tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL) is extremely rare. Because it is very difficult to distinguish TDLs from neoplasms, invasive brain biopsies are required for a definitive diagnosis. MR spectroscopy (MRS) without brain biopsy was recently shown diagnostic in some patients with TDLs, based on the elevation of glutamate/glutamine peaks. This report describes the clinical course of a 9-year-old girl with multiple sclerosis following a TDL and discusses the usefulness of MRS and brain biopsies to diagnose TDLs.

  5. Review of automatic segmentation methods of multiple sclerosis white matter lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Francis, Simon; Narayanan, Sridar; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often used to characterize and quantify multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in the brain and spinal cord. The number and volume of lesions have been used to evaluate MS disease burden, to track the progression of the disease and to evaluate the effect of new pharmaceuticals in clinical trials. Accurate identification of MS lesions in MR images is extremely difficult due to variability in lesion location, size and shape in addition to anatomical variability between subjects. Since manual segmentation requires expert knowledge, is time consuming and is subject to intra- and inter-expert variability, many methods have been proposed to automatically segment lesions. The objective of this study was to carry out a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the state of the art in automated multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation. From 1240 hits found initially with PubMed and Google scholar, our selection criteria identified 80 papers that described an automatic lesion segmentation procedure applied to MS. Only 47 of these included quantitative validation with at least one realistic image. In this paper, we describe the complexity of lesion segmentation, classify the automatic MS lesion segmentation methods found, and review the validation methods applied in each of the papers reviewed. Although many segmentation solutions have been proposed, including some with promising results using MRI data obtained on small groups of patients, no single method is widely employed due to performance issues related to the high variability of MS lesion appearance and differences in image acquisition. The challenge remains to provide segmentation techniques that work in all cases regardless of the type of MS, duration of the disease, or MRI protocol, and this within a comprehensive, standardized validation framework. MS lesion segmentation remains an open problem.

  6. Activation status of human microglia is dependent on lesion formation stage and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Ummenthum, Kimberley; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla D A M; Gerritsen, Wouter H; Peferoen-Baert, Regina M B; van der Valk, Paul; Dijkstra, Christine D; Amor, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Similar to macrophages, microglia adopt diverse activation states and contribute to repair and tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, we show that in vitro M1-polarized (proinflammatory) human adult microglia express the distinctive markers CD74, CD40, CD86, and CCR7, whereas M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia express mannose receptor and the anti-inflammatory cytokine CCL22. The expression of these markers was assessed in clusters of activated microglia in normal-appearing white matter (preactive lesions) and areas of remyelination, representing reparative multiple sclerosis lesions. We show that activated microglia in preactive and remyelinating lesions express CD74, CD40, CD86, and the M2 markers CCL22 and CD209, but not mannose receptor. To examine whether this intermediate microglia profile is static or dynamic and thus susceptible to changes in the microenvironment, we polarized microglia into M1 or M2 phenotype in vitro and then subsequently treated them with the opposing polarization regimen. These studies revealed that expression of CD40, CXCL10, and mannose receptor is dynamic and that microglia, like macrophages, can switch between M1 and M2 phenotypic profiles. Taken together, our data define the differential activation states of microglia during lesion development in multiple sclerosis-affected CNS tissues and underscore the plasticity of human adult microglia in vitro.

  7. Performance evaluation for volumetric segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using MATLAB and computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh H.; Park, Young W.; Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Liu, Brent J.

    2010-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disease affecting myelin pathways in the brain. Multiple lesions in the white matter can cause paralysis and severe motor disabilities of the affected patient. To solve the issue of inconsistency and user-dependency in manual lesion measurement of MRI, we have proposed a 3-D automated lesion quantification algorithm to enable objective and efficient lesion volume tracking. The computer-aided detection (CAD) of MS, written in MATLAB, utilizes K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method to compute the probability of lesions on a per-voxel basis. Despite the highly optimized algorithm of imaging processing that is used in CAD development, MS CAD integration and evaluation in clinical workflow is technically challenging due to the requirement of high computation rates and memory bandwidth in the recursive nature of the algorithm. In this paper, we present the development and evaluation of using a computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU) with MATLAB for segmentation of MS lesions. The paper investigates the utilization of a high-end GPU for parallel computing of KNN in the MATLAB environment to improve algorithm performance. The integration is accomplished using NVIDIA's CUDA developmental toolkit for MATLAB. The results of this study will validate the practicality and effectiveness of the prototype MS CAD in a clinical setting. The GPU method may allow MS CAD to rapidly integrate in an electronic patient record or any disease-centric health care system.

  8. Evaluation of an automatic multiple sclerosis lesion quantification tool in an informatics-based MS e-folder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Fernandez, James; Amezcua, Lilyana; Lerner, Alex; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The chronic nature of MS necessitates multiple MRI studies to track disease progression. We have presented an imaging informatics decision-support system, called MS eFolder, designed to integrate patient clinical data with MR images and a computer-aided detection (CAD) component for automatic white matter lesion quantification. The purpose of the MS eFolder is to comprehensively present MS patient data for clinicians and radiologists, while providing a lesion quantification tool that can be objective and consistent for MS tracking in longitudinal studies. The MS CAD algorithm is based on the K-nearest neighbor (KNN) principles and has been integrated within the eFolder system. Currently, the system has been completed and the CAD algorithm for quantifying MS lesions has undergone the expert evaluation in order to validate system performance and accuracy. The evaluation methodology has been developed and the data has been collected, including over 100 MS MRI cases with various age and ethnic backgrounds. The preliminary results of the evaluation are expected to include sensitivity and specificity of lesion and non-lesion voxels in the white matter, the effectiveness of different probability thresholds for each voxel, and comparison between CAD quantification results and radiologists' manual readings. The results aim to show the effectiveness of a MS lesion CAD system to be used in a clinical setting, as well as a step closer to full clinical implementation of the eFolder system.

  9. Multi-output decision trees for lesion segmentation in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jog, Amod; Carass, Aaron; Pham, Dzung L.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system in which the protective myelin sheath of the neurons is damaged. MS leads to the formation of lesions, predominantly in the white matter of the brain and the spinal cord. The number and volume of lesions visible in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) are important criteria for diagnosing and tracking the progression of MS. Locating and delineating lesions manually requires the tedious and expensive efforts of highly trained raters. In this paper, we propose an automated algorithm to segment lesions in MR images using multi-output decision trees. We evaluated our algorithm on the publicly available MICCAI 2008 MS Lesion Segmentation Challenge training dataset of 20 subjects, and showed improved results in comparison to state-of-the-art methods. We also evaluated our algorithm on an in-house dataset of 49 subjects with a true positive rate of 0.41 and a positive predictive value 0.36.

  10. Detection of Protein Aggregates in Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid Derived from Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Monique Antoinette; Tayebi, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the properties of soluble oligomer species of amyloidogenic proteins, derived from different proteins with little sequence homology, have indicated that they share a common structure and may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. Amyloid β, tau protein, as well as amyloid precursor protein normally associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease were found in lesions and plaques of multiple sclerosis patients. The objective of the study is to investigate whether brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from multiple sclerosis patients demonstrate the presence of soluble oligomers normally associated with protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. We have used anti-oligomer monoclonal antibodies to immunodetect soluble oligomers in CSF and brain tissues derived from multiple sclerosis patients. In this report, we describe the presence of soluble oligomers in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients detected with our monoclonal anti-oligomer antibodies with Western blot and Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sELISA). These results might suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis although further and more refined studies are needed to confirm the role of soluble aggregates in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25520699

  11. Detection of lesions in mammographic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper is a report on very surprising results from recent work on detection of real lesions in digitized mammograms. The experiments were done using a novel experimental procedure with hybrid images. The lesions (signals) were real tumor masses extracted from breast tissue specimen radiographs. In the detection experiments, the tumors were added to digitized normal mammographic backgrounds. The results of this new work have been both novel and very surprising. Contrast thresholds increased with increasing lesion size for lesions larger than approximately 1 mm in diameter. Earlier work with white noise, radiographic image noise, computed tomography (CT) noise and some types of patient structure have accustomed us to a particular relationship between lesion size and contrast for constant detectability. All previous contrast/detail (CD) diagrams have been similar, the contrast threshold decreases as lesion size increases and flattens at large lesion sizes. The CD diagram for lesion detection in mammographic structure is completely different. It will be shown that this is a consequence of the power-law dependence of the projected breast tissue structure spectral density on spatial frequency. Mammographic tissue structure power spectra have the form P(f) equals B/f(beta ), with an average exponent of approximately 3 (range from 2 to 4), and are approximately isotropic (small angular dependence). Results for two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) signal detection experiments using 4 tumor lesions and one mathematically generated signal will be presented. These results are for an unbiased selection of mammographic backgrounds. It is possible that an additional understanding of the effects of breast structure on lesion detectability can be obtained by investigating detectability in various classes of mammographic backgrounds. This will be the subject of future research.

  12. Lesion comparison of multiple sclerosis in hispanic and caucasian patients utilizing an imaging informatics-based eFolder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Fernandez, James; Amezcua, Lilyana; Lerner, Alex; Shiroishi, Mark; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease in the central nervous system. Genetics have been considered as a leading factor in the prevalence and disease course of MS. We have presented an informatics-based eFolder system for integrating patients' clinical data with MR images and lesion quantification results. The completed eFolder system has been designed and developed in aiding to evaluate disease manifestation differences in Hispanic and Caucasian MS patients. MS lesion data, as shown in MRI, can be extracted by the 3-D automatic lesion detection tool in the eFolder, and data storing and mining tools in eFolder is able to extract and compare data from individual patients. The computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm has been modified and enhanced to include spatial information as detection criteria. For this study, 36 Caucasian MS patients and 36 matched Hispanic patients have been selected. Most recent MR images of the patients are collected, and images are evaluated both by the CAD tool in the eFolder and radiologists. The results are compared between Caucasian and Hispanic patients and statistically evaluated to see if the two populations have significant difference in lesion presentations. The results can be used to evaluate differences in the two groups of patients and to evaluate the new CAD algorithm's performance with radiologists' contours. Significant findings can further evaluate effectiveness of MS eFolder in MS-related research.

  13. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Montalban, Xavier; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. First of all, images were processed using the LST and SLS toolkits with different pipeline combinations that differed in either automated or manual lesion segmentation, and lesion filling or masking out lesions. Then, images processed following each of the pipelines were segmented into gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) using SPM8, and compared with the same images where expert lesion annotations were filled before segmentation. Our results showed that fully automated lesion segmentation and filling pipelines reduced significantly the % of error in GM and WM volume on images of MS patients, and performed similarly to the images where expert lesion annotations were masked before segmentation. In all the pipelines, the amount of misclassified lesion voxels was the main cause in the observed error in GM and WM volume. However, the % of error was significantly lower when automatically estimated lesions were filled and not masked before segmentation. These results are relevant and suggest that LST and SLS toolboxes allow the performance of accurate brain tissue volume measurements without any kind of manual intervention, which can be convenient not only in terms of time and economic costs, but also to avoid the inherent intra/inter variability between manual annotations. PMID:26740917

  14. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  15. Decoding Diffusivity in Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Optic Radiation Lesional and Non-Lesional White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, Alexander; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L.; Parratt, John; Garrick, Raymond; Levin, Netta; Masters, Lynette; Lagopoulos, Jim; Barnett, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage. Method Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR) of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR. Results Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD), which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD) in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local) T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI. Conclusion This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our

  16. The effect of hypointense white matter lesions on automated gray matter segmentation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gelineau-Morel, Rose; Tomassini, Valentina; Jenkinson, Mark; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Matthews, Paul M; Palace, Jacqueline

    2012-12-01

    Previous imaging studies assessing the relationship between white matter (WM) damage and matter (GM) atrophy have raised the concern that Multiple Sclerosis (MS) WM lesions may affect measures of GM volume by inducing voxel misclassification during intensity-based tissue segmentation. Here, we quantified this misclassification error in simulated and real MS brains using a lesion-filling method. Using this method, we also corrected GM measures in patients before comparing them with controls in order to assess the impact of this lesion-induced misclassification error in clinical studies. We found that higher WM lesion volumes artificially reduced total GM volumes. In patients, this effect was about 72% of that predicted by simulation. Misclassified voxels were located at the GM/WM border and could be distant from lesions. Volume of individual deep gray matter (DGM) structures generally decreased with higher lesion volumes, consistent with results from total GM. While preserving differences in GM volumes between patients and controls, lesion-filling correction revealed more lateralised DGM shape changes in patients, which were not evident with the original images. Our results confirm that WM lesions can influence MRI measures of GM volume and shape in MS patients through their effect on intensity-based GM segmentation. The greater effect of lesions at increasing levels of damage supports the use of lesion-filling to correct for this problem and improve the interpretability of the results. Volumetric or morphometric imaging studies, where lesion amount and characteristics may vary between groups of patients or change over time, may especially benefit from this correction.

  17. Search field size and lesion detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter; Hardie, Andrew; Ogden, Kent

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of an observer to identify abnormal foci on CT and how that ability is affected by changing the search field size from a whole abdomen to the liver region alone. A 2-Alternate Forced Choice (2 AFC) experimental paradigm was used to quantify observer detection performance. Each AFC experiment yielded the intensity needed to achieve 92% accuracy in lesion detection (I92%). Abdominal images were obtained at an x-ray tube voltage of 120 kV with a CTDIvol of 20 mGy. Circular lesions were generated by projecting spheres onto the image plane, followed by blurring function. Five lesion sizes (5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm), and four readers who were extensively trained in AFC methodology, were used in the 2AFC experiments. Each experiment was repeated 4 times to improve the experimental precision, as well as to provide an estimate of experimental uncertainty. For each observer, the experimental order of the 40 experiments was randomized to eliminate learning curve and/or observer fatigue. We measured contrast detail slopes for both Abdomen and Liver search field size, and determined ratio of I92% value for Abdomen search field to the corresponding I92% for the Liver search field (i.e., Rabd:liv). Values of Rabd:liv provides quantitative indicator of the relative difficulty of detection lesions in the whole Abdomen relative to lesion detection restricted to the Liver. The slope of the contrast detail curve for the Abdomen search field was -0.03, whereas the corresponding slope for the Liver search field was -0.18. Rabd:liv ranged between 1.3 and 1.6, with an average of 1.4 +/- 0.1. The value of Rabd:liv monotonically increased from 1.35 for 5 mm lesions to nearly 1.6 for the largest 15 mm lesion. The results of our study indicate that limiting the area of search to the liver on a CT of the abdomen improves the detection of mass lesions. This finding is almost certainly related to the fact that the liver provides a relatively

  18. NADPH oxidase expression in active multiple sclerosis lesions in relation to oxidative tissue damage and mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marie T; Sharma, Rakhi; Lim, Jamie L; Haider, Lukas; Frischer, Josa M; Drexhage, Joost; Mahad, Don; Bradl, Monika; van Horssen, Jack; Lassmann, Hans

    2012-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, and we recently provided evidence for oxidative damage of oligodendrocytes and dystrophic axons in early stages of active multiple sclerosis lesions. In this study, we identified potential sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species through gene expression in carefully staged and dissected lesion areas and by immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression. Genome-wide microarrays confirmed mitochondrial injury in active multiple sclerosis lesions, which may serve as an important source of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found differences in the gene expression levels of various nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits between initial multiple sclerosis lesions and control white matter. These results were confirmed at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry, showing upregulation of the subunits gp91phox, p22phox, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 in activated microglia in classical active as well as slowly expanding lesions. The subunits gp91phox and p22phox were constitutively expressed in microglia and were upregulated in the initial lesion. In contrast, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 expression were more restricted to the zone of initial damage or to lesions from patients with acute or early relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis. Double labelling showed co-expression of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits in activated microglia and

  19. NADPH oxidase expression in active multiple sclerosis lesions in relation to oxidative tissue damage and mitochondrial injury

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marie T.; Sharma, Rakhi; Lim, Jamie L.; Haider, Lukas; Frischer, Josa M.; Drexhage, Joost; Mahad, Don; Bradl, Monika; van Horssen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, and we recently provided evidence for oxidative damage of oligodendrocytes and dystrophic axons in early stages of active multiple sclerosis lesions. In this study, we identified potential sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species through gene expression in carefully staged and dissected lesion areas and by immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression. Genome-wide microarrays confirmed mitochondrial injury in active multiple sclerosis lesions, which may serve as an important source of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found differences in the gene expression levels of various nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits between initial multiple sclerosis lesions and control white matter. These results were confirmed at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry, showing upregulation of the subunits gp91phox, p22phox, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 in activated microglia in classical active as well as slowly expanding lesions. The subunits gp91phox and p22phox were constitutively expressed in microglia and were upregulated in the initial lesion. In contrast, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 expression were more restricted to the zone of initial damage or to lesions from patients with acute or early relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis. Double labelling showed co-expression of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits in activated microglia and

  20. Computer detection of stellate lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The three primary signs for which radiologists search when screening mammograms for breast cancer are stellate lesions, microcalcifications, and circumscribed lesions. Stellate lesions are of particular importance, as they are almost always associated with a malignancy. Further, they are often indicated only by subtle architectural distortions and so are in general easier to miss than the other signs. We have developed a method for the automatic detection of stellate lesions in digitized mammograms, and have tested them on image data where the presence or absence of malignancies is known. We extract image features from the known images, use them to grow binary decision trees, and use those trees to label each pixel of new mammograms with its probability of being located on an abnormality. The primary feature for the detection of stellate lesions is ALOE, analysis of local oriented edges, which is derived from an analysis of the histogram of edge orientations in local windows. Other features, based on the Laws texture energy measures, have been developed to respond to normal tissue, and so improve the false alarm performance of the entire system.

  1. Abnormal endothelial tight junctions in active lesions and normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Jonnie; McQuaid, Stephen; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Kirk, John

    2002-04-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, demonstrable in vivo by enhanced MRI is characteristic of new and expanding inflammatory lesions in relapsing-remitting and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtle leakage may also occur in primary progressive MS. However, the anatomical route(s) of BBB leakage have not been demonstrated. We investigated the possible involvement of interendothelial tight junctions (TJ) by examining the expression of TJ proteins (occludin and ZO-1 ) in blood vessels in active MS lesions from 8 cases of MS and in normal-appearing white (NAWM) matter from 6 cases. Blood vessels (10-50 per frozen section) were scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to acquire datasets for analysis. TJ abnormalities manifested as beading, interruption, absence or diffuse cytoplasmic localization of fluorescence, or separation of junctions (putative opening) were frequent (affecting 40% of vessels) in oil-red-O-positive active plaques but less frequent in NAWM (15%), and in normal (< 2%) and neurological controls (6%). Putatively "open" junctions were seen in vessels in active lesions and in microscopically inflamed vessels in NAWM. Dual fluorescence revealed abnormal TJs in vessels with pre-mortem serum protein leakage. Abnormal or open TJs, associated with inflammation may contribute to BBB leakage in enhancing MRI lesions and may also be involved in subtle leakage in non-enhancing focal and diffuse lesions in NAWM. BBB disruption due to tight junctional pathology should be regarded as a significant form of tissue injury in MS, alongside demyelination and axonopathy.

  2. Neuroaxonal regeneration is more pronounced in early multiple sclerosis than in traumatic brain injury lesions.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Lucas; Merkler, Doron; König, Fatima B; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The extent of irreversible neuroaxonal damage is the key determinant of permanent disability in traumatic and inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS). Structural damage is nevertheless in part compensated by neuroplastic events. However, it is unknown whether the same kinetics and mechanisms of neuroaxonal de- and regeneration take place in inflammatory and traumatic conditions. We analyzed neuroaxonal degeneration and plasticity in early multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neuroaxonal degeneration identified by the presence of SMI31+ chromatolytic neurons and SMI32+ axonal profiles were characteristic features of leukocortical TBI lesions. Axonal transport disturbances as determined by amyloid precursor protein (APP)+ spheroids were present in both TBI and MS lesions to a similar degree. Neurons expressing growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) and synaptophysin (Syn) were found under both pathological conditions. However, axonal swellings immunopositive for GAP43 and Syn clearly prevailed in subcortical MS lesions, suggesting a higher regenerative potential in MS. In this context, GAP43+/APP+ axonal spheroid ratios correlated with macrophage infiltration in TBI and MS lesions, supporting the idea that phagocyte activation might promote neuroplastic events. Furthermore, axonal GAP43+ and Syn+ swellings correlated with prolonged survival after TBI, indicating a sustained regenerative response.

  3. Vibration sonoelastography and the detectability of lesions.

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Fu, D; Graceswki, S M; Yeung, F; Levinson, S F

    1998-11-01

    Vibration sonoelastography has been developed for the detection of hard lesions in relatively soft tissue. The basic concept is to propagate low-amplitude and low-frequency shear waves (with displacements below 0.1 mm and frequencies typically below 1000 Hz) through deep organs, and displaying the vibration response in real-time using advanced color Doppler imaging techniques. A hard inhomogeneity, such as a tumor, will produce a localized disturbance in the vibration pattern, forming the basis for detection even when the tumor is isoechoic on B-scan images. This paper focuses on the important quantitative issues concerning the detectability or inherent contrast of lesions. The specific factors of lesion size, relative stiffness and vibration frequency are studied using theoretical models, finite element methods and experimental measurements on tissue-mimicking materials. The results indicate that detectability increases with vibration (shear wave) frequency; however, loss mechanisms ultimately limit the penetration of higher vibration frequencies (in the kHz range).

  4. Comprehensive tissue processing strategy for quantitative proteomics of formalin-fixed multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Ly, Linda; Barnett, Michael H; Zheng, Yuan Z; Gulati, Twishi; Prineas, John W; Crossett, Ben

    2011-10-07

    Formalin-fixed (FF) autopsy tissue comprises the bulk of existing Multiple Sclerosis (MSc) pathology archives, providing a rich pool of material for biomarker discovery and disease characterization. Here, we present the development of a heat-induced extraction protocol for the proteomic analysis of FF brain tissue, its application to the study of lesion remyelination and its failure in MSc. A 4-round extraction strategy was optimized using FF tissue leading to a 35% increase in the number of proteins identified compared to a single extraction; and a 65% increase in proteins identified with ≥4 peptides. Histological staining of sections with oil red O and luxol fast blue-periodic acid Schiff, required to characterize MSc lesions was found to have minimal effect on LC-MS/MS. The application of the optimized protocol to chronic demyelinated and remyelinated FF MSc lesions and the adjacent periplaque white matter, isolated through laser guided manual dissection from 3 patients, identified 428 unique proteins (0.2% FDR) using LC-MS/MS. Comparison of the lesion types using iTRAQ and 2-D LC-MS/MS revealed 82 differentially expressed proteins. Protein quantitation by iTRAQ and spectral counting was well-correlated (r(s)= 0.7653; p < 10(-30)). The data generated from this work illustrates the scope of the methodology and provides insights into the pathogenesis of MSc and remyelination.

  5. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 biopsies diagnosed as oral ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral primary lymphoma were selected from the archives of the Pathology Department. Thirty-two samples that were diagnosed as being without any pathological changes were selected as the control group. All the paraffin blocks were cut for hematoxylin and eosin staining to confirm the diagnoses and then the samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry staining. Data were collected and analyzed. Results. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between the frequency of H. pylori positivity in normal tissue and the lesions were examined (P=0.000). In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the lesions examined (P=0.042). Chi-squared test showed significant differences between H. pylori positivity and different tissue types except inside the muscle layer as follows: in epithelium and in lamina propria (P=0.000), inside the blood vessels (P=0.003), inside the salivary gland duct (P=0.036), and muscle layer (P=0.122). Conclusion. There might be a relation between the presence of H. pylori and oral lesions. Therefore, early detection and eradication of H. pylori in high-risk patients are suggested. PMID:24578822

  6. Detecting and Treating Occlusal Caries Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Stolpe, M.; Meyer-Lueckel, H.; Paris, S.

    2015-01-01

    The health gains and costs resulting from using different caries detection strategies might not only depend on the accuracy of the used method but also the treatment emanating from its use in different populations. We compared combinations of visual-tactile, radiographic, or laser-fluorescence–based detection methods with 1 of 3 treatments (non-, micro-, and invasive treatment) initiated at different cutoffs (treating all or only dentinal lesions) in populations with low or high caries prevalence. A Markov model was constructed to follow an occlusal surface in a permanent molar in an initially 12-y-old male German patient over his lifetime. Prevalence data and transition probabilities were extracted from the literature, while validity parameters of different methods were synthesized or obtained from systematic reviews. Microsimulations were performed to analyze the model, assuming a German health care setting and a mixed public-private payer perspective. Radiographic and fluorescence-based methods led to more overtreatments, especially in populations with low prevalence. For the latter, combining visual-tactile or radiographic detection with microinvasive treatment retained teeth longest (mean 66 y) at lowest costs (329 and 332 Euro, respectively), while combining radiographic or fluorescence-based detections with invasive treatment was the least cost-effective (<60 y, >700 Euro). In populations with high prevalence, combining radiographic detection with microinvasive treatment was most cost-effective (63 y, 528 Euro), while sensitive detection methods combined with invasive treatments were again the least cost-effective (<59 y, >690 Euro). The suitability of detection methods differed significantly between populations, and the cost-effectiveness was greatly influenced by the treatment initiated after lesion detection. The accuracy of a detection method relative to a “gold standard” did not automatically convey into better health or reduced costs. Detection

  7. Sodium MRI in Multiple Sclerosis is Compatible with Intracellular Sodium Accumulation and Inflammation-Induced Hyper-Cellularity of Acute Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Armin; Pflugmann, Isabella; Badde, Stephanie; Diem, Ricarda; Wildemann, Brigitte; Nagel, Armin M.; Jordan, J.; Benkhedah, Nadia; Kleesiek, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The cascade of inflammatory pathogenetic mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS) has no specific conventional MRI correlates. Clinicians therefore stipulate improved imaging specificity to define the pathological substrates of MS in vivo including mapping of intracellular sodium accumulation. Based upon preclinical findings and results of previous sodium MRI studies in MS patients we hypothesized that the fluid-attenuated sodium signal differs between acute and chronic lesions. We acquired brain sodium and proton MRI data of N = 29 MS patients; lesion type was defined by the presence or absence of contrast enhancement. N = 302 MS brain lesions were detected, and generalized linear mixed models were applied to predict lesion type based on sodium signals; thereby controlling for varying numbers of lesions among patients and confounding variables such as age and medication. Hierarchical model comparisons revealed that both sodium signals average tissue (χ2(1) = 27.89, p < 0.001) and fluid-attenuated (χ2(1) = 5.76, p = 0.016) improved lesion type classification. Sodium MRI signals were significantly elevated in acute compared to chronic lesions compatible with intracellular sodium accumulation in acute MS lesions. If confirmed in further studies, sodium MRI could serve as biomarker for diagnostic assessment of MS, and as readout parameter in clinical trials promoting attenuation of chronic inflammation. PMID:27507776

  8. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a reduces lesion formation in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stuart, William H; Calabresi, Peter A; Confavreux, Christian; Galetta, Steven L; Rudick, Richard A; Lublin, Fred D; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Wynn, Daniel R; Fisher, Elizabeth; Papadopoulou, Athina; Lynn, Frances; Panzara, Michael A; Sandrock, Alfred W

    2010-05-15

    The SENTINEL study showed that the addition of natalizumab improved outcomes for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) who had experienced disease activity while receiving interferon beta-1a (IFNbeta-1a) alone. Previously unreported secondary and tertiary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures are presented here. Patients received natalizumab 300 mg (n=589) or placebo (n=582) intravenously every 4 weeks plus IFNbeta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly once weekly. Annual MRI scans allowed comparison of a range of MRI end points versus baseline. Over 2 years, 67% of patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a remained free of new or enlarging T2-lesions compared with 30% of patients receiving IFNbeta-1a alone. The mean change from baseline in T2 lesion volume over 2 years decreased in patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a and increased in those receiving IFNbeta-1a alone (-277.5mm(3) versus 525.6mm(3); p<0.001). Compared with IFNbeta-1a alone, add-on natalizumab therapy resulted in a smaller increase in mean T1-hypointense lesion volume after 2 years (1821.3mm(3) versus 2210.5mm(3); p<0.001), a smaller mean number of new T1-hypointense lesions over 2 years (2.3 versus 4.1; p<0.001), and a slower rate of brain atrophy during the second year of therapy (-0.31% versus -0.40%; p=0.020). Natalizumab add-on therapy reduced gadolinium-enhancing, T1-hypointense, and T2 MRI lesion activity and slowed brain atrophy progression in patients with relapsing MS who experienced disease activity despite treatment with IFNbeta-1a alone.

  9. Cellular distribution of glucose and monocarboxylate transporters in human brain white matter and multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Philip G; Michailidou, Iliana; Witte, Maarten E; Mizee, Mark R; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, Bert; Reijerkerk, Arie; Pellerin, Luc; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2014-07-01

    To ensure efficient energy supply to the high demanding brain, nutrients are transported into brain cells via specific glucose (GLUT) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT). Mitochondrial dysfunction and altered glucose metabolism are thought to play an important role in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we investigated the cellular localization of key GLUT and MCT proteins in human brain tissue of non-neurological controls and MS patients. We show that in control brain tissue GLUT and MCT proteins were abundantly expressed in a variety of central nervous system cells, particularly in microglia and endothelial cells. In active MS lesions, GLUTs and MCTs were highly expressed in infiltrating leukocytes and reactive astrocytes. Astrocytes manifest increased MCT1 staining and maintain GLUT expression in inactive lesions, whereas demyelinated axons exhibit significantly reduced GLUT3 and MCT2 immunoreactivity in inactive lesions. Finally, we demonstrated that the co-transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), an important protein involved in energy metabolism, is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes in active MS lesions. Overexpression of PGC-1α in astrocyte-like cells resulted in increased production of several GLUT and MCT proteins. In conclusion, we provide for the first time a comprehensive overview of key nutrient transporters in white matter brain samples. Moreover, our data demonstrate an altered expression of these nutrient transporters in MS brain tissue, including a marked reduction of axonal GLUT3 and MCT2 expression in chronic lesions, which may impede efficient nutrient supply to the hypoxic demyelinated axons thereby contributing to the ongoing neurodegeneration in MS.

  10. Central role of Th2/Tc2 lymphocytes in pattern II multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Planas, Raquel; Metz, Imke; Ortiz, Yaneth; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Jelčić, Ilijas; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Heesen, Christoph; Brück, Wolfgang; Martin, Roland; Sospedra, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system with marked heterogeneity in several aspects including pathological processes. Based on infiltrating immune cells, deposition of humoral factors and loss of oligodendrocytes and/or myelin proteins, four lesion patterns have been described. Pattern II is characterized by antibody and complement deposition in addition to T-cell infiltration. MS is considered a T-cell-mediated disease, but until now the study of pathogenic T cells has encountered major challenges, most importantly the limited access of brain-infiltrating T cells. Our objective was to identify, isolate, and characterize brain-infiltrating clonally expanded T cells in pattern II MS lesions. Methods We used next-generation sequencing to identify clonally expanded T cells in demyelinating pattern II brain autopsy lesions, subsequently isolated these as T-cell clones from autologous cerebrospinal fluid and functionally characterized them. Results We identified clonally expanded CD8+ but also CD4+ T cells in demyelinating pattern II lesions and for the first time were able to isolate these as live T-cell clones. The functional characterization shows that T cells releasing Th2 cytokines and able to provide B cell help dominate the T-cell infiltrate in pattern II brain lesions. Interpretation Our data provide the first functional evidence for a putative role of Th2/Tc2 cells in pattern II MS supporting the existence of this pathogenic phenotype and questioning the protective role that is generally ascribed to Th2 cells. Our observations are important to consider for future treatments of pattern II MS patients. PMID:26401510

  11. Visual discrimination modeling of lesion detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Lubin, Jeffrey; Nafziger, John S.; Chakraborty, Dev P.

    2002-04-01

    The Sarnoff JNDmetrix visual discrimination model (VDM) was applied to predict human psychophysical performance in the detection of simulated mammographic lesions. Contrast thresholds for the detection of synthetic Gaussian masses on mean backgrounds and simulated mammographic backgrounds were measured in two-alternative, forced-choice (2AFC) trials. Experimental thresholds for 2-D Gaussian signal detection decreased with increasing signal size on mean backgrounds and on 1/f3 filtered noise images presented with identical (paired) backgrounds. For 2AFC presentations of different (unpaired) filtered noise backgrounds, detection thresholds increased with increasing signal diameter, consistent with a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio. Thresholds for mean and paired filtered noise backgrounds were used to calibrate a new low-pass, spatial-frequency channel in the VDM. The calibrated VDM was able to predict accurate detection thresholds for Gaussian signals on mean and paired 1/f3 filtered noise backgrounds. To simulate noise-limited detection thresholds for unpaired backgrounds, an approach is outlined for the development of a VDM-based model observer based on statistical decision theory.

  12. Automatic white matter lesion segmentation using an adaptive outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kok Haur; Ramachandram, Dhanesh; Mandava, Rajeswari; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi

    2012-07-01

    White matter (WM) lesions are diffuse WM abnormalities that appear as hyperintense (bright) regions in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). WM lesions are often observed in older populations and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other brain-related disorders. In this paper, a new automated method for WM lesions segmentation is presented. In the proposed method, the presence of WM lesions is detected as outliers in the intensity distribution of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images using an adaptive outlier detection approach. Outliers are detected using a novel adaptive trimmed mean algorithm and box-whisker plot. In addition, pre- and postprocessing steps are implemented to reduce false positives attributed to MRI artifacts commonly observed in FLAIR sequences. The approach is validated using the cranial MRI sequences of 38 subjects. A significant correlation (R=0.9641, P value=3.12×10(-3)) is observed between the automated approach and manual segmentation by radiologist. The accuracy of the proposed approach was further validated by comparing the lesion volumes computed using the automated approach and lesions manually segmented by an expert radiologist. Finally, the proposed approach is compared against leading lesion segmentation algorithms using a benchmark dataset.

  13. TROY and LINGO-1 expression in astrocytes and macrophages/microglia in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Tabunoki, H; Yamamura, T; Arima, K; Konno, H

    2007-02-01

    Nogo constitutes a family of neurite outgrowth inhibitors contributing to a failure of axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Nogo-A is expressed exclusively on oligodendrocytes where Nogo-66 segment binds to Nogo receptor (NgR) expressed on neuronal axons. NgR signalling requires a coreceptor p75(NTR) or TROY in combination with an adaptor LINGO-1. To characterize the cell types expressing the NgR complex in the human CNS, we studied demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) brains by immunohistochemistry. TROY and LINGO-1 were identified in subpopulations of reactive astrocytes, macrophages/microglia and neurones but not in oligodendrocytes. TROY was up-regulated, whereas LINGO-1 was reduced in MS brains by Western blot. These results suggest that the ternary complex of NgR/TROY/LINGO-1 expressed on astrocytes, macrophages/microglia and neurones, by interacting with Nogo-A on oligodendrocytes, might modulate glial-neuronal interactions in demyelinating lesions of MS.

  14. Automatic iterative segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases in FLAIR images.

    PubMed

    Freire, Paulo G L; Ferrari, Ricardo J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease that attacks the central nervous system (CNS) and affects more than 2 million people worldwide. The segmentation of MS lesions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very important task to assess how a patient is responding to treatment and how the disease is progressing. Computational approaches have been proposed over the years to segment MS lesions and reduce the amount of time spent on manual delineation and inter- and intra-rater variability and bias. However, fully-automatic segmentation of MS lesions still remains an open problem. In this work, we propose an iterative approach using Student's t mixture models and probabilistic anatomical atlases to automatically segment MS lesions in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images. Our technique resembles a refinement approach by iteratively segmenting brain tissues into smaller classes until MS lesions are grouped as the most hyperintense one. To validate our technique we used 21 clinical images from the 2015 Longitudinal Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Segmentation Challenge dataset. Evaluation using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), True Positive Ratio (TPR), False Positive Ratio (FPR), Volume Difference (VD) and Pearson's r coefficient shows that our technique has a good spatial and volumetric agreement with raters' manual delineations. Also, a comparison between our proposal and the state-of-the-art shows that our technique is comparable and, in some cases, better than some approaches, thus being a viable alternative for automatic MS lesion segmentation in MRI.

  15. Lesion registration for longitudinal disease tracking in an imaging informatics-based multiple sclerosis eFolder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Liu, Joseph; Zhang, Xuejun; Lerner, Alex; Shiroishi, Mark; Amezcua, Lilyana; Liu, Brent

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and developed a multiple sclerosis eFolder system for patient data storage, image viewing, and automatic lesion quantification results stored in DICOM-SR format. The web-based system aims to be integrated in DICOM-compliant clinical and research environments to aid clinicians in patient treatments and data analysis. The system needs to quantify lesion volumes, identify and register lesion locations to track shifts in volume and quantity of lesions in a longitudinal study. In order to perform lesion registration, we have developed a brain warping and normalizing methodology using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) MATLAB toolkit for brain MRI. Patients' brain MR images are processed via SPM's normalization processes, and the brain images are analyzed and warped according to the tissue probability map. Lesion identification and contouring are completed by neuroradiologists, and lesion volume quantification is completed by the eFolder's CAD program. Lesion comparison results in longitudinal studies show key growth and active regions. The results display successful lesion registration and tracking over a longitudinal study. Lesion change results are graphically represented in the web-based user interface, and users are able to correlate patient progress and changes in the MRI images. The completed lesion and disease tracking tool would enable the eFolder to provide complete patient profiles, improve the efficiency of patient care, and perform comprehensive data analysis through an integrated imaging informatics system.

  16. Penalized maximum-likelihood image reconstruction for lesion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2006-08-01

    Detecting cancerous lesions is one major application in emission tomography. In this paper, we study penalized maximum-likelihood image reconstruction for this important clinical task. Compared to analytical reconstruction methods, statistical approaches can improve the image quality by accurately modelling the photon detection process and measurement noise in imaging systems. To explore the full potential of penalized maximum-likelihood image reconstruction for lesion detection, we derived simplified theoretical expressions that allow fast evaluation of the detectability of a random lesion. The theoretical results are used to design the regularization parameters to improve lesion detectability. We conducted computer-based Monte Carlo simulations to compare the proposed penalty function, conventional penalty function, and a penalty function for isotropic point spread function. The lesion detectability is measured by a channelized Hotelling observer. The results show that the proposed penalty function outperforms the other penalty functions for lesion detection. The relative improvement is dependent on the size of the lesion. However, we found that the penalty function optimized for a 5 mm lesion still outperforms the other two penalty functions for detecting a 14 mm lesion. Therefore, it is feasible to use the penalty function designed for small lesions in image reconstruction, because detection of large lesions is relatively easy.

  17. Optimized lesion detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2009-02-01

    While diagnostic improvement via breast tomosynthesis has been notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This is because of the complex task of optimizing multiple parameters that constitute image acquisition and thus affect tomosynthesis performance. Those parameters include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, we investigated the effects of acquisition parameters, independent of each other, on the overall diagnostic image quality of tomosynthesis. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view mammographic dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 non-overlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm at 224 different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which one of the many possible combinations maximized performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. Results showed that performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. At a constant dose level and angular span, the performance rolled-off beyond a certain number of projections, indicating that simply increasing the number of projections in tomosynthesis may not necessarily improve its performance. The best performance was obtained with 15-17 projections spanning an angular arc of ~45° - the maximum tested in our study, and for an acquisition dose equal to single-view mammography. The optimization framework developed in this framework is applicable to other reconstruction techniques and other multi-projection systems.

  18. Dealing with excess of zeros in the statistical analysis of magnetic resonance imaging lesion count in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Francois, Mercier; Peter, Chin; Gordon, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Lesion count observed on brain magnetic resonance imaging scan is a common end point in phase 2 clinical trials evaluating therapeutic treatment in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). This paper compares the performances of Poisson, zero-inflated poisson (ZIP), negative binomial (NB), and zero-inflated NB (ZINB) mixed-effects regression models in fitting lesion count data in a clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of fingolimod in comparison with placebo, in MS. The NB and ZINB models prove to be superior to the Poisson and ZIP models. We discuss the advantages and limitations of zero-inflated models in the context of MS treatment.

  19. Locally adaptive MR intensity models and MRF-based segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzianova, Alfiia; Lesjak, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Špiclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Neuroimaging biomarkers are an important paraclinical tool used to characterize a number of neurological diseases, however, their extraction requires accurate and reliable segmentation of normal and pathological brain structures. For MR images of healthy brains the intensity models of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) in combination with Markov random field (MRF) models are known to give reliable and smooth NABT segmentation. However, the presence of pathology, MR intensity bias and natural tissue-dependent intensity variability altogether represent difficult challenges for a reliable estimation of NABT intensity model based on MR images. In this paper, we propose a novel method for segmentation of normal and pathological structures in brain MR images of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that is based on locally-adaptive NABT model, a robust method for the estimation of model parameters and a MRF-based segmentation framework. Experiments on multi-sequence brain MR images of 27 MS patients show that, compared to whole-brain model and compared to the widely used Expectation-Maximization Segmentation (EMS) method, the locally-adaptive NABT model increases the accuracy of MS lesion segmentation.

  20. Development of a web-based DICOM-SR viewer for CAD data of multiple sclerosis lesions in an imaging informatics-based efolder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Wong, Jonathan; Zhong, Mark; Zhang, Jeff; Liu, Brent

    2014-03-01

    In the past, we have presented an imaging-informatics based eFolder system for managing and analyzing imaging and lesion data of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, which allows for data storage, data analysis, and data mining in clinical and research settings. The system integrates the patient's clinical data with imaging studies and a computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm for quantifying MS lesion volume, lesion contour, locations, and sizes in brain MRI studies. For compliance with IHE integration protocols, long-term storage in PACS, and data query and display in a DICOM compliant clinical setting, CAD results need to be converted into DICOM-Structured Report (SR) format. Open-source dcmtk and customized XML templates are used to convert quantitative MS CAD results from MATLAB to DICOM-SR format. A web-based GUI based on our existing web-accessible DICOM object (WADO) image viewer has been designed to display the CAD results from generated SR files. The GUI is able to parse DICOM-SR files and extract SR document data, then display lesion volume, location, and brain matter volume along with the referenced DICOM imaging study. In addition, the GUI supports lesion contour overlay, which matches a detected MS lesion with its corresponding DICOM-SR data when a user selects either the lesion or the data. The methodology of converting CAD data in native MATLAB format to DICOM-SR and displaying the tabulated DICOM-SR along with the patient's clinical information, and relevant study images in the GUI will be demonstrated. The developed SR conversion model and GUI support aim to further demonstrate how to incorporate CAD post-processing components in a PACS and imaging informatics-based environment.

  1. White matter and lesion T1 relaxation times increase in parallel and correlate with disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parry, A; Clare, S; Jenkinson, M; Smith, S; Palace, J; Matthews, P M

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have established the clinical relevance of hypointense lesions ("black holes") on T1-weighted MRI as a surrogate marker for pathological change [36]. In contrast to measuring the volume of "black holes", the direct measurement of T1 values allows an objective assessment of the changes contributing to hypointensity both in the focal lesions and in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). The aims of this study were first, to determine the relationship between T1 values in the NAWM and in discrete lesions, second, to test the relationship between white matter T1 changes and measures of disability and third, to determine whether pathology leading to T1 change occurred in thalamic grey matter of patients with multiple sclerosis. 24 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (13 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 11 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis) and 11 controls participated. White matter T1 histograms and mean T1 values for the thalamus were generated from whole brain T1 relaxation time maps measured using a novel echo-planar imaging based MRI sequence at 3Tesla. Tissue segmentation based on T2- and T1-weighted images allowed independent study of changes in lesions and NAWM. White matter T1 histograms from the patient group showed a reduced peak height and a shift towards higher T1 values (p = 0.028) relative to controls. The mean thalamic T1 was greater for secondary progressive patients than for healthy controls (p = 0.03). Mean white matter T1 values correlated significantly with disability (r = 0.48, p = 0.02). The mean T1 value in the T1-hypointense lesions correlated strongly with the mean T1 value in the NAWM (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). No significant relationship was found between mean white matter T1 value and cerebral volume (r = -0.23, p = 0.31). The T1 measurements extend previous observations suggesting that changes in the NAWM occur in parallel with pathology in lesions of MS. T1 measurements of either

  2. Detection of endometrial lesions by degree of linear polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2010-02-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most common causes of chronic pelvic pain and infertility and is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterine cavity. A novel laparoscopic polarization imaging system was designed to detect endometriosis by imaging endometrial lesions. Linearly polarized light with varying incident polarization angles illuminated endometrial lesions. Degree of linear polarization image maps of endometrial lesions were constructed by using remitted polarized light. The image maps were compared with regular laparoscopy image. The degree of linear polarization map contributed to the detection of endometriosis by revealing structures inside the lesion. The utilization of rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides extended understanding of endometrial lesions. The developed polarization system with varying IPA and the collected image maps could provide improved characterization of endometrial lesions via higher visibility of the structure of the lesions and thereby improve diagnosis of endometriosis.

  3. Incidental Breast Lesions Detected on Computed Thorax Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Necdet; Emlik, Ganime Dilek; Keskin, Suat; Kalkan, Havva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mammography is the primary imaging method of the breast, incidental benign and malignant breast lesions are increasingly being detected on computed tomographies (CTs) performed to detect different pathologies. Therefore, the detection and accurate identification of these lesions is important. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency, morphological features, and results of incidental breast lesions on CTs performed for the detection of extramammarian pathologies. Materials and Methods Incidental breast lesions on CTs performed in our department between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated. Patients who had previously diagnosed breast lesions were excluded from the study. The inclusion criteria were histopathologic diagnose and being followed-up for at least 2 years. Results The study population consisted of 33 women whose mean age was 55±1.38 (37–78) years. Of the 33 women, 12 (36%) had malignant and 21 (64%) had benign or normal findings. The most common malignant lesion was invasive ductal carcinoma, and the most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma. Ill-defined contour and lymphadenopathy in malignant lesions and well-defined contour in benign lesions were the most important CT findings. Conclusion Breast must be carefully evaluated if it is included in the scans. An accurate report of breast lesions gives an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Evaluation of scintillation cameras by spherical lesion detectability.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, H; Koga, Y

    1980-12-01

    The lesion detectability with a scintillation camera as a function of count density was determined for the four spherical cold lesions with diameter 0.9-2.5 cm (in square root 2 step) within a uniform background activity. It can be seen from the curves that the lesion detectability increases with an increase in count density until 2 kcounts/cm2, however it does not appreciably improve for count densities above 2 kcounts/cm2. The curves also show that, for a giving count density, the lesion detectability decreases as the lesion size or object contrast decreases. From these curves minimum count density required for recognition of each cold lesion is deduced. This value is applied to the evaluation of scintillation camera system.

  5. Balo’s concentric lesions with concurrent features of Schilder’s disease in relapsing multiple sclerosis: neuropathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, David

    2016-01-01

    Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes are rare neurological diseases that differ from multiple sclerosis (MS), owing to unusual clinicoradiological and pathological findings, and poor responses to treatment. The distinction between them and the criteria for their diagnoses are poorly defined due to the lack of advanced research studies. Balo’s concentric sclerosis (BCS) and Schilder’s disease (SD) are two of these syndromes and can present as monophasic or in association with chronic MS. Both variants are difficult to distinguish when they present in acute stages. We describe an autopsy case of middle-aged female with a chronic history of MS newly relapsed with atypical demyelinating lesions, which showed concurrent features of BCS and SD. We also describe the neuropathological findings, and discuss the overlapping features between these two variants. PMID:28210570

  6. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  7. Automated White Matter Hyperintensity Detection in Multiple Sclerosis Using 3D T2 FLAIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yi; Wang, Ying; Kang, Yan; Haacke, E. Mark

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) seen on T2WI are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) as it indicates inflammation associated with the disease. Automatic detection of the WMH can be valuable in diagnosing and monitoring of treatment effectiveness. T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images provided good contrast between the lesions and other tissue; however the signal intensity of gray matter tissue was close to the lesions in FLAIR images that may cause more false positives in the segment result. We developed and evaluated a tool for automated WMH detection only using high resolution 3D T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. We use a high spatial frequency suppression method to reduce the gray matter area signal intensity. We evaluate our method in 26 MS patients and 26 age matched health controls. The data from the automated algorithm showed good agreement with that from the manual segmentation. The linear correlation between these two approaches in comparing WMH volumes was found to be Y = 1.04X + 1.74  (R2 = 0.96). The automated algorithm estimates the number, volume, and category of WMH. PMID:25136355

  8. Detecting Optic Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using New Colorimetric Analysis Software: From Idea to Application.

    PubMed

    Bambo, Maria Pilar; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Perez-Olivan, Susana; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologists typically observe a temporal pallor of the optic disc in patients with multiple sclerosis. Here, we describe the emergence of an idea to quantify these optic disc color changes in multiple sclerosis patients. We recruited 12 multiple sclerosis patients with previous optic neuritis attack and obtained photographs of their optic discs. The Laguna ONhE, a new colorimetric software using hemoglobin as the reference pigment in the papilla, was used for the analysis. The papilla of these multiple sclerosis patients showed greater pallor, especially in the temporal sector. The software detected the pallor and assigned hemoglobin percentages below normal reference values. Measurements of optic disc hemoglobin levels obtained with the Laguna ONhE software program had good ability to detect optic atrophy and, consequently, axonal loss in multiple sclerosis patients. This new technology is easy to implement in routine clinical practice.

  9. Lesion Load May Predict Long-Term Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lavorgna, Luigi; Messina, Silvia; Chisari, Clara Grazia; Ippolito, Domenico; Lanzillo, Roberta; Vacchiano, Veria; Realmuto, Sabrina; Valentino, Paola; Coniglio, Gabriella; Buccafusca, Maria; Paolicelli, Damiano; D’Ambrosio, Alessandro; Montella, Patrizia; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Savettieri, Giovanni; Alfano, Bruno; Gallo, Antonio; Simone, Isabella; Viterbo, Rosa; Zappia, Mario; Bonavita, Simona; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques provided evidences into the understanding of cognitive impairment (CIm) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Objectives To investigate the role of white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) in predicting long-term CIm in a cohort of MS patients. Methods 303 out of 597 patients participating in a previous multicenter clinical-MRI study were enrolled (49.4% were lost at follow-up). The following MRI parameters, expressed as fraction (f) of intracranial volume, were evaluated: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-f), WM-f, GM-f and abnormal WM (AWM-f), a measure of lesion load. Nine years later, cognitive status was assessed in 241 patients using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), the Semantically Related Word List Test (SRWL), the Modified Card Sorting Test (MCST), and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). In particular, being SRWL a memory test, both immediate recall and delayed recall were evaluated. MCST scoring was calculated based on the number of categories, number of perseverative and non-perseverative errors. Results AWM-f was predictive of an impaired performance 9 years ahead in SDMT (OR 1.49, CI 1.12–1.97 p = 0.006), PASAT (OR 1.43, CI 1.14–1.80 p = 0.002), SRWL-immediate recall (OR 1.72 CI 1.35–2.20 p<0.001), SRWL-delayed recall (OR 1.61 CI 1.28–2.03 p<0.001), MCST-category (OR 1.52, CI 1.2–1.9 p<0.001), MCST-perseverative error(OR 1.51 CI 1.2–1.9 p = 0.001), MCST-non perseverative error (OR 1.26 CI 1.02–1.55 p = 0.032). Conclusion In our large MS cohort, focal WM damage appeared to be the most relevant predictor of the long-term cognitive outcome. PMID:25816303

  10. Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2000-10-13

    Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored.

  11. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    PubMed Central

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient measurements, all tumors were visible and easily differentiated from artifacts and areolas in the scatterplots. The different rate of intake and wash out of the fluorescent contrast agent in the healthy versus malignant tissues was also observed in the scatterplot: this information can be used to discriminate malignant lesion from normal structures. PMID:21483622

  12. Automatic detection of red lesions in digital color fundus photographs.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Meindert; van Ginneken, Bram; Staal, Joes; Suttorp-Schulten, Maria S A; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2005-05-01

    The robust detection of red lesions in digital color fundus photographs is a critical step in the development of automated screening systems for diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, a novel red lesion detection method is presented based on a hybrid approach, combining prior works by Spencer et al. (1996) and Frame et al. (1998) with two important new contributions. The first contribution is a new red lesion candidate detection system based on pixel classification. Using this technique, vasculature and red lesions are separated from the background of the image. After removal of the connected vasculature the remaining objects are considered possible red lesions. Second, an extensive number of new features are added to those proposed by Spencer-Frame. The detected candidate objects are classified using all features and a k-nearest neighbor classifier. An extensive evaluation was performed on a test set composed of images representative of those normally found in a screening set. When determining whether an image contains red lesions the system achieves a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 87%. The method is compared with several different automatic systems and is shown to outperform them all. Performance is close to that of a human expert examining the images for the presence of red lesions.

  13. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  14. Association of Cortical Lesion Burden on 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Cognition and Disability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Daniel M.; Roy, Snehashis; Oh, Jiwon; Izbudak, Izlem; Pham, Dzung; Courtney, Susan; Caffo, Brian; Jones, Craig K.; van Zijl, Peter; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cortical lesions (CLs) contribute to physical and cognitive disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Accurate methods for visualization of CLs are necessary for future clinical studies and therapeutic trials in MS. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical relevance of measures of CL burden derived from high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational clinical imaging study was conducted at an academic MS center. Participants included 36 individuals with MS (30 relapsing-remitting, 6 secondary or primary progressive) and 15 healthy individuals serving as controls. The study was conducted from March 10, 2010, to November 23, 2012, and analysis was performed from June 1, 2011, to September 30, 2014. Seven-Tesla MRI of the brain was performed with 0.5-mm isotropic resolution magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) and whole-brain, 3-dimensional, 1.0-mm isotropic resolution magnetization–prepared, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (MPFLAIR). Cortical lesions, seen as hypointensities on MPRAGE, were manually segmented. Lesions were classified as leukocortical, intracortical, or subpial. Images were segmented using the Lesion-TOADS (Topology-Preserving Anatomical Segmentation) algorithm, and brain structure volumes and white matter (WM) lesion volume were reported. Volumes were normalized to intracranial volume. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical disability was measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Cognitive disability was measured with the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in MS battery. RESULTS Cortical lesions were noted in 35 of 36 participants (97%), with a median of 16 lesions per participant (range, 0-99). Leukocortical lesion volume correlated with WM lesion volume (ρ = 0.50; P = .003) but not with cortical volume; subpial lesion volume inversely correlated with cortical volume (ρ = −0.36; P = .04) but not with WM lesion volume. Total CL count and

  15. Automatic colonic lesion detection and tracking in endoscopic videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gustafsson, Ulf; A-Rahim, Yoursif

    2011-03-01

    The biology of colorectal cancer offers an opportunity for both early detection and prevention. Compared with other imaging modalities, optical colonoscopy is the procedure of choice for simultaneous detection and removal of colonic polyps. Computer assisted screening makes it possible to assist physicians and potentially improve the accuracy of the diagnostic decision during the exam. This paper presents an unsupervised method to detect and track colonic lesions in endoscopic videos. The aim of the lesion screening and tracking is to facilitate detection of polyps and abnormal mucosa in real time as the physician is performing the procedure. For colonic lesion detection, the conventional marker controlled watershed based segmentation is used to segment the colonic lesions, followed by an adaptive ellipse fitting strategy to further validate the shape. For colonic lesion tracking, a mean shift tracker with background modeling is used to track the target region from the detection phase. The approach has been tested on colonoscopy videos acquired during regular colonoscopic procedures and demonstrated promising results.

  16. Detection of small human cerebral cortical lesions with MRI under different levels of Gaussian smoothing: applications in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Goubran, Maged; Kraguljac, Alan; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of smoothing filter selection in Voxel-Based Morphometry studies on structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Gaussian filters of 4 mm, 8 mm or 10 mm Full Width at High Maximum are commonly used, based on the assumption that the filter size should be at least twice the voxel size to obtain robust statistical results. The hypothesis of the presented work was that the selection of the smoothing filter influenced the detectability of small lesions in the brain. Mesial Temporal Sclerosis associated to Epilepsy was used as the case to demonstrate this effect. Twenty T1-weighted MRIs from the BrainWeb database were selected. A small phantom lesion was placed in the amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus of ten of the images. Subsequently the images were registered to the ICBM/MNI space. After grey matter segmentation, a T-test was carried out to compare each image containing a phantom lesion with the rest of the images in the set. For each lesion the T-test was repeated with different Gaussian filter sizes. Voxel-Based Morphometry detected some of the phantom lesions. Of the three parameters considered: location,size, and intensity; it was shown that location is the dominant factor for the detection of the lesions.

  17. Using multiple imputation to efficiently correct cerebral MRI whole brain lesion and atrophy data in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Alicia S; Egorova, Svetlana; Anderson, Mark C; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Guttmann, Charles R G; Bakshi, Rohit; Healy, Brian C

    2015-10-01

    Automated segmentation of brain MRI scans into tissue classes is commonly used for the assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, manual correction of the resulting brain tissue label maps by an expert reader remains necessary in many cases. Since automated segmentation data awaiting manual correction are "missing", we proposed to use multiple imputation (MI) to fill-in the missing manually-corrected MRI data for measures of normalized whole brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF) and T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV). Automated and manually corrected MRI measures from 1300 patients enrolled in the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) were identified. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the performance of MI with missing data both missing completely at random and missing at random. An imputation model including the concurrent automated data as well as clinical and demographic variables explained a high proportion of the variance in the manually corrected BPF (R(2)=0.97) and T2LV (R(2)=0.89), demonstrating the potential to accurately impute the missing data. Further, our results demonstrate that MI allows for the accurate estimation of group differences with little to no bias and with similar precision compared to an analysis with no missing data. We believe that our findings provide important insights for efficient correction of automated MRI measures to obviate the need to perform manual correction on all cases.

  18. Clonal Expansions of Cd8+ T Cells Dominate the T Cell Infiltrate in Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions as Shown by Micromanipulation and Single Cell Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Babbe, Holger; Roers, Axel; Waisman, Ari; Lassmann, Hans; Goebels, Norbert; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Friese, Michael; Schröder, Roland; Deckert, Martina; Schmidt, Stephan; Ravid, Rivka; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Clonal composition and T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrating actively demyelinating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions were determined with unprecedented resolution at the level of single cells. Individual CD4+ or CD8+ T cells were isolated from frozen sections of lesional tissue by micromanipulation and subjected to single target amplification of TCR-β gene rearrangements. This strategy allows the assignment of a TCR variable region (V region) sequence to the particular T cell from which it was amplified. Sequence analysis revealed that in both cases investigated, the majority of CD8+ T cells belonged to few clones. One of these clones accounted for 35% of CD8+ T cells in case 1. V region sequence comparison revealed signs of selection for common peptide specificities for some of the CD8+ T cells in case 1. In both cases, the CD4+ T cell population was more heterogeneous. Most CD4+ and CD8+ clones were represented in perivascular infiltrates as well as among parenchymal T cells. In case 2, two of the CD8+ clones identified in brain tissue were also detected in peripheral blood. Investigation of the antigenic specificities of expanded clones may help to elucidate their functional properties. PMID:10934227

  19. Detection of dermal systemic sclerosis using noncontact optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Hicks, M. John; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc is a rare disorder, but has a high mortality, particularly in last decade of life. To improve the survival rate, an accurate and early diagnosis is crucial. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is the gold standard for evaluating SSc progression based on clinical palpation at 17 sites on the body. However, this procedure can be time consuming, and the assessed score may be biased by the experience of the clinician, causing inter- and intraobserver variabilities. Moreover, the instrinsic elasticity of skin may further bias the mRSS assessment in the early stages of SSc, such as oedematous. To overcome these limitations, there is a need for a rapid, accurate, and objective assessment technique. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a novel, rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the first use of OCE to assess the mechanical properties of control and SSc-like diseased skin non-invasively. A focused air-pulse induced an elastic wave in the skin, which was detected by a home-built OCE system. The elastic wave propagated significantly faster in SSc skin compared to healthy skin. The Young's modulus of the SSc skin was significantly higher than that of normal skin (P<0.05). Thus, OCE was able to objectively differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin completely noninvasively and is a promising and potentially useful new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc.

  20. Detection of infarct lesions from single MRI modality using inconsistency between voxel intensity and spatial location--a 3-D automatic approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shan; Szameitat, André J; Sterr, Annette

    2008-07-01

    Detection of infarct lesions using traditional segmentation methods is always problematic due to intensity similarity between lesions and normal tissues, so that multispectral MRI modalities were often employed for this purpose. However, the high costs of MRI scan and the severity of patient conditions restrict the collection of multiple images. Therefore, in this paper, a new 3-D automatic lesion detection approach was proposed, which required only a single type of anatomical MRI scan. It was developed on a theory that, when lesions were present, the voxel-intensity-based segmentation and the spatial-location-based tissue distribution should be inconsistent in the regions of lesions. The degree of this inconsistency was calculated, which indicated the likelihood of tissue abnormality. Lesions were identified when the inconsistency exceeded a defined threshold. In this approach, the intensity-based segmentation was implemented by the conventional fuzzy c-mean (FCM) algorithm, while the spatial location of tissues was provided by prior tissue probability maps. The use of simulated MRI lesions allowed us to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the proposed method, as the size and location of lesions were prespecified. The results showed that our method effectively detected lesions with 40-80% signal reduction compared to normal tissues (similarity index > 0.7). The capability of the proposed method in practice was also demonstrated on real infarct lesions from 15 stroke patients, where the lesions detected were in broad agreement with true lesions. Furthermore, a comparison to a statistical segmentation approach presented in the literature suggested that our 3-D lesion detection approach was more reliable. Future work will focus on adapting the current method to multiple sclerosis lesion detection.

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Cortical Inflammation and Subpial Pathology in Multiple Sclerosis by Combined PET and MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    and Subpial Pathology in Multiple Sclerosis by Combined PET and MRI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Caterina Mainero...studies in multiple sclerosis (MS) suggested that cortical demyelinating lesions, which are hardly detected in vivo on conventional magnetic resonance...disease progression in many MS cases. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Multiple sclerosis ; cortex; cortical sulci; neuroinflammation; microglia; cortical

  2. Improved operator agreement and efficiency using the minimum area contour change method for delineation of hyperintense multiple sclerosis lesions on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Activity of disease in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is monitored by detecting and delineating hyper-intense lesions on MRI scans. The Minimum Area Contour Change (MACC) algorithm has been created with two main goals: a) to improve inter-operator agreement on outlining regions of interest (ROIs) and b) to automatically propagate longitudinal ROIs from the baseline scan to a follow-up scan. Methods The MACC algorithm first identifies an outer bound for the solution path, forms a high number of iso-contour curves based on equally spaced contour values, and then selects the best contour value to outline the lesion. The MACC software was tested on a set of 17 FLAIR MRI images evaluated by a pair of human experts and a longitudinal dataset of 12 pairs of T2-weighted Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images that had lesion analysis ROIs drawn by a single expert operator. Results In the tests where two human experts evaluated the same MRI images, the MACC program demonstrated that it could markedly reduce inter-operator outline error. In the longitudinal part of the study, the MACC program created ROIs on follow-up scans that were in close agreement to the original expert’s ROIs. Finally, in a post-hoc analysis of 424 follow-up scans 91% of propagated MACC were accepted by an expert and only 9% of the final accepted ROIS had to be created or edited by the expert. Conclusion When used with an expert operator's verification of automatically created ROIs, MACC can be used to improve inter- operator agreement and decrease analysis time, which should improve data collected and analyzed in multicenter clinical trials. PMID:24004511

  3. Automatic detection of ureter lesions in CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exell, Trevor; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cha, Kenny H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a CAD system for automated detection of ureter abnormalities in multi-detector row CT urography (CTU). Our CAD system consists of two stages. The first stage automatically tracks the ureter via the previously proposed COmbined Model-guided Path-finding Analysis and Segmentation System (COMPASS). The second stage consists of lesion enhancement filtering, adaptive thresholding, edge extraction, and noise removal. With IRB approval, 36 cases were collected from patient files, including 15 cases (17 ureters with 32 lesions) for training, and 10 abnormal cases (11 ureters with 17 lesions) and 11 normal cases (22 ureters) for testing. All lesions were identified by experienced radiologists on the CTU images and COMPASS was able to track the ureters in 100% of the cases. The average lesion size was 5.1 mm (range: 2.1 mm - 21.9 mm) for the training set and 6.1 mm (range: 2.0 mm - 18.9 mm) for the test set. The average conspicuity was 4.1 (range: 2 to 5) and 3.9 (range: 1 to 5) on a scale of 1 to 5 (5 very subtle), for the training and test sets, respectively. The system achieved 90.6% sensitivity at 2.41 (41/17) FPs/ureter for the training set and 70.6% sensitivity at 2 (44/22) FPs/normal ureter for the test set. These initial results demonstrate the feasibility of the CAD system to track the ureter and detect ureter cancer of medium conspicuity and relatively small sizes.

  4. Brain lesion detection in MRI with fuzzy and geostatistical models.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan D

    2010-01-01

    Automated image detection of white matter changes of the brain is essentially helpful in providing a quantitative measure for studying the association of white matter lesions with other types of biomedical data. Such study allows the possibility of several medical hypothesis validations which lead to therapeutic treatment and prevention. This paper presents a new clustering-based segmentation approach for detecting white matter changes in magnetic resonance imaging with particular reference to cognitive decline in the elderly. The proposed method is formulated using the principles of fuzzy c-means algorithm and geostatistics.

  5. Tuberous sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cross, Nicola Jayne; Fung, Diane E

    2010-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder that occurs in approximately 1 in 7,500 live births. It is characterized by benign neoplasms of the skin, heart, kidneys, lungs, central nervous system, and mucosa. Oral lesions are usually fibrous in nature and most commonly occur on the anterior gingivae. Patients may suffer with epilepsy and learning difficulties, which may complicate dental management. When a 10-year-old girl with a history of tuberous sclerosis was brought in for a routine dental check-up, a leafy growth on the anterior gingiva was detected. An excisional biopsy was carried out. Histologically, the appearance was described as nonspecific, but was consistent with a diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis is a rare condition that may exhibit oral manifestations. The patients may also exhibit epilepsy and learning difficulties. Dental management of affected patients may therefore be more complicated and complex.

  6. Recommendations for the detection and therapeutic management of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bensa, C; Bodiguel, E; Brassat, D; Laplaud, D; Magy, L; Ouallet, J-C; Zephir, H; De Seze, J; Blanc, F

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the Multiple Sclerosis Think Tank (Groupe de réflexion sur la sclérose en plaques [GRESEP]) is to prescribe recommendations following a systematic literature search and using a Rand Corporation and California University (RAND/UCLA) appropriateness derived method, in response to practical questions that are raised in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The topics of this working program were chosen because they were not addressed in the French recommendations and because of the few data in the literature that enabled practices to be based on validated data. Following the theme on useful serum testing with suspected multiple sclerosis, the subjects of the present work concern the detection and management of cognitive impairment in the beginning stages of the disease course. Two clinical questions were asked: which complementary exams (besides physical examination and neuropsychological tests) would help in the screening of cognitive impairment at the beginning of the disease? What care management should the person with MS and cognitive impairment be offered (treatments and neurocognitive rehabilitation)? The recommendations are the result of a consensus amongst a working group, a rating group and a reading group comprised of hospital neurologists involved in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. Each recommendation is presented with the degree of consensus that it was accorded.

  7. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection.

  8. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem

    PubMed Central

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection. PMID:27603778

  9. [Demand for abortion. Detection of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions].

    PubMed

    Benmoura, D

    1994-03-01

    Eighteen years of experience with cervical screening in the Center for Social Gynecology in Marseilles has demonstrated the existence of a group at high risk of cervical dysplasia. Its characteristics are early initiation of sexual activity, sexually transmitted disease, sexual promiscuity, and an unfavorable socioeconomic environment. Precancerous lesions are sometimes observed before the age of 18. Pap tests are done during preabortion consultations at the Center except in very young patients, those who are too emotionally distressed, and those with inflammations from vaginitis. The test may be done before the abortion because in the first trimester the cells do not yet show changes that would interfere with interpretation of the Pap smear. Bleeding after the abortion interferes with reading the slide. Results of 405 Pap tests conducted during a reference period from August 1992 to July 1993 among women seeking abortions at the Center for Social Gynecology were compared to those of 1601 women undergoing gynecological examinations at two other centers. Among patients at the Center for Social Gynecology and the other two centers respectively, 3.5% and 1.4% were diagnosed with condylomas, 1.5% and 1.2% with dysplasia, and 1.25% and 0.5% with condylomas and dysplasia. During the reference period, only 20% of women were screened. The number of lesions detected suggests that a higher proportion of women should be screened in this population of women often lacking regular medical care.

  10. Accuracy for detection of simulated lesions: comparison of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery, proton density--weighted, and T2-weighted synthetic brain MR imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, E. H.; Itoh, R.; Melhem, E. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to determine the effects of MR sequence (fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery [FLAIR], proton density--weighted, and T2-weighted) and of lesion location on sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We generated FLAIR, proton density-weighted, and T2-weighted brain images with 3-mm lesions using published parameters for acute multiple sclerosis plaques. Each image contained from zero to five lesions that were distributed among cortical-subcortical, periventricular, and deep white matter regions; on either side; and anterior or posterior in position. We presented images of 540 lesions, distributed among 2592 image regions, to six neuroradiologists. We constructed a contingency table for image regions with lesions and another for image regions without lesions (normal). Each table included the following: the reviewer's number (1--6); the MR sequence; the side, position, and region of the lesion; and the reviewer's response (lesion present or absent [normal]). We performed chi-square and log-linear analyses. RESULTS: The FLAIR sequence yielded the highest true-positive rates (p < 0.001) and the highest true-negative rates (p < 0.001). Regions also differed in reviewers' true-positive rates (p < 0.001) and true-negative rates (p = 0.002). The true-positive rate model generated by log-linear analysis contained an additional sequence-location interaction. The true-negative rate model generated by log-linear analysis confirmed these associations, but no higher order interactions were added. CONCLUSION: We developed software with which we can generate brain images of a wide range of pulse sequences and that allows us to specify the location, size, shape, and intrinsic characteristics of simulated lesions. We found that the use of FLAIR sequences increases detection accuracy for cortical-subcortical and periventricular lesions over that associated with proton density- and T2-weighted sequences.

  11. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  12. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Luo, Jie; Lancia, Samantha; Hildebolt, Charles; Cross, Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gray matter (GM) damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS). The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2(*)) in 10 each relapsing-remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2(*) values from healthy controls (HCs) of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2(*) values - age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2(*) values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT) and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT) neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2(*) values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2(*) values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05) correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests) showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2(*) values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  13. Evaluation of penalty design in penalized maximum-likelihood image reconstruction for lesion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Ferrero, Andrea; Hagge, Rosalie J.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-03-01

    Detecting cancerous lesions is a major clinical application in emission tomography. In previous work, we have studied penalized maximum-likelihood (PML) image reconstruction for the detection task, where we used a multiview channelized Hotelling observer (mvCHO) to assess the lesion detectability in 3D images. It mimics the condition where a human observer examines three orthogonal views of a 3D image for lesion detection. We proposed a method to design a shift-variant quadratic penalty function to improve the detectability of lesions at unknown locations, and validated it using computer simulations. In this study we evaluated the bene t of the proposed penalty function for lesion detection using real data. A high-count real patient data with no identi able tumor inside the eld of view was used as the background data. A Na-22 point source was scanned in air at variable locations and the point source data were superimposed onto the patient data as arti cial lesions after being attenuated by the patient body. Independent Poisson noise was added to the high-count sinograms to generate 200 pairs of lesion-present and lesion-absent data sets, each mimicking a 5-minute scans. Lesion detectability was assessed using a multiview CHO and a human observer two alternative forced choice (2AFC) experiment. The results showed that the optimized penalty can improve lesion detection over the conventional quadratic penalty function.

  14. Comparison of Diffuse Weighted Imaging and Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery Sequences of MRI in Brain Multiple Sclerosis Plaques Detection

    PubMed Central

    NAFISI-MOGHADAM, Reza; RAHIMDEL, Abolghasem; SHANBEHZADEH, Tahereh; FALLAH, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Objective Suitable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques from conventional to new devices can help physicians in diagnosis and follow up of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. The aim of present research was to compare effectiveness of Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) sequence of conventional MRI and Diffuse Weighted Imaging (DWI) sequence as a new technique in detection of brain MS plaques. Materials & Methods In this analytic cross sectional study, sample size was assessed as 40 people to detect any significant difference between two sequences with a level of 0.05. DWI and FLAIR sequences of without contrast brain MRI of consecutive MS patients referred to MRI center of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital, Yazd, Iran from January to May 2012, were evaluated. Results Thirty-two females and 8 males with mean age of 35.20±9.80 yr (range = 11-66 yr) were evaluated and finally 340 plaques including 127(37.2%) in T2WI, 127(37.2%) in FLAIR, 63(18.5%) in DWI and 24(7.1%) in T1WI were detected. FLAIR sequence was more efficient than DWI in detection of brain MS plaques, oval, round, amorphous plaque shapes, frontal and occipital lobes, periventricular, intracapsular, corpus callosum, centrum semiovale, subcortical, basal ganglia plaques and diameter of detected MS plaques in DWI sequence was smaller than in FLAIR. Conclusion Old lesion can be detected by conventional MRI and new techniques might be more useful in early inflammatory phase of MS and assessment of experimental treatments. PMID:28277551

  15. Expression of the Nogo-A system in cortical lesions of pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-Xun; Li, Song; Shu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Chun-Qing; Liu, Shi-Yong; Yang, Hui

    2012-07-01

    The reticulon protein Nogo-A is an important regulator of neurite growth, axonal plasticity, and cell migration in the central nervous system. Previous studies have shown markedly elevated levels of Nogo-A in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, we examined the expression pattern of the Nogo-A system in cortical lesions of pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb. These disorders are characterized by malformations of cortical development and are frequently associated with intractable epilepsy. We found that the messenger RNA and protein levels of the Nogo-A receptor (NgR) and the downstream targets of Nogo-A, LINGO-1, TROY, and RhoA but not P75 were upregulated in the cortices of patients compared with autopsy control samples. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that Nogo-A and NgR were strongly expressed in misshapen cells, particularly dysmorphic neurons, balloon cells, and giant cells. TROY was diffusely expressed in the malformations of cortical development. Most of theNogo-A/NgR-positive misshapen cells were colabeled with neuronal rather than astrocytic markers. Taken together, our results suggestthat the activation of Nogo-A via the NgR/LINGO-1/TROY signal transduction pathways, but not NgR/LINGO-1/P75, may be involved in the development and/or seizure activity of cortical lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex and focal cortical dysplasia type IIb.

  16. Brain MRI lesion load quantification in multiple sclerosis: a comparison between automated multispectral and semi-automated thresholding computer-assisted techniques.

    PubMed

    Achiron, Anat; Gicquel, Sebastien; Miron, Shmuel; Faibel, Meir

    2002-12-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion volume measurement is an advantageous tool for assessing disease burden in multiple sclerosis (MS). We have evaluated two computer-assisted techniques: MSA multispectral automatic technique that is based on bayesian classification of brain tissue and NIH image analysis technique that is based on local (lesion by lesion) thresholding, to establish reliability and repeatability values for each technique. Brain MRIs were obtained for 30 clinically definite relapsing-remitting MS patients using a 2.0 Tesla MR scanner with contiguous, 3 mm thick axial, T1, T2 and PD weighted modalities. Digital (Dicom 3) images were analyzed independently by three observers; each analyzed the images twice, using the two different techniques (Total 360 analyses). Accuracy of lesion load measurements using phantom images of known volumes showed significantly better results for the MSA multispectral technique (p < 0.001). The mean intra-and inter-observer variances were, respectively, 0.04 +/- 0.4 (range 0.04-0.13), and 0.09 +/- 0.6 (range 0.01-0.26) for the multispectral MSA analysis technique, 0.24 +/- 2.27 (range 0.23-0.72) and 0.33 +/- 3.8 (range 0.47-1.36) for the NIH threshold technique. These data show that the MSA multispectral technique is significantly more accurate in lesion volume measurements, with better results of within and between observers' assessments, and the lesion load measurements are not influenced by increased disease burden. Measurements by the MSA multispectral technique were also faster and decreased analysis time by 43%. The MSA multispectral technique is a promising tool for evaluating MS patients. Non-biased recognition and delineation algorithms enable high accuracy, low intra-and inter-observer variances and fast assessment of MS related lesion load.

  17. A Channelized Hotelling Observer Study of Lesion Detection in SPECT MAP Reconstruction Using Anatomical Priors

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, S.; Khurd, P.; Hsiao, I.; Zhou, L.; Gindi, G.

    2010-01-01

    In emission tomography, anatomical side information, in the form of organ and lesion boundaries, derived from intra-patient coregistered CT or MR scans can be incorporated into the reconstruction. Our interest is in exploring the efficacy of such side information for lesion detectability. To assess detectability we used the SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer and a signal-known exactly/background known exactly detection task. In simulation studies we incorporated anatomical side information into a SPECT MAP (maximum a posteriori) reconstruction by smoothing within but not across organ or lesion boundaries. A non-anatomical prior was applied by uniform smoothing across the entire image. We investigated whether the use of anatomical priors with organ boundaries alone or with perfect lesion boundaries alone would change lesion detectability relative to the case of a prior with no anatomical information. Furthermore, we investigated whether any such detectability changes for the organ-boundary case would be a function of the distance of the lesion to the organ boundary. We also investigated whether any detectability changes for the lesion-boundary case would be a function of the degree of proximity, i.e. a difference in the radius of the true functional lesion and the radius of the anatomical lesion boundary. Our results showed almost no detectability difference with vs without organ boundaries at any lesion-to-organ boundary distance. Our results also showed no difference in lesion detectability with and without lesion boundaries, and no variation of lesion detectability with degree of proximity. PMID:17664562

  18. Polarized hyperspectral imaging system for in vivo detection of vulvar lichen sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingjie; Ren, Wenqi; Liu, Songde; Liu, Peng; Xie, Lan; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Shiwu; Chang, Shufang; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Vulvar lichen sclerosis (VLS) is a chronic, inflammatory and mucocutaneous disease of extragenital skin, which often goes undetected for years. The underlying causes are associated with the decrease of VEGF that reduces the blood oxygenation of vulva and the structural changes in the collagen fibrils, which can lead to scarring of the affected area. However, few methods are available for quantitative detection of VLS. Clinician's examinations are subjective and may lead to misdiagnosis. Spectroscopy is a potentially effective method for noninvasive detection of VLS. In this paper, we developed a polarized, hyperspectral imaging system for quantitative assessment. The system utilized a hyperspectral camera to collect the reflectance images of the entire vulva under Xenon lamp illumination with and without a polarizer in front of the fiber. One image (Ipar) acquired with the AOTF parallel to the polarization of illumination and the other image (Iper) acquired with the AOTF perpendicular to the illumination. This paper compares polarized images of VLS in a pilot clinical study. The collected reflectance data under Xenon lamp illumination without a polarizer are calibrated and the hyperspectral signals are extracted. An IRB approved clinical trial was carried out to evaluate the clinical utility for VLS detection. Our pilot study has demonstrated the technical potential of using this polarized hyperspectral imaging system for in vivo detection of vulvar lichen sclerosis.

  19. The Effect of Three Times a Week Glatiramer Acetate on Cerebral T1 Hypointense Lesions in Relapsing‐Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Michael G.; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Davis, Mat D.; Steinerman, Joshua R.; Khan, Omar

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two definitions of T1 hypointense (T1H) lesions can be derived from pre‐contrast images: those that may or may not have a corresponding gadolinium‐enhancing correlate on post‐contrast images (T1H total), and those that are simultaneously non‐gadolinium‐enhancing on post‐contrast scans (T1H non‐enhancing). To determine the differences in lesion evolution between these two T1H definitions, we examined the effect of glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL three times weekly subcutaneous injection (GA40) on the number of new or enlarging T1H total and T1H non‐enhancing lesions in patients with relapsing‐remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). METHODS The Phase III GALA study randomized 1404 RRMS subjects 2:1 to receive GA40 or placebo for 12 months. MRI scans were obtained at baseline and at months 6 and 12. Cumulative numbers of T1H total and of T1H non‐enhancing lesions were analyzed using an adjusted negative binomial regression model. A total of 1,357 patients had MRI data collected at either the month 6 or month 12 visit. RESULTS Among the 1,357 patients with MRI scans performed at either the month 6 or month 12 visit, 883 treated with GA40 developed an adjusted cumulative mean of 1.72 T1H total lesions versus 2.62 in 440 placebo controls (risk ratio, .66; 95% CI, .54‐.80; P < .0001). On T1H non‐enhanced scans, GA40‐treated patients developed an adjusted cumulative mean of 1.35 T1H non‐enhancing lesions versus 1.91 in placebo controls (risk ratio, .71; CI, .58‐.87; P = .0009). CONCLUSIONS GA40 significantly reduced the number of new or enlarging T1H total lesions and T1H non‐enhancing lesions compared with placebo. Although the treatment effect magnitude was comparable with both definitions, the use of T1H non‐enhancing lesions may be more relevant for more uniform standardization in future clinical trials. PMID:26394270

  20. Targeting Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Lesions to a Predetermined Axonal Tract System Allows for Refined Behavioral Testing in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Martin; Stadelmann, Christine; Buddeberg, Bigna S.; Merkler, Doron; Bareyre, Florence M.; Anthony, Daniel C.; Linington, Christopher; Brück, Wolfgang; Schwab, Martin E.

    2004-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the structural damage to axons determines the persistent clinical deficit patients acquire during the course of the disease. It is therefore important to test therapeutic strategies that can prevent or reverse this structural damage. The conventional animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), typically shows disseminated inflammation in the central nervous system, which leads to a clinical deficit that cannot be directly attributed to a defined tract system. For this reason we have developed a localized EAE model, in which large inflammatory lesions are targeted to the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, an area including the corticospinal tract. These lesions show the pathological hallmarks of MS plaques and lead to reproducible and pronounced deficits in hindlimb locomotion. Because of the anatomical specificity of this technique we can now use highly sensitive behavioral tests that assess the functional integrity of specific axonal tracts. We show that these tests are predictive of the site and extent of a given lesion and are more sensitive for assessing the clinical course than the scales commonly used for disseminated EAE models. We believe that this targeted EAE model will become a helpful new tool for the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for MS that attempt to protect axons or support their repair. PMID:15039233

  1. Effective detection of bronchial preinvasive lesions by a new autofluorescence imaging bronchovideoscope system.

    PubMed

    Chiyo, Masako; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Hoshino, Hidehisa; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Yasuo; Iizasa, Toshihiko; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2005-06-01

    Autofluorescence bronchoscopy is an important tool for the early detection of preinvasive bronchial lesions. However, autofluorescence bronchoscopy has difficulty distinguishing between preinvasive lesions and other benign epithelial changes. A new autofluorescence imaging bronchovideoscope system (AFI) comprises three signals, including an autofluorescence (460-690 nm) on excitation blue light (395-445 nm) and two different bands of reflected light: G' (550 nm) and R' (610 nm). We hypothesized that color analyses of these three wave lengths would improve our ability to differentiate between inflammation and preinvasive lesions. In order to prove this hypothesis and to evaluate the efficacy of AFI for detecting preinvasive lesions, we conducted a prospective study. A total of 32 patients with suspected or known lung cancer were entered into this study. Conventional white light bronchovideoscopy (WLB) and light induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) were performed prior to using AFI. WLB and LIFE detected 62 lesions, including lung cancers (n=2), squamous dysplasias (n=30), and bronchitis (n=30). By utilizing AFI, 24 dysplasias and 2 cancer lesions were magenta in color, while 25 bronchitis lesions were blue. The sensitivities of detecting dysplasia by LIFE and AFI were 96.7% and 80%, respectively. The specificity of AFI (83.3%) was significantly higher than that of LIFE (36.6%) (p=0.0005). We conclude that AFI appears to represent a significant advance in distinguishing preinvasive and malignant lesions from bronchitis or hyperplasia under circumstances where LIFE would identify these all as abnormal lesions.

  2. How do kV and mAs affect CT lesion detection performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, W.; Ogden, K. M.; Shah, K.; Jadoo, C.; Scalzetti, E. M.; Lavallee, R. L.; Roskopf, M. L.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how output (mAs) and x-ray tube voltage (kV) affect lesion detection in CT imaging. An adult Rando phantom was scanned on a GE LightSpeed CT scanner at x-ray tube voltages from 80 to 140 kV, and outputs from 90 to 360 mAs. Axial images of the abdomen were reconstructed and viewed on a high quality monitor at a soft tissue display setting. We measured detection of 2.5 to 12.5 mm sized lesions using a 2 Alternate Forced Choice (2-AFC) experimental paradigm that determined lesion contrast (I) corresponding to a 92% accuracy (I 92%) of lesion detection. Plots of log(I 92%) versus log(lesion size) were all approximately linear. The slope of the contrast detail curve was ~ -1.0 at 90 mAs, close to the value predicted by the Rose model, but monotonically decreased with increasing mAs to a value of ~ -0.7 at 360 mAs. Increasing the x-ray tube output by a factor of four improved lesion detection by a factor of 1.9 for the smallest lesion (2.5 mm), close to the value predicted by the Rose model, but only by a factor of 1.2 for largest lesion (12.5 mm). Increasing the kV monotonically decreased the contrast detail slopes from -1.02 at 80 kV to -0.71 at 140 kV. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV improved lesion detection by a factor of 2.8 for the smallest lesion (2.5 mm), but only by a factor of 1.7 for largest lesion (12.5 mm). We conclude that: (i) quantum mottle is an important factor for low contrast lesion detection in images of anthropomorphic phantoms; (ii) x-ray tube voltage has a much greater influence on lesion detection performance than x-ray tube output; (iii) the Rose model only predicts CT lesion detection performance at low x-ray tube outputs (90 mAs) and for small lesions (2.5 mm).

  3. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  4. Effect of Treatment with Interferon Beta-1a on Changes in Voxel-Wise Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue and Lesions of Patients with Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A 24-Week, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zivadinov, Robert; Dwyer, Michael G.; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Kennedy, Cheryl; Bergsland, Niels; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Durfee, Jacqueline; Hojnacki, David; Hayward, Brooke; Dangond, Fernando; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study investigated changes in remyelinating and demyelinating activity in normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and lesions, by using voxel-wise magnetization transfer ratio (VW-MTR), in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) receiving interferon beta-1a 44 mcg subcutaneously (IFN β-1a SC) three times weekly versus healthy controls (HCs) (NCT01085318). Methods Increasing (suggestive of remyelination) and decreasing (suggestive of demyelination) VW-MTR changes in NABT and in T2, T1 and gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesion volume were measured over 24 weeks in 23 patients treated with IFN β-1a SC and in 15 HCs (where applicable). VW-MTR changes were tested using the Wilcoxon signed–rank or Wilcoxon rank–sum test. Results A trend for greater volume of NABT with increasing VW-MTR at 24 weeks was observed for patients versus HCs (median [range] 1206 [0–15278]; 342 [0–951] mm3; p = 0.061). NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks was significantly greater in patients than in HCs (852 [6–11577]; 360 [0–1755] mm3; p = 0.028). Similar findings were detected for lesion volumes. Two patients with notably high numbers of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline had a markedly greater volume of tissue with increasing VW-MTR compared with other patients. Volume of NABT tissue with decreasing VW-MTR was significantly greater in patients versus HCs at 24 weeks (942 [0–6141]; 297 [0–852] mm3; p<0.001). Conclusions The significant change in NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks suggests that active remyelination in patients with RRMS may occur during treatment with IFN β-1a SC. Findings from two patients with the highest number of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline suggest that extensive remyelination in NABT may occur in patients with high disease activity. Tissue volume with decreasing VW-MTR was greater in patients than in HCs, despite treatment, validating the sensitivity of this technique for detecting MS

  5. Haemophilus ducreyi detection by polymerase chain reaction in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Borges, M C; Colares, J K B; Lima, D M; Fonseca, B A L

    2009-04-01

    HIV patients frequently have opportunistic oesophageal infections. We report Haemophilus ducreyi genetic material detected by polymerase chain reaction in biopsies of oesophageal lesions in three HIV-1-infected patients. This finding may be an indication of its aetiopathological role in oesophageal lesions of HIV patients.

  6. Coexistence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with neuro-Behçet's disease presenting as a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion: clinicopathologic features of an autopsied patient.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoe; Ouchi, Haruka; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Yamazaki, Motoyoshi; Hashidate, Hideki; Igarashi, Shuichi; Kakita, Akiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    We report the clinical and autopsy features of a 65-year-old Japanese man who clinically exhibited overlap of both neuro-Behçet's disease (NBD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The patient had a HLA-B51 serotype, a recent history of uveitis and had suffered paraparesis, sensory and autonomic disturbance, frontal signs and tremor. A brain and spine MRI study revealed a longitudinally extensive thoracic cord (Th) lesion, but no apparent intracranial abnormalities. The lesion extended ventrally from Th4 to Th9, exhibiting low intensity on T1-weighted images, high intensity on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images and gadolinium enhancement. The patient's upper and lower motor neuron signs and sensory disturbance worsened and he died 16 months after admission. At autopsy, the spinal cord and brain exhibited characteristic histopathological features of both NBD and ALS, including chronic destruction of the ventral thoracic white and gray matter, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, binucleated neurons, lower and upper motor neuron degeneration, Bunina bodies and skein-like inclusions. Although incidental coexistence of these rare disorders could occur in an individual, this case raises the possibility of a pathomechanistic association between NBD and ALS.

  7. Methods to detect antifibrillarin antibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc): a comparison.

    PubMed

    García, Josefina Huerta; Osuna, Monica Delgado; Castrejon, Filiberto Martinez; Enriquez, Laura Guzman; Reyes, Pedro A; Hermosillo, J Jesus Cortes

    2004-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleolar antigens are common in systemic sclerosis (SSc). They include autoantibodies against fibrillarin (Fb), which are serological markers for SSc. Fb is associated with the evolutionally-conserved box C/D of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). We compared indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), Western blot (WB), and immunoprecipitation (IPP) of total small RNAs assays to determine which of these techniques is most specific for the detection of snoRNPs. We also examined the frequency and specificity of autoantibodies from SSc patients to snoRNAs, snRNAs, and scRNAs, and concluded that 1) IIF can not determine autoantibody specificity against Fb, 2) 36% of SSc sera were false-negative by WB, and 3) by IPP, anti-Fb autoantibodies from SSc patients can bind U3, U8, U13, U15, and U22 snoRNAs.

  8. Validation of White-Matter Lesion Change Detection Methods on a Novel Publicly Available MRI Image Database.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Žiga; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Špiclin, Žiga

    2016-10-01

    Changes of white-matter lesions (WMLs) are good predictors of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). Based on longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the changes can be monitored, while the need for their accurate and reliable quantification led to the development of several automated MR image analysis methods. However, an objective comparison of the methods is difficult, because publicly unavailable validation datasets with ground truth and different sets of performance metrics were used. In this study, we acquired longitudinal MR datasets of 20 MS patients, in which brain regions were extracted, spatially aligned and intensity normalized. Two expert raters then delineated and jointly revised the WML changes on subtracted baseline and follow-up MR images to obtain ground truth WML segmentations. The main contribution of this paper is an objective, quantitative and systematic evaluation of two unsupervised and one supervised intensity based change detection method on the publicly available datasets with ground truth segmentations, using common pre- and post-processing steps and common evaluation metrics. Besides, different combinations of the two main steps of the studied change detection methods, i.e. dissimilarity map construction and its segmentation, were tested to identify the best performing combination.

  9. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 3 Lesions Detected on Whole-Breast Screening Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sang Yu; Ko, Eun Young; Han, Boo-Kyung; Shin, Jung Hee; Hahn, Soo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the incidence and cancer rate of probably benign lesions detected on bilateral whole-breast screening ultrasound (US), which corresponded to US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, and evaluated the proper management of those lesions. Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board in our institution, which waived informed patient consent. We retrospectively reviewed US images of 1,666 patients who underwent bilateral whole-breast screening US as a supplemental screening test to negative screening mammography or screening US only. The incidence, clinical course, and cancer rate of screening US-detected probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were investigated, and the size and multiplicity of screening US-detected category 3 lesions were evaluated. Results Probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were detected in 689 of 1,666 patients (41.4%) who underwent screening US. Among them, 653 had follow-up US images for at least 24 months, and among these 653, 190 (29.1%) had multiple bilateral category 3 lesions. Moreover, 539 of 1,666 patients (32.4%) had lesions ≤1 cm in size and 114 of 1,666 (6.8%) had lesions >1 cm (median, 0.82 cm; range, 0.3–4.2 cm). Four of the 653 patients (0.6%) showed suspicious interval changes and were categorized into BI-RADS category 4. Biopsy analysis confirmed only one lesion as invasive ductal carcinoma at the 6-month follow-up; another lesion was an intraductal papilloma and the remaining two were fibroadenomas. Overall cancer rate of the screening US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions was 0.2%. Conclusion The incidence of category 3 lesions detected on screening US only was very high, but the cancer rate was very low. Therefore, in an average-risk population, routine screening US is preferable over short-term follow-up for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected on whole-breast screening US. PMID:27721880

  10. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  11. Interleukin-17- and interleukin-22-secreting myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells resistant to corticoids are related with active brain lesions in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wing, Ana Cristina; Hygino, Joana; Ferreira, Thais B; Kasahara, Taissa M; Barros, Priscila O; Sacramento, Priscila M; Andrade, Regis M; Camargo, Solange; Rueda, Fernanda; Alves-Leon, Soniza V; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina; Alvarenga, Regina; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be an autoimmune disorder. It is believed that immunological events in the early stages have great impact on the disease course. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile of myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells from MS patients in the early phase of the disease and correlate it to clinical parameters, as well as to the effect of in vitro corticoid treatment. Peripheral T cells from MS patients were stimulated with MBP with our without hydrocortisone for 5 days. The cytokines level were determined by ELISA. The number of active brain lesions was determined by MRI scans, and the neurological disabilities were assessed by Expanded Disability Status Scale scores. Our results demonstrated that MS-derived T cells responded to MBP by producing high levels of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines. Although the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-17 and IL-22 was less sensitive to hydrocortisone inhibition, only IL-17 and IL-22 levels correlated with active brain lesions. The ability of hydrocortisone to inhibit IL-17 and IL-22 production by MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells was inversely related to the number of active brain lesions. Finally, the production of both cytokines was significantly higher in cell cultures from Afrodescendant patients and it was less sensitive to hydrocortisone inhibition. In summary, our data suggest that IL-17- and IL-22-secreting CD4(+) T cells resistant to corticoids are associated with radiological activity of the MS in early stages of the disease, mainly among Afrodescendant patients who, normally, have worse prognosis.

  12. Image patch-based method for automated classification and detection of focal liver lesions on CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Mustafa; Pasari, Raghav; Rubin, Daniel; Greenspan, Hayit

    2013-03-01

    We developed a method for automated classification and detection of liver lesions in CT images based on image patch representation and bag-of-visual-words (BoVW). BoVW analysis has been extensively used in the computer vision domain to analyze scenery images. In the current work we discuss how it can be used for liver lesion classification and detection. The methodology includes building a dictionary for a training set using local descriptors and representing a region in the image using a visual word histogram. Two tasks are described: a classification task, for lesion characterization, and a detection task in which a scan window moves across the image and is determined to be normal liver tissue or a lesion. Data: In the classification task 73 CT images of liver lesions were used, 25 images having cysts, 24 having metastasis and 24 having hemangiomas. A radiologist circumscribed the lesions, creating a region of interest (ROI), in each of the images. He then provided the diagnosis, which was established either by biopsy or clinical follow-up. Thus our data set comprises 73 images and 73 ROIs. In the detection task, a radiologist drew ROIs around each liver lesion and two regions of normal liver, for a total of 159 liver lesion ROIs and 146 normal liver ROIs. The radiologist also demarcated the liver boundary. Results: Classification results of more than 95% were obtained. In the detection task, F1 results obtained is 0.76. Recall is 84%, with precision of 73%. Results show the ability to detect lesions, regardless of shape.

  13. Detection of Alveolar Fibrocytes in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phin, Sophie; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Marchal-Somme, Joelle; Tiev, Kiet; Bonay, Marcel; Fabre, Aurélie; Soler, Paul; Dehoux, Monique; Crestani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrocytes are circulating precursors for fibroblasts. Blood fibrocytes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to determine whether alveolar fibrocytes are detected in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), to identify their prognostic value, and their potential association with culture of fibroblasts from BAL. Methods We quantified fibrocytes in BAL from 26 patients with IPF, 9 patients with Systemic Sclerosis(SSc)-interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 11 controls. BAL cells were cultured to isolate alveolar fibroblasts. Results Fibrocytes were detected in BAL in 14/26 IPF (54%) and 5/9 SSc patients (55%), and never in controls. Fibrocytes were in median 2.5% [0.4–19.7] and 3.0% [2.7–3.7] of BAL cells in IPF and SSc-ILD patients respectively. In IPF patients, the number of alveolar fibrocytes was correlated with the number of alveolar macrophages and was associated with a less severe disease but not with a better outcome. Fibroblasts were cultured from BAL in 12/26 IPF (46%), 5/9 SSc-ILD (65%) and never in controls. The detection of BAL fibrocytes did not predict a positive culture of fibroblasts. Conclusion Fibrocytes were detected in BAL fluid in about half of the patients with IPF and SSc-ILD. Their number was associated with less severe disease in IPF patients and did not associate with the capacity to grow fibroblasts from BAL fluid. PMID:23341987

  14. Melanoma and other skin lesion detection using smart handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Zouridakis, George; Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Hu, Rui; Yuan, Xiaojing; Lancaster, Keith; Queen, Courtney M

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones of the latest generation featuring advanced multicore processors, dedicated microchips for graphics, high-resolution cameras, and innovative operating systems provide a portable platform for running sophisticated medical screening software and delivering point-of-care patient diagnostic services at a very low cost. In this chapter, we present a smartphone digital dermoscopy application that can analyze high-resolution images of skin lesions and provide the user with feedback about the likelihood of malignancy. The same basic procedure has been adapted to evaluate other skin lesions, such as the flesh-eating bacterial disease known as Buruli ulcer. When implemented on the iPhone, the accuracy and speed achieved by this application are comparable to that of a desktop computer, demonstrating that smartphone applications can combine portability and low cost with high performance. Thus, smartphone-based systems can be used as assistive devices by primary care physicians during routine office visits, and they can have a significant impact in underserved areas and in developing countries, where health-care infrastructure is limited.

  15. Screening Instruments for the Early Detection of Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zemon, Vance; Rath, Joseph F.; Picone, MaryAnn; Gromisch, Elizabeth S.; Glubo, Heather; Smith-Wexler, Lucia; Foley, Frederick W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive impairments are common in individuals with MS and adversely affect functioning. Early detection of cognitive impairment, therefore, would enable earlier, and possibly more effective, treatment. We sought to compare self-reports with a short neuropsychological test as possible screening tools for cognitive impairment. Methods: One hundred patients with MS were tested with the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis; z scores were used to derive the Cognitive Index (CI). Receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed, with criteria for impairment set at −1.5 and −2.0 SD below the mean. Scores from two self-reports (the Multiple Sclerosis Neuropsychological Screening Questionnaire–Patient Version and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function–Adult Version [BRIEF-A]) and a neuropsychological test (the Symbol Digit Modalities Test [SDMT]) were entered as test variables. Exploratory regression analyses were conducted with 1) CI and self-reports and 2) CI and the Problem-Solving Inventory (PSI). Results: Classification accuracy was high or moderately high for SDMT when the criterion was −2.0 or −1.5 SD, respectively, but low for the self-reports. Hierarchical linear regression showed that the SDMT alone was the best predictor of cognitive impairment; adding the self-reports did not improve the model. Exploratory analyses indicated that certain self-reports (BRIEF-A, PSI) provided some explanatory power in separate models. Conclusions: The SDMT is a more accurate screening tool for cognitive impairment; however, self-reports provide additional information and may complement objective testing. Results suggest that screening for cognitive impairment may require a multidimensional approach. PMID:28243180

  16. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  17. Detection of helicobacter pylori in benign laryngeal lesions by polymerase chain reaction: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Helicobacter Pylori (HP) was detected in some cases of chronic laryngitis, the results were not confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By this time, it has not been found in laryngeal lesions by in house PCR, the most sensitive method for detecting the genome tracks. Regarding the previous results and also few numbers of studies about the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions, specifically by PCR, we aimed to investigate the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions by in-house PCR. Methods The samples were taken from 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions and frozen in −20°C. One milliliter (ml) of lysis buffer was added to 100 mg (mg) of each sample and the tube was placed in 56°C overnight. Then DNA extraction was carried out. Results To find HP DNA, in-house PCR was performed that revealed 5 positive results among 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions. Of them, 3 were polyp, 1 was nodule and 1 was papilloma. Conclusion Although the number of positive results was not a lot in this study, it was in contrast with previous studies which could not find any HP tracks in benign laryngeal lesions by other methods. More studies about the prevalence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions improve judging about the effect of this infection on benign laryngeal lesions. PMID:22515206

  18. Spinal focal lesion detection in multiple myeloma using multimodal image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, Andrea; Hillengass, Jens; Bendl, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a tumor disease in the bone marrow that affects the skeleton systemically, i.e. multiple lesions can occur in different sites in the skeleton. To quantify overall tumor mass for determining degree of disease and for analysis of therapy response, volumetry of all lesions is needed. Since the large amount of lesions in one patient impedes manual segmentation of all lesions, quantification of overall tumor volume is not possible until now. Therefore development of automatic lesion detection and segmentation methods is necessary. Since focal tumors in multiple myeloma show different characteristics in different modalities (changes in bone structure in CT images, hypointensity in T1 weighted MR images and hyperintensity in T2 weighted MR images), multimodal image analysis is necessary for the detection of focal tumors. In this paper a pattern recognition approach is presented that identifies focal lesions in lumbar vertebrae based on features from T1 and T2 weighted MR images. Image voxels within bone are classified using random forests based on plain intensities and intensity value derived features (maximum, minimum, mean, median) in a 5 x 5 neighborhood around a voxel from both T1 and T2 weighted MR images. A test data sample of lesions in 8 lumbar vertebrae from 4 multiple myeloma patients can be classified at an accuracy of 95% (using a leave-one-patient-out test). The approach provides a reasonable delineation of the example lesions. This is an important step towards automatic tumor volume quantification in multiple myeloma.

  19. Automated detection of colorectal lesions with dual-energy CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Kim, Se Hyung; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    Conventional single-energy computed tomography colonography (CTC) tends to miss polyps 6 - 9 mm in size and flat lesions. Dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) provides more complete information about the chemical composition of tissue than does conventional CTC. We developed an automated computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme for detecting colorectal lesions in which dual-energy features were used to identify different bowel materials and their partial-volume artifacts. Based on these features, the dual-energy CAD (DE-CAD) scheme extracted the region of colon by use of a lumen-tracking method, detected lesions by use of volumetric shape features, and reduced false positives by use of a statistical classifier. For validation, 20 patients were prepared for DE-CTC by use of reduced bowel cleansing and orally administered fecal tagging with iodine and/or barium. The DE-CTC was performed in dual positions by use of a dual-energy CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition, Siemens) at 140 kVp and 80 kVp energy levels. The lesions identified by subsequent same-day colonoscopy were correlated with the DE-CTC data. The detection accuracies of the DE-CAD and conventional CAD schemes were compared by use of leave-one-patient-out evaluation and a bootstrap analysis. There were 25 colonoscopy-confirmed lesions: 22 were 6 - 9 mm and 3 were flat lesions >=10 mm in size. The DE-CAD scheme detected the large flat lesions and 95% of the 6 - 9 mm lesions with 9.9 false positives per patient. The improvement in detection accuracy by the DE-CAD was statistically significant.

  20. Automatic detection of significant and subtle arterial lesions from coronary CT angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dongwoo; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Cheng, Victor Y.; Min, James K.; Li, Debiao; Berman, Daniel S.; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Dey, Damini

    2012-02-01

    Visual analysis of three-dimensional (3D) Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA) remains challenging due to large number of image slices and tortuous character of the vessels. We aimed to develop an accurate, automated algorithm for detection of significant and subtle coronary artery lesions compared to expert interpretation. Our knowledge-based automated algorithm consists of centerline extraction which also classifies 3 main coronary arteries and small branches in each main coronary artery, vessel linearization, lumen segmentation with scan-specific lumen attenuation ranges, and lesion location detection. Presence and location of lesions are identified using a multi-pass algorithm which considers expected or "normal" vessel tapering and luminal stenosis from the segmented vessel. Expected luminal diameter is derived from the scan by automated piecewise least squares line fitting over proximal and mid segments (67%) of the coronary artery, considering small branch locations. We applied this algorithm to 21 CCTA patient datasets, acquired with dual-source CT, where 7 datasets had 17 lesions with stenosis greater than or equal to 25%. The reference standard was provided by visual and quantitative identification of lesions with any >=25% stenosis by an experienced expert reader. Our algorithm identified 16 out of the 17 lesions confirmed by the expert. There were 16 additional lesions detected (average 0.13/segment); 6 out of 16 of these were actual lesions with <25% stenosis. On persegment basis, sensitivity was 94%, specificity was 86% and accuracy was 87%. Our algorithm shows promising results in the high sensitivity detection and localization of significant and subtle CCTA arterial lesions.

  1. The prevalence, distribution and severity of detectable pathological lesions in badgers naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, H E; Morrison, W I; Cox, D R; Donnelly, C A; Johnston, W T; Bourne, F J; Clifton-Hadley, R S; Gettinby, G; McInerney, J P; Watkins, G H; Woodroffe, R

    2008-10-01

    The Randomized Badger Culling Trial (RBCT) began in 1998 to determine the impact of badger culling in controlling bovine tuberculosis in cattle. A total of 1166 badgers (14% of total) proactively culled during the RBCT were found to be tuberculous, offering a unique opportunity to study the pathology caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a large sample of badgers. Of these, 39% of adults (approximately 6% of all adults culled) had visible lesions (detectable at necropsy) of bovine tuberculosis; cubs had a lower prevalence of infection (9%) but a higher percentage of tuberculous cubs (55.5%) had visible lesions. Only approximately 1% of adult badgers had extensive, severe pathology. Tuberculous badgers with recorded bite wounds (approximately 5%) had a higher prevalence of visible lesions and a different distribution of lesions, suggesting transmission via bite wounds. However, the predominance of lesions in the respiratory tract indicates that most transmission occurs by the respiratory route.

  2. Detection of blunt, sharp force and gunshot lesions on burnt remains: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Gibelli, Daniele; Mazzucchi, Alessandra; Brandone, Alberto; Grandi, Marco; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2011-09-01

    The study of skin and bone lesions may give information concerning type and manner of production, but in burnt material modification of tissues by the high temperatures may considerably change the morphological characteristics of the lesions. This study aims at pointing out the effects of burning head of pigs with several types of lesions (blunt trauma, sharp force, and gunshot lesions) on soft tissues and bones, both from a morphological and chemical point of view. Results show that the charring process does not completely destroy signs of lesions on bones, which can often be recovered by cleaning bone surface from charred soft-tissue residues. Furthermore, neutron activation analysis test proved that antimony may be detectable also on gunshot entry wounds at the final stages of charring process.

  3. Detection of lesions in dysplastic Barrett's esophagus by community and expert endoscopists.

    PubMed

    Schölvinck, Dirk W; van der Meulen, Kim; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Weusten, Bas L A M

    2017-02-01

    Background and aims Endoscopic treatment of Barrett's esophagus (BE) consists of endoscopic resection of visible lesions followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for any remaining flat BE. Because RFA is only justified in flat BE, detection of neoplastic lesions (high grade dysplasia [HGD] and early adenocarcinoma [EAC]) is crucial. We hypothesized that the detection of visible lesions containing HGD or EAC would be superior in BE expert centers compared with community hospitals, thereby supporting centralization of therapy for BE-related neoplasia. Methods Patients referred with histologically proven HGD or EAC to two Dutch BE expert centers were included. Referral letters, and endoscopy and pathology reports were reviewed for the description of the BE, presence of lesions, and histopathological analysis of target and random tissue sampling. Primary outcome was the endoscopic detection rate of lesions containing histopathologically proven neoplasia (HGD and/or EAC) in community and expert centers. Results There were 198 patients referred from 37 community hospitals (median referral time 55 days [interquartile range 33 - 85]). Detection rates for visible lesions were 60 % in community centers (75 % in patients with a biopsy diagnosis of EAC, 47 % in HGD) and 87 % in expert centers (98 % in EAC, 75 % in HGD); P < 0.001. Even with HGD/EAC on random biopsies from the index endoscopy, the yield at repeat endoscopy was < 50 % in community hospitals. In 79 patients referred solely because of random biopsy results, a lesion requiring endoscopic resection or surgery was found in 76 % by the expert endoscopists. Conclusions Endoscopists at community hospitals detect neoplastic lesions at a significantly lower rate. These data support the value of BE expert centers for work-up and further treatment of BE.

  4. Simulations of lesion detection using a combined phased array LHMI-technique.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound based elasticity imaging techniques have been developed during the past decades. Some of these techniques are based on an internal radiation force stimulation in which a transient or dynamic radiation force is produced by using a single or dual-frequency sonication. In addition, sonication and data acquisition can be implemented using combined or separate transducers. In this simulation study of lesion detection using localized harmonic motion imaging (LHMI), we used a combined phased array designed for simultaneous thermal ablation and lesion detection. In the sonication mode, a focused single-frequency amplitude-modulated sonication is used to induce harmonic motion and in the tracking mode, some of the array elements are used for pulse-echo tracking of the induced displacements. The results showed that the size of the lesion affected the induced displacement around the sonication point. The displacement tracking simulations demonstrated that these changes in the displacement distributions can be detected using only a few of the array elements in the tracking mode but the exact size of the lesion can not be detected accurately. The simulations also showed that two lesions having the radius of 2.5mm can be distinguished if distance between these lesions is at least 2.5mm.

  5. Experimental evaluation of a simple lesion detection task with time-of-flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of high-performance, time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners have recently been developed. In earlier works, the gain with TOF information was derived as a reduction of noise in the reconstructed image, or essentially a gain in scanner sensitivity. These derivations were applicable to analytical reconstruction techniques and 2D PET imaging. In this work, we evaluate the gain measured in the clinically relevant task of lesion detection with TOF information in fully 3D PET scanners using iterative reconstruction algorithms. We performed measurements in a fully 3D TOF PET scanner using spherical lesions in uniform, cylindrical phantom. Lesion detectability was estimated for 10 mm diameter lesions using a non-prewhitening matched filter signal-to-noise-ratio (NPW SNR) as the metric. Our results show that the use of TOF information leads to increased lesion detectability, which is achieved with less number of iterations of the reconstruction algorithm. These phantom results indicate that clinically, TOF PET will allow reduced scan times and improved lesion detectability, especially in large patients.

  6. Initial assessment of image quality for low-dose PET: evaluation of lesion detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua D.; Yan, Jianhua; Townsend, David W.; Conti, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    In the context of investigating the potential of low-dose PET imaging for screening applications, we developed methods to assess small lesion detectability as a function of the number of counts in the scan. We present here our methods and preliminary validation using tuberculosis cases. FDG-PET data from seventeen patients presenting diffuse hyper-metabolic lung lesions were selected for the study, to include a wide range of lesion sizes and contrasts. Reduced doses were simulated by randomly discarding events in the PET list mode, and ten realizations at each simulated dose were generated and reconstructed. The data were grouped into 9 categories determined by the number of included true events, from  >40 M to  <250 k counts. The images reconstructed from the original full statistical set were used to identify lung lesions, and each was, at every simulated dose, quantified by 6 parameters: lesion metabolic volume, lesion-to-background contrast, mean lesion tracer uptake, standard deviation of activity measurements (across realizations), lesion signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and Hotelling observer SNR. Additionally, a lesion-detection task including 550 images was presented to several experienced image readers for qualitative assessment. Human observer performances were ranked using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The observer results were correlated with the lesion image measurements and used to train mathematical observer models. Absolute sensitivities and specificities of the human observers, as well as the area under the ROC curve, showed clustering and performance similarities among images produced from 5 million or greater counts. The results presented here are from a clinically realistic but highly constrained experiment, and more work is needed to validate these findings with a larger patient population.

  7. Detection of JCPyV microRNA in blood and urine samples of multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Irene; Martelli, Francesco; Repice, Anna; Massacesi, Luca; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2015-12-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation and development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a health concern in multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy. Here, the JCPyV microRNA-J1-3p and microRNA-J1-5p expressions and genomic variability were investigated in blood and urine samples of multiple sclerosis patients before and under natalizumab therapy and in healthy controls. The two JCPyV microRNAs were detected in the JCPyV-DNA-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples and in the exosomes derived from plasma and urine obtained from JCPyV-DNA-positive and JCPyV-DNA-negative patients. In particular, the increased JCPyV microRNA expression in samples of multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy was consistent with the high JCPyV-DNA positivity observed in these samples. Moreover, JCPyV microRNA genomic region showed few nucleotide differences in samples obtained from blood and urine of multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls. Overall, these data suggest a potential role of the JCPyV microRNA expression in counteracting the viral reactivation to maintain JCPyV asymptomatic persistence in the host.

  8. Exosomal proteome analysis of cerebrospinal fluid detects biosignatures of neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jingyun; McKinney, Kimberly Q; Pavlopoulos, Antonis J; Han, May H; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ho Jin; Hwang, Sunil

    2016-11-01

    Quantitative proteomic analysis of exosomes isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients detected signature proteins differentiating NMO from multiple sclerosis (MS) and idiopathic longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Exosomes with good yields were obtained using ultracentrifugation from pooled CSF assisted by chemokine-based clustering strategy, which improved target molecule identification by providing amplified fold change values. 442 significant proteins generated a list of signature molecules of diseases validated primarily by the identification of known markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and fibronectin specific to NMO and MS respectively. MetaCore pathway analysis of significant proteins supported the involvement of these proteins in disease progression via neurological pathway. Expression levels of target molecules from orthogonal label-free quantification employing quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometry were in good agreement with those from Western blotting. Additional investigation of GFAP and fibronectin as representative disease molecules revealed their presence in intact exosomes as detected by flow cytometry. This comprehensive study suggests that the exosomal proteomic analysis of CSF can be applied to the identification and characterization of inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.

  9. Distribution of the immune inhibitory molecules CD200 and CD200R in the normal central nervous system and multiple sclerosis lesions suggests neuron-glia and glia-glia interactions.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nathalie; Swaab, Dick F; Hoek, Robert M; Huitinga, Inge

    2009-02-01

    CD200 is a membrane glycoprotein that suppresses immune activity via its receptor, CD200R. CD200-CD200R interactions have recently been considered to contribute to the "immune privileged" status of the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms by which these interactions take place are not well understood in part because there is limited detailed information on the distribution of CD200 and CD200R in the CNS. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to characterize the distinct anatomical and cellular distribution of these molecules in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and controls. CD200 was robustly expressed in gray matter areas including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and spinal cord, where neurons appeared immunopositive. CD200 expression was also detected in oligodendrocytes, but not in astrocytes or microglia. In CNS samples from MS patients, CD200 expression was additionally observed on reactive astrocytes in chronic active plaque centers, despite our previous finding of an overall decrease ofCD200 expression in MS lesions. In contrast to CD200, the immunolocalization pattern of CD200R was very distinct, showing high expression on perivascular macrophages in both gray and white matter. Using flow cytometry, we also found that human primary microglia express low levels of CD200R. These data suggest that CD200-mediated immune suppression may occur not only via neuron-microglia interactions, but also via glia-glia interactions, especially in inflammatory conditions in which an immune-suppressive environment needs to be restored; this may occur as a result of increased CD200 expression on reactive astrocytes.

  10. Optical configuration of pigmented lesion detection by frequency analysis of skin speckle patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bishitz, Yael; Ozana, Nisan; Schwarz, Ariel; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach of realizing a safe, simple, and inexpensive sensor applicable to pigmented lesions detection. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back-reflected secondary speckle patterns generated while illuminating the affected area with a laser and applying periodic pressure to the surface via a controlled vibration source. When applied to pigmented lesions, the technique is superior to visual examination in avoiding many false positives and resultant unnecessary biopsies. Applying a series of different vibration frequencies at the examined tissue and analyzing the 2-D time varying speckle patterns in response to the applied periodic pressure creates a unique signature for each and different pigmented lesion. Analyzing these signatures is the first step toward detection of malignant melanoma. In this paper we present preliminary experiments that show the validity of the developed sensor for the classification of pigmented lesions. PMID:27231603

  11. B-Spline Filtering for Automatic Detection of Calcification Lesions in Mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, G.; Ruiz, M.; Sanchez, S

    2006-10-04

    Breast cancer continues to be an important health problem between women population. Early detection is the only way to improve breast cancer prognosis and significantly reduce women mortality. It is by using CAD systems that radiologist can improve their ability to detect, and classify lesions in mammograms. In this study the usefulness of using B-spline based on a gradient scheme and compared to wavelet and adaptative filtering has been investigated for calcification lesion detection and as part of CAD systems. The technique has been applied to different density tissues. A qualitative validation shows the success of the method.

  12. B-Spline Filtering for Automatic Detection of Calcification Lesions in Mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, G.; Sánchez, S.; Ruiz, M.

    2006-10-01

    Breast cancer continues to be an important health problem between women population. Early detection is the only way to improve breast cancer prognosis and significantly reduce women mortality. It is by using CAD systems that radiologist can improve their ability to detect, and classify lesions in mammograms. In this study the usefulness of using B-spline based on a gradient scheme and compared to wavelet and adaptative filtering has been investigated for calcification lesion detection and as part of CAD systems. The technique has been applied to different density tissues. A qualitative validation shows the success of the method.

  13. Incidentally detected breast lesions on chest CT with US correlation: a pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Hee; Jung, Hyun Kyung; Song, Jong Woon; Baek, Hye Jin; Doo, Kyung Won; Kim, Woogyeong; Kim, Yeon Mee; Kim, Woon Won; Lee, Jung Sun; Cho, Een Young

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing use of computed tomography (CT), incidental breast lesions are detected more frequently. When interpreting chest CT findings, it is important for radiologists to carefully review the breast to recognize any abnormal findings that could affect patient management. The purpose of this study is to discuss incidental breast lesions on chest CT with ultrasonography correlation that may be encountered in routine clinical practice. PMID:27707680

  14. 4D numerical observer for lesion detection in respiratory-gated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Li, Quanzheng; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hoog, Christopher; Petibon, Yoann; Laine, Andrew F.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography protocols reduce lesion smearing and improve lesion detection through a synchronized acquisition of emission data. However, an objective assessment of image quality of the improvement gained from respiratory-gated PET is mainly limited to a three-dimensional (3D) approach. This work proposes a 4D numerical observer that incorporates both spatial and temporal informations for detection tasks in pulmonary oncology. Methods: The authors propose a 4D numerical observer constructed with a 3D channelized Hotelling observer for the spatial domain followed by a Hotelling observer for the temporal domain. Realistic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose activity distributions were simulated using a 4D extended cardiac torso anthropomorphic phantom including 12 spherical lesions at different anatomical locations (lower, upper, anterior, and posterior) within the lungs. Simulated data based on Monte Carlo simulation were obtained using GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE). Fifty noise realizations of six respiratory-gated PET frames were simulated by GATE using a model of the Siemens Biograph mMR scanner geometry. PET sinograms of the thorax background and pulmonary lesions that were simulated separately were merged to generate different conditions of the lesions to the background (e.g., lesion contrast and motion). A conventional ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction (5 iterations and 6 subsets) was used to obtain: (1) gated, (2) nongated, and (3) motion-corrected image volumes (a total of 3200 subimage volumes: 2400 gated, 400 nongated, and 400 motion-corrected). Lesion-detection signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in different lesion-to-background contrast levels (3.5, 8.0, 9.0, and 20.0), lesion diameters (10.0, 13.0, and 16.0 mm), and respiratory motion displacements (17.6–31.3 mm). The proposed 4D numerical observer applied on multiple-gated images was

  15. Bright Retinal Lesions Detection using Colour Fundus Images Containing Reflective Features

    SciTech Connect

    Giancardo, Luca; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Chaum, Edward; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Li, Yaquin

    2009-01-01

    In the last years the research community has developed many techniques to detect and diagnose diabetic retinopathy with retinal fundus images. This is a necessary step for the implementation of a large scale screening effort in rural areas where ophthalmologists are not available. In the United States of America, the incidence of diabetes is worryingly increasing among the young population. Retina fundus images of patients younger than 20 years old present a high amount of reflection due to the Nerve Fibre Layer (NFL), the younger the patient the more these reflections are visible. To our knowledge we are not aware of algorithms able to explicitly deal with this type of reflection artefact. This paper presents a technique to detect bright lesions also in patients with a high degree of reflective NFL. First, the candidate bright lesions are detected using image equalization and relatively simple histogram analysis. Then, a classifier is trained using texture descriptor (Multi-scale Local Binary Patterns) and other features in order to remove the false positives in the lesion detection. Finally, the area of the lesions is used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Our database consists of 33 images from a telemedicine network currently developed. When determining moderate to high diabetic retinopathy using the bright lesions detected the algorithm achieves a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 100% using hold-one-out testing.

  16. Effect of Cortical Bone Thickness on Detection of Intraosseous Lesions by Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Sadaf; Shakibafard, Alireza; Karimi Sarvestani, Zohreh; Saadat, Najmeh; Khojastepour, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background. Usefulness of ultrasound (US) in detection of intrabony lesions has been showed. A cortical bone perforation or a very thin and intact cortical bone is prerequisite for this purpose. Objective. The current in vitro study was aimed at measuring the cut-off thickness of the overlying cortical bone which allows ultrasonic assessment of bony defects. Materials and Methods. 20 bovine scapula blocks were obtained. Samples were numbered from 1 to 20. In each sample, 5 artificial lesions were made. The lesions were made in order to increase the overlying bone thickness, from 0.1 mm in the first sample to 2 mm in the last one (with 0.1 mm interval). After that, the samples underwent ultrasound examinations by two practicing radiologists. Results. All five lesions in samples numbered 1 to 11 were detected as hypoechoic area. Cortical bone thickness more than 1.1 mm resulted in a failure in the detection of central lesions. Conclusion. We can conclude that neither bony perforation nor very thin cortical bones are needed to consider US to be an effective imaging technique in the evaluation of bony lesion. PMID:26366296

  17. Temporal Characteristics of Radiologists' and Novices' Lesion Detection in Viewing Medical Images Presented Rapidly and Sequentially

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Ryoichi; Komori, Yuya; Maeda, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Although viewing multiple stacks of medical images presented on a display is a relatively new but useful medical task, little is known about this task. Particularly, it is unclear how radiologists search for lesions in this type of image reading. When viewing cluttered and dynamic displays, continuous motion itself does not capture attention. Thus, it is effective for the target detection that observers' attention is captured by the onset signal of a suddenly appearing target among the continuously moving distractors (i.e., a passive viewing strategy). This can be applied to stack viewing tasks, because lesions often show up as transient signals in medical images which are sequentially presented simulating a dynamic and smoothly transforming image progression of organs. However, it is unclear whether observers can detect a target when the target appears at the beginning of a sequential presentation where the global apparent motion onset signal (i.e., signal of the initiation of the apparent motion by sequential presentation) occurs. We investigated the ability of radiologists to detect lesions during such tasks by comparing the performances of radiologists and novices. Results show that overall performance of radiologists is better than novices. Furthermore, the temporal locations of lesions in CT image sequences, i.e., when a lesion appears in an image sequence, does not affect the performance of radiologists, whereas it does affect the performance of novices. Results indicate that novices have greater difficulty in detecting a lesion appearing early than late in the image sequence. We suggest that radiologists have other mechanisms to detect lesions in medical images with little attention which novices do not have. This ability is critically important when viewing rapid sequential presentations of multiple CT images, such as stack viewing tasks. PMID:27774080

  18. Automatic segmentation of lesions for the computer-assisted detection in fluorescence urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kage, Andreas; Legal, Wolfgang; Kelm, Peter; Simon, Jörg; Bergen, Tobias; Münzenmayer, Christian; Benz, Michaela

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in the western world. The diagnosis in Germany is based on the visual inspection of the bladder. This inspection performed with a cystoscope is a challenging task as some kinds of abnormal tissues do not differ much in their appearance from their surrounding healthy tissue. Fluorescence Cystoscopy has the potential to increase the detection rate. A liquid marker introduced into the bladder in advance of the inspection is concentrated in areas with high metabolism. Thus these areas appear as bright "glowing". Unfortunately, the fluorescence image contains besides the glowing of the suspicious lesions no more further visual information like for example the appearance of the blood vessels. A visual judgment of the lesion as well as a precise treatment has to be done using white light illumination. Thereby, the spatial information of the lesion provided by the fluorescence image has to be guessed by the clinical expert. This leads to a time consuming procedure due to many switches between the modalities and increases the risk of mistreatment. We introduce an automatic approach, which detects and segments any suspicious lesion in the fluorescence image automatically once the image was classified as a fluorescence image. The area of the contour of the detected lesion is transferred to the corresponding white light image and provide the clinical expert the spatial information of the lesion. The advantage of this approach is, that the clinical expert gets the spatial and the visual information of the lesion together in one image. This can save time and decrease the risk of an incomplete removal of a malign lesion.

  19. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for detection of cervical preneoplastic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Ward, Rabab K.; Carraro, Anita; Chen, Zhaoyang; van Niekerk, Dirk; MacAulay, Calum; Follen, Michele; Lane, Pierre; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-03-01

    We examined and established the potential of ex-vivo confocal fluorescence microscopy for differentiating between normal cervical tissue, low grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN1), and high grade CIN (CIN2 and CIN3). Our objectives were to i) use Quantitative Tissue Phenotype (QTP) analysis to quantify nuclear and cellular morphology and tissue architecture in confocal microscopic images of fresh cervical biopsies and ii) determine the accuracy of high grade CIN detection via confocal microscopy. Cervical biopsy specimens of colposcopically normal and abnormal tissues obtained from 15 patients were evaluated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Confocal images were analyzed and about 200 morphological and architectural features were calculated at the nuclear, cellular, and tissue level. For the purpose of this study, we used four features to delineate disease grade including nuclear size, cell density, estimated nuclear-cytoplasmic (ENC) ratio, and the average of three nearest Delaunay neighbors distance (3NDND). Our preliminary results showed ENC ratio and 3NDND correlated well with histopathological diagnosis. The Spearman correlation coefficient between each of these two features and the histopathological diagnosis was higher than the correlation coefficient between colposcopic appearance and histopathological diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity of ENC ratio for detecting high grade CIN were both equal to 100%. QTP analysis of fluorescence confocal images shows the potential to discriminate high grade CIN from low grade CIN and normal tissues. This approach could be used to help clinicians identify HGSILs in clinical settings.

  20. Hierarchical detection of red lesions in retinal images by multiscale correlation filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bob; Wu, Xiangqian; You, Jane; Li, Qin; Karray, Fakhri

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to the computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of diabetic retinopathy (DR) -- a common and severe complication of long-term diabetes which damages the retina and cause blindness. Since red lesions are regarded as the first signs of DR, there has been extensive research on effective detection and localization of these abnormalities in retinal images. In contrast to existing algorithms, a new approach based on Multiscale Correlation Filtering (MSCF) and dynamic thresholding is developed. This consists of two levels, Red Lesion Candidate Detection (coarse level) and True Red Lesion Detection (fine level). The approach was evaluated using data from Retinopathy On-line Challenge (ROC) competition website and we conclude our method to be effective and efficient.

  1. [Method of automatic detection of brain lesion based on wavelet feature vector].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya; Liu, Wei; Feng, Huanqing

    2011-06-01

    A new method of automatic detection of brain lesion based on wavelet feature vector of CT images has been proposed in the present paper. Firstly, we created training samples by manually segmenting normal CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid sub images. Then, we obtained the cluster centers using FCM clustering algorithm. When detecting lesions, the CT images to be detected was automatically segmented into sub images, with a certain degree of over-segmenting allowed under the premise of ensuring accuracy as much as possible. Then we extended these sub images and extracted the features to compute the distances with the cluster centers and to determine whether they belonged to the three kinds of normal samples, or, otherwise, belonged to lesions. The proposed method was verified by experiments.

  2. Detection and characterisation of papillomavirus in skin lesions of giraffe and sable antelope in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, E; Bosman, A M; van Wilpe, E; Williams, J H; Bengis, R G; van Heerden, J; Venter, E H

    2011-06-01

    Papillomavirus was detected electron microscopically in cutaneous fibropapillomas of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger). The virus particles measured 45 nm in diameter. Histopathologically, the lesions showed histopathological features similar to those of equine sarcoid as well as positive immunoperoxidase-staining of tissue sections for papillomavirus antigen. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA. Bovine papillomavirus-1 was characterised by real-time PCR in the sable and giraffe, and cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed a similarity to BPV-1. As in the 1st giraffe, the lesions from a 2nd giraffe revealed locally malignant pleomorphism, possibly indicating the lesional end-point of papilloma infection. Neither virus particles nor positively staining papillomavirus antigen could be demonstrated in the 2nd giraffe but papillomavirus DNA was detected by real-time PCR which corresponded with BPV-1 and BPV-2.

  3. Theoretical evaluation of the detectability of random lesions in bayesian emission reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-05-01

    Detecting cancerous lesion is an important task in positron emission tomography (PET). Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (also called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed to deal with the low signal to noise ratio in the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the prior parameters in Bayesian reconstruction control the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affect detectability of lesions in reconstructed images. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Most research has been based on Monte Carlo simulations, which are very time consuming. Building on the recent progress on the theoretical analysis of image properties of statistical reconstructions and the development of numerical observers, here we develop a theoretical approach for fast computation of lesion detectability in Bayesian reconstruction. The results can be used to choose the optimum hyperparameter for the maximum lesion detectability. New in this work is the use of theoretical expressions that explicitly model the statistical variation of the lesion and background without assuming that the object variation is (locally) stationary. The theoretical results are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons show good agreement between the theoretical predications and the Monte Carlo results.

  4. Effect of patient thickness and scan duration on lesion detectability in PET oncology imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Phillip M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Comtat, Claude; Lartizien, Carole; Lewellen, Thomas K.

    2005-04-01

    A dominant component of image quality for whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is attenuation, which is determined by patient thickness. This can be partially compensated for by adjusting scan duration. We evaluate the effect of changes in patient thickness and scan duration on lesion detection with model observers. We simulated 2D PET acquisitions of an anthropomorphic phantom with spherical target lesions. Three different anthropomorphic phantoms were used, with effective abdominal diameters of 20 cm, 27 cm, and 35 cm. The diameters of the lesions were varied from 1.0 to 3.0 cm, and the contrast ratios of the lesions were varied from 1.5 to 4.0. Noise-free scans were simulated with an analytical simulator. Poisson noise was added to simulate scan durations ranging from 1 to 10 minutes per bed position, using noise equivalent count rates previously measured using a modified NEMA NU2 countrate phantom. The average detectability of each target lesion under each condition was calculated using a non-prewhitening matched filter from 25 noisy realizations for each combination of parameters. Our results demonstrate the variation of the minimum scan duration required to detect a target of a given size and contrast ratio, for any fixed threshold of detectability. For image quality to remain constant for patients with larger cross-sectional areas, acquisition times should be increased accordingly, although in some cases this may not be possible due to practical constraints.

  5. Exploring sarcasm detection in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using ecologically valid measures.

    PubMed

    Staios, Mathew; Fisher, Fiona; Lindell, Annukka K; Ong, Ben; Howe, Jim; Reardon, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive condition involving degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. Recent research suggests that a proportion of persons with ALS show a profile similar to that of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), with this group of ALS patients exhibiting social cognitive deficits. Although social cognitive deficits have been partially explored in ALS, research has yet to investigate such changes using ecologically valid measures. Therefore, this study aimed to further characterize the scope of social cognitive and emotion recognition deficits in non-demented ALS patients using an ecologically valid measure of social cognition. A sample of 35 ALS patients and 30 age-and-education matched controls were assessed using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination, the Brixton Spatial Anticipation Test, and The Awareness of Social Inference Test, where participants were required to discriminate between various emotions and decipher socially challenging scenarios enacted in video vignettes. Participants with ALS showed significant difficulties in recognizing both sarcastic and paradoxical sarcastic statements, but not sincere statements, when compared to controls. After controlling for executive difficulties, ALS patients still displayed significant difficulties on tasks that assessed their comprehension of both sarcastic and paradoxical sarcastic statements. The inability to read social cues and make social inferences has the potential to place significant strain on familial/interpersonal relationships in ALS. The findings of this study highlight the importance of employing a broader range of neuropsychological assessment tools to aid in early detection of frontal lobe impairment in non-demented ALS patients.

  6. Detection of suspicious lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Twellmann, T; Saalbach, A; Müller, C; Nattkemper, T W; Wismüller, A

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important source of information to aid breast cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, next to the temporal sequence of 3D volume data from the DCE-MRI technique, the radiologist commonly adducts information from other modalities for his final diagnosis. Thus, the diagnosis process is time consuming and tools are required to support the human expert. We investigate an automatic approach that detects the location and delineates the extent of suspicious masses in multi-temporal DCE-MRI data sets. It applies the state-of-the-art support vector machine algorithm to the classification of the short-time series associated with each voxel. The ROC analysis shows an increased specificity in contrast to standard evaluations techniques.

  7. Enhancing the detection of hidden occlusal caries lesions with OCT using high index liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hobin; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, we investigated the influence of several high refractive index fluids on the performance of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). That study showed that these liquids can increase the effective imaging depth and lesion contrast. Other in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that OCT can be used to show whether occlusal lesions have penetrated to the dentinal-enamel junction (DEJ) and spread laterally under the enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if high index fluids can enhance the ability of OCT to detect hidden occlusal lesions and show if these lesions have penetrated through the enamel into the underlying dentin. Ten extracted teeth with occlusal lesions were imaged using OCT after the application of water, glycerol, BABB (33% Benzyl Alcohol + 67% Benzyl Benzoate) and a Cargille Liquid (Cedar Grove, NJ) (hydrogenated terphenyl 1- bromo-naphthalene) with a refractive index of 1.61. The intensity of the reflectance from the underlying lesion area for each sample was compared with the reflectance of the sound tooth surface for each fluid. The use of high index fluids significantly (P< 0.0001) increased the reflectivity of subsurface occlusal lesions under the surrounding sound enamel.

  8. Effects of grayscale window/level parameters on breast lesion detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Nafziger, John S.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Lubin, Jeffrey; Roehrig, Hans

    2003-05-01

    The detectability of low-contrast lesions in medical images can be affected significantly by the choice of grayscale window width and level (W/L) for electronic display. Our objective was to measure the effects of various W/L conditions on lesion detectability in simulated and real mammographic images, and then correlate observer performance with predictions of detection thresholds derived from a visual discrimination model (VDM). In the first experiment, detection thresholds were measured in 2AFC trials for five W/L conditions applied to simulated mammographic backgrounds and lesions (i.e., Gaussian "masses" and blurred-disk "microcalcification clusters") using nonmedical observers. In the second experiment, the detectability of real microcalcification clusters in digitized mammograms was evaluated for three W/L conditions in an ROC observer study with mammographers. For the simulated images, there was generally good agreement between model and experimental thresholds and their variations across W/L conditions. Both experimental and model results showed significant reductions in thresholds when W/L processing was applied locally near the lesion. ROC results with digitized mammograms read by radiologists, however, failed to show enhanced detection of microcalcifications using a localized W/L frame, probably due to the nonuniform appearance of parenchymal tissue across the image.

  9. Automated detection of remineralization in simulated enamel lesions with PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively image the subsurface structure and measure the thickness of the highly mineralized transparent surface zone of caries lesions. There are structural differences between active lesions and arrested lesions, and the surface layer thickness may correlate with activity of the lesion. The purpose of this study was to develop a method that can be used to automatically detect and measure the thickness of the transparent surface layer in PS-OCT images. Automated methods of analysis were used to measure the thickness of the transparent layer and the depth of the bovine enamel lesions produced using simulated caries models that emulate demineralization in the mouth. The transparent layer thickness measured with PS-OCT correlated well with polarization light microscopy (PLM) measurements of all regions (r2=0.9213). This study demonstrates that PS-OCT can automatically detect and measure thickness of the transparent layer formed due to remineralization in simulated caries lesions.

  10. Optimised nuclear medicine method for tumour marking and sentinel node detection in occult primary breast lesions.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, C; Trifirò, G; Intra, M; Marotta, G; Ciprian, A; Frasson, A; Prisco, G; Luini, A; Viale, G; Paganelli, G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sentinel node (SN) biopsy in occult breast lesions with different radiopharmaceuticals and to establish the optimal lymphoscintigraphic method to detect both occult lesions and SNs (SNOLL: sentinel node and occult lesion localisation). Two hundred and twenty-seven consecutive patients suspected to have clinically occult breast carcinoma were enrolled in the study. In addition to the radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) procedure, using macroaggregates of technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin (MAA) injected directly into the lesion, lymphoscintigraphy was performed with nanocolloids (NC) injected in a peritumoral (group I) or a subdermal site (group II). In group III, a sole injection of NC was done into the lesion in order to perform both ROLL and SNOLL. Overall, axillary SNs were identified in 205 of the 227 patients (90.3%). In 12/62 (19.4%) patients of group I and 9/79 (11.4%) patients of group III, radioactive nodes were not visualised, whereas SNs were successfully localised in 85 of 86 patients of group II ( P<0.001). Pathological findings revealed breast carcinoma in 148/227 patients (65.2%) and benign lesions in 79 (34.8%). A total of 131 axillary SNs were removed in 118 patients with breast carcinoma; intraoperative examination of the SNs revealed metastatic involvement in 16 out of 96 cases of invasive carcinoma (16.7%). It is concluded that the combination of the ROLL procedure with direct injection of MAA into the lesion and lymphoscintigraphy performed with subdermal injection of radiocolloids represents the method of choice for accurate localisation of both non-palpable lesions and SNs.

  11. Density-based parallel skin lesion border detection with webCL

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermoscopy is a highly effective and noninvasive imaging technique used in diagnosis of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. Many aspects of the lesion under consideration are defined in relation to the lesion border. This makes border detection one of the most important steps in dermoscopic image analysis. In current practice, dermatologists often delineate borders through a hand drawn representation based upon visual inspection. Due to the subjective nature of this technique, intra- and inter-observer variations are common. Because of this, the automated assessment of lesion borders in dermoscopic images has become an important area of study. Methods Fast density based skin lesion border detection method has been implemented in parallel with a new parallel technology called WebCL. WebCL utilizes client side computing capabilities to use available hardware resources such as multi cores and GPUs. Developed WebCL-parallel density based skin lesion border detection method runs efficiently from internet browsers. Results Previous research indicates that one of the highest accuracy rates can be achieved using density based clustering techniques for skin lesion border detection. While these algorithms do have unfavorable time complexities, this effect could be mitigated when implemented in parallel. In this study, density based clustering technique for skin lesion border detection is parallelized and redesigned to run very efficiently on the heterogeneous platforms (e.g. tablets, SmartPhones, multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units) by transforming the technique into a series of independent concurrent operations. Heterogeneous computing is adopted to support accessibility, portability and multi-device use in the clinical settings. For this, we used WebCL, an emerging technology that enables a HTML5 Web browser to execute code in parallel for heterogeneous platforms. We depicted WebCL and our parallel algorithm design. In

  12. [Contribution of cognitive evoked potentials for detecting early cognitive disorders in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Magnié, M N; Bensa, C; Laloux, L; Bertogliati, C; Faure, S; Lebrun, C

    2007-11-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), one of the most frequent neurological diseases in young adults, cognitive dysfunctions have been under considered whereas their evolution may produce a fronto-sous-cortical deterioration and more than half of the MS patients present such dysfunctions. Nevertheless sensory evoked-potentials are classically used in this disease, event-related potentials (ERP) are not included in the clinical exploration of MS. Two studies are presented aimed at further tracking the usefulness of ERP for detecting early cognitive dysfunctions in MS. All of the patients presented a relapsing remitting MS for less than 5 years with a moderate physical handicap and complained from their memory. They performed a neuropsychological set and ERP were elicited using the oddball paradigm in both modalities, visual and auditory. In the first study, 10 patients without cognitive dysfunction at the neuropsychological evaluation and 10 patients with an attention deficit participated with 10 age-matched controls. In the second study, 10 patients with memory impairment at the neuropsychological evaluation and 10 age-matched controls were included. Our data argue for an earlier modification of ERP parameters in the visual modality than in the auditory one, even before the modification of cognitive scores. In both studies, P300 parameters were correlated to neuropsychological performances (and especially to the attention examination in the first study and to memory tests in the second study) in both modalities. Taking into account the clinical usefulness of ERPs, it is nowadays important to include this electrophysiological method in evaluation and follow-up of MS, and not only using the auditory modality but also the visual presentation in order to detect earlier cognitive dysfunctions even before modification of neuropsychological performances.

  13. Clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions: detection and classification with high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Niehoff, A; Obrist, P; DeKoekkoek-Doll, P; Dünser, M

    2000-08-01

    With recent significant advances in ultrasound technology, the potential of high-resolution sonography to improve the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis in women with dense breasts has become a matter of interest for breast imagers. To determine how often physician-performed high-resolution sonography can detect nonpalpable breast cancers that are not revealed by mammography, 8,970 women with breast density grades 2 through 4 underwent high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography. All sonographically detected, clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions that were not simple cysts were prospectively classified into benign, indeterminate, or malignant categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, core-needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy. In 8,103 women with normal findings at mammography and physical examination, 32 cancers and 330 benign lesions were detected in 273 patients with sonography only. Eight additional cancers were found in 867 patients with a malignant (n = 5) or a benign (n = 3) palpable or mammographically detected index lesion. The overall prevalence of cancers detected with screening sonography was 0.41%, and the proportion of sonographically detected cancers to the total number of nonpalpable cancers was 22%. The mean size of invasive cancers detected only by sonography was 9.1 mm, and was not statistically different from the mean size of invasive cancers detected by mammography. The sensitivity of prospective sonographic classification for malignancy was 100%, and the specificity was 31%. In conclusion, the use of high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography in women with dense breasts may lead to detection of a significant number of otherwise occult cancers that are no different in size from nonpalpable mammographically detected cancers. Prospective classification of these lesions based on sonographic characteristics resulted in an acceptable benign-to-malignant biopsy rate of 6.3:1.

  14. Detection of early carious lesions using contrast enhancement with coherent light scattering (speckle imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deana, A. M.; Jesus, S. H. C.; Koshoji, N. H.; Bussadori, S. K.; Oliveira, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, dental caries still represent one of the chronic diseases with the highest prevalence and present in most countries. The interaction between light and teeth (absorption, scattering and fluorescence) is intrinsically connected to the constitution of the dental tissue. Decay induced mineral loss introduces a shift in the optical properties of the affected tissue; therefore, study of these properties may produce novel techniques aimed at the early diagnosis of carious lesions. Based on the optical properties of the enamel, we demonstrate the application of first-order spatial statistics in laser speckle imaging, allowing the detection of carious lesions in their early stages. A highlight of this noninvasive, non-destructive, real time and cost effective approach is that it allows a dentist to detect a lesion even in the absence of biofilm or moisture.

  15. Lesion detection in magnetic resonance brain images by hyperspectral imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Wang, Lin; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hsian Min; Chang, Chein-I.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images can be considered as multispectral images so that MR imaging can be processed by multispectral imaging techniques such as maximum likelihood classification. Unfortunately, most multispectral imaging techniques are not particularly designed for target detection. On the other hand, hyperspectral imaging is primarily developed to address subpixel detection, mixed pixel classification for which multispectral imaging is generally not effective. This paper takes advantages of hyperspectral imaging techniques to develop target detection algorithms to find lesions in MR brain images. Since MR images are collected by only three image sequences, T1, T2 and PD, if a hyperspectral imaging technique is used to process MR images it suffers from the issue of insufficient dimensionality. To address this issue, two approaches to nonlinear dimensionality expansion are proposed, nonlinear correlation expansion and nonlinear band ratio expansion. Once dimensionality is expanded hyperspectral imaging algorithms are readily applied. The hyperspectral detection algorithm to be investigated for lesion detection in MR brain is the well-known subpixel target detection algorithm, called Constrained Energy Minimization (CEM). In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed CEM in lesion detection, synthetic images provided by BrainWeb are used for experiments.

  16. Remote optical configuration of pigmented lesion detection and diagnosis of bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Nisan; Bishitz, Yael; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev; Schwarz, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach of realizing a safe, simple, and inexpensive sensor applicable to bone fractures and pigmented lesions detection. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back-reflected secondary speckle pattern generated while illuminating the affected area with a laser and applying periodic pressure to the surface via a controlled vibration. The use of such a concept was already demonstrated for non-contact monitoring of various bio-medical parameters such as heart rate, blood pulse pressure, concentration of alcohol and glucose in the blood stream and intraocular pressure. The presented technique is a safe and effective method of detecting bone fractures in populations at risk. When applied to pigmented lesions, the technique is superior to visual examination in avoiding many false positives and resultant unnecessary biopsies. Applying a series of different vibration frequencies at the examined tissue and analyzing the 2-D speckle pattern trajectory in response to the applied periodic pressure creates a unique signature for each and different pigmented lesion. Analyzing these signatures is the first step toward detection of malignant melanoma. In this paper we present preliminary experiments that show the validity of the developed sensor for both applications: the detection of damaged bones as well as the classification of pigmented lesions.

  17. Improving lesion detectability in PET imaging with a penalized likelihood reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M.

    2015-03-01

    Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) is currently the most widely used image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET. However, OSEM does not necessarily provide optimal image quality, and a number of alternative algorithms have been explored. We have recently shown that a penalized likelihood image reconstruction algorithm using the relative difference penalty, block sequential regularized expectation maximization (BSREM), achieves more accurate lesion quantitation than OSEM, and importantly, maintains acceptable visual image quality in clinical wholebody PET. The goal of this work was to evaluate lesion detectability with BSREM versus OSEM. We performed a twoalternative forced choice study using 81 patient datasets with lesions of varying contrast inserted into the liver and lung. At matched imaging noise, BSREM and OSEM showed equivalent detectability in the lungs, and BSREM outperformed OSEM in the liver. These results suggest that BSREM provides not only improved quantitation and clinically acceptable visual image quality as previously shown but also improved lesion detectability compared to OSEM. We then modeled this detectability study, applying both nonprewhitening (NPW) and channelized Hotelling (CHO) model observers to the reconstructed images. The CHO model observer showed good agreement with the human observers, suggesting that we can apply this model to future studies with varying simulation and reconstruction parameters.

  18. Automatic ultrasonic breast lesions detection using support vector machine based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Miao, Shan-Jung; Fan, Wei-Che; Chen, Yung-Sheng

    2007-03-01

    It is difficult to automatically detect tumors and extract lesion boundaries in ultrasound images due to the variance in shape, the interference from speckle noise, and the low contrast between objects and background. The enhancement of ultrasonic image becomes a significant task before performing lesion classification, which was usually done with manual delineation of the tumor boundaries in the previous works. In this study, a linear support vector machine (SVM) based algorithm is proposed for ultrasound breast image training and classification. Then a disk expansion algorithm is applied for automatically detecting lesions boundary. A set of sub-images including smooth and irregular boundaries in tumor objects and those in speckle-noised background are trained by the SVM algorithm to produce an optimal classification function. Based on this classification model, each pixel within an ultrasound image is classified into either object or background oriented pixel. This enhanced binary image can highlight the object and suppress the speckle noise; and it can be regarded as degraded paint character (DPC) image containing closure noise, which is well known in perceptual organization of psychology. An effective scheme of removing closure noise using iterative disk expansion method has been successfully demonstrated in our previous works. The boundary detection of ultrasonic breast lesions can be further equivalent to the removal of speckle noise. By applying the disk expansion method to the binary image, we can obtain a significant radius-based image where the radius for each pixel represents the corresponding disk covering the specific object information. Finally, a signal transmission process is used for searching the complete breast lesion region and thus the desired lesion boundary can be effectively and automatically determined. Our algorithm can be performed iteratively until all desired objects are detected. Simulations and clinical images were introduced to

  19. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study.

  20. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D.; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10−5) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known ‘PCR jackpot effect’, with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. PMID:27477585

  1. Potential of hybrid adaptive filtering in inflammatory lesion detection from capsule endoscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Charisis, Vasileios S; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-01-01

    A new feature extraction technique for the detection of lesions created from mucosal inflammations in Crohn’s disease, based on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images processing is presented here. More specifically, a novel filtering process, namely Hybrid Adaptive Filtering (HAF), was developed for efficient extraction of lesion-related structural/textural characteristics from WCE images, by employing Genetic Algorithms to the Curvelet-based representation of images. Additionally, Differential Lacunarity (DLac) analysis was applied for feature extraction from the HAF-filtered images. The resulted scheme, namely HAF-DLac, incorporates support vector machines for robust lesion recognition performance. For the training and testing of HAF-DLac, an 800-image database was used, acquired from 13 patients who undertook WCE examinations, where the abnormal cases were grouped into mild and severe, according to the severity of the depicted lesion, for a more extensive evaluation of the performance. Experimental results, along with comparison with other related efforts, have shown that the HAF-DLac approach evidently outperforms them in the field of WCE image analysis for automated lesion detection, providing higher classification results, up to 93.8% (accuracy), 95.2% (sensitivity), 92.4% (specificity) and 92.6% (precision). The promising performance of HAF-DLac paves the way for a complete computer-aided diagnosis system that could support physicians’ clinical practice. PMID:27818583

  2. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    PubMed

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10(-5)) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes.

  3. Orofacial manifestations in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scully, C

    1977-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare congenital disorder with characteristic neurologic, dermatologic, and orofacial lesions. There have been very few case reports in the dental literature. Four cases demonstrating the range of orofacial anomalies and problems in management are presented.

  4. Low tube voltage CT for improved detection of pancreatic cancer: detection threshold for small, simulated lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is associated with dismal prognosis. The detection of small pancreatic tumors which are still resectable is still a challenging problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decreasing the tube voltage from 120 to 80 kV on the detection of pancreatic tumors. Methods Three scanning protocols was used; one using the standard tube voltage (120 kV) and current (160 mA) and two using 80 kV but with different tube currents (500 and 675 mA) to achieve equivalent dose (15 mGy) and noise (15 HU) as that of the standard protocol. Tumors were simulated into collected CT phantom images. The attenuation in normal parenchyma at 120 kV was set at 130 HU, as measured previously in clinical examinations, and the tumor attenuation was assumed to differ 20 HU and was set at 110HU. By scanning and measuring of iodine solution with different concentrations the corresponding tumor and parenchyma attenuation at 80 kV was found to be 185 and 219 HU, respectively. To objectively evaluate the differences between the three protocols, a multi-reader multi-case receiver operating characteristic study was conducted, using three readers and 100 cases, each containing 0–3 lesions. Results The highest reader averaged figure-of-merit (FOM) was achieved for 80 kV and 675 mA (FOM = 0,850), and the lowest for 120 kV (FOM = 0,709). There was a significant difference between the three protocols (p < 0,0001), when making an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Post-hoc analysis (students t-test) shows that there was a significant difference between 120 and 80 kV, but not between the two levels of tube currents at 80 kV. Conclusion We conclude that when decreasing the tube voltage there is a significant improvement in tumor conspicuity. PMID:22828284

  5. The method for detecting small lesions in medical image based on sliding window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guilai; Jiao, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    At present, the research on computer-aided diagnosis includes the sample image segmentation, extracting visual features, generating the classification model by learning, and according to the model generated to classify and judge the inspected images. However, this method has a large scale of calculation and speed is slow. And because medical images are usually low contrast, when the traditional image segmentation method is applied to the medical image, there is a complete failure. As soon as possible to find the region of interest, improve detection speed, this topic attempts to introduce the current popular visual attention model into small lesions detection. However, Itti model is mainly for natural images. But the effect is not ideal when it is used to medical images which usually are gray images. Especially in the early stages of some cancers, the focus of a disease in the whole image is not the most significant region and sometimes is very difficult to be found. But these lesions are prominent in the local areas. This paper proposes a visual attention mechanism based on sliding window, and use sliding window to calculate the significance of a local area. Combined with the characteristics of the lesion, select the features of gray, entropy, corner and edge to generate a saliency map. Then the significant region is segmented and distinguished. This method reduces the difficulty of image segmentation, and improves the detection accuracy of small lesions, and it has great significance to early discovery, early diagnosis and treatment of cancers.

  6. Automated and interactive lesion detection and segmentation in uterine cervix images.

    PubMed

    Alush, Amir; Greenspan, Hayit; Goldberger, Jacob

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a procedure for automatic extraction and segmentation of a class-specific object (or region) by learning class-specific boundaries. We describe and evaluate the method with a specific focus on the detection of lesion regions in uterine cervix images. The watershed segmentation map of the input image is modeled using a Markov random field (MRF) in which watershed regions correspond to binary random variables indicating whether the region is part of the lesion tissue or not. The local pairwise factors on the arcs of the watershed map indicate whether the arc is part of the object boundary. The factors are based on supervised learning of a visual word distribution. The final lesion region segmentation is obtained using a loopy belief propagation applied to the watershed arc-level MRF. Experimental results on real data show state-of-the-art segmentation results on this very challenging task that, if necessary, can be interactively enhanced.

  7. Effect of glatiramer acetate three-times weekly on the evolution of new, active multiple sclerosis lesions into T1-hypointense "black holes": a post hoc magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Dwyer, Michael; Barkay, Hadas; Steinerman, Joshua R; Knappertz, Volker; Khan, Omar

    2015-03-01

    Conversion of active lesions to black holes has been associated with disability progression in subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and represents a complementary approach to evaluating clinical efficacy. The objective of this study was to assess the conversion of new active magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions, identified 6 months after initiating treatment with glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL three-times weekly (GA40) or placebo, to T1-hypointense black holes in subjects with RRMS. Subjects received GA40 (n = 943) or placebo (n = 461) for 12 months. MRI was obtained at baseline and Months 6 and 12. New lesions were defined as either gadolinium-enhancing T1 or new T2 lesions at Month 6 that were not present at baseline. The adjusted mean numbers of new active lesions at Month 6 converting to black holes at Month 12 were analyzed using a negative binomial model; adjusted proportions of new active lesions at Month 6 converting to black holes at Month 12 were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Of 1,292 subjects with complete MRI data, 433 (50.3 %) GA-treated and 247 (57.2 %) placebo-treated subjects developed new lesions at Month 6. Compared with placebo, GA40 significantly reduced the mean number (0.31 versus 0.45; P = .0258) and proportion (15.8 versus 19.6 %; P = .006) of new lesions converting to black holes. GA significantly reduced conversion of new active lesions to black holes, highlighting the ability of GA40 to prevent tissue damage in RRMS.

  8. Parathyroid incidentalomas detected during thyroid ultrasonography and effect of chronic thyroiditis on false positive parathyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Didem; Arpaci, Dilek; Ucler, Rifki; Cuhaci, Neslihan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of parathyroid incidentalomas in patients referred for thyroid ultrasonography (US) and investigate the role of chronic thyroiditis on false positive lesions. Patients suspected to have parathyroid lesions during thyroid US were recorded prospectively between August 2009 and January 2010. Patients referred for parathyroid US and patients with known high serum calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were excluded. Suspected parathyroid lesions were defined as hypoechoic, homogeneous, solid lesions with regular margins located outside the thyroid lobe, most commonly inferior to the thyroid gland. Thyroid US was performed in 6,528 patients. There were 78 patients (1.19 %) (73 female and 5 male) with suspected parathyroid lesion. The diagnosis of a true parathyroid adenoma was confirmed in 6 (7.69 %) patients. In patients with true adenoma, mean serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH levels were 10.57 ± 0.48 mg/dl, 3.03 ± 0.52 mg/dl, and 182.91 ± 46.62 pg/ml, respectively. Among 72 patients with false positive parathyroid lesion, antithyroid peroxidase antibody was positive in 50 (69.4 %), antithyroglobulin antibody was positive in 46 (63.9 %), and one of these antibodies were positive in 59 (81.9 %) patients. Also, 46 (63.9 %) of these patients had thyroid dysfunctions (43 hypothyroidism and 3 hyperthyroidism) and 59 (81.9 %) had chronic thyroiditis ultrasonographically. Parathyroid incidentaloma was detected in 0.09 % of patients referred for thyroid US. The presence of clinically or ultrasonographically chronic thyroiditis might cause inadvertent interpretation of a hypoechoic lesion as a parathyroid pathology during thyroid US.

  9. An effective hair detection algorithm for dermoscopic melanoma images of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Damayanti; Kaur, Ravneet; Umbaugh, Scott; LeAnder, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Dermoscopic images are obtained using the method of skin surface microscopy. Pigmented skin lesions are evaluated in terms of texture features such as color and structure. Artifacts, such as hairs, bubbles, black frames, ruler-marks, etc., create obstacles that prevent accurate detection of skin lesions by both clinicians and computer-aided diagnosis. In this article, we propose a new algorithm for the automated detection of hairs, using an adaptive, Canny edge-detection method, followed by morphological filtering and an arithmetic addition operation. The algorithm was applied to 50 dermoscopic melanoma images. In order to ascertain this method's relative detection accuracy, it was compared to the Razmjooy hair-detection method [1], using segmentation error (SE), true detection rate (TDR) and false positioning rate (FPR). The new method produced 6.57% SE, 96.28% TDR and 3.47% FPR, compared to 15.751% SE, 86.29% TDR and 11.74% FPR produced by the Razmjooy method [1]. Because of the 7.27-9.99% improvement in those parameters, we conclude that the new algorithm produces much better results for detecting thick, thin, dark and light hairs. The new method proposed here, shows an appreciable difference in the rate of detecting bubbles, as well.

  10. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  11. Immunohistochemical myofiber typing and high-resolution myofibrillar lesion detection in LR white embedded muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Vijayan, K.; Riley, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method of fixing, embedding, sectioning, and staining that allows high-resolution detection of myofibrillar structure and myosin immunocytochemical muscle fiber typing in serial semithin sections of LR White plastic embedded muscle at the light microscopic level. Traditional approaches, such as cryostat sections, permit fiber typing, but small myofibrillar lesions (1-3 sarcomeres) are difficult to detect because of section thickness. Semithin sections of hydrophobic resins do not stain well either histochemically or immunocytochemically. Electron microscopy can resolve lesions and discriminate fiber types based on morphology, but the sampling area is small. Our goal was to develop a rapid method for defining both fiber type and high-resolution primary myofibrillar lesion damage. Mild fixation (1-4% paraformaldehyde, 0. 05-0.1% glutaraldehyde) and embedment in a hydrophilic resin (LR White) were used. Myofibrillar structure was extremely well preserved at the light microscopic (LM) level, and lesions could be readily resolved in Toluidine blue stained 500-nm sections. Fiber type was defined by LM immunomyosin staining of serial plastic semithin sections, which demonstrated reciprocal staining patterns for "fast (Sigma M4276) and "total" (skeletal muscle) myosins (Sigma M7523). Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The impact of breast structure on lesion detection in breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Loren W.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials (VCT) can be carefully designed to inform, orient, or potentially replace clinical trials. The focus of this study was to demonstrate the capability of the sophisticated tools that can be used in the design, implementation, and performance analysis of VCTs, through characterization of the effect of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of irregular masses in digital breast tomosynthesis. Twenty breast phantoms from the extended cardiactorso (XCAT) family, generated based on dedicated breast computed tomography of human subjects, were used to extract a total of 2173 volumes of interest (VOI) from simulated tomosynthesis images. Five different lesions, modeled after human subject tomosynthesis images, were embedded in the breasts, for a total of 6×2173 VOIs with and without lesions. Effects of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of the lesions were studied by implementing a doubly composite hypothesis signal detection theory paradigm with location known exactly, lesion known exactly, and background known statistically. The results indicated that the detection performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) deteriorated as density was increased, yielding findings consistent with clinical studies. The detection performance varied substantially across the twenty breasts. Furthermore, the log-likelihood ratio under H0 and H1 seemed to be affected by background tissue density and heterogeneity differently. Considering background tissue variability can change the outcomes of a VCT and is hence of crucial importance. The XCAT breast phantoms can address this concern by offering realistic modeling of background tissue variability based on a wide range of human subjects.

  13. What proportions of focal liver lesions detected by unenhanced ultrasound are inconclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Willits, Iain; Burn, Julie; Cole, Helen; Hoare, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence produced positive diagnostics guidance on the ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue®, but recommended further research involving an estimation of the proportion of unenhanced ultrasound scans reporting, but not characterising, focal liver lesions, particularly in cirrhotic livers. Patient records from the Radiology Information System of an acute hospital trust were progressively filtered based on categorical fields and keywords in the free text reports, to obtain ultrasound records including the liver that were appropriate for manual analysis. In total, 21,731 records referred from general practice or out-patient clinics were analysed. Patients described as having cirrhosis were analysed as a subgroup. After automatic exclusion of records considered likely to be negative, 5812 records were manually read and categorised as focal liver lesion inconclusive, benign or malignant. In the general practice cohort of 9175 records, 746 reported the presence of one or more focal liver lesions, with 18.4% (95% CI 15.7% to 21.3%) of these records mentioning an inconclusive focal liver lesion. In the out-patient cohort of 12,556 records, 1437 reported one or more focal liver lesions, and 29.4% (95% CI 26.9% to 32.0%) of these were inconclusive. Cirrhosis was reported in 10.8% of the out-patient scans that also reported a focal liver lesion, and 47.4% (95% CI 39.3% to 55.6%) of these scans had an inconclusive focal liver lesion, compared with 27.3% (95% CI 24.9% to 29.8%) that were inconclusive in non-cirrhotic livers (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.4). This retrospective study indicates that unenhanced ultrasound scans, in which a focal liver lesion is detected, are frequently inconclusive, with the probability of an inconclusive scan being greater in out-patient than general practice referrals. Inconclusive focal liver lesions were also reported in greater proportions of cirrhotic than non-cirrhotic livers. The

  14. Oral precancerous lesions: Problems of early detection and oral cancer prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gileva, Olga S.; Libik, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Konstantin V.

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the results of the research in the structure, local and systemic risk factors, peculiarities of the clinical manifestation, and quality of primary diagnosis of precancerous oral mucosa lesions (OMLs). In the study a wide range of OMLs and high (25.4%) proportion of oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) in their structure was indicated. The high percentage of different diagnostic errors and the lack of oncological awareness of dental practitioners, as well as the sharp necessity of inclusion of precancer/cancer early detection techniques into their daily practice were noted. The effectiveness of chemilumenescence system of early OPLs and oral cancer detection was demonstrated, the prospects of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool were also discussed.

  15. Standard examination and adjunctive techniques for detection of oral premalignant and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A Ross; Shah, Sonal S

    2013-05-01

    This article outlines how to perform a standard comprehensive extraoral and intraoral examination and the existing commercially available adjunctive techniques for the early detection of oral cancer and premalignant lesions. Visualization-based techniques (e.g., autofluorescence and chemiluminescence), toluidine blue vital staining, cytopathologic tests and high-risk human papillomavirus testing are discussed in detail, including the indications and protocols for use, their advantages and disadvantages and clinical cases.

  16. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  17. Noninvasive Real-Time Automated Skin Lesion Analysis System for Melanoma Early Detection and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Barkana, Buket D.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma spreads through metastasis, and therefore, it has been proved to be very fatal. Statistical evidence has revealed that the majority of deaths resulting from skin cancer are as a result of melanoma. Further investigations have shown that the survival rates in patients depend on the stage of the cancer; early detection and intervention of melanoma implicate higher chances of cure. Clinical diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma are challenging, since the processes are prone to misdiagnosis and inaccuracies due to doctors’ subjectivity. Malignant melanomas are asymmetrical, have irregular borders, notched edges, and color variations, so analyzing the shape, color, and texture of the skin lesion is important for the early detection and prevention of melanoma. This paper proposes the two major components of a noninvasive real-time automated skin lesion analysis system for the early detection and prevention of melanoma. The first component is a real-time alert to help users prevent skinburn caused by sunlight; a novel equation to compute the time for skin to burn is thereby introduced. The second component is an automated image analysis module, which contains image acquisition, hair detection and exclusion, lesion segmentation, feature extraction, and classification. The proposed system uses PH2 Dermoscopy image database from Pedro Hispano Hospital for the development and testing purposes. The image database contains a total of 200 dermoscopy images of lesions, including benign, atypical, and melanoma cases. The experimental results show that the proposed system is efficient, achieving classification of the benign, atypical, and melanoma images with accuracy of 96.3%, 95.7%, and 97.5%, respectively. PMID:27170906

  18. Coordinating Center: Molecular and Cellular Findings of Screen-Detected Lesions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Screen‐Detected Lesions ‐ Coordinating Center and Data Management Group will provide support for the participating studies responding to RFA CA14‐10. The coordinating center supports three main domains: network coordination, statistical support and computational analysis and protocol development and database support. Support for communication is provided through an interactive web portal, management of conference calls, and meeting support. |

  19. A gradient in cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis by in vivo quantitative 7 T imaging.

    PubMed

    Mainero, Caterina; Louapre, Céline; Govindarajan, Sindhuja T; Giannì, Costanza; Nielsen, A Scott; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Sloane, Jacob; Kinkel, Revere P

    2015-04-01

    We used a surface-based analysis of T2* relaxation rates at 7 T magnetic resonance imaging, which allows sampling quantitative T2* throughout the cortical width, to map in vivo the spatial distribution of intracortical pathology in multiple sclerosis. Ultra-high resolution quantitative T2* maps were obtained in 10 subjects with clinically isolated syndrome/early multiple sclerosis (≤ 3 years disease duration), 18 subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (≥ 4 years disease duration), 13 subjects with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and in 17 age-matched healthy controls. Quantitative T2* maps were registered to anatomical cortical surfaces for sampling T2* at 25%, 50% and 75% depth from the pial surface. Differences in laminar quantitative T2* between each patient group and controls were assessed using general linear model (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). In all 41 multiple sclerosis cases, we tested for associations between laminar quantitative T2*, neurological disability, Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, cortical thickness, and white matter lesions. In patients, we measured, T2* in intracortical lesions and in the intracortical portion of leukocortical lesions visually detected on 7 T scans. Cortical lesional T2* was compared with patients' normal-appearing cortical grey matter T2* (paired t-test) and with mean cortical T2* in controls (linear regression using age as nuisance factor). Subjects with multiple sclerosis exhibited relative to controls, independent from cortical thickness, significantly increased T2*, consistent with cortical myelin and iron loss. In early disease, T2* changes were focal and mainly confined at 25% depth, and in cortical sulci. In later disease stages T2* changes involved deeper cortical laminae, multiple cortical areas and gyri. In patients, T2* in intracortical and leukocortical lesions was increased compared with normal-appearing cortical grey matter (P < 10(-10) and P < 10(-7)), and mean

  20. Early-Stage White Matter Lesions Detected by Multispectral MRI Segmentation Predict Progressive Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Jokinen, Hanna; Gonçalves, Nicolau; Vigário, Ricardo; Lipsanen, Jari; Fazekas, Franz; Schmidt, Reinhold; Barkhof, Frederik; Madureira, Sofia; Verdelho, Ana; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo; Erkinjuntti, Timo

    2015-01-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are the main brain imaging surrogate of cerebral small-vessel disease. A new MRI tissue segmentation method, based on a discriminative clustering approach without explicit model-based added prior, detects partial WML volumes, likely representing very early-stage changes in normal-appearing brain tissue. This study investigated how the different stages of WML, from a “pre-visible” stage to fully developed lesions, predict future cognitive decline. MRI scans of 78 subjects, aged 65–84 years, from the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS) study were analyzed using a self-supervised multispectral segmentation algorithm to identify tissue types and partial WML volumes. Each lesion voxel was classified as having a small (33%), intermediate (66%), or high (100%) proportion of lesion tissue. The subjects were evaluated with detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline and at three annual follow-up visits. We found that voxels with small partial WML predicted lower executive function compound scores at baseline, and steeper decline of executive scores in follow-up, independently of the demographics and the conventionally estimated hyperintensity volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. The intermediate and fully developed lesions were related to impairments in multiple cognitive domains including executive functions, processing speed, memory, and global cognitive function. In conclusion, early-stage partial WML, still too faint to be clearly detectable on conventional MRI, already predict executive dysfunction and progressive cognitive decline regardless of the conventionally evaluated WML load. These findings advance early recognition of small vessel disease and incipient vascular cognitive impairment. PMID:26696814

  1. Detection of questionable occlusal carious lesions using an electrical bioimpedance method with fractional electrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, A. P.; Pino, A. V.; Souza, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the diagnostic performance of an alternative electric bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS-STEP) detect questionable occlusal carious lesions. Six specialists carried out the visual (V), radiography (R), and combined (VR) exams of 57 sound or non-cavitated occlusal carious lesion teeth classifying the occlusal surfaces in sound surface (H), enamel caries (EC), and dentinal caries (DC). Measurements were based on the current response to a step voltage excitation (BIS-STEP). A fractional electrical model was used to predict the current response in the time domain and to estimate the model parameters: Rs and Rp (resistive parameters), and C and α (fractional parameters). Histological analysis showed caries prevalence of 33.3% being 15.8% hidden caries. Combined examination obtained the best traditional diagnostic results with specificity = 59.0%, sensitivity = 70.9%, and accuracy = 60.8%. There were statistically significant differences in bioimpedance parameters between the H and EC groups (p = 0.016) and between the H and DC groups (Rs, p = 0.006; Rp, p = 0.022, and α, p = 0.041). Using a suitable threshold for the Rs, we obtained specificity = 60.7%, sensitivity = 77.9%, accuracy = 73.2%, and 100% of detection for deep lesions. It can be concluded that BIS-STEP method could be an important tool to improve the detection and management of occlusal non-cavitated primary caries and pigmented sites.

  2. Pre-envelope deconvolution for increased lesion detection efficiency in ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Zemp, Roger J.; Insana, Michael F.

    2003-05-01

    We use an ideal observer model to evaluate the efficiency of human observers detecting a simulated lesion in the presence of speckle, and the ability of pre-envelope deconvolution to improve performance in this task. We model the lesion as a localized area of increased scatter density, which translates into an area of higher variance in the ultrasound signal. Assuming the scattering function and electronic noise obey Gaussian distributions, the ideal observer for lesion detection is given by a quadratic function of the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) data. For comparison, human-observer performance is assessed through two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) psychophysical studies after making a B-mode image by computing the magnitude (envelope) of the I and Q components. We also consider the effect of removing spatial correlations in the I and Q components, before computing the magnitude (pre-envelope deconvolution). Our Psychophysical studies indicate approximately a 4-fold improvement in detection efficiency with pre-envelope deconvolution.

  3. Left atrial dysfunction detected by speckle tracking in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac involvement is a relevant clinical finding in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and is associated with poor prognosis. Left atrial (LA) remodeling and/or dysfunction can be an early sign of diastolic dysfunction. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a novel and promising tool for detecting very early changes in LA myocardial performance. Aim To assess whether STE strain parameters may detect early alterations in LA function in SSc patients. Methods Forty-two SSc patients (Group 1, age 50 ± 14 years, 95% females) without clinical evidence for cardiac involvement and 42 age- and gender-matched control subjects (Group 2, age 49 ± 13 years, 95% females) were evaluated with comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging analysis. Positive peak left atrial longitudinal strain (ϵ pos peak), second positive left atrial longitudinal strain (sec ϵ pos peak), and negative left atrial longitudinal strain (ϵ neg peak) were measured using a 12-segment model for the LA, by commercially available semi-automated 2D speckle-tracking software (EchoPac PC version 108.1.4, GE Healthcare, Horten, Norway). Results All SSc patients had a normal left ventricular ejection fraction (63.1 ± 4%). SSc patients did not differ from controls in E/A (Group 1 = 1.1 ± 0.4 vs Group 2 = 1.3 ± 0.4, p = .14) or pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (Group 1 = 24.1 ± 8 mmHg vs Group 2 = 21 ± 7 mmHg, p = .17). SSc patients did not show significantly different indexed LA volumes (Group 1 = 24.9 ± 5.3 ml/m2 vs Group 2 = 24.7 ± 4.4 ml/m2, p = .8), whereas E/e’ ratio was significantly higher in SSc (Group 1 = 7.6 ± 2.4 vs Group 2 = 6.5 ± 1.7, p<0.05), although still within normal values. LA strain values were significantly different between the two groups (ϵ pos peak Group 1 = 31.3 ± 4.2% vs Group 2 = 35.0 ± 7.6%, p

  4. Random forest learning of ultrasonic statistical physics and object spaces for lesion detection in 2D sonomammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheet, Debdoot; Karamalis, Athanasios; Kraft, Silvan; Noël, Peter B.; Vag, Tibor; Sadhu, Anup; Katouzian, Amin; Navab, Nassir; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Early diagnosis can significantly improve lifeexpectancy and allow different treatment options. Clinicians favor 2D ultrasonography for breast tissue abnormality screening due to high sensitivity and specificity compared to competing technologies. However, inter- and intra-observer variability in visual assessment and reporting of lesions often handicaps its performance. Existing Computer Assisted Diagnosis (CAD) systems though being able to detect solid lesions are often restricted in performance. These restrictions are inability to (1) detect lesion of multiple sizes and shapes, and (2) differentiate between hypo-echoic lesions from their posterior acoustic shadowing. In this work we present a completely automatic system for detection and segmentation of breast lesions in 2D ultrasound images. We employ random forests for learning of tissue specific primal to discriminate breast lesions from surrounding normal tissues. This enables it to detect lesions of multiple shapes and sizes, as well as discriminate between hypo-echoic lesion from associated posterior acoustic shadowing. The primal comprises of (i) multiscale estimated ultrasonic statistical physics and (ii) scale-space characteristics. The random forest learns lesion vs. background primal from a database of 2D ultrasound images with labeled lesions. For segmentation, the posterior probabilities of lesion pixels estimated by the learnt random forest are hard thresholded to provide a random walks segmentation stage with starting seeds. Our method achieves detection with 99.19% accuracy and segmentation with mean contour-to-contour error < 3 pixels on a set of 40 images with 49 lesions.

  5. Detecting and treating occlusal caries lesions: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Stolpe, M; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Paris, S

    2015-02-01

    The health gains and costs resulting from using different caries detection strategies might not only depend on the accuracy of the used method but also the treatment emanating from its use in different populations. We compared combinations of visual-tactile, radiographic, or laser-fluorescence-based detection methods with 1 of 3 treatments (non-, micro-, and invasive treatment) initiated at different cutoffs (treating all or only dentinal lesions) in populations with low or high caries prevalence. A Markov model was constructed to follow an occlusal surface in a permanent molar in an initially 12-y-old male German patient over his lifetime. Prevalence data and transition probabilities were extracted from the literature, while validity parameters of different methods were synthesized or obtained from systematic reviews. Microsimulations were performed to analyze the model, assuming a German health care setting and a mixed public-private payer perspective. Radiographic and fluorescence-based methods led to more overtreatments, especially in populations with low prevalence. For the latter, combining visual-tactile or radiographic detection with microinvasive treatment retained teeth longest (mean 66 y) at lowest costs (329 and 332 Euro, respectively), while combining radiographic or fluorescence-based detections with invasive treatment was the least cost-effective (<60 y, >700 Euro). In populations with high prevalence, combining radiographic detection with microinvasive treatment was most cost-effective (63 y, 528 Euro), while sensitive detection methods combined with invasive treatments were again the least cost-effective (<59 y, >690 Euro). The suitability of detection methods differed significantly between populations, and the cost-effectiveness was greatly influenced by the treatment initiated after lesion detection. The accuracy of a detection method relative to a "gold standard" did not automatically convey into better health or reduced costs. Detection methods

  6. Detection of Olfactory Dysfunction Using Olfactory Event Related Potentials in Young Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caminiti, Fabrizia; De Salvo, Simona; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia; Ciurleo, Rosella

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies reported olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis. The estimate of the incidence of olfactory deficits in multiple sclerosis is uncertain; this may arise from different testing methods that may be influenced by patients' response bias and clinical, demographic and cognitive features. Aims To evaluate objectively the olfactory function using Olfactory Event Related Potentials. Materials and Methods We tested the olfactory function of 30 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (mean age of 36.03±6.96 years) and of 30 age, sex and smoking–habit matched healthy controls by using olfactory potentials. A selective and controlled stimulation of the olfactory system to elicit the olfactory event related potentials was achieved by a computer-controlled olfactometer linked directly with electroencephalograph. Relationships between olfactory potential results and patients' clinical characteristics, such as gender, disability status score, disease-modifying therapy, and disease duration, were evaluated. Results Seven of 30 patients did not show olfactory event related potentials. Sixteen of remaining 23 patients had a mean value of amplitude significantly lower than control group (p<0.01). The presence/absence of olfactory event related potentials was associated with dichotomous expanded disability status scale (p = 0.0433), as well as inversely correlated with the disease duration (r = −0.3641, p = 0.0479). Conclusion Unbiased olfactory dysfunction of different severity found in multiple sclerosis patients suggests an organic impairment which could be related to neuroinflammatory and/or neurodegenerative processes of olfactory networks, supporting the recent findings on neurophysiopathology of disease. PMID:25047369

  7. Electron microscopic detection of human papillomavirus particles in oral proliferative lesions.

    PubMed

    Broich, G; Sasaki, T

    1989-11-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been demonstrated in a series of benign proliferative lesions of skin and mucosae. To prove the distribution of HPV in the oral proliferative lesions at the ultrastructural level, we performed electron microscopic analysis of 10 specimens taken from 5 patients through large excisional biopsy. All of them were diagnosed pathologically as fibropapilloma. In each patient, specimens were taken from both clinically evident proliferative lesions and clinically normal surrounding mucosa. Obtained specimens were fixed in a glutaraldehyde solution and processed for routine ultrathin sectioning. Before electron microscopic observation, the tissue sections on copper grids were subjected to amylase digestion of glycogen granules. Spherical viral particles of 40-55 nm in diameter were detected the non-keratinized epithelial cells in all specimens examined. Of particular interest were the large amounts of viral particles found in the cytoplasmic matrix and nuclei (especially on their chromatin masses) of the cells in intermediate and surface layers, which did not form a crystal array. All the membranous cell organelles of epithelial cells were, however, devoid of viral particles. Some viral particles were distributed in the extracellular spaces of an intermediate layer. Viral particles were hardly observed in the cells of a basal/suprabasal and prickle cell layers. There were no significant differences in the HPV distribution between the cells derived from the proliferative lesion and those derived from the surrounding normal mucosa.

  8. Pigmented skin lesion detection using random forest and wavelet-based texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ping; Yang, Tie-jun

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma, a disease of worldwide distribution and is the deadliest form of skin cancer, has been rapidly increasing over the last few decades. Because advanced cutaneous melanoma is still incurable, early detection is an important step toward a reduction in mortality. Dermoscopy photographs are commonly used in melanoma diagnosis and can capture detailed features of a lesion. A great variability exists in the visual appearance of pigmented skin lesions. Therefore, in order to minimize the diagnostic errors that result from the difficulty and subjectivity of visual interpretation, an automatic detection approach is required. The objectives of this paper were to propose a hybrid method using random forest and Gabor wavelet transformation to accurately differentiate which part belong to lesion area and the other is not in a dermoscopy photographs and analyze segmentation accuracy. A random forest classifier consisting of a set of decision trees was used for classification. Gabor wavelets transformation are the mathematical model of visual cortical cells of mammalian brain and an image can be decomposed into multiple scales and multiple orientations by using it. The Gabor function has been recognized as a very useful tool in texture analysis, due to its optimal localization properties in both spatial and frequency domain. Texture features based on Gabor wavelets transformation are found by the Gabor filtered image. Experiment results indicate the following: (1) the proposed algorithm based on random forest outperformed the-state-of-the-art in pigmented skin lesions detection (2) and the inclusion of Gabor wavelet transformation based texture features improved segmentation accuracy significantly.

  9. Fast approach to evaluate map reconstruction for lesion detection and localization

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2004-02-01

    Lesion detection is an important task in emission tomography. Localization ROC (LROC) studies are often used to analyze the lesion detection and localization performance. Most researchers rely on Monte Carlo reconstruction samples to obtain LROC curves, which can be very time-consuming for iterative algorithms. In this paper we develop a fast approach to obtain LROC curves that does not require Monte Carlo reconstructions. We use a channelized Hotelling observer model to search for lesions, and the results can be easily extended to other numerical observers. We theoretically analyzed the mean and covariance of the observer output. Assuming the observer outputs are multivariate Gaussian random variables, an LROC curve can be directly generated by integrating the conditional probability density functions. The high-dimensional integrals are calculated using a Monte Carlo method. The proposed approach is very fast because no iterative reconstruction is involved. Computer simulations show that the results of the proposed method match well with those obtained using the tradition LROC analysis.

  10. Improved detection reveals active β-papillomavirus infection in skin lesions from kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Borgogna, Cinzia; Lanfredini, Simone; Peretti, Alberto; De Andrea, Marco; Zavattaro, Elisa; Colombo, Enrico; Quaglia, Marco; Boldorini, Renzo; Miglio, Umberto; Doorbar, John; Bavinck, Jan N Bouwes; Quint, Koen D; de Koning, Maurits N C; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether detection of β-HPV gene products, as defined in epidermodysplasia verruciformis skin cancer, could also be observed in lesions from kidney transplant recipients alongside the viral DNA. A total of 111 samples, corresponding to 79 skin lesions abscised from 17 kidney transplant recipients, have been analyzed. The initial PCR analysis demonstrated that β-HPV-DNA was highly present in our tumor series (85%). Using a combination of antibodies raised against the E4 and L1 proteins of the β-genotypes, we were able to visualize productive infection in 4 out of 19 actinic keratoses, and in the pathological borders of 1 out of 14 squamous cell carcinomas and 1 out of 31 basal cell carcinomas. Increased expression of the cellular proliferation marker minichromosome maintenance protein 7 (MCM7), that extended into the upper epithelial layers, was a common feature of all the E4-positive areas, indicating that cells were driven into the cell cycle in areas of productive viral infections. Although the present study does not directly demonstrate a causal role of these viruses, the detection of E4 and L1 positivity in actinic keratosis and the adjacent pathological epithelium of skin cancer, clearly shows that β-HPV are actively replicating in the intraepidermal precursor lesions of kidney transplant recipients and can therefore cooperate with other carcinogenic agents, such as UVB, favoring skin cancer promotion.

  11. In vivo light scattering for the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, Judith R

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical diagnostic system for detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix was evaluated in vivo. The optical system included a fiber-optic probe designed to measure polarized and unpolarized light transport properties of a small volume of tissue. An algorithm for diagnosing tissue based on the optical measurements was developed that used four optical properties, three of which were related to light scattering properties and the fourth of which was related to hemoglobin concentration. A sensitivity of {approx}77% and specificities in the mid 60% range were obtained for separating high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. The use of different cross-validation methods in algorithm development is analyzed, and the relative difficulties of diagnosing certain pathologies are assessed. Furthermore, the robustness of the optical system for use by different doctors and to changes in fiber-optic probe are also assessed, and potential improvements in the optical system are discussed.

  12. Development and validation of a fully automated system for detection and diagnosis of mammographic lesions.

    PubMed

    Casti, Paola; Mencattini, Arianna; Salmeri, Marcello; Ancona, Antonietta; Mangieri, Fabio; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive and fully automated system for computer-aided detection and diagnosis of masses in mammograms. Novel methods for detection include: selection of suspicious focal areas based on analysis of the gradient vector field, rejection of oriented components of breast tissue using multidirectional Gabor filtering, and use of differential features for rejection of false positives (FPs) via clustering of the surrounding fibroglandular tissue. The diagnosis step is based on extraction of contour-independent features for characterization of lesions as benign or malignant from automatically detected circular and annular regions. A new unified 3D free-response receiver operating characteristic framework is introduced for global analysis of two binary categorization problems in cascade. In total, 3,080 suspicious focal areas were extracted from a set of 156 full-field digital mammograms, including 26 malignant tumors, 120 benign lesions, and 18 normal mammograms. The proposed system detected and diagnosed malignant tumors with a sensitivity of 0.96, 0.92, and 0.88 at, respectively, 1.83, 0.46, and 0.45 FPs/image, with two stages of stepwise logistic regression for selection of features, a cascade of Fisher linear discriminant analysis and an artificial neural network with radial basis functions, and leave-one-patient-out cross-validation.

  13. The development of a disease oriented eFolder for multiple sclerosis decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Fernandez, James; Amezcua, Lilyana; Liu, Brent

    2010-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The chronic nature of MS necessitates multiple MRI studies to track disease progression. Currently, MRI assessment of multiple sclerosis requires manual lesion measurement and yields an estimate of lesion volume and change that is highly variable and user-dependent. In the setting of a longitudinal study, disease trends and changes become difficult to extrapolate from the lesions. In addition, it is difficult to establish a correlation between these imaged lesions and clinical factors such as treatment course. To address these clinical needs, an MS specific e-Folder for decision support in the evaluation and assessment of MS has been developed. An e-Folder is a disease-centric electronic medical record in contrast to a patient-centric electronic health record. Along with an MS lesion computer aided detection (CAD) package for lesion load, location, and volume, clinical parameters such as patient demographics, disease history, clinical course, and treatment history are incorporated to make the e-Folder comprehensive. With the integration of MRI studies together with related clinical data and informatics tools designed for monitoring multiple sclerosis, it provides a platform to improve the detection of treatment response in patients with MS. The design and deployment of MS e-Folder aims to standardize MS lesion data and disease progression to aid in decision making and MS-related research.

  14. Low-contrast lesion detection in tomosynthetic breast imaging using a realistic breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lili; Oldan, Jorge; Fisher, Paul; Gindi, Gene

    2006-03-01

    Tomosynthesis mammography is a potentially valuable technique for detection of breast cancer. In this simulation study, we investigate the efficacy of three different tomographic reconstruction methods, EM, SART and Backprojection, in the context of an especially difficult mammographic detection task. The task is the detection of a very low-contrast mass embedded in very dense fibro-glandular tissue - a clinically useful task for which tomosynthesis may be well suited. The project uses an anatomically realistic 3D digital breast phantom whose normal anatomic variability limits lesion conspicuity. In order to capture anatomical object variability, we generate an ensemble of phantoms, each of which comprises random instances of various breast structures. We construct medium-sized 3D breast phantoms which model random instances of ductal structures, fibrous connective tissue, Cooper's ligaments and power law structural noise for small scale object variability. Random instances of 7-8 mm irregular masses are generated by a 3D random walk algorithm and placed in very dense fibro-glandular tissue. Several other components of the breast phantom are held fixed, i.e. not randomly generated. These include the fixed breast shape and size, nipple structure, fixed lesion location, and a pectoralis muscle. We collect low-dose data using an isocentric tomosynthetic geometry at 11 angles over 50 degrees and add Poisson noise. The data is reconstructed using the three algorithms. Reconstructed slices through the center of the lesion are presented to human observers in a 2AFC (two-alternative-forced-choice) test that measures detectability by computing AUC (area under the ROC curve). The data collected in each simulation includes two sources of variability, that due to the anatomical variability of the phantom and that due to the Poisson data noise. We found that for this difficult task that the AUC value for EM (0.89) was greater than that for SART (0.83) and Backprojection (0.66).

  15. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piombo, Marianna; Chiarello, Daniela; Corbetto, Marzia; Di Pino, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Riva, Elisabetta; De Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient. PMID:26955334

  16. Detection of intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis by capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay in oligoclonal band negative multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Huss, André; Buttmann, Mathias; Steinacker, Petra; Oeckl, Patrick; Brecht, Isabel; Weishaupt, Andreas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCBs) restricted to the cerebrospinal fluid indicate intrathecal inflammation. Using isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting, they are detected in about 95 % of patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). To elucidate whether in the remaining 5 % OCBs are truly absent or alternatively missed due to insufficient sensitivity of the routine measurement, we employed a new, highly sensitive nanoscale method for OCB detection. Capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection served to analyze OCBs in 33 well-characterized OCB-negative and 10 OCB-positive MS patients as well as in 100 OCB-negative control patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases and 30 OCB-positive control patients with inflammatory neurological diseases. We detected intrathecal immunoglobulin G production in 10 out of 33 MS patients (30 %), initially diagnosed as being OCB-negative, and in all 10 OCB-positive MS patients, but in only 3 out of 100 non-inflammatory neurological controls (3 %) and in 29 of 30 inflammatory neurological controls (97 %). At least about one-third of MS patients without intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis according to standard methods are OCB-positive. Advanced methods for OCB detection may increase the analytical sensitivity for detecting OCB in patients with MS who are OCB-negative according to current routine methods.

  17. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective ...

  18. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  19. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  20. Computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening using stomach shape and appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midoh, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Takashima, M.; Nakamae, K.; Fujioka, H.

    2007-03-01

    In Japan, stomach cancer is one of the three most common causes of death from cancer. Since periodic health checks of stomach X-rays have become more widely carried out, the physicians' burdens have been increasing in the mass screening to detect initial symptoms of a disease. For the purpose of automatic diagnosis, we try to develop a computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening. The proposed system has two databases. One is the stomach shape database that consists of the computer graphics stomach 3D models based on biomechanics simulation and their projected 2D images. The other is the normal appearance database that is constructed by learning patterns in a normal patient training set. The stomach contour is extracted from an X-ray image including a barium filled region by the following steps. Firstly, the approximated stomach region is obtained by nonrigid registration based on mutual information. We define nonrigid transformation as one that includes translations, rotations, scaling, air-barium interface and weights of eigenvectors determined by principal components analysis in the stomach shape database. Secondly, the accurate stomach contour is extracted from the gradient of an image by using the Dynamic Programming. After then, stomach lesions are detected by inspecting whether the Mahalanobis distance from the mean in the normal appearance database is longer than a suitable value on the extracted stomach contour. We applied our system to 75 X-ray images of barium-filled stomach to show its validity.

  1. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOEpatents

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur [Seattle, WA; Majewski, Stanislaw [Morgantown, WV; Welch, Benjamin L [Hampton, VA

    2012-07-03

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  2. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOEpatents

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur; Majewski, Stanislaw; Welch, Benjamin L.

    2008-10-28

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  3. High throughput image cytometry for detection of suspicious lesions in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Guillaud, Martial; Michele Williams, Pamela; Laronde, Denise M.; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2012-08-01

    The successful management of oral cancer depends upon early detection, which relies heavily on the clinician's ability to discriminate sometimes subtle alterations of the infrequent premalignant lesions from the more common reactive and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. Even among experienced oral specialists this can be challenging, particularly when using new wide field-of-view direct fluorescence visualization devices clinically introduced for the recognition of at-risk tissue. The objective of this study is to examine if quantitative cytometric analysis of oral brushing samples could facilitate the assessment of the risk of visually ambiguous lesions. About 369 cytological samples were collected and analyzed: (1) 148 samples from pathology-proven sites of SCC, carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia; (2) 77 samples from sites with inflammation, infection, or trauma, and (3) 144 samples from normal sites. These were randomly separated into training and test sets. The best algorithm correctly recognized 92.5% of the normal samples, 89.4% of the abnormal samples, 86.2% of the confounders in the training set as well as 100% of the normal samples, and 94.4% of the abnormal samples in the test set. These data suggest that quantitative cytology could reduce by more than 85% the number of visually suspect lesions requiring further assessment by biopsy.

  4. Radiographic detection of thoracic lesions in adult cows: A retrospective study of 42 cases (1995–2002)

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, Isabelle; Fecteau, Gilles; Breton, Luc; Hélie, Pierre; Beauregard, Guy; Blond, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Medical records of 42 cows that underwent both thoracic radiographic and postmortem examinations within a period of 7 days were reviewed to develop an evaluation grid to interpret bovine thoracic radiographs and to determine the sensitivity and the specificity of thoracic radiographs for detection of thoracic lesions, based on postmortem examination. Most cows (64%) had clinical signs of respiratory disease, whereas 19% showed signs of cardiac problems. The sensitivity and specificity of radiographs for identifying cows with thoracic lesions were 94% and 50%, respectively. In this study, with a prevalence of thoracic lesions of 86%, the positive- and negative-predictive values were 92% and 57%, respectively. This study provides an evaluation grid that allows standardization of the reading of bovine thoracic radiographs and the identification of most thoracic lesions. Bovine thoracic radiographs are useful in detecting thoracic lesions in cows. PMID:18390098

  5. Experimental evaluation of a simple lesion detection task with Time-of-Flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2009-02-01

    Parts (a) and (b) of figure 8 in this article were in error not included in the published article. The correct figure is reproduced below. figure 8 Figure 8. Plots of CRC (a) and (b) and Noise (c) and (d) as a function of iteration number for varying scan times in the 35 cm lesion detectability phantom. Left column (a and c) shows result from TOF reconstructions while the right column (b) and (d) has the non-TOF reconstruction results. The curves within each plot are for varying scan times of 2 (circle), 3 (dtri), 4 ◊, and 5 minutes squ.

  6. Retinal image analysis to detect and quantify lesions associated with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C I; Hornero, R; López, M I; Poza, J

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method to detect hard exudates, a lesion associated with diabetic retinopathy, is proposed. The algorithm found on their color, using a statistical classification, and their sharp edges, applying an edge detector, to localize them. A sensitivity of 79.62% with a mean number of 3 false positives per image is obtained in a database of 20 retinal image with variable color, brightness and quality. In that way, we evaluate the robustness of the method in order to make adequate to a clinical environment. Further efforts will be done to improve its performance.

  7. Automatic detection and segmentation of liver metastatic lesions on serial CT examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Cohen, Avi; Diamant, Idit; Klang, Eyal; Amitai, Michal; Greenspan, Hayit

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a fully automated method for detection and segmentation of liver metastases on serial CT examinations (portal phase) given a 2D baseline segmentation mask. Our database contains 27 CT scans, baselines and follow-ups, of 12 patients and includes 22 test cases. Our method is based on the information given in the baseline CT scan which contains the lesion's segmentation mask marked manually by a radiologist. We use the 2D baseline segmentation mask to identify the lesion location in the follow-up CT scan using non-rigid image registration. The baseline CT scan is also used to locate regions of tissues surrounding the lesion and to map them onto the follow-up CT scan, in order to reduce the search area on the follow-up CT scan. Adaptive region-growing and mean-shift segmentation are used to obtain the final lesion segmentation. The segmentation results are compared to those obtained by a human radiologist. Compared to the reference standard our method made a correct RECIST 1.1 assessment for 21 out of 22 test cases. The average Dice index was 0.83 +/- 0.07, average Hausdorff distance was 7.85+/- 4.84 mm, average sensitivity was 0.87 +/- 0.11 and positive predictive value was 0.81 +/- 0.10. The segmentation performance and the RECIST assessment results look promising. We are pursuing the methodology further with expansion to 3D segmentation while increasing the dataset we are collecting from the CT abdomen unit at Sheba medical center.

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious.

  9. Detection and Classification of Thyroid Follicular Lesions Based on Nuclear Structure from Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2010-01-01

    Follicular lesions of the thyroid are traditionally difficult and tedious challenges in diagnostic surgical pathology in part due to lack of obvious discriminatory cytological and microarchitectural features. We describe a computerized method to detect and classify follicular adenoma of the thyroid, follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, and normal thyroid based on the nuclear chromatin distribution from digital images of tissue obtained by routine histological methods. Our method is based on determining whether a set of nuclei, obtained from histological images using automated image segmentation, is most similar to sets of nuclei obtained from normal or diseased tissues. This comparison is performed utilizing numerical features, a support vector machine, and a simple voting strategy. We also describe novel methods to identify unique and defining chromatin patterns pertaining to each class. Unlike previous attempts in detecting and classifying these thyroid lesions using computational imaging, our results show that our method can automatically classify the data pertaining to 10 different human cases with 100% accuracy after blind cross validation using at most 43 nuclei randomly selected from each patient. We conclude that nuclear structure alone contains enough information to automatically classify the normal thyroid, follicular carcinoma, and follicular adenoma, as long as groups of nuclei (instead of individual ones) are used. We also conclude that the distribution of nuclear size and chromatin concentration (how tightly packed it is) seem to be discriminating features between nuclei of follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and normal thyroid. PMID:20099247

  10. Use of adaptive hybrid filtering process in Crohn's disease lesion detection from real capsule endoscopy videos.

    PubMed

    Charisis, Vasileios S; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this Letter is to present a new capsule endoscopy (CE) image analysis scheme for the detection of small bowel ulcers that relate to Crohn's disease. More specifically, this scheme is based on: (i) a hybrid adaptive filtering (HAF) process, that utilises genetic algorithms to the curvelet-based representation of images for efficient extraction of the lesion-related morphological characteristics, (ii) differential lacunarity (DL) analysis for texture feature extraction from the HAF-filtered images and (iii) support vector machines for robust classification performance. For the training of the proposed scheme, namely HAF-DL, an 800-image database was used and the evaluation was based on ten 30-second long endoscopic videos. Experimental results, along with comparison with other related efforts, have shown that the HAF-DL approach evidently outperforms the latter in the field of CE image analysis for automated lesion detection, providing higher classification results. The promising performance of HAF-DL paves the way for a complete computer-aided diagnosis system that could support the physicians' clinical practice.

  11. Image-detected 'probably benign' breast lesions: a significant reason for referral from primary care.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M E; Houssami, N

    2006-10-01

    In Australia, and many health care provider systems, primary care physicians are the first to see women with breast symptoms and are responsible for making decisions on whether to investigate and when to refer to specialist teams. We present an audit of new patient referrals from primary care triaged to a 'low-risk' (low likelihood of cancer) clinic on the basis of benign findings. The most common reason for referral was 'breast lump' (38%) followed by 'image-detected' abnormality (26%.) We have identified that (outside of population screening services) many women are being referred from primary care to specialist clinics for management of screen-detected lesions considered benign on imaging. Further research is needed to identify the reasons for such referrals and to develop appropriate educational strategies and clinical policy, both for the primary care and the specialist breast practitioner.

  12. CXCR-4 Targeted, Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Emitting Nanoprobes for Enhanced Deep Tissue Imaging and Micrometastatic Cancer Lesion Detection.

    PubMed

    Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Kantamneni, Harini; Mingozzi, Marco; Kim, Paul; Adler, Derek; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Pierce, Mark; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2015-12-16

    Realizing the promise of precision medicine in cancer therapy depends on identifying and tracking cancerous growths to maximize treatment options and improve patient outcomes. This goal of early detection remains unfulfilled by current clinical imaging techniques that fail to detect lesions due to their small size and suborgan localization. With proper probes, optical imaging techniques can overcome this by identifying the molecular phenotype of tumors at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. In this study, the first use of nanophotonic short wave infrared technology is proposed to molecularly phenotype small lesions for more sensitive detection. Here, human serum albumin encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles (ReANCs) with ligands for targeted lesion imaging are designed. AMD3100, an antagonist to CXCR4 (a classic marker of cancer metastasis) is adsorbed onto ReANCs to form functionalized ReANCs (fReANCs). fReANCs are able to preferentially accumulate in receptor positive lesions when injected intraperitoneally in a subcutaneous tumor model. fReANCs can also target subtissue microlesions at a maximum depth of 10.5 mm in a lung metastatic model of breast cancer. Internal lesions identified with fReANCs are 2.25 times smaller than those detected with ReANCs. Thus, an integrated nanoprobe detection platform is presented, which allows target-specific identification of subtissue cancerous lesions.

  13. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  14. Improvement of mammographic lesion detection by fusion of information from different views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquerault, Sophie; Petrick, Nicholas; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman

    2001-07-01

    In screening mammography, two standard views, craniocaudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO), are commonly taken, and radiologists use information from the two views for lesion detection and diagnosis. Current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are designed to detect lesions on each view separately. We are developing a CAD method that utilizes information from the two views to reduce false-positives (FPs). Our two-view detection scheme consists of two main stages, a one-view pre-screening stage and a two-view correspondence stage. The one-view and two-view scores are then fused to estimate the likelihood that an object is a true mass. In this study, we analyzed the effectiveness of the proposed fusion scheme for FP reduction and its dependence on the number of objects per image in the pre-screening stage. The preliminary results demonstrate that the fusion of information from the CC and MLO views significantly reduced the FP rate in comparison to the one-view scheme. When the pre-screening stage produced 10 objects per image, the two-view fusion technique reduced the FP rate from an average of 2.1 FPs/image in our current one-view CAD scheme to 1.2 FPs/image at a sensitivity of 80%. The results also indicate that the improvement in the detection accuracy was essentially independent of the number of initial objects per image obtained at the pre-screening stage for this data set.

  15. The mystery of the origin of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W I

    1986-01-01

    Our present understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis is discussed in relation to the views of Sir William Gowers. He perceived that both environmental and genetic factors might be implicated in the aetiology of the disease. Evidence for the former was first reported in 1903, but has become convincing only in the past 20 years; the nature of the environmental factor remains obscure. Evidence for a genetic influence on susceptibility has accumulated since the 1930s, the most compelling coming from the recent Canadian twin study. The number and mode of operation of the genetic factors is still uncertain, but there is evidence for the implication of genetically controlled cellular immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the disease. The precise relationship between transient changes in immunological status and the development of new lesions has yet to be defined; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to play a significant role in this analysis because of its sensitivity in detecting abnormalities in multiple sclerosis. MRI is not in itself specific; it is probable that the similar appearances in multiple sclerosis and cerebral vascular disease both derive at least in part from the influence of astrocytic gliosis on proton content and distribution. The significance of the gliosis is uncertain. Gowers believed that the primary defect in multiple sclerosis lay in the astrocyte. Recent observations on the immunological functions of this cell in vitro suggest that it could be involved early in the pathogenesis of the lesion. Images PMID:2936869

  16. Diagnostic power of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted detection of breast lesions with microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Soares, Jaqueline S; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Volynskaya, Zoya; Liu, Wendy; Klein, Nina; Plecha, Donna; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2013-01-08

    Microcalcifications geographically target the location of abnormalities within the breast and are of critical importance in breast cancer diagnosis. However, despite stereotactic guidance, core needle biopsy fails to retrieve microcalcifications in up to 15% of patients. Here, we introduce an approach based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for detection of microcalcifications that focuses on variations in optical absorption stemming from the calcified clusters and the associated cross-linking molecules. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra are acquired ex vivo from 203 sites in fresh biopsy tissue cores from 23 patients undergoing stereotactic breast needle biopsies. By correlating the spectra with the corresponding radiographic and histologic assessment, we have developed a support vector machine-derived decision algorithm, which shows high diagnostic power (positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 97% and 88%, respectively) for diagnosis of lesions with microcalcifications. We further show that these results are robust and not due to any spurious correlations. We attribute our findings to the presence of proteins (such as elastin), and desmosine and isodesmosine cross-linkers in the microcalcifications. It is important to note that the performance of the diffuse reflectance decision algorithm is comparable to one derived from the corresponding Raman spectra, and the considerably higher intensity of the reflectance signal enables the detection of the targeted lesions in a fraction of the spectral acquisition time. Our findings create a unique landscape for spectroscopic validation of breast core needle biopsy for detection of microcalcifications that can substantially improve the likelihood of an adequate, diagnostic biopsy in the first attempt.

  17. Detection of cervical lesions by multivariate analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Prabitha, Vasumathi Gopala; Suchetha, Sambasivan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj Lalitha; Baiju, Kamalasanan Vijayakumary; Rema, Prabhakaran; Anuraj, Koyippurath; Mathews, Anita; Sebastian, Paul; Subhash, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy is a non-invasive, real-time, and cost-effective tool for early detection of malignant changes in squamous epithelial tissues. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic power of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive discrimination of cervical lesions in vivo. A clinical trial was carried out on 48 sites in 34 patients by recording DR spectra using a point-monitoring device with white light illumination. The acquired data were analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Diagnostic accuracies were validated using random number generators. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted for evaluating the discriminating power of the proposed statistical technique. An algorithm was developed and used to classify non-diseased (normal) from diseased sites (abnormal) with a sensitivity of 72 % and specificity of 87 %. While low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) could be discriminated from normal with a sensitivity of 56 % and specificity of 80 %, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) from normal with a sensitivity of 89 % and specificity of 97 %, LSIL could be discriminated from HSIL with 100 % sensitivity and specificity. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.993 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0 to 1) and 1 (95 % CI 1) for the discrimination of HSIL from normal and HSIL from LSIL, respectively. The results of the study show that DR spectroscopy could be used along with multivariate analytical techniques as a non-invasive technique to monitor cervical disease status in real time.

  18. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Two Different b-Values in Detection of Solid Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Da-wei; Wang, Ke-yang; Yao, Xun; Ye, Hui-yi; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Jia-yin; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yang, Zheng-han

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-two consecutive patients with suspected liver disease were recruited to receive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with two different b-values, in comparison with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). The detection rate of three MR sequences in solid focal liver lesions (FLLs) and subgroup analyses were performed. Our prospective study found that DWI600 was equivalent to DWI100 and T2WI for the detection of solid FLLs overall but was significantly more accurate in the detection of malignant solid FLLs and lesions larger than 10 mm.

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENOMIC ARRAYS FACILITATE DETECTION OF NOVEL CRYPTIC CHROMOSOMAL LESIONS IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Christine L.; Tiu, Ramon; Gondek, Lukasz P.; Powers, Jennifer; Theil, Karl S.; Kalaycio, Matt; Lichtin, Alan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Unbalanced chromosomal aberrations are common in myelodysplastic syndromes, and have prognostic implications. An increased frequency of cytogenetic changes may reflect an inherent chromosomal instability due to failure of DNA repair. Therefore, it is likely that chromosomal defects in myelodysplastic syndromes may be more frequent than predicted by metaphase cytogenetics and new cryptic lesions may be revealed by precise analysis methods. Methods We used a novel high-resolution karyotyping technique, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, to investigate the frequency of cryptic chromosomal lesions in a cohort of 38 well-characterized myelodysplastic syndromes patients; results were confirmed by microsatellite quantitative PCR or single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Results As compared to metaphase karyotyping, chromosomal abnormalities detected by array-based analysis were encountered more frequently and in a higher proportion of patients. For example, chromosomal defects were found in patients with a normal karyotype by traditional cytogenetics. In addition to verifying common abnormalities, previously cryptic defects were found in new regions of the genome. Cryptic changes often overlapped chromosomes and regions frequently identified as abnormal by metaphase cytogenetics. Conclusion The results underscore the instability of the myelodysplastic syndromes genome and highlight the utility of array-based karyotyping to study cryptic chromosomal changes which may provide new diagnostic information. PMID:17258073

  20. Molecular Assays for Detecting Aphanomyces invadans in Ulcerative Mycotic Fish Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vandersea, Mark W.; Litaker, R. Wayne; Yonnish, Bryan; Sosa, Emilio; Landsberg, Jan H.; Pullinger, Chris; Moon-Butzin, Paula; Green, Jason; Morris, James A.; Kator, Howard; Noga, Edward J.; Tester, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is the primary etiological agent in ulcerative mycosis, an ulcerative skin disease caused by a fungus-like agent of wild and cultured fish. We developed sensitive PCR and fluorescent peptide nucleic acid in situ hybridization (FISH) assays to detect A. invadans. Laboratory-challenged killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were first tested to optimize and validate the assays. Skin ulcers of Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) from populations found in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries in North Carolina were then surveyed. Results from both assays indicated that all of the lesioned menhaden (n = 50) collected in September 2004 were positive for A. invadans. Neither the FISH assay nor the PCR assay cross-reacted with other closely related oomycetes. These results provided strong evidence that A. invadans is the primary oomycete pathogen in ulcerative mycosis and demonstrated the utility of the assays. The FISH assay is the first molecular assay to provide unambiguous visual confirmation that hyphae in the ulcerated lesions were exclusively A. invadans. PMID:16461710

  1. Sentinel node detection and radioguided occult lesion localization in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Trifirò, Guiseppe; Lavinia Travaini, Laura; De Cicco, Concetta; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy might replace complete axillary dissection for staging of the axilla in clinically N0 breast cancer patients and represent a significant advantage as a minimally invasive procedure, considering that about 70% of patients are found to be free from metastatic disease, yet axillary node dissection can lead to significant morbidity. In our Institute, Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization is the standard method to locate non-palpable breast lesions and the gamma probes is very effective in assisting intra-operative localization and removal, as in sentinel node biopsy. The rapid spread of sentinel lymph node biopsy has led to its use in clinical settings previously considered contraindications to sentinel lymph node biopsy. In this contest, we evaluated in a large group of patients possible factors affecting sentinel node detection and the reliability of sentinel lymph node biopsy carried out after large excisional breast biopsy. Our data confirm that a previous breast surgery does not prohibit efficient sentinel lymph node localization and sentinel lymph node biopsy can correctly stage the axialla in these patients.

  2. Statistical image segmentation for the detection of skin lesion borders in UV fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Franco, Walfre

    2016-04-01

    The skin contains several fluorescent molecules or fluorophores that serve as markers of structure, function and composition. UV fluorescence excitation photography is a simple and effective way to image specific intrinsic fluorophores, such as the one ascribed to tryptophan which emits at a wavelength of 345 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, and is a marker of cellular proliferation. Earlier, we built a clinical UV photography system to image cellular proliferation. In some samples, the naturally low intensity of the fluorescence can make it difficult to separate the fluorescence of cells in higher proliferation states from background fluorescence and other imaging artifacts -- like electronic noise. In this work, we describe a statistical image segmentation method to separate the fluorescence of interest. Statistical image segmentation is based on image averaging, background subtraction and pixel statistics. This method allows to better quantify the intensity and surface distributions of fluorescence, which in turn simplify the detection of borders. Using this method we delineated the borders of highly-proliferative skin conditions and diseases, in particular, allergic contact dermatitis, psoriatic lesions and basal cell carcinoma. Segmented images clearly define lesion borders. UV fluorescence excitation photography along with statistical image segmentation may serve as a quick and simple diagnostic tool for clinicians.

  3. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  4. Detection and discrimination of carvone enantiomers in rats with olfactory bulb lesions.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, B; Bisulco, S

    2003-01-01

    Rats with lesions of dorsal and dorsolateral bulbar sites known to be differentially responsive to carvone enantiomers were tested for their ability to detect (+)-carvone, to discriminate between (+)-carvone from (-)-carvone, and to discriminate (+)-carvone from mixtures of both enantiomers after they had been pre-trained or not pre-trained on these tasks prior to surgery. In postoperative tests, rats pre-trained on the enantiomer discrimination problems made somewhat fewer errors than those not pre-trained, but experimental rats performed as well as controls (those that had one intact olfactory bulb) within both conditions and on each task. These results indicate that removal of most bulbar sites known to be differentially responsive to carvone enantiomers and the consequent disruption of normal patterns of bulbar input produced in response to carvones are largely without effect on the ability of rats to discriminate between these odors.

  5. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging detects corticospinal tract involvement at multiple levels in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Toosy, A; Werring, D; Orrell, R; Howard, R; King, M; Barker, G; Miller, D; Thompson, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Histopathological studies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are of end stage disease. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides the opportunity to investigate indirectly corticospinal tract pathology of ALS in vivo. Methods: DTI was used to study the water diffusion characteristics of the corticospinal tracts in 21 patients with ALS and 14 normal controls. The authors measured the fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) along the pyramidal tracts from the internal capsules down to the pyramids. A mixed model regression analysis was used to compare FA and MD between the ALS and control groups. Results: FA showed a downward linear trend from the cerebral peduncles to the pyramids and was lower in the ALS group than controls at multiple levels of the corticospinal tract. At the internal capsules, FA was higher on the right. MD showed an upward trend, progressing caudally from the internal capsules to the pyramids. MD was higher at the level of the internal capsule in the ALS group, but caudally this difference was not maintained. No correlations were found between clinical markers of disability and water diffusion indices. Conclusions: These findings provide insights into the pathological processes of ALS. Differences in diffusion characteristics at different anatomical levels may relate to underlying tract architecture or the distribution of pathological damage in ALS. Further development may permit monitoring of progression and treatment of disease. PMID:12933929

  7. Polyomavirus detection in multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy: Profile and frequency of urinary shedding.

    PubMed

    Nali, Luiz Henrique; Fink, Maria Cristina; do Olival, Guilherme S; Moraes, Lenira; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Tilbery, Charles Peter; Vidal, Jose Ernesto; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva; Romano, Camila M

    2017-03-01

    Patients undergoing Natalizumab (NTZ) therapy are at risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Besides John Cunningham virus (JCV), BK polyomavirus might represent an additional concern for such patients since it can also infect CNS cells. Currently, data regarding the presence of anti-JCV antibodies added to previous immunosuppressive therapy and prolonged NTZ therapy has been used to classify patients at risk of developing PML. Here, we investigated the profile shedding of JCV and BKV in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during treatment with NTZ. Serial blood and urine samples from 97 MS patients receiving either NTZ or β-interferon were investigated for polyomavirus shedding. While all blood samples tested negative, 36% of the patients shed polyomavirus in the urine in at least one time point. From these, 21.7%, 9.3%, and 5.1% shed JCV, BKV, and both polyomavirus, respectively. No difference was observed between the rates of urinary shedding of patients treated with NTZ (38.9%) and patients treated with other drugs (34.5%), also no PML event was diagnosed during the follow-up. Therefore, urinary shedding might not be interfered by therapy condition. In our study, we also observed 14/27 (52%) of anti-JCV antibodies prevalence, and nearly half of them (42%) did not present any event of urinary shedding during the follow-up. J. Med. Virol. 89:528-534, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. CXCR-4 Targeted, Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Emitting Nanoprobes for Enhanced Deep Tissue Imaging and Micrometastatic Lesion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Kantamneni, Harini; Mingozzi, Marco; Kim, Paul; Adler, Derek; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Pierce, Mark; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2016-01-01

    Realizing the promise of precision medicine in cancer therapy depends on identifying and tracking of cancerous growths in order to maximize treatment options and improve patient outcomes. However, this goal of early detection remains unfulfilled by current clinical imaging techniques that fail to detect diseased lesions, due to their small size and sub-organ localization. With proper probes, optical imaging techniques can overcome this limitation by identifying the molecular phenotype of tumors at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. In this study, we propose the first use of nanophotonic short wave infrared technology to molecularly phenotype small sub-surface lesions for more sensitive detection and improved patient outcomes. To this end, we designed human serum albumin encapsulated rare-earth (RE) nanoparticles (ReANCs)[1, 2] with ligands for targeted lesion imaging. AMD3100, an antagonist to CXCR4 (a chemokine receptor involved in cell motility and a classic marker of cancer metastasis) was adsorbed onto ReANCs to form functionalized ReANCs (fReANCs). Functionalized nanoparticles were able to discriminate and preferentially accumulate in receptor positive lesions when injected intraperitoneally in a subcutaneous tumor model. Additionally, fReANCs, administered intravenously, were able to target sub-tissue tumor micro-lesions, at a maximum depth of 10.5 mm, in a lung metastatic model of breast cancer. Internal lesions identified with fReANCs were 2.25 times smaller than those detected with unfunctionalized ReANCs (p < .01) with the smallest tumor being 18.9 mm3. Thus, we present an integrated nanoprobe detection platform that allows target-specific identification of sub-tissue cancerous lesions. PMID:26514367

  9. A Feed-forward Neural Network Algorithm to Detect Thermal Lesions Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Shakhssalim, Naser; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-10-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound surgeries such as high intensity focused ultrasound have been developed to treat tumors or to stop bleeding. In this technique, incorporation of a suitable imaging modality to monitor and control the treatments is essential so several imaging methods such as X-ray, Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging have been proposed to monitor the induced thermal lesions. Currently, the only ultrasound imaging technique that is clinically used for monitoring this treatment is standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging. This paper describes a novel method for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions using a feed forward neural-network. This study was carried on in vitro animal tissue samples. Backscattered radio frequency signals were acquired in real-time during treatment in order to detect induced thermal lesions. Changes in various tissue properties including tissue's attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter, scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution, frequency dependent scatterer amplitudes and tissue vibration derived from the backscattered radio frequency data acquired 10 minutes after treatment regarding to before treatment were used in this study. These estimated parameters were used as features of the neural network. Estimated parameters of two sample tissues including two thermal lesions and their segmented B-mode images were used along with the pathological results as training data for the neural network. The results of the study shows that the trained feed forward neural network could effectively detect thermal lesions in vitro. Comparing the estimated size of the thermal lesion (9.6 mm × 8.5 mm) using neural network with the actual size of that from physical examination (10.1 mm × 9 mm) shows that we could detect high intensity focused ultrasound thermal lesions with the difference of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  10. Female sex steroids and glia cells: Impact on multiple sclerosis lesion formation and fine tuning of the local neurodegenerative cellular network.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Schmitz, Christoph; Beyer, Cordian

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease that shows a female-to-male gender prevalence and alleviation of disease activity during late stage pregnancy. In MS-related animal models, sex steroids ameliorate symptoms and protect from demyelination and neuronal damage. Underlying mechanisms of these protective avenues are continuously discovered, in part by using novel transgenic animal models. In this review article, we highlight the regulation of glia cell function by female sex steroids. We specifically focus on the relevance of glia cells for immune cell recruitment into the central nervous system and show how estrogen and progesterone can modulate these cell-cell communication pathways. Since MS is considered to have a strong neurodegenerative component, principal neuroprotective mechanisms, exerted by sex-steroids will be discussed as well. Activation of steroid receptors might not just act as immunosuppressant but at the same time harmonize brain-intrinsic networks to dampen neurodegeneration and, thus, disease progression in MS.

  11. Whole body MRI: Improved Lesion Detection and Characterization With Diffusion Weighted Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  12. Virtopsy -- noninvasive detection of occult bone lesions in postmortem MRI: additional information for traffic accident reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Buck, Ursula; Christe, Andreas; Naether, Silvio; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    In traffic accidents with pedestrians, cyclists or motorcyclists, patterned impact injuries as well as marks on clothes can be matched to the injury-causing vehicle structure in order to reconstruct the accident and identify the vehicle which has hit the person. Therefore, the differentiation of the primary impact injuries from other injuries is of great importance. Impact injuries can be identified on the external injuries of the skin, the injured subcutaneous and fat tissue, as well as the fractured bones. Another sign of impact is a bone bruise. The bone bruise, or occult bone lesion, means a bleeding in the subcortical bone marrow, which is presumed to be the result of micro-fractures of the medullar trabeculae. The aim of this study was to prove that bleeding in the subcortical bone marrow of the deceased can be detected using the postmortem noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging. This is demonstrated in five accident cases, four involving pedestrians and one a cyclist, where bone bruises were detected in different bones as a sign of impact occurring in the same location as the external and soft tissue impact injuries.

  13. Effects of visual fixation cues on the detectability of simulated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, John S.; Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    A discrepancy exists between two studies that investigated psychophysical detection of simulated lesions (e.g. gaussians or designer nodules) embedded in filtered noise images (Johnson et al, 2002; Burgess et al, 2003). Johnson et al, 2002 identified a significant difference in the slope of the contrast detail plots (CD plots) as the presentation methodology in a 2AFC task was changed from the unlike background (unpaired) to identical backgrounds (paired). In comparable experiments, Burgess et al, 2003 challenged the results by finding no difference between the slopes (both positive) of the CD plots when using paired backgrounds or unpaired backgrounds. We found that a significant difference between the two studies, namely the presence of a circular fixation cue was responsible for the discrepancy. The detection noise due to positional uncertainty was sufficient to reduce subject's threshold for small target diameters. This effect was amplified in the paired background, switching the CD plot from a negative slope (without fixation) to a positive slope (with fixation). The effect was less dramatic with the unpaired backgrounds, however intra-observer variability seemed to be reduced with fixation cues. These results significantly reduce the discrepancies in C-D characteristics between the two studies.

  14. Assessment of enamel-dentin caries lesions detection using bitewing PSP digital images

    PubMed Central

    TORRES, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; SANTOS, Aline da Silva; NEVES, Frederico Sampaio; ARRIAGA, Marcel Lautenschlager; CAMPOS, Paulo Sérgio Flores; CRUSOÉ-REBELLO, Iêda

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection of enamel-dentin occlusal caries using photostimulable phosphor plates. Material and Methods The ability to detect enamel-dentin occlusal caries in 607 premolars and molars from 47 patients between 10 and 18 years old, referred to the School of Dentistry of the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, was evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations, using the criteria proposed in a previous study. A total of 156 bitewing digital images were obtained using Digora® (Soredex Medical Systems, Helsinki, Finland) phosphor plates. The plates were scanned and the images were captured and displayed on a computer screen. Image evaluation was done using Digora® for Windows 2.1 software, Soredex®. The radiologists were allowed to use enhancement tools to obtain better visibility during scoring of the teeth based on the radiographic criteria proposed in a previous study. Descriptive analysis and chi-squared proportion tests were done at 5% significance level. Results The results of clinical examination showed a higher prevalence of teeth with a straight dark line or demineralization of the occlusal fissure (score 1) and a lower prevalence of sealed teeth (score 5). In the bitewing digital images, 47 teeth presented visible radiolucency, circumscribed, in dentin under occlusal enamel (enamel-dentin caries lesions). Conclusions Correlating the clinical and radiographic findings, it was found that in the majority of teeth diagnosed by radiographic images as having enamel-dentin caries, no caries could be detected by clinical examination. PMID:21986650

  15. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  16. Differentiation and quantification of inflammation, demyelination and axon injury or loss in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Peng; Wang, Qing; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Schmidt, Robert E; Naismith, Robert T; Cross, Anne H; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2015-05-01

    Axon injury/loss, demyelination and inflammation are the primary pathologies in multiple sclerosis lesions. Despite the prevailing notion that axon/neuron loss is the substrate of clinical progression of multiple sclerosis, the roles that these individual pathological processes play in multiple sclerosis progression remain to be defined. An imaging modality capable to effectively detect, differentiate and individually quantify axon injury/loss, demyelination and inflammation, would not only facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology underlying multiple sclerosis progression, but also the assessment of treatments at the clinical trial and individual patient levels. In this report, the newly developed diffusion basis spectrum imaging was used to discriminate and quantify the underlying pathological components in multiple sclerosis white matter. Through the multiple-tensor modelling of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging signals, diffusion basis spectrum imaging resolves inflammation-associated cellularity and vasogenic oedema in addition to accounting for partial volume effects resulting from cerebrospinal fluid contamination, and crossing fibres. Quantitative histological analysis of autopsied multiple sclerosis spinal cord specimens supported that diffusion basis spectrum imaging-determined cellularity, axon and myelin injury metrics closely correlated with those pathologies identified and quantified by conventional histological staining. We demonstrated in healthy control subjects that diffusion basis spectrum imaging rectified inaccurate assessments of diffusion properties of white matter tracts by diffusion tensor imaging in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid contamination and/or crossing fibres. In multiple sclerosis patients, we report that diffusion basis spectrum imaging quantitatively characterized the distinct pathologies underlying gadolinium-enhanced lesions, persistent black holes, non-enhanced lesions and non-black hole lesions, a

  17. Detection of benign proliferative lesions on vocal cords with voice handicap index.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuekun; Zhang, Gehua; Liu, Xiujin; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Ling

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the significance and practical applicability of the voice handicap index (VHI) in the diagnosis of benign proliferative lesions of the vocal cords (BLVCs). The detection of VHI included the calculation of functional (F), physical (P) and emotional (E) domains, and the score of each domain and total score (TVH). The VHI was scored in patients with BLVCs and healthy controls. Eighty-four patients with BLVCs and 27 healthy controls were enrolled in the present study. The F, P, E and TVH scores were 10.40±7.84, 19.88±8.81, 9.39±8.49 and 39.37±21.83, respectively, in the BLVC group and 0.78±0.97, 0.85±1.06, 0.26±0.72 and 1.89±2.31, respectively, in the control group. A significant difference was found between the two groups (P<0. 01). The daily duration of speech and course of BLVCs did not correlate with the VHI score in BLVC patients (P>0.05). There was no marked difference in the VHI score between voice-consuming and non-voice consuming occupations (P>0.05) or between males and females (P>0.05). In BLVC patients, VHI may subjectively express the voice handicap, while daily duration of speech, course of BLVC, occupation and gender have no impact on VHI.

  18. FISH analysis of intrapulmonary malignant mesothelioma without a clinically detectable primary pleural lesion: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Sato, Akitoshi; Tsubomizu, Sayuri; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Wu, Di; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-12-01

    Patients with malignant mesothelioma typically present with a pleural effusion or pleural thickening and masses. A rare autopsy case of mesothelioma presenting with multiple bilateral lung nodules without clinically detectable pleural lesions is presented. A definitive diagnosis of the video-assisted thoracic surgery specimen could not be made, though a pattern of fibrosis mimicking organizing pneumonia was identified. Despite corticosteroid therapy, follow-up chest computed tomography showed enlargement of multiple nodules accompanied by the appearance of pleural thickening and effusions. The patient died of respiratory failure 11 months after initial presentation. Autopsy and retrospective analysis of the video-assisted thoracic surgery specimen using a p16 fluorescence in situ hybridization assay showed p16 homozygous deletion. The final diagnosis was sarcomatoid mesothelioma, and the lung nodules were intrapulmonary metastases from a clinically undetectable pleural sarcomatoid mesothelioma. It is important both to consider the possibility of mesothelioma with unusual clinical, radiological and pathological presentations and to remember that p16 fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis can play an important role in the diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  19. Consortium for Molecular Characterization of Screen-Detected Lesions Created: Eight Grants Awarded | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has awarded eight grants to create the Consortium for Molecular Characterization of Screen-Detected Lesions. The consortium has seven molecular characterization laboratories (MCLs) and a coordinating center, and is supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Biology. | 7 laboratories and a coordinating center focused on identifying screening-detected pre-cancers and early cancers, including within the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy reveals microglia-associated myelin and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis-like lesions in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imitola, Jaime; Côté, Daniel; Rasmussen, Stine; Xie, X. Sunney; Liu, Yingru; Chitnis, Tanuja; Sidman, Richard L.; Lin, Charles. P.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2011-02-01

    Myelin loss and axonal degeneration predominate in many neurological disorders; however, methods to visualize them simultaneously in live tissue are unavailable. We describe a new imaging strategy combining video rate reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy tuned to CH2 vibration of myelin lipids, applied in live tissue of animals with chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our method allows monitoring over time of demyelination and neurodegeneration in brain slices with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Local areas of severe loss of lipid signal indicative of demyelination and loss of the reflectance signal from axons were seen in the corpus callosum and spinal cord of EAE animals. Even in myelinated areas of EAE mice, the intensity of myelin lipid signals is significantly reduced. Using heterozygous knock-in mice in which green fluorescent protein replaces the CX3CR1 coding sequence that labels central nervous system microglia, we find areas of activated microglia colocalized with areas of altered reflectance and CARS signals reflecting axonal injury and demyelination. Our data demonstrate the use of multimodal CARS microscopy for characterization of demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, and further confirm the critical role of microglia in chronic inflammatory neurodegeneration.

  1. Multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy reveals microglia-associated myelin and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis-like lesions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Imitola, Jaime; Côté, Daniel; Rasmussen, Stine; Xie, X. Sunney; Liu, Yingru; Chitnis, Tanuja; Sidman, Richard L.; Lin, Charles. P.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2011-01-01

    Myelin loss and axonal degeneration predominate in many neurological disorders; however, methods to visualize them simultaneously in live tissue are unavailable. We describe a new imaging strategy combining video rate reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy tuned to CH2 vibration of myelin lipids, applied in live tissue of animals with chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our method allows monitoring over time of demyelination and neurodegeneration in brain slices with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Local areas of severe loss of lipid signal indicative of demyelination and loss of the reflectance signal from axons were seen in the corpus callosum and spinal cord of EAE animals. Even in myelinated areas of EAE mice, the intensity of myelin lipid signals is significantly reduced. Using heterozygous knock-in mice in which green fluorescent protein replaces the CX3CR1 coding sequence that labels central nervous system microglia, we find areas of activated microglia colocalized with areas of altered reflectance and CARS signals reflecting axonal injury and demyelination. Our data demonstrate the use of multimodal CARS microscopy for characterization of demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, and further confirm the critical role of microglia in chronic inflammatory neurodegeneration. PMID:21361672

  2. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B ameliorates skeletal muscle lesions in a SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Yuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Ono, Yoko; Noda, Yasuhiro; Ohuchi, Kazuki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Hara, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons and subsequent muscular atrophy. The quality of life of patients with ALS is significantly improved by ameliorating muscular symptoms. We previously reported that glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB; osteoactivin) might serve as a target for ALS therapy. In the present study, superoxide dismutase 1/glycine residue 93 changed to alanine (SOD1(G93A) ) transgenic mice were used as a model of ALS. Expression of the C-terminal fragment of GPNMB was increased in the skeletal muscles of SOD1(G93A) mice and patients with sporadic ALS. SOD1(G93A) /GPNMB transgenic mice were generated to determine whether GPNMB expression ameliorates muscular symptoms. The weight and cross-sectional area of the gastrocnemius muscle, number and cross-sectional area of myofibers, and denervation of neuromuscular junctions were ameliorated in SOD1(G93A) /GPNMB vs. SOD1(G93A) mice. Furthermore, direct injection of a GPNMB expression plasmid into the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1(G93A) mice increased the numbers of myofibers and prevented myofiber atrophy. These findings suggest that GPNMB directly affects skeletal muscle and prevents muscular pathology in SOD1(G93A) mice and may therefore serve as a target for therapy of ALS.

  3. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target to lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing in...

  4. Multiple sclerosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - multiple sclerosis ... The following organizations provide information on multiple sclerosis : Multiple Sclerosis Foundation -- www.msfocus.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis National ...

  5. Tuberous Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other symptoms can be life-threatening. Tuberous sclerosis has no cure, but treatments can help symptoms. Options include medicines, educational and occupational therapy, surgery, or surgery to ...

  6. Perirhinal Cortex Lesions in Rats: Novelty Detection and Sensitivity to Interference

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rats with perirhinal cortex lesions received multiple object recognition trials within a continuous session to examine whether they show false memories. Experiment 1 focused on exploration patterns during the first object recognition test postsurgery, in which each trial contained 1 novel and 1 familiar object. The perirhinal cortex lesions reduced time spent exploring novel objects, but did not affect overall time spent exploring the test objects (novel plus familiar). Replications with subsequent cohorts of rats (Experiments 2, 3, 4.1) repeated this pattern of results. When all recognition memory data were combined (Experiments 1–4), giving totals of 44 perirhinal lesion rats and 40 surgical sham controls, the perirhinal cortex lesions caused a marginal reduction in total exploration time. That decrease in time with novel objects was often compensated by increased exploration of familiar objects. Experiment 4 also assessed the impact of proactive interference on recognition memory. Evidence emerged that prior object experience could additionally impair recognition performance in rats with perirhinal cortex lesions. Experiment 5 examined exploration levels when rats were just given pairs of novel objects to explore. Despite their perirhinal cortex lesions, exploration levels were comparable with those of control rats. While the results of Experiment 4 support the notion that perirhinal lesions can increase sensitivity to proactive interference, the overall findings question whether rats lacking a perirhinal cortex typically behave as if novel objects are familiar, that is, show false recognition. Rather, the rats retain a signal of novelty but struggle to discriminate the identity of that signal. PMID:26030425

  7. Automatic segmentation of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance images of the brain by using an outlier detection strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Li, Chao; Wang, Jie; Wei, Xiaoer; Li, Yuehua; Hui, Chun; Zhu, Yuemin; Zhang, Su

    2014-12-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are commonly observed on the magnetic resonance (MR) images of normal elderly in association with vascular risk factors, such as hypertension or stroke. An accurate WML detection provides significant information for disease tracking, therapy evaluation, and normal aging research. In this article, we present an unsupervised WML segmentation method that uses Gaussian mixture model to describe the intensity distribution of the normal brain tissues and detects the WMLs as outliers to the normal brain tissue model based on extreme value theory. The detection of WMLs is performed by comparing the probability distribution function of a one-sided normal distribution and a Gumbel distribution, which is a specific extreme value distribution. The performance of the automatic segmentation is validated on synthetic and clinical MR images with regard to different imaging sequences and lesion loads. Results indicate that the segmentation method has a favorable accuracy competitive with other state-of-the-art WML segmentation methods.

  8. A simulator for evaluating methods for the detection of lesion-deficit associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megalooikonomou, V.; Davatzikos, C.; Herskovits, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    Although much has been learned about the functional organization of the human brain through lesion-deficit analysis, the variety of statistical and image-processing methods developed for this purpose precludes a closed-form analysis of the statistical power of these systems. Therefore, we developed a lesion-deficit simulator (LDS), which generates artificial subjects, each of which consists of a set of functional deficits, and a brain image with lesions; the deficits and lesions conform to predefined distributions. We used probability distributions to model the number, sizes, and spatial distribution of lesions, to model the structure-function associations, and to model registration error. We used the LDS to evaluate, as examples, the effects of the complexities and strengths of lesion-deficit associations, and of registration error, on the power of lesion-deficit analysis. We measured the numbers of recovered associations from these simulated data, as a function of the number of subjects analyzed, the strengths and number of associations in the statistical model, the number of structures associated with a particular function, and the prior probabilities of structures being abnormal. The number of subjects required to recover the simulated lesion-deficit associations was found to have an inverse relationship to the strength of associations, and to the smallest probability in the structure-function model. The number of structures associated with a particular function (i.e., the complexity of associations) had a much greater effect on the performance of the analysis method than did the total number of associations. We also found that registration error of 5 mm or less reduces the number of associations discovered by approximately 13% compared to perfect registration. The LDS provides a flexible framework for evaluating many aspects of lesion-deficit analysis.

  9. Skin lesion-associated pathogens from Octopus vulgaris: first detection of Photobacterium swingsii, Lactococcus garvieae and betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Perrucci, S; Vanni, A; Cersini, A; Lenzi, C; De Wolf, T; Fronte, B; Guarducci, M; Susini, F

    2015-07-23

    The common octopus Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1798 is extremely important in fisheries and is a useful protein source in most Mediterranean countries. Here we investigated pathogens associated with skin lesions in 9 naturally deceased specimens that included both cultured and wild common octopus. Within 30 min after death, each octopus was stored at 4°C and microbiologically examined within 24 h. Bacterial colonies, cultured from swabs taken from the lesions, were examined using taxonomical and biochemical analyses. Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were only isolated from cultured animals. A conventional PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and sequencing were performed on 2 bacterial isolates that remained unidentified after taxonomical and biochemical analysis. The sequence results indicated that the bacteria had a 99% identity with Lactococcus garvieae and Photobacterium swingsii. L. garvieae was confirmed using a specific PCR based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region, while P. swingsii was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Although all animals examined were found to be infected by the protozoan species Aggregata octopiana localised in the intestines, it was also present in skin lesions of 2 of the animals. Betanodavirus was detected in both cultured and wild individuals by cell culture, PCR and electron microscopy. These findings are the first report of L. garvieae and betanodavirus from skin lesions of common octopus and the first identification of P. swingsii both in octopus skin lesions and in marine invertebrates in Italy.

  10. Novel method for the detection of necrotic lesions in human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, A.L.; Chen, F.M.; Taylor, C.R.

    1988-10-15

    Data are presented in support of the hypothesis that malignant tumors, containing abnormally permeable, degenerating cells, can be selectively detected using monoclonal antibodies to intracellular antigens. Biodistribution, imaging, and autoradiographic studies were performed in nude mice transplanted with four different human tumor cell lines to demonstrate the binding of radiolabeled antinuclear monoclonal antibodies within bulky tumors containing necrotic lesions. For these studies, two monoclonal antibodies, designated TNT-1 (IgG2a) and TNT-2 (IgM) were chosen since they were found to bind to abundant nuclear antigens which are retained in permeable, dying cells. F(ab')2 fragments prepared by pepsin digestion were radiolabeled with iodine-125 or iodine-131 by the iodogen method for i.v. administration. Biodistribution studies in nontumor-bearing BALB/c mice at various time intervals revealed normal patterns of antibody excretion with no accumulation of antibody in healthy organs. In contrast, biodistribution studies performed on Day 3 in tumor-bearing nude mice showed high tumor to organ ratios in those animals bearing necrotic tumors. Necrotic regions dissected at necropsy gave tumor to blood ratios as high as 131:1. Transplants having little demonstrable necrosis were found to have low tumor to blood ratios (0.4:1). Sequential imaging studies confirmed the high tumor-to-organ ratios and showed positive tumor imaging as early as 4 h. Autoradiographic studies of excised tumors showed the presence of label selectively in necrotic areas with preferential labeling over the nuclei of degenerating cells. Because of the universal presence of these nuclear antigens and the known prevalence of necrosis in tumors, this approach may be of value for the imaging and treatment of a wide variety of cancers in humans.

  11. Rituximab in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsson, Rasmus; Alping, Peter; Novakova, Lenka; Björck, Anna; Fink, Katharina; Islam-Jakobsson, Protik; Malmeström, Clas; Axelsson, Markus; Vågberg, Mattias; Sundström, Peter; Lycke, Jan; Piehl, Fredrik; Svenningsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of rituximab in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In this retrospective uncontrolled observational multicenter study, off-label rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified through the Swedish MS register. Outcome data were collected from the MS register and medical charts. Adverse events (AEs) grades 2–5 according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were recorded. Results: A total of 822 rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified: 557 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 198 secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and 67 primary progressive MS (PPMS). At baseline, 26.2% had contrast-enhancing lesions (CELs). Patients were treated with 500 or 1,000 mg rituximab IV every 6–12 months, during a mean 21.8 (SD 14.3) months. During treatment, the annualized relapse rates were 0.044 (RRMS), 0.038 (SPMS), and 0.015 (PPMS), and 4.6% of patients displayed CELs. Median Expanded Disability Status Scale remained unchanged in RRMS (p = 0.42) and increased by 0.5 and 1.0 in SPMS and PPMS, respectively (p = 0.10 and 0.25). Infusion-related AEs occurred during 7.8% of infusions and most were mild. A total of 89 AEs grades ≥2 (of which 76 infections) were recorded in 72 patients. No case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was detected. Conclusions: This is the largest cohort of patients with MS treated with rituximab reported so far. The safety, clinical, and MRI findings in this heterogeneous real-world cohort treated with different doses of rituximab were similar to those reported in previous randomized controlled trials on B-cell depletion therapy in MS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with MS, rituximab is safe and effective. PMID:27760868

  12. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Aman Mann CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute La Jolla, CA 92037-1005 REPORT DATE: April...2015 – 31 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0032 Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast...identified a peptide CISQ that targets to the stroma in premalignant lesions and binds to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in MMTV-PyMT mice

  13. In vitro evaluation of the efficacy of laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent) to detect demineralization and remineralization of smooth enamel lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Musavi, Seyed Ahmad; Kabudan, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Early detection of smooth surface lesions is important for appropriate management and monitoring of dental caries. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser fluorescence to detect demineralization and remineralization of smooth enamel surfaces. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 132 enamel blocks of semi-impacted human third molars were obtained; artificial caries lesions were induced and they were submitted to the pH-cycling process to create remineralization. Superficial microhardness (SMH) and laser fluorescence (LF) analysis were performed at baseline, after demineralization, and remineralization processes. The data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS)-16 using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Paired samples t-test, and Pearson's correlation test. Results: There was a significant difference between SMH values at baseline, after demineralization and after remineralization. Also, a statistically significant difference was observed between LF values in these three stages. The LF values increased after demineralization and then decreased after remineralization, and the SMH values decreased after demineralization and increased after remineralization. There was an inverse relationship between SMH and LF only at baseline and after demineralization, but not after remineralization. Conclusion: The results showed that LF is an appropriate method for detection of demineralization in an in vitro condition in smooth enamel lesions, but it was not so efficient in the detection of remineralization. PMID:23956542

  14. Photodynamic detection in visualisation of cutaneous and oral mucosa premalignant and malignant lesions: two clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziólkowski, Piotr; Osiecka, Beata; Gerber, Hanna; Dziedzic, Magdalena

    2008-11-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is promising method of visualisation of premalignant and malignant lesions. PDD is consisted of two main agents: special chemical compound which is called photosensitizer and light. Photosensitizer has affinity to fast proliferating cells such as pre- or malignant. During light irradiation (with proper wavelength - corresponding to absorption peak of photosensitizer) photosensitizer gains energy and passes into excited singlet state S1. Returning to basic singlet state Sn, leads to fluorescence. Due to difference between concentration of photosensitizer in lesion and normal tissue it is possible to obtain high contrast image of lesion. Case #1: 53 years old woman with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in nasal region; 20% delta-aminolevulinic acid as a precursor of photosensitizer on eucerin base was used. Case #2: 57 years old woman with multifocal oral leukoplakia on cheek mucosa and tongue; 2% chlorophyll gel as photosesitizer was used. All photographs were taken in white light without any filter and in blue and UV light with orange filter: in both cases the total area of the lesions appeared to be larger than it has been clinically observed. Thus, the PDD might be helpful in evaluation of margins of surgical excision of such lesions.

  15. Perirhinal cortex lesions impair tests of object recognition memory but spare novelty detection.

    PubMed

    Olarte-Sánchez, Cristian M; Amin, Eman; Warburton, E Clea; Aggleton, John P

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined why perirhinal cortex lesions in rats impair the spontaneous ability to select novel objects in preference to familiar objects, when both classes of object are presented simultaneously. The study began by repeating this standard finding, using a test of delayed object recognition memory. As expected, the perirhinal cortex lesions reduced the difference in exploration times for novel vs. familiar stimuli. In contrast, the same rats with perirhinal cortex lesions appeared to perform normally when the preferential exploration of novel vs. familiar objects was tested sequentially, i.e. when each trial consisted of only novel or only familiar objects. In addition, there was no indication that the perirhinal cortex lesions reduced total levels of object exploration for novel objects, as would be predicted if the lesions caused novel stimuli to appear familiar. Together, the results show that, in the absence of perirhinal cortex tissue, rats still receive signals of object novelty, although they may fail to link that information to the appropriate object. Consequently, these rats are impaired in discriminating the source of object novelty signals, leading to deficits on simultaneous choice tests of recognition.

  16. Puppy line, metaphyseal sclerosis, and caudolateral curvilinear and circumferential femoral head osteophytes in early detection of canine hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Risler, Amanda; Klauer, Julia M; Keuler, Nicholas S; Adams, William M

    2009-01-01

    Ventrodorsal extended hip radiographs were analyzed from Foxhounds, Irish setters, Greyhounds, and Labrador retrievers radiographed four to seven times between 8 and 110 weeks of age. Occurrence in these 91 dogs of a puppy line, an ill-defined zone of proximal femoral metaphyseal sclerosis, a femoral neck linear sclerosis, or circumferential linear femoral head osteophytosis at 15-17 weeks of age were compared with hip joint laxity, as measured by distraction index, and to later findings of caudal curvilinear femoral neck osteophytes, circumferential femoral head osteophytes, hip incongruity consistent with hip dysplasia and degenerative joint disease by 52 weeks of age. A puppy line and/or femoral metaphyseal sclerosis was common at 15-17 weeks of age for dogs at mimimal risk (Greyhounds) and high risk (Foxhounds) of developing early degenerative joint disease associated with canine hip dysplasia. Though 44% of Greyhound hips had puppy lines and 28% had femoral metaphyseal sclerosis at 15-17 weeks of age, no Greyhound had a caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte or circumferential femoral head osteophyte at 24-27 or 52 weeks of age. No significant relationship was found between occurrence of a puppy line, a circumferential femoral head osteophyte or femoral metaphyseal sclerosis at 15-17 weeks and canine hip dysplasia or degenerative joint disease incidence at 42-52 weeks. Presence of a caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte in at least one hip at 24-27 weeks was significantly related to the diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia by 42-52 weeks. When both a caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte and a circumferential femoral head osteophyte were present in a hip at 24-27 weeks, degenerative joint disease was evident in all such hips by 42-52 weeks of age.

  17. Detection of retinal lesions in diabetic retinopathy: comparative evaluation of 7-field digital color photography versus red-free photography.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sharma, Reetika; Vashist, Nagender; Vohra, Rajpal; Garg, Satpal

    2015-10-01

    Red-free light allows better detection of vascular lesions as this wavelength is absorbed by hemoglobin; however, the current gold standard for the detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy remains 7-field color fundus photography. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of 7-field fundus photography using red-free light to detect retinopathy lesions with corresponding images captured using standard 7-field color photography. Non-stereoscopic standard 7-field 30° digital color fundus photography and 7-field 30° digital red-free fundus photography were performed in 200 eyes of 103 patients with various grades of diabetic retinopathy ranging from mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The color images (n = 1,400) were studied with corresponding red-free images (n = 1,400) by one retina consultant (PV) and two senior residents training in retina. The various retinal lesions [microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, soft exudates, intra-retinal microvascular anomalies (IRMA), neovascularization of the retina elsewhere (NVE), and neovascularization of the disc (NVD)] detected by all three observers in each of the photographs were noted followed by determination of agreement scores using κ values (range 0-1). Kappa coefficient was categorized as poor (≤0), slight (0.01-0.20), fair (0.2 -0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), substantial (0.61-0.80), and almost perfect (0.81-1). The number of lesions detected by red-free images alone was higher for all observers and all abnormalities except hard exudates. Detection of IRMA was especially higher for all observers with red-free images. Between image pairs, there was substantial agreement for detection of hard exudates (average κ = 0.62, range 0.60-0.65) and moderate agreement for detection of hemorrhages (average κ = 0.52, range 0.45-0.58), soft exudates (average κ = 0.51, range 0.42-0.61), NVE (average κ = 0.47, range 0.39-0.53), and NVD

  18. Effect of 18F-FDG uptake time on lesion detectability in PET imaging of early stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Kurland, Brenda F.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Prior reports have suggested that delayed FDG-PET oncology imaging can improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for known lesions. Our goal was to estimate realistic bounds for lesion detectability for static measurements with one to four hours between FDG injection and image acquisition. Tumor and normal tissue kinetic model parameters were estimated from dynamic PET studies of patients with early stage breast cancer. These were used to generate time-activity curves (TACs) out to four hours, for which we assumed both nonreversible and reversible models with different rates of FDG dephosphorylation (k4). For each pair of tumor and normal tissue TACs, 600 PET sinogram realizations were generated, and images were reconstructed using OSEM. Test statistics for each tumor and normal tissue region of interest were output from the computer model observers and evaluated using an ROC analysis with the calculated AUC providing a measure of lesion detectability. For the nonreversible model (k4 = 0), the AUC increased in 11/23 (48%) of patients for one to two hours after the current standard post-radiotracer injection imaging window of one hour. This improvement was driven by increased tumor/normal tissue contrast before the impact of increased noise due to radiotracer decay began to dominate the imaging signal. As k4 was increased from 0 to 0.01 min−1, the time of maximum detectability shifted earlier, as the decreasing FDG concentration in the tumor lowered the CNR. These results imply that delayed PET imaging may reveal low-conspicuity lesions that would have otherwise gone undetected. PMID:26807443

  19. Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy to detect malignant and potentially malignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Craig; Brown, Brian H; Hearnden, Vanessa; Speight, Paul M; D'Apice, Katy; Hegarty, Anne M; Tidy, John A; Healey, T Jamie; Highfield, Peter E; Thornhill, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues depend on their architecture and cellular composition. We have previously shown that changes in electrical impedance can be used to differentiate between different degrees of cervical dysplasia and cancer of the cervix. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to determine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could distinguish between normal oral mucosa; benign, potentially malignant lesions (PML); and oral cancer. EIS data were collected from oral cancer (n=10), PML (n=27), and benign (n=10) lesions. EIS from lesions was compared with the EIS reading from the normal mucosa on the contralateral side of the mouth or with reference spectra from mucosal sites of control subjects (n=51). Healthy controls displayed significant differences in the EIS obtained from different oral sites. In addition, there were significant differences in the EIS of cancer and high-risk PML versus low-risk PML and controls. There was no significant difference between benign lesions and normal controls. Study subjects also deemed the EIS procedure considerably less painful and more convenient than the scalpel biopsy procedure. EIS shows promise at distinguishing among malignant, PML, and normal oral mucosa and has the potential to be developed into a clinical diagnostic tool.

  20. Treponemes Detected in Digital Dermatitis Lesions in Brazilian Dairy Cattle and Possible Host Reservoirs of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Ligia Valéria; Mauerwerk, Marlise Teresinha; dos Santos, Cibelli Lopes; de Barros Filho, Ivan Roque; Birgel Júnior, Eduardo Harry; Madeira, Humberto Maciel França

    2015-01-01

    The main pathogenic treponemes causing bovine digital dermatitis were identified from 17 infected herds in southern Brazil for the first time in this study using PCR. We did not find a relationship between treponeme phylogroup composition and clinical classification. Treponema phagedenis was present in all lesions. Rumen fluid was implicated as a reservoir location for these pathogens. PMID:25788552

  1. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    characterized by distinct phenotypic changes that occur in the mammary gland . We proposed to utilize this animal model to probe early stage...of the matrix in the mammary glands containing the early cancer lesions. On further analysis, we determined that CSG peptide co-localizes with

  2. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p < 0.001 in all cases. The value of β was also found to be associated with patient age and

  3. Label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for detection of colorectal cancer and precursor lesions using blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangyuan; Wang, Wenbo; Tai, Isabella T.; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Fecal based tests have limited diagnostic values in detecting adenomatous polyps, the precursor lesions to colorectal cancer (CRC). Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using silver nanoparticles as substrate is a multiplexed analytical technique capable of detecting biomolecules with high sensitivity. This study utilizes SERS to analyze blood plasma for detecting both CRC and adenomatous polyps for the first time. Blood plasma samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with adenomas and CRC. Using a real-time Raman system, SERS spectra for blood plasma samples are measured in 1 s. The collected SERS spectra are analyzed with partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Classification of normal versus CRC plus adenomatous polyps achieved diagnostic sensitivity of 86.4% and specificity of 80%. The results suggest that blood plasma SERS analysis could be a potential screening test to detect both CRC and adenomas. PMID:26417518

  4. Label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for detection of colorectal cancer and precursor lesions using blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangyuan; Wang, Wenbo; Tai, Isabella T; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-09-01

    Fecal based tests have limited diagnostic values in detecting adenomatous polyps, the precursor lesions to colorectal cancer (CRC). Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using silver nanoparticles as substrate is a multiplexed analytical technique capable of detecting biomolecules with high sensitivity. This study utilizes SERS to analyze blood plasma for detecting both CRC and adenomatous polyps for the first time. Blood plasma samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with adenomas and CRC. Using a real-time Raman system, SERS spectra for blood plasma samples are measured in 1 s. The collected SERS spectra are analyzed with partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Classification of normal versus CRC plus adenomatous polyps achieved diagnostic sensitivity of 86.4% and specificity of 80%. The results suggest that blood plasma SERS analysis could be a potential screening test to detect both CRC and adenomas.

  5. Ability of laser fluorescence device associated with fluorescent dyes in detecting and quantifying early smooth surface caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; de Oliveira, Elisabeth; de Faria, Dalva Lúcia Araújo; Nicolau, José

    2006-01-01

    A laser fluorescence (LF) device is a portable tool, but it does not measure minor mineral changes. Our in vitro study aim is to propose the association of an LF with two fluorescent dyes and to evaluate the performance in detecting and quantifying early demineralization. Artificial caries lesions are created in 40 primary canine teeth using a demineralizing solution (pH=4.8) for 12, 24, 48, and 96 h. LF measurements are performed with DIAGNOdent after demineralization in these samples and in 20 sound primary teeth. Measurements with LF with 0.2-mM tetrakis(N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin (LF TMPyP) and with 4-mM protoporphyrin IX (LF PPIX) are made. The amount of calcium loss is determined by atomic emission spectrometry. A correlation between LF and LF with dyes and mineral loss and receiver operating characteristics analysis are performed, as well as comparisons of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values. Significant correlation is obtained with LF TMPyP and mineral loss of lesions demineralized for 24, 48, and 96 h. Better performance is achieved with LF TMPyP for all parameters than with LF alone. LF PPIX does not present good results. In conclusion, LF TMPyP provides good performance in detecting and quantifying very early enamel caries lesions.

  6. In vivo detection and replication studies of α-anomeric lesions of 2′-deoxyribonucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Nicholas J.; Zhai, Qianqian; Navarro, Diana C.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, arising from endogenous metabolism or exposure to environmental agents, may perturb the transmission of genetic information by blocking DNA replication and/or inducing mutations, which contribute to the development of cancer and likely other human diseases. Hydroxyl radical attack on the C1′, C3′ and C4′ of 2-deoxyribose can give rise to epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions, for which the in vivo occurrence and biological consequences remain largely unexplored. Through independent chemical syntheses of all three epimeric lesions of 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrated unambiguously the presence of substantial levels of the α-anomer of dG (α-dG) in calf thymus DNA and in DNA isolated from mouse pancreatic tissues. We further assessed quantitatively the impact of all four α-dN lesions on DNA replication in Escherichia coli by employing a shuttle-vector method. We found that, without SOS induction, all α-dN lesions except α-dA strongly blocked DNA replication and, while replication across α-dA was error-free, replicative bypass of α-dC and α-dG yielded mainly C→A and G→A mutations. In addition, SOS induction could lead to markedly elevated bypass efficiencies for the four α-dN lesions, abolished the G→A mutation for α-dG, pronouncedly reduced the C→A mutation for α-dC and triggered T→A mutation for α-dT. The preferential misincorporation of dTMP opposite the α-dNs could be attributed to the unique base-pairing properties of the nucleobases elicited by the inversion of the configuration of the N-glycosidic linkage. Our results also revealed that Pol V played a major role in bypassing α-dC, α-dG and α-dT in vivo. The abundance of α-dG in mammalian tissue and the impact of the α-dNs on DNA replication demonstrate for the first time the biological significance of this family of DNA lesions. PMID:26202973

  7. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  8. Automated metastatic brain lesion detection: a computer aided diagnostic and clinical research tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Jeremy; Sahgal, Arjun; Karam, Irene; Martel, Anne L.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate localization of brain metastases in magnetic resonance (MR) images is crucial for patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to ensure that all neoplastic foci are targeted. Computer automated tumor localization and analysis can improve both of these tasks by eliminating inter and intra-observer variations during the MR image reading process. Lesion localization is accomplished using adaptive thresholding to extract enhancing objects. Each enhancing object is represented as a vector of features which includes information on object size, symmetry, position, shape, and context. These vectors are then used to train a random forest classifier. We trained and tested the image analysis pipeline on 3D axial contrast-enhanced MR images with the intention of localizing the brain metastases. In our cross validation study and at the most effective algorithm operating point, we were able to identify 90% of the lesions at a precision rate of 60%.

  9. A heat transfer model of skin tissue for the detection of lesions: sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cetingül, M Pirtini; Herman, C

    2010-10-07

    In this paper, we study the transient thermal response of skin layers to determine to which extent the surface temperature distribution reflects the properties of subsurface structures, such as benign or malignant lesions. Specifically, we conduct a detailed sensitivity analysis to interpret the changes in the surface temperature distribution as a function of variations in thermophysical properties, blood perfusion rate, metabolic heat generation and thicknesses of skin layers, using a multilayer computational model. These properties can vary from individual to individual or depend on location, external and internal influences, and in certain situations accurate property data are not available in the literature. Therefore, the uncertainties in these data could potentially affect the accuracy of the interpretation/diagnosis of a lesion in a clinical setting. In this study, relevant parameters were varied within characteristic physiological ranges, and differences in the surface temperature response were quantified. It was observed that variations in these parameters have a small influence on the surface temperature distribution. Analysis using this multilayer model was further conducted to determine the sensitivity of transient thermal response to different lesion sizes. This work validates the idea of examining the transient thermal response obtained using a thermal imaging system with the objective of lesion identification. The modeling effort and the sensitivity analysis reported in this paper comprise a portion of a comprehensive research effort involving experimentation on a skin phantom model as well as measurements on patients in a clinical setting, that are currently underway. One of the preliminary results from the ongoing clinical trial is also included to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. Spectrum of intra-thoracic lesion detected by computed tomography guided fine needle aspiration biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a rapid, sensitive and inexpensive procedure for diagnosing benign and malignant palpable lesions. For lesions that are not palpable or deep seated, FNAB can be performed under the guidance of radiological imaging. Our basic objective was to evaluate the spectrum of intrathoracic lesions by using Computed Tomography guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and evaluate its diagnostic yield. Methodology It was a retrospective study carried out in the Department of Histopathology, Liaquat National Hospital and Medical College, during the months of August 2011 and August 2012. All patients with pulmonary, mediastinal or paravertebral mass who underwent CT guided intrathoracic biopsy were included in this study. Fine needle aspiration biopsies were performed in the Radiology Department and specimen retrieved was sent in 10% buffered Formalin to the Histopathology Department. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19.0. Results A total of 130 cases were evaluated, out of which 108 (83.1%) were pulmonary, 16 (12.3%) were mediastinal and 6 (4.6%) were paravertebral. Conclusive biopsies were possible in 113 cases, while 17 biopsies were inconclusive. In those that showed a conclusive diagnosis, 83.1% were neoplastic and 16.9% were non neoplastic. Of the neoplastic cases, 27 (20.8%) were adenocarcinomas, followed by squamous cell carcinomas (15.4%) and large cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified, (12.3%). Conclusion CT guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is a reliable tool for examination of intrathoracic lesions, with a high rate of conclusive diagnosis. PMID:23402220

  11. Detection of rotaviruses and intestinal lesions in broiler chicks from flocks with runting and stunting syndrome (RSS).

    PubMed

    Otto, Peter; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Elschner, Mandy; Reetz, Jochen; Löhren, Ulrich; Diller, Roland

    2006-09-01

    The intestinal tract and intestinal contents were collected from 34 stunted, 5-to-14-day-old broiler chicks from eight flocks with runting and stunting syndrome (RSS) in Northern Germany to investigate intestinal lesions and the presence of enteric pathogens with a special focus on rotaviruses (RVs). Seven chicks from a healthy flock were used as controls. Severe villous atrophy was seen in chicks from six flocks with RSS but not in the control flock. Lesions were often "regionally" distributed in the middle-to-distal small intestine. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (PAGE), reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and seminested RT-PCR were used for detection and characterization of RVs. The PAGE allows discrimination of different RV groups, and the RT-PCR was used to verify the presence of group (gp) A RVs. RVs were detected (by all methods) in 32 of 34 chicks from the flocks with RSS. By TEM (negative staining), RV particles were observed in intestinal contents of 28 chicks from the flocks with RSS. PAGE analysis showed four RV groups: gpA, gpD, gpF, and gpG. Group A RVs were detected in four chicks from two flocks with RSS, without intestinal lesions. GpD RVs were detected in 12 chicks of five flocks with RSS, 10 of them with severe villous atrophy. GpF RVs were confirmed in four chicks from three flocks with RSS and in two birds in the control flock. GpG RVs were verified in two chicks from two flocks with RSS, one with, and one without, intestinal lesions. At present, PCR methods are only available for detection of gpA RVs. Using RT-PCR, gpA RVs were identified in samples from 22 chicks including samples of two chicks from the control flock. Statistical analysis revealed a positive correlation between presence of gpD RV and severe villous atrophy in flocks with RSS. The results suggest that gpD RV plays a major role in the pathogenesis of RSS.

  12. Bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Mariana Inés; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Araújo, Carolina Reis; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2007-12-01

    Bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Although research in this area is limited, studies assessing the nature of this association have focused on genetic aspects, adverse reaction to drugs and brain demyelinating lesions. Herein we report three patients with MS that also presented bipolar disorder. The coexistence of neurological and psychiatric symptoms in most MS relapses highlights the relevance of biological factors in the emergence of mood disorders in these patients.

  13. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  14. Reversible hippocampal lesions detected on magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of transient selective amnesia for simple machine operation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yumiko; Bandoh, Mitsuaki; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases involving the development of transient selective retrograde amnesia for simple machine operation lasting for several hours. A 61-year-old male taxi driver suddenly became unable to operate a taximeter, and a 66-year-old female janitor suddenly became unable to use a fax machine. They could precisely recount their episodes to others both during and after the attacks, and their memories during their attacks corresponded to the memory of the witness and the medical records of the doctor, respectively. Therefore, it appears that these individuals remained alert and did not develop anterograde amnesia during their attacks. On day 4, they underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and diffusion-weighted MRI with 2-mm section thickness revealed small high-intensity signal lesions in the left hippocampal cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) region. However, these lesions disappeared during the chronic phase. This is the first report describing lesions detected by MRI in patients with transient selective amnesia without anterograde amnesia. Reversible damage to the hippocampal CA1 region may cause transient selective amnesia by impairing the retrieval of relevant memories.

  15. Utility of fractional anisotropy imaging analyzed by statistical parametric mapping for detecting minute brain lesions in chronic-stage patients who had mild or moderate traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Okumura, Ayumi; Aki, Tatsuki; Takenaka, Shunsuke; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Mikito; Ito, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has recently evolved as valuable technique to investigate diffuse axonal injury (DAI). This study examined whether fractional anisotropy (FA) images analyzed by statistical parametric mapping (FA-SPM images) are superior to T(2)*-weighted gradient recalled echo (T2*GRE) images or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images for detecting minute lesions in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. DTI was performed in 25 patients with cognitive impairments in the chronic stage after mild or moderate TBI. The FA maps obtained from the DTI were individually compared with those from age-matched healthy control subjects using voxel-based analysis and FA-SPM images (p < 0.001). Abnormal low-intensity areas on T2*GRE images (T2* lesions) were found in 10 patients (40.0%), abnormal high-intensity areas on FLAIR images in 4 patients (16.0%), and areas with significantly decreased FA on FA-SPM image in 16 patients (64.0%). Nine of 10 patients with T2* lesions had FA-SPM lesions. FA-SPM lesions topographically included most T2* lesions in the white matter and the deep brain structures, but did not include T2* lesions in the cortex/near-cortex or lesions containing substantial hemosiderin regardless of location. All 4 patients with abnormal areas on FLAIR images had FA-SPM lesions. FA-SPM imaging is useful for detecting minute lesions because of DAI in the white matter and the deep brain structures, which may not be visualized on T2*GRE or FLAIR images, and may allow the detection of minute brain lesions in patients with post-traumatic cognitive impairment.

  16. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  17. Detection of Carious Lesions and Restorations Using Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Naebi, Mohammad; Saberi, Eshaghali; Risbaf Fakour, Sirous; Naebi, Ahmad; Hosseini Tabatabaei, Somayeh; Ansari Moghadam, Somayeh; Bozorgmehr, Elham; Davtalab Behnam, Nasim; Azimi, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. In terms of the detection of tooth diagnosis, no intelligent detection has been done up till now. Dentists just look at images and then they can detect the diagnosis position in tooth based on their experiences. Using new technologies, scientists will implement detection and repair of tooth diagnosis intelligently. In this paper, we have introduced one intelligent method for detection using particle swarm optimization (PSO) and our mathematical formulation. This method was applied to 2D special images. Using developing of our method, we can detect tooth diagnosis for all of 2D and 3D images. Materials and Methods. In recent years, it is possible to implement intelligent processing of images by high efficiency optimization algorithms in many applications especially for detection of dental caries and restoration without human intervention. In the present work, we explain PSO algorithm with our detection formula for detection of dental caries and restoration. Also image processing helped us to implement our method. And to do so, pictures taken by digital radiography systems of tooth are used. Results and Conclusion. We implement some mathematics formula for fitness of PSO. Our results show that this method can detect dental caries and restoration in digital radiography pictures with the good convergence. In fact, the error rate of this method was 8%, so that it can be implemented for detection of dental caries and restoration. Using some parameters, it is possible that the error rate can be even reduced below 0.5%. PMID:27212947

  18. Rotation-invariant multi-contrast non-local means for MS lesion segmentation.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Nicolas; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S; Manjón, Jose V; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion segmentation is crucial for evaluating disease burden, determining disease progression and measuring the impact of new clinical treatments. MS lesions can vary in size, location and intensity, making automatic segmentation challenging. In this paper, we propose a new supervised method to segment MS lesions from 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images using non-local means (NLM). The method uses a multi-channel and rotation-invariant distance measure to account for the diversity of MS lesions. The proposed segmentation method, rotation-invariant multi-contrast non-local means segmentation (RMNMS), captures the MS lesion spatial distribution and can accurately and robustly identify lesions regardless of their orientation, shape or size. An internal validation on a large clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of MS patients demonstrated a good similarity measure result (Dice similarity = 60.1% and sensitivity = 75.4%), a strong correlation between expert and automatic lesion load volumes (R(2) = 0.91), and a strong ability to detect lesions of different sizes and in varying spatial locations (lesion detection rate = 79.8%). On the independent MS Grand Challenge (MSGC) dataset validation, our method provided competitive results with state-of-the-art supervised and unsupervised methods. Qualitative visual and quantitative voxel- and lesion-wise evaluations demonstrated the accuracy of RMNMS method.

  19. New contrast-detail phantoms for improved precision in lesion detection measurements.

    PubMed

    Smith, S W; Insana, M F; Lopez, H

    1989-01-01

    The previous design of our ultrasound contrast-detail (C-D) phantom is limited in its ability to evaluate the quality of diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems. There is uncertainty in the contrast-detail measurements due to the single available viewing angle for each target and the resulting single realization of the ultrasound speckle pattern. Two new contrast-detail phantom designs are described which enable many independent realizations of the speckle noise for observer C-D experiments of improved precision. In the first design, a single tissue-mimicking cone is located on the axis of a tissue-mimicking cylinder. Cross-sectional images of the cone which simulate focal lesions can be obtained from any orientation by rotating the cylinder under the transducer. In the second new design, a tissue-mimicking cone is positioned in a tissue-mimicking slurry of agar/graphite spheres. Gentle stirring of the slurry and rotation of the cone produce many independent realizations of the speckle. In both new phantoms, the lesion contrast can be specified and is frequency/transducer independent.

  20. Comparison of Color Fundus Photography, Infrared Fundus Photography, and Optical Coherence Tomography in Detecting Retinal Hamartoma in Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Da-Yong; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Jun-Yang; Li, Li; Gao, Jun; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sensitive method is required to detect retinal hamartomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The aim of the present study was to compare the color fundus photography, infrared imaging (IFG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the detection rate of retinal hamartoma in patients with TSC. Methods: This study included 11 patients (22 eyes) with TSC, who underwent color fundus photography, IFG, and spectral-domain OCT to detect retinal hamartomas. TSC1 and TSC2 mutations were tested in eight patients. Results: The mean age of the 11 patients was 8.0 ± 2.1 years. The mean spherical equivalent was −0.55 ± 1.42 D by autorefraction with cycloplegia. In 11 patients (22 eyes), OCT, infrared fundus photography, and color fundus photography revealed 26, 18, and 9 hamartomas, respectively. The predominant hamartoma was type I (55.6%). All the hamartomas that detected by color fundus photography or IFG can be detected by OCT. Conclusion: Among the methods of color fundus photography, IFG, and OCT, the OCT has higher detection rate for retinal hamartoma in TSC patients; therefore, OCT might be promising for the clinical diagnosis of TSC. PMID:27174333

  1. Molecular detection of Canine distemper virus and the immunohistochemical characterization of the neurologic lesions in naturally occurring old dog encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn A; Amude, Alexandre M; Alfieri, Alice F; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L; Alfieri, Amauri A; Summers, Brian A

    2009-09-01

    The current article describes a spontaneous case of old dog encephalitis (ODE) in a 7-year-old, intact, female Miniature Schnauzer dog from Londrina, Paraná, southern Brazil. Unlike conventional distemper encephalomyelitis, ODE is a poorly understood and extremely rare manifestation of Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection. The dog was presented with progressive clinical manifestations consistent with cerebral dysfunction. Briefly, histopathologic lesions were restricted to the forebrain and included chronic multifocal lymphoplasmacytic encephalitis with extensive perivascular cuffing, astrocytosis, and intranuclear inclusions within astrocytes and giant cells, with both intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to identify the antigens of the nucleoprotein (NP) of CDV and to detect cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD79a, macrophage (MAC) 387, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and vimentin to characterize the neuroparenchymal lesions. By IHC, CDV NP was demonstrated predominantly within neurons and astrocytes. Cells that formed perivascular cuffs and some astrocyte-like cells reacted intensely to vimentin. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay from brain sections further confirmed a role for CDV in this disease by the amplification and partial sequence analysis of the NP gene. These findings confirmed simultaneous detection of CDV in ODE by IHC and molecular assays. In addition, results of the current study could contribute to the neuropathologic characterization of this rare manifestation of CDV.

  2. Fine mapping of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain gene 1 failed to detect a significant association with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grabmer, C; Nachbauer, W; Schanda, K; Feurle, P; Loacker, K; Scholz, E; Schennach, H; Berger, T; Reindl, M; Gassner, C

    2010-03-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) gene family encodes receptors on T-cells that regulate Th1- and Th2-cell-mediated immunity. Recently published data implied differential expression of human TIM molecules by mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and might therefore be involved in different phases of the pathogenesis of MS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of TIM1 gene polymorphism with susceptibility to and clinical progression in MS. In total, 272 patients with MS and 272 sex- and age-matched healthy blood donors from Western Austria were genotyped for 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Five SNPs were located in the promoter region of TIM1 (rs7702920, rs41297577, rs41297579, rs9313422 and rs34333511). Another five SNPs were selected in exon 4 (rs1553316 and rs12522248) and in the intronic regions 4 and 7 of TIM1 (rs1553318, rs2279804 and rs2277025), respectively. None of these SNPs showed a significant association with MS after correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype analysis of our data resulted in 11 haplotypes and showed no significant differences between MS patients and controls. Our findings suggest that even fine mapping of TIM1 shows no significant association of this gene with multiple sclerosis.

  3. Novel Approaches to Detect Serum Biomarkers for Clinical Response to Interferon-β Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Kaushal S.; McKay, Fiona C.; Diefenbach, Eve; Crossett, Ben; Schibeci, Stephen D.; Heard, Robert N.; Stewart, Graeme J.; Booth, David R.; Arthur, Jonathan W.

    2010-01-01

    Interferon beta (IFNβ) is the most common immunomodulatory treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). However, some patients fail to respond to treatment. In this study, we identified putative clinical response markers in the serum and plasma of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFNβ. In a discovery-driven approach, we use 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify putative clinical response markers and apply power calculations to identify the sample size required to further validate those markers. In the process we have optimized a DIGE protocol for plasma to obtain cost effective and high resolution gels for effective spot comparison. APOA1, A2M, and FIBB were identified as putative clinical response markers. Power calculations showed that the current DIGE experiment requires a minimum of 10 samples from each group to be confident of 1.5 fold difference at the p<0.05 significance level. In a complementary targeted approach, Cytometric Beadarray (CBA) analysis showed no significant difference in the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-8, MIG, Eotaxin, IP-10, MCP-1, and MIP-1α, between clinical responders and non-responders, despite the association of these proteins with IFNβ treatment in MS. PMID:20463963

  4. Novel approaches to detect serum biomarkers for clinical response to interferon-beta treatment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kaushal S; McKay, Fiona C; Diefenbach, Eve; Crossett, Ben; Schibeci, Stephen D; Heard, Robert N; Stewart, Graeme J; Booth, David R; Arthur, Jonathan W

    2010-05-05

    Interferon beta (IFNbeta) is the most common immunomodulatory treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). However, some patients fail to respond to treatment. In this study, we identified putative clinical response markers in the serum and plasma of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFNbeta. In a discovery-driven approach, we use 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify putative clinical response markers and apply power calculations to identify the sample size required to further validate those markers. In the process we have optimized a DIGE protocol for plasma to obtain cost effective and high resolution gels for effective spot comparison. APOA1, A2M, and FIBB were identified as putative clinical response markers. Power calculations showed that the current DIGE experiment requires a minimum of 10 samples from each group to be confident of 1.5 fold difference at the p<0.05 significance level. In a complementary targeted approach, Cytometric Beadarray (CBA) analysis showed no significant difference in the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-8, MIG, Eotaxin, IP-10, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha, between clinical responders and non-responders, despite the association of these proteins with IFNbeta treatment in MS.

  5. Detection of anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin IgG antibodies by line immunoblot assay has comparable clinical significance to immunoprecipitation testing in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Jaskowski, Troy D; Mayes, Maureen D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance and clinical relevance of a commercially available line immunoblot assay (LIA) for detecting anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin (anti-U3-RNP), against immunoprecipitation (gold standard). This study involved a multi-ethnic cohort of 1000 American systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients and 50 healthy controls. Antinuclear antibodies and centromere antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescent antibody test, anti-topo I by immunodiffusion and anti-RNAP III by ELISA. The presence of anti-U3-RNP in select serum samples was detected by immunoprecipitation (IP) and LIA. By IP, U3-RNP antibody was detected in 75 (7.5 %) patients with SSc. Overall agreement between LIA and IP was very good (κ = 0.966). Analytic sensitivity and specificity of the U3-RNP LIA was 100 and 94.7 %, respectively. Clinical features associated with positivity for the anti-U3-RNP antibody include diffuse cutaneous SSc and increased prevalence of renal crisis, consistent with previous studies that used IP. Testing for U3-RNP antibodies is only performed by a small number of laboratories due to the complexity of both performance and interpretation of the IP. LIA is faster and less complex than IP. Excellent agreement between IP and LIA demonstrates that LIA is an acceptable and attractive alternative to IP for anti-U3-RNP detection.

  6. A Novel Method Based on Learning Automata for Automatic Lesion Detection in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Leila; Azmi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. In this way, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful tool for the detection of breast cancer. Breast MRI presently has two major challenges. First, its specificity is relatively poor, and it detects many false positives (FPs). Second, the method involves acquiring several high-resolution image volumes before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. The large volume of data makes the task of interpretation by the radiologist both complex and time-consuming. These challenges have led to the development of the computer-aided detection systems to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the interpretation process. Detection of suspicious regions of interests (ROIs) is a critical preprocessing step in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data evaluation. In this regard, this paper introduces a new automatic method to detect the suspicious ROIs for breast DCE-MRI based on region growing. The results indicate that the proposed method is thoroughly able to identify suspicious regions (accuracy of 75.39 ± 3.37 on PIDER breast MRI dataset). Furthermore, the FP per image in this method is averagely 7.92, which shows considerable improvement comparing to other methods like ROI hunter. PMID:25298929

  7. Computerized detection of breast lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument DCE-MR data using 3D principal component maps and template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertas, Gokhan; Doran, Simon; Leach, Martin O.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we introduce a novel, robust and accurate computerized algorithm based on volumetric principal component maps and template matching that facilitates lesion detection on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR. The study dataset comprises 24 204 contrast-enhanced breast MR images corresponding to 4034 axial slices from 47 women in the UK multi-centre study of MRI screening for breast cancer and categorized as high risk. The scans analysed here were performed on six different models of scanner from three commercial vendors, sited in 13 clinics around the UK. 1952 slices from this dataset, containing 15 benign and 13 malignant lesions, were used for training. The remaining 2082 slices, with 14 benign and 12 malignant lesions, were used for test purposes. To prevent false positives being detected from other tissues and regions of the body, breast volumes are segmented from pre-contrast images using a fast semi-automated algorithm. Principal component analysis is applied to the centred intensity vectors formed from the dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images of the segmented breasts, followed by automatic thresholding to eliminate fatty tissues and slowly enhancing normal parenchyma and a convolution and filtering process to minimize artefacts from moderately enhanced normal parenchyma and blood vessels. Finally, suspicious lesions are identified through a volumetric sixfold neighbourhood connectivity search and calculation of two morphological features: volume and volumetric eccentricity, to exclude highly enhanced blood vessels, nipples and normal parenchyma and to localize lesions. This provides satisfactory lesion localization. For a detection sensitivity of 100%, the overall false-positive detection rate of the system is 1.02/lesion, 1.17/case and 0.08/slice, comparing favourably with previous studies. This approach may facilitate detection of lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MR data.

  8. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS.

  9. Developing a new case based computer-aided detection scheme and an adaptive cueing method to improve performance in detecting mammographic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new method to improve performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of screening mammograms with two approaches. In the first approach, we developed a new case based CAD scheme using a set of optimally selected global mammographic density, texture, spiculation, and structural similarity features computed from all four full-field digital mammography images of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views by using a modified fast and accurate sequential floating forward selection feature selection algorithm. Selected features were then applied to a ‘scoring fusion’ artificial neural network classification scheme to produce a final case based risk score. In the second approach, we combined the case based risk score with the conventional lesion based scores of a conventional lesion based CAD scheme using a new adaptive cueing method that is integrated with the case based risk scores. We evaluated our methods using a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on 924 cases (476 cancer and 448 recalled or negative), whereby each case had all four images from the CC and MLO views. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC  =  0.793  ±  0.015 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 37.21 as CAD-generated case based detection scores increased. Using the new adaptive cueing method, the region based and case based sensitivities of the conventional CAD scheme at a false positive rate of 0.71 per image increased by 2.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The study demonstrated that supplementary information can be derived by computing global mammographic density image features to improve CAD-cueing performance on the suspicious mammographic lesions.

  10. The role of MSCT angiography in early detection of lower limb arterial lesions in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saponjski, Jovica; Stojanovich, Ljudmila; Petrovic, Jelena; Saponjski, Dusan

    2017-01-25

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by arterial and venous thromboses, fetal loss, and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the serum. It is characterized by accelerated atherosclerosis. Increased tendency towards thrombosis leads to the occurrence of various vascular events. The objective of our study was to determine if there are subclinical changes on lower limb arteries in APS patients and what the best diagnostic choice for their establishment is. In this study, we analyzed 50 patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) and 50 patients, who have secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (SAPS). The results were compared to 50 controls. The groups were comparable with respect to age, gender, and traditional risk factors except for the lipid status, since controls had significantly higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Study was conducted on 64-multi-slice computed tomography (64-MSCT), where we analyzed quantitative and morphological characteristics of blood vessel-detected lesions. Patients from the control group had statistically very significant elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels in regard to the patients with SAPS and PAPS (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05). Analyzing percentage of diameter stenosis, we have established that lesions from group with 0-30% diameter stenosis (DS) in patients with PAPS (n = 47) and SAPS (n = 39) are more common than that in control group (n = 3, p < 0.001). The incidence of lesions higher than 70% DS in control group (n = 74) was statistically significant than that in patients with SAPS (n = 74, p < 0.05), while very statistically significant than that in patients with PAPS (n = 48, p < 0.001). Analyzing the qualitative characteristics of plaques, we have established significant higher frequency of soft tissue (n = 32) and mixed lesions (n = 36) in patients with PAPS than the calcified one (n = 7, p < 0.001). Our study showed that

  11. Echocardiography and genetic counselling in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, D W; Thomas, R D; Osborne, J P

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess echocardiography as an investigation for the detection of occult gene carriers in tuberous sclerosis. PATIENTS--Sixty parents of children with tuberous sclerosis who had been extensively investigated for signs of the disease and 60 age and sex matched controls. PROCEDURE--Blind study by two experienced echocardiographers and blind interpretation of video recordings by an adult cardiologist. SETTING--Cardiology department of a district general hospital. RESULTS--Two parents and three controls had bright echodense areas interpreted as possible rhabdomyomas. CONCLUSIONS--In our hands echocardiography of adults is not an investigation with a high specificity for gene detection in tuberous sclerosis. Images PMID:1640428

  12. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  13. Molecular detection of Leishmania spp. isolated from cutaneous lesions of patients referred to Herat regional hospital, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Mosawi, S H; Dalimi, A

    2016-03-15

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the main public health problems in Afghanistan, particularly in Herat. To identify Leishmania spp., molecular techniques were applied to samples from 64 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients referred to Herat regional hospital during 2013. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) was used. Most of the patients demonstrated dry type single lesions on the head. The results of direct microscopy detection using Giemsastained skin scrapings were compared with that of ITS PCR-RFLP for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Light microscopy examination showed 37/64 positive cases (58%). PCR revealed 50 positive cases (78%), from which ITS PCR-RFLP identified 48 cases (96%) as L. tropica and 2 cases (4%) as L. major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Herat appears to be endemic and of the clinically dry type, caused mainly by L. tropica and occasionally by L. major.

  14. Blood Based Biomarkers for Lung Cancer Early Detection and Evaluation of CT Based Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    miRNA ), methylation and gene expression profiles of tumor and matched non-malignant tissues to identify differentially expressed miRNAs and...from the Pan-Canadian Early Lung Cancer Detection Study. Candidate miRNA that accurately discriminate between tumor and non-malignant samples are...generate miRNA , methylation and gene expression profiles of tumor and normal tissues . Status: Completed Work accomplished: Histological confirmation was

  15. Channeling Nanoparticles for Detection and Targeted Treatment of Breast Cancerous Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    have also confirmed that non-neoplastic breast epithelial MCF10A cells display basal polarity on filters. This represents a simplified system to study ...is to provide a model to study the use of fluorescent magnetic nano or submicron particles for future detection and treatment applications. In the...PEGylation was successful as indicated by an observed size increase for the PEGylated SMPs relative to the size of the stock SMPs. Zeta potential

  16. Progressive multiple sclerosis: prospects for disease therapy, repair, and restoration of function.

    PubMed

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Thompson, Alan J; Fox, Robert J; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major cause of neurological disability, which accrues predominantly during progressive forms of the disease. Although development of multifocal inflammatory lesions is the underlying pathological process in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the gradual accumulation of disability that characterises progressive multiple sclerosis seems to result more from diffuse immune mechanisms and neurodegeneration. As a result, the 14 anti-inflammatory drugs that have regulatory approval for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis have little or no efficacy in progressive multiple sclerosis without inflammatory lesion activity. Effective therapies for progressive multiple sclerosis that prevent worsening, reverse damage, and restore function are a major unmet need. In this Series paper we summarise the current status of therapy for progressive multiple sclerosis and outline prospects for the future.

  17. Value of the ViziLite Plus System as a diagnostic aid in the early detection of oral cancer/premalignant epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Mojsa, Izabela; Kaczmarzyk, Tomasz; Zaleska, Malgorzata; Stypulkowska, Jadwiga; Zapala-Pospiech, Agnieszka; Sadecki, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the value of the chemiluminescent light and 1% tolonium chloride as a diagnostic aid in the early detection of oral cancer/premalignant epithelial lesions. Thirty consecutive patients with 41 visually identified oral lesions suggestive of being premalignant underwent chemiluminescence and tolonium chloride examination followed by incisional biopsy with histopathologic evaluation. The biopsies of 34 lesions (82.92%) revealed no dysplasia, 3 lesions (7.32%) revealed mild dysplasia, 3 lesions (7.32%) demonstrated severe dysplasia, and 1 lesion (2.44%) was malignant (squamous cell carcinoma). The chemiluminescent examination improved the brightness (58.54% of the cases), sharpness (56.1% of the cases), texture (60.98% of the cases), and size of the lesion (53.66% of the cases). With references to serious pathologies, 7 cases (100.0%) were brighter, and size was more visualized in 6 cases (85.71%) when using chemiluminescence examination than under incandescent light. Twenty-five (73.53%) of nonserious pathology and 7 (100.0%) of serious pathology (6 dysplasias, 1 squamous cell carcinoma) were positively stained by toluidine blue. Three (8.82%) of nonserious pathology and 0 (0.0%) of serious pathology lesions were identified as true negatives when toluidine blue staining was used. The overall toluidine blue sensitivity and specificity were 81.8% and 37.5%, respectively. Chemiluminescent light demonstrates better visualization (brightness, size) of serious pathology lesions in comparison with conventional clinical oral examination under incandescent light. Toluidine blue demonstrates 100% sensitivity in staining serious pathology. The ViziLite Plus system may help the practitioner to visualize oral pathologies that are not readily detectable with conventional incandescent lighting.

  18. Optineurin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease, and thus it is important to identify the causative gene and resolve the mechanism of the disease. We identified optineurin as a causative gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found three types of mutations: a homozygous deletion of exon 5, a homozygous Q398X nonsense mutation and a heterozygous E478G missense mutation within its ubiquitin-binding domain. Optineurin negatively regulates the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Nonsense and missense mutations abolished this function. Mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also negated the inhibition of interferon regulatory factor-3. The missense mutation showed a cyotoplasmic distribution different from that of the wild type. There are no specific clinical symptoms related to optineurin. However, severe brain atrophy was detected in patients with homozygous deletion. Neuropathologically, an E478G patient showed transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa-positive neuronal intracytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and medullary motor neurons. Furthermore, Golgi fragmentation was identified in 73% of this patient's anterior horn cells. In addition, optineurin is colocalized with fused in sarcoma in the basophilic inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with fused in sarcoma mutations, and in basophilic inclusion body disease. These findings strongly suggest that optineurin is involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  19. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  20. Studies on experimental pulmonary granulomas. I. Detection of lymphokines in granulomatous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Masih, N.; Majeska, J.; Yoshida, T.

    1979-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions were immunologically induced in guinea pigs by several procedures, including intravenous injections of Bacille Calmette Gúerin (BCG) into animals immunized with complete Freund's Adjuvant and an intravenous injection of agarose beads linked to a specific antigen (dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin) into immune animals. The tissue extracts obtained from lungs at various stages of granuloma formation were examined for macrophage migration inhibition (MIF) activity. The activity was found in a high incidence during the early stages of the granulomatous response. In contrast, MIF activity could be detected only rarely in granulomatous spleens and not in granulomatous livers. Chemotactic factor activity and mitogenic factor activity were only sporadically detectable. The MIF activity was associated with fractions showing chemical heterogeneity. One fraction was physicochemically indistinguishable from conventional lymphocyte-derived MIF; the other was a substance of large molecular weight. These results demonstrate the presence of biologically active mediators in immune granulomas, which may be related to early events involved in the induction or enhancement of such reactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:377991

  1. Performance comparisons of planar and volumetric observers for lesion detection in PET scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Seung; Kinahan, Paul E.; Lartizien, Carole; Comtat, Claude; Lewellen, Tom K.

    2003-05-01

    This work presents initial results of comparisons between planar and volumetric observer detection task performances for both human and model observers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging acquires and reconstructs tomographic images as contiguous volumetric (3D) images. Consequently physicians typically interpret these images by searching the image volume using linked orthogonal planar images in the three standard orientations (transverse, sagittal, and coronal). Most of observer studies, however, have typically used planar images for evaluation. For human observer ROC studies, an observer scoring tool, similar to the display tool being used in clinical PET oncology imaging, has been developed. For model observer studies the non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) were used to compute detectabilities as figures-of-merit for class separations. For the volumetric (3D)model observers, the entire image volume is used with appropriate 3D templates. For the planar (2D) model observers the transaxial plane centered on the target sphere is extracted and analyzed using 2D templates. Multiple realizations were generated using a non-Monte Carlo analytic simulator for feasible amount of simulation time and statistically accurate noise properties. For comparisons, the correlations between each model observer and human observer performance are computed. The result showed that 3D model observers have a higher correlation with human observers than 2D observers do when axial smoothing is not applied. With axial smoothing, however, the correlation of 2D model observers in general increased to the level of 3D model observer correlations with the human observer.

  2. Detection of reduced interhemispheric cortical communication during task execution in multiple sclerosis patients using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jon J.; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Varshney, Vishal P.; Golestani, Ali-Mohammad; Goodyear, Bradley G.; Metz, Luanne M.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs brain activity through demyelination and loss of axons. Increased brain activity is accompanied by increases in microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (oxygenation) and total hemoglobin, which can be measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Due to the potentially reduced size and integrity of the white matter tracts within the corpus callosum, it may be expected that MS patients have reduced functional communication between the left and right sides of the brain; this could potentially be an indicator of disease progression. To assess interhemispheric communication in MS, we used fNIRS during a unilateral motor task and the resting state. The magnitude of the change in hemoglobin parameters in the motor cortex was significantly reduced in MS patients during the motor task relative to healthy control subjects. There was also a significant decrease in interhemispheric communication between the motor cortices (expressed as coherence) in MS patients compared to controls during the motor task, but not during the resting state. fNIRS assessment of interhemispheric coherence during task execution may be a useful marker in disorders with white matter damage or axonal loss, including MS.

  3. Pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging is similar to chest tomography in detecting inflammation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolina de Souza; Warszawiak, Danny; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz

    2017-02-20

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are prevalent complications of systemic sclerosis (SS) and are currently the leading causes of death related to the disease. The accurate recognition of these conditions is therefore of utmost importance for patient management. A study was carried out with 24 SS patients being followed at the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital de Clínicas of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR) and 14 healthy volunteers, with the objective of evaluating the usefulness of lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when assessing ILD in SS patients. The results obtained with lung MRI were compared to those obtained by computed tomography (CT) of the chest, currently considered the examination of choice when investigating ILD in SS patients. The assessed population was predominantly composed of women with a mean age of 50 years, limited cutaneous SS, and a disease duration of approximately 7 years. In most cases, there was agreement between the findings on chest CT and lung MRI. Considering it is a radiation-free examination and capable of accurately identifying areas of lung tissue inflammatory involvement, lung MRI showed to be a useful examination, and further studies are needed to assess whether there is an advantage in using lung MRI instead of chest CT when assessing ILD activity in SS patients.

  4. Detection of Cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine and Microcystins, from a Lake Surrounded by Cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S.; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  5. Detection of Viral DNA and Immune Responses to the Human Herpesvirus 6 101-Kilodalton Virion Protein in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and in Controls

    PubMed Central

    Tejada-Simon, Maria V.; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Hong, Jian; Rivera, Victor M.; Killian, James M.; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2002-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), a latent lymphotropic and neurotropic virus, has been suspected as an etiologic agent in multiple sclerosis (MS). The study was undertaken to correlate virologic evidence for HHV-6 activity with the state of host immunity to HHV-6 in MS patients and control subjects. The study revealed that cell-free DNA of HHV-6 was detected more frequently in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients than in those of control subjects. T cells recognizing the recombinant 101-kDa protein (101K) corresponding to the major immunoreactive region unique to HHV-6 occurred at significantly lower precursor frequency in MS patients than in control subjects. The resulting HHV-6-specific T-cell lines obtained from MS patients exhibited skewed cytokine profiles characterized by the inability to produce interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10. The decreased T-cell responses to HHV-6 and the altered cytokine profile were consistent with significantly declined serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers for HHV-6 of MS patients compared to those of control subjects. In contrast, elevated serum IgM titers for HHV-6 were detected in the majority of MS patients, which may reflect frequent exposure of B cells to HHV-6. The findings suggest that the decreased immune responses to HHV-6 may be responsible for ineffective clearance of HHV-6 in MS patients. PMID:12021348

  6. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  7. Detection and characterization of human tissue lesions with near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, Michael S.; Manoharan, Ramasamy; Salenius, Juha; Orenstein-Carndona, Jacobo; Roemer, Tjeerd J.; Brennan, James F., III; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Wang, Yang

    1995-05-01

    Near infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for quantitative histochemistry of human tissue and disease diagnosis. The feasibility and potential of this technique for in situ histochemical analysis of human coronary artery has been demonstrated and presented in other reports from our laboratory. In this work, we review recent results obtained with the NIR Raman spectroscopy on a variety of tissue types studied at the MIT Laser Biomedical Research Center. We have collected NIR Raman spectra from colon, bladder, breast, and carotid artery. For colon, bladder and breast, consistent differences between carcinoma and normal tissue spectra were observed. For colon and bladder, the spectral differences appear to be due to an increased content of nucleic acid in carcinomas, while the spectral changes in malignant breast tissue are associated with an increase of protein content. Spectra from carotid artery have similar features as those from aorta and coronary arteries. We also show some preliminary results obtained with a NIR Raman microspectroscopy setup with 20 micron lateral resolution. The biochemical distributions for normal and diseased regions on the same tissue samples are observed. The potential of using this NIR Raman spectroscopy for detection and characterization of carcinoma and atherosclerosis, is discussed.

  8. Large scale deep learning for computer aided detection of mammographic lesions.

    PubMed

    Kooi, Thijs; Litjens, Geert; van Ginneken, Bram; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Sánchez, Clara I; Mann, Ritse; den Heeten, Ard; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in machine learning yielded new techniques to train deep neural networks, which resulted in highly successful applications in many pattern recognition tasks such as object detection and speech recognition. In this paper we provide a head-to-head comparison between a state-of-the art in mammography CAD system, relying on a manually designed feature set and a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), aiming for a system that can ultimately read mammograms independently. Both systems are trained on a large data set of around 45,000 images and results show the CNN outperforms the traditional CAD system at low sensitivity and performs comparable at high sensitivity. We subsequently investigate to what extent features such as location and patient information and commonly used manual features can still complement the network and see improvements at high specificity over the CNN especially with location and context features, which contain information not available to the CNN. Additionally, a reader study was performed, where the network was compared to certified screening radiologists on a patch level and we found no significant difference between the network and the readers.

  9. Uridine-based paramagnetic supramolecular nanoaggregate with high relaxivity capable of detecting primitive liver tumor lesions.

    PubMed

    Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Moon, Hyeyoung; Lee, Hyunseung; Hong, Kwan Soo; Lee, Sumin; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Kim, Jong Seung

    2011-09-01

    The water soluble uridine-based paramagnetic self-assembled amphiphilic molecules (LGd2-5) with DTTA binding site were synthesized and have been characterized in regard to their T(1) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (CA) properties. The water proton relaxivities have been measured in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 36 °C at 3 different magnetic fields. Among the self-assembled CAs, LGd3 showed unprecedented, high relaxivities of 30.3 and 23.4 mM(-1) s(-1) in PBS solution at 36 °C at 0.47 and 1.41 T, respectively. The non-covalent interactions between the new CAs and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated and the relaxivity was further increased by 135-215% depending on alkyl chain lengths. The chemically inertness of these complexes (LGd1, LGd2, LGd3, LGd4) against biologically most abundant metal ion (i.e. Zn(2+)) have shown within the range of commercial DTPA-based CAs. In vivo pharmacokinetics of the complex LGd3 showed highly specific for hepatocytes resulting in increase of contrast noise ratio by ∼240% in T(1)-weighted MR images of mouse liver 2 h after injection of the LGd3. It is capable to detect small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with diameter of 1.5 mm.

  10. Black holes in multiple sclerosis: definition, evolution, and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Sahraian, M A; Radue, E-W; Haller, S; Kappos, L

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive paraclinical test for diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) and is often used to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. The formation of new T2-hyperintense MRI lesions is commonly used to measure disease activity, but lacks specificity because edema, inflammation, gliosis, and axonal loss all contribute to T2 lesion formation. As the role of neurodegeneration in the pathophysiology of MS has become more prominent, the formation and evolution of chronic or persistent Tl-hypointense lesions (black holes) have been used as markers of axonal loss and neuronal destruction to measure disease activity. Despite the use of various detection methods, including advanced imaging techniques such as magnetization transfer imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, correlation of persistent black holes with clinical outcomes in patients with MS remains uncertain. Furthermore, although axonal loss and neuronal tissue destruction are known to contribute to irreversible disability in patients with MS, there are limited data on the effect of therapy on longitudinal change in Tl-hypointense lesion volume. Measurement of black holes in clinical studies may elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of MS and may be an additional method of evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  11. Non-Local Means Inpainting of MS Lesions in Longitudinal Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Guizard, Nicolas; Nakamura, Kunio; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Arnold, Douglas L.; Collins, D. Louis

    2015-01-01

    In medical imaging, multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions can lead to confounding effects in automatic morphometric processing tools such as registration, segmentation and cortical extraction, and subsequently alter individual longitudinal measurements. Multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inpainting techniques have been proposed to decrease the impact of MS lesions in medical image processing, however, most of these methods make the assumption that lesions only affect white matter. Here, we propose a method to fill lesion regions using the patch-based non-local mean (NLM) strategy. The method consists of a hierarchical concentric filling strategy after identification of the lesion region. The lesion is filled iteratively, based on the surrounding tissue intensity, using an onion peel strategy. This concentric technique presents the advantage of preserving the local information and therefore the continuity of the anatomy and does not require identification of any a priori normal brain tissues. The method is first evaluated on 20 healthy subjects with simulated artificial MS lesions where we assessed our technique by measuring the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the images with inpainted lesion and the original healthy images. Second, in order to assess the impact of lesion filling on longitudinal image analyses, we performed a power analysis with sample size estimation to evaluate brain atrophy and ventricular growth in patients with MS. The method was compared to two different publicly available methods (FSL lesion fill and Lesion LEAP) and a more classic method, which fills the region with intensities similar to that of the surrounding healthy white matter tissue or mask the lesions. The proposed method was shown to exceed the other methods in reproducing the fidelity of healthy subject images where the lesions were inpainted. The method also improved the power to detect brain atrophy or ventricular growth by decreasing the sample size by 25% in the presence

  12. Non-Local Means Inpainting of MS Lesions in Longitudinal Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Nicolas; Nakamura, Kunio; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis

    2015-01-01

    In medical imaging, multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions can lead to confounding effects in automatic morphometric processing tools such as registration, segmentation and cortical extraction, and subsequently alter individual longitudinal measurements. Multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inpainting techniques have been proposed to decrease the impact of MS lesions in medical image processing, however, most of these methods make the assumption that lesions only affect white matter. Here, we propose a method to fill lesion regions using the patch-based non-local mean (NLM) strategy. The method consists of a hierarchical concentric filling strategy after identification of the lesion region. The lesion is filled iteratively, based on the surrounding tissue intensity, using an onion peel strategy. This concentric technique presents the advantage of preserving the local information and therefore the continuity of the anatomy and does not require identification of any a priori normal brain tissues. The method is first evaluated on 20 healthy subjects with simulated artificial MS lesions where we assessed our technique by measuring the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the images with inpainted lesion and the original healthy images. Second, in order to assess the impact of lesion filling on longitudinal image analyses, we performed a power analysis with sample size estimation to evaluate brain atrophy and ventricular growth in patients with MS. The method was compared to two different publicly available methods (FSL lesion fill and Lesion LEAP) and a more classic method, which fills the region with intensities similar to that of the surrounding healthy white matter tissue or mask the lesions. The proposed method was shown to exceed the other methods in reproducing the fidelity of healthy subject images where the lesions were inpainted. The method also improved the power to detect brain atrophy or ventricular growth by decreasing the sample size by 25% in the presence

  13. ROC evaluation of SPECT myocardial lesion detectability with and without single iteration non-uniform Chang attenuation compensation using an anthropomorphic female phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, S.; Jaszczak, R.J. |; Gilland, D.R.; Turkington, T.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Metz, C.E.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate lesion detectability with and without nonuniform attenuation compensation (AC) in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women using an anthropomorphic phantom and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology. Breast attenuation causes artifacts in reconstructed images and may increase the difficulty of diagnosis of myocardial perfusion imaging in women. The null hypothesis tested using the ROC study was that nonuniform AC does not change the lesion detectability in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women. The authors used a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm and Chang`s single iteration method for AC. In conclusion, with the proposed myocardial defect model nuclear medicine physicians demonstrated no significant difference for the detection of the anterior wall defect; however, a greater accuracy for the detection of the inferior wall defect was observed without nonuniform AC than with it. Medical physicists did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in defect detection accuracy with or without nonuniform AC in the female phantom.

  14. Using transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitor (TOSCA 500) to detect respiratory failure in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad K; Bradburn, Michael; Proctor, Alison R; Billings, Catherine; Bianchi, Stephen; McDermott, Christopher J; Shaw, Pamela J

    2012-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition, respiratory failure being the commonest cause of death. Quality of life and survival can be improved by supporting respiratory function with non-invasive ventilation. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring is a non-invasive method of measuring arterial carbon dioxide levels enabling simple and efficient screening for respiratory failure. The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of carbon dioxide level recorded transcutaneously with a TOSCA 500 monitor. It is a prospective, observational study of 40 consecutive patients with ALS, recruited from a specialist ALS clinic. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO(2)) in each patient was determined by both transcutaneous monitoring and by an arterialized ear lobe capillary blood sample. The carbon dioxide (CO(2)) levels obtained with these two methods were compared by Bland-Altman analysis. The results showed that the mean difference between arterialized and transcutaneous readings was - 0.083 kPa (SD 0.318). The Bland-Altman limits of agreement ranged from 0.553 to - 0.719 kPa. The difference was < 0.5 kPa in 90% of the recordings. Four of the 40 measurements had a difference of > 0.5 kPa, with a maximum recorded difference of 0.95 kPa. In conclusion, non-invasive carbon dioxide monitoring using a TOSCA monitor is a useful clinical tool in neurology practice. Users should be aware of the possibility of occasional inaccurate readings. A clinically unexpected or incompatible reading should be verified with a blood gas analysis, especially when a decision to provide ventilatory support is required.

  15. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-01

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid ``omics''-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.Although tissue staining

  16. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-28

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid "omics"-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.

  17. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000129.htm Multiple sclerosis - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis (MS). This disease affects the brain and spinal ...

  18. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a progressive nervous system (neurological) disease that ...

  19. Neuronal Biomarker Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase (UCH-L1) Detects Traumatic Intracranial Lesions on CT in Children and Youth with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Papa, Linda; Mittal, Manoj K; Ramirez, Jose; Silvestri, Salvatore; Giordano, Philip; Braga, Carolina F; Tan, Ciara Natasha S; Ameli, Neema J; Lopez, Marco; Haeussler, Crystal A; Mendez Giordano, Diego; Zonfrillo, Mark R

    2017-02-03

    This study examined the performance of serum Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase (UCH-L1) in detecting traumatic intracranial lesions on CT scan (+CT) in children and youth with mild and moderate TBI (MMTBI) and assessed its performance in trauma control patients without head trauma. This prospective cohort study enrolled children and youth presenting to three Level 1 Trauma Centers following blunt head trauma and a GCS 9-15 as well as trauma control patients with GCS 15 that did not have blunt head trauma. The primary outcome measure was the presence of intracranial lesions on initial CT scan. Blood samples were obtained in all patients within six hours of injury and measured by ELISA for UCH-L1 (ng/ml). A total of 256 children and youth were enrolled in the study and had serum samples drawn within 6 hours of injury for analysis, 196 had blunt head trauma and 60 were trauma controls. CT scan of the head was performed in 151 patients and traumatic intracranial lesions on CT scan were evident in 17 (11%), all of whom had a GCS 13-15. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for UCH-L1 in detecting children and youth with traumatic intracranial lesions on CT was 0.83 (95%CI 0.73-0.93). In those presenting with a GCS of 15, the AUC for detecting lesions was 0.83 (95%CI 0.72-0.94). Similarly, in children under five years old the AUC was 0.79 (95%CI 0.59-1.00). Performance for detecting intracranial lesions at a UCH-L1 cutoff level of 0.18 ng/ml yielded a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 47% and negative predictive value of 100%.

  20. In vivo detection of free radicals using molecular MRI and immuno-spin trapping in a mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; West, Melinda; Ramirez, Dario C; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Bonini, Marcelo G; Mason, Ronald P; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Hensley, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals associated with oxidative stress play a major role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). By combining immuno-spin trapping and molecular magnetic resonance imaging, in vivo trapped radical adducts were detected in the spinal cords of SOD1(G93A)-transgenic (Tg) mice, a model for ALS. For this study, the nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) was administered (ip) over 5 days before administration (iv) of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to an albumin-gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap free radicals. MRI was used to detect the presence of the anti-DMPO radical adducts by a significant sustained increase in MR signal intensities (p < 0.05) or anti-DMPO probe concentrations measured from T₁ relaxations (p < 0.01). The biotin moiety of the anti-DMPO probe was targeted with fluorescence-labeled streptavidin to locate the probe in excised tissues. Negative controls included either Tg ALS mice initially administered saline rather than DMPO followed by the anti-DMPO probe or non-Tg mice initially administered DMPO and then the anti-DMPO probe. The anti-DMPO probe was found to bind to neurons via colocalization fluorescence microscopy. DMPO adducts were also confirmed in diseased/nondiseased tissues from animals administered DMPO. Apparent diffusion coefficients from diffusion-weighted images of spinal cords from Tg mice were significantly elevated (p < 0.001) compared to wild-type controls. This is the first report regarding the detection of in vivo trapped radical adducts in an ALS model. This novel, noninvasive, in vivo diagnostic method can be applied to investigate the involvement of free radical mechanisms in ALS rodent models.

  1. Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression following moderate exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea T.; Light, Alan R.; Hughen, Ronald W.; VanHaitsma, Timothy A.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are characterized by debilitating fatigue, yet evaluation of this symptom is subjective. We examined metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression (mRNA) in patients with CFS (n=22) vs. MS (n=20) vs. healthy controls (n=23) and determined their relationship to fatigue and pain before and after exercise. Methods Blood samples and fatigue and pain ratings were obtained at baseline and 0.5, 8, 24, and 48 hours following sustained moderate exercise. Leukocyte mRNA of 4 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3, P2X4, P2X5, TRPV1), 4 adrenergic (α-2a, β-1, β-2 receptors, COMT) and 5 immune markers (CD14, TLR4, IL-6, IL-10, LTa) was examined using quantitative PCR. Results CFS patients had greater post-exercise increases in fatigue and pain (10–29 pts above baseline, p<.001) and greater mRNA increases in P2X4, TRPV1, CD14 and all adrenergic receptors than controls (1.3 ± .14 to 3.4 ± .90 fold increase above baseline, p=.04 – .005). CFS patients with co-morbid fibromyalgia (n=18) also showed greater increases in ASIC3 and P2X5 (p<.05). MS patients had greater post-exercise increases than controls in β-1 and β-2 adrenergic receptor expression (1.4 ± .27 and 1.3 ± .06 fold increase, respectively, p=.02 and <.001) and greater decreases in TLR4 (p=.02). In MS, IL-10 and TLR4 decreases correlated with higher fatigue scores. Conclusion Post-exercise mRNA increases in metabolite-detecting receptors were unique to CFS patients while both MS and CFS showed abnormal increases in adrenergic receptors. Among MS patients, greater fatigue was correlated with blunted immune marker expression. PMID:22210239

  2. Adding Papillomacular Bundle Measurements to Standard Optical Coherence Tomography Does Not Increase Sensitivity to Detect Prior Optic Neuritis in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mona; Jarius, Sven; Schmidt-Bacher, Annette; Platten, Michael; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve the detection of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in multiple sclerosis (MS), a special peripapillary ring scanning algorithm (N-site RNFL, N-RNFL) was developed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In contrast to the standard protocol (ST-RNFL) scanning starts nasally, not temporally, and provides an additional sector of analysis, the papillomacular bundle (PMB). We aimed to ascertain whether the temporal RNFL differs between the two techniques, whether N-RNFL is more sensitive than ST-RNFL to detect previous optic neuritis (ON), and whether analyzing the PMB adds additional sensitivity. Furthermore, we investigated whether RNFL is associated with disease severity and/or disease duration. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study of 38 patients with MS, of whom 24 had a history of ON, and 40 healthy controls (HC). Subjects with ON within the previous 6 months were excluded. Records included clinical characteristics, visual evoked potentials (VEP), and SD-OCT in both techniques. Results In a total of 73 evaluable MS eyes, temporal N-RNFL was abnormal in 17.8%, temporal ST-RNFL in 19.2%, and the PMB-RNFL in 21.9%. In ON eyes, the sensitivity of temporal N-RNFL and ST-RNFL did not differ significantly (37.0%/33.3%, p = 0.556). The sensitivity of VEP was 85.2%. RNFL thickness was associated with disease severity in all eyes, with and without a history of ON, and with disease duration. Conclusion The two OCT techniques detected previous ON with similar sensitivity, but the sensitivity of VEPs was superior to that of both N-RNFL and ST-RNFL. Our results indicate that the widely used ST-RNFL technique is appropriate for peripapillary RNFL measurements in MS patients. PMID:27171375

  3. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I’ β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients’ serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu5 and His9 residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His9 protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I’ β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent. PMID:26437433

  4. The effect of dose reduction and feasibility of edge-preserving noise reduction on the detection of liver lesions using MSCT.

    PubMed

    Wessling, Johannes; Esseling, Rainer; Raupach, Rainer; Fockenberg, Stefanie; Osada, Nani; Gerss, Joachim; Heindel, Walter; Fischbach, Roman

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of dose reduction and the potential of noise reduction filters on image quality and the detection of liver lesions using MSCT. Twenty-nine patients with a total of 40 liver lesions underwent 16-slice CT (120 kV; 180 mAs). Virtual noise was added to CT raw datasets simulating effective mAs levels of 155, 130, 105, 80, 55, 30 and 10 mAs. All datasets were post-processed with an edge-preserving noise-reduction filter (ANR-3D), yielding a total of 15 datasets per patient. Ten radiologists performed independent evaluations of image quality, the presence of liver lesions and diagnostic confidence. Quantitative noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were obtained. Superior image quality (P < 0.02), reduction of image noise (P < 0.001) and the increase of lesion-to-liver CNR (P < 0.001) were observed in images processed with the ANR-3D filter. Sensitivity for lesion detection remained unchanged down to 105 mAs (CTDI(w) 6.6 mGy) without filter and 80 mAs (CTDI(w) 5.1 mGy) with ANR-3D. Confidence was rated significantly higher for datasets reconstructed with ANR-3D. The use of a noise-reducing, but edge-preserving filter (ANR-3D) is a promising option to reduce further the radiation dose in liver CT.

  5. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy. PMID:25473883

  6. Trimodal color-fluorescence-polarization endoscopy aided by a tumor selective molecular probe accurately detects flat lesions in colitis-associated cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charanya, Tauseef; York, Timothy; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Garcia, Missael; Akers, Walter J.; Rubin, Deborah; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) arises from premalignant flat lesions of the colon, which are difficult to detect with current endoscopic screening approaches. We have developed a complementary fluorescence and polarization reporting strategy that combines the unique biochemical and physical properties of dysplasia and cancer for real-time detection of these lesions. Using azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) treated mice, which recapitulates human CAC and dysplasia, we show that an octapeptide labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye selectively identified all precancerous and cancerous lesions. A new thermoresponsive sol-gel formulation allowed topical application of the molecular probe during endoscopy. This method yielded high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between adenomatous tumors (20.6±1.65) and flat lesions (12.1±1.03) and surrounding uninvolved colon tissue versus CNR of inflamed tissues (1.62±0.41). Incorporation of nanowire-filtered polarization imaging into NIR fluorescence endoscopy shows a high depolarization contrast in both adenomatous tumors and flat lesions in CAC, reflecting compromised structural integrity of these tissues. Together, the real-time polarization imaging provides real-time validation of suspicious colon tissue highlighted by molecular fluorescence endoscopy.

  7. A Bayesian hierarchical surrogate outcome model for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Luca; Schmidli, Heinz; Ohlssen, David I

    2016-07-01

    The development of novel therapies in multiple sclerosis (MS) is one area where a range of surrogate outcomes are used in various stages of clinical research. While the aim of treatments in MS is to prevent disability, a clinical trial for evaluating a drugs effect on disability progression would require a large sample of patients with many years of follow-up. The early stage of MS is characterized by relapses. To reduce study size and duration, clinical relapses are accepted as primary endpoints in phase III trials. For phase II studies, the primary outcomes are typically lesion counts based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as these are considerably more sensitive than clinical measures for detecting MS activity. Recently, Sormani and colleagues in 'Surrogate endpoints for EDSS worsening in multiple sclerosis' provided a systematic review and used weighted regression analyses to examine the role of either MRI lesions or relapses as trial level surrogate outcomes for disability. We build on this work by developing a Bayesian three-level model, accommodating the two surrogates and the disability endpoint, and properly taking into account that treatment effects are estimated with errors. Specifically, a combination of treatment effects based on MRI lesion count outcomes and clinical relapse was used to develop a study-level surrogate outcome model for the corresponding treatment effects based on disability progression. While the primary aim for developing this model was to support decision-making in drug development, the proposed model may also be considered for future validation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Determining Changes in Neural Circuits in Tuberous Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    how the mTOR pathway contributes to autism -like repetitive behavior and to seizures. Notably, this is the first TS mouse model to capture both of...that they gave themselves severe lesions. A similar overgrooming phenotype has been described in genetic mouse models of autism and obsessive compulsive...features of human Tuberous Sclerosis including mosaicism, autism and epilepsy. This research progress deepened our understanding of Tuberous Sclerosis by

  9. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient Diagnosed after Switching from Natalizumab to Fingolimod

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Tim; Othman, Jalal; Kühl, Marc; Metz, Imke; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kunkel, Annett; Wuerfel, Jens; Faiss, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Natalizumab- (NTZ-) associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe and often disabling infectious central nervous system disease that can become evident in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients after NTZ discontinuation. Recently, novel diagnostic biomarkers for the assessment of PML risk in NTZ treated MS patients such as the anti-JC virus antibody index have been reported, and the clinical relevance of milky-way lesions detectable by MRI has been discussed. Case Presentation and Conclusion. We report a MS patient in whom PML was highly suspected solely based on MRI findings after switching from NTZ to fingolimod despite repeatedly negative (ultrasensitive) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for JC virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid. The PML diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed by brain biopsy. The occurrence of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) during fingolimod therapy, elevated measures of JCV antibody indices, and the relevance of milky-way-like lesions detectable by (7 T) MRI are discussed. PMID:27994897

  10. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient Diagnosed after Switching from Natalizumab to Fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Sinnecker, Tim; Othman, Jalal; Kühl, Marc; Metz, Imke; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kunkel, Annett; Paul, Friedemann; Wuerfel, Jens; Faiss, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Natalizumab- (NTZ-) associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe and often disabling infectious central nervous system disease that can become evident in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients after NTZ discontinuation. Recently, novel diagnostic biomarkers for the assessment of PML risk in NTZ treated MS patients such as the anti-JC virus antibody index have been reported, and the clinical relevance of milky-way lesions detectable by MRI has been discussed. Case Presentation and Conclusion. We report a MS patient in whom PML was highly suspected solely based on MRI findings after switching from NTZ to fingolimod despite repeatedly negative (ultrasensitive) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for JC virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid. The PML diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed by brain biopsy. The occurrence of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) during fingolimod therapy, elevated measures of JCV antibody indices, and the relevance of milky-way-like lesions detectable by (7 T) MRI are discussed.

  11. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  12. Differentiation of Malignant and Benign Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography: Added Value of Quantitative Enhancement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Pang; Hsu, Hsian-He; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chang, Tsun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the association between breast lesion morphology and malignancy and to determine the optimal value of lesion enhancement (HU, Hounsfield units) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer in patients with incidental breast lesions (IBLs). A total of 97 patients with 102 IBLs detected from July 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the presence of malignancy based on the morphology of the lesions alone and in combination with an enhancement value (HU) analysis. There were 36 malignant and 66 benign IBLs. When the morphology and enhancement values were combined, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92%, 97%, and 95%, respectively, for reader 1 and 89%, 94%, and 92%, respectively, for reader 2. The addition of HU values led to correct changes in the diagnosis; specifically, the accuracy of the diagnosis of reader 1 and reader 2 improved by 6.9% and 11.8%, respectively. The addition of the enhancement value (HU) to the CT morphology improved the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of malignant from benign IBLs by using the region of interest (ROI) to measure the HU within the most suspicious part of the lesion. PMID:27128524

  13. [Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Darlix, A; Mathey, G; Monin, M-L; Sauvée, M; Braun, M; Schaff, J-L; Debouverie, M

    2012-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement is a rare condition in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We report two patients with a long history of MS who presented with severe acute hypothermia with associated thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminase levels. Several cases of hypothermia or hyperthermia in patients with MS have been reported in the literature. They could be linked with hypothalamic lesions, in particular in the pre-optic area. However, other anatomical locations seem to be involved in thermoregulation and can be affected by MS. Besides, some cases of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion have been reported in patients with MS. Finally, some sleep disorders, particularly hypersomnia or narcolepsy, could be related to hypothalamic lesions, through the fall in hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Hypocretin-1 is a neuropeptide that is secreted by some hypothalamic cells. It plays a role in the sleep-awake rhythm. We report one patient with narcolepsy and cataplexy before the first symptoms of MS appeared. Hypothalamic signs are rare in MS. However, several series of autopsies have shown a high frequency of demyelinating lesions in the hypothalamic area. Among these lesions, the proportion of active lesions seems elevated. Yet only few of them have a clinical or biological translation such as thermoregulation dysfunction, sleep disorders or natremia abnormalities. Thus, it seems unlikely that inflammatory hypothalamic lesions alone, even when bilateral, could be the explanation of these signs. A sufficient number of inflammatory demyelinating lesions, which we can observe in patients with a long history of MS and an already severe disability, is probably necessary to develop such a rare symptomatology. Hypothalamic signs might be a factor of poor prognosis for the disease course and progression of the disability.

  14. Cutaneous Adverse Events Associated with Interferon-β Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kolb-Mäurer, Annette; Goebeler, Matthias; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Interferons are widely used platform therapies as disease-modifying treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. Although interferons are usually safe and well tolerated, they frequently cause dermatological side effects. Here, we present a multiple sclerosis (MS) patient treated with interferon-β who developed new-onset psoriasis. Both her MS as well as her psoriasis finally responded to treatment with fumarates. This case illustrates that interferons not only cause local but also systemic adverse events of the skin. These systemic side effects might indicate that the Th17/IL-17 axis plays a prominent role in the immunopathogenesis of this individual case and that the autoimmune process might be deteriorated by further administration of interferons. In conclusion, we think that neurologists should be aware of systemic cutaneous side effects and have a closer look on interferon-associated skin lesions. Detection of psoriasiform lesions might indicate that interferons are probably not beneficial in the individual situation. We suggest that skin lesions may serve as biomarkers to allocate MS patients to adequate disease-modifying drugs.

  15. Objective comparison of lesion detectability in low and medium-energy collimator iodine-123 mIBG images using a channelized Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Rebecca A.; Murray, Iain; Gear, Jonathan; Aldridge, Matthew D.; Levine, Daniel; Fowkes, Lucy; Waddington, Wendy A.; Chua, Sue; Flux, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Iodine-123 mIBG imaging is widely regarded as a gold standard for diagnostic studies of neuroblastoma and adult neuroendocrine cancer although the optimal collimator for tumour imaging remains undetermined. Low-energy (LE) high-resolution (HR) collimators provide superior spatial resolution. However due to septal penetration of high-energy photons these provide poorer contrast than medium-energy (ME) general-purpose (GP) collimators. LEGP collimators improve count sensitivity. The aim of this study was to objectively compare the lesion detection efficiency of each collimator to determine the optimal collimator for diagnostic imaging. The septal penetration and sensitivity of each collimator was assessed. Planar images of the patient abdomen were simulated with static scans of a Liqui-Phil™ anthropomorphic phantom with lesion-shaped inserts, acquired with LE and ME collimators on 3 different manufacturers’ gamma camera systems (Skylight (Philips), Intevo (Siemens) and Discovery (GE)). Two-hundred normal and 200 single-lesion abnormal images were created for each collimator. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed and validated to score the images for the likelihood of an abnormality. The areas under receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves, Az, created from the scores were used to quantify lesion detectability. The CHO ROC curves for the LEHR collimators were inferior to the GP curves for all cameras. The LEHR collimators resulted in statistically significantly smaller Azs (p  <  0.05), of on average 0.891  ±  0.004, than for the MEGP collimators, 0.933  ±  0.004. In conclusion, the reduced background provided by MEGP collimators improved 123I mIBG image lesion detectability over LEHR collimators that provided better spatial resolution.

  16. Improving the performance of lesion-based computer-aided detection schemes of breast masses using a case-based adaptive cueing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Qian, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Current commercialized CAD schemes have high false-positive (FP) detection rates and also have high correlations in positive lesion detection with radiologists. Thus, we recently investigated a new approach to improve the efficacy of applying CAD to assist radiologists in reading and interpreting screening mammograms. Namely, we developed a new global feature based CAD approach/scheme that can cue the warning sign on the cases with high risk of being positive. In this study, we investigate the possibility of fusing global feature or case-based scores with the local or lesion-based CAD scores using an adaptive cueing method. We hypothesize that the information from the global feature extraction (features extracted from the whole breast regions) are different from and can provide supplementary information to the locally-extracted features (computed from the segmented lesion regions only). On a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) testing dataset with 785 cases (347 negative and 438 cancer cases with masses only), we ran our lesion-based and case-based CAD schemes "as is" on the whole dataset. To assess the supplementary information provided by the global features, we used an adaptive cueing method to adaptively adjust the original CAD-generated detection scores (Sorg) of a detected suspicious mass region based on the computed case-based score (Scase) of the case associated with this detected region. Using the adaptive cueing method, better sensitivity results were obtained at lower FP rates (<= 1 FP per image). Namely, increases of sensitivities (in the FROC curves) of up to 6.7% and 8.2% were obtained for the ROI and Case-based results, respectively.

  17. Epstein–Barr virus in the multiple sclerosis brain: a controversial issue—report on a focused workshop held in the Centre for Brain Research of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Niedobitek, Gerald; Aloisi, Francesca; Middeldorp, Jaap M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent epidemiological and immunological studies provide evidence for an association between Epstein–Barr virus infection and multiple sclerosis, suggesting a role of Epstein–Barr virus infection in disease induction and pathogenesis. A key question in this context is whether Epstein–Barr virus-infected B lymphocytes are present within the central nervous system and the lesions of patients with multiple sclerosis. Previous studies on this topic provided highly controversial results, showing Epstein–Barr virus reactivity in B cells in the vast majority of multiple sclerosis cases and lesions, or only exceptional Epstein–Barr virus-positive B cells in rare cases. In an attempt to explain the reasons for these divergent results, a workshop was organized under the umbrella of the European Union FP6 NeuroproMiSe project, the outcome of which is presented here. This report summarizes the current knowledge of Epstein–Barr virus biology and shows that Epstein–Barr virus infection is highly complex. There are still major controversies, how to unequivocally identify Epstein–Barr virus infection in pathological tissues, particularly in situations other than Epstein–Barr virus-driven lymphomas or acute Epstein–Barr virus infections. It further highlights that unequivocal proof of Epstein–Barr virus infection in multiple sclerosis lesions is still lacking, due to issues related to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection methods. PMID:21846731

  18. Epstein-Barr virus in the multiple sclerosis brain: a controversial issue--report on a focused workshop held in the Centre for Brain Research of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Hans; Niedobitek, Gerald; Aloisi, Francesca; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2011-09-01

    Recent epidemiological and immunological studies provide evidence for an association between Epstein-Barr virus infection and multiple sclerosis, suggesting a role of Epstein-Barr virus infection in disease induction and pathogenesis. A key question in this context is whether Epstein-Barr virus-infected B lymphocytes are present within the central nervous system and the lesions of patients with multiple sclerosis. Previous studies on this topic provided highly controversial results, showing Epstein-Barr virus reactivity in B cells in the vast majority of multiple sclerosis cases and lesions, or only exceptional Epstein-Barr virus-positive B cells in rare cases. In an attempt to explain the reasons for these divergent results, a workshop was organized under the umbrella of the European Union FP6 NeuroproMiSe project, the outcome of which is presented here. This report summarizes the current knowledge of Epstein-Barr virus biology and shows that Epstein-Barr virus infection is highly complex. There are still major controversies, how to unequivocally identify Epstein-Barr virus infection in pathological tissues, particularly in situations other than Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphomas or acute Epstein-Barr virus infections. It further highlights that unequivocal proof of Epstein-Barr virus infection in multiple sclerosis lesions is still lacking, due to issues related to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection methods.

  19. PSMA-Based [18F]DCFPyL PET/CT Is Superior to Conventional Imaging for Lesion Detection in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda L.; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario; Carducci, Michael; Fan, Hong; Dannals, Robert F.; Chen, Ying; Mease, Ronnie C.; Szabo, Zsolt; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Current standard of care conventional imaging modalities (CIM) such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and bone scan can be limited for detection of metastatic prostate cancer and therefore improved imaging methods are an unmet clinical need. We evaluated the utility of a novel second-generation low molecular weight radiofluorinated prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, [18F]DCFPyL, in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Procedures Nine patients with suspected prostate cancer recurrence, eight with CIM evidence of metastatic prostate cancer and one with biochemical recurrence, were imaged with [18F]DCFPyL PET/CT. Eight of the patients had contemporaneous CIM for comparison. A lesion-by-lesion comparison of the detection of suspected sites of metastatic prostate cancer was carried out between PET and CIM. Statistical analysis for estimated proportions of inter-modality agreement for detection of metastatic disease was calculated accounting for intra-patient correlation using general estimating equation (GEE) intercept-only regression models. Results One hundred thirty-nine sites of PET positive [18F]DCFPyL uptake (138 definite, 1 equivocal) for metastatic disease were detected in the eight patients with available comparison CIM. By contrast, only 45 lesions were identified on CIM (30 definite, 15 equivocal). When lesions were negative or equivocal on CIM, it was estimated that a large portion of these lesions or 0.72 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.55–0.84) would be positive on [18F]DCFPyL PET. Conversely, of those lesions negative or equivocal on [18F]DCFPyL PET, it was estimated that only a very small proportion or 0.03 (95 % CI 0.01–0.07) would be positive on CIM. Delayed 2-h-post-injection time point PET yielded higher tumor radiotracer uptake and higher tumor-to-background ratios than an earlier 1-h-post-injection time point. Conclusions A novel PSMA-targeted PET radiotracer, [18F

  20. Computer-aided tracking of MS lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Deborah; Gurwitz Kletenik, Devorah; Koshy, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions are known to change over time. The location, size and shape characteristics of lesions are often used to diagnose and to track disease progression. We have improved our lesion-browsing tool that allows users to automatically locate successive significant lesions in a MRI stack. In addition, an automatic alignment feature was implemented to facilitate comparisons across stacks. A lesion stack is formed that can be browsed independently or in tandem with the image windows. Lesions of interest can then be measured, rendered and rotated. Multiple windows allow the viewer to compare the size and shape of lesions from the MRI images of the same patient taken at different time intervals.

  1. MS lesion segmentation using a multi-channel patch-based approach with spatial consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechrez, Roey; Goldberger, Jacob; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an automatic method for segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the brain. The approach is based on similarities between multi-channel patches (T1, T2 and FLAIR). An MS lesion patch database is built using training images for which the label maps are known. For each patch in the testing image, k similar patches are retrieved from the database. The matching labels for these k patches are then combined to produce an initial segmentation map for the test case. Finally a novel iterative patch-based label refinement process based on the initial segmentation map is performed to ensure spatial consistency of the detected lesions. A leave-one-out evaluation is done for each testing image in the MS lesion segmentation challenge of MICCAI 2008. Results are shown to compete with the state-of-the-art methods on the MICCAI 2008 challenge.

  2. Perirhinal cortex lesions uncover subsidiary systems in the rat for the detection of novel and familiar objects

    PubMed Central

    Albasser, Mathieu M; Amin, Eman; Iordanova, Mihaela D; Brown, Malcolm W; Pearce, John M; Aggleton, John P

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the impact of perirhinal cortex lesions on tests of object recognition. Object recognition was tested directly by looking at the preferential exploration of novel objects over simultaneously presented familiar objects. Object recognition was also tested indirectly by presenting just novel objects or just familiar objects, and recording exploration levels. Rats with perirhinal cortex lesions were severely impaired at discriminating a novel object from a simultaneously presented familiar object (direct test), yet displayed normal levels of exploration to novel objects presented on their own and showed normal declines in exploration times for familiar objects that were repeatedly presented (indirect tests). This effective reduction in the exploration of familiar objects after perirhinal cortex lesions points to the sparing of some recognition mechanisms. This possibility led us to determine whether rats with perirhinal cortex lesions can overcome their preferential exploration deficits when given multiple object familiarisation trials prior to that same (familiar) object being paired with a novel object. It was found that after multiple familiarisation trials, objects could now successfully be recognised as familiar by rats with perirhinal cortex lesions, both following a 90-min delay (the longest delay tested) and when object recognition was tested in the dark after familiarisation trials in the light. These latter findings reveal: (i) the presumed recruitment of other regions to solve recognition memory problems in the absence of perirhinal cortex tissue; and (ii) that these additional recognition mechanisms require more familiarisation trials than perirhinal-based recognition mechanisms. PMID:21707792

  3. Multi-Sectional Views Textural Based SVM for MS Lesion Segmentation in Multi-Channels MRIs

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bassem A; Younis, Akmal A; John, Nigel M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new technique is proposed for automatic segmentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The technique uses a trained support vector machine (SVM) to discriminate between the blocks in regions of MS lesions and the blocks in non-MS lesion regions mainly based on the textural features with aid of the other features. The classification is done on each of the axial, sagittal and coronal sectional brain view independently and the resultant segmentations are aggregated to provide more accurate output segmentation. The main contribution of the proposed technique described in this paper is the use of textural features to detect MS lesions in a fully automated approach that does not rely on manually delineating the MS lesions. In addition, the technique introduces the concept of the multi-sectional view segmentation to produce verified segmentation. The proposed textural-based SVM technique was evaluated using three simulated datasets and more than fifty real MRI datasets. The results were compared with state of the art methods. The obtained results indicate that the proposed method would be viable for use in clinical practice for the detection of MS lesions in MRI. PMID:22741026

  4. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor binding 4{prime}-IODO-PK11195: A new radioiodinated ligand for detecting lesioned brain areas

    SciTech Connect

    Saji, H.; Iida, Y.; Nakatsuka, I.

    1995-05-01

    An increase in the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS) has recently been reported in excitotoxic and ischaemic lesions in the brain. Thus, PBBS visualization has been of greater interest due to the possibility of imaging the lesioned area as positive image. In this study, our interest is focussed in the development of a radioiodinated compound for the SPECT study of PBBS function. Taking account of the environment of binding sites and the stability in vivo, we selected the 4{prime}position of C-1 phenyl moiety of the isoqunoline derivative PK11195 as the best exploitable site for the iodination. The no-carrier-added I-125 labeled 4{prime}-iodo-PK11195 (IPK) was synthesized by the bromine-iodine exchange reaction in 60% radiochemical yield and > 98% radiochemical purity. In vitro competitive binding studies with H-3-PI11195 using rat kidney membranes shows that IPK has high affinity for PBBS as much as PK11195. The in vivo biodistribution in mice showed high uptake of I-125-IPK in the kidney, lung, heart and adrenal, organs reported as containing high PBBS, which were reduced by the treatment with cold PK11195. Furthermore, autoradiographic studies in transient middle cerebral arteries occlusion in rats showed high accumulation of I-125-IPK in lesioned sites, in contrast to the decease of radioactivity of Tc-99m-HM-PAO. Gathered data indicated that the newly designed IPK holds to great potential for detecting the lesioned brain areas as positive image.

  5. Comparison of virus culture and direct immunofluorescent staining of cytocentrifuged virus transport medium for detection of varicella-zoster virus in skin lesions.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Y S; Ratkiewicz, I N

    1998-05-01

    Direct immunofluorescent staining of centrifuged viral transport medium (CVTM) was compared with conventional cell culture for the detection of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 87 dermal lesions from 84 patients. A total of 21 (24%) were positive for VZV; 8 (38%) of these were positive by culture and CVTM, 13 (62%) by CVTM alone, and none by culture only. Virus cultures were positive for VZV in an average of 9.1 days (range, 4-20 days). CVTM, using cytocentrifugation, is more sensitive and rapid than conventional cell culture for the detection of VZV in cutaneous specimens.

  6. Detection and Type-Distribution of Human Papillomavirus in Vulva and Vaginal Abnormal Cytology Lesions and Cancer Tissues from Thai Women.

    PubMed

    Ngamkham, Jarunya; Boonmark, Krittika; Phansri, Thainsang

    2016-01-01

    Vulva and Vaginal cancers are rare among all gynecological cancers worldwide, including Thailand, and typically affect women in later life. Persistent high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is one of several important causes of cancer development. In this study, we focused on HPV investigation and specific type distribution from Thai women with abnormality lesions and cancers of the vulva and Vaginal. A total of ninety paraffin-embedded samples of vulva and Vaginal abnormalities and cancer cells with histologically confirmed were collected from Thai women, who were diagnosed in 2003-2012 at the National Cancer Institute, Thailand. HPV DNA was detected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay with GP5+/ bio 6+ consensus specific primers and digoxigenin-labeled specific oligoprobes, respectively. The human β-globin gene was used as an internal control. Overall results represented that HPV frequency was 16/34 (47.1%) and 8/20 (40.0%) samples of vulva with cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, while, 3/5 (60%) and 16/33 (51.61%) samples of Vaginal cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, were HPV DNA positive. Single HPV type and multiple HPV type infection could be observed in both type of cancers and abnormal lesion samples in the different histological categorizes. HPV16 was the most frequent type in all cancers and abnormal cytology lesions, whereas HPV 18 was less frequent and could be detected as co-infection with other high risk HPV types. In addition, low risk types such as HPV 6, 11 and 70 could be detected in Vulva cancer and abnormal cytology lesion samples, whereas, all Vaginal cancer samples exhibited only high risk HPV types; HPV 16 and 31. In conclusion, from our results in this study we suggest that women with persistent high risk HPV type infection are at risk of developing vulva and Vaginal cancers and HPV 16 was observed at the highest frequent both of these, similar to the cervical

  7. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): A 3D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69, 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo. PMID:22036637

  8. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  9. (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) in Evaluation of Osteosarcoma: Comparative Studies with (18)F-FDG PET/CT in Detection of Primary and Malignant Lesions.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyaya, G P; Gupta, Priyanka; Singh, Archana; Shukla, Jaya; Rastogi, S; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the role of (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) and [(18)F]FDG PET-CT in management of patients with osteosarcoma, 22 patients were included in our study. All patients underwent both (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) and whole-body [(18)F]FDG PET-CT scans within an interval of 1 week. 555-740 MBq of (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) was injected i.v. the whole-body planar, SPECT images of primary site and chest were performed after 3-4 hours. [(18)F]FDG PET-CT images were obtained 60 minutes after i.v. injection of 370 MBq of F-18 FDG. Both FDG PET-CT (mean SUV(max) = 7.1) and DMSA (V) scans showed abnormal uptake at primary site in all the 22 patients (100% sensitivity for both). Whole-body PET-CT detected metastasis in 11 pts (lung mets in 10 and lung + bone mets in 1 patient). Whole-body planar DMSA (V) and SPECT detected bone metastasis in one patient, lung mets in 7 patients and LN in 1 patient. HRCT of chest confirmed lung mets in 10 patients and inflammatory lesion in one patient. 7 patients positive for mets on DMSA (V) scan had higher uptake in lung lesions as compared to FDG uptake on PET-CT. Three patients who did not show any DMSA uptake had subcentimeter lung nodule. Resuts of both (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) (whole-body planar and SPECT imaging) and [(18)F]FDG PET-CT were comparable in evaluation of primary site lesions and metastatic lesions greater than 1 cm. Though (99m)Tc-DMSA (V) had higher uptake in the lesions as compared to [(18)F]FDG PET-CT, the only advantage [(18)F]FDG PET-CT had was that it could also detect subcentimeter lesions.

  10. Normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis is in a subtle balance between inflammation and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Zeis, Thomas; Graumann, Ursula; Reynolds, Richard; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS. Although progressive axonal injury and diffuse inflammatory damage has been shown in the chronic phase of the disease, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these pathological processes. In order to identify these mechanisms, we have studied the gene expression profile in non-lesion containing tissue, the so-called normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). We performed differential gene expression analysis and quantitative RT-PCR on subcortical white matter from 11 multiple sclerosis and 8 control cases. Differentially expressed genes were further analysed in detail by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence studies. We show that genes known to be involved in anti-inflammatory and protective mechanisms such as STAT6, JAK1, IL-4R, IL-10, Chromogranin C and Hif-1alpha are consistently upregulated in the multiple sclerosis NAWM. On the other hand, genes involved in pro-inflammatory mechanisms, such as STAT4, IL-1beta and MCSF, were also upregulated but less regularly. Immunofluorescence colocalization analysis revealed expression of STAT6, JAK1, IL-4R and IL-13R mainly in oligodendrocytes, whereas STAT4 expression was detected predominantly in microglia. In line with these data, in situ hybridization analysis showed an increased expression in multiple sclerosis NAWM of HIF-1alpha in oligodendrocytes and HLA-DRalpha in microglia cells. The consistency of the expression levels of STAT6, JAK1, JAK3 and IL-4R between the multiple sclerosis cases suggests an overall activation of the STAT6-signalling pathway in oligodendrocytes, whereas the expression of STAT4 and HLA-DRalpha indicates the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways in microglia. The upregulation of genes involved in anti-inflammatory mechanisms driven by oligodendrocytes may protect the CNS environment and thus limit lesion formation, whereas the activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms in microglia may favour disease

  11. HPV Genotypes in High Grade Cervical Lesions and Invasive Cervical Carcinoma as Detected by Two Commercial DNA Assays, North Carolina, 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Susan; Steinau, Martin; Rinas, Allen; Gargano, Julia W.; Ludema, Christina; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Carter, Alicia L.; Grant, Kathy L.; Bamberg, Melanie; McDermott, James E.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Brewer, Noel T.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background HPV typing using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) cervical tissue is used to evaluate HPV vaccine impact, but DNA yield and quality in FFPE specimens can negatively affect test results. This study aimed to evaluate 2 commercial assays for HPV detection and typing using FFPE cervical specimens. Methods Four large North Carolina pathology laboratories provided FFPE specimens from 299 women ages18 and older diagnosed with cervical disease from 2001 to 2006. For each woman, one diagnostic block was selected and unstained serial sections were prepared for DNA typing. Extracts from samples with residual lesion were used to detect and type HPV using parallel and serial testing algorithms with the Linear Array and LiPA HPV genotyping assays. Findings LA and LiPA concordance was 0.61 for detecting any high-risk (HR) and 0.20 for detecting any low-risk (LR) types, with significant differences in marginal proportions for HPV16, 51, 52, and any HR types. Discordant results were most often LiPA-positive, LA-negative. The parallel algorithm yielded the highest prevalence of any HPV type (95.7%). HR type prevalence was similar using parallel (93.1%) and serial (92.1%) approaches. HPV16, 33, and 52 prevalence was slightly lower using the serial algorithm, but the median number of HR types per woman (1) did not differ by algorithm. Using the serial algorithm, HPV DNA was detected in >85% of invasive and >95% of pre-invasive lesions. The most common type was HPV16, followed by 52, 18, 31, 33, and 35; HPV16/18 was detected in 56.5% of specimens. Multiple HPV types were more common in lower grade lesions. Conclusions We developed an efficient algorithm for testing and reporting results of two commercial assays for HPV detection and typing in FFPE specimens, and describe HPV type distribution in pre-invasive and invasive cervical lesions in a state-based sample prior to HPV vaccine introduction. PMID:22479516

  12. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  13. Treatment of multiple sclerosis with the pregnancy hormone estriol.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Nancy L; Liva, Stephanie M; Klutch, Rochelle; Pfeiffer, Paul; Bouvier, Seth; Odesa, Sylvia; Wu, T C Jackson; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2002-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis patients who become pregnant experience a significant decrease in relapses that may be mediated by a shift in immune responses from T helper 1 to T helper 2. Animal models of multiple sclerosis have shown that the pregnancy hormone, estriol, can ameliorate disease and can cause an immune shift. We treated nonpregnant female multiple sclerosis patients with the pregnancy hormone estriol in an attempt to recapitulate the beneficial effect of pregnancy. As compared with pretreatment baseline, relapsing remitting patients treated with oral estriol (8 mg/day) demonstrated significant decreases in delayed type hypersensitivity responses to tetanus, interferon-gamma levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and gadolinium enhancing lesion numbers and volumes on monthly cerebral magnetic resonance images. When estriol treatment was stopped, enhancing lesions increased to pretreatment levels. When estriol treatment was reinstituted, enhancing lesions again were significantly decreased. Based on these results, a larger, placebo-controlled trial of estriol is warranted in women with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. This novel treatment strategy of using pregnancy doses of estriol in multiple sclerosis has relevance to other autoimmune diseases that also improve during pregnancy.

  14. A phantom-based JAFROC observer study of two CT reconstruction methods: the search for optimisation of lesion detection and effective dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John D.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Szczepura, Katy; Vamvakas, Ioannis; Tootell, Andrew; Manning, David J.; Hogg, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose saving potential of iterative reconstruction (IR) in a computed tomography (CT) examination of the thorax. Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing various configurations of simulated lesions (5, 8, 10 and 12mm; +100, -630 and -800 Hounsfield Units, HU) was imaged on a modern CT system over a tube current range (20, 40, 60 and 80mA). Images were reconstructed with (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP). An ATOM 701D (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) dosimetry phantom was used to measure organ dose. Effective dose was calculated. Eleven observers (15.11+/-8.75 years of experience) completed a free response study, localizing lesions in 544 single CT image slices. A modified jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was completed to look for a significant effect of two factors: reconstruction method and tube current. Alpha was set at 0.05 to control the Type I error in this study. Results: For modified JAFROC analysis of reconstruction method there was no statistically significant difference in lesion detection performance between FBP and IR when figures-of-merit were averaged over tube current (F(1,10)=0.08, p = 0.789). For tube current analysis, significant differences were revealed between multiple pairs of tube current settings (F(3,10) = 16.96, p<0.001) when averaged over image reconstruction method. Conclusion: The free-response study suggests that lesion detection can be optimized at 40mA in this phantom model, a measured effective dose of 0.97mSv. In high-contrast regions the diagnostic value of IR, compared to FBP, is less clear.

  15. Radiographic detection of initial carious lesions on the proximal surfaces of teeth. Part I. The influence of exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, L.V.

    1987-08-01

    The relationship between a number of technical exposure conditions and the diagnostic value of bitewing radiographs in the interpretation of initial proximal carious lesions was evaluated. The most important exposure factors for radiographs are tube voltage, filtration, and exposure time. Tube voltage and filtration were found to have an insignificant influence on the diagnostic quality. Exposure time proved to be the most critical factor in influencing diagnostic quality. The greatest difference in diagnostic quality, however, was caused by differences between observers.

  16. Multiple sclerosis update.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Clyde E

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic but incurable disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is often diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. It is more common among women than men, significantly impairs patient quality of life, and is associated with substantial costs to patients, healthcare systems, and society. Of the approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide that have MS, more than 400,000 reside in the United States. Although the etiology of MS is not completely understood, a great deal of evidence suggests a complex relationship between environmental and genetic factors. The pathophysiology of MS involves an aberrant attack by the host immune system on oligodendrocytes, which synthesize and maintain myelin sheaths in the CNS. There are 4 identified disease courses in MS, and approximately 85% of people with MS present with relapsing-remitting MS, which is characterized by discrete acute attacks followed by periods of remission. Signs and symptoms of MS are dependent on the demyelinated area(s) of the CNS and often involve sensory disturbances, limb weakness, fatigue, and increased body temperature. The criteria for a diagnosis of MS include evidence of damage in at least 2 separate areas of the CNS, evidence that the damage occurred at different time points, and the ruling out of other possible diagnoses. Diseasemodifying drugs (DMDs) that reduce the frequency of relapses, development of brain lesions, and progression of disability are the standard of care for relapsing forms of MS, and the use of DMDs should be initiated as early as possible.

  17. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin–spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes’ positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids. PMID:19304747

  18. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  19. Hughes syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uthman, I; Noureldine, M H A; Berjawi, A; Skaf, M; Haydar, A A; Merashli, M; Hughes, G R V

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) share common clinical, laboratory and radiological features. We reviewed all the English papers on MS and APS published in the literature from 1965 to 2014 using PubMed and Google Scholar. We found that APS can mimic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-positive MS in many ways in its clinical presentation. Nevertheless, APS diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management differ from those of MS. aPL were found in MS patients with titers ranging from 2% to 88%. The distribution and volume of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to differentiate MS from primary APS. In addition, atypical MS presentation can guide physicians toward an alternative diagnosis, especially when features of thrombosis and/or history of connective tissue disease are present. In that case, an anticoagulation trial could be worthwhile.

  20. Grey matter atrophy in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás; Tóth, Eszter; Bankó, Nóra; Veréb, Dániel; Szabó, Nikoletta; Csete, Gergő; Faragó, Péter; Király, András; Bencsik, Krisztina; Vécsei, László

    2014-09-30

    White matter lesions are defining characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas grey matter involvement is a less recognised attribute. Recent investigations using dedicated imaging approaches have made it possible to depict cortical lesions. Additionally, grey matter atrophy may be estimated using various methods. Several studies have suggested that grey matter atrophy closely correlates to clinical disability. In this review we have collected information on grey matter atrophy in MS and the effect of disease modifying therapies upon brain atrophy.

  1. Treatment of Renal Angiomyolipoma and Other Hamartomas in Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Joshua A

    2017-03-16

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by growth of benign tumors (hamartomas) in multiple organs, especially the kidneys, brain, heart, lungs, and skin. Tuberous sclerosis complex is usually caused by a mutation in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or tuberous sclerosis complex 2 gene, resulting in constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Currently, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are recommended in adult patients with tuberous sclerosis complex for the treatment of asymptomatic, growing renal angiomyolipoma that are >3 cm in diameter and pediatric or adult patients with brain lesions (subependymal giant cell astrocytoma) that either are growing or are not amenable to surgical resection. Clinical evidence suggests that systemic administration of a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor may provide concurrent improvements in multiple lesions and symptoms of tuberous sclerosis complex. With the major paradigm shift in consensus guidelines toward screening at diagnosis and ongoing monitoring and with the recent availability of an effective oral treatment, it is important that nephrologists have a thorough understanding of our role in the management of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Because the various manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex typically emerge at different periods during patients' lifetimes, patients will need to be followed throughout their lives. Unlike brain and cardiac lesions, renal lesions are more likely to emerge as patients age and can grow at any time. Considerations regarding long-term medication administration for the potential control of multiple tuberous sclerosis complex manifestations will need to be addressed; these include the most appropriate starting dose, appropriate doses for tumor shrinkage versus prevention of regrowth, and management of adverse events. Best practices and potential obstacles for nephrologists treating patients

  2. Oral contraceptives combined with interferon β in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Giglio, Laura; Barletta, Valeria T.; Marinelli, Fabiana; Angelis, Floriana De; Gallo, Valentina; Pagano, Veronica A.; Marini, Stefano; Piattella, Maria C.; Tomassini, Valentina; Pantano, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the effect of oral contraceptives (OCs) in combination with interferon β (IFN-β) on disease activity in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: One hundred fifty women with RRMS were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive IFN-β-1a subcutaneously (SC) only (group 1), IFN-β-1a SC plus ethinylstradiol 20 μg and desogestrel 150 μg (group 2), or IFN-β-1a SC plus ethinylestradiol 40 μg and desogestrel 125 μg (group 3). The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of combined unique active (CUA) lesions on brain MRI at week 96. Secondary endpoints included MRI and clinical and safety measures. Results: The estimated number of cumulative CUA lesions at week 96 was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81–1.14) in group 1, 0.84 (95% CI 0.66–1.02) in group 2, and 0.72 (95% CI 0.53–0.91) in group 3, with a decrease of 14.1% (p = 0.24) and 26.5% (p = 0.04) when comparing group 1 with groups 2 and 3, respectively. The number of patients with no gadolinium-enhancing lesions was greater in group 3 than in group 1 (p = 0.03). No significant differences were detected in other secondary endpoints. IFN-β or OC discontinuations were equally distributed across groups. Conclusions: Our results translate the observations derived from experimental models to patients, supporting the anti-inflammatory effects of OCs with high-dose estrogens, and suggest possible directions for future research. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that in women with RRMS, IFN-β plus ethinylstradiol and desogestrel decreases the cumulative number of active brain MRI lesions compared with IFN-β alone. PMID:26140279

  3. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  4. Biophysical mechanisms of MRI signal frequency contrast in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Luo, Jie; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Iyer, Aditi; Cross, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    Phase images obtained with gradient echo MRI provide image contrast distinct from T1- and T2-weighted images. It is commonly assumed that the local contribution to MRI signal phase directly relates to local bulk tissue magnetic susceptibility. Here, we use Maxwell’s equations and Monte Carlo simulations to provide theoretical background to the hypothesis that the local contribution to MRI signal phase does not depend on tissue bulk magnetic susceptibility but tissue magnetic architecture—distribution of magnetic susceptibility inclusions (lipids, proteins, iron, etc.) at the cellular and subcellular levels. Specifically, we show that the regular longitudinal structures forming cylindrical axons (myelin sheaths and neurofilaments) can be locally invisible in phase images. Contrary to an expectation that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions should always increase in degree along with worsening of lesion severity (which happens for all known MR magnitude-based contrast mechanisms), we show that phase contrast can actually disappear with extreme tissue destruction. We also show that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions could be altered without loss of nervous system tissue, which happens in mild injury to the myelin sheaths or axonal neurofilaments. Moreover, we predict that the sign of phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions indicates the predominant type of tissue injury—myelin damage (positive sign) vs. axonal neurofilament damage (negative sign). Therefore, our theoretical and experimental results shed light on understanding the relationship between gradient echo MRI signal phase and multiple sclerosis pathology. PMID:22891307

  5. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, Geraldine; Niedl, Anna G.; Patronov, Atanas; Siewert, Katherina; Pinkert, Stefan; Kalemanov, Maria; Friese, Manuel A.; Attfield, Kathrine E.; Antes, Iris; Hohlfeld, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify target antigens presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–A*02:01 to the myelin-reactive human T-cell receptor (TCR) 2D1, which was originally isolated from a CD8+ T-cell clone recognizing proteolipid protein (PLP) in the context of HLA-A*03:01, we employed a new antigen search technology. Methods: We used our recently developed antigen search technology that employs plasmid-encoded combinatorial peptide libraries and a highly sensitive single cell detection system to identify endogenous candidate peptides of mice and human origin. We validated candidate antigens by independent T-cell assays using synthetic peptides and refolded HLA:peptide complexes. A molecular model of HLA-A*02:01:peptide complexes was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. Results: We identified one peptide from glycerolphosphatidylcholine phosphodiesterase 1, which is identical in mice and humans and originates from a protein that is expressed in many cell types. When bound to HLA-A*02:01, this peptide cross-stimulates the PLP-reactive HLA-A3-restricted TCR 2D1. Investigation of molecular details revealed that the peptide length plays a crucial role in its capacity to bind HLA-A*02:01 and to activate TCR 2D1. Molecular modeling illustrated the 3D structures of activating HLA:peptide complexes. Conclusions: Our results show that our antigen search technology allows us to identify new candidate antigens of a presumably pathogenic, autoreactive, human CD8+ T-cell-derived TCR. They further illustrate how this TCR, which recognizes a myelin peptide bound to HLA-A*03:01, may cross-react with an unrelated peptide presented by the protective HLA class I allele HLA-A*02:01. PMID:27231714

  6. OxLDL-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo MRI detection of perivascular carotid collar induced atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Song; Liu, Dong-Fang; Liu, Zhen; Harris, Steven; Yao, Yu-Yu; Ding, Qi; Nie, Fang; Lu, Tong; Chen, Hua-Jun; An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and oxidized LDL (OxLDL) plays a key role in the formation, rupture, and subsequent thrombus formation in atherosclerotic plaques. In the current study, anti-mouse OxLDL polyclonal antibody and nonspecific IgG antibody were conjugated to polyethylene glycol-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles, and a carotid perivascular collar model in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was imaged at 7.0 Tesla MRI before contrast administration and at 8 h and 24 h after injection of 30 mg Fe/kg. The results showed MRI signal loss in the carotid atherosclerotic lesions after administration of targeted anti-OxLDL-USPIO at 8 h and 24 h, which is consistent with the presence of the nanoparticles in the lesions. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the colocalization of the OxLDL/macrophages and iron oxide nanoparticles. The nonspecific IgG-USPIO, unconjugated USPIO nanoparticles, and competitive inhibition groups had limited signal changes (p < 0.05). This report shows that anti-OxLDL-USPIO nanoparticles can be used to directly detect OxLDL and image atherosclerotic lesions within 24 h of nanoparticle administration and suggests a strategy for the therapeutic evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. PMID:22393161

  7. Association of West Nile virus with lymphohistiocytic proliferative cutaneous lesions in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) detected by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Nevarez, Javier G; Mitchell, Mark A; Morgan, Timothy; Roy, Alma; Johnson, April

    2008-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is known to affect captive populations of alligators and, in some instances, cause significant mortalities. Alligators have been shown to amplify the virus, serve as a reservoir host, and even represent a source of infection for humans. This study describes a cutaneous manifestation of WNV in captive-reared American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), previously described as lymphohistiocytic proliferative syndrome of alligators (LPSA), based on the findings of gross examination, histopathologic evaluation, WNV antibody testing, and WNV reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Forty alligators with LPSA and 41 controls were examined. There was a significant difference (P = 0.01(-21)) in the WNV serostatus between the treatment group (100%) and the control group (0%, 95% CI: 0-7.3%). In the treatment group, 97.5% (39/40) (95% CI: 92.7-102.3%) of the LPSA skin lesions were positive for WNV via RT-PCR. Of the skin sections within the treatment group that had no LPSA lesions, 7.5% (3/40) (95% CI: 0-15.7%) were positive for WNV. In the control group, all of the skin samples were negative for WNV (41/41) (0%; 95% CI: 0-7.3%). The LPSA skin lesions were significantly more likely to be WNV positive by RT-PCR when compared to control animals (P = 0.07(-20)) and normal skin sections from affected animals (P = 0.08(-16)). There was no significant difference in the WNV RT-PCR results between control animals and normal skin sections from affected animals (P = 0.24). These findings suggest that LPSA is a cutaneous manifestation of WNV in alligators.

  8. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  9. Vision and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Simon J; Raoof, Naz; McLean, Rebecca J; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect vision in many ways, including optic neuritis, chronic optic neuropathy, retrochiasmal visual field defects, higher order cortical processing, double vision, nystagmus and also by related ocular conditions such as uveitis. There are also side effects from recently introduced multiple sclerosis treatments that can affect vision. This review will discuss all these aspects and how they come together to cause visual symptoms. It will then focus on practical aspects of how to recognise when there is a vision problem in a multiple sclerosis patient and on what treatments are available to improve vision.

  10. Distinct brain imaging characteristics of autoantibody-mediated CNS conditions and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jurynczyk, Maciej; Geraldes, Ruth; Probert, Fay; Woodhall, Mark R; Waters, Patrick; Tackley, George; DeLuca, Gabriele; Chandratre, Saleel; Leite, Maria I; Vincent, Angela; Palace, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    Brain imaging characteristics of MOG antibody disease are largely unknown and it is unclear whether they differ from those of multiple sclerosis and AQP4 antibody disease. The aim of this study was to identify brain imaging discriminators between those three inflammatory central nervous system diseases in adults and children to support diagnostic decisions, drive antibody testing and generate disease mechanism hypotheses. Clinical brain scans of 83 patients with brain lesions (67 in the training and 16 in the validation cohort, 65 adults and 18 children) with MOG antibody (n = 26), AQP4 antibody disease (n = 26) and multiple sclerosis (n = 31) recruited from Oxford neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis clinical services were retrospectively and anonymously scored on a set of 29 predefined magnetic resonance imaging features by two independent raters. Principal component analysis was used to perform an overview of patients without a priori knowledge of the diagnosis. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to build models separating diagnostic groups and identify best classifiers, which were then tested on an independent cohort set. Adults and children with MOG antibody disease frequently had fluffy brainstem lesions, often located in pons and/or adjacent to fourth ventricle. Children across all conditions showed more frequent bilateral, large, brainstem and deep grey matter lesions. MOG antibody disease spontaneously separated from multiple sclerosis but overlapped with AQP4 antibody disease. Multiple sclerosis was discriminated from MOG antibody disease and from AQP4 antibody disease with high predictive values, while MOG antibody disease could not be accurately discriminated from AQP4 antibody disease. Best classifiers between MOG antibody disease and multiple sclerosis were similar in adults and children, and included ovoid lesions adjacent to the body of lateral ventricles, Dawson's fingers, T1 hypointense lesions (multiple

  11. Widespread grey matter pathology dominates the longitudinal cerebral MRI and clinical landscape of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Menke, Ricarda A L; Körner, Sonja; Filippini, Nicola; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Diagnosis, stratification and monitoring of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis currently rely on clinical history and examination. The phenotypic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including extramotor cognitive impairments is now well recognized. Candidate biomarkers have shown variable sensitivity and specificity, and studies have been mainly undertaken only cross-sectionally. Sixty patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (without a family history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or dementia) underwent baseline multimodal magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. Grey matter pathology was identified through analysis of T1-weighted images using voxel-based morphometry. White matter pathology was assessed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis of indices derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Cross-sectional analyses included group comparison with a group of healthy controls (n = 36) and correlations with clinical features, including regional disability, clinical upper motor neuron signs and cognitive impairment. Patients were offered 6-monthly follow-up MRI, and the last available scan was used for a separate longitudinal analysis (n = 27). In cross-sectional study, the core signature of white matter pathology was confirmed within the corticospinal tract and callosal body, and linked strongly to clinical upper motor neuron burden, but also to limb disability subscore and progression rate. Localized grey matter abnormalities were detected in a topographically appropriate region of the left motor cortex in relation to bulbar disability, and in Broca's area and its homologue in relation to verbal fluency. Longitudinal analysis revealed progressive and widespread changes in the grey matter, notably including the basal ganglia. In contrast there was limited white matter pathology progression, in keeping with a previously unrecognized limited change in individual clinical upper motor neuron scores, despite advancing disability

  12. Role of Chlamydia in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, M V; Kolkova, N I; Morgunova, E Yu; Pashko, Yu P; Zigangirova, N A; Zakharova, M N

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydia and antibodies to them were detected by serological, molecular biological, and culture methods in the sera and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis and in the reference groups of subjects without neurological diseases. Correlations between the agent presence in the biological fluids of patients and clinical characteristics of the disease were analyzed. C. pneumoniae were more incident in the biological liquids of patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy volunteers. On the other hand, the incidence of the agent in the patients was not high and its presence did not correlate with the clinical manifestations. C. trachomatis was equally rare in the patients and volunteers. The studies indicated the existence of a group of patients infected by C. pneumoniae in the cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis, but the impact of this agent for the disease course remains unclear.

  13. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  14. Fatigue and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Béthoux, F

    2006-07-01

    Even if the definition and pathophysiology of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still debated, and despite the scarcity of objective markers correlated with the subjective sensation of fatigue, a review of the literature shows the importance of its detection and management, and allows one to propose therapeutic strategies. Fatigue is not only the most frequently reported symptom in MS, but also a frequent source of activity and participation limitations, psychological distress, and impairment of quality of life. Its management, which must be initiated early, is based on a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics and consequences (sometimes with the use of scales such as the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale), and on the identification of many potential contributing factors (psychological disorders, sleep disturbances, pain, infections and other comorbidities, medications, and deconditioning). Rehabilitative interventions are essential to the treatment of fatigue. Beyond the traditional energy conservation strategies and cooling techniques, several randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the positive impact of aerobic exercise. Medications are partially beneficial, and with the exception of amantadine, their efficacy has not been confirmed by randomized double-blind trials.

  15. The simultaneous detection of mitochondrial DNA damage from sun-exposed skin of three whale species and its association with UV-induced microscopic lesions and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amy; Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Gendron, Diane; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Due to life history and physiological constraints, cetaceans (whales) are unable to avoid prolonged exposure to external environmental insults, such as solar ultraviolet radiation (UV). The majority of studies on the effects of UV on skin are restricted to humans and laboratory animals, but it is important to develop tools to understand the effects of UV damage on large mammals such as whales, as these animals are long-lived and widely distributed, and can reflect the effects of UV across a large geographical range. We and others have used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a reliable marker of UV-induced damage particularly in human skin. UV-induced mtDNA strand breaks or lesions accumulate throughout the lifespan of an individual, thus constituting an excellent biomarker for cumulative exposure. Based on our previous studies in human skin, we have developed for the first time in the literature a quantitative real-time PCR methodology to detect and quantify mtDNA lesions in skin from sun-blistered whales. Furthermore the methodology allows for simultaneous detection of mtDNA damage in different species. Therefore using 44 epidermal mtDNA samples collected from 15 blue whales, 10 fin whales, and 19 sperm whales from the Gulf of California, Mexico, we quantified damage across 4.3 kilobases, a large region of the ~16,400 base pair whale mitochondrial genome. The results show a range of mtDNA damage in the skin of the three different whale species. This previously unreported observation was correlated with apoptotic damage and microscopic lesions, both of which are markers of UV-induced damage. As is the case in human studies, this suggests the potential use of mtDNA as a biomarker for measuring the effect of cumulative UV exposure in whales and may provide a platform to help understand the effects of changing global environmental conditions.

  16. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your brain and spinal cord. These neurons ... breathing machine can help, but most people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes ...

  17. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Veldink, J H; Weikamp, J; Schelhaas, H J; van den Berg, L H

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is one of the most severe and disabling diseases of the nervous system. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis leads to the progressive weakening of the muscles in the arms, legs, face, mouth and trunk. The onset of the disease is insidious, starting with weakness in the hands or feet or with slurred speech. The weakness worsens and patients pass away as a result of weakness of the respiratory muscles on average within 3 years of the onset of the disease. In the Netherlands, approximately 400 patients are diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis every year. There is no diagnostic test for this neuro-muscular disease; the diagnosis is established by excluding other disorders that resemble amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Only one drug is able to inhibit the progression of the disease to any extent: riluzole. Treatment, therefore, is mainly focused on supportive measures and those which enhance the quality of life optimally.

  18. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR for the simultaneous detection of herpes simplex and varicella zoster viruses in cerebrospinal fluid and lesion swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Wong, Anita A; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Wong, Sallene; Tellier, Raymond

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) can have very similar and wide-ranging clinical presentations. Rapid identification is necessary for timely antiviral therapy, especially with infections involving the central nervous system, neonates, and immunocompromised individuals. Detection of HSV-1, HSV-2 and VZV was combined into one real-time PCR reaction utilizing hydrolysis probes. The assay was validated on the LightCycler(®) (Roche) and Applied Biosystems 7500 Real-Time PCR System (Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.) to detect alphaherpesviruses in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and lesion swab specimens, respectively. Validation data on blood and tissue samples are also presented. The multiplex assay showed excellent sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility when compared to two singleplex real-time PCR assays for CSF samples and direct fluorescent antigen/culture for lesion swab samples. Implementation of the multiplex assay has facilitated improved sensitivity and accuracy as well as reduced turn-around-times and costs. The results from a large data set of 16,622 prospective samples tested between August 16, 2012 to February 1, 2014 at the Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (Alberta, Canada) are presented here.

  19. Impaired neurosteroid synthesis in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Maingat, Ferdinand; Warren, Kenneth G; Han, May H; Steinman, Lawrence; Baker, Glen B; Power, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    High-throughput technologies have led to advances in the recognition of disease pathways and their underlying mechanisms. To investigate the impact of micro-RNAs on the disease process in multiple sclerosis, a prototypic inflammatory neurological disorder, we examined cerebral white matter from patients with or without the disease by micro-RNA profiling, together with confirmatory reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, immunoblotting and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These observations were verified using the in vivo multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis demonstrated differential expression of multiple micro-RNAs, but expression of three neurosteroid synthesis enzyme-specific micro-RNAs (miR-338, miR-155 and miR-491) showed a bias towards induction in patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Analysis of the neurosteroidogenic pathways targeted by micro-RNAs revealed suppression of enzyme transcript and protein levels in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). This was confirmed by firefly/Renilla luciferase micro-RNA target knockdown experiments (P < 0.05) and detection of specific micro-RNAs by in situ hybridization in the brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis. Levels of important neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, were suppressed in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Induction of the murine micro-RNAs, miR-338 and miR-155, accompanied by diminished expression of neurosteroidogenic enzymes and allopregnanolone, was also observed in the brains of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (P < 0.05). Allopregnanolone treatment of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model limited the associated neuropathology, including neuroinflammation, myelin and axonal injury and reduced neurobehavioral deficits (P < 0.05). These multi-platform studies point to

  20. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  1. Cutaneous human papillomavirus types detected on the surface of male external genital lesions: A case series within the HPV Infection in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Jukic, Drazen M.; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik; Rollison, Dana E.; Sichero, Laura; Sirak, Bradley A.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lu, Beibei; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may be associated with cutaneous epithelial lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. No study has systematically evaluated the presence of genus beta [β]-HPV in male genital skin or external genital lesions (EGLs). Objectives To examine cutaneous β-HPV types detected on the surface of EGLs in men and describe their presence prior to EGL development. Study design A retrospective case series was conducted among 69 men with pathologically confirmed EGLs (n=72) who participated in the HPV Infection in Men Study. Archived exfoliated cells collected from the surface of each EGL and normal genital skin specimens 6–12 months preceding EGL development were tested for β-HPV DNA using a type-specific multiplex genotyping assay. Results β-HPV DNA was detected on 61.1% of all EGLs, with types 38 (16.7%), 5 (15.3%), and 12 (12.5%) most commonly identified. HPV prevalence differed across pathological diagnoses, with the largest number of β-HPV types detected on condylomas. Most β-HPV types were detected on normal genital skin prior to EGL development, though the prevalence was lower on EGLs compared to preceding normal genital skin. Conclusions EGLs and the normal genital skin of men harbor a large number of β-HPV types; however, it appears that β-HPVs are unrelated to EGL development in men. Despite evidence to support a causal role in skin carcinogenesis at UVR-exposed sites, cutaneous HPV appears unlikely to cause disease at the UVR-unexposed genitals. PMID:24210970

  2. Papanicolaou test in the detection of high-grade cervical lesions: a re-evaluation based on cytohistologic non-correlation rates in 356 concurrently obtained samples.

    PubMed

    Carns, Bhavini; Fadare, Oluwole

    2008-01-01

    Studies evaluating the routine Papanicolaou (Pap) test have traditionally used as the reference gold standard, the diagnoses on the follow-up histologic samples. Since the latter are typically obtained days to weeks after the Pap test, the accuracy of the resultant comparison may be affected by interim factors, such as regression of human papillomavirus, new lesion acquisitions or colposcopy-associated variability. A subset of our clinicians have routinely obtained cervical cytology samples immediately prior to their colposcopic procedures, which presented a unique opportunity to re-evaluate the test performance of liquid-based cervical cytology in detecting the most clinically significant lesions (i.e. cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or worse: CIN2+), using as gold standard, diagnoses on cervical biopsies that were essentially obtained simultaneously. For each patient, cytohistologic non-correlation between the Pap test and biopsy was considered to be present when either modality displayed a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL)/CIN2+ while the other displayed a less severe lesion. Therefore, HGSIL/CIN2+ was present in both the Pap test and biopsy in true positives, and absent in both modalities in true negatives. In false positives, the Pap test showed HGSIL while the biopsy showed less than a CIN2+. In false negatives, Pap tests displaying less than a HGSIL were associated with biopsies displaying CIN2+. Combinations associated with "atypical" interpretations were excluded. A cytohistologic non-correlation was present in 17 (4.8%) of the 356 combinations reviewed. The non-correlation was attributed, by virtue of having the less severe interpretation, to the Pap test in all 17 cases. There were 17, 322, 0, and 17 true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the Pap test, at a diagnostic threshold of HGSIL, in identifying

  3. [Comparing the activity of multiple sclerosis (MS) at the minute and at 20 minutes of gadolinium application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain?

    PubMed

    Saldívar-Uribe, Christina; de la Portilla-Villanueva, Mario Alberto; Esau-Mendoza-García, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to compare active disease in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, brain by MRI after gadolinium application at one minute and 20 minutes. A longitudinal, prospective, observational, analytical and comparative study was conducted in 18 patients over 18 years of age diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). An analysis was made for each patient, watching for inflammatory activity in MS lesions, comparing the results to one minute and 20 minutes after the application of gadolinium. For the descriptive analysis, absolute frequencies and percentages were used, as well as means and standard deviations or medians with ranges for the inferential analysis comparing the presence or absence of enhancement in lesions at one minute and 20 minutes; the exact probability test used was Fisher. Finally, the results were analyzed, looking at the gender distribution: 14 (77.8%) were female. The average age was 36.2 ± 9.5 years, with a minimum age of 18 years and a maximum of 55 years; four patients (22.2%) presented further highlight active lesions at 20 minutes, and two patients (11.1%) presented enhancement at one minute. Concluding that MRI in the diagnosis of MS is very important for the detection of activity in lesions caused by the disease, it is evident that the optimum time for evaluation of postcontrast sequences is 20 minutes.

  4. Diffusion Weighted Callosal Integrity Reflects Interhemispheric Communication Efficiency in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warlop, Nele P.; Achten, Eric; Debruyne, Jan; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relation between damage in the corpus callosum and the performance on an interhemispheric communication task in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Relative callosal lesion load defined as the ratio between callosal area and the total lesion load in the total corpus callosum, and the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)…

  5. Clinical neurophysiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, Letizia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The availability of new treatments able to modify the natural course of multiple sclerosis (MS) has generated interest in paraclinical measures to monitor disease evolution. Among these, neurophysiologic measures, mainly evoked potentials (EPs), are used in the functional assessment of central sensorimotor and cognitive networks affected by MS. EP abnormalities may reveal subclinical lesions, objectivate the involvement of sensory and motor pathways in the presence of vague disturbances, and provide indications of the demyelinating nature of the disease process. However, their diagnostic value is much lower than that of magnetic resonance imaging, and is more sensitive to brain and cervical spinal cord lesions. The application of EPs in assessing disease severity and monitoring the evolution of nervous damage is more promising, thanks to their good correlation with disability in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, and potential use as paraclinical endpoints in clinical trials. Recent evidence indicates that EPs performed early in the disease may help to predict a worse future progression in the long term. If confirmed, these data suggest the possible usefulness of EPs in the early identification of patients who are more likely to develop future disability, thus requiring more frequent monitoring or being potential candidates for more aggressive disease-modifying treatments.

  6. Detection of renal ischemic lesions using Gd-DTPA enhanced turbo FLASH MRI: Experimental and clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Vosshenrich, R.; Fischer, U.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to investigate the role of Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MRI in the evaluation of renal ischemic lesions. With a turbo FLASH sequence before and after injection of Gd-DTPA, nine foxhound dogs after 60-120 min of renal ischemia underwent MR examination. In addition, five patients with a tumor in a solitary kidney were examined before and after nephron-sparing renal surgery to evaluate renal perfusion and function. The experimental and clinical findings were correlated with conventional measurements of kidney function and with histological findings. Complete renal ischemia leads to a poor corticomedullary differentiation in Gd-DTPA-enhanced turbo FLASH MRI. The signal-intensity-versus-time plots of kidneys with significant postischemic changes show a less steep increase of signal intensity in the cortex and a steeper increase of signal intensity in the medulla than those of normal kidneys. Dynamic MRI demonstrate renal morphology and reflect the functional status of the renal vasculature. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable ...

  8. Evoked potentials in monitoring multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, L; Medaglini, S; Comi, G

    2000-01-01

    The usefulness of evoked potentials (EPs) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is limited by its relatively low sensitivity to subclinical lesions. However, they are still a good tool to assess the integrity of afferent and efferent pathways and to quantify the severity of white matter involvement. Transversal and longitudinal studies have demonstrated good correlation between EP abnormalities and disability, suggesting that multimodal evoked potentials could be useful in monitoring the disease evolution in single patients and as surrogate end points in clinical trials.

  9. Pemphigus vulgaris and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Matin, Marzieh; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune bullous and erosive mucocutaneous disease. Rarely, it occurs in patients with other autoimmune disease. The relation between PV and neurological disorders is unclear and needs to be more studied. Here, we report a case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), followed by dermatologic involvement. Histopathological evidence and direct immunofluorescence are consistent with PV. Systemic corticosteroid and azathioprine were effective in the treatment of mucocutaneous lesions. PV seems to be accidentally associated with ALS. Expression of major histocompatibility complex Class II in autoimmune disease and production of autoantibodies have been proposed to describe the association of PV with ALS. PMID:28163728

  10. Understanding the Etiology of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    of tuber- ous sclerosis. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;615:125–127.   2. European  Chromosome  16 Tuberous Sclerosis  Consortium. Identification and...our lesion lacks cytomegalic cells with a mixed neuron-glial or immature phenotype (e.g. immunostaining for nestin or proliferative markers ) called...circuitry of TSC and other mTOR-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. References Alexander GM, Rogan SC, Abbas AI, Armbruster BN, Pei Y

  11. Blue laser imaging endoscopy system for the early detection and characterization of colorectal lesions: a guide for the endoscopist

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Kazutomo; Nemoto, Daiki; Utano, Kenichi; Isohata, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Endo, Shungo; Lefor, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Blue laser imaging is a new system for image-enhanced endoscopy using laser light. Blue laser imaging utilizes two monochromatic lasers (410 and 450 nm) instead of xenon light. A 410 nm laser visualizes vascular microarchitecture, similar to narrow band imaging, and a 450 nm laser provides white light by excitation. According to three recently published reports, the diagnostic ability of polyp characterization using blue laser imaging compares favorably with narrow band imaging. No published data are available to date regarding polyp detection with blue laser imaging. However, blue laser imaging has the possibility to increase the detection of colorectal polyps by depicting brighter and clearer endoscopic images, even at a distant view, compared with first-generation image-enhanced endoscopy. A clinical trial to compare the detection between blue laser imaging and xenon light is warranted. PMID:26770267

  12. Blue laser imaging endoscopy system for the early detection and characterization of colorectal lesions: a guide for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Kazutomo; Nemoto, Daiki; Utano, Kenichi; Isohata, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Endo, Shungo; Lefor, Alan K

    2016-01-01

    Blue laser imaging is a new system for image-enhanced endoscopy using laser light. Blue laser imaging utilizes two monochromatic lasers (410 and 450 nm) instead of xenon light. A 410 nm laser visualizes vascular microarchitecture, similar to narrow band imaging, and a 450 nm laser provides white light by excitation. According to three recently published reports, the diagnostic ability of polyp characterization using blue laser imaging compares favorably with narrow band imaging. No published data are available to date regarding polyp detection with blue laser imaging. However, blue laser imaging has the possibility to increase the detection of colorectal polyps by depicting brighter and clearer endoscopic images, even at a distant view, compared with first-generation image-enhanced endoscopy. A clinical trial to compare the detection between blue laser imaging and xenon light is warranted.

  13. Stress thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy for the detection of individual coronary arterial lesions in patients with and without previous myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Rigo, P.; Bailey, I.K.; Griffith, L.S.; Pitt, B.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-08-01

    The value of stress thallium-201 scintigraphy for detecting individual coronary arterial stenoses was analyzed in 141 patients with angiographically proved coronary artery disease, 101 with and 40 without a previous myocardial infarction. In patients without infarction, the sensitivity for detecting greater than 50 percent narrowing in the left anterior descending, the right and the left circumflex coronary artery was 66, 53 and 24 percent, respectively. In those with a previous infarction, the sensitivity for demonstrating disease in the artery corresponding to the site of infarction was 100 percent for the left anterior descending, 79 percent for the right and 63 percent for the left circumflex coronary artery. In patients with a prior anterior infarction, concomitant right or left circumflex coronary arterial lesions were detected in only 1 of 12 cases, whereas in those with previous inferior or inferolateral infarction, the sensitivity for left anterior descending coronary artery disease was 69 percent. Because of the reasonably high sensitivity for detecting left anterior descending arterial disease, irrespective of the presence and location of previous infarction, myocardial scintigraphy was useful in identifying multivessel disease in patients with a previous inferior infarction. However, because of its relative insensitivity for right or left circumflex coronary artery disease, scintigraphy proved to be a poor predictor of multivessel disease in patients with a prior anterior infarction and in patients without previous myocardial infarction.

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in endodontic lesions detected by culture and by PCR.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B P F A; Jacinto, R C; Pinheiro, E T; Sousa, E L R; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R; Souza-Filho, F J

    2005-08-01

    he aim of this study was to investigate the presence of four black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, in endodontic infections by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Microbial samples were obtained from 50 teeth with untreated necrotic pulps (primary infection) and from 50 teeth with failing endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Microbiological strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation, and identification. For PCR detection, the samples were analyzed using species-specific primers of 16S rDNA and the downstream intergenic spacer region. Culture and PCR detected the test species in 13/100 and 50/100 of the study teeth, respectively. The organisms were cultured from 11/50 (22%) of primarily infected root canal samples and from 2/50 (4%) of secondary root canal samples. PCR detection identified the target species in 32/50 (64%) and 18/50 (36%) of primary and secondary infections, respectively. P. gingivalis was rarely isolated by culture methods (1%), but was the most frequently identified test species by PCR (38%). Similarly, P. endodontalis was not recovered by culture from any tooth studied, but was detected by PCR in 25% of the sampled teeth. PCR-based identification also showed higher detection rates of P. intermedia (33%) and P. nigrescens (22%) than culture (13%). In conclusion, P. gingivalis, P. endodontalis, P. intermedia, and P. nigrescens were identified more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment. Also, a higher frequency of black-pigmented species was detected by PCR than by culture.

  15. Spinal cord gray matter atrophy correlates with multiple sclerosis disability

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeger, Regina; Papinutto, Nico; Panara, Valentina; Bevan, Carolyn; Lobach, Iryna V.; Bucci, Monica; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Green, Ari J.; Jordan, Kesshi M.; Stern, William A.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zhu, Alyssa H.; Goodin, Douglas S.; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Henry, Roland G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS) cerebral gray matter (GM) atrophy correlates more strongly than white matter (WM) atrophy with disability. The corresponding relationships in the spinal cord (SC) are unknown due to technical limitations in assessing SCGM atrophy. Using phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) MRI, we determined the association of the SCGM and SCWM areas with MS disability and disease type. Methods 113 MS patients and 20 healthy controls were examined at 3T with a PSIR sequence acquired at the C2/C3 disc level. Two independent, clinically-masked readers measured the cord WM and GM areas. Correlations between cord areas and Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) were determined. Differences in areas between groups were assessed with age and sex as covariates. Results Relapsing (R) MS patients showed smaller SCGM areas than age and sex matched controls (p=0.008) without significant differences in SCWM areas. Progressive MS patients showed smaller SCGM and SCWM areas compared to RMS patients (all p≤0.004). SCGM, SCWM, and whole cord areas inversely correlated with EDSS (rho: −0.60, −0.32, −0.42, respectively; all p≤0.001). SCGM area was the strongest correlate of disability in multivariate models including brain GM and WM volumes, FLAIR lesion load, T1-lesion load, SCWM area, number of spinal cord T2 lesions, age, sex, disease duration. Brain and spinal GM independently contributed to EDSS. Interpretation SCGM atrophy is detectable in-vivo in absence of WM atrophy in RMS. It is more pronounced in progressive than RMS and contributes more to patient disability than spinal cord WM or brain GM atrophy. PMID:25087920

  16. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  17. Comparison of self-collected vaginal, vulvar and urine samples with physician-collected cervical samples for human papillomavirus testing to detect high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, John W.; Lorincz, Attila T.; Mahony, James B.; Mielzynska, Iwona; Lytwyn, Alice; Roth, Paula; Howard, Michelle; Chong, Sylvia; Daya, Dean; Chapman, William; Chernesky, Max

    2000-01-01

    Background Certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical samples are strongly associated with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and invasive cervical carcinoma. We determined and compared the test characteristics of testing for HPV with samples obtained by patients and with samples obtained by their physicians. Methods In a consecutive series of women referred to a colposcopy clinic at a teaching hospital because of abnormalities on cervical cytologic screening, 200 agreed to collect vulvar, vaginal and urine samples for HPV testing. The physician then collected cervical samples for HPV testing, and colposcopy, with biopsy as indicated, was performed. Presence of HPV was evaluated using the hybrid capture II assay (Digene Corp., Silver Spring, Md.) with a probe cocktail for 13 carcinogenic types. Cervical specimens were also tested for HPV by polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with type-specific probes. Cervical smears for cytologic examination were obtained from all women. Results High-grade lesions (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [HSIL], equivalent to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 2 or 3, and adenocarcinoma) were found in 58 (29.0%) of the 200 women. Carcinogenic types of HPV were detected in the self-collected vaginal samples of 50 (86.2%) of these 58 women, in the self-collected vulvar samples of 36 (62.1%) and in the self-collected urine samples of 26 (44.8%). Carcinogenic types of HPV were detected in the cervical samples collected by physicians for 57 (98.3%) of these 58 women. The remaining 142 women (71.0%) had normal findings or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, CIN grade 1). Test results were negative or noncarcinogenic types of HPV were detected in the self-collected vaginal samples of 76 (53.5%) of these 142 women, in the self-collected vulvar samples of 89 (62.7%) and in the self-collected urine samples of 99 (69.7%). The sensitivity for self-collected samples ranged from 44.8% to

  18. Detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in oral mucosa of women with cervical lesions and their relation to oral sex practices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have either investigated the relationship of HPV with oral cancer or the prevalence of HPV on the oral cavity. The purpose of this investigation was to study the prevalence of HPV in oral cavity of women with oral sex practices and cervical lesions. Methods Forty six (46) non-smokers and non-alcoholic patients attended the "Clínica de Displasias" of "Ciudad Juarez" were sampled. This population had a CIN diagnosis sometime between the previous six months. On previous consent they filled out a questionnaire related to their oral sex practices. Afterwards one swab from cheeks and another from palate/gum were taken; PCR was used to determine generic HPV, HPV16 and HPV18. Results Seventy two percent (72%) of the patients stated to have oral sex practices regularly which all of them were positive to HPV either in oral mucus, palate/gum or both. The total of the given results showed that 35% had HPV16; among those distributed in 26% with regular oral sex practices and 9% stated as never practiced oral sex. An association was found between oral HPV16 positivity and progression to cervical CIN advanced lesions. On the other hand HPV18 was not detected. The frequency of HPV16 was higher in buccal mucosa (23%) versus palate/gum (16%). Conclusions This study suggests that buccal HPV16 infection is associated with CIN progression. PMID:21129222

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Five Different Fecal Markers for the Detection of Precancerous and Cancerous Lesions of the Colorectum

    PubMed Central

    Rutka, Mariann; Bor, Renáta; Milassin, Ágnes; Nagy, Ferenc; Szepes, Zoltán; Szűcs, Mónika; Tiszlavicz, László; Molnár, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second deadliest malignancy worldwide. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of different fecal markers in the detection of colorectal adenomas and cancer. Methods. Stool samples of patients referred to colonoscopy were collected for the analysis of tumor M2 pyruvate kinase (M2PK), human hemoglobin (Hb), hemoglobin/haptoglobin (Hb/Hp) complex, fecal calprotectin (FC), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Results. Sensitivity and specificity of M2PK for adenomas sized > 1 cm were 60% and 67.5% and for CRC were 94.7% and 67.5%. Sensitivity and specificity of iFOBT for adenomas sized ≥ 1 cm were 80% and 72.5% and for CRC were 94.7% and 72.5%. Sensitivity and specificity of Hb/Hp complex for adenomas sized ≥ 1 cm were 80% and 52.9% and for CRC were 100% and 52.9%. Sensitivity of FC and MMP-9 for CRC was 77.8% and 72.2%. Combined use of M2PK, iFOBT, and FC resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 47.5% for the detection of adenomas sized ≥ 1 cm. Discussion. In CRC, sensitivity of M2PK, iFOBT, and Hb/Hp complex proved to be high. Combined use of M2PK, iFOBT, and FC may be valuable in the detection of large adenomas. PMID:27413251

  20. Failure to detect genomic material of HTLV-I or HTLV-II in mononuclear cells of Italian patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic progressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Merelli, E; Sola, P; Marasca, R; Salati, R; Torelli, G

    1993-01-01

    To contribute to the undecided question if a retrovirus of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) family may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), we investigated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) the presence of HTLV-I and HTLV-II sequences in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNAs from 30 patients affected by MS and 15 by chronic progressive myelopathy. Moreover a control group of 14 blood donors was examined. All these patients were devoid of anti-HTLV-I antibody in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid at ELISA. For the PCR, primers and probes specific for the tax region common to HTLV-I and HTLV-II, for the pol region of HTLV-I, and for the pol region of HTLV-II were used. In spite of the high sensitivity of the technique used, the three groups of subjects were negative for HTLV-I and HTLV-II genomic sequences.

  1. Remyelination strategies in multiple sclerosis: a critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is the natural repair mechanism of demyelination and can be a highly efficient process in multiple sclerosis. However, in the majority of lesions, this regenerative approach is incomplete or fails. It is believed that remyelination protects against progressive axonal damage and thus long-term disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. For this reason, therapeutic promotion of remyelination represents an attractive option for preventing disease progression. In this editorial we casts a critical eye over the most frequently used experimental settings which aim to uncover potential remyelination promoting drugs. This article reflects upon the personal opinion of the author who currently used animal models allow to assess the potency of pharmacological interventions to accelerate, but not to induce myelin repair. Furthermore, it is discussed how remyelination and neuroprotection might well be two separate entities. Thus, induction of remyelination does not necessarily prevent disease progression in multiple sclerosis patients.

  2. Covalently Linked Tandem Lesions in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patrzyc, Helen B.; Dawidzik, Jean B.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.; Wilton, John H.; Box, Harold C.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution. PMID:23106212

  3. Distinction of seropositive NMO spectrum disorder and MS brain lesion distribution

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Rita; Jenkinson, Mark; Küker, Wilhelm; Luppe, Sebastian; Leite, Maria Isabel; Giorgio, Antonio; De Stefano, Nicola; Robertson, Neil; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Evangelou, Nikos; Palace, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can present similarly to relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Using a quantitative lesion mapping approach, this research aimed to identify differences in MRI brain lesion distribution between aquaporin-4 antibody–positive NMOSD and RRMS, and to test their diagnostic potential. Methods: Clinical brain MRI sequences for 44 patients with aquaporin-4 antibody–positive NMOSD and 50 patients with RRMS were examined for the distribution and morphology of brain lesions. T2 lesion maps were created for each subject allowing the quantitative comparison of the 2 conditions with lesion probability and voxel-wise analysis. Results: Sixty-three percent of patients with NMOSD had brain lesions and of these 27% were diagnostic of multiple sclerosis. Patients with RRMS were significantly more likely to have lesions adjacent to the body of the lateral ventricle than patients with NMOSD. Direct comparison of the probability distributions and the morphologic attributes of the lesions in each group identified criteria of “at least 1 lesion adjacent to the body of the lateral ventricle and in the inferior temporal lobe; or the presence of a subcortical U-fiber lesion; or a Dawson's finger-type lesion,” which could distinguish patients with multiple sclerosis from those with NMOSD with 92% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 98% positive predictive value, and 86% negative predictive value. Conclusion: Careful inspection of the distribution and morphology of MRI brain lesions can distinguish RRMS and NMOSD. PMID:23486868

  4. Effect of Radiation Dose Reduction and Reconstruction Algorithm on Image Noise, Contrast, Resolution, and Detectability of Subtle Hypoattenuating Liver Lesions at Multidetector CT: Filtered Back Projection versus a Commercial Model-based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Patel, Bhavik; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-02-07

    Purpose To determine the effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction (IR) on noise, contrast, resolution, and observer-based detectability of subtle hypoattenuating liver lesions and to estimate the dose reduction potential of the IR algorithm in question. Materials and Methods This prospective, single-center, HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A dual-source computed tomography (CT) system was used to reconstruct CT projection data from 21 patients into six radiation dose levels (12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) on the basis of two CT acquisitions. A series of virtual liver lesions (five per patient, 105 total, lesion-to-liver prereconstruction contrast of -15 HU, 12-mm diameter) were inserted into the raw CT projection data and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (B31f kernel) and sinogram-affirmed IR (SAFIRE) (I31f-5 kernel). Image noise (pixel standard deviation), lesion contrast (after reconstruction), lesion boundary sharpness (average normalized gradient at lesion boundary), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Next, a two-alternative forced choice perception experiment was performed (16 readers [six radiologists, 10 medical physicists]). A linear mixed-effects statistical model was used to compare detection accuracy between FBP and SAFIRE and to estimate the radiation dose reduction potential of SAFIRE. Results Compared with FBP, SAFIRE reduced noise by a mean of 53% ± 5, lesion contrast by 12% ± 4, and lesion sharpness by 13% ± 10 but increased CNR by 89% ± 19. Detection accuracy was 2% higher on average with SAFIRE than with FBP (P = .03), which translated into an estimated radiation dose reduction potential (±95% confidence interval) of 16% ± 13. Conclusion SAFIRE increases detectability at a given radiation dose (approximately 2% increase in detection accuracy) and allows for imaging at reduced radiation dose (16% ± 13), while maintaining low

  5. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  6. Visible and near infrared autofluorescence and hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy for the investigation of colorectal lesions and detection of exogenous fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Kevin R.; Wood, Tobias C.; Goldin, Robert D.; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Elson, Daniel S.

    2009-02-01

    Colonoscopy is the most widely prescribed method of colonic imaging for the clinical surveillance of colorectal cancer. This white light-based imaging technique is often used for the detection of adenomatous polyps, the dysplastic precursors of cancer, that are subsequently removed to prevent progression to colonic carcinoma. However, some adenomas are diminutive and flat, making them difficult to discriminate from non-neoplastic tissue even for the most experienced of colonoscopists. We report here an optical system for performing excitation resolved visible and near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence imaging and hyperspectral reflectance imaging for the investigation of differences in the spectral signatures between neoplastic and non-neoplastic mucosa along the gastrointestinal tract. This is demonstrated on ex vivo colorectal tissues using our multimodal laparoscopic imaging system, which consists of a supercontinuum excitation source and a digital multimirror device (DMD) for tuneable wavelength selection. We also demonstrate the discrimination of exogenous fluorophores applied to the tissue using the Isomap dimensionality reduction technique for visualisation of the acquired image data.

  7. Detection of PrPSc in lung and mammary gland is favored by the presence of Visna/maedi virus lesions in naturally coinfected sheep

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Eider; Monleón, Eva; Bolea, Rosa; Acín, Cristina; Pérez, Marta; Álvarez, Neila; Leginagoikoa, Iratxe; Juste, Ramón; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Reina, Ramsés; Glaria, Idoia; Berriatua, Eduardo; de Andrés, Damián; Badiola, Juan José; Amorena, Beatriz; Luján, Lluís

    2010-01-01

    There are few reports on the pathogenesis of scrapie (Sc) and Visna/maedi virus (VMV) coinfections. The aim of this work was to study in vivo as well as post mortem both diseases in 91 sheep. Diagnosis of Sc and VMV infections allowed the distribution of animals into five groups according to the presence (+) or absence (−) of infection by Sc and VMV: Sc−/VMV−, Sc−/VMV+, Sc+/VMV− and Sc+/VMV+. The latter was divided into two subgroups, with and without VMV-induced lymphoid follicle hyperplasia (LFH), respectively. In both the lung and mammary gland, PrPSc deposits were found in the germinal center of hyperplasic lymphoid follicles in the subgroup of Sc+/VMV+ having VMV-induced LFH. This detection was always associated with (and likely preceded by) PrPSc observation in the corresponding lymph nodes. No PrPSc was found in other VMV-associated lesions. Animals suffering from scrapie had a statistically significantly lower mean age than the scrapie free animals at the time of death, with no apparent VMV influence. ARQ/ARQ genotype was the most abundant among the 91 ewes and the most frequent in scrapie-affected sheep. VMV infection does not seem to influence the scrapie risk group distribution among animals from the five groups established in this work. Altogether, these data indicate that certain VMV-induced lesions can favor PrPSc deposits in Sc non-target organs such as the lung and the mammary gland, making this coinfection an interesting field that warrants further research for a better comprehension of the pathogenesis of both diseases. PMID:20423698

  8. Regressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Black, C; Dieppe, P; Huskisson, T; Hart, F D

    1986-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a disease which usually progresses or reaches a plateau with persistence of symptoms and signs. Regression is extremely unusual. Four cases of established scleroderma are described in which regression is well documented. The significance of this observation and possible mechanisms of disease regression are discussed. Images PMID:3718012

  9. Collimator optimization in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer and realistic background variability for lesion detection and joint detection and localization tasks

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    In SPECT imaging, collimators are a major factor limiting image quality and largely determine the noise and resolution of SPECT images. In this paper, we seek the collimator with the optimal tradeoff between image noise and resolution with respect to performance on two tasks related to myocardial perfusion SPECT: perfusion defect detection and joint detection and localization. We used the Ideal Observer (IO) operating on realistic background-known-statistically (BKS) and signal-known-exactly (SKE) data. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC (LROC) curves (AUCd, AUCd+l), respectively, were used as the figures of merit for both tasks. We used a previously developed population of 54 phantoms based on the eXtended Cardiac Torso Phantom (XCAT) that included variations in gender, body size, heart size and subcutaneous adipose tissue level. For each phantom, organ uptakes were varied randomly based on distributions observed in patient data. We simulated perfusion defects at six different locations with extents and severities of 10% and 25%, respectively, which represented challenging but clinically relevant defects. The extent and severity are, respectively, the perfusion defect's fraction of the myocardial volume and reduction of uptake relative to the normal myocardium. Projection data were generated using an analytical projector that modeled attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response effects, a 9% energy resolution at 140 keV, and a 4 mm full-width at half maximum (FWHM) intrinsic spatial resolution. We investigated a family of eight parallel-hole collimators that spanned a large range of sensitivity-resolution tradeoffs. For each collimator and defect location, the IO test statistics were computed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 540 pairs of defect-present and -absent images that included the aforementioned anatomical and uptake variability. Sets of test statistics were computed

  10. Collimator optimization in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer and realistic background variability for lesion detection and joint detection and localization tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, collimators are a major factor limiting image quality and largely determine the noise and resolution of SPECT images. In this paper, we seek the collimator with the optimal tradeoff between image noise and resolution with respect to performance on two tasks related to myocardial perfusion SPECT: perfusion defect detection and joint detection and localization. We used the Ideal Observer (IO) operating on realistic background-known-statistically (BKS) and signal-known-exactly (SKE) data. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC (LROC) curves (AUCd, AUCd+l), respectively, were used as the figures of merit for both tasks. We used a previously developed population of 54 phantoms based on the eXtended Cardiac Torso Phantom (XCAT) that included variations in gender, body size, heart size and subcutaneous adipose tissue level. For each phantom, organ uptakes were varied randomly based on distributions observed in patient data. We simulated perfusion defects at six different locations with extents and severities of 10% and 25%, respectively, which represented challenging but clinically relevant defects. The extent and severity are, respectively, the perfusion defect’s fraction of the myocardial volume and reduction of uptake relative to the normal myocardium. Projection data were generated using an analytical projector that modeled attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response effects, a 9% energy resolution at 140 keV, and a 4 mm full-width at half maximum (FWHM) intrinsic spatial resolution. We investigated a family of eight parallel-hole collimators that spanned a large range of sensitivity-resolution tradeoffs. For each collimator and defect location, the IO test statistics were computed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for an ensemble of 540 pairs of defect-present and -absent images that included the aforementioned anatomical and uptake variability. Sets of test statistics were

  11. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C D

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the main reasons for invalidation of young adults of both sexes. The disease is more common in women than in men. The illness begins most frequently in patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, which is also the most fertile period for women. MS is an immune-mediated disease with chronic evolution marked by exacerbations and remissions that amplify the degree of disability. The most common clinical picture is the one with relapse and remission whose evolution is greatly improved after immunomodulatory treatment. We have revised the literature together with the data from the national multiple sclerosis society and the cases that are in the National Programme of Multiple Sclerosis, mainly the ones that are assigned to the regional center of Iaşi, at the Neurology Clinic inside the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital Iaşi. Pregnancy is quite frequent in female patients with MS. Certain risks are present during pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding and certain protocols must be applied, such as interrupting the immunomodulatory treatment before the conception. Child delivery must be closely monitored and it must take into consideration the dysfunction that the patient has and be adapted to the existing deficits. There are some methods that may be used during delivery for female patients with multiple sclerosis in order to make this process smooth and reduce the risk of postpartum complications. Multiple sclerosis is an invalidating disease, with a high prevalence in women. Pregnancy in patients with MS is not such a natural phenomenon as in a healthy female and it requires a multidisciplinary team in order to ensure the safety of both the mother and the newborn.

  12. Multiple sclerosis and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen-Ni; He, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by episodic and progressive neurologic dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. The underlying pathogenesis of MS remains largely unclear. However, it is currently accepted as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Among other clinical manifestations, sexual dysfunction (SD) is a painful but still underreported and underdiagnosed symptom of the disorder. SD in MS patients may result from a complex set of conditions and may be associated with multiple anatomic, physiologic, biologic, medical and psychological factors. SD arises primarily from lesions affecting the neural pathways involved in physiologic function. In addition, psychological factors, the side effects of medications and physical symptoms such as fatigue, muscular weakness, menstrual changes, pain and concerns about bladder and bowel incontinence may also be involved. Since MS primarily affects young people, SD secondary to MS may have a great impact on quality of life. Thus, maintaining a healthy sexual life with MS is an important priority. The treatment of SD requires multidisciplinary teamwork and cooperation among specialists, individual patients, partners and the society. PMID:22447199

  13. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms.

  14. Cone-beam computed tomography versus digital periapical radiography in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions: A pilot study of the diagnostic accuracy of endodontists using both techniques

    PubMed Central

    Campello, Andrea Fagundes; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Guedes, Fábio Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of previously trained endodontists in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography (DPR). Materials and Methods An ex vivo model using dry skulls was used, in which simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged using #1/2, #2, #4, and #6 round burs. A total of 11 teeth were included in the study, and 110 images were obtained with CBCT and with an intraoral digital periapical radiographic sensor (Instrumentarium dental, Tuusula, Finland) initially and after each bur was used. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated. All images were evaluated by 10 previously trained, certified endodontists. Agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient. The accuracy of each method in detecting apical lesions was calculated using the chi-square test. Results The kappa coefficient between examiners showed low agreement (range, 0.17-0.64). No statistical difference was found between CBCT and DPR in teeth without apical lesions (P=.15). The accuracy for CBCT was significantly higher than for DPR in all corresponding simulated lesions (P<.001). The correct diagnostic rate for CBCT ranged between 56.9% and 73.6%. The greatest difference between CBCT and DPR was seen in the maxillary teeth (CBCT, 71.4%; DPR, 28.6%; P<.01) and multi-rooted teeth (CBCT, 83.3%; DPR, 33.3%; P<.01). Conclusion CBCT allowed higher accuracy than DPR in detecting simulated lesions for all simulated lesions tested. Endodontists need to be properly trained in interpreting CBCT scans to achieve higher diagnostic accuracy. PMID:28361026

  15. Early detection of denervated muscle fibers in hindlimb muscles after sciatic nerve transection in wild type mice and in the G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, T; Ly, V; Hegedus, J; Tyreman, N

    2009-02-01

    The cell adhesion molecule N-CAM is localized to the adult neuromuscular junction but is also expressed in the extrajunctional membrane of denervated muscles concurrent with extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors. Here we used N-CAM immunohistochemistry to determine whether we could detect early denervation in hindlimb muscles of the G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In denervated wild type mouse muscles, N-CAM immunoreactivity on the sarcolemma of all fiber types and within the sarcoplasm of only type IIA fibers was detected at day 2: approximately 30% of the muscle fibers in cross-section were fully circumscribed by N-CAM immunoreactivity and approximately 25% of fibers were incompletely circumscribed. The proportion of the latter fibers remained constant over the next 8 days as the proportions of the former fibers increased exponentially. Thereafter, fully circumscribed muscle fibers increased to a maximum by 30 days with a concomitant fall in the incompletely circumscribed fibers. Hence, early muscle denervation was detected by the incomplete circumscription of fiber membranes by N-CAM immunoreactivity with full circumscription and intracellular localization indicating more long-term denervation. In the G93A transgenic mouse, rapid denervation of fast-twitch muscles was readily detected by a corresponding proportion of muscle fibers in cross-section with positive N-CAM immunoreactivity. The proportions of incompletely and completely circumscribed muscle fibers corresponded well with the rate of decline in intact motor units and reduced muscle contractile forces. Progressively more fully circumscribed muscle fibers became evident with age. We conclude that the N-CAM immunoreactivity on muscle fiber membranes in muscle cross-sections provides a sensitive means of detecting early muscle fiber denervation.

  16. Pontine lesions mimicking acute peripheral vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thomke, F.; Hopf, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Clinical signs of acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV) were repeatedly reported with pontine lesions. The clinical relevance of such a mechanism is not known, as most studies were biased by patients with additional clinical signs of brainstem dysfunction.
METHODS—Masseter reflex (MassR), blink reflex (BlinkR), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and DC electro-oculography (EOG) were tested in 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of unilateral APV.
RESULTS—Forty five of the 232 patients (19.4%) had at least one electrophysiological abnormality suggesting pontine dysfunction mainly due to possible vertebrobasilar ischaemia (22 patients) and multiple sclerosis (eight patients). MassR abnormalities were seen in 24patients, and EOG abnormalities of saccades and following eye movements occurred in 22 patients. Three patients had BlinkR-R1 abnormalities, and one had delayed BAEP waves IV and V. Clinical improvement was almost always (32 of 34 re-examined patients) associated with improvement or normalisation of at least one electrophysiological abnormality. Brain MRI was done in 25 of the 44 patients and confirmed pontine lesions in six (two infarcts, three inflammations, one tumour).
CONCLUSIONS—Pontine dysfunction was suggested in 45 of 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of APV on the basis of abnormal electrophysiological findings, and was mainly attributed to brainstem ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. The frequency of pontine lesions mimicking APV is underestimated if based on MRI established lesions only.

 PMID:10084533

  17. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... primary lateral sclerosis, juvenile Merck Manual Consumer Version: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Motor Neuron Diseases Patient Support and ... domains, is mutated in a form of recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nat Genet. 2001 Oct;29(2):160-5. ...

  18. Pregnancy-like (pseudolactational) hyperplasia: a primary diagnosis in mammographically detected lesions of the breast and its relationship to cystic hypersecretory hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Rosen, P P

    2000-12-01

    Pregnancy-like (pseudolactational) hyperplasia (PLH) has long been recognized as an incidental finding in breast biopsies performed for various clinically detected benign and malignant conditions. The histologic features of PLH have been well described, including some instances exhibiting cytologic and structural atypia. The presence of calcifications in these lesions was rarely mentioned and was considered to be of little consequence. More recently, however, calcifications in PLH have become the target of needle localization and needle core biopsies. The authors report 12 instances in which PLH was the primary diagnosis in biopsy specimens obtained for radiographic abnormalities, usually calcifications. Six of 12 procedures (50.0%) were performed for mammographically detected calcifications, four cases for a mass, one for an "abnormal mammogram," and one for galactorrhea. Calcifications were present in PLH in 10 biopsies, in benign terminal ducts in one specimen, and were not identified histologically in the remaining specimen. In most instances, calcifications associated with PLH had smooth round or lobulated contours and distinctive, internal, unevenly spaced laminations. Cystic hypersecretory hyperplasia (CHH) was present in five specimens. In four of the five specimens, CHH merged with PLH (PLH/CHH). Four of 12 specimens (33.3%) showed atypia within foci of PLH/CHH. PLH should be recognized as a primary diagnosis in breast biopsies for mammographically detected abnormalities such as calcifications. Some calcifications associated with PLH have a distinctive histologic appearance, and their recognition can aid in the diagnosis of PLH. Additional cases of PLH/CHH must be studied to ascertain the clinical significance, if any, of this previously undescribed entity. The precancerous significance of PLH/CHH and of PLH with atypia has not been determined. In most instances, surgical excision would be prudent if PLH/ CHH or PLH with atypia is present in a needle core

  19. Synergy in combining findings from mammography and ultrasonography in detecting malignancy in women with higher density breasts and lesions over 2 cm in Albania

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Albana

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study To provide evidence of the synergy of combining findings from mammography (MM) and ultrasonography (US) in detecting malignancy in women with high-density breasts. Material and methods A total of 245 women were screened for breast cancer using both mammography and ultrasonography at the American Hospital in Tirana during 2013–2014. The data was used to identify possible benefits in detecting malignancy, by combining the findings of MM and US and confirming them with those of the biopsy. Data on age, breast density, BI-RADS classification, and biopsy confirmations were collected and analysed. Results Out of the 245 women, 36 biopsies were taken (17 for women classified BI-RADS 4 and 5; 19 for women with BI-RADS 3 that had grown in size from the previous examination). The accuracy in detecting malignancy for low-density-breast women was 90% for MM, 70% for US, and 90% for combined. For high-density breasts, the accuracy was 65% for MM, 79% for US, and 82% for combined findings. Multivariate analysis indicates that high-density-breast women who have a malignant finding in at least one of the examinations (MM or US) are 24 times more likely (p = 0.039) to have a positive finding in biopsy for malignancy. The odds increased 32 times for lesions over 2 cm (p = 0.056). Conclusions Our study results indicate additional benefits of combining findings from MM and US for high-density-breast women. Further study is warranted in a larger population and for different kinds of cancer. PMID:28239286

  20. Outcome of initially only magnetic resonance mammography-detected findings with and without correlate at second-look sonography: distribution according to patient history of breast cancer and lesion size.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Zuiani, Chiara; Londero, Viviana; Bazzocchi, Massimo

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the outcome of initially only magnetic resonance mammography (MRM)-detected breast lesions as a function of radiologic features, history of breast cancer and lesion size. We evaluated core needl