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Sample records for sea effects obtained

  1. A preliminary study on the sea effect correction of magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained at the Ulleung Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Choi, H.

    2016-12-01

    Ulleung Island is a quaternary volcanic island located in the northern edge of the Ulleung Basin in the Ease Sea (Sea of Japan), where a number of geological and geophysical surveys have been performing to develop the geothermal resources of the island in recent. According to the previous geophysical studies, a highly positive Bouguer anomaly has been reported in and around the island, indicating that the depth of the Moho in this region is much shallow. To reveal the nature of the deep part of the Ulleung Island, we examine the deep geoelectrical structure of the island using magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained. In such an insular setting, it is not easy to properly infer the deep structures such as the lower crust and the upper mantle using MT data, because their low-frequency components are strongly affected by the sea surrounding the island. To estimate the sea effect, we set up a simple synthetic model consisting of the seas surrounding the island and a homogeneous half space with a resistivity of 100 ohm-m, and then perform 3-D forward MT modeling for this model. The modeling results show that the sea effect starts to appear at frequencies below 10 Hz, which means that for reliable interpretation on the deep part of the island we need to correct the sea effect from the observed MT data. We apply the iterative sea-effect correction method of Yang et al. (2010) to the observed MT data, and infer a representative 1-D resistivity model derived from the inversion results for corrected MT data.

  2. Sea pavement using sulfur obtained from coal gasification. Research report for dec 80-jul 81

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinskas, M.M.; LaChance, H.C.; Nashold, F.G.

    1981-10-01

    A sulfur-extended asphalt (SEA) pavement using sulfur obtained from a coal gasification process was placed in a commuter parking lot. This report covers the design, mixing and placement of the SEA material and associated problems.

  3. Determination of the amount of Cs-137 in the sea water obtained from the Dardanelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataseven, D.; Şen, S.

    2017-02-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, high concentrations of Cs-137 radioisotope reached the Black Sea through dry and wet fallout. Therefore, a number of studies were performed to determine the current activity of Cs-137 near this region in the sea water and in marine organisms. Cs-137 activity was determined in the Dardanelles sea water taken from three separate locations and two different depths for each location. The old data base obtained in our previous studies was updated.

  4. Ice Thickness Estimation of Thin Sea Ice Using Active Microwave Sensor Data Obtained at Different Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brath, M.; Kern, S.; Stammer, D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to estimate thin sea ice thickness based on multi-frequency and multi-angle RADAR backscatter measurements. The method is based on the inversion of a first order backscattering model using Monte Carlo methods without any need for additional measured data than the measured radar cross section (RCS) except an optional guess of the surface temperature. The method is applied to RCS data obtained with the Multi3Scat during August and September 2007 over the Arctic Ocean. The Multi3Scat is a helicopter-borne scatterometer of the University of Hamburg, which simultaneously measures the like-polarization RCS at five different frequencies between 1 GHz and 15 GHz (in frequency bands L, S, C, X, and Ku) at incidence angles of 20° to 65°. A video and an infrared camera simultaneously sense the surface in the scatterometer's footprint for additional, independent information. The uncertainty of the thin sea ice thickness estimates obtained with our method is about 5 cm when combining two or more frequencies but only about 10 cm when using just one frequency. Thin sea ice thickness values obtained with our method are of the same order of independent in-situ observations.

  5. Sea Level Variability During The 1993-1999 Obtained From A Assimilation of Topex/poseidon Altimetry Into A Global Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, J.; Wenzel, M.; Schroeter, J.

    Sea surface height variability is studied from ocean model simulations and altimer data. The estimate of the ocean state is obtained by constraining the LSG model of the Max Plank Institute of Meteorology, Hamburg. Seven years (1993-1999) TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) sea surface heights relative to the EGM96 geoid model are assimilated into the model. 4D-VAR is used to optimize a set of control variables. The impact of the geoid data is presented by comparing the results from assimilating of mean plus time variability of sea surface heigh, or assimilating of sea level tempo- ral anomaly provided by T/P only. The sea surface height variability is analyzed. The individual effects of thermal and haline variability on the sea level are investigated as well.

  6. Assessment Of Sea Surface Salinity Obtain From SMOS And Aquarius Satellites Over Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calla, O. P. N.; Dadhich, Harendra Kumar; Singhal, Shruti

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, assessment is done of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) obtained from both SMOS and Aquarius satellites for couple of months over Indian Ocean (IO). The SSS values of the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO) are being investigated as the North Indian Ocean (NIO) is found much corrupted with the Radio Frequency Interference and even due to large variability of SSS in IO; the study area has been divided into different sub regions. The data of both the satellites at same location and of same processing level that is Level-2 have been procured and evaluated. The resolution factor is also being taken care for both onboard sensors. The resolution of SMOS L2 data products [1] is 15 X 15 Km and for Aquarius there are three different resolutions according to the BEAM's. BEAM 1 has a resolution of 76 X 94 Km, BEAM 2 has 84X120Km and BEAM3 has 96X156Km. The data have been averaged of SMOS [2] in the same way so as to match up with Aquarius resolution. By this paper we want to convince the readers that measuring SSS from space is a practical idea. SSS remote sensing now bears no more scientific perils than other remote sensing techniques did in their formative years. Advancing technology with proper resources has significantly reduced the errors.

  7. Multiscroll Chaotic Sea Obtained from a Simple 3D System Without Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Sajad; Pham, Viet-Thanh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    Recently, many rare chaotic systems have been found including chaotic systems with no equilibria. However, it is surprising that such a system can exhibit multiscroll chaotic sea. In this paper, a novel no-equilibrium system with multiscroll hidden chaotic sea is introduced. Besides having multiscroll chaotic sea, this system has two more interesting properties. Firstly, it is conservative (which is a rare feature in three-dimensional chaotic flows) but not Hamiltonian. Secondly, it has a coexisting set of nested tori. There is a hidden torus which coexists with the chaotic sea. This new system is investigated through numerical simulations such as phase portraits, Lyapunov exponents, Poincaré map, and frequency spectra. Furthermore, the feasibility of such a system is verified through circuital implementation.

  8. Analysis of geophysical well logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole, Salton Sea geothermal area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    A complete suite of conventional geophysical well logs was obtained in the upper part of a 3220-m-deep borehole drilled into geothermally altered alluvial sediments on the southeastern edge of the Salton Sea. Geophysical logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole indicate that neutron porosity, gamma-gamma, and deep-induction logs provide useful information on lithologic trends with depth. The natural gamma log contains almost continuous, high-frequency fluctuations that obscure lithologic trends and that may be related to recent radioisotope redistribution and departure from radiometric equilibrium. Acoustic transit time logs give unrealistically low in situ compressional velocities ranging from 1.8 to 3.0 km/s, whereas acoustic waveform logs indicate that sediment compressional velocities range from less than 3.0 km/s shallower than 1000 m in depth to almost 5.0 km/s at depths greater than 2000 m. Analyses indicate that most log values lie between two lithologic end points: an electrically conductive claystone with moderate neutron porosity, but no effective porosity, and an electrically nonconductive, fully cemented siltstone that has small but finite porosity. -from Authors

  9. Sea level record obtained from submerged the Great Barrier Reef coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Esat, T. M.; Thompson, W. G.; Thomas, A. L.; Webster, J.; Miyairi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Okuno, J.; Fallon, S.; Braga, J.; Humblet, M.; Iryu, Y.; Potts, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    The last glacial is an interesting time in climate history. The growth and decay of large northern hemisphere ice sheets acting in harmony with major changes in ocean circulation amplified climate variations and resulted in severe and rapid climate swings throughout this time. The variability is not limited to climate but includes rapid, large scale changes in sea level recorded by tropical corals (eg., Yokoyama and Esat, 2011 Oceanography). Research done in the last decade using corals provides a better picture of the climate system, though only a few samples older than 15 ka are available. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 325 drilled 34 holes across 17 sites in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia to recover fossil coral reef deposits. We recovered reef materials from water depth to 126 m that ranged in age from 9,000 years to older than 30,000 years ago covering several paleoclimatologically important events, including the Last Glacial Maximum. Two transects separated more than 600 km apart show an identical sea-level history thereby verifying the reliability of the records. Radiometrically dated corals and coralline algae indicate periods of rapid sea-level fluctuation at this time, likely due to complex interactions between ocean currents and ice sheets of the North Atlantic.

  10. Assessment of wind products obtained from multiple microwave scatterometers over the China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixiong; Zhao, Chaofang

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface winds (SSWs) are vital to many meteorological and oceanographic applications, especially for regional study of short-range forecasting and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) assimilation. Spaceborne scatterometers can provide global ocean surface vector wind products at high spatial resolution. However, given the limited spatial coverage and revisit time for an individual sensor, it is valuable to study improvements of multiple microwave scatterometer observations, including the advanced scatterometer onboard parallel satellites MetOp-A (ASCAT-A) and MetOp-B (ASCAT-B) and microwave scatterometers aboard Oceansat-2 (OSCAT) and HY-2A (HY2-SCAT). These four scatterometer-derived wind products over the China Seas (0°-40°N, 105°-135°E) were evaluated in terms of spatial coverage, revisit time, bias of wind speed and direction, after comparison with ERA-Interim forecast winds from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and spectral analysis of wind components along the satellite track. The results show that spatial coverage of wind data observed by combination of the four sensors over the China Seas is about 92.8% for a 12-h interval at 12:00 and 90.7% at 24:00, respectively. The analysis of revisit time shows that two periods, from 5:30-8:30 UTC and 17:00-21:00 UTC each day, had no observations in the study area. Wind data observed by the four sensors along satellite orbits in one month were compared with ERA-Interim data, indicating that bias of both wind speed and direction varies with wind speed, especially for speeds less than 7 m/s. The bias depends on characteristics of each satellite sensor and its retrieval algorithm for wind vector data. All these results will be important as guidance in choosing the most suitable wind product for applications and for constructing blended SSW products.

  11. Representation of the Weddell Sea Anomaly obtained by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slominska, E.; Blecki, J. S.; Slominski, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recently it has become apparent that the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) and the mid-latitude nighttime summer anomaly (MSNA) are phenomena, which are governed by similar mechanisms. Key questions relate to the fact how do those anomalies set up or how does spatial and altitudinal structure evolve. In-situ registrations of electron density from the Langmuir probe onboard three Swarm satellites are used to study the spatial and temporal evolution of nighttime plasma density enhancements. The study introduces the normalized density difference index INDD to provide global estimates of the phenomenon. The advantage of the index is, that it provides relative values and can be used for further comparison with external missions and exhisting ionospheric models (like IRI). With proposed index, we find signatures the Weddell Sea Anomaly and mid-latitude nighttime summer anomaly in the ionosphere. The study provides evidence that occurrence of the WSA and MSNA is not limited to the local summer conditions but tends to occur in remaining seasons. Analyzed annual trends and spatial pattern of INDD suggest that observed anomalies evince similarity with the behaviour of the equatorial ionosphere. Multi-instrumental analysis based on the Swarm data provide better insight into the WSA phenomenon and should help to acquire full understanding of responsible processes.

  12. Analysis of vector magnetic anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea magnetic exploration by AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical surveys near the seafloor are very effective methods in order to investigate fine structures of the oceanic crust. Such surveys have increased in researches and developments of the seafloor, and will be more and more necessary in the future. For example, seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits have recently focused attention behind the international situation for natural resources like a competition of resources development. In order to estimate accurate abundance of those resources, the above detailed investigations should be needed because of low resolution of geophysical surveys on the sea and low efficiency of exploratory drilling. From such a viewpoint, we have been developing a measurement system for magnetic explorations using an AUV and a deep-tow system. The magnetic exploration system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, one/two Overhauser magnetometer(s), an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this system can measure three components and total intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep sea. In 2009, the first test of the magnetic exploration system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the magnetic exploration system was further tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The

  13. Effective Charge on Polymer Colloids Obtained Using a Renormalization Model.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Pérez; Callejas-Fernández; Hidalgo-Álvarez

    1998-10-01

    Static light scattering has been used to study the electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles. Experiments were carried out using a latex with a very small diameter, allowing structure determination at high particle concentration. The obtained effective charge characterizing this interaction is found to be smaller than the bare charge determined from titration. A renormalization model connecting both values has been used. The agreement between the renormalized charge and that obtained from scattering data seems to point out that this model operates well. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of reverse-transcribed bacterial rRNA obtained from deep-sea cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fumio; Sakihama, Yuri; Inoue, Akira; Kato, Chiaki; Horikoshi, Koki

    2002-05-01

    A depth profile of naturally occurring bacterial community structures associated with the deep-sea cold seep push-core sediment in the Japan Trench at a depth of 5343 m were evaluated using molecular phylogenetic analyses of RNA reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) amplified 16S crDNA fragments. A total of 137 clones of bacterial crDNA (complimentary rDNA) phylotypes (phylogenetic types) obtained at three different depths (2-4, 8-10 and 14-16 cm) were identified in partial crDNA sequencings. crDNA phylotypes from the cold seep sediment were dominantly composed of delta- and epsilon-Proteobacteria (36% and 42% respectively). Phylotype analysis of crDNA clone libraries and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the majority of bacterial components shifted from delta- Proteobacteria to epsilon-Proteobacteria with increasing depth. Among the delta-proteobacterial crDNA clones, the sequences related to the genus Desulfosarcina were dominant. Almost all sequences of crDNA belonging to epsilon-Proteobacteria were affiliated with the same cluster (epsilon-CSG: epsilon-proteobacterial cold seep group), and were closely related with rDNA sequences from deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

  15. Orbital and suborbital variability in North Atlantic bottom water temperature obtained from deep-sea ostracod Mg/Ca ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; DeMartino, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios were measured in the deep-sea ostracod (Crustacea) genus Krithe from Chain core 82-24-4PC from the western mid-Atlantic Ridge (3427 m) in order to estimate ocean circulation and bottom water temperature (BWT) variability over the past 200,000 years. Mg/Ca ratios have been used as a paleothermometer because the ratios are controlled primarily by ambient water temperatures at the time the organism secretes its adult carapace. Over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles, Mg/Ca values oscillated between about 7 mmol/mol and 12 mmol/mol, equivalent to a BWT range of 0 to > 3.5??C. The lowest values were obtained on specimens from glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 2, 4 and 6; the highest values were obtained from specimens from the early part of the Holocene interglacial (MIS 1), and also from MISs 5 and 7. These trends suggest that BWTs in the North Atlantic Ocean fluctuate over orbital time scales. Suborbital variability in Mg/Ca ratios and BWT was also observed for the past 100,000 years. Ratios rose from ~8 mmol/mol to ~10 mmol/mol (implying a BWT increase of ~1 to 3??C) during 14 Mg/Ca excursions. The highest ratios were found in Krithe dated at approximately 32, 36-38, 43, 48, 73, 85 and 93 ka. Although the age model for the Chain 82-24-4PC and temporal resolution do not allow precise correlation, some of these deep-sea bottom temperature excursions appear to correspond to Heinrich events recorded in other regions of the North Atlantic and perhaps Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadial events recorded in Greenland ice cores. If confirmed, this would support the hypothesis that millennial-scale oscillations of climate in the North Atlantic are capable of affecting global climate via thermohaline circulation changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Determination of effective loss factors in reduced SEA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimeno Manguán, M.; Fernández de las Heras, M. J.; Roibás Millán, E.; Simón Hidalgo, F.

    2017-01-01

    The definition of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models for large complex structures is highly conditioned by the classification of the structure elements into a set of coupled subsystems and the subsequent determination of the loss factors representing both the internal damping and the coupling between subsystems. The accurate definition of the complete system can lead to excessively large models as the size and complexity increases. This fact can also rise practical issues for the experimental determination of the loss factors. This work presents a formulation of reduced SEA models for incomplete systems defined by a set of effective loss factors. This reduced SEA model provides a feasible number of subsystems for the application of the Power Injection Method (PIM). For structures of high complexity, their components accessibility can be restricted, for instance internal equipments or panels. For these cases the use of PIM to carry out an experimental SEA analysis is not possible. New methods are presented for this case in combination with the reduced SEA models. These methods allow defining some of the model loss factors that could not be obtained through PIM. The methods are validated with a numerical analysis case and they are also applied to an actual spacecraft structure with accessibility restrictions: a solar wing in folded configuration.

  17. Osteoblast-like cell response to macro- and micro-patterned carbon scaffolds obtained from the sea rush Juncus maritimus.

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, M; Pereiro, I; Serra, J; de Carlos, A; González, P

    2011-08-01

    Carbon scaffolds with a directional patterned surface were obtained by pyrolysis of the sea rush Juncus maritimus. The structure of the scaffolds was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and interferometric profilometry. X-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence were the techniques used for their chemical characterization. The alignment and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cell line) incubated on the patterned scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and by the quantification of the phosphatase alkaline activity and the osteocalcin synthesis. It was found that pyrolysis at 500 °C preserved and even enhanced the natural macro- and micro-patterning of the plant. The results obtained for porosity and chemical composition validated these structures as viable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the patterned surface was confirmed to promote the oriented growth of the pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1, not only after short periods of incubation (hours) but also after longer ones (several weeks). The quantification of the cell differentiation markers together with the evaluation of the cell layer morphology up to 28 days of incubation confirmed the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells to osteoblasts. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  18. Dynamic Effects of Airborne Water Droplets on Air-Sea Interactions: Sea-Spray and Rain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY...In order to assure a sufficiently long residence time to obtain statistical properties for this test case, the droplet was released at 10 meters...velocity is approximately 85% of the 10 -m wind speed. It should be noted that this effect also exist with sea spray, albeit to a lesser extent

  19. BcIV, a new paralyzing peptide obtained from the venom of the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum. A comparison with the Na+ channel toxin BcIII.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joacir Stolarz; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Ferreira, Wilson Alves; Konno, Katsuhiro; Shida, Cláudio Saburo; Richardson, Michael; Lúcio, Aline Duarte; Beirão, Paulo Sérgio Lacerda; de Freitas, José Carlos

    2006-10-01

    Sea anemones produce a wide variety of biologically active compounds, such as the proteinaceous neurotoxins and cytolysins. Herein we report a new peptide, purified to homogeneity from the neurotoxic fraction of B. caissarum venom, by using gel filtration followed by rp-HPLC, naming it as BcIV. BcIV is a 41 amino acid peptide (molecular mass of 4669 amu) possessing 6 cysteines covalently linked by three disulfide bonds. This toxin has 45 and 48% of identity when compared to APETx1 and APETx2 from Anthopleura elegantissima, respectively, and 42% of identity with Am-II and BDS-I and-II obtained from Antheopsis maculata and Anemonia sulcata, respectively. This neurotoxin presents only a weak-paralyzing action (minimal Lethal Dose close to 2000 microg/kg) in swimming crabs Callinectes danae. This appears to be a different effect to that caused by the type 1 sea anemone toxin BcIII that is lethal to the same animals at lower doses (LD50=219 microg/kg). Circular dichroism spectra of BcIII and BcIV show a high content of beta-strand secondary structure in both peptides, very similar to type 1 sodium channel toxins from various sea anemones, and to APETx1 and APETx2 from A. elegantissima, a HERG channel modulator and an ASIC3 inhibitor, respectively. Interestingly, BcIII and BcIV have similar effects on the action potential of the crab leg nerves, suggesting the same target in this tissue. As BcIII was previously reported as a Na+ channel effector and BcIV is inactive over Na+ currents of mammalian GH3 cells, we propose a species-specific action for this new molecule. A molecular model of BcIV was constructed using the structure of the APETx1 as template and putative key residues are discussed.

  20. Evaluating the substantive effectiveness of SEA: Towards a better understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, D. van; Driessen, P.P.J.; Schijf, B.; Runhaar, H.A.C.

    2013-01-15

    Evaluating the substantive effectiveness of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is vital in order to know to what extent the tool fulfills its purposes and produces expected results. However, the studies that have evaluated the substantive effectiveness of SEA produce varying outcomes as regards the tool's contribution to decision-making and have used a variety of approaches to appraise its effectiveness. The aim of this article is to discuss the theoretical concept of SEA substantive effectiveness and to present a new approach that can be applied for evaluation studies. The SEA effectiveness evaluation framework that will be presented is composed of concepts of, and approaches to, SEA effectiveness derived from SEA literature and planning theory. Lessons for evaluation can be learned from planning theory in particular, given its long history of analyzing and understanding how sources of information and decisions affect (subsequent) decision-making. Key concepts of this new approach are 'conformance' and 'performance'. In addition, this article presents a systematic overview of process and context factors that can explain SEA effectiveness, derived from SEA literature. To illustrate the practical value of our framework for the assessment and understanding of substantive effectiveness of SEA, three Dutch SEA case studies are examined. The case studies have confirmed the usefulness of the SEA effectiveness assessment framework. The framework proved helpful in order to describe the cumulative influence of the three SEAs on decision-making and the ultimate plan. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new framework to evaluate the substantive effectiveness of SEA is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework is based on two key concepts: 'conformance' and 'performance.' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The practical applicability of the framework is demonstrated by three Dutch cases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework allows for a more

  1. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  2. Comparing Inversion Strategies for Obtaining 2-D Temperature Images of the South China Sea from Seismic Oceanography Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, T. M.; Padhi, A.; Mallick, S.; Fortin, W. F.; Holbrook, W.

    2012-12-01

    receiver). We show results for all three approaches applied to a section of seismic data obtained in the South China Sea. Coincident expendable bathythermograph (XBT) profiles are available so that our inverted temperature models can be compared to the measured temperature. The first two strategies (poststack and local PWI) use starting models obtained from the GA inversion for a few CMPs spaced along the section. None of the three approaches require temperature measurements (e.g., from XBTs) making them applicable to seismic data lacking coincident XBT profiles, although smoothed XBT profiles can be used as starting models if they are available. In this presentation, we discuss the improvements that can be obtained in the inverted 2-D temperature images with corresponding increases in required effort without using measured temperature profiles.

  3. Effects of Mackenzie River Discharge and Bathymetry on Sea Ice in the Beaufort Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Rigor, I. G; Li, P.; Neumann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mackenzie River discharge and bathymetry effects on sea ice in the Beaufort Sea are examined in 2012 when Arctic sea ice extent hit a record low. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature revealed warmer waters closer to river mouths. By 5 July 2012, Mackenzie warm waters occupied most of an open water area about 316,000 sq km. Surface temperature in a common open water area increased by 6.5 C between 14 June and 5 July 2012, before and after the river waters broke through a recurrent landfast ice barrier formed over the shallow seafloor offshore the Mackenzie Delta. In 2012, melting by warm river waters was especially effective when the strong Beaufort Gyre fragmented sea ice into unconsolidated floes. The Mackenzie and other large rivers can transport an enormous amount of heat across immense continental watersheds into the Arctic Ocean, constituting a stark contrast to the Antarctic that has no such rivers to affect sea ice.

  4. Validation of Mean Absolute Sea Level of the North Atlantic obtained from Drifter, Altimetry and Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximenko, Nikolai A.

    2003-01-01

    Mean absolute sea level reflects the deviation of the Ocean surface from geoid due to the ocean currents and is an important characteristic of the dynamical state of the ocean. Values of its spatial variations (order of 1 m) are generally much smaller than deviations of the geoid shape from ellipsoid (order of 100 m) that makes the derivation of the absolute mean sea level a difficult task for gravity and satellite altimetry observations. Technique used by Niiler et al. for computation of the absolute mean sea level in the Kuroshio Extension was then developed into more general method and applied by Niiler et al. (2003b) to the global Ocean. The method is based on the consideration of balance of horizontal momentum.

  5. A practical method for obtaining useful quantities of pheromones from sea lamprey and other fishes for identification and control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, J.M.; Sisler, S.P.; Vrieze, L.A.; Swink, W.D.; Sorensen, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Pheromonally-mediated trapping is currently being developed for use in sea lamprey control in the Laurentian Great Lakes. To identify and test lamprey pheromones a practical procedure was needed to isolate relatively large quantities of pheromone from lamprey holding water. The present study developed such a technique. It employs Amberlite XAD7HP, an adsorbent resin which we found can extract over 80% of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone from larval holding water at low cost and with relative ease. This technique allowed its to collect tens of milligrams of all three components of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone, eventually permitting both identification and successful field testing. This technique might also be used to collect pheromones released by other species of fish.

  6. The effect of droplets in the air-sea transition zone on the sea brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C. C. H.

    1974-01-01

    A model is presented which shows that, for a fully developed sea driven by the wind with speeds above 5 m/sec the air in the transition zone immediately above the air-sea interface is mixed with sea water droplets from bursting air bubbles. The absorptive droplet concentration in the zone is assumed to have a profile tapering off from the interface to zero at a certain height. The dielectric constant of the absorptive inhomogeneous droplet profile is thus both a function of the wind speed and the height above the interface. Both the inhomogeneity effect and the absorption-emission effect of the droplet concentration have been considered. Theoretical calculations show that the presence of the absorptive inhomogeneous droplet transition zone significantly increases the sea brightness temperature as wind speed rises. Combined effects of both the droplet areas and the foam areas on sea surface have also been considered.

  7. Nail surgery: best way to obtain effective anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, Nathaniel J; Vélez, Nicole F

    2015-04-01

    Nail procedures require an effective and reliable approach to anesthesia of the distal digit. Several techniques have been described in the literature. Herein, the relevant anatomy of the nail unit, pain pathways, anesthetic options, and several injection approaches to achieve complete anesthesia are reviewed. Also considered are the potential pitfalls and complications and their management. Ultimately, the physician's approach must be individualized to the patient, procedure, and setting.

  8. Estimating the effective nitrogen import: An example for the North Sea-Baltic Sea boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, H.; Maar, M.

    2016-10-01

    Semienclosed water bodies such as the Baltic Sea are prone to eutrophication problems. If local nutrient abatement measures are taken to tackle these problems, their success may be limited if a strong nutrient exchange with the adjacent waters exists. The quantification of this exchange is therefore essential to estimate its impact on the ecosystem status. At the example of the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, we illustrate that neither gross transports nor net transports of nutrients have a strong informative value in this context. Instead, we define an "effective import" as the import of nutrients which have not been inside the Baltic Sea before and estimate it in an ecological model with a nutrient-tagging technique. This effective import of bioreactive nitrogen from the Skagerrak to the Kattegat amounts to 103 kt/yr; from Kattegat to Belt Sea it is 54 kt/yr. The nitrogen exchange is therefore 30% stronger than other estimates, e.g., based on import in the deep water, suggest. An isolated view on the Baltic Sea and the North Sea in terms of eutrophication, as it is practiced in management today, is therefore questionable. Nitrogen imported from the North Sea typically spreads eastward up to the Bornholm Basin but can be transported into the deep waters of the Gotland Basin during Major Baltic Inflows in a significant amount.

  9. Effects of internal tidal dissipation and self-attraction and loading on semidiurnal tides in the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea and East China Sea: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Fang, Guohong; Xu, Xiaoqing

    2017-09-01

    A parameterized internal tide dissipation term and self-attraction and loading (SAL) tide term are introduced in a barotropic numerical model to investigate the dynamics of semidiurnal tidal constituents M 2 and S 2 in the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea and East China Sea (BYECS). The optimal parameters for bottom friction and internal dissipation are obtained through a series of numerical computations. Numerical simulation shows that the tide-generating force contributes 1.2% of M 2 power for the entire BYECS and up to 2.8% for the East China Sea deep basin. SAL tide contributes 4.4% of M 2 power for the BYECS and up to 9.3% for the East China Sea deep basin. Bottom friction plays a major role in dissipating tidal energy in the shelf regions, and the internal tide effect is important in the deep water regions. Numerical experiments show that artificial removal of tide-generating force in the BYECS can cause a significant difference (as much as 30 cm) in model output. Artificial removal of SAL tide in the BYECS can cause even greater difference, up to 40 cm. This indicates that SAL tide should be taken into account in numerical simulations, especially if the tide-generating force is considered.

  10. Effects of internal tidal dissipation and self-attraction and loading on semidiurnal tides in the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea and East China Sea: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Fang, Guohong; Xu, Xiaoqing

    2016-09-01

    A parameterized internal tide dissipation term and self-attraction and loading (SAL) tide term are introduced in a barotropic numerical model to investigate the dynamics of semidiurnal tidal constituents M2 and S2 in the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea and East China Sea (BYECS). The optimal parameters for bottom friction and internal dissipation are obtained through a series of numerical computations. Numerical simulation shows that the tide-generating force contributes 1.2% of M2 power for the entire BYECS and up to 2.8% for the East China Sea deep basin. SAL tide contributes 4.4% of M2 power for the BYECS and up to 9.3% for the East China Sea deep basin. Bottom friction plays a major role in dissipating tidal energy in the shelf regions, and the internal tide effect is important in the deep water regions. Numerical experiments show that artificial removal of tide-generating force in the BYECS can cause a significant difference (as much as 30 cm) in model output. Artificial removal of SAL tide in the BYECS can cause even greater difference, up to 40 cm. This indicates that SAL tide should be taken into account in numerical simulations, especially if the tide-generating force is considered.

  11. Investigation of sea level trends and the effect of the north atlantic oscillation (NAO) on the black sea and the eastern mediterranean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgenc Aksoy, Aysegul

    2017-07-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) has significant effects on sea levels, weather, and climate. In this study, the sea level trends and the effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation Indices (NAOI) on annual mean sea level data were assessed for the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The trends of sea level and NAOI were determined using Mann-Kendall dimensionless z statistics. Generally, upward sea level trends were detected for the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. In the Black Sea, significant and continuous upward trends were detected after the year 1950. Weaker trends were detected for the Eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea. Sea level trends were correlated with trends in NAO indices; negative correlations were detected for the Black Sea, whereas positive correlations were found for the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Paired t tests were performed to determine the turning points for all sea level data sets. The value of t was positive for all data sets, which means that the mean value of the data set before the turning point was smaller than the mean value of the data set after the turning point.

  12. An evaluation of deep-sea benthic megafauna length measurements obtained with laser and stereo camera methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, Katherine M.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Ruhl, Henry A.; Huffard, Christine L.; Caress, David W.; Henthorn, Richard G.; Hobson, Brett W.; McGill, Paul; Smith, Kenneth L.

    2015-02-01

    The 25 year time-series collected at Station M, ~4000 m on the Monterey Deep-sea Fan, has substantially improved understanding of the role of the deep-ocean benthic environment in the global carbon cycle. However, the role of deep-ocean benthic megafauna in carbon bioturbation, remineralization and sequestration is relatively unknown. It is important to gather both accurate and precise measurements of megafaunal community abundance, size distribution and biomass to further define their role in deep-sea carbon cycling and possible sequestration. This study describes initial results from a stereo camera system attached to a remotely operated vehicle and analyzed using the EventMeasure photogrammetric measurement software to estimate the density, length and biomass of 10 species of mobile epibenthic megafauna. Stereo length estimates were compared to those from a single video camera system equipped with sizing lasers and analyzed using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's Video Annotation and Reference System. Both camera systems and software were capable of high measurement accuracy and precision (<±1 mm measurement error and precision). However, the oblique angle of the single video camera caused the spatial scale of the image perspective to change with distance from the camera, resulting in error when measurements were not parallel or vertical to two horizontal-oriented scaling lasers. Analysis showed that the stereo system recorded longer lengths and higher biomass estimates than the single video camera system for the majority of the 10 megafauna species studied. The stereo image analysis process took substantially longer than the video analysis and the value of the EventMeasure software tool would be improved with developments in analysis automation. The stereo system is less influenced by object orientation and height, and is potentially a useful tool to be mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle and for measuring deep-sea pelagic animals where

  13. Analysis of Experimental Sea-level Transient Data and Analog Method of Obtaining Altitude Response for Turbine-propeller Engine with Relay-type Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasu, George; Pack, George J

    1951-01-01

    Correlation has been established between transient engine and control data obtained experimentally and data obtained by simulating the engine and control with an analog computer. This correlation was established at sea-level conditions for a turbine-propeller engine with a relay-type speed control. The behavior of the controlled engine at altitudes of 20,000 and 35,000 feet was determined with an analog computer using the altitude pressure and temperature generalization factors to calculate the new engine constants for these altitudes. Because the engine response varies considerably at altitude some type of compensation appears desirable and four methods of compensation are discussed.

  14. Vertical ship motions and sea loads considering nonlinear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham, I.; Weller, T.

    1986-12-01

    A mathematical model dealing with vertical motions and longitudinal strength of a ship, whose shape deviates from the linear theory assumptions, was developed. The model includes nonlinear effects stemming from ship flexibility, widening of side walls in the waterline region and ship bottom emersion. The model also considers coupling between ship response and exciting forces (hydroelastic). Based on the mathematical model equations, a computer program was written to calculate the motions and stresses, developed in a prescribed ship hull sailing at a given speed and course in a given sinusoidal type sea. Calculations obtained for a fast patrol boat and an aircraft carrier featured by a large bow flare, demonstrated very good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with results measured in sea trials. The method of solution proposed resulted in a time saving computer program, which can be applied effectively for a parametric study of the many factors which affect the whipping phenomenon. The program can also be used as an auxiliary tool at the design stage of new ships and for the determination of sailing envelopes of existing ships.

  15. Effect of surface mesoscale eddies on deep-sea currents and mixing in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Liu, Zhifei; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Jianru; Liang, Xinfeng

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that deep-reaching surface-generated eddies result in anomalous current velocities in the deep sea, and ultimately lead to energy transfer from mesoscale to small-scale motions. Here we examine the influence of mesoscale eddies on deep-sea subinertial and near-inertial currents, and on possible enhanced oceanic mixing in the deep South China Sea (SCS). We analyzed current velocity data for nearly a full water column. Data were obtained using acoustic Doppler current profilers and recording current meters on a deep-sea mooring system at a depth of 2100 m in the northeastern SCS from October 2012 to May 2013. A highly nonlinear southwestward-propagating anticyclonic eddy was detected via a resolved sea-surface-level anomaly. This eddy induced pronounced subinertial currents with a characteristic time scale of 1-2 months and a maximum velocity of up to 0.2 m s-1 at the subsurface and 0.1 m s-1 at great depth. Near-inertial energy co-occurring with subinertial flows showed a distinctive vertical propagation trend during strong subinertial oscillations in the deep sea. During periods of strong subinertial and near-inertial kinetic energy, estimates of diapycnal diffusivity in the deep ocean showed approximately 10-fold enhancement, with a mean value of 1.2×10-3 m2 s-1 compared to the background value of 1.4×10-4 m2 s-1. The results provide observational evidence of the effect of surface-observed mesoscale motions on benthic currents and ocean mixing in the deep SCS.

  16. Tidal effects of disconnected hydrocarbon seas on Titan.

    PubMed

    Dermott, S F; Sagan, C

    1995-03-16

    Thermodynamic and photochemical arguments suggest that Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, has a deep ocean of liquid hydrocarbons. At visible wavelengths, Titan's surface is obscured by a thick stratospheric haze, but radar observations have revealed large regions of high surface reflectivity that are inconsistent with a global hydrocarbon ocean. Titan's surface has also been imaged at infrared wavelengths, and the highest-resolution data (obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope) show clear variations in surface albedo and/or topography. The natural interpretation of these observations is that Titan, like the Earth, has continents and oceans. But Titan's high orbital eccentricity poses a problem for this interpretation, as the effects of oceanic tidal friction would have circularized Titan's orbit for most configurations of oceans and continents. Here we argue that a more realistic topography, in which liquid hydrocarbons are confined to a number of disconnected seas or crater lakes, may satisfy both the dynamical and observational constraints.

  17. Effects of heavy sea quarks at low energies.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mattia; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Leder, Björn; Sommer, Rainer

    2015-03-13

    We present a factorization formula for the dependence of light hadron masses and low energy hadronic scales on the mass M of a heavy quark: apart from an overall mass-independent factor Q, ratios such as r_{0}(M)/r_{0}(0) are computable in perturbation theory at large M. The perturbation theory part is stable concerning different loop orders. Our nonperturbative Monte Carlo results obtained in a model calculation, where a doublet of heavy quarks is decoupled, match quantitatively to the perturbative prediction. Upon taking ratios of different hadronic scales at the same mass, the perturbative function drops out and the ratios are given by the decoupled theory up to M^{-2} corrections. We verify-in the continuum limit-that the sea quark effects of quarks with masses around the charm mass are very small in such ratios.

  18. Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and coastal zone management

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are expected to warm the earth several degrees in the next century by a mechanism known as the greenhouse effect. Such a warming could cause sea level to rise two to five feet by expanding ocean water, melting mountain glaciers, and perhaps eventually causing polar glaciers to melt and slide into the oceans. A rise in sea level of even three feet could cause substantial erosion of beaches and coastal wetlands, increased flooding, and intrusion of salt water into rivers, bays, and aquifer. Fortunately, many of the adverse consequences can be avoided by taking timely measures in anticipation of sea level rise. Nevertheless, many coastal zone managers are reluctant to take these measures until the prospect of sea level rise becomes more certain. This article examines the implications of future sea level rise and identifies anticipatory measures that may be appropriate today in spite of current uncertainties. 46 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Effects of sea maturity on satellite altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Pilorz, Stuart H.

    1990-01-01

    For equilibrium and near-equilibrium sea states, the wave slope variance is a function of wind speed U and of the sea maturity. The influence of both factors on the altimeter measurements of wind speed, wave height, and radar cross section is studied experimentally on the basis of 1 year's worth of Geosat altimeter observations colocated with in situ wind and wave measurements by 20 NOAA buoys. Errors and biases in altimeter wind speed and wave height measurements are investigted. A geophysically significant error trend correlated with the sea maturity is found in wind-speed measurements. This trend is explained by examining the effect of the generalized wind fetch on the curves of the observed dependence. It is concluded that unambiguous measurements of wind speed by altimeter, in a wide range of sea states, are impossible without accounting for the actual degree of wave development.

  20. Effects of sea maturity on satellite altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Pilorz, Stuart H.

    1990-01-01

    For equilibrium and near-equilibrium sea states, the wave slope variance is a function of wind speed U and of the sea maturity. The influence of both factors on the altimeter measurements of wind speed, wave height, and radar cross section is studied experimentally on the basis of 1 year's worth of Geosat altimeter observations colocated with in situ wind and wave measurements by 20 NOAA buoys. Errors and biases in altimeter wind speed and wave height measurements are investigted. A geophysically significant error trend correlated with the sea maturity is found in wind-speed measurements. This trend is explained by examining the effect of the generalized wind fetch on the curves of the observed dependence. It is concluded that unambiguous measurements of wind speed by altimeter, in a wide range of sea states, are impossible without accounting for the actual degree of wave development.

  1. Draft Genome of Scalindua rubra, Obtained from the Interface Above the Discovery Deep Brine in the Red Sea, Sheds Light on Potential Salt Adaptation Strategies in Anammox Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Speth, Daan R; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Dutilh, Bas E; Jetten, Mike S M

    2017-07-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that members of the phylum Planctomycetes are abundantly present at the brine-seawater interface (BSI) above multiple brine pools in the Red Sea. Planctomycetes include bacteria capable of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Here, we investigated the possibility of anammox at BSI sites using metagenomic shotgun sequencing of DNA obtained from the BSI above the Discovery Deep brine pool. Analysis of sequencing reads matching the 16S rRNA and hzsA genes confirmed presence of anammox bacteria of the genus Scalindua. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that this Scalindua sp. belongs to a distinct group, separate from the anammox bacteria in the seawater column, that contains mostly sequences retrieved from high-salt environments. Using coverage- and composition-based binning, we extracted and assembled the draft genome of the dominant anammox bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that this Scalindua species uses compatible solutes for osmoadaptation, in contrast to other marine anammox bacteria that likely use a salt-in strategy. We propose the name Candidatus Scalindua rubra for this novel species, alluding to its discovery in the Red Sea.

  2. Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    To further society's understanding of how to rationally respond to the possibility of a substantial rise in level, EPA has undertaken assessments of the impacts of sea level rise on economic development, beach erosion control strategies, salinity of estuaries and aquifers, and coastal drainage and sewage systems. Those studies have generally found that even a one-foot rise in a sea level has important implications for the planning and design of coastal facilities. This report examines the potential impacts of sea level on coastal wetlands in the United States. Coastal marshes and swamps are generally within a few feet of sea level, and hence could be lost if seal level rises significantly. Although new wetlands could form where new areas are flooded, this cannot happen where the land adjacent to today's wetlands is developed and protected from the rising sea. Once built, neighborhoods can be expected to last a century or longer. Therefore, todays coastal development could limit the ability of coastal wetlands to survive sea level in the next century. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the greenhouse effect, projections of future sea level rise, the basis for expecting significant impacts on coastal wetlands, and possible responses. Chapters 2 and 3 present case studies of the potential impacts on wetlands around Charleston, South Carolina, and Long Beach Island, New Jersey, based on field surveys. Chapter 4 presents a first attempt to estimate the nationwide impact, based on topographic maps. Finally, Chapter 5 describes measures that wetland protection officials can take today. This report neither examines the impact of sea level rise on specific federal programs nor recommends specific policy changes.

  3. The effects of large beach debris on nesting sea turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Lamont, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to understand the effects of large beach debris on sea turtle nesting behavior as well as the effectiveness of large debris removal for habitat restoration. Large natural and anthropogenic debris were removed from one of three sections of a sea turtle nesting beach and distributions of nests and false crawls (non-nesting crawls) in pre- (2011–2012) and post- (2013–2014) removal years in the three sections were compared. The number of nests increased 200% and the number of false crawls increased 55% in the experimental section, whereas a corresponding increase in number of nests and false crawls was not observed in the other two sections where debris removal was not conducted. The proportion of nest and false crawl abundance in all three beach sections was significantly different between pre- and post-removal years. The nesting success, the percent of successful nests in total nesting attempts (number of nests + false crawls), also increased from 24% to 38%; however the magnitude of the increase was comparably small because both the number of nests and false crawls increased, and thus the proportion of the nesting success in the experimental beach in pre- and post-removal years was not significantly different. The substantial increase in sea turtle nesting activities after the removal of large debris indicates that large debris may have an adverse impact on sea turtle nesting behavior. Removal of large debris could be an effective restoration strategy to improve sea turtle nesting.

  4. Late Pleistocene variations in Antarctica sea ice. I - Effect of orbital isolation changes. II - Effect of interhemispheric deep-ocean heat exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model is presently used to ascertain the effects of orbitally-induced insolation changes on Antarctic sea-ice cover; the results thus obtained are compared with modified CLIMAP reconstructions of sea-ice 18,000 years ago. The minor influence exerted by insolation on Pleistocene sea-ice distributions is attributable to a number of factors. In the second part of this investigation, variations in the production of warm North Atlantic Deep Water are proposed as a mechanism constituting the linkage between climate fluctuations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the Pleistocene; this hypothesis is tested by examining the sensitivity of the dynamic-thermodynamic model for Antarctic sea-ice changes in vertical ocean heat flux, and comparing the simulations with modified CLIMAP sea-ice maps for 18,000 years ago.

  5. Late Pleistocene variations in Antarctica sea ice. I - Effect of orbital isolation changes. II - Effect of interhemispheric deep-ocean heat exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model is presently used to ascertain the effects of orbitally-induced insolation changes on Antarctic sea-ice cover; the results thus obtained are compared with modified CLIMAP reconstructions of sea-ice 18,000 years ago. The minor influence exerted by insolation on Pleistocene sea-ice distributions is attributable to a number of factors. In the second part of this investigation, variations in the production of warm North Atlantic Deep Water are proposed as a mechanism constituting the linkage between climate fluctuations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the Pleistocene; this hypothesis is tested by examining the sensitivity of the dynamic-thermodynamic model for Antarctic sea-ice changes in vertical ocean heat flux, and comparing the simulations with modified CLIMAP sea-ice maps for 18,000 years ago.

  6. The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn

    2000-01-01

    We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed anomalies in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra suggest an advective forcing of SST anomalies by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST anomalies. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH anomalies is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.

  7. Sea breezes and advective effects in southwest James Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckendry, Ian; Roulet, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Observations from a transect extending 100 km inland during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) in 1990 show that the sea breeze develops on approximately 25% of days during summer and may penetrate up to 100 km inland on occasions. The sea breeze exhibits a marked diurnal clockwise rotation as a result of the Coriolis effect along the unobstructed coastline. The marine advective effect is shown to depend on gradient wind direction. With northwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to be northeasterly in direction and is associated with decreased temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD). With southwesterly upper level flow the sea breeze tends to have a southeasterly direction and less effect on temperatures and VPD. This is attributed to shorter residence times of air parcels over water. For two cases, Colorado State University mesoscale model simulations show good agreement with surface wind observations and suggest that under northwesterly gradient flow, Bowen ratios are increased in the onshore flow along western James Bay, while during southwesterly gradient flow these effects are negligible. These results have implications for the interpretation of local climate, ecology, and hydrology as well as land-based and airborne turbulent flux measurements made during NOWES.

  8. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  9. Improving Accuracy of Acoustic Prediction in the Philippine Sea through Incorporation of Mesoscale Environmental Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    OF ACOUSTIC PREDICTION IN THE PHILIPPINE SEA THROUGH INCORPORATION OF MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS by Kimberly M. Freitas June 2008...in the Philippine Sea through Incorporation of Mesoscale Environmental Effects 6. AUTHOR(S) Kimberly Freitas 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...warfare. In the tactically important Philippine Sea , powerful mesoscale eddies can have strong effects on acoustic fields. To quantify eddy effects, a

  10. Evaluating the effect of synchronized sea lice treatments in Chile.

    PubMed

    Arriagada, G; Stryhn, H; Sanchez, J; Vanderstichel, R; Campistó, J L; Rees, E E; Ibarra, R; St-Hilaire, S

    2017-01-01

    The sea louse is considered an important ectoparasite that affects farmed salmonids around the world. Sea lice control relies heavily on pharmacological treatments in several salmon-producing countries, including Chile. Among options for drug administration, immersion treatments represent the majority of antiparasitic control strategies used in Chile. As a topical procedure, immersion treatments do not induce a long lasting effect; therefore, re-infestation from neighbouring farms may undermine their efficacy. Synchronization of treatments has been proposed as a strategy to improve immersion treatment performance, but it has not been evaluated so far. Using a repeated-measures linear mixed-effect model, we evaluated the impact of treatment synchronization of neighbouring farms (within 10km seaway distance) on the adult lice mean abundance from weeks 2 to 8 post-treatment on rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon farms in Chile, while controlling for external and internal sources of lice before the treatments, and also for environmental and fish-related variables. Results indicate that treatment synchronization was significantly associated with lower adult lice levels from weeks 5 to 7 after treatment. This relationship appeared to be linear, suggesting that higher levels of synchronization may result in lower adult sea lice levels during these weeks. These findings suggest that synchronization can improve the performance of immersion delousing treatments by keeping sea lice levels low for a longer period of time. Our results may be applicable to other regions of the world where immersion treatments are widely used.

  11. Microgravity effects of sea urchin fertilization and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, S.; Simerly, C.; Schatten, H.; Schatten, G.; Fiser, R.

    1992-01-01

    Gravity has been a pervasive influence on all living systems and there is convincing evidence to suggest that it alters fertilization and embryogenesis in several developmental systems. Notwithstanding the global importance of gravity on development, it has only been recently possible to begin to design experiments which might directly investigate the specific effects of this vector. The goal of this research program is to explore and understand the effects of gravity on fertilization and early development using sea urchins as a model system. Sea urchin development has several advantages for this project including the feasibility of maintaining and manipulating these cells during spaceflight, the high percentage of normal fertilization and early development, and the abundant knowledge about molecular, biochemical, and cellular events during embryogenesis which permits detailed insights into the mechanism by which gravity might interfere with development. Furthermore, skeletal calcium is deposited into the embryonic spicules within a day of fertilization permitting studies of the effects of gravity on bone calcium deposition.

  12. Zinc effect on the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immunological competence.

    PubMed

    Pagliara, Patrizia; Stabili, Loredana

    2012-10-01

    Pollution by heavy metals has become one of the most important problems in marine coastal areas as a consequence of anthropogenic inputs. Among metal contaminants, zinc, being considered not very toxic, is sometimes released into the sea in appreciable quantities and its concentration is loosely regulated. In this work we analyzed the effects of a high zinc concentration on the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune system. In particular, after 24 h of zinc treatment, we evaluated coelomocytes morphology and composition as well as the zinc influence on some humoral parameters such as hemolysis, lysozyme-like activity and antibacterial activity on Vibrio alginolyticus. Our results evidenced that the presence of zinc affected both cellular and acellular components of the sea urchin immune system. The P. lividus coelomocytes changed in morphology and number; moreover, the amebocytes changed from a petaloid to a filipodial-like shape and the red spherula cells increased in number. Among the considered humoral effectors lysozyme-like activity and antibacterial activity on V. alginolyticus decreased in short-term to zinc treatment. The modifications in the sea urchin immunological competence might give an early indication of disease susceptibility thus suggesting to consider the examined defence mechanisms as potential biological indicators of metal pollution.

  13. High Element Interactivity Information during Problem Solving May Lead to Failure to Obtain the Testing Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Wayne; Hanham, José; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect occurs when learners who are tested rather than relearning material perform better on a final test than those who relearn. Based on cognitive load theory, it was predicted that the testing effect may not be obtained when the material being learned is high in element interactivity. Three experiments investigated conditions of the…

  14. High Element Interactivity Information during Problem Solving May Lead to Failure to Obtain the Testing Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Wayne; Hanham, José; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect occurs when learners who are tested rather than relearning material perform better on a final test than those who relearn. Based on cognitive load theory, it was predicted that the testing effect may not be obtained when the material being learned is high in element interactivity. Three experiments investigated conditions of the…

  15. The effect of sea ice loss on sea salt aerosol concentrations and the radiative balance in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struthers, H.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Glantz, P.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Mårtensson, E. M.; Seland, Ø.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2011-04-01

    Understanding Arctic climate change requires knowledge of both the external and the local drivers of Arctic climate as well as local feedbacks within the system. An Arctic feedback mechanism relating changes in sea ice extent to an alteration of the emission of sea salt aerosol and the consequent change in radiative balance is examined. A set of idealized climate model simulations were performed to quantify the radiative effects of changes in sea salt aerosol emissions induced by prescribed changes in sea ice extent. The model was forced using sea ice concentrations consistent with present day conditions and projections of sea ice extent for 2100. Sea salt aerosol emissions increase in response to a decrease in sea ice, the model results showing an annual average increase in number emission over the polar cap (70-90° N) of 86 × 106 m-2 s-1 (mass emission increase of 23 μg m-2 s-1). This in turn leads to an increase in the natural aerosol optical depth of approximately 23%. In response to changes in aerosol optical depth, the natural component of the aerosol direct forcing over the Arctic polar cap is estimated to be between -0.2 and -0.4 W m-2 for the summer months, which results in a negative feedback on the system. The model predicts that the change in first indirect aerosol effect (cloud albedo effect) is approximately a factor of ten greater than the change in direct aerosol forcing although this result is highly uncertain due to the crude representation of Arctic clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions in the model. This study shows that both the natural aerosol direct and first indirect effects are strongly dependent on the surface albedo, highlighting the strong coupling between sea ice, aerosols, Arctic clouds and their radiative effects.

  16. Effect of Tides On Sea Ice Deformation and Growth Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, J.; Heil, P.; Hibler, W. D.

    Due to high ice strength in present formulations of non-linear plastic sea ice dynamic models, the relatively small tides in the Arctic Basin produces little relative motion. However, recent work with a stand alone sea ice model including a more realistic for- mulation of ice-ocean coupling [Heil & Hibler, accepted] has produced more realistic inertial motion in agreement with observations. With such improved model physics, we expect tidal motion of the ice pack to have a more pronounced effect on simulated periodic lead opening and closing, enhancing winter ice growth rate. To investigate this process, tidal forcing [Kowalik 1998] is included in the momentum balance of a stand alone sea ice model [Heil & Hibler, accepted]. The model includes a modi- fied coulombic rheology, hourly interpolated NCEP reanalysis atmospheric forcing, climatological cloud fraction [Gorshkov,1980] , oceanic currents and heat flux from Polyakov et al. [1998] and inertial embedding as Hibler et al. [1998]. Arctic sea ice is simulated for the period 1948-2000 and compared to a control without tidal forcing. It is investigated how tidal motion and inertial motion interact. As the inertial period is close to the major semi-diurnal tidal period we expect ice deformation in tidally active regions (such as the Barents Sea) to be amplified through inertial resonance. The tidal influence on ice mass balance is estimated. The interannual variability of ice mass is examined to show how tidal influence differs between years of high Arctic Oscillation (AO) index, when ice divergence is increased and trans-polar transport widened, and low AO index, when the Arctic high dominates and convergent motion prevails.

  17. Immunomodulatory effects upon in vitro exposure of California sea lion and southern sea otter peripheral blood leukocytes to domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Joshi, Dhanashree; Draghi, Andrew; Gulland, Frances M; Jessup, David; De Guise, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    During red tide bloom events, the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produces the toxin domoic acid (DA), which has been associated with stranding and mortality events involving California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris). In addition to these well-documented DA-induced neurotoxic events, there is increasing concern that DA may exert chronic effects, such as immunomodulation, which may potentially increase an individual's susceptibility to a number of opportunistic infections following nonlethal exposure. We investigated the effects of DA on innate (phagocytosis and respiratory burst) and adaptive (mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation) immune functions with the use of peripheral blood leukocytes collected from healthy California sea lions and southern sea otters upon in vitro exposure to 0 (unexposed control), 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 100 microM DA. Domoic acid did not significantly modulate phagocytosis or respiratory burst in either species. For California sea lions, DA significantly increased ConA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation upon exposure to DA concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 10 microM, resulting in a nonlinear dose-response curve. There was no effect on lymphocyte proliferation at the highest concentration of DA tested. No effects on lymphocyte proliferation were observed in southern sea otters. Importantly, the in vitro DA concentrations affecting T-cell proliferation were within or below the range of DA in serum measured in free-ranging California sea lions following natural exposure, suggesting a risk for immunomodulation in free-ranging animals. Understanding the risk for immunomodulation upon DA exposure will contribute in the health assessment and management of California sea lions and southern sea otters, as well as guide veterinarians and wildlife rehabilitators in caring for and treating afflicted animals.

  18. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  19. Observational Evidence of a Hemispheric-wide Ice-ocean Albedo Feedback Effect on Antarctic Sea-ice Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ice-ocean albedo feedback (a kind of ice-albedo feedback) on sea-ice decay is demonstrated over the Antarctic sea-ice zone from an analysis of satellite-derived hemispheric sea ice concentration and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-40) atmospheric data for the period 1979-2001. Sea ice concentration in December (time of most active melt) correlates better with the meridional component of the wind-forced ice drift (MID) in November (beginning of the melt season) than the MID in December. This 1 month lagged correlation is observed in most of the Antarctic sea-ice covered ocean. Daily time series of ice , concentration show that the ice concentration anomaly increases toward the time of maximum sea-ice melt. These findings can be explained by the following positive feedback effect: once ice concentration decreases (increases) at the beginning of the melt season, solar heating of the upper ocean through the increased (decreased) open water fraction is enhanced (reduced), leading to (suppressing) a further decrease in ice concentration by the oceanic heat. Results obtained fi-om a simple ice-ocean coupled model also support our interpretation of the observational results. This positive feedback mechanism explains in part the large interannual variability of the sea-ice cover in summer.

  20. Observational Evidence of a Hemispheric-wide Ice-ocean Albedo Feedback Effect on Antarctic Sea-ice Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ice-ocean albedo feedback (a kind of ice-albedo feedback) on sea-ice decay is demonstrated over the Antarctic sea-ice zone from an analysis of satellite-derived hemispheric sea ice concentration and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-40) atmospheric data for the period 1979-2001. Sea ice concentration in December (time of most active melt) correlates better with the meridional component of the wind-forced ice drift (MID) in November (beginning of the melt season) than the MID in December. This 1 month lagged correlation is observed in most of the Antarctic sea-ice covered ocean. Daily time series of ice , concentration show that the ice concentration anomaly increases toward the time of maximum sea-ice melt. These findings can be explained by the following positive feedback effect: once ice concentration decreases (increases) at the beginning of the melt season, solar heating of the upper ocean through the increased (decreased) open water fraction is enhanced (reduced), leading to (suppressing) a further decrease in ice concentration by the oceanic heat. Results obtained fi-om a simple ice-ocean coupled model also support our interpretation of the observational results. This positive feedback mechanism explains in part the large interannual variability of the sea-ice cover in summer.

  1. Effects of a sea breeze discontinuity on air quality in an industrial coastal environment of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Patrick; Sokolov, Anton; Talbot, Charles; Fourmentin, Marc; Willart, Véronique; Delbarre, Hervé

    2010-05-01

    The effects of interaction between the sea breeze and synoptic wind on air pollutants have been studied in an industrial coastal environment of the North Sea. These effects have been investigated, during one day, using ground-based remote sensing systems and surface station data alongside with mesoscale modelling outputs. During a campaign in the North of France, continuous lidar measurements documented the structure and the evolution of the lower troposphere. The combination of lidar, sodar and surface station observations showed that the atmospheric boundary layer is well stratified during the night, with a stable double layer structure which slows the growing process of the mixing layer, in the morning and before the sea-breeze onset. During the day, we observed discontinuity in meteorological measurements due to the sea-breeze occurrences. We have found that these sudden changes were well correlated with high concentrations of sulphur dioxide at ground level (up to 400 ?g/m3). The first sea breeze puff generates a change of the structure of the lower troposphere with a coupling between the residual layer and the convective boundary layer. The discontinuity of the sea-breeze gravity current is well observed by lidar signals and sodar echo. The analysis revealed that the impacts of the sea-breeze discontinuity have significant implications on the local and the regional pollution above industrialized areas. This phenomenon triggers important changes on the local and regional air quality, more particularly in urban and industrial coastal localities.

  2. Nonlinear effects of winter sea ice on the survival probabilities of Adélie penguins.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, Tosca; Tavecchia, Giacomo; Olmastroni, Silvia; Pezzo, Francesco; Focardi, Silvano

    2009-08-01

    The population dynamics of Antarctic seabirds are influenced by variations in winter sea ice extent and persistence; however, the type of relationship differs according to the region and the demographic parameter considered. We used annual presence/absence data obtained from 1,138 individually marked birds to study the influence of environmental and individual characteristics on the survival of Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae at Edmonson Point (Ross Sea, Antarctica) between 1994 and 2005. About 25% of 600 birds marked as chicks were reobserved at the natal colony. The capture and survival rates of Adélie penguins at this colony increased with the age of individuals, and five age classes were identified for both parameters. Mean adult survival was 0.85 (SE = 0.01), and no effect of sex on survival was evident. Breeding propensity, as measured by adult capture rates, was close to one, indicating a constant breeding effort through time. Temporal variations in survival were best explained by a quadratic relationship with winter sea ice extent anomalies in the Ross Sea, suggesting that for this region optimal conditions are intermediate between too much and too little winter sea ice. This is likely the result of a balance between suitable wintering habitat and food availability. Survival rates were not correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index. Low adult survival after a season characterized by severe environmental conditions at breeding but favorable conditions during winter suggested an additional mortality mediated by the reproductive effort. Adélie penguins are sensitive indicators of environmental changes in the Antarctic, and the results from this study provide insights into regional responses of this species to variability in winter sea ice habitat.

  3. Plankton effect on cod recruitment in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaugrand, Grégory; Brander, Keith M.; Alistair Lindley, J.; Souissi, Sami; Reid, Philip C.

    2003-12-01

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) has been overexploited in the North Sea since the late 1960s and great concern has been expressed about the decline in cod biomass and recruitment. Here we show that, in addition to the effects of overfishing, fluctuations in plankton have resulted in long-term changes in cod recruitment in the North Sea (bottom-up control). Survival of larval cod is shown to depend on three key biological parameters of their prey: the mean size of prey, seasonal timing and abundance. We suggest a mechanism, involving the match/mismatch hypothesis, by which variability in temperature affects larval cod survival and conclude that rising temperature since the mid-1980s has modified the plankton ecosystem in a way that reduces the survival of young cod.

  4. Plankton effect on cod recruitment in the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Beaugrand, Grégory; Brander, Keith M; Alistair Lindley, J; Souissi, Sami; Reid, Philip C

    2003-12-11

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) has been overexploited in the North Sea since the late 1960s and great concern has been expressed about the decline in cod biomass and recruitment. Here we show that, in addition to the effects of overfishing, fluctuations in plankton have resulted in long-term changes in cod recruitment in the North Sea (bottom-up control). Survival of larval cod is shown to depend on three key biological parameters of their prey: the mean size of prey, seasonal timing and abundance. We suggest a mechanism, involving the match/mismatch hypothesis, by which variability in temperature affects larval cod survival and conclude that rising temperature since the mid-1980s has modified the plankton ecosystem in a way that reduces the survival of young cod.

  5. Effect of alkaline and autohydrolysis processes on the purity of obtained hemicelluloses from corn stalks.

    PubMed

    Egüés, Itziar; Sanchez, Cristina; Mondragon, Iñaki; Labidi, Jalel

    2012-01-01

    A study of the potential of autohydrolysis and alkaline extraction processes from corn stalks was performed for high purity hemicellulose extraction. The influence of process parameters on the purity of obtained hemicelluloses was analyzed. An experimental design was developed for the autohydrolysis treatments to determine the optimal conditions to solubilize the hemicelluloses with lowest content in contaminants. On the other hand, alkaline extraction, including raw material pretreatment (dewaxing and delignification step) was carried out analyzing the effectiveness of this processes for maximum pure hemicellulose recovery. The maximum yield (54% of the raw material hemicelluloses) and the best physicochemical properties (highest hemicellulose content free of lignin) were obtained with these pretreatments in alkaline extraction. Moreover, the effect of lignin removal by sulfuric acid from the autohydrolysis liquors before hemicellulose precipitation was studied. This purification step has allowed to obtain lignin-free autohydrolysis hemicellulose but with the presence of sulfur as predominant contaminant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Method of the Assessment of the Influence of Longwall Effective Working Time Onto Obtained Mining Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snopkowski, Ryszard; Napieraj, Aneta; Sukiennik, Marta

    2016-12-01

    Method of the influence of assessment of longwall effective working time onto obtained mining output, has been discussed in the present study. Mean flow rate of the winning stream being also considered as directional factor of linear function describing relation between daily output and effective mining in the longwall face, has been determined. Such relation - presented also graphically in form of the diagram - determines significance and influence of the effective working time onto obtained mining output. This relation should be considered as motivation in particular for supervisory personnel, as it shows advantages resulting from elongation of this time, as well as it shows possible loses of the daily output in a case, when the effective working time in given longwall face was shortened.

  7. 20 CFR 702.421 - Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization. 702.421 Section 702.421 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT... nature of the injury required such treatment and services and the employer or his superintendent or...

  8. 20 CFR 702.421 - Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization. 702.421 Section 702.421 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT... nature of the injury required such treatment and services and the employer or his superintendent or...

  9. 20 CFR 702.421 - Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of failure to obtain initial authorization. 702.421 Section 702.421 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... nature of the injury required such treatment and services and the employer or his superintendent or...

  10. [Multiple scattering of visible and infrared light by sea fog over wind driving rough sea surface].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian-Ming; Wang, Hai-Hua; Lei, Cheng-Xin; Shen, Jin

    2013-08-01

    The present paper is concerned with computing the multiple scattering characteristics of a sea fog-sea surface couple system within this context. The single scattering characteristics of sea fog were studied by Mie theory, and the multiple scattering of sunlight by single sea fog layer was studied by radiative transfer theory. The reflection function of a statistically rough ocean surface was obtained using the standard Kirchhoff formulation, with shadowing effects taken into account. The reflection properties of the combined sea fog and ocean surface were obtained employing the adding method, and the results indicated that the reflected light intensity of sea fog increased with the sea background.

  11. Effects of air-sea coupling over the North Sea and the Baltic Sea on simulated summer precipitation over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho-Hagemann, Ha Thi Minh; Gröger, Matthias; Rockel, Burkhardt; Zahn, Matthias; Geyer, Beate; Meier, H. E. Markus

    2017-03-01

    This study introduces a new approach to investigate the potential effects of air-sea coupling on simulated precipitation inland over Central Europe. We present an inter-comparison of two regional climate models (RCMs), namely, the COSMO-CLM (hereafter CCLM) and RCA4 models, which are configured for the EURO-CORDEX domain in the coupled and atmosphere-only modes. Two versions of the CCLM model, namely, 4.8 and 5.0, join the inter-comparison being almost two different models while providing pronouncedly different summer precipitation simulations because of many changes in the dynamics and physics of CCLM in version 5.0. The coupling effect on the prominent summer dry bias over Central Europe is analysed using seasonal (JJA) mean statistics for the 30-year period from 1979 to 2009, with a focus on extreme precipitation under specific weather regimes. The weather regimes are compared between the coupled and uncoupled simulations to better understand the mechanism of the coupling effects. The comparisons of the coupled systems with the atmosphere-only models show that coupling clearly reduces the dry bias over Central Europe for CCLM 4.8, which has a large dry summer bias, but not for CCLM 5.0 and RCA4, which have smaller dry biases. This result implies that if the atmosphere-only model already yields reasonable summer precipitation over Central Europe, not much room for improvement exists that can be caused by the air-sea coupling over the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. However, if the atmosphere-only model shows a pronounced summer dry bias because of a lack of moisture transport from the seas into the region, the considered coupling may create an improved simulation of summer precipitation over Central Europe, such as for CCLM 4.8. For the latter, the benefit of coupling varies over the considered timescales. The precipitation simulations that are generated by the coupled system COSTRICE 4.8 and the atmosphere-only CCLM 4.8 are mostly identical for the summer mean

  12. Effect of the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sea surface microlayer on their coastal air-sea exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitart, C.; García-Flor, N.; Miquel, J. C.; Fowler, S. W.; Albaigés, J.

    2010-01-01

    Several measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal marine compartments (viz. atmosphere, sea surface microlayer, subsurface seawater, sinking particles and sediments), made nearly simultaneously at two stations in the north-eastern Mediterranean, were used to estimate the transport fluxes of individual and total PAHs through the air-seawater-sediment system. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes were estimated using both subsurface water (SSW) and sea surface microlayer (SML) concentrations. The air-SML fluxes ranged from 411 to 12,292 ng m - 2 d - 1 (absorption) and from - 506 to -13,746 ng m - 2 d - 1 (volatilisation) for total PAHs (Σ15). Air-seawater column transport of particle-associated PAHs was estimated from the analysis of particulate atmospheric and sediment interceptor trap materials. Air-sea particle deposition fluxes of total PAHs ranged from 13 to 114 ng m - 2 d - 1 and seawater particle settling fluxes (upper 5 m water column) ranged from 184 to 323 ng m - 2 d - 1 . The results of this study indicate that both the magnitude and the direction of the calculated air-sea diffusive fluxes change when PAH concentrations in the SML are considered. As a result, PAHs accumulation in the SML could produce the so-called "flux capping effect". However, the high variability in the coastal air-sea PAHs flux estimations, mainly due to the parameters uncertainty, requires further experimental approaches, including improvement of parameterisations.

  13. Detection of rotavirus antigenemia in routinely obtained serum specimens to augment surveillance and vaccine effectiveness evaluations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish; Rench, Marcia A; Boom, Julie A; Tate, Jacqueline E; Sahni, Leila C; Hull, Jennifer A; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh D; Baker, Carol J

    2010-09-01

    : Antigenemia is common among children with rotavirus disease. Because obtaining stool specimens is cumbersome, we evaluated whether detection of antigenemia in sera obtained during routine clinical practice could augment rotavirus surveillance to assess the effect of vaccination. : We determined the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of serum/plasma rotavirus antigen detection using fecal antigen positivity as the gold standard. Fecal specimens obtained by active surveillance and residual serum/plasma specimens obtained during routine clinical testing from children 15 days to 23 months of age presenting with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to a children's hospital in Houston were tested for rotavirus using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Using case-control methods, we compared vaccine effectiveness (VE) using cases identified through serum/plasma testing versus stool testing. : Of the 205 AGE patients with fecal specimens, 71 (35%) had a serum/plasma sample available. Among these 71 children, antigenemia was detected in 22 of 29 with rotavirus-positive fecal specimens (sensitivity = 75%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 60%-91%) versus 2 of 42 children with rotavirus-negative fecal specimens (specificity = 95%; 95% CI = 89%-100%). The positive and negative predictive values of rotavirus antigenemia were 92% (95% CI = 81%-100%) and 85% (95% CI = 75%-95%), respectively. Thirty-four of 195 children with AGE without fecal specimens had serum/plasma available; 10 (29%) had rotavirus antigenemia. Three-dose VE using cases identified through serum/plasma testing was similar (VE = 84%; 95% CI = 25%-96%) to that using cases identified though fecal testing (VE = 85%; 95% CI = 55%-95%). : Detection of antigenemia in routinely collected serum/plasma could augment identification of rotavirus disease for postlicensure evaluation of impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination.

  14. Effects of oceanic salinity on body condition in sea snakes.

    PubMed

    Brischoux, François; Rolland, Virginie; Bonnet, Xavier; Caillaud, Matthieu; Shine, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Since the transition from terrestrial to marine environments poses strong osmoregulatory and energetic challenges, temporal and spatial fluctuations in oceanic salinity might influence salt and water balance (and hence, body condition) in marine tetrapods. We assessed the effects of salinity on three species of sea snakes studied by mark-recapture in coral-reef habitats in the Neo-Caledonian Lagoon. These three species include one fully aquatic hydrophiine (Emydocephalus annulatus), one primarily aquatic laticaudine (Laticauda laticaudata), and one frequently terrestrial laticaudine (Laticauda saintgironsi). We explored how oceanic salinity affected the snakes' body condition across various temporal and spatial scales relevant to each species' ecology, using linear mixed models and multimodel inference. Mean annual salinity exerted a consistent and negative effect on the body condition of all three snake species. The most terrestrial taxon (L. saintgironsi) was sensitive to salinity over a short temporal scale, corresponding to the duration of a typical marine foraging trip for this species. In contrast, links between oceanic salinity and body condition in the fully aquatic E. annulatus and the highly aquatic L. laticaudata were strongest at a long-term (annual) scale. The sophisticated salt-excreting systems of sea snakes allow them to exploit marine environments, but do not completely overcome the osmoregulatory challenges posed by oceanic conditions. Future studies could usefully explore such effects in other secondarily marine taxa such as seabirds, turtles, and marine mammals.

  15. On the mechanism of two way shape memory effect obtained by stabilized stress induced martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Fernandez, J. . Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia)

    1994-02-01

    Two way shape memory effect (TWME) can be obtained by suitable thermomechanical processing which involve repetitive training routines. J. Perkins found that TWME take place as a result of a macroscopic non-uniform residual stress field, concluding that plastic deformation was necessary to get TWME. K. Enami et al found that complex dislocations arrays are generated by thermomechanical cycling during the training procedure. TWME results obtained by the above training methods are not as good as would be expected, because during the thermal cycles, above and below A[sub f] and M[sub f] respectively, new dislocations are generated which interact with the dislocations that control TWME so giving a loss of TWME. A different training method has been developed by J.M. Guilemany et al based on the stabilization of stress induced martensite variants (SSIM). This method has been derived from the observation made by J. Perkins and R.O. Sponholz who found that retained (not stabilized) martensite acts as a nucleation site of thermal martensite. Thus, during cooling the stabilized martensite would grow or influence the nucleation and growth of the thermal martensite giving TWME. The effect of training temperature, time and stress on TWME obtained by SSIM has been studied.

  16. The effect of applying orthogonal projection technique in short window segments to obtain fetal magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Lowery, Curtis L; Preissl, Hubert; Eswaran, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive recordings of fetal heart and brain have been possible for almost a decade with the advancement in biomagnetic sensors using the SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) technology. Techniques such as orthogonal projection and ICA have been applied to attenuate interference from other biological sources such as maternal heart. Successful application of such techniques among other factors depend on the non-stationary characteristics of the signals. To minimize the effect of non-stationarity due to maternal and/or fetal movement in long duration datasets, we proposed to investigate the minimal time window that is needed to obtain averaging with good SNR to apply the orthogonal projection technique to attenuate maternal magnetocardiogram (MCG) and obtain fetal MCG. The quantifying measure is based on spectral power of signals from 151-channel SQUID array system.

  17. The effect of applying orthogonal projection technique in short window segments to obtain fetal magnetocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D.; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Lowery, Curtis L.; Preissl, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive recordings of fetal heart and brain have been possible for almost a decade with the advancement in biomagnetic sensors using the SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) technology. Techniques such as orthogonal projection and ICA have been applied to attenuate interference from other biological sources such as maternal heart. Successful application of such techniques among other factors depend on the non-stationary characteristics of the signals. To minimize the effect of non-stationarity due to maternal and/or fetal movement in long duration datasets, we proposed to investigate the minimal time window that is needed to obtain averaging with good SNR to apply the orthogonal projection technique to attenuate maternal magnetocardiogram (MCG) and obtain fetal MCG. The quantifying measure is based on spectral estimation of signals from 151-channel SQUID array system. PMID:24109713

  18. Field Penetration in a Rectangular Box Using Numerical Techniques: An Effort to Obtain Statistical Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Yu, Shih-Pin

    2006-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the application of numerical methods to explore the ideas related to shielding effectiveness from a statistical view. An empty rectangular box is examined using a hybrid modal/moment method. The basic computational method is presented followed by the results for single- and multiple observation points within the over-moded empty structure. The statistics of the field are obtained by using frequency stirring, borrowed from the ideas connected with reverberation chamber techniques, and extends the ideas of shielding effectiveness well into the multiple resonance regions. The study presented in this paper will address the average shielding effectiveness over a broad spatial sample within the enclosure as the frequency is varied.

  19. Gravity effects obtained from global hydrology models in comparison with high precision gravimetric time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Wilmes, Herbert; Güntner, Andreas; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Water mass changes are a major source of variations in residual gravimetric time series obtained from the combination of observations with superconducting and absolute gravimeters. Changes in the local water storage are the main influence, but global variations contribute to the signal significantly. For three European gravity stations, Bad Homburg, Wettzell and Medicina, different global hydrology models are compared. The influence of topographic effects is discussed and due to the long-term stability of the combined gravity time series, inter-annual signals in model data and gravimetric observations are compared. Two sources of influence are discriminated, i.e., the effect of a local zone with an extent of a few kilometers around the gravimetric station and the global contribution beyond 50km. Considering their coarse resolution and uncertainties, local effects calculated from global hydrological models are compared with the in-situ gravity observations and, for the station Wettzell, with local hydrological monitoring data.

  20. Effect of photogrammetric reading error on slope-frequency distributions. [obtained from Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Wu, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of reading error on two hypothetical slope frequency distributions and two slope frequency distributions from actual lunar data in order to ensure that these errors do not cause excessive overestimates of algebraic standard deviations for the slope frequency distributions. The errors introduced are insignificant when the reading error is small and the slope length is large. A method for correcting the errors in slope frequency distributions is presented and applied to 11 distributions obtained from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 panoramic camera photographs and Apollo 16 metric camera photographs.

  1. Batch effect confounding leads to strong bias in performance estimates obtained by cross-validation.

    PubMed

    Soneson, Charlotte; Gerster, Sarah; Delorenzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    With the large amount of biological data that is currently publicly available, many investigators combine multiple data sets to increase the sample size and potentially also the power of their analyses. However, technical differences ("batch effects") as well as differences in sample composition between the data sets may significantly affect the ability to draw generalizable conclusions from such studies. The current study focuses on the construction of classifiers, and the use of cross-validation to estimate their performance. In particular, we investigate the impact of batch effects and differences in sample composition between batches on the accuracy of the classification performance estimate obtained via cross-validation. The focus on estimation bias is a main difference compared to previous studies, which have mostly focused on the predictive performance and how it relates to the presence of batch effects. We work on simulated data sets. To have realistic intensity distributions, we use real gene expression data as the basis for our simulation. Random samples from this expression matrix are selected and assigned to group 1 (e.g., 'control') or group 2 (e.g., 'treated'). We introduce batch effects and select some features to be differentially expressed between the two groups. We consider several scenarios for our study, most importantly different levels of confounding between groups and batch effects. We focus on well-known classifiers: logistic regression, Support Vector Machines (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (kNN) and Random Forests (RF). Feature selection is performed with the Wilcoxon test or the lasso. Parameter tuning and feature selection, as well as the estimation of the prediction performance of each classifier, is performed within a nested cross-validation scheme. The estimated classification performance is then compared to what is obtained when applying the classifier to independent data.

  2. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  3. A Procedure to Obtain the Effective Nuclear Charge from the Atomic Spectrum of Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala*, O.; Araki, Koiti; Noda, L. K.

    1999-09-01

    The penetration of the valence electron orbitals of the alkali metals into their inner shells and its effect on the energy levels can be considered through two methods that take into account modifications of the hydrogen formula (one-electron system). One of them considers the quantum defect, modifying the quantum number n; the other considers the effective nuclear charge Z* replacing the nuclear charge Z. The method using the quantum defect is widely used because this quantity is practically constant for a given angular momentum quantum number l. However, the method using effective nuclear charge is more realistic because it explains many atomic and molecular properties - but the effective nuclear charge depends on l as well as on the principal quantum number n. This article describes a relatively simple graphical procedure to calculate the effective nuclear charges experienced by the sodium valence electron from its atomic spectrum. A relation of Z* with n for a given l is obtained and the Z* values for all states of the valence electron are found; the energy terms can also be determined. The calculations can be performed by using common spreadsheet software.

  4. Batch Effect Confounding Leads to Strong Bias in Performance Estimates Obtained by Cross-Validation

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background With the large amount of biological data that is currently publicly available, many investigators combine multiple data sets to increase the sample size and potentially also the power of their analyses. However, technical differences (“batch effects”) as well as differences in sample composition between the data sets may significantly affect the ability to draw generalizable conclusions from such studies. Focus The current study focuses on the construction of classifiers, and the use of cross-validation to estimate their performance. In particular, we investigate the impact of batch effects and differences in sample composition between batches on the accuracy of the classification performance estimate obtained via cross-validation. The focus on estimation bias is a main difference compared to previous studies, which have mostly focused on the predictive performance and how it relates to the presence of batch effects. Data We work on simulated data sets. To have realistic intensity distributions, we use real gene expression data as the basis for our simulation. Random samples from this expression matrix are selected and assigned to group 1 (e.g., ‘control’) or group 2 (e.g., ‘treated’). We introduce batch effects and select some features to be differentially expressed between the two groups. We consider several scenarios for our study, most importantly different levels of confounding between groups and batch effects. Methods We focus on well-known classifiers: logistic regression, Support Vector Machines (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (kNN) and Random Forests (RF). Feature selection is performed with the Wilcoxon test or the lasso. Parameter tuning and feature selection, as well as the estimation of the prediction performance of each classifier, is performed within a nested cross-validation scheme. The estimated classification performance is then compared to what is obtained when applying the classifier to independent data. PMID:24967636

  5. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant and antibacterial effects of sea buckthorn berries.

    PubMed

    Chaman, Saadia; Syed, Nawazish-I-Husain; Danish, Zeeshan; Khan, Farrakh Zia

    2011-07-01

    Sea buckthorn berries are therapeutically used as folk medicine for a variety of diseases, however, the scientific evidence is hardly available to support their role. This study explored their chemical constituents and their role as antioxidant and antibacterial agents. Three common solvents such as petroleum ether (40° - 60°C), chloroform and methanol were successively used for the extraction of active principles from sea buckthorn berries. Five major fractions (F1-F5) were isolated from the active methanol extract by column and thin layer chromatography. An attempt was made to identify the chemical nature of pooled fractions by available spectral means. Antioxidant potential of methanol extract and its fractions was measured by DPPH, formation of phosphomolybdenum complex and TBA methods. The hole-plate diffussion method was used to find out the antibacterial activity. A very brief structure-activity relationship of the potent antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds is discussed. Methanolic extract and its fractions contain numerous phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, which may be responsible for antioxidant and antibacterial effects.

  6. The Effects of Snow Depth Forcing on Southern Ocean Sea Ice Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powel, Dylan C.; Markus, Thorsten; Stoessel, Achim

    2003-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of snow on sea ice is an important factor for sea ice and climate models. First, it acts as an efficient insulator between the ocean and the atmosphere, and second, snow is a source of fresh water for altering the already weak Southern Ocean stratification. For the Antarctic, where the ice thickness is relatively thin, snow can impact the ice thickness in two ways: a) As mentioned above snow on sea ice reduces the ocean-atmosphere heat flux and thus reduces freezing at the base of the ice flows; b) a heavy snow load can suppress the ice below sea level which causes flooding and, with subsequent freezing, a thickening of the sea ice (snow-to-ice conversion). In this paper, we compare different snow fall paramterizations (incl. the incorporation of satellite-derived snow depth) and study the effect on the sea ice using a sea ice model.

  7. Healing effect of sea buckthorn, olive oil, and their mixture on full-thickness burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Edraki, Mitra; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Tanideh, Nader; Salehi, Alireza; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the healing effect of silver sulfadiazine (SSD), sea buckthorn, olive oil, and 5% sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture on full-thickness burn wounds with respect to both gross and histopathologic features. Full-thickness burns were induced on 60 rats; the rats were then were divided into 5 groups and treated with sea buckthorn, olive oil, a 5% sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture, SSD, and normal saline (control). They were observed for 28 days, and the wounds' healing process was evaluated. Wound contraction occurred faster in sea buckthorn, olive oil, and the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture groups compared with the SSD and control groups. The volume of the exudates was controlled more effectively in wounds treated with the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture. Purulent exudates were observed in the control group, but the others did not show infection. The group treated with sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture revealed more developed re-epithelialization with continuous basement membrane with a mature granulation tissue, whereas the SSD-treated group showed ulceration, necrosis, and immature granulation. The results show that sea buckthorn and olive oil individually are proper dressing for burn wounds and that they also show a synergetic effect when they are used together. A sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture could be considered as an alternative dressing for full-thickness burns because of improved wound healing characteristics and antibacterial property.

  8. Flow-cytometric determination of genotoxic effects of exposure to petroleum in mink and sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bickham, J.W.; Mazet, J.A.; Blake, J.; Smolen, M.J.; Lou, Y.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the genotoxic effects of crude oil on mink and sea otters, In the first experiment, the effects on mink of chronic exposure to weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil were studied, Female mink were fed a diet that included weathered crude oil for a period of 3 weeks prior to mating, during pregnancy and until weaning. Kits were exposed through lactation and by diet after weaning until 4 months of age. Kidney and liver tissues of the kits were examined using flow cytometry (FCM) and it was found that the genome size was increased in kidney samples from the experimental group compared to the control group. This effect was probably due to some type of DNA amplification and it could have been inherited from the exposed mothers or have been a somatic response to oil exposure in the pups, No evidence of clastogenic effects, as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the G(1) peak, was found in kidney or liver tissue. In the second experiment, yearling female mink were exposed either by diet or externally to crude oil or bunker C fuel oil. Evidence for clastogenic damage was found in spleen tissue for the exposure groups, but not in kidney tissue. No evidence of increased genome size was observed. In the third experiment, blood was obtained from wild-caught sea otters in Prince William Sound. The sea otters represented two populations: one from western Prince William Sound that was potentially exposed to oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a reference population from eastern Prince William Sound that did not receive oil from the spill. The spill had occurred 1.5 years prior to obtaining the blood samples. Although the mean CVs did not differ between the populations, the exposed population had a significantly higher variance of CV measurements and five out of 15 animals from the exposed population had CVs higher than the 95% confidence limits of the reference population, It is concluded that FCM is a sensitive indicator

  9. WhatsApp is an effective tool for obtaining second opinion in oral pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S; Anand, Rahul; Patil, Shankargouda; Unadkat, Hemant

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of WhatsApp application for obtaining second opinion on histopathological diagnosis in oral pathology practice. A total of 247 cases comprising of 34 different oral pathologies were photomicrographed using smartphone cameras through compound microscopes and sent for second opinion diagnosis (SOD) to 20 different oral pathologists using WhatsApp. Of 4795 (97.06%) total second opinion received, correct SOD were received for 4710 (98.22%) cases. Hundred percent times correct SOD was received for lesions including adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, keratinizing cystic odontogenic tumor, odontome, and dentigerous cyst. Lesions such as myoepithelial carcinoma, osteosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, and intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia received less percentage of correct SOD (85.71-75.75%). Correct SOD was obtained for variants of ameloblastoma (99.01%), grading of epithelial dysplasia (87.54%), and squamous cell carcinoma (95.26%). A positive correlation was observed between correct SOD and age (P = 0.0143) and experience (P = 0.0189) of the pathologist. The time taken for giving second opinion by the pathologists ranged from 81.98 ± 32.89 to 90.72 ± 38.88 min. Smartphone camera is a handy and efficient tool in capturing photomicrographs from the compound microscope. Transfer of such photomicrograph via WhatsApp is an effective and convenient approach in procuring second opinion on histopathological diagnosis of oral pathologies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The effect of temperature on the essential oil components of Salvia potentillifolia obtained by various methods.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Mehmet; Tel, Gülsen; Duru, Mehmet Emin; Harmandar, Mansur; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2009-07-01

    The chemical compositions of the essential oils of Salvia potentillifolia (Lamiaceae) were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The oils were obtained by four different methods (hydrodistillation, steam distillation, and two extraction methods) to investigate the effect of temperature on the volatile compounds. In total, 121 components were detected in the various oils. The major compounds characterized were alpha-pinene (30.2, 31.2, 10.6, and 14.8%) and beta-pinene (15.0, 14.6, 7.6, and 11.4%), respectively. Surprisingly, the percentage concentrations of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene in the hydrodistilled and steam distilled oils were high, even though prepared at high temperature, whereas the contents of both compounds were lower in the essential oils obtained by the extraction methods prepared without added heat. The percentage concentration of 8,13-epoxy-labda-14-en-2-one, a diterpenoid, in the extracted essential oil was 22 times higher than in the hydrodistilled and steam distilled essential oils. However, the concentrations of cis-p-menth-2-en-1-ol was four times, and beta-bourbonene and beta-caryophyllene two times superior than their percentage concentrations in the hydrodistilled and steam distilled essential oils.

  11. Modeling the Effects of Mortality on Sea Otter Populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.; Ballachey, Brenda E.

    2010-01-01

    mortality in all simulations eventually led to low proportions of males, leading to instability in projected populations over time. Our findings identify the critical need to understand underlying rates of change that can be acquired only through frequent monitoring of managed populations. Models could be improved through better understanding of the effects of density and demographic and environmental stochasticity on sea otter vital rates. Although our primary objective was to provide information useful in managing harvests of sea otters, our findings have implications for the conservation and management of sea otter populations subjected to other sources of mortality that can be quantified, such as incidental, accidental, or illegal.

  12. Anthocyanin copigmentation and color of wine: The effect of naturally obtained hydroxycinnamic acids as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bimpilas, Andreas; Panagopoulou, Marilena; Tsimogiannis, Dimitrios; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2016-04-15

    Copigmentation of anthocyanins accounts for over 30% of fresh red wine color, while during storage, the color of polymeric pigments formed between anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins predominates. Rosmarinic acid and natural extracts rich in hydroxycinnamic acids, obtained from aromatic plants (Origanum vulgare and Satureja thymbra), were examined as cofactors to fresh Merlot wine and the effect on anthocyanin copigmentation and wine color was studied during storage for 6months. An increase of the copigmented anthocyanins that enhanced color intensity by 15-50% was observed, confirming the ability of complex hydroxycinnamates to form copigments. The samples with added cofactors retained higher percentages of copigmented anthocyanins and higher color intensity, compared to the control wine, up to 3 months. However, the change in the equilibrium between monomeric and copigmented anthocyanins that was induced by added cofactors, did not affect the rate of polymerization reactions during storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasticizing effect of ionic liquid on cellulose acetate obtained by melt processing.

    PubMed

    Bendaoud, Amine; Chalamet, Yvan

    2014-08-08

    Cellulose acetate (CA) plasticized by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and with diethylphtalate (DEP) was obtained by melt processing at 150°C. The effect and the interaction of ionic liquid with the cellulose acetate and their influence on structural, thermo-mechanical, rheological and tensile properties of CA materials were investigated. Ionic liquid (BMIMCl) has shown a good plasticization and more efficient destruction of the crystalline structure of cellulose acetate than the DEP plasticized CA. BMIMCl interacts intensively with CA molecules due to the pronounced van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic nature of ionic liquid. The tensile test and the low Young's modulus for plasticized CA suggest a strong reduction of the interaction between the CA chains due to the presence of the ionic liquid.

  14. Effects of pulp mill chlorate on Baltic Sea algae.

    PubMed

    Rosemarin, A; Lehtinen, K J; Notini, M; Mattson, J

    1994-01-01

    The long-term effects of pulp mill chlorate on different algal species of the Baltic Sea were studied in land-based model ecosystems simulating the littoral zone. Brown algae (Phaeophyta) exhibited an extraordinarily high sensitivity to chlorate and pulp mill effluents containing chlorate. All brown algal species ceased growth or showed major signs of toxicity at all concentrations tested, down to microgram per litre levels. EC50 levels for growth of Fucus vesiculosus were about 80-100 microg ClO3- litre(-1). Blue-green algae (Cyanophyta) were not deleteriously affected nor were green algae (Chlorophyta). The perennial and annual species of red algae (Rhodophyta) were also unaffected by the effluents. Diatoms did not show any sensitivity and phytoplankton (fresh- and brackish water) were particularly insensitive. A phanerogam, Zostera marina was also unaffected by the treatments.

  15. Effects of pesticides and related organic compounds in the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, W.

    1980-03-01

    The majority of organic chemicals identified so far in the sea are pesticides and products of technical use; most contain chlorine. Only a limited amount of the actual pollutant load is detectable because few data for “unconventional ” pollutants are available. In view of the considerable structural variety of the large number of chemicals produced, there is a need for prediction measurements of bioconcentration and toxic effects. Physico-chemical data may be used for predicting bioconcentration and life-cycle toxicity tests for the estimation of safe levels. The degree of biomagnification via food chains increases with half lives of the pollutants. When comparing pollutant concentrations with toxicological data it becomes apparent that estuaries and coastal areas deserve special concern, whereas pollutant levels of open ocean waters are unlikely to endanger marine life at present.

  16. Effectiveness of spray congealing to obtain physically stabilized amorphous dispersions of a poorly soluble thermosensitive API.

    PubMed

    Kulthe, Viraj Vitthal; Chaudhari, Pravin Digambar

    2014-12-01

    An amorphous phase produced by micronization up to the molecular or colloidal level of a poorly soluble drug having low lipophilicity can distinctly enhance its solubility characteristics. However, though dispersing the molten mass of a poorly water-soluble drug within polymeric matrix has been found to be most effective in formation of molecular dispersions, the drug molecules which melt at high temperature also accompanied by decomposition, such as acetazolamide, are difficult to formulate as molecular dispersions. Hence, a method is proposed to obtain molecular dispersions of acetazolamide with poloxamer-237 by spray congealing under optimal heat treatment. Uniform molecular and/or colloidal dispersions of the drug were achieved with instantaneous solvent evaporation by mixing a drug solution with molten mass of the plasticizer matrix. Immobilization of dispersed drug molecules was effected subsequently through rapid solidification by spray congealing. Initial characterization of 1:1, 1:1.5, and 1:2 ratios of solid dispersions and devitrification study of an optimized (1:2) ratio ensured efficacy of the proposed method in formation of physically stabilized amorphous systems without thermal degradation and hence resulted in more than ninefold rise in solubility and more than 90% dissolution within initial 10 min. With 1:2 ratio, molecular dispersions could be achieved by initial solvent evaporation stage, which when subjected to spray congealing produced physically stable amorphous systems, without signs of thermal degradation. This study also proposes an opportunity for selection of those polymers with which the drug is immiscible in their fluid state, yet obtaining molecular dispersions.

  17. Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    have also contributed to the recent ONR “whitepaper” that describes an initiative for comprehensive research on coupled air and sea boundary layers...transferring heat and moisture across the air -sea interface, especially in high winds. Ultimately, we hope to develop simple parameterizations for...these air -sea fluxes for use in large-scale models, especially those simulating tropical and extra-tropical storms. OBJECTIVES The ultimate goal of this

  18. Effects of oil pollution on the development of sex cells in sea urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenko, M. A.

    1980-03-01

    The sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus is highly sensitive to oil pollution. Experiments were performed in winter, spring and summer over periods of 15 to 45 days. Experimental urchins were kept in water with hydrocarbon concentrations of 10 to 30 mg l-1, and control urchins in pure sea water. Thermal stimulation by Evdokimov's method was applied to obtain mature sexual products during winter and spring tests. Summer investigations were conducted at temperatures of 17 to 18 °C. The gonads were studied histologically and morphometrically, and the sexual cells obtained were analyzed at the embryological level. No histological and morphometrical differences were recorded between sexual cells of controls and experimentals. However, marked hydrocarbon effects were observed in the embryonic development of artificially fertilized cells from experimental urchins. Control embryos developed normally. Embryogenesis of artificially fertilized gametes from control females and experimental males, and vice versa, was found to be distinctly abnormal. Many abnormalities were identified at the first cleavage stage, as well as in blastula, gastrula and pluteus. Fertilization of experimental eggs with experimental sperm resulted in serious disturbances of embryos, followed by the development of non-viable larvae. On the whole, embryogenesis of sexual cells from experimental urchins was characterized by prominent delay, asynchronism and presence of abnormal non-viable larvae. Consequently, long-term effects of sublethal hydrocarbon concentrations resulted in the formation of defective sex cells and high larval mortality.

  19. Climate change effects on the Baltic Sea borderland between land and sea.

    PubMed

    Strandmark, Alma; Bring, Arvid; Cousins, Sara A O; Destouni, Georgia; Kautsky, Hans; Kolb, Gundula; de la Torre-Castro, Maricela; Hambäck, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Coastal habitats are situated on the border between land and sea, and ecosystem structure and functioning is influenced by both marine and terrestrial processes. Despite this, most scientific studies and monitoring are conducted either with a terrestrial or an aquatic focus. To address issues concerning climate change impacts in coastal areas, a cross-ecosystem approach is necessary. Since habitats along the Baltic coastlines vary in hydrology, natural geography, and ecology, climate change projections for Baltic shore ecosystems are bound to be highly speculative. Societal responses to climate change in the Baltic coastal ecosystems should have an ecosystem approach and match the biophysical realities of the Baltic Sea area. Knowledge about ecosystem processes and their responses to a changing climate should be integrated within the decision process, both locally and nationally, in order to increase the awareness of, and to prepare for climate change impacts in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea.

  20. Effects of ultrasonic disintegration of excess sludge obtained in disintegrators of different constructions.

    PubMed

    Zielewicz, Ewa; Tytła, Malwina

    2015-01-01

    The ultrasonic disintegration of excess sludge is placed after the mechanical thickening but before the digestion tanks in order to intensify the process of sludge stabilization. The effects obtained directly after ultrasonic disintegration depend on many factors and can be grouped in two main categories: factors affecting the quality of sludge and those associated with the construction of disintegrators and its parameters. The ultrasonic disintegration research was carried out using three types of structural solutions of disintegrators. Two of them, that is, WK-2000 ultrasonic generator (P = 400 W) working with a thin sonotrode and WK-2010 ultrasonic generator (P = 100-1000 W) working with a new type construction emitter lens sonotrode, were compared with the influence of a washer with a flat emitter. The investigations have shown that in the same sludge, using the same value of volumetric energy, the resulting effect depends on the construction of the ultrasonic disintegrator, that is, design of the head and the ratio between the field of the emitter and the field of the chamber in sonicated medium.

  1. An effective encoding scheme of obtaining radial topology structures in distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Wen, Juan; Tan, Yanghong; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a distribution network has great effects on economy, power supply reliability and investment of a power system. To obtain an optimal topology from possible topologies, we need to solve an optimisation problem which aims to find a radial structure satisfying operating constraints. As a basis of solving this optimisation problem, the encoding scheme, is to represent the candidate configurations by a series of codes. Numerical candidate topologies and unfeasible codes would lead low efficiency or premature convergence. This paper presents an effective scheme which can rapidly produce all radial configurations of a distribution network. In order to reduce the computational requirement of solution space, initial network is simplified as a topological graph which reserves loop branches and T-nodes. And a loop-branch chain incidence matrix is derived from analyzing the relationship between any two loops. Then the principles of selecting switches of each variable are designed to determine the ranges of the variables. All radial candidate solutions are available rapidly through applying the theory of combination. The scheme presented minimizes the number of solutions and avoids tedious radial checking procedure in view of avoiding any infeasible solutions. The validity of the proposed scheme is verified by illustrative examples.

  2. Antiallergic effects of pigments isolated from green sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) shells.

    PubMed

    Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Shikov, Alexander N; Makarova, Marina N; Ivanova, Svetlana A; Kosman, Vera M; Makarov, Valery G; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2013-12-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate possible antiallergic effects of an extract of pigments from green sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) shells. Effects were studied on animal models - guinea pig ileum contraction, rabbit eyes allergic conjunctivitis, and rabbit local skin irritation. The extract significantly reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the histamine-induced contractions of the isolated guinea pig ileum with ID50 =1.2 µg/mL (in equivalents of spinochrome B), had an inhibitory effect on the model of ocular allergic inflammation surpassing the reference drug olopatadine, and did not show any irritating effect in rabbits. The extract predominantly contained polyhydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone which would be responsible for the pharmacological activity. The active compounds of the extract were evaluated in silico with molecular docking. Molecular docking into H1R receptor structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations showed that all spinochrome derivatives bind to the receptor active site, but spinochrome monomers fit better to it. The results of the present study suggest possibilities for the development of new agents for treating allergic diseases on the base of pigments from sea urchins shells.

  3. Effect of geometrical features various objects on the data quality obtained with measured by TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowicz, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Collecting data on different building structures using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) has become in recent years a very popular due to minimize the time required to complete the task as compared to traditional methods. Technical parameters of 3D scanning devices (digitizers) are increasingly being improved, and the accuracy of the data collected allows you to play not only the geometry of an existing object in a digital image, but also enables the assessment of his condition. This is possible thanks to the digitalization of existing objects e.g., a 3D laser scanner, with which is obtained a digital data base is presented in the form of a cloud of points and by using reverse engineering. Measurements using laser scanners depends to a large extent, on the quality of the returning beam reflected from the target surface, towards the receiver. High impact on the strength and quality of the beam returning to the geometric features of the object. These properties may contribute to the emergence of some, sometimes even serious errors during scanning of various shapes. The study defined the effect of the laser beam distortion during the measurement objects with the same material but with different geometrical features on their three-dimensional imaging obtained from measurements made using TLS. We present the problem of data quality, dependent on the deflection of the beam intensity and shape of the object selected examples. The knowledge of these problems allows to obtain valuable data necessary for the implementation of digitization and the visualization of virtually any building structure made of any materials. The studies has been proven that the increase in the density of scanning does not affect the values of mean square error. The increase in the angle of incidence of the beam onto a flat surface, however, causes a decrease in the intensity of scattered radiation that reaches the receiver. The article presents an analysis of the laser beam reflected from broken at

  4. Effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on water-quality samples obtained from wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Gibs, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Factors that affect the mass of chemical constituents entering a well include the distributions of flow rate and chemical concentrations along and near the screened or open section of the well. Assuming a layered porous medium (with each layer being characterized by a uniform hydraulic conductivity and chemical concentration), a knowledge of the flow from each layer along the screened zone and of the chemical concentrations in each layer enables the total mass entering the well to be determined. Analyses of hypothetical systems and a site at Galloway, NJ, provide insight into the temporal variation of water-quality data observed when withdrawing water from screened wells in heterogeneous ground-water systems.The analyses of hypothetical systems quantitatively indicate the cause-and-effect relations that cause temporal variability in water samples obtained from wells. Chemical constituents that have relatively uniform concentrations with depth may not show variations in concentrations in the water discharged from a well after the well is purged (evacuation of standing water in the well casing). However, chemical constituents that do not have uniform concentrations near the screened interval of the well may show variations in concentrations in the well discharge water after purging because of the physics of ground-water flow in the vicinity of the screen.Water-quality samples were obtained through time over a 30 minute period from a site at Galloway, NJ. The water samples were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, and the data for benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene were evaluated for temporal variations. Samples were taken from seven discrete zones, and the flow-weighted concentrations of benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene all indicate an increase in concentration over time during pumping. These observed trends in time were reproduced numerically based on the estimated concentration distribution in the aquifer and the flow rates from each zone.The results of

  5. Space weather effects on drilling accuracy in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, S. J.; Allen, W.; Baillie, O.; Bowe, J.; Clarke, E.; Lesur, V.; MacMillan, S.

    2005-11-01

    The oil industry uses geomagnetic field information to aid directional drilling operations when drilling for oil and gas offshore. These operations involve continuous monitoring of the azimuth and inclination of the well path to ensure the target is reached and, for safety reasons, to avoid collisions with existing wells. Although the most accurate method of achieving this is through a gyroscopic survey, this can be time consuming and expensive. An alternative method is a magnetic survey, where measurements while drilling (MWD) are made along the well by magnetometers housed in a tool within the drill string. These MWD magnetic surveys require estimates of the Earth's magnetic field at the drilling location to correct the downhole magnetometer readings. The most accurate corrections are obtained if all sources of the Earth's magnetic field are considered. Estimates of the main field generated in the core and the local crustal field can be obtained using mathematical models derived from suitable data sets. In order to quantify the external field, an analysis of UK observatory data from 1983 to 2004 has been carried out. By accounting for the external field, the directional error associated with estimated field values at a mid-latitude oil well (55° N) in the North Sea is shown to be reduced by the order of 20%. This improvement varies with latitude, local time, season and phase of the geomagnetic activity cycle. By accounting for all sources of the field, using a technique called Interpolation In-Field Referencing (IIFR), directional drillers have access to data from a "virtual" magnetic observatory at the drill site. This leads to an error reduction in positional accuracy that is close to matching that of the gyroscopic survey method and provides a valuable independent technique for quality control purposes.

  6. Bioactive compounds of sea cucumbers and their therapeutic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shujuan; Feng, Wenjing; Hu, Song; Liang, Shixiu; An, Nina; Mao, Yongjun

    2016-05-01

    Sea cucumbers belong to the Class Holothuroidea of marine invertebrates. They are commercially valuable and prized as a food and folk medicine in Asia. Nutritionally, sea cucumbers have an impressive profile of valuable nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and amino acids. A number of unique biological and pharmacological activities/properties, including anticancer, anticoagulant/antithrombotic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihyperlipidemic, antihyperglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antihypertension and radioprotective, have been ascribed to various compounds isolated from sea cucumbers. The therapeutic properties and medicinal benefits of sea cucumbers can be linked to the presence of a wide array of bioactives, especially triterpene glycosides, acid mucopolysaccharide, sphingoid bases, glycolipids, fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, polysaccharides, phospholipids, cerebrosides, phosphatidylcholines, and other extracts and hydrolysates. This review highlights the valuable bioactive components as well as the multiple therapeutic properties of sea cucumbers with a view to exploring their potential uses as functional foods and a natural source of new multifunctional drugs.

  7. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal waterbirds are vulnerable to water-level changes especially under predictions of accelerating sea-level rise and increased storm frequency in the next century. Tidal and wind-driven fluctuations in water levels affecting marshes, their invertebrate communities, and their dependent waterbirds are manifested in daily, monthly, seasonal, annual, and supra-annual (e.g., decadal or 18.6-yr) periodicities. Superimposed on these cyclic patterns is a long-term (50?80 yr) increase in relative sea-level rise that varies from about 2?4 + mm/yr along the Atlantic coastline. At five study sites selected on marsh islands from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to coastal Virginia, we monitored marsh elevation changes and flooding, tide variations over time, and waterbird use. We found from longterm marsh core data that marsh elevations at three of five sites may not be sufficient to maintain pace with current sea-level rise. Results of the short-term (3?4 yr) measures using surface elevation tables suggest a more dramatic difference, with marsh elevation change at four of five sites falling below relative sea-level rise. In addition, we have found a significant increase (in three of four cases) in the rate of surface marsh flooding in New Jersey and Virginia over the past 70?80 yr during May?July when waterbirds are nesting on or near the marsh surface. Short-term, immediate effects of flooding will jeopardize annual fecundity of many species of concern to federal and state agencies, most notably American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Nelson?s Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni), Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (A. caudacutus), Seaside Sparrow (A. maritima), Coastal Plain Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis), Forster?s Tern (Sterna forsteri), Gull-billed Tern (S. nilotica), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haemotopus palliatus). Forster?s Terns are probably most at risk given the large proportion of their

  8. The effect of heavy metal pollution on foraminifera in the Western Marmara Sea (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heavy metals on foraminiferal assemblages in Holocene sediments in the western Marmara Sea. Accordingly, four drilling samples, one in Bandırma (Balıkesir/Turkey), two in Erdek Bay (Erdek-Bandırma/Turkey) and one in Tekirdağ (Turkey). Samples of cores taken from 43 different locations in the western Marmara Sea also have been examined. Changes in heavy metal concentrations were determined (spatially) in the vertical direction by means of drilling samples in the vertical direction for geochronology and in the horizontal direction by the areal distribution of the core samples, and foraminiferal assemblages were identified. In order to summarize the results of geochemical analyses, an average value defined as Pollution Index (PI) was used for the first time in this study. In this method, the pollution index value is obtained by dividing the sum of average value ratios of heavy metal measurement values by the number of measurements. The obtained index value was correlated separately with the numbers of foraminifer individuals and species. It was observed that the number of individuals and species decreased where the heavy metal measured values (MV) were higher than the pollution index and increased where the heavy metal values were lower than the pollution index. It was also observed that foraminifera were completely absent in some locations where PI was less than MV. Morphological changes were observed in Elphidium crispum, Massilina secans, and Ammonia compacta foraminifer species in the core samples taken in areas where industrial wastes are discharged into the southern parts of the Marmara Sea. No foraminifer species were observed at some locations where the heavy metal density was high (between Misakça-Denizkent, and Erdek-Balikesir). The pollution index (PI) value measured in this area was higher than the critical value, indicating that heavy metal concentrations affect the habitats of foraminifera.

  9. Electrical conductivity of oxidized-graphenic nanoplatelets obtained from bamboo: effect of the oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Prías Barragán, J. J.; Sangiao, S.; De Teresa, J. M.; Lajaunie, L.; Arenal, R.; Ariza Calderón, H.; Prieto, P.

    2016-09-01

    The large-scale production of graphene and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO) requires low-cost and eco-friendly synthesis methods. We employed a new, simple, cost-effective pyrolytic method to synthetize oxidized-graphenic nanoplatelets (OGNP) using bamboo pyroligneous acid (BPA) as a source. Thorough analyses via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy provides a complete structural and chemical description at the local scale of these samples. In particular, we found that at the highest carbonization temperature the OGNP-BPA are mainly in a sp2 bonding configuration (sp2 fraction of 87%). To determine the electrical properties of single nanoplatelets, these were contacted by Pt nanowires deposited through focused-ion-beam-induced deposition techniques. Increased conductivity by two orders of magnitude is observed as oxygen content decreases from 17% to 5%, reaching a value of 2.3 × 103 S m-1 at the lowest oxygen content. Temperature-dependent conductivity reveals a semiconductor transport behavior, described by the Mott three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. From the localization length, we estimate a band-gap value of 0.22(2) eV for an oxygen content of 5%. This investigation demonstrates the great potential of the OGNP-BPA for technological applications, given that their structural and electrical behavior is similar to the highly reduced rGO sheets obtained by more sophisticated conventional synthesis methods.

  10. Antimycotic effect of the essential oil of Aloysia triphylla against Candida species obtained from human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María de las Mercedes; Carezzano, María Evangelina; Gallucci, Mauro Nicolás; Demo, Mirta Susana

    2011-07-01

    The research of alternative substances to treat infections caused by Candida species is a need. Aromatic plants have the ability to produce secondary metabolites, such as essential oils (EO). The antimicrobial properties of Aloysia triphylla (L'Her.) Britton (cedrón) EO has been previously described. The aims of this work were to determine the antimicrobial activity and the effect on the cell structure of the EO of A. triphylla against Candida sp isolated from human illnesses. The EO was obtained by hydrodistillation of A. triphylla leaves. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was performed with microdilution method and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) was determined. A. triphylla EO's showed antifungal activity against all yeast: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. guillermondii, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis which were resistant to fluconazol (150 mg/mL). The range of MIC values was from: 35 to 140 microg/mL and the MFC: 1842 to 2300 microg/mL. The time of killing at the MFC against C. albicans (3 x 10(5) UFC/mL) was 140 min. The dates of OD620 and OD260 suggest lysis and loss of absorbing material, respectively. The HROM shows distortion in morphology and shape of the cell, with large vacuoles in the cytoplasm. These studies clearly show that A. triphylla EO is a promising alternative for the treatment of candidiasis.

  11. Effective shear modulus reconstruction obtained with approximate mean normal stress remaining unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2007-11-01

    We previously reported Methods A and B for reconstructing tissue shear modulus and density using mean normal stress as an unknown. The use of Method A enables us to obtain such reconstructions with the mean normal stress remaining unknown by using an iterative method to solve algebraic equations. However, Method A results in a low convergence speed and a low reconstruction accuracy compared with Method B that enables a reconstruction of mean normal stress together. Thus, in this report, we describe a new, rapid and accurate method, Method C, that enables the reconstructions of shear modulus and density in real time with a higher accuracy than Method A. In Method A, no reference mean normal stress is used. In Method C, an arbitrary finite value is used as a quasireference mean normal stress at an arbitrary point (i.e., a quasireference point) or an arbitrary region (i.e., a quasireference region) in the region of interest on the basis of the fact that the gradient operator implemented on the mean normal stress becomes positive-definite. When a quasireference region can be realized, Method C enables such reconstructions with a high accuracy and a high convergence speed similar to Method B. The effectiveness of Method C was verified using simulated phantom deformation data. Method C must be used instead of Method A as a practical method, in combination with Method B.

  12. An effective approach for obtaining optimal sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an effective approach for optimizing sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments. Sampling windows has been proposed for population pharmacokinetic experiments that are conducted in late phase drug development programs where patients are enrolled in many centers and out-patient clinic settings. Collection of samples under this uncontrolled environment at fixed times may be problematic and can result in uninformative data. A sampling windows approach is more practicable, as it provides the opportunity to control when samples are collected by allowing some flexibility and yet provide satisfactory parameter estimation. This approach uses D-optimality to specify time intervals around fixed D-optimal time points that results in a specified level of efficiency. The sampling windows have different lengths and achieve two objectives: the joint sampling windows design attains a high specified efficiency level and also reflects the sensitivities of the plasma concentration-time profile to parameters. It is shown that optimal sampling windows obtained using this approach are very efficient for estimating population PK parameters and provide greater flexibility in terms of when samples are collected.

  13. Effects of Power Ultrasound on Stability of Cyanidin-3-glucoside Obtained from Blueberry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guang-Long; Ma, Xing-Hui; Cao, Xian-Yin; Chen, Jian

    2016-11-18

    Power ultrasound (US) could potentially be used in the food industry in the future. However, the extent of anthocyanin degradation by US requires investigation. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-glu) obtained from blueberry extracts was used as research material to investigate the effect of power ultrasound on food processing of anthocyanin-rich raw materials. The effects of ultrasonic waves on the stability of Cy-3-glu and on the corresponding changes in UV-Vis spectrum and antioxidant activity were investigated, and the mechanisms of anthocyanin degradation induced by ultrasonic waves were discussed. To explore Cy-3-glu degradation in different environments, we kept the Cy-3-glu solution treated with ultrasonic waves in four concentrations (0%, 10%, 20%, and 50%) of ethanol aqueous solutions to simulate water, beer, wine, and liquor storage environment according to the chemical kinetics method. Results show that the basic spectral characteristics of Cy-3-glu did not significantly change after power ultrasound cell crusher application at 30 °C. However, with anthocyanin degradation, the intensity of the peak for Cy-3-glu at 504 nm significantly decreased (p < 0.05). The degradation kinetics of Cy-3-glu by ultrasonic waves (200-500 W frequency) fitted well to first-order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constant of Cy-3-glu under power ultrasound was considerably larger than that under thermal degradation (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the anthocyanins of blueberry to temperature increased with increasing ethanol concentration, and the longest half-life was observed in 20% ethanol aqueous solution.

  14. Resolution Effects on the Mean Square Displacement as Obtained by the Self-Distribution-Function Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, A.; Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F.; Mondelli, C.; Gonzalez, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    In the present contribution, a procedure for molecular motion characterization based on the evaluation of the Mean Square Displacement (MSD), through the Self-Distribution Function (SDF), is presented. It is shown how MSD, which represents an important observable for the characterization of dynamical properties, can be decomposed into different partial contributions associated to system dynamical processes within a specific spatial scale. It is also shown how the SDF procedure allows us to evaluate both total MSD and partial MSDs through total and partial SDFs. As a result, total MSD is the weighed sum of partial MSDs in which the weights are obtained by the fitting procedure of measured Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) intensity. We apply SDF procedure to data collected,by IN13, IN10 and IN4 spectrometers (Institute Laue Langevin), on aqueous mixtures of two homologous disaccharides (sucrose and trehalose) and on dry and hydrated (H2O and D2O) lysozyme with and without disaccharides. It emerges that the hydrogen bond imposed network of the water-trehalose mixture appears to be stronger with respect to that of the water-sucrose mixture. This result can justify the higher bioprotectant effectiveness of trehalose. Furthermore, it emerges that partial MSDs of sucrose and trehalose are equivalent in the low Q domain (0÷1.7) Å-1 whereas they are different in the high Q domain (1.7÷4) Å-1. This suggests that the higher structure sensitivity of sucrose should be related to the small spatial observation windows. Moreover, the role of the instrumental resolution in EINS is considered. The nature of the dynamical transition is highlighted and it is shown that it occurs when the system relaxation time becomes shorter than the instrumental energy time. Finally, the bioprotectants effect on protein dynamics and the amplitude of vibrations in lysozyme are presented.

  15. Effect of Diets Supplemented with Different Sources of Astaxanthin on the Gonad of the Sea Urchin Anthocidaris crassispina

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Chorella zofingiensis, and synthetic astaxanthin on the gonad of the sea urchin Anthocidaris crassispina was studied. The basal diet was supplemented with H. pluvialis, C. zofingiensis, or synthetic astaxanthin, at two levels of astaxanthin (approximately 400 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg), to obtain the experimental diets HP1, HP2, CZ1, CZ2, AST1, and AST2, respectively, for two months of feeding experiment. The results showed that the concentrations of astaxanthin in the gonads of the sea urchins fed these experimental diets ranged from 0.15 to 3.01 mg/kg dry gonad weight. The higher astaxanthin levels (>2.90 mg/kg) were found in the gonads of the sea urchins fed the diets HP1 (containing 380 mg/kg of astaxanthins, mostly mono- and diesters) and AST1 (containing 385 mg/kg of synthetic astaxanthin). The lowest astaxanthin level (0.15 mg/kg) was detected in the gonads of the sea urchins fed the diet CZ2 (containing 98 mg/kg of astaxanthins, mostly diesters). Furthermore, the highest canthaxanthin level (7.48 mg/kg) was found in the gonads of the sea urchins fed the diet CZ1 (containing 387 mg/kg of astaxanthins and 142 mg/kg of canthaxanthin), suggesting that astaxanthins, especially astaxanthin esters, might not be assimilated as easily as canthaxanthin by the sea urchins. Our results show that sea urchins fed diets containing astaxanthin pigments show higher incorporation of these known antioxidant constituents, with the resultant seafood products therefore being of potential higher nutritive value. PMID:23016124

  16. Climate Projection of Maximum Water Level accounting for the Effect of Waves, Storm Surges and Mean Sea Level Changes: an Application to Climate Projections along the Coastline of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, P.; Conte, D.; Marzo, L.; Scarascia, L.

    2014-12-01

    The maximum level that water reaches during a storm depends on changes of mean sea level and storminess. Increase of mean sea level can be caused by mass addition, steric effects and land subsidence. Changes of storminess will change the height of ocean waves and storm surges. This study proposes a methodology for estimating the change of maximum water level at the coast as it results from the superposition of these different factors, and applies it to climate change scenario simulations in the Mediterranean Sea. The analysis is based on a 7-member ensemble of regional climate model simulations covering the period 1951-2050 under the A1B emission scenario. Models that include a high resolution Mediterranean Sea circulation component have been used for diagnosing the steric sea level change. Model sea level pressure and wind fields are used for forcing a hydro-dynamical shallow water model (HYPSE), wind fields are used for forcing a wave model (WAM), obtaining estimates of storm surges and ocean waves, respectively. The climate change signal is computed as the difference between water level maxima in the 1971-2000 and 2021-2050 period. Results show that in the next decades storm surge level and wave height will decrease and partially compensate for the increase of maximum water level produced by the positive steric effect.

  17. Effects of sediment transport and deposition on crustal loading, Earth's gravitational field, and sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Perron, T.; Milne, G. A.; Wickert, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial patterns in static sea level are controlled by the interplay between the history of ice mass variations and the associated deformational, gravitational and rotational perturbations in the Earth's state. Over the last decade, there has been a renewed effort to extend classic treatments of ice-age sea-level change (Farrell and Clark, 1976) to incorporate effects such as shoreline migration due to the local onlap or offlap of seawater and changes in the extent of grounded, marine-based ice, as well as feedbacks between sea level and the orientation of Earth's rotation axis. To date, the impact of sediment transport - whether in the context of glacial processes, or other processes such as fluvial deposition - has not been incorporated into a gravitationally self-consistent sea-level theory. Here we briefly summarize the main elements of a new sea-level theory that includes sediment transport, and we apply this new theory to investigate crustal deformation and sea-level changes driven by sediment deposition on the Mississippi fan in the Gulf of Mexico. The calculations incorporate sediment transport from the start of the last glacial cycle through to the present and are constrained to conserve sediment and ocean mass. We compare relative sea level histories predicted with and without sediment transport at sites in and around the Gulf of Mexico, and we quantify the relative impacts of gravitational and deformational effects of sediment deposition. We also explore the extent to which sea-level changes associated with sediment transport impact the interpretation of paleo-sea-level records. Our new sea-level formulation provides an important component of a comprehensive coupling between sediment transfer and sea level on local, regional and global spatial scales, and on time scales extending from decades to tens of thousands of years. References: Farrell, W.E., and Clark, J.A., 1976. On postglacial sea level: Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, v

  18. Idealized WRF model sensitivity simulations of sea breeze types and their effects on offshore windfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C. J.; Dorling, S. R.; von Glasow, R.; Bacon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour and characteristics of the marine component of sea breeze cells have received little attention relative to their onshore counterparts. Yet there is a growing interest and dependence on the offshore wind climate from, for example, a wind energy perspective. Using idealized model experiments, we investigate the sea breeze circulation at scales which approximate to those of the southern North Sea, a region of major ongoing offshore wind farm development. We also contrast the scales and characteristics of the pure and the little known corkscrew and backdoor sea breeze types, where the type is pre-defined by the orientation of the synoptic scale flow relative to the shoreline. We find, crucially, that pure sea breezes, in contrast to corkscrew and backdoor types, can lead to substantial wind speed reductions offshore and that the addition of a second eastern coastline emphasises this effect through generation of offshore "calm zones". The offshore extent of all sea breeze types is found to be sensitive to both the influence of Coriolis acceleration and to the boundary layer scheme selected. These extents range, for example for a pure sea breeze produced in a 2 m s-1 offshore gradient wind, from 0 km to 21 km between the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino and the Yonsei State University schemes respectively. The corkscrew type restricts the development of a backdoor sea breeze on the opposite coast and is also capable of traversing a 100 km offshore domain even under high along-shore gradient wind speed (>15 m s-1) conditions. Realistic variations in sea surface skin temperature and initializing vertical thermodynamic profile do not significantly alter the resulting circulation, though the strengths of the simulated sea breezes are modulated if the effective land-sea thermal contrast is altered. We highlight how sea breeze impacts on circulation need to be considered in order to improve the accuracy of both assessments of the offshore wind energy climate and

  19. Compounding effects of sea level rise and fluvial flooding.

    PubMed

    Moftakhari, Hamed R; Salvadori, Gianfausto; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett F; Matthew, Richard A

    2017-09-12

    Sea level rise (SLR), a well-documented and urgent aspect of anthropogenic global warming, threatens population and assets located in low-lying coastal regions all around the world. Common flood hazard assessment practices typically account for one driver at a time (e.g., either fluvial flooding only or ocean flooding only), whereas coastal cities vulnerable to SLR are at risk for flooding from multiple drivers (e.g., extreme coastal high tide, storm surge, and river flow). Here, we propose a bivariate flood hazard assessment approach that accounts for compound flooding from river flow and coastal water level, and we show that a univariate approach may not appropriately characterize the flood hazard if there are compounding effects. Using copulas and bivariate dependence analysis, we also quantify the increases in failure probabilities for 2030 and 2050 caused by SLR under representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5. Additionally, the increase in failure probability is shown to be strongly affected by compounding effects. The proposed failure probability method offers an innovative tool for assessing compounding flood hazards in a warming climate.

  20. Ocean circulation: its effects on seasonal sea-ice simulations.

    PubMed

    Hibler, W D; Bryan, K

    1984-05-04

    A diagnostic ice-ocean model of the Arctic, Greenland, and Norwegian seas is constructed and used to examine the role of ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations. The model includes lateral ice motion and three-dimensional ocean circulation. The ocean portion of the model is weakly forced by observed temperature and salinity data. Simulation results show that including modeled ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations substantially improves the predicted ice drift and ice margin location. Simulations that do not include lateral ocean movment predict a much less realistic ice edge.

  1. The Effect of Monomolecular Films on Low Sea State Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    122 meters in a sea sate 6. Tne calming effect of olive oil on the sea surface is cuneifon old. Alt, -i.ce-active materials have little influence on...surfactant constituent of olive oil , a material whose capillary wave-damping virtues have been extolled at least since the ninth century B.C. [10

  2. Stratospheric Ozone-induced Indirect Radiative Effects on Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Xia, Y.; LIU, J.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the Antarctic Ozone Hole has important influences on Antarctic sea ice. While all these have focused on stratospheric ozone-induced dynamic effects on sea ice, here we show results that ozone-induced indirect radiative effects have important influences on Antarctic sea ice. Our simulations demonstrate that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes equatorward shift of clouds over the Southern Ocean. The cloud-band shift leads to reduction of downward infrared radiation, which causes surface cooling. On the other hand, it also causes increasing solar radiation on the surface. However, the increase in solar radiation is offset by surface reflection due to increasing sea ice. As a result solar radiation absorbed by the surface is reduced, which also causes surface cooling. Therefore, the overall ozone-induced cloud radiative effect is to cool the surface and causes expansion of sea ice around the Antarctic. As shown in previous studies, the cloud-band shift is associated with the equatorward shift of the westerly jet stream around the Antarctic. Our simulations also demonstrate increasing snow rate near the sea ice edge, which also contributes to Antarctic sea-ice expansion. The ozone-induced cloud radiative effect would mitigate Antarctic sea-ice melting due to greenhouse warming in the 21st century.

  3. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on quality of Sea Buckthorn during postharvest storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) has been used to retain the quality of postharvest produce. In the present study the effect of MAP on quality of berry fruit of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., a hardy, deciduous shrub, native to Asia) during refrigerated storage was investigated. Sea buck...

  4. Effect of sea water interaction on strontium isotope composition of deep-sea basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julius, Dasch E.; Hedge, C.E.; Dymond, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of rim-to-interior samples of fresh tholeiitic pillow basalts, deuterically altered holocrystalline basalts, and older, weathered tholeiitic basalts from the deep sea indicate that 87Sr 86Sr ratios of the older basalts are raised by low temperature interaction with strontium dissolved in sea water. 87Sr 86Sr correlates positively with H2O in these basalts; however, there is little detectable modification of the strontium isotope composition in rocks with H2O contents less than 1%. The isotope changes appear to be a function of relatively long-term, low-temperature weathering, rather than high-temperature or deuteric alteration. Strontium abundance and isotopic data for these rocks suggest that strontium content is only slightly modified by interaction with sea water, and it is a relatively insensitive indicator of marine alteration. Average Rb-Sr parameters for samples of apparently unaltered basalt are: Rb = 1.11 ppm; Sr = 132 ppm; 87Sr 86Sr = 0.70247. ?? 1973.

  5. Dietary patterns obtained through principal components analysis: the effect of input variable quantification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew D A C; Emmett, Pauline M; Newby, P K; Northstone, Kate

    2013-05-28

    Principal components analysis (PCA) is a popular method for deriving dietary patterns. A number of decisions must be made throughout the analytic process, including how to quantify the input variables of the PCA. The present study aims to compare the effect of using different input variables on the patterns extracted using PCA on 3-d diet diary data collected from 7473 children, aged 10 years, in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Four options were examined: weight consumed of each food group (g/d), energy-adjusted weight, percentage contribution to energy of each food group and binary intake (consumed/not consumed). Four separate PCA were performed, one for each intake measurement. Three or four dietary patterns were obtained from each analysis, with at least one component that described 'more healthy' and 'less healthy' diets and one component that described a diet with high consumption of meat, potatoes and vegetables. There were no obvious differences between the patterns derived using percentage energy as a measurement and adjusting weight for total energy intake, compared to those derived using gram weights. Using binary input variables yielded a component that loaded positively on reduced fat and reduced sugar foods. The present results suggest that food intakes quantified by gram weights or as binary variables both resulted in meaningful dietary patterns and each method has distinct advantages: weight takes into account the amount of each food consumed and binary intake appears to describe general food preferences, which are potentially easier to modify and useful in public health settings.

  6. Pathological effects of cyanobacteria on sea fans in southeast Florida.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Y; Landsberg, J H; Peters, E C; Tichenor, E; Burleson, C; Perry, N

    2015-07-01

    In early August 2008, observations by divers indicated that sea fans, particularly Gorgonia ventalina, Gorgonia flabellum, and Iciligorgia schrammi, were being covered by benthic filamentous cyanobacteria. From August 2008 through January 2009 and again in April 2009, tissue samples from a targeted G. ventalina colony affected by cyanobacteria and from a nearby, apparently healthy (without cyanobacteria) control colony, were collected monthly for histopathological examination. The primary cellular response of the sea fan to overgrowth by cyanobacteria was an increase in the number of acidophilic amoebocytes (with their granular contents dispersed) that were scattered throughout the coenenchyme tissue. Necrosis of scleroblasts and zooxanthellae and infiltration of degranulated amoebocytes were observed in the sea fan surface tissues at sites overgrown with cyanobacteria. Fungal hyphae in the axial skeleton were qualitatively more prominent in cyanobacteria-affected sea fans than in controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of seawater acidification on early development of the intertidal sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck 1816).

    PubMed

    Moulin, Laure; Catarino, Ana Isabel; Claessens, Thomas; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The effect of pH ranging from 8.0 to 6.8 (total scale - pH(T)) on fertilization, cleavage and larval development until pluteus stage was assessed in an intertidal temperate sea urchin. Gametes were obtained from adults collected in two contrasting tide pools, one showing a significant nocturnal pH decrease (lowest pH(T)=7.4) and another where pH was more stable (lowest pH(T)=7.8). The highest pH(T) at which significant effects on fertilization and cleavage were recorded was 7.6. On the contrary, larval development was only affected below pH(T) 7.4, a value equal or lower than that reported for several subtidal species. This suggests that sea urchins inhabiting stressful intertidal environments produce offspring that may better resist future ocean acidification. Moreover, at pH(T) 7.4, the fertilization rate of gametes whose progenitors came from the tide pool with higher pH decrease was significantly higher, indicating a possible acclimatization or adaptation of gametes to pH stress.

  8. Effects of removing sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis): Stability of the barren state and succession of kelp forest recovery in the east Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Leinaas, Hans Petter; Christie, Hartvig

    1996-03-01

    Stability properties of the barren state of a kelp forest-sea urchin system were studied in northern Norway. The ability of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis to maintain high population densities and recover from perturbations, and the succession of kelp forest revegetation, were studied experimentally by reducing the sea urchin density on a barren skerry. Additional information was obtained from community changes following a natural, but patchy, sea urchin mortality that varied between sites. On the barren grounds, high sea urchin densities (30 50 per m(2)) is maintained by annual recruitment. Severe reductions of sea urchin densities initiated luxuriant kelp growth, while more moderate reductions allowed establishment of opportunistic algae (during spring and early summer), but no kelps. Succession of algal growth, after the severe decline in sea urchin densities, followed a predictable pattern. At first the substrate was colonized by filamentous algae, but within few weeks they were outcompeted by the fast growing kelp Laminaria saccharina. After 3-4 years of the removal experiment, the slower-growing, long-lived kelp L. hyperborea became increasingly dominant. Increased food availability after reduction in sea urchin density led to increased individual growth of the remaining sea urchins. However, the population density did not increase, neither from recruitment nor immigration from adjacent areas with high sea urchin densities. Possibly, early establishment of a dense kelp stand, may represent a breakpoint in the ability of sea urchins to reestablish a barren state. The ability of L. saccharina quickly to invade and monopolize an area may have both positive and negative effects on the succession towards the climax L. hyperborea kelp forest. Competitive interactions may slow the process, but development of a dense stand of L. saccharina will also reduce grazing risk on scattered recruits of the more slowly growing L. hyperborea.

  9. Obtaining contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M; Maxwell, G

    1980-01-01

    A survey of 3 sample urban populations of adolescent males and females was conducted in New Zealand to ascertain whether difficulties in obtaining contraceptives was a major factor contributing toward the high rate of unprotected intercourse among young people. The samples included 246 high school students, 80 university students, and 70 individuals from the general population. There was a 47% refusal rate so the interviewed subjects could not be considered representative of the total populations. Subjects were asked to indicate the degree of embarrassment they would experience in obtaining contraceptives from a variety of sources including some sources which were currently not available. Males felt somewhat more embarrassed in obtaining contraceptives than females. About 1/3 of the males said that they felt embarrassed when obtaining contraceptives at a chemist's shop, especially if they were served by a female shop assistant. Males preferred obtaining contraceptives from sources which provided them with a high degree of privacy and anonymity. Males favored obtaining contraceptives from mail order houses, from vending machines, and from male chemists who made contraceptives available in a special display area. Many males said that they would use the services of a male family planning clinic if such services were made available. Most female methods were available through doctors and females reported less embarrassment in obtaining contraceptives than males. About 1/3 of the females preferred getting contraceptive advice and methods from female doctors, and 1/2 of the females felt it was important to know how the physician felt about contraception before seeking his advice. Current methods of distribution are inadequate and new sources associated with less embarrassment are needed.

  10. 42 CFR 489.68 - Effect of failure to obtain, maintain, and timely file a surety bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of failure to obtain, maintain, and timely file a surety bond. 489.68 Section 489.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... SUPPLIER APPROVAL Surety Bond Requirements for HHAs § 489.68 Effect of failure to obtain, maintain,...

  11. Orographic effects on South China Sea summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiming; Xie, Shang-Ping; Wang, Yuqing; Zhuang, Wei; Wang, Dongxiao

    2007-09-01

    New satellite observations reveal several distinct features of the South China Sea (SCS) summer climate: an intense low-level southwesterly wind jet off the coast of south Vietnam, a precipitation band on the western flank of the north-south running Annam mountain range, and a rainfall shadow to the east in the western SCS off the east coast of Vietnam. A high-resolution full-physics regional atmospheric model is used to investigate the mechanism for the formation of SCS summer climate. A comparison of the control model simulation with a sensitivity experiment with the mountain range artificially removed demonstrates that the aforementioned features form due to orographic effects of the Annam mountains. Under the prevailing southwesterly monsoon, the mountain range forces the ascending motion on the windward and subsidence on the lee side, giving rise to bands of active and suppressed convection, respectively. On the south edge of the mountain range, the southwesterlies are accelerated to form an offshore low-level wind jet. The mid-summer cooling in the SCS induced by this wind jet further helps reduce precipitation over the central SCS. A reduced-gravity ocean model is used to investigate the ocean response to the orographically induced wind forcing, which is found to be important for the formation of the double-gyre circulation observed in the summer in SCS, in particular for the northern cyclonic circulation. Thus, orography is a key to shaping the SCS summer climate both in the atmosphere and in the ocean.

  12. Orographic effects on South China Sea summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Xie, S.-P.; Wang, Y.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, D.

    2008-08-01

    New satellite observations reveal several distinct features of the South China Sea (SCS) summer climate: an intense low-level southwesterly wind jet off the coast of South Vietnam, a precipitation band on the western flank of the north south running Annam mountain range, and a rainfall shadow to the east in the western SCS off the east coast of Vietnam. A high-resolution full-physics regional atmospheric model is used to investigate the mechanism for the formation of SCS summer climate. A comparison of the control model simulation with a sensitivity experiment with the mountain range artificially removed demonstrates that the aforementioned features form due to orographic effects of the Annam mountains. Under the prevailing southwesterly monsoon, the mountain range forces the ascending motion on the windward and subsidence on the lee side, giving rise to bands of active and suppressed convection, respectively. On the south edge of the mountain range, the southwesterlies are accelerated to form an offshore low-level wind jet. The mid-summer cooling in the SCS induced by this wind jet further helps reduce precipitation over the central SCS. A reduced-gravity ocean model is used to investigate the ocean response to the orographically induced wind forcing, which is found to be important for the formation of the double-gyre circulation observed in the summer in SCS, in particular for the northern cyclonic circulation. Thus, orography is a key to shaping the SCS summer climate both in the atmosphere and in the ocean.

  13. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 11/5 in the South Atlantic and Northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE sections A-12 and A-21)

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.; Kozyr, A. |; Gaslightwala, A.F. |

    1994-07-01

    This document presents the procedures and methods used to obtain carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), hydrographic, and chemical data during R/V Meteor Expedition 11/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean, including the Drake Passage; the Northern Weddell Sea; and the Eastern South Atlantic Ocean. This cruise was conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The cruise started from Ushuaia, Argentina, on January 23, 1990, and ended at Capetown, South Africa on March 8, 1990. Samples were collected at 78 stations that covered the Drake Passage; the Northern Weddell Sea; a section along the 58 W parallel; and two segmented S-N sections between the Northern Weddell Sea and Capetown, South Africa. Measurements taken at WOCE sections A-12 and A-21 included pressure, temperature, salinity measured by the Conductivity, Temperature and Depth sensor (CTD); bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrate; silicate; total carbon concentration (TCO{sub 2}); and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) measured at 20 C. In addition, potential density at 0 decibar (dbar) and potential temperature were calculated from the measured variables. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in seawater samples was measured using a coulometer with an estimated precision of approximately {+-} {mu}mol/kg.

  14. (abstract) A Polarimetric Model for Effects of Brine Infiltrated Snow Cover and Frost Flowers on Sea Ice Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    A polarimetric scattering model is developed to study effects of snow cover and frost flowers with brine infiltration on thin sea ice. Leads containing thin sea ice in the Artic icepack are important to heat exchange with the atmosphere and salt flux into the upper ocean. Surface characteristics of thin sea ice in leads are dominated by the formation of frost flowers with high salinity. In many cases, the thin sea ice layer is covered by snow, which wicks up brine from sea ice due to capillary force. Snow and frost flowers have a significant impact on polarimetric signatures of thin ice, which needs to be studied for accessing the retrieval of geophysical parameters such as ice thickness. Frost flowers or snow layer is modeled with a heterogeneous mixture consisting of randomly oriented ellipsoids and brine infiltration in an air background. Ice crystals are characterized with three different axial lengths to depict the nonspherical shape. Under the covering multispecies medium, the columinar sea-ice layer is an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium composed of ellipsoidal brine inclusions preferentially oriented in the vertical direction in an ice background. The underlying medium is homogeneous sea water. This configuration is described with layered inhomogeneous media containing multiple species of scatterers. The species are allowed to have different size, shape, and permittivity. The strong permittivity fluctuation theory is extended to account for the multispecies in the derivation of effective permittivities with distributions of scatterer orientations characterized by Eulerian rotation angles. Polarimetric backscattering coefficients are obtained consistently with the same physical description used in the effective permittivity calculation. The mulitspecies model allows the inclusion of high-permittivity species to study effects of brine infiltrated snow cover and frost flowers on thin ice. The results suggest that the frost cover with a rough interface

  15. (abstract) A Polarimetric Model for Effects of Brine Infiltrated Snow Cover and Frost Flowers on Sea Ice Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    A polarimetric scattering model is developed to study effects of snow cover and frost flowers with brine infiltration on thin sea ice. Leads containing thin sea ice in the Artic icepack are important to heat exchange with the atmosphere and salt flux into the upper ocean. Surface characteristics of thin sea ice in leads are dominated by the formation of frost flowers with high salinity. In many cases, the thin sea ice layer is covered by snow, which wicks up brine from sea ice due to capillary force. Snow and frost flowers have a significant impact on polarimetric signatures of thin ice, which needs to be studied for accessing the retrieval of geophysical parameters such as ice thickness. Frost flowers or snow layer is modeled with a heterogeneous mixture consisting of randomly oriented ellipsoids and brine infiltration in an air background. Ice crystals are characterized with three different axial lengths to depict the nonspherical shape. Under the covering multispecies medium, the columinar sea-ice layer is an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium composed of ellipsoidal brine inclusions preferentially oriented in the vertical direction in an ice background. The underlying medium is homogeneous sea water. This configuration is described with layered inhomogeneous media containing multiple species of scatterers. The species are allowed to have different size, shape, and permittivity. The strong permittivity fluctuation theory is extended to account for the multispecies in the derivation of effective permittivities with distributions of scatterer orientations characterized by Eulerian rotation angles. Polarimetric backscattering coefficients are obtained consistently with the same physical description used in the effective permittivity calculation. The mulitspecies model allows the inclusion of high-permittivity species to study effects of brine infiltrated snow cover and frost flowers on thin ice. The results suggest that the frost cover with a rough interface

  16. Effect of timing of count events on estimates of sea lice abundance and interpretation of effectiveness following bath treatments.

    PubMed

    Gautam, R; Vanderstichel, R; Boerlage, A S; Revie, C W; Hammell, K L

    2017-03-01

    Effectiveness of sea lice bath treatment is often assessed by comparing pre- and post-treatment counts. However, in practice, the post-treatment counting window varies from the day of treatment to several days after treatment. In this study, we assess the effect of post-treatment lag time on sea lice abundance estimates after chemical bath treatment using data from the sea lice data management program (Fish-iTrends) between 2010 and 2014. Data on two life stages, (i) adult female (AF) and (ii) pre-adult and adult male (PAAM), were aggregated at the cage level and log-transformed. Average sea lice counts by post-treatment lag time were computed for AF and PAAM and compared relative to treatment day, using linear mixed models. There were 720 observations (treatment events) that uniquely matched pre- and post-treatment counts from 53 farms. Lag time had a significant effect on the estimated sea lice abundance, which was influenced by season and pre-treatment sea lice levels. During summer, sea lice were at a minimum when counted 1 day post-treatment irrespective of pre-treatment sea lice levels, whereas in the spring and autumn, low levels were observed for PAAM over a longer interval of time, provided the pre-treatment sea lice levels were >5-10. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of Methylphenidate and Morphine on Delay-Discount Functions Obtained within Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Raymond C.; McKinney, A. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Four rats responded under a "self-control" procedure designed to obtain delay- discount functions within sessions. Each session consisted of seven blocks, with seven trials within each block. Each block consisted of two initial forced- choice trials followed by five free-choice trials. On choice trials, the rats could press either of two…

  18. Effects of Methylphenidate and Morphine on Delay-Discount Functions Obtained within Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Raymond C.; McKinney, A. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Four rats responded under a "self-control" procedure designed to obtain delay- discount functions within sessions. Each session consisted of seven blocks, with seven trials within each block. Each block consisted of two initial forced- choice trials followed by five free-choice trials. On choice trials, the rats could press either of two…

  19. The Effect of Online College Attendance on Job Obtainment through Social Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taggart, Gabel

    2017-01-01

    Attending college online has implications for students' ability to make social connections and eventually obtain jobs by means of social capital. Previous academic work has tested employer callback rates to fictitious resumes treated by indications of either online or face-to-face college attendance but such methods overlook the networking aspect…

  20. Assessing potential effects of incinerating organic wastes at sea: Using research to answer management questions

    SciTech Connect

    Redford, D.; Jackson, M.; Gentile, J.; Oberacker, D.; Boehm, P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses research to assess potential effects of incinerating hazardous wastes at sea. In 1985, the U.S. EPA developed a research strategy to measure environmental and public health effects of incinerating hazardous wastes at sea. Although existing data indicated that effects would be minimal, the research strategy was designed to ensure that effects would be adequately and accurately assessed. These methods were developed and evaluated in land-based tests; they have been found suitable for use in research to be conducted at sea. Plans for conducting research at sea include emissions sampling and toxicity tests in conjunction with monitoring for emissions constituents in the air, surface water, sea-surface microlayer, and organisms that live in surface water (neuston). Samples from the sea-surface microlayer will also be used as test media for toxicity tests. Results of the research conducted at sea may be used to refine the procedures used in permitting and monitoring ocean incineration activities. The paper describes development of EPA's ocean incineration regulation and a program to administer the regulation. Also discussed is the use of research results in developing short- and long-term monitoring programs.

  1. Effect of polymerization on antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory potential of sea buckthorn (H. rhamnoides) proanthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Arimboor, Ranjith; Arumughan, C

    2012-10-01

    Inhibitory potential of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L) seed proanthocyanidins against oxidative stress and xanthine oxidase activity was evaluated. Composition of antioxidant proanthocyanidins was profiled by analyzing the cleavage products obtained by the acid catalyzed hydrolysis in the presence of phloroglucinol. Catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, and epigallocatechin were found as the extension and terminal subunits of proanthocyanidins with an average degree of polymerization (ADP) of 14.7. Seed proanthocyanidins showed considerably high antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory potentials. Antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory capacity evaluation of proanthocyanidin fractions with varying ADP showed that proanthocyanidins with lower molecular size were more effective as superoxide anion (ADP ≤ 4.2) and hydroxyl radical (ADP ≤ 5.9) scavengers and xanthine oxidase (ADP ≤ 3.1) inhibitors. ADP of the studied proanthocyanidin fractions did not show significant influence on their DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging and ferric reduction capacities.

  2. Distribution of bioluminescent organisms in the Mediterranean Sea and predicted effects on a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jessica; Jamieson, Alan J.; Heger, Amandine; Priede, Imants G.

    2009-04-01

    The density of bioluminescent organisms was measured using an ISIT camera profiler in the eastern and western Mediterranean, from the subsurface layer to the seafloor; in the Ligurian, Tyrrhenian, Ionian, Adriatic Seas and the Strait of Sicily, including neutrino telescope sites at ANTARES and NESTOR. A west-east gradient in the density of bioluminescent animals in deep water (1500-2500 m) was observed, with the average density in the Ligurian (ANTARES) Sea (0.65±0.13 m-3) an order of magnitude greater than the E Ionian (NESTOR) Sea (0.06±0.04 m-3). Additionally, an exponential relationship was found between the density of near-bed bioluminescence (0-400 mab) and depth, with greatest divergence from the trend at the extreme west and easterly sites. For small scale effects we applied flash kinetics of bioluminescent organisms to map the bioluminescent field around a sphere; we predict most light emission downstream of an optical module.

  3. Effect of retreating sea ice on Arctic cloud cover in simulated recent global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Manabu; Nozawa, Toru; Ogura, Tomoo; Takata, Kumiko

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of sea ice reduction on Arctic cloud cover in historical simulations with the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model MIROC5. Arctic sea ice has been substantially retreating since the 1980s, particularly in September, under simulated global warming conditions. The simulated sea ice reduction is consistent with satellite observations. On the other hand, Arctic cloud cover has been increasing in October, with about a 1-month lag behind the sea ice reduction. The delayed response leads to extensive sea ice reductions because the heat and moisture fluxes from the underlying open ocean into the atmosphere are enhanced. Sensitivity experiments with the atmospheric part of MIROC5 clearly show that sea ice reduction causes increases in cloud cover. Arctic cloud cover increases primarily in the lower troposphere, but it decreases in the near-surface layers just above the ocean; predominant temperature rises in these near-surface layers cause drying (i.e., decreases in relative humidity), despite increasing moisture flux. Cloud radiative forcing due to increases in cloud cover in autumn brings an increase in the surface downward longwave radiation (DLR) by approximately 40-60 % compared to changes in clear-sky surface DLR in fall. These results suggest that an increase in Arctic cloud cover as a result of reduced sea ice coverage may bring further sea ice retreat and enhance the feedback processes of Arctic warming.

  4. Sea salt production over Bay of Bengal : Effect of salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, K. N.; S K, S.; S S, B.; K, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosols constitute one of the most important natural aerosol systems globally and play an important role in global climate regulation and the marine biogenic system. One of the major constituents of the marine aerosol system is sea salt. Sea salt aerosols are produced via the bubble-bursting process resulting from whitecap generation (due to high wind speed). The resulting sea salt particles are of sub micrometre sizes and go up to a few micrometres. An increase in sea salt mass is primarily associated with increasing wind speeds. The increase in wind speed not only increases the mass concentration of the small-sized sea salt particles but also that of higher-sized particles. This behaviour is constrained by other factors like temperature and salinity. In the present work, this variability in the change in mass concentration of sea salt aerosol is studied with respect to the wind speed variation over Bay of Bengal (BoB). This work includes measurements from two field experiments held on 2006 ((ICARB) March-April) and 2012 ((CTCZ) July-August) over BoB. An analysis of the mass concentration with the wind history showed the mass concentration increasing with the increase in wind speed. Here wind history is used instead of instantaneous wind speed, because it is a good indicator of dependence of mass concentrations on wind speed. However, the cruise held in 2012 showed the size of particles constraining to 2.5 μm unlike the cruise in 2006. This difference in the size of the particles formed is majorly due to change in salinity. In 2012, the cruise was during summer monsoon season wherein the high runoff associated with high precipitation lead to reduced salinity. Whereas in 2006, the cruise was in summer season during which high evaporation lead to increase in salinity. This shows that with lower salinity the sea salt particles formed will be of smaller size. This also shows that apart from wind speed, salinity also affects the sea salt production.

  5. Improved simulation of Antarctic sea ice due to the radiative effects of falling snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Richardson, Mark; Hong, Yulan; Lee, Wei-Liang; Wang, Yi-Hui; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Fetzer, Eric; Stephens, Graeme; Liu, Yinghui

    2017-08-01

    Southern Ocean sea-ice cover exerts critical control on local albedo and Antarctic precipitation, but simulated Antarctic sea-ice concentration commonly disagrees with observations. Here we show that the radiative effects of precipitating ice (falling snow) contribute substantially to this discrepancy. Many models exclude these radiative effects, so they underestimate both shortwave albedo and downward longwave radiation. Using two simulations with the climate model CESM1, we show that including falling-snow radiative effects improves the simulations relative to cloud properties from CloudSat-CALIPSO, radiation from CERES-EBAF and sea-ice concentration from passive microwave sensors. From 50-70°S, the simulated sea-ice-area bias is reduced by 2.12 × 106 km2 (55%) in winter and by 1.17 × 106 km2 (39%) in summer, mainly because increased wintertime longwave heating restricts sea-ice growth and so reduces summer albedo. Improved Antarctic sea-ice simulations will increase confidence in projected Antarctic sea level contributions and changes in global warming driven by long-term changes in Southern Ocean feedbacks.

  6. Effect of histologic processing on dimensions of skin samples obtained from cat cadavers.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, Sakthila; Smith, Annette N; Schleis, Stephanie E; Cattley, Russell C; Tillson, D Michael; Henderson, Ralph A

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine changes in dimensions of feline skin samples as a result of histologic processing and to identify factors that contributed to changes in dimensions of skin samples after sample collection. SAMPLE Cadavers of 12 clinically normal cats. PROCEDURES Skin samples were obtained bilaterally from 3 locations (neck, thorax, and tibia) of each cadaver; half of the thoracic samples included underlying muscle. Length, width, and depth were measured at 5 time points (before excision, after excision, after application of ink to mark tissue margins, after fixation in neutral-buffered 10% formalin for 36 hours, and after completion of histologic processing and staining with H&E stain). Measurements obtained after sample collection were compared with measurements obtained before excision. RESULTS At the final time point, tissue samples had decreased in length (mean decrease, 32.40%) and width (mean decrease, 34.21%) and increased in depth (mean increase, 54.95%). Tissue from the tibia had the most shrinkage in length and width and that from the neck had the least shrinkage. Inclusion of underlying muscle on thoracic skin samples did not affect the degree of change in dimensions. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, each step during processing from excision to formalin fixation and histologic processing induced changes in tissue dimensions, which were manifested principally as shrinkage in length and width and increase in depth. Most of the changes occured during histologic processing. Inclusion of muscle did not affect thoracic skin shrinkage. Shrinkage should be a consideration when interpreting surgical margins in clinical cases. 945).

  7. Feather keratin hydrolysates obtained from microbial keratinases: effect on hair fiber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hair is composed mainly of keratin protein and a small amount of lipid. Protein hydrolysates, in particular those with low molecular weight distribution have been known to protect hair against chemical and environmental damage. Many types of protein hydrolysates from plants and animals have been used in hair and personal care such as keratin hydrolysates obtained from nails, horns and wool. Most of these hydrolysates are obtained by chemical hydrolysis and hydrothermal methods, but recently hydrolyzed hair keratin, feather keratin peptides, and feather meal peptides have been obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using Bacillus spp in submerged fermentation. Results Keratin peptides were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of keratinases using Bacillus subtilis AMR. The microorganism was grown on a feather medium, pH 8.0 (1% feathers) and supplemented with 0.01% of yeast extract, for 5 days, at 28°C with agitation. The supernatant containing the hydrolysates was colleted by centrifugation and ultra filtered in an AMICON system using nano–membranes (Millipore – YC05). The Proteins and peptides were analyzed using HPTLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Commercial preparations of keratin hydrolysates were used as a comparative standard. After five days the feather had been degraded (90-95%) by the peptidases and keratinases of the microorganism. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed multiple peaks that correspond to peptides in the range of 800 to 1079 Daltons and the commercial hydrolysate was in the range of 900 to 1400 Da. HPTLC showed lower molecular mass peptides and amino acids in the enzymatic hydrolysate when compared with the commercial hydrolysate . A mild shampoo and a rinse off conditioner were formulated with the enzymatic hydrolysate and applied to hair fibers to evaluate the hydration, with and without heat, using a Corneometer® CM 825. The hydration was more efficient with heat, suggesting a more complete incorporation of hydrolysates into the fibers

  8. Feather keratin hydrolysates obtained from microbial keratinases: effect on hair fiber.

    PubMed

    Villa, Ana Lúcia Vazquez; Aragão, Márcia Regina Senrra; Dos Santos, Elisabete Pereira; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Zingali, Russolina B; de Souza, Edilma Paraguai; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2013-02-18

    Hair is composed mainly of keratin protein and a small amount of lipid. Protein hydrolysates, in particular those with low molecular weight distribution have been known to protect hair against chemical and environmental damage. Many types of protein hydrolysates from plants and animals have been used in hair and personal care such as keratin hydrolysates obtained from nails, horns and wool. Most of these hydrolysates are obtained by chemical hydrolysis and hydrothermal methods, but recently hydrolyzed hair keratin, feather keratin peptides, and feather meal peptides have been obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using Bacillus spp in submerged fermentation. Keratin peptides were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of keratinases using Bacillus subtilis AMR. The microorganism was grown on a feather medium, pH 8.0 (1% feathers) and supplemented with 0.01% of yeast extract, for 5 days, at 28°C with agitation. The supernatant containing the hydrolysates was colleted by centrifugation and ultra filtered in an AMICON system using nano-membranes (Millipore - YC05). The Proteins and peptides were analyzed using HPTLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Commercial preparations of keratin hydrolysates were used as a comparative standard. After five days the feather had been degraded (90-95%) by the peptidases and keratinases of the microorganism. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed multiple peaks that correspond to peptides in the range of 800 to 1079 Daltons and the commercial hydrolysate was in the range of 900 to 1400 Da. HPTLC showed lower molecular mass peptides and amino acids in the enzymatic hydrolysate when compared with the commercial hydrolysate . A mild shampoo and a rinse off conditioner were formulated with the enzymatic hydrolysate and applied to hair fibers to evaluate the hydration, with and without heat, using a Corneometer® CM 825. The hydration was more efficient with heat, suggesting a more complete incorporation of hydrolysates into the fibers. Scanning Electron Microscopy

  9. Sterilizing effects of cobalt-60 and cesium-137 radiation on male sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    Male spawning-run sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus were exposed to various doses of cobalt-60 or cesium-137 radiation in an attempt to sterilize them for use in a program for controlling sea lampreys through the release of sterile males. Males captured and irradiated during the early part of the upstream migration were not effectively sterilized at the doses tested. After irradiation, the sea lampreys were more susceptible to fungal infections by Saprolegnia sp., and many died without attempting to spawn. Males captured and irradiated during the middle and late parts of the spawning migration were effectively sterilized at a dose of 2,000 rads. However, some radiation-induced mortality was observed in males captured and irradiated during the middle part of the spawning migration. Radiation is not as effective as the chemosterilant bisazir for sterilizing male sea lampreys.

  10. Approximate analytical effective phase function obtained for a thin slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudelle, F.

    2017-05-01

    The reflection and transmission of light from a slab containing a turbid medium provide a scattering effective phase function from which the true optical anisotropy factor may not be always easily retrieved. From the statistical Poissonian theory and thanks to approximations about the optical path related to the first scattering events, a simplified relationship is established between angular phase function and effective phase function. Therefore, with a modified Gegenbauer or a Two-Terms Henyey-Greenstein phase function, some adjustable analytic functions are proposed in order to fit the measurements linked to the true effective phase function. An efficiency of the approximate analytical function is proved, thanks to the light modelling by Monte Carlo method, for optical thickness lower or equal to 2. This is confirmed by comparisons of the anisotropy retrieval with other methods. Concerning applications, several fits were made on experimental effective phase functions corresponding to goniometric measurements from usual diffusing materials and biological tissues.

  11. Innovative plasticized alginate obtained by thermo-mechanical mixing: Effect of different biobased polyols systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengcheng; Pollet, Eric; Avérous, Luc

    2017-02-10

    Plasticized alginate films with different biobased polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and their mixtures were successfully prepared by thermo-mechanical mixing instead of the usual casting-evaporation procedure. The microstructure and properties of the different plasticized alginate formulations were investigated by SEM, FTIR, XRD, DMTA and uniaxial tensile tests. SEM and XRD results showed that native alginate particles were largely destructured with the plasticizers (polyols and water), under a thermo-mechanical input. With increasing amount of plasticizers, the samples showed enhanced homogeneity while their thermal and mechanical properties decreased. Compared to sorbitol, glycerol resulted in alginate films with a higher flexibility due to its better plasticization efficiency resulting from its smaller size and higher hydrophilic character. Glycerol and sorbitol mixtures seemed to be an optimum to obtain the best properties. This work showed that thermo-mechanical mixing is a promising method to produce, at large scale, plasticized alginate-based films with improved properties.

  12. Can Quantized Vibrational Effects Be Obtained from Ehrenfest Mixed Quantum-Classical Dynamics?

    PubMed

    Goings, Joshua J; Lingerfelt, David B; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-12-15

    We explore the question of whether mean-field or "Ehrenfest" mixed quantum-classical dynamics is capable of capturing the quantized vibrational features in photoabsorption spectra that result from infrared and Raman-active vibrational transitions. We show that vibrational and electronic absorption spectra can indeed be obtained together within a single Ehrenfest simulation. Furthermore, the electronic transitions show new sidebands that are absent in electronic dynamics simulations with fixed nuclei. Inspection of the electronic sidebands reveals that the spacing corresponds to vibrational frequencies of totally symmetric vibrational modes of the ground electronic state. A simple derivation of the time-evolving dipole in the presence of external fields and vibrational motion shows the origin of these features, demonstrating that mixed quantum-classical Ehrenfest dynamics is capable of producing infrared, Raman, and electronic absorption spectra from a single simulation.

  13. Luteolin and fisetin inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory process of infectious origin that affects the gums and, in severe cases, destroys connective tissue, leading to loss of the dental organ. Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria are recovered from patients with chronic periodontitis. The polysaccharide obtained from these bacteria induces the expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6. Flavonoids are molecules that participate in the control of inflammatory processes. We studied the role of the flavonoids fisetin, luteolin, myricetin, and morin in inhibiting the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT as well as their role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) transcription. All four of these flavonoids were found to inhibit MAPK and AKT. Fisetin and luteolin blocked the activation of MAPK and AKT to levels below basal levels. All of these flavonoids also blocked LPS-mediated COX-2 expression.

  14. Drying effects on the antioxidant properties of polysaccharides obtained from Agaricus blazei Murrill.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhai; Li, Feng; Jia, Shaoyi; Ren, Haitao; Gong, Guili; Wang, Yanyan; Lv, Zesheng; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-15

    Three polysaccharides (ABMP-F, ABMP-V, ABMP-A) were obtained from Agaricus blazei Murrill via methods such as freeze drying, vacuum drying and air drying, respectively. Their chemical compositions were examined, and antioxidant activities were investigated on the basis of assay for hydroxyl radical, DPPH radical, ABTS free radical scavenging ability and assay for Fe(2+)-chelating ability. Results showed that the three ABMPs have different physicochemical and antioxidant properties. Compared with air drying and vacuum drying methods, freeze drying method resulted to ABMP with higher neutral sugar, polysaccharide yield, uronic acid content, and stronger antioxidant abilities of hydroxyl radical, DPPH radical, ABTS radical scavenging and Fe(2+)-chelating. As a result, Agaricus blazei Murrill polysaccharides are natural antioxidant and freeze drying method serves as a good choice for the preparation of such polysaccharides and should be used to produce antioxidants for food industry.

  15. Shape effect in FMR of Ni-Co-Mn-In layers obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubiel, Łukasz; Kuzma, Marian; Stefaniuk, Ireneusz; Wisz, Grzegorz; Wal, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    We have studied thin layers of Ni50-xCoxMn50-yIny alloys on (001) Si substrate obtained by pulsed laser deposition method (PLD) using YAG Nd3+ laser operating at second harmonic. The target was bulk Ni50-xCoxMn50-yIny (x = 5, y = 14.5) alloy prepared by induction melting of pure elements under argon atmosphere. Magnetic properties were investigated on Bruker X band EPR spectrometer (9.36 GHz) at room temperature. The magnetic resonance spectrum consists of non-symmetric lines with resonance field within wide field range (2500-4800 Gs) depending on the orientation of the static field in the plane perpendicular to the layer. Calculated spectroscopic splitting factor g = 2.09.

  16. Protective effects of a novel sea buckthorn wine on oxidative stress and hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Negi, Bharti; Kaur, Rajdeep; Dey, Gargi

    2013-02-01

    We developed a novel sea buckthorn wine containing significant in vitro free radical-scavenging activity. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the sea buckthorn wine revealed that it contains high rutin, myricetin and quercetin levels compared to Cabernet Shiraz wine. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of sea buckthorn wine against phorone-induced oxidative stress and high-cholesterol diet induced hypercholesterolemia in male LACA mice. Oral administration of sea buckthorn wine increased the redox ratio accompanied by reduction of oxidized glutathione levels leading to attenuation of phorone-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the sea buckthorn wine supplementation reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation and increased the superoxide dismutase activity indicating improved resistance to oxidative stress. In addition, high-cholesterol-fed mice administered with sea buckthorn wine exhibited a 197% increase in the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio compared to high-cholesterol diet treated mice. These studies provide important evidence that sea buckthorn wine exerts protective effects against oxidative stress and hypercholesterolemia.

  17. [Choleretic effects of methanol extracts obtained from various Chinese traditional medicine].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Ohta, S; Kamogawa, A; Shinoda, M

    1989-07-01

    Choleretic effects of 60 kinds of Chinese traditional medicine frequently used in clinical practice were investigated. Consequently, significant effects of choleretics were found in the methanol extracts of Ko-so-san, Intinko-to, Saiko-seikan-to, Hange-koboku-to, Antyu-san, Syo-kankyo-to, Keisi-syakuyaku-timo-to, Senkan-meimoku-to, Bohu-tusyo-san, Juzen-taiho-to, Jumi-haidoku-to Kami-syoyo-san and Hange-syasin-to. Water extracts of these Chinese traditional medicine had no such effect. Alteration of excretion of various biliary components after administration of the methanol extracts with the choleretic effect was examined, and with all medicines, bile acid excretion decreased and sodium and potassium excretions increased. Therefore, a medicine inducing choleresis involves some selective increases in the bile acid-independent fraction of bile flow. And after administration of methanol extracts of Keisi-syakuyaku-timo-to and Bohu-tusyo-san, lithogenic index, an index of saturation level of cholesterol, decreased significantly. Therefore, with these medicines, a dissolving effect on cholesterol gallstone is expected.

  18. Effect of blood handling conditions on progesterone assay results obtained by chemiluminescence in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Tahir, M Z; Thoumire, S; Raffaelli, M; Grimard, B; Reynaud, K; Chastant-Maillard, S

    2013-10-01

    Assay of blood progesterone (P4) is commonly practiced to determine the time of ovulation, diagnose luteal insufficiency, and predict time of parturition in bitches. Because of practical constraints, most blood samples cannot be assayed on site immediately after collection. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of various sampling and storage conditions on concentrations of P4 as determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay. The blood of 5 Beagle bitches was collected from the jugular vein to study the effect of the type of collection tube (silicone, lithium heparin, EDTA), the storage time of unseparated or separated plasma (2 h to 14 d), and the number of freeze-thaw cycles (1-10) on P4. The effect of each factor was tested within one assay session. None of the factors significantly affected P4. Thus, P4 appears to remain relatively stable in canine blood samples exposed to various processing and storage conditions.

  19. A numerical study of the effects of a large sandbar upon sea breeze development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, R. C.; Pielke, R. A.; Mcqueen, J.; Eppel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of sea breeze development over a large sandbar on the North Sea coast of Germany are reported. The numerical model used in these experiments contains a detailed treatment of soil moisture, which allows evaluation of the effects of differential surface characteristics on the airflow pattern. Results of the simulations indicate that the contrast between the moist sandbar and adjacent dry land, the tidal inundation of the sandbar, and the westward penetration of the Baltic sea breeze play important roles in the development of mesoscale airflow patterns in the sandbar region.

  20. Effect of a uniform sea-level change on the earth's rotation and gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; O'Connor, William P.

    1988-01-01

    Global water redistriburtion between the oceans, atmosphere and continents causes changes in the earth's rotation and gravitational field. To conserve water mass, the effect of the small uniform change in sea-level must be considered. Explicit formulas are provided for these sea-level corrections to the gravitational Stokes coefficients, polar motion and length of day. In two recent publications, this sea-level correction term for polar motion was given incorrectly. These errors which arose from normalization conventions with the ocean function are corrected.

  1. Effect of a uniform sea-level change on the earth's rotation and gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; O'Connor, William P.

    1988-01-01

    Global water redistriburtion between the oceans, atmosphere and continents causes changes in the earth's rotation and gravitational field. To conserve water mass, the effect of the small uniform change in sea-level must be considered. Explicit formulas are provided for these sea-level corrections to the gravitational Stokes coefficients, polar motion and length of day. In two recent publications, this sea-level correction term for polar motion was given incorrectly. These errors which arose from normalization conventions with the ocean function are corrected.

  2. Concept of Sea Basing and Its Effect on Indo-US Naval Relations: The Way Ahead

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Syllabus and Reader, n.p., n.d., 3. 3 The concept of sea basing envisages using a number of platforms based at sea to project offensive and defensive...India’s subjugation by maritime powers, the effect it had on the Indian national psyche should be understandable. The realization that the ...Elective Syllabus and Reader AY 2003-2004 n.p., n.d. Mahan, Alfred T. The Influence of Sea Power Upon History 1600 – 1783. New York: Dover Publication

  3. Effects of gravity on spicule formation in cultured micromeres of sea urchin embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi-Kurotani, A.; Kiyomoto, M.; Imai, M.; Eguchi, H.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effects of gravity on morphogenesis at the cellular level, we have proposed a new experimental system with micromeres from sea urchin embryos [Izumi-Kurotani, A., Kiyomoto, M. Morphogenesis and gravity in a whole Amphibian Embryo and in isolated blastomeres of sea urchins, in: Marthy, H. -J. (Ed.), Developmental Biology Research in Space. Adv. Space Biol. Med. vol. 9, Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 83 99, 2003]. We studied spicule formation in cultured micromeres of sea urchin embryo under various conditions of gravity: hypergravity by a centrifuge and simulated microgravity in a vertical clinostat. Spicule elongation was suppressed under both experimental conditions.

  4. [Is it possible to obtain reliable information about the long-term effects of induced abortion?].

    PubMed

    Iversen, Grete Alræk; Løkeland, Mette; Fjereide, Anneli Katrine; Bjørge, Line; Iversen, Ole-Erik

    2012-06-26

    The psychological long-term effects of an induced abortion are the subject of constant debate, but the scientific basis of experience is limited and by no means unambiguous. We wanted to study how a random selection of women felt about pre-agreed follow-up studies after an induced abortion. All abortion patients who attended the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Haukeland University Hospital during a three-month period received a questionnaire. They were asked if they would be willing to be contacted in writing with questions about long-term effects 1-2 years and 5-10 years after the intervention, and to give reasons for their decisions by setting crosses in the multiple choice responses that were listed. During the period of the study, 300 abortions were carried out at the department. Questionnaires were distributed to 227 of these patients, and 181 (80 %) of them were included. 43 % of the women in the study agreed to take part in a questionnaire survey concerning the long-term effects, if any, of induced abortion 1-2 years after the intervention, and 35 % 5-10 years afterwards. It appears that it may be difficult to study the psychological long-term effects of induced abortion by means of questionnaire surveys. Our results indicate that the percentage of participants in long-term studies would be too low, and hence not representative of the group as a whole.

  5. A Methodology to Obtain Learning Effective Laboratories with Learning Management System Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruano, Ildefonso; Gamez, Javier; Dormido, Sebastian; Gomez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Online laboratories are useful and valuable resources in high education, especially in engineering studies. This work presents a methodology to create effective laboratories for learning that interact with a Learning Management System (LMS) to achieve advanced integration. It is based on pedagogical aspects and considers not only the laboratory…

  6. 77 FR 34350 - November 2010 Biological Opinion on the Effects of the Alaska Groundfish Fisheries on Steller Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Effects of the Alaska Groundfish Fisheries on Steller Sea Lions and Other Endangered Species; Public... Steller sea lions and other endangered species (Final Biop). The meeting will provide an opportunity for... relevant to Steller sea lions and fisheries since completion of the Final Biop. The review consists of two...

  7. Effects of Wind and Sea Ice Drift on the Seasonal Variation of Warm Circumpolar Deep Water in the Amundsen Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. W.; Wahlin, A.; Ha, H. K.; Lee, S.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We examined the effect of wind and sea ice on seasonal variation in the thickness of circumpolar deep water, to better understand the processes causing mass loss in the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS). Spatial and temporal variation of the layer of warm and salty circumpolar deep water (CDW) at the center of the Amundsen Shelf was measured during two oceanographic surveys and a two-year mooring deployment. A hydrographic transect from the deep ocean, across the shelf break, and into the Dotson Trough shows a local elevation of the warm deep water layer at the shelf break. On the shelf, the water flows south-east along the trough. The thickness of the warm layer displays seasonal variation with maximum thickness in austral summer and minimum thickness in austral winter. The variation in warm layer thickness gives rise to a seasonal variation of the modified CDW heat content. In order to investigate the effects of wind and sea ice drift on the heat content, ocean surface stress was calculated using the ERA interim reanalysis wind data and observed sea ice velocity and concentration from satellites. The Ekman pumping velocity was calculated from the ocean surface stress field. The Ekman pumping at the shelf break, where the warm layer is elevated, shows a strong seasonal variation coinciding with the mooring data. The average wind field is eastward north of the shelf break and westward south of the shelf break during all seasons. The main effect of a layer of sea ice (between the wind and the water) is to reduce the surface stress which can intensify the horizontal gradient of surface stress at the marginal ice zone. This creates a divergence of the Ekman transport and a positive Ekman pumping at the marginal ice zone, if the wind direction is eastward. From February to April, a marginal ice zone close to the shelf break gives rise to a positive Ekman pumping that may explain the seasonal signal seen in the mooring data. At northern boundaries of coastal polynya

  8. Modeling of topographic effects on Antarctic sea ice using multivariate adaptive regression splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Veaux, Richard D.; Gordon, Arnold L.; Comiso, Joey C.; Bacherer, Nadine E.

    1993-01-01

    The role of seafloor topography in the spatial variations of the southern ocean sea ice cover as observed (every other day) by the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer satellite in the years 1980, 1983, and 1984 is studied. Bottom bathymetry can affect sea ice surface characteristics because of the basically barotropic circulation of the ocean south of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. The main statistical tool used to quantify this effect is a local nonparametric regression model of sea ice concentration as a function of the depth and its first two derivatives in both meridional and zonal directions. First, we model the relationship of bathymetry to sea ice concentration in two sudy areas, one over the Maud Rise and the other over the Ross Sea shelf region. The multiple correlation coefficient is found to average 44% in the Maud Rise study area and 62% in the Ross Sea study area over the years 1980, 1983, and 1984. Second, a strategy of dividing the entire Antarctic region into an overlapping mosaic of small areas, or windows is considered. Keeping the windows small reduces the correlation of bathymetry with other factors such as wind, sea temperature, and distance to the continent. We find that although the form of the model varies from window to window due to the changing role of other relevant environmental variables, we are left with a spatially consistent ordering of the relative importance of the topographic predictors. For a set of three representative days in the Austral winter of 1980, the analysis shows that an average of 54% of the spatial variation in sea ice concentration over the entire ice cover can be attributed to topographic variables. The results thus support the hypothesis that there is a sea ice to bottom bathymetry link. However this should not undermine the considerable influence of wind, current, and temperature which affect the ice distribution directly and are partly responsible for the observed bathymetric effects.

  9. Communication: comparing ab initio methods of obtaining effective U parameters for closed-shell materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuang; Carter, Emily A

    2014-03-28

    The density functional theory (DFT)+U method is an efficient and effective way to calculate the ground-state properties of strongly correlated transition metal compounds, with the effective U parameters typically determined empirically. Two ab initio methods have been developed to compute the U parameter based on either constrained DFT (CDFT) or unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) theory. Previous studies have demonstrated the success of both methods in typical open-shell materials such as FeO and NiO. In this Communication we report numerical instability issues that arise for the CDFT method when applied to closed-shell transition metals, by using ZnO and Cu2O as examples. By contrast, the UHF method behaves much more robustly for both closed- and open-shell materials, making it more suitable for treating closed-shell transition metals, as well as main group elements.

  10. Molecular properties and prebiotic effect of inulin obtained from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Navarro-Martínez, María Dolores; Rojas Melgarejo, Francisco; Hiner, Alexander N P; Chazarra, Soledad; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2005-06-01

    A high molecular weight inulin has been prepared from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) agroindustrial wastes using environmentally benign aqueous extraction procedures. Physico-chemical analysis of the properties of artichoke inulin was carried out. Its average degree of polymerization was 46, which is higher than for Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, and dahlia inulins. GC-MS confirmed that the main constituent monosaccharide in artichoke inulin was fructose and its degradation by inulinase indicated that it contained the expected beta-2,1-fructan bonds. The FT-IR spectrum was identical to that of chicory inulin. These data indicate that artichoke inulin will be suitable for use in a wide range of food applications. The health-promoting prebiotic effects of artichoke inulin were demonstrated in an extensive microbiological study showing a long lasting bifidogenic effect on Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 cultures and also in mixed cultures of colonic bacteria.

  11. Braking Indices of Pulsars Obtained in the Presence of an Effective Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Nadja S.; Okada, André S.; Frajuca, Carlos

    The theoretical calculation of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this work we present a study on this issue which adapts the model that assumes that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles by introducing a compensating component in the energy conservation equation of the system. Such component relates to an effective force that varies with the first power of the tangential velocity of the pulsar’s crust. We tested the proposed model using data available.

  12. The in vivo trypanocidal effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone obtained from Salvia gilliesii.

    PubMed

    Lozano, E; Strauss, M; Spina, R; Cifuente, D; Tonn, C; Rivarola, H W; Sosa, M A

    2016-02-01

    The search for new compounds with trypanocidal activity is crucial for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Previous in vitro studies have shown that the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone (ICTX) is active against Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of ICTX on the parasites in infected mice, in an experimental model that mimics the acute phase of the disease. Swiss albino mice were infected with T. cruzi and treated daily with 10mg/kg/day ICTX (i.p.). Infected mice and mice injected with either saline or the vehicle DMSO were used as controls. Animals' survival and parasitemia were monitored once a week and histological studies were made at necropsy by the 5th week after infection. It was observed that the administration of ICTX increased the survival of mice infected, and induced a significant decrease in the parasitemia, as compared to controls. A similar protective effect was observed when animals were treated orally with benznidazole (BZN, used as a control of antiparasitic effect). By the 5th week post-infection, the presence of amastigote nests was observed within the fibers of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in controls, but not in animals treated with either ICTX or BZN. In addition, inflammatory infiltrates were observed in the tissues of controls, but not in animals treated with the drugs. We conclude that ICTX has an antiparasitic effect against T. cruzi, thus constituting an interesting option for the treatment of Chagas' disease, alone or combined with other drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Matching methods for obtaining survival functions to estimate the effect of a time-dependent treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Schaubel, Douglas E.; He, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    In observational studies of survival time featuring a binary time-dependent treatment, the hazard ratio (an instantaneous measure) is often used to represent the treatment effect. However, investigators are often more interested in the difference in survival functions. We propose semiparametric methods to estimate the causal effect of treatment among the treated with respect to survival probability. The objective is to compare post-treatment survival with the survival function that would have been observed in the absence of treatment. For each patient, we compute a prognostic score (based on the pre-treatment death hazard) and a propensity score (based on the treatment hazard). Each treated patient is then matched with an alive, uncensored and not-yet-treated patient with similar prognostic and/or propensity scores. The experience of each treated and matched patient is weighted using a variant of Inverse Probability of Censoring Weighting to account for the impact of censoring. We propose estimators of the treatment-specific survival functions (and their difference), computed through weighted Nelson-Aalen estimators. Closed-form variance estimators are proposed which take into consideration the potential replication of subjects across matched sets. The proposed methods are evaluated through simulation, then applied to estimate the effect of kidney transplantation on survival among end-stage renal disease patients using data from a national organ failure registry. PMID:25309633

  14. Packaging effective community service delivery: the utility of mandates and contracts in obtaining administrative cooperation.

    PubMed

    Woodard, K L

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary agreements, mandates, and contracts integrate networks of social service organizations, allowing them to function as coordinated wholes. The author reviews the history of contracting and mandating in the public sector. It is hypothesized that contracted relationships formalize agreements between local organizations dependent on others. Mandated relationships are perceived to be important by policy-makers at a state or federal level. The differential acceptance and rejection of these relationships in the community is explored. Data from social service agencies are used to compare administrators' assessments of the effectiveness of mandated and contracted relationships used to coordinate a group of agencies delivering services to children. When a mandated relationship has been formalized into a contract by a local administrator the perceived effectiveness of that relationship is higher than any other relationship in the community. If the mandated relationship has not been formalized by a contract this relationship is perceived to be the least effective. Important mandated inter-organizational ties without monetary incentives are less likely to work. Local administrators having developed the contracted ties see these ties as producing a higher level of performance.

  15. Conceptual and methodological challenges to integrating SEA and cumulative effects assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, Jill; Noble, Bram F.

    2011-03-15

    The constraints to assessing and managing cumulative environmental effects in the context of project-based environmental assessment are well documented, and the potential benefits of a more strategic approach to cumulative effects assessment (CEA) are well argued; however, such benefits have yet to be clearly demonstrated in practice. While it is widely assumed that cumulative effects are best addressed in a strategic context, there has been little investigation as to whether CEA and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are a 'good fit' - conceptually or methodologically. This paper identifies a number of conceptual and methodological challenges to the integration of CEA and SEA. Based on results of interviews with international experts and practitioners, this paper demonstrates that: definitions and conceptualizations of CEA are typically weak in practice; approaches to effects aggregation vary widely; a systems perspective lacks in both SEA and CEA; the multifarious nature of SEA complicates CEA; tiering arrangements between SEA and project-based assessment are limited to non-existing; and the relationship of SEA to regional planning remains unclear.

  16. Sea-breeze front effects on boundary-layer aerosols at a tropical coastal station

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, K.K.; Murthy, B.V.K.; Nair, P.R. )

    1993-07-01

    The effects of sea breeze on optical depth, size distribution, and columnar loading of aerosols at the tropical coastal station of Trivandrum are studied. It has been observed that sea-breeze front activity results in a significant and short-lived enhancement in aerosol optical depth and columnar loading in contrast to the effects seen on normal sea-breeze days. Examination of the changes in columnar aerosol size distribution associated with sea-breeze activity revealed an enhancement of small-particle (size less than 0.28 [mu]m) concentration. The aerosol size distribution deduced from optical depth measurements generally show a pronounced bimodal structure associated with the frontal activity. 22 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effect of sea cucumber (Australostichopus mollis) grazing on coastal sediments impacted by mussel farm deposition.

    PubMed

    Slater, Matthew J; Carton, Alexander G

    2009-08-01

    Deposit-feeding holothurians are important processors of surface sediments in many coastal marine systems. The present study examined the effect of grazing by the sea cucumber Australostichopus mollis on sediment impacted by green-lipped mussel biodeposits (faeces and pseudofaeces) from coastal aquaculture activities. Grazing effects were investigated in a series of tank-based feeding experiments conducted over 1, 2, 4 and 8 week periods. Sediment quality indicators routinely applied to determine the impacts of coastal aquaculture were used to evaluate sediment health from grazed and ungrazed sediments. Sea cucumber grazing resulted in reductions in total organic carbon, chlorophyll a and phaeopigment, as well as chlorophyll a/phaeopigment ratio of impacted sediments. These results demonstrate that sea cucumber grazing significantly reduces the accumulation of both organic carbon and phytopigments associated with biodeposition from mussel farms. Sea cucumber grazing offers a means of constraining or reversing the pollutive impacts of coastal bivalve aquaculture.

  18. Effect of image resolution manipulation in rearfoot angle measurements obtained with photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, I.C.N.; Picon, A.P.; Ribeiro, A.P.; Sartor, C.D.; Camargo-Junior, F.; Macedo, D.O.; Mori, E.T.T.; Monte, F.; Yamate, G.Y.; Neves, J.G.; Kondo, V.E.; Aliberti, S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution manipulation on the photogrammetric measurement of the rearfoot static angle. The study design was that of a reliability study. We evaluated 19 healthy young adults (11 females and 8 males). The photographs were taken at 1536 pixels in the greatest dimension, resized into four different resolutions (1200, 768, 600, 384 pixels) and analyzed by three equally trained examiners on a 96-pixels per inch (ppi) screen. An experienced physiotherapist marked the anatomic landmarks of rearfoot static angles on two occasions within a 1-week interval. Three different examiners had marked angles on digital pictures. The systematic error and the smallest detectable difference were calculated from the angle values between the image resolutions and times of evaluation. Different resolutions were compared by analysis of variance. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The rearfoot static angles obtained by the examiners in each resolution were not different (P > 0.05); however, the higher the image resolution the better the inter-examiner reliability. The intra-examiner reliability (within a 1-week interval) was considered to be unacceptable for all image resolutions (ICC range: 0.08-0.52). The whole body image of an adult with a minimum size of 768 pixels analyzed on a 96-ppi screen can provide very good inter-examiner reliability for photogrammetric measurements of rearfoot static angles (ICC range: 0.85-0.92), although the intra-examiner reliability within each resolution was not acceptable. Therefore, this method is not a proper tool for follow-up evaluations of patients within a therapeutic protocol. PMID:22911379

  19. Antinociceptive effect of the aqueous extract obtained from roots of Physalis angulata L. on mice.

    PubMed

    Bastos, G N T; Santos, A R S; Ferreira, V M M; Costa, A M R; Bispo, C I; Silveira, A J A; Do Nascimento, J L M

    2006-01-16

    In this study, we attempted to identify the possible antinociceptive action of aqueous extract (AE) obtained from roots of Physalis angulata, known in Brazil as "Camapu", used to treat various pain-related physiological conditions. The AE of Physalis angulata (10-30 mg/kg) given by i.p. or p.o. route, 0.5 and 1h prior, produced significant inhibition of abdominal constrictions caused by acetic acid, with ID(50) values of 18.5 (17.4-19.8) and 21.5 (18.9-24.4)mg/kg and inhibitions of 83+/-8 and 66+/-5%, respectively. The AE (10-60 mg/kg, i.p.) also caused significant inhibition of the late-phase of formalin-induced pain, with an ID(50) value of 20.8 (18.4-23.4)mg/kg and inhibition of 100%. Treatment of mice with AE (60 mg/kg, i.p.) or with morphine (10mg/kg, i.p.) produced a significant increase of the reaction time in the hot-plate test. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that the AE of Physalis angulata produce marked antinociception against the acetic acid-induced visceral pain and inflammatory pain responses induced by formalin in mice. The mechanism by which the AE produces antinociception still remains unclear. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s) responsible for the antinociceptive action and also to identify the active principles present in Physalis angulata. Moreover, the antinociceptive action demonstrated in the present study supports, at least partly, the ethnomedical uses of this plant.

  20. Effect of image resolution manipulation in rearfoot angle measurements obtained with photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Sacco, I C N; Picon, A P; Ribeiro, A P; Sartor, C D; Camargo-Junior, F; Macedo, D O; Mori, E T T; Monte, F; Yamate, G Y; Neves, J G; Kondo, V E; Aliberti, S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution manipulation on the photogrammetric measurement of the rearfoot static angle. The study design was that of a reliability study. We evaluated 19 healthy young adults (11 females and 8 males). The photographs were taken at 1536 pixels in the greatest dimension, resized into four different resolutions (1200, 768, 600, 384 pixels) and analyzed by three equally trained examiners on a 96-pixels per inch (ppi) screen. An experienced physiotherapist marked the anatomic landmarks of rearfoot static angles on two occasions within a 1-week interval. Three different examiners had marked angles on digital pictures. The systematic error and the smallest detectable difference were calculated from the angle values between the image resolutions and times of evaluation. Different resolutions were compared by analysis of variance. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The rearfoot static angles obtained by the examiners in each resolution were not different (P > 0.05); however, the higher the image resolution the better the inter-examiner reliability. The intra-examiner reliability (within a 1-week interval) was considered to be unacceptable for all image resolutions (ICC range: 0.08-0.52). The whole body image of an adult with a minimum size of 768 pixels analyzed on a 96-ppi screen can provide very good inter-examiner reliability for photogrammetric measurements of rearfoot static angles (ICC range: 0.85-0.92), although the intra-examiner reliability within each resolution was not acceptable. Therefore, this method is not a proper tool for follow-up evaluations of patients within a therapeutic protocol.

  1. Internal wave effects on the ambient noise notch in the East China Sea: model/data comparison.

    PubMed

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun

    2006-09-01

    The vertical directivity pattern of the ambient noise field observed in shallow water is typically anisotropic with a trough in the horizontal. This trough, often called the ambient noise notch, develops because downward refraction steepens all rays emanating from near the sea surface. Variability in the environment has the potential to redistribute the noise into shallower angles and thereby fill the notch. In the present work, a model for the width and depth of the ambient noise notch is developed. Transport theory for acoustic propagation is combined with a shallow water internal wave model to predict the average output of a beamformer. Ambient noise data from the East China Sea are analyzed in the 1-to-5-kHz band. Good agreement between the model and the data for both the width and depth of the ambient noise notch is obtained at multiple frequencies, suggesting that internal wave effects are significant.

  2. Braking indices of pulsars obtained in the presence of an effective force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, N. S.; Okada, A. S.; Frajuca, C.

    2016-10-01

    Braking indices of pulsars present a scientific challenge as their theoretical calculation is still an open problem. In this paper, we report results of a study regarding such calculation which adapts the canonical model (which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles) basically by introducing a compensating component in the energy conservation equation of the system. This component would correspond to an effective force that varies with the first power of the tangential velocity of the pulsar's crust. We test the proposed model using data available and predict braking indices values for different stars. We comment on the high braking index recently measured of the pulsar J1640-4631.

  3. Dehydration as an effective treatment for brevetoxicosis in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Manire, Charles A; Anderson, Eric T; Byrd, Lynne; Fauquier, Deborah A

    2013-06-01

    Harmful algal blooms are known to cause morbidity and mortality to a large number of marine and estuarine organisms worldwide, including fish and marine mammals, birds, and turtles. The effects of these algal blooms on marine organisms are due to the various toxins produced by the different algal species. In southwest Florida, frequent blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces neurotoxins known as brevetoxins, cause widespread fish kills and affect many marine animals. In 2005-2007, numerous sea turtles of several species underwent treatment for brevetoxicosis at the Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Hospital. In green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, and Kemp's ridley sea turtles, Lepidochelys kempii, symptoms associated with brevetoxicosis were limited to neurologic signs, such as the inability to control the head (head bobbing) and nervous twitching. For these turtles, treatment involved removing the turtles from the environment containing the toxins and providing short-term supportive care. In loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, symptoms were more generalized; thus, a similar approach was unsuccessful, as was routine treatment for general toxicosis. Loggerhead sea turtles had more extreme neurologic symptoms including coma, and other symptoms that included generalized edema, conjunctival edema, and cloacal or penile prolapse. Treatment of brevetoxicosis in loggerhead sea turtles required a therapeutic regimen that initially included dehydration and systemic antihistamine treatment followed by supportive care.

  4. SEA effectiveness for landscape and master planning: An investigation in Sardinia

    SciTech Connect

    De Montis, Andrea; Ledda, Antonio; Caschili, Simone; Ganciu, Amedeo; Barra, Mario

    2014-07-01

    The Italian administrative bodies and planning agencies have embraced with mixed feedbacks the introduction of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) through the European Directive 2001/42/EC. Concurrently, regional and local spatial planning practice have been characterized by a new approach inspired by landscape planning. The Italian region of Sardinia has been one of the pioneering administrative bodies in the Italian and European arena that has adopted landscape principles for the construction of its regional master plan (PPR, Piano Paesaggistico Regionale). Municipalities are now carrying out the review of their master plans to the PPR's prescriptions and indications. Against this background, the aim of this paper is to assess the level of SEA implementation in the municipal master plans of Sardinia, six years after the approval of the PPR. Rooted in the SEA international literature we construct a modular and adaptable on-line survey for officers involved in the review of municipal master plans. The results show that many Sardinian municipalities have not reviewed their master plans to the PPR's regulations yet and only a few municipalities have started this review process according to the SEA procedure. - Highlights: • We study strategic environmental assessment (SEA) effectiveness on land use plans • Four SEA implementation key issues are drawn from international literature • Data collection has included an on-line survey with close and open questions • Results indicate that SEA has been poorly implemented in landscape and master plans • Weak aspects include planning alternatives, financial resources, and monitoring.

  5. Acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of a cellulosic exopolysaccharide obtained from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; De-Oliveira, Ana Cecília A X; De-Carvalho, Rosangela R; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Coelho, Deise R; Lima, Salvador Vilar C; Paumgartten, Francisco José R; Aguiar, José Lamartine A

    2016-02-10

    The acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of BC were studied. Cytotoxicity of BC was evaluated in cultured C3A hepatoma cells (HepG2/C3A) using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. Acute toxicity was tested in adults Wistar rats treated with a single dose of BC. The genotoxicity of BC was evaluated in vivo by the micronucleus assay. BC (0.33-170 μg/mL) added to C3A cell culture medium caused no elevation in LDH release over the background level recorded in untreated cell wells. The treatment with the BC in a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg body weight) caused no deaths or signs of toxicity. BC attenuated CP-induced and inhibition the incidence of MNPCE (female: 46.94%; male: 22.7%) and increased the ratio of PCE/NCE (female: 46.10%; male: 35.25%). There was no alteration in the LDH release in the wells where C3A cells were treated with increasing concentrations of BC compared to the wells where the cells received the cell culture medium only (background of approximately 20% cell death), indicated that in the dose range tested BC was not cytotoxic. BC was not cytotoxic, genotoxic or acutely toxic. BC attenuated CP-induced genotoxic and myelotoxic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Obtaining rapid and effective hemostasis: Part I. Update and review of topical hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Howe, Nicole; Cherpelis, Basil

    2013-11-01

    Effective and rapid hemostasis is critical to optimize surgical outcomes. An advantageous adjunct in accelerating the clotting process during dermatologic surgery is the use of topical hemostatic agents, which allow dermatologic surgeons to quickly clear the surgical field while avoiding the adverse effects of systemic medications. The growing rate of patients with pacemakers and defibrillators limits the possibility of electrosurgery. It is not unusual for patients to be taking ≥1 anticoagulant medication(s). For these reasons, the use of topical hemostatic agents is likely to gain more recognition in the literature. The term topical hemostatic agents encompasses an array of pharmacotherapies, sealants, adhesives, absorbable agents, biologics, and combination products. The optimal use of topical hemostatic agents demands that dermatologic surgeons be familiar with each of these options, because the type of product used must be selected based on surgical location, wound size, and the extent of bleeding. With few randomized controlled trials in existence reviewing the efficacy of these medications, the subject of topical styptic agents has largely gone unstudied. Part I of this continuing medical education article reviews the available topical hemostatic agents and the ideal clinical settings for their use.

  7. Remanence anisotropy effect on the palaeointensity results obtained from various archaeological materials, excluding pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacheva, M.; Chauvin, A.; Jordanova, N.; Lanos, P.; Karloukovski, V.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of magnetic anisotropy on the palaeointensity results has been evaluated in different materials, including samples from archaeological structures of various ages, such as baked clay from prehistoric domestic ovens or pottery kilns, burnt soil from ancient fires, and bricks and bricks or tiles used in the kiln's construction. The remanence anisotropy was estimated by the thermoremanent (TRM) anisotropy tensor and isothermal remanence (IRM) tensor methods. The small anisotropy effect (less than 5%) observed in the palaeointensity results of baked clay from the relatively thin prehistoric oven's floors estimated previously through IRM anisotropy was confirmed by TRM anisotropy of this material. The new results demonstrate the possibility of using IRM anisotropy evaluation to correct baked clay palaeointensity data instead of the more difficult to determine TRM anisotropy ellipsoid. This is not always the case for the palaeointensity results from bricks and tiles. The anisotropy correction to palaeointensity results seems negligible for materials other than pottery. It would therefore appear that the palaeointensity determination is more sensitive to the degree of remanence anisotropy P and the angle between the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vector and the laboratory field direction, than to the angle between the NRM and the maximum axis of the remanence anisotropy ellipsoid (Kmax).

  8. Anxiolytic effects of fractions obtained from Passiflora incarnata L. in the elevated plus maze in mice.

    PubMed

    Sampath, C; Holbik, M; Krenn, L; Butterweck, V

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the putative anxiolytic-like activity of fractions prepared from a hydroethanol extract of Passiflora incarnata L. using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) in mice. The fractions were prepared as published recently, yielding a butanol, petroleum ether and chloroform fraction. From the tested fractions, the butanol fraction showed significant increases in the number of open arm entries in the EPM in concentrations of 2.1 mg/kg and 4.2 mg/kg corresponding to 150 and 300 mg/kg of the original extract. The highest activity was found for the chloroform fraction in doses of 0.17 mg/kg (10.0 ± 1.9, p < 0.001) and 0.34 mg/kg (6.6 ± 0.86; p < 0.05) which corresponds to a total extract dose of 150 and 300 mg/kg, respectively. Interestingly, the petroleum ether fraction did not show any effects in the elevated plus maze. A sedative or stimulatory effect of each of the fractions could be excluded, since none of the compounds had an influence on the total distance that the animals covered during the observation period. The results suggest that the active principle of passion flower seems to be in the chloroform fraction and to a lower extent in the butanol fraction.

  9. Sea Ice Friction: The Effect of Ice Rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scourfield, S.; Sammonds, P. R.; Lishman, B.; Riska, K.; Marchenko, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Ice deformation processes in the Arctic often generate ice rubble, and situations arise where ice fragments of varying size separate sea ice floes. While the shear forces between sea ice floes in direct contact with each other are controlled by ice-ice friction, what is not known is how the slip of the floes is affected by the presence of rubble between the sliding surfaces. We present the result of field experiments undertaken on fjord ice in Svea, Svalbard, which investigated the velocity and hold time dependence of sea ice friction involving ice gouge. Average air temperature for the duration of time in which experiments were run was -12.4°C, and the thickness of the level fjord ice was 70 cm. A double-direct-shear experiment was done on floating sea ice in the field, with the addition of rubble ice between the sliding surfaces. This was achieved by moving a floating ice block through a channel of open water whilst subjected to normal loading, which was transferred through regions of ice rubble on both sides of the mobile block. The ice rubble regions were 30 cm deep and 50 cm wide. The displacement of the block and the force needed to move the block were measured. The rate dependence of friction was investigated for speeds of 10-3 to 10-2 ms-1. To investigate the state dependence of friction, slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests were conducted for hold times ranging from 1 second to 18 hours. When comparing the results from these experiments with a model for ice friction presented by Schulson and Fortt (2013), similar behaviour is seen at low hold times, where the peak coefficient of friction has a linear relationship with the logarithm of hold time. This is not the case for long hold times, however, and we attribute this to thermal consolidation of the ice rubble region.

  10. Neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are effective against deleterious effects induced by the Thalassophryne nattereri fish venom.

    PubMed

    Piran-Soares, Ana Amélia; Komegae, Evilin Naname; Souza, Valdênia Maria Oliveira; Fonseca, Luiz Alberto; Lima, Carla; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2007-06-01

    Thalassophryne nattereri envenoming represents a great cost to North and Northeast Brazilian communities in terms of public healths, leisure and tourism. Victims rapidally develop symptoms as pain, local swelling, erythema followed by intense necrosis that persist for long days. The aim of this work was tested the immune competence of neutralizing antibodies in pre-immunized mice against principal toxic activities induced by venom. During the primary antibody response in mice, an elevation of IgG antibody levels was only observed on day 28. After boosting, high antibody levels were detected between days 49 and 70, with a 12-fold increase in IgG level over control values at day 49. We confirmed the in vitro neutralizing capacity of T. nattereri anti-venom against toxic effects and thereafter we show that neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are more effective, inclusive against edematous reaction. After boosting during the secondary response mice with high antibody levels do not present any alterations in venule or arteriole after topical application of venom on cremaster muscle. In addition, CK activity diminished in these mice with high neutralizing antibody levels corroborating the attenuation of the myonecrotic effect by venom. In addition, we determined the presence of high IgG antibodies levels in patients 6 months after injury by T. nattereri. In conclusion, the presence of neutralizing antibodies against to T. nattereri venom in the serum of pre-immunized mice could change the outcome of lesion at site of posterior envenoming. Antigen-specific antibodies of high affinity in consequence to specific immune response, dependent of T lymphocyte activation, could minimize the symptoms of intense and immediate inflammatory reaction caused by T. nattereri venom. These finding prompt us to the possibility of development of immune therapeutic strategies using specific anti-venom as an efficient intervention for protecting human victims.

  11. Lateral conduction effects on heat-transfer data obtained with the phase-change paint technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maise, G.; Rossi, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized tool, CAPE, (Conduction Analysis Program using Eigenvalues) has been developed to account for lateral heat conduction in wind tunnel models in the data reduction of the phase-change paint technique. The tool also accounts for the effects of finite thickness (thin wings) and surface curvature. A special reduction procedure using just one time of melt is also possible on leading edges. A novel iterative numerical scheme was used, with discretized spatial coordinates but analytic integration in time, to solve the inverse conduction problem involved in the data reduction. A yes-no chart is provided which tells the test engineer when various corrections are large enough so that CAPE should be used. The accuracy of the phase-change paint technique in the presence of finite thickness and lateral conduction is also investigated.

  12. Antihelmintic effects of nutmeg (Myristica fragans) on Anisakis simplex L3 larvae obtained from Micromesistius potassou.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Gerique, Javier; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; Valero, Marta Sofía; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota

    2015-06-01

    Anisakis simplex is a foodborne pathogen that can produce human infections and allergic reactions due to the high consumption of raw fish. The seeds of Myristica fragans (Myristicaceae), popularly known as nutmeg, are worldwide used as a culinary spice due to its flavour and properties in food preservation. A nutmeg extract was prepared, analyzed, screened for cytotoxicity and tested against Anisakis simplex L3 larvae. In order to detect the biologically active constituents of the extract, myristicin was tested on the larvae. An acetylcholinesterase inhibition bioassay was also carried out to investigate the antihelmintic mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that nutmeg exerts antihelmintic effects on Anisakis simplex, being myristicin one of the active compounds. The extract induced a high rate of dead anisakis at concentrations between 0.5 and 0.7 mg/ml without being considered cytotoxic; however, an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was discarded as the molecular mechanism involved in the activity.

  13. Effect of using different cover image quality to obtain robust selective embedding in steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Karwan Asaad; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Abdulla, Alan Anwer

    2014-05-01

    One of the common types of steganography is to conceal an image as a secret message in another image which normally called a cover image; the resulting image is called a stego image. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of using different cover image quality, and also analyse the use of different bit-plane in term of robustness against well-known active attacks such as gamma, statistical filters, and linear spatial filters. The secret messages are embedded in higher bit-plane, i.e. in other than Least Significant Bit (LSB), in order to resist active attacks. The embedding process is performed in three major steps: First, the embedding algorithm is selectively identifying useful areas (blocks) for embedding based on its lighting condition. Second, is to nominate the most useful blocks for embedding based on their entropy and average. Third, is to select the right bit-plane for embedding. This kind of block selection made the embedding process scatters the secret message(s) randomly around the cover image. Different tests have been performed for selecting a proper block size and this is related to the nature of the used cover image. Our proposed method suggests a suitable embedding bit-plane as well as the right blocks for the embedding. Experimental results demonstrate that different image quality used for the cover images will have an effect when the stego image is attacked by different active attacks. Although the secret messages are embedded in higher bit-plane, but they cannot be recognised visually within the stegos image.

  14. Effectiveness of Autologous Fat Grafting in Adherent Scars: Results Obtained by a Comprehensive Scar Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E H; Brouwer, Katrien M; van Trier, Antoine J M; Groot, Marloes L; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, patients normally survive severe traumas such as burn injuries and necrotizing fasciitis. Large skin defects can be closed but the scars remain. Scars may become adherent to underlying structures when the subcutical fat layer is damaged. Autologous fat grafting provides the possibility of reconstructing a functional sliding layer underneath the scar. Autologous fat grafting is becoming increasingly popular for scar treatment, although large studies using validated evaluation tools are lacking. The authors therefore objectified the effectiveness of single-treatment autologous fat grafting on scar pliability using validated scar measurement tools. Forty patients with adherent scars receiving single-treatment autologous fat grafting were measured preoperatively and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome parameter was scar pliability, measured using the Cutometer. Scar quality was also evaluated by the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the DSM II ColorMeter. To prevent selection bias, measurements were performed following a standardized algorithm. The Cutometer parameters elasticity and maximal extension improved 22.5 percent (p < 0.001) and 15.6 percent (p = 0.001), respectively. Total Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale scores improved from 3.6 to 2.9 on the observer scale, and from 5.1 to 3.8 on the patient scale (both p < 0.001). Color differences between the scar and normal skin remained unaltered. For the first time, the effect of autologous fat grafting on functional scar parameters was ascertained using a comprehensive scar evaluation protocol. The improved scar pliability supports the authors' hypothesis that the function of the subcutis can be restored to a certain extent by single-treatment autologous fat grafting. Therapeutic, IV.

  15. Dynamic Effects of Airborne Water Droplets on Air-Sea Interactions: Sea-Spray and Rain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION...order to assure a sufficiently long residence time to obtain statistical properties for this test case, the droplet was released at 10 meters above

  16. Pelagic effects of offshore wind farm foundations in the stratified North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floeter, Jens; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Auch, Dominik; Callies, Ulrich; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Dudeck, Tim; Eberle, Sabine; Eckhardt, André; Gloe, Dominik; Hänselmann, Kristin; Hufnagl, Marc; Janßen, Silke; Lenhart, Hermann; Möller, Klas Ove; North, Ryan P.; Pohlmann, Thomas; Riethmüller, Rolf; Schulz, Sabrina; Spreizenbarth, Stefan; Temming, Axel; Walter, Bettina; Zielinski, Oliver; Möllmann, Christian

    2017-08-01

    A recent increase in the construction of Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs) has initiated numerous environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs. These focus on sea mammals, seabirds, benthos or demersal fish, but generally ignore any potential effects OWFs may have on the pelagic ecosystem. The only work on the latter has been through modelling analyses, which predict localised impacts like enhanced vertical mixing leading to a decrease in seasonal stratification, as well as shelf-wide changes of tidal amplitudes. Here we provide for the first-time empirical bio-physical data from an OWF. The data were obtained by towing a remotely operated vehicle (TRIAXUS ROTV) through two non-operating OWFs in the summer stratified North Sea. The undulating TRIAXUS transects provided high-resolution CTD data accompanied by oxygen and chlorophyll-a measurements. We provide empirical indication that vertical mixing is increased within the OWFs, leading to a doming of the thermocline and a subsequent transport of nutrients into the surface mixed layer (SML). Nutrients were taken up rapidly because underwater photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) enabled net primary production in the entire water column, especially within submesoscale chlorophyll-a pillars that were observed at regular intervals within the OWF regions. Video Plankton Recorder (VPR) images revealed distinct meroplankton distribution patterns in a copepod-dominated plankton community. Hydroacoustic records did not show any OWF effects on the distribution of pelagic fish. The results of a pre-OWF survey show however, that it is difficult to fully separate the anthropogenic impacts from the natural variability.

  17. Distribution of sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Patagonian Sea: Seasonal, biological and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Lucía C.; Bianchi, Alejandro A.; Osiroff, Ana Paula; Pino, Diana Ruiz; Piola, Alberto R.

    2017-07-01

    Sea-air CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in the Patagonian Sea (PS) were studied using observations collected in 2000-2006. Based on the PS frontal structures and the thermal and biological contributions to FCO2 we present a regional subdivision between distinct regimes that provide new insights on the processes that control these fluxes. The coastal regime (CR) is a net source of atmospheric CO2 (4.9 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1) while the open shelf regime (SHR) is a net CO2 sink (-6.0 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1). The interface between these two regions closely follows the location of along-shore fronts. In addition, based on the nature of the processes that drive the FCO2, the PS is subdivided between northern (NR) and southern (SR) regions. Both, NR and SR are CO2 sinks, but the CO2 uptake is significantly higher in NR (-6.4 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1) than in SR (-0.5 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1). The data reveal a strong seasonality in FCO2. The mean CO2 capture throughout the PS in austral spring is -5.8 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1, reaching values lower than -50 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1 in NR, while in winter FCO2 is close to equilibrium in SR. The analysis of the biological and thermal effects (BE and TE, respectively) on seasonal pCO2 variability indicates that regions of CO2 emission are dominated by the TE while regions of CO2 uptake are dominated by the BE. Our results indicate that the biological pump is the dominant process determining the sea-air CO2 flux in the PS.

  18. Electrical conductivity of graphite oxide nanoplatelets obtained from bamboo: Effect of the deoxidation degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Prias-Barragan, J. J.; Sangiao, S.; de Teresa, J. M.; Lajaunie, L.; Arenal, R.; Ariza-Calderón, H.; Prieto, P.

    Given the high interest in the fabrication and application of carbon-based materials, we present a new and cost-effective method for the synthesis of graphite oxide nanoplatelets (GONP) using bamboo pyroligneous acid (BPA) as source. GONP-BPA present lateral dimensions of 5-100 micro-meter and thickness less than 80 nm, as confirmed by TEM. EEL spectra show that locally the carbon is mainly in sp2 bonding configuration and confirm a short/medium range crystalline order. Elemental analysis by EDX confirms the presence of oxygen in an atomic percentage ranging from 17 to 5%. For electrical characterization, single platelets were contacted by focused-ion-beam-induced deposition of Pt nanowires. The four-point probe electrical conductivity shows a direct correlation with the oxygen percentage. Three orders of magnitude conductivity rise is observed by the oxygen reduction, reaching a value of 2.3x103 S/m at the final deoxidation degree. The results suggest that GONP-BPA could be used in the development of advanced devices and sensors.

  19. Effect of glycation on sodium caseinate-stabilized emulsions obtained by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Corzo-Martínez, M; Soria, A C; Villamiel, M; Olano, A; Harte, F M; Moreno, F J

    2011-01-01

    This work explores the potential of high-intensity ultrasound to produce fine-dispersion, long-time-stable, oil-in-water emulsions prepared with native and glycated bovine sodium caseinate (SC). Regardless the ultrasound amplitude and time assayed, the sonicated emulsions of native SC at 0.5 mg/mL had much higher emulsifying activity indexes compared with those emulsions formed by Ultra-Turrax (IKA Werke GmbH & Co., Staufen, Germany) homogenization. Nevertheless, the native SC emulsions were very unstable despite the optimization of parameters such as protein concentration, amplitude of ultrasound wave, and sonication time by using a Box-Behnken design. Early glycation of SC with either galactose, lactose, or 10 kDa dextran substantially improved both emulsifying activity and the stability, whereas at advanced stages of glycation, SC emulsions showed notably reduced emulsifying properties, likely because extensive glycation of SC promoted its polymerization mainly through covalent cross-linking, as was demonstrated by particle size measurements. The increase in particle diameter of glycoconjugates likely affected the diffusion of SC from bulk to the oil-water interface and slowed the reorientation process of the protein at the interface. These findings show that the combined effect of early-stage glycation of SC and high-intensity ultrasound as an emergent technique to form emulsions has the potential to provide improved emulsions that could be used in several food applications.

  20. Obtaining edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers from different sewage sludges. Effects on soil biological properties.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morgado, Bruno; Gómez, Isidoro; Parrado, Juan; García-Martínez, Ana M; Aragón, Carlos; Tejada, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We studied the influence of six edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers (BSs) manufactured by the pH-stat method from different sewage sludge (SS): SS1 (an anaerobic mature sludge, one year old), SS2 (an aerobic young sludge, without maturation) and SS3 (an aerobic mature sludge, four months old), not previously autoclaved (A) and autoclaved (B), by analysing their effects on soil biological properties. Soil enzymatic activities were measured at 1, 3, 5, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days of the incubation period, whereas the 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles were determined at 0, 5 and 60 days. The enzymatic activities were significantly stimulated. The highest stimulation was found in the B2 treatment followed by B3, A2, A3, B1 and A1 treatments. Increasing the number of lower molecular weight proteins in the BS enhances the stimulation of soil enzymatic activities. The application of BS caused at 5 days of the incubation period temporal variations in the soil bacterial community structure.

  1. The contrasting effect of increasing mean sea level and decreasing storminess on the maximum water level during storms along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the mid 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Piero; Conte, Dario; Marzo, Luigi; Scarascia, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The maximum level that water reaches during a storm along the coast has important consequences on coastal defences and coastal erosion. It depends on future sea level, storm surges, ocean wind generated waves, vertical land motion. The future sea level in turn depends on water mass addition and steric contributions (with a thermosteric and halosteric component). This study proposes a practical methodology for assessing the effects of these different factors (which need to be estimated at sub-regional scale) and applies it to a 7-member model ensemble of regional climate model simulations (developed and carried out in the CIRCE fp6 project) covering the period 1951-2050 under the A1B emission scenario. Sea level pressure and wind fields are used for forcing a hydro-dynamical shallow water model (HYPSE), wind fields are used for forcing a wave model (WAM), obtaining estimates of storm surges and ocean waves, respectively. Thermosteric and halosteric effects are diagnosed from the projections of sea temperature and salinity. Steric expansion and storminess are shown to be contrasting factors: in the next decades wave and storm surge maxima will decrease while thermosteric expansion will increase mean sea level. These two effects will to a large extent compensate each other, so that their superposition will increase/decrease the maximum water level along two comparable fractions of the coastline (about 15-20%) by the mid 21st century. However, mass addition across the Gibraltar Strait to the Mediterranean Sea will likely become the dominant factor and determine an increase of the maximum water level along most of the coastline.

  2. SST Variability over the Southern South China Sea: Local effects and Remote forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B.; Tkalich, P.

    2012-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is one of the largest semi-enclosed marginal seas in the world ocean. The SCS is connected to the East China Sea through the Taiwan Strait to the northeast and the Pacific Ocean in the east through the Luzon Strait, laying between the Luzon and Taiwan Islands. To the south, SCS is connected to the Indonesian Sea (IS) through the Karimata and Gaspar Straits, and to the Indian Ocean though the Malacca Strait. The large-scale circulation and SST over the SCS is dominantly influenced by the seasonal reversal of the monsoon winds. Beyond the seasonal time scale, the circulation and temperature variability over the SCS demonstrate strong relationship with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the Pacific Ocean. The present study addresses the inter-annual variability of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the southern South China Sea with special emphasis on the ENSO and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events during the period 1993 to 2009. Due to its geographical location, the dynamics and thermodynamics of the southern SCS is largely influenced by the anomalous events occurring in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. A high resolution, three-dimensional sigma co-ordinate, regional ocean general circulation model (ROMS) configured for the South China Sea and Bay of Bengal region is used for the analysis. The model has been forced by 12-hourly varying surface wind, air temperature, relative humidity, surface downward solar and longwave radiation and precipitation fields obtained from the ERA-interim re-analysis data set as well as space- and time-dependent lateral fluxes of temperature, salinity, currents and sea level. Detailed analysis has been done to identify the roles of the surface heat fluxes, and the water mass advection from the Java Sea and northern South China Sea in driving the SST variability over the region. The surface heat flux data set (NOC v2.0) developed by the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, is also used to

  3. Assessment of the toxic effect exerted by fluorescent pseudomonads on embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus.

    PubMed

    Beleneva, I A; Shamshurina, E V; Eliseikina, M G

    2015-05-01

    Strains of bacteria capable of growing on artificial culture media were isolated from the fouling of brass plates submerged in Nha Trang Bay, South China Sea, and from tissues of the seastar Distolasterias nipon, caught in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan. According to the complex of data of genetic and physiological/biochemical analyzes, two strains of cultivated bacteria were identified by us as the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two strains as Pseudomonas fluorescens, and one strain as Ruegeria sp. It was shown that the cultivated strains of P. aeruginosa released exotoxins, particularly phenazine pigments, into the environment. Production of the toxins did not depend on presence of a target organism in the system and was aimed at regulation of interactions in the microbial community. The toxicity of the studied natural isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads was analyzed by using embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus, which are the sensitive and dynamic toxicological sea-urchin embryo test (SET) system. As was established, exotoxins produced by the strains of P. aeruginosa inhibit activity of cilia in sea urchin larvae, as well as disturb processes of cell differentiation in embryos and larvae. Their toxic influence is accompanied by disturbances of protein synthesis and the disruptions of cytoskeleton in the course of zygote cleavage and larval development. Unlike P. aeruginosa, the strains of P. fluorescens and Ruegeria sp. did not exert the toxic effect on SET. The obtained data allow considering objects of the environment as the natural reservoir of opportunistic microorganisms posing a potential threat to human, whereas the use of SET for determination of toxicity of isolated bacteria provides an opportunity to study the mechanisms of their interactions with organisms in marine ecosystems.

  4. Chemical contaminants in the Wadden Sea: Sources, transport, fate and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laane, R. W. P. M.; Vethaak, A. D.; Gandrass, J.; Vorkamp, K.; Köhler, A.; Larsen, M. M.; Strand, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Wadden Sea receives contaminants from various sources and via various transport routes. The contaminants described in this overview are various metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) and various organic contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and lindane (hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-HCH)). In addition, information is presented about other and emerging contaminants such as antifouling biocides (e.g. TBT and Irgarol), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), poly- and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs). Special attention is given to biogeochemical processes that contribute to the mobilization of contaminants in the surface sediments of the Wadden Sea. Finally, the effects on organisms of contaminants are reviewed and discussed. The main source of contaminants in the Wadden Sea are the rivers Rhine (via de Dutch coastal zone), Elbe and Weser. The Wadden Sea is not a sink for contaminants and adsorbed contaminants are transported from east to west. The surface sediments of the Wadden Sea are an important source for contaminants to the water above. The input and concentration of most contaminants have significantly decreased in water, sediments, organisms (e.g., mussel, flounder and bird eggs) in various parts of the Wadden Sea in the last three decades. Remarkably, the Cd concentration in mussels is increasing the last decades. In recent decades, the effects of contaminants on organisms (e.g., flounder, seal) have fallen markedly. Most of the affected populations have recovered, except for TBT induced effects in snails. Little is known about the concentration and effects of most emerging contaminants and the complex environmental mixtures of contaminants. It is recommended to install an international coordinated monitoring programme for contaminants and their effects in the whole Wadden Sea and to identify the chemical contaminants that really cause the effect.

  5. Obtaining effective pair potentials in colloidal monolayers using a thermodynamically consistent inversion scheme.

    PubMed

    Law, A D; Buzza, D M A

    2010-05-18

    The structure and stability of colloidal monolayers depends crucially on the effective pair interaction potential u(r) between colloidal particles. In this study, we construct a novel method for extracting u(r) from the two-dimensional (2D) radial distribution function g(r) of dense colloidal monolayers. The method is based on the Ornstein-Zernike relation and the HMSA closure first proposed by Zerah and Hansen (Zerah, G.; Hansen, J.-P. Self-consistent integral equations for fluid pair distribution functions: Another attempt. J. Chem. Phys. 1986, 84(4), 2336-2343). The HMSA closure contains a single fitting parameter which is determined by requiring thermodynamic consistency between the virial and compressibility equations of state. The accuracy of the HMSA inversion scheme is compared to a 2D predictor corrector scheme based on hard-disk fluids (HDPC) previously proposed by us (Law, A. D.; Buzza, D. M. A. Determination of interaction potentials of colloidal monolayers from the inversion of pair correlation functions: A two-dimensional predictor-corrector method. J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 131, 094704) and the conventional "one-step" inversion methods of HNC and Percus-Yevick (PY). The accuracy of all these schemes is tested against Monte Carlo simulation data for g(r) from monolayers interacting via a range of commonly encountered potentials, including both purely repulsive potentials and potentials containing an attractive well. For all the potentials studied, we find that the accuracy of the HMSA and HDPC schemes is superior to HNC and PY, especially as we go to higher densities. The HDPC and HMSA schemes are particularly accurate for hard-core and soft-core fluids, respectively, at high density and are therefore complementary to each other. Finally, we find that, even in the presence of experimentally realistic levels of noise in the input g(r) data, both HMSA and HDPC schemes are able to faithfully extract the salient features of the underlying interaction

  6. Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: might they be connected?

    PubMed

    Peltier, W R; Tushingham, A M

    1989-05-19

    Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 +/- 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming.

  7. Modeling landscape dynamics and effects of sea-level rise on coastal wetlands of northwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, T.W.; Day, R.H.; Biagas, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    A research study to examine the ability to predict changes in coastal vegetation caused by sea level rise is very briefly summarized. A field survey was carried out on the northwest coast of Florida. A predictive elevation model was then generated from digitized US Geologic Survey 1:2400 hypsographic data using surface modeling techniques. Sea-level rise model simulations were generated to predict a likelihood index of habitat change and conversions under different scenarios. Maps were produced depicting location of the coastline and inland extent of salt marsh using a range of sea level rise rates through the year 2100. This modeling approach offers a technological tool to researchers and wetland managers for effective cumulative impact analysis of wetlands affected by sea-level rise.

  8. Investigation of electromagnetic backscattering from nearshore sea surfaces modulated by shoaling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, D.; Zhang, M.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) scattering features of radar scattered echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are investigated using the second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II). The joint influences of wind fetch and water depth on the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of and Doppler spectra for echoes from nearshore sea surfaces are mainly studied. The numerical results show that with a further increasing fetch, the excess of NRCS for small depth sea over that for deeper sea increases, and Doppler spectral features are also intensely influenced by nonlinear interactions between waves in the large wind fetch and small water depth marine environment. These both indicate that the effects of the finite depth are more prominent with increasing wind fetch, especially for HH polarization.

  9. On the effect of sea spray on the aerodynamic surface drag under severe winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Soustova, Irina; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of the sea spray on the air-sea momentum exchange during the entire "life cycle" of a droplet, torn off the crest of a steep surface wave, and its fall down to the water, in the framework of a model covering the following aspects of the phenomenon: (1) motion of heavy particle in the driving air flow (equations of motion); (2) structure of the wind field (wind velocity, wave-induced disturbances, turbulent fluctuations); (3) generation of the sea spray; and (4) statistics of droplets (size distribution, wind speed dependence). It is demonstrated that the sea spray in strong winds leads to an increase in the surface drag up to 40 % on the assumption that the velocity profile is neutral.

  10. Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: might they be connected

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M.

    1989-03-21

    Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {+-} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming.

  11. 'Direct PCR' optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, nondestructive and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Hing; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Puniamoorthy, Jayanthi; Balke, Michael; Cranston, Peter S; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately, obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short cut to DNA barcoding, that is, a nondestructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction ('direct PCR') and that can be used for a broad range of invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate how direct PCR can be optimized for the larvae and adults of nonbiting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae), a typical invertebrate group that is abundant, contains important bioindicator species, but is difficult to identify based on morphological features. After optimization, direct PCR yields high PCR success rates (>90%), preserves delicate morphological features (e.g. details of genitalia, and larval head capsules) while allowing for the recovery of genomic DNA. We also document that direct PCR can be successfully optimized for a wide range of other invertebrate taxa that need routine barcoding (flies: Culicidae, Drosophilidae, Dolichopodidae, Sepsidae; sea stars: Oreasteridae). Key for obtaining high PCR success rates is optimizing (i) tissue quantity, (ii) body part, (iii) primer pair and (iv) type of Taq polymerase. Unfortunately, not all invertebrates appear suitable because direct PCR has low success rates for other taxa that were tested (e.g. Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Copepoda, Hymenoptera: Formicidae and Odonata). It appears that the technique is less successful for heavily sclerotized insects and/or those with many exocrine glands.

  12. Effects of co-fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Issatchenkia orientalis on sea buckthorn juice.

    PubMed

    Negi, Bharti; Dey, Gargi

    2013-06-01

    This work relates to the development of a co-fermented product of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Issatchenkia orientalis. Besides malic acid degradation, the parameters of present production technology were also standardized with emphasis on the retainability of total phenolic content (TPC) of sea buckthorn juice. The effect of co-fermentation on physico-chemical characteristics, organic acids, flavonoids, TPC and antioxidant activities was studied. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed 55% reduction in malic acid content after the co-fermentation of sea buckthorn juice. The TPC of sea buckthorn product was 2.18 g gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/l. The estimated scavenging effect on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radicals was 2.63 Trolox equivalent (TE) mmol/l. Ferric-reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assays also showed that sea buckthorn product was on a par with commercial wines (Cabernet Shiraz and Beaujolais). We conclude that the process of co-fermentation resulted in a significant antioxidant potential of sea buckthorn product.

  13. Bald eagles and sea otters in the Aleutian Archipelago: indirect effects of trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Robert G; Estes, James A; Ricca, Mark A; Miles, A Keith; Forsman, Eric D

    2008-10-01

    Because sea otters (Enhydra lutris) exert a wide array of direct and indirect effects on coastal marine ecosystems throughout their geographic range, we investigated the potential influence of sea otters on the ecology of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA. We studied the diets, productivity, and density of breeding Bald Eagles on four islands during 1993-1994 and 2000-2002, when sea otters were abundant and scarce, respectively. Bald Eagles depend on nearshore marine communities for most of their prey in this ecosystem, so we predicted that the recent decline in otter populations would have an indirect negative effect on diets and demography of Bald Eagles. Contrary to our predictions, we found no effects on density of breeding pairs on four islands from 1993-1994 to 2000-2002. In contrast, diets and diet diversity of Bald Eagles changed considerably between the two time periods, likely reflecting a change in prey availability resulting from the increase and subsequent decline in sea otter populations. The frequency of sea otter pups, rock greenling (Hexagammus lagocephalus), and smooth lumpsuckers (Aptocyclus ventricosus) in the eagle's diet declined with corresponding increases in Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus), Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens), Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), and various species of seabirds during the period of the recent otter population decline. Breeding success and productivity of Bald Eagles also increased during this time period, which may be due to the higher nutritional quality of avian prey consumed in later years. Our results provide further evidence of the wide-ranging indirect effects of sea otter predation on nearshore marine communities and another apex predator, the Bald Eagle. Although the indirect effects of sea otters are widely known, this example is unique because the food-web pathway transcended five species and several trophic levels in linking one apex predator

  14. Bald eagles and sea otters in the Aleutian Archipelago: indirect effects of trophic cascades.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Estes, J.A.; Ricca, M.A.; Miles, A.K.; Forsman, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Because sea otters (Enhydra lutris) exert a wide array of direct and indirect effects on coastal marine ecosystems throughout their geographic range, we investigated the potential influence of sea otters on the ecology of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA. We studied the diets, productivity, and density of breeding Bald Eagles on four islands during 1993–1994 and 2000–2002, when sea otters were abundant and scarce, respectively. Bald Eagles depend on nearshore marine communities for most of their prey in this ecosystem, so we predicted that the recent decline in otter populations would have an indirect negative effect on diets and demography of Bald Eagles. Contrary to our predictions, we found no effects on density of breeding pairs on four islands from 1993–1994 to 2000–2002. In contrast, diets and diet diversity of Bald Eagles changed considerably between the two time periods, likely reflecting a change in prey availability resulting from the increase and subsequent decline in sea otter populations. The frequency of sea otter pups, rock greenling (Hexagammus lagocephalus), and smooth lumpsuckers (Aptocyclus ventricosus) in the eagle's diet declined with corresponding increases in Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus), Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens), Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), and various species of seabirds during the period of the recent otter population decline. Breeding success and productivity of Bald Eagles also increased during this time period, which may be due to the higher nutritional quality of avian prey consumed in later years. Our results provide further evidence of the wide-ranging indirect effects of sea otter predation on nearshore marine communities and another apex predator, the Bald Eagle. Although the indirect effects of sea otters are widely known, this example is unique because the food-web pathway transcended five species and several trophic levels in linking one apex

  15. Fishing effects on energy use by North Sea fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Simon; van Hal, Ralf; Hiddink, Jan G.; Maxwell, Tracy A. D.

    Fishing affects patterns of energy use in fish populations, as demonstrated by changes in population energy consumption and the size and age when energy demands are greatest. We compare theoretical predictions and observed patterns of energy use (expressed as the primary production required to support fish production) by North Sea fish, based on simple and widely applicable theory that links life history parameters, fishing mortality ( F), trophic transfer efficiency and relationships between size and trophic level (as determined using nitrogen stable isotope analysis). For the demersal species that dominate total biomass, relationships between size and trophic level were quite consistent among years. There were large decreases in relative energy requirements of all exploited demersal populations except plaice Pleuronectes platessa during the last 3 to 4 decades. Relative energy requirements of plaice were more stable because smaller plaice, which now dominate the exploited population, feed at higher trophic levels than larger plaice. The sizes and ages when population energy demands were greatest fell with increasing fishing mortality and differences between the predicted ( F = 0) and observed ages at maximum energy demand were greater in larger species. Currently, the energy demands of most species peak early in life (1-3 years) and largely reflect patterns of recruitment, leading to a homogenisation of the trophodynamics of the fish community. The fate of energy that is no longer used by commercially exploited species is not clear, partly because of the infrequent and untargeted monitoring of species that are more resilient to fishing. However, we conducted a preliminary assessment of the energy demands of solenette Buglossidium luteum, a very abundant small flatfish in the central North Sea that has increased in abundance in recent years. The solenette's high abundance and resilience to fishing, suggests that it now requires 35% of primary production in part of

  16. GIS analysis of effects of future Baltic sea level rise on the island of Gotland, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Karin; Ekstedt, Karin; Jarsjö, Jerker

    2016-07-01

    Future sea level rise as a consequence of global warming will affect the world's coastal regions. Even though the pace of sea level rise is not clear, the consequences will be severe and global. Commonly the effects of future sea level rise are investigated for relatively vulnerable development countries; however, a whole range of varying regions needs to be considered in order to improve the understanding of global consequences. In this paper we investigate consequences of future sea level rise along the coast of the Baltic Sea island of Gotland, Sweden, with the aim to fill knowledge gaps regarding comparatively well-suited areas in developed countries. We study both the quantity of the loss of features of infrastructure, cultural, and natural value in the case of a 2 m sea level rise of the Baltic Sea and the effects of climate change on seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers, which indirectly cause saltwater intrusion in wells. We conduct a multi-criteria risk analysis by using lidar data on land elevation and GIS-vulnerability mapping, which gives the application of distance and elevation parameters formerly unimaginable precision. We find that in case of a 2 m sea level rise, 3 % of the land area of Gotland, corresponding to 99 km2, will be inundated. The features most strongly affected are items of touristic or nature value, including camping places, shore meadows, sea stack areas, and endangered plants and species habitats. In total, 231 out of 7354 wells will be directly inundated, and the number of wells in the high-risk zone for saltwater intrusion in wells will increase considerably. Some valuable features will be irreversibly lost due to, for example, inundation of sea stacks and the passing of tipping points for seawater intrusion into coastal aquifers; others might simply be moved further inland, but this requires considerable economic means and prioritization. With nature tourism being one of the main income sources of Gotland, monitoring and

  17. Effects of feeding schedule on locomotor activity rhythms and stress response in sea bream.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J A; López-Olmeda, J F; Blanco-Vives, B; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2009-08-04

    Feeding cycles entrain biological rhythms, which enable animals to anticipate feeding times and so maximize food utilization and welfare. In this article, the effect of mealtime was investigated in two groups of sea bream (Sparus aurata): one group received a single daily meal at random times during the light period (random daytime feeding, RDF), whereas the other group received the meal during the light period but at the same time (scheduled daytime feeding, SDF). All the fish showed diurnal behavior, although the SDF group showed a lower percentage of diurnalism (84.4% vs. 79.5% in RDF and SDF respectively) and developed food anticipatory activity some hours before the mealtime. In addition, the mean daily locomotor activity of the RDF group was significantly higher than that of the SDF group (3132 vs. 2654 counts/day, respectively). Although the mean weight differed between both groups on day 30 (115.7 g and 125.6 g in RDF and SDF respectively), these differences had disappeared by day 60. Plasma cortisol and glucose significantly differed in both groups (cortisol: 71.8 vs. 8.7 ng/ml, glucose: 53.7 vs. 43.8 mg/dl in RDF and SDF, respectively), whereas lactate did not differ significantly. The results obtained suggest that altering the feeding time (scheduled vs. random) affects the behavior and physiology of sea bream, indicating that a single daily feeding cycle (compared to random) is beneficial for fish welfare because they can prepare themselves for the forthcoming feed.

  18. Scale effect and optimum relations for sea surface planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedov, L.

    1947-01-01

    From the general dimensional and mechanical similarity theory it follows that a condition of steady motion of a given shape\\bottom with constant speed on the surface of water is determined by four nondimensional parameters. By considering the various systems of independent parameters which are applied in theory and practice and special tests, there is determined their mutual relations and their suitability as planning characteristics. In studying the scale effect on the basis of the Prnndtl formula for the friction coefficient for a turbulent condition the order of magnitude is given of the error in applying the model data to full scale in the case of a single-step bottom For a bottom of complicated shape it is shown how from the test data of the hydrodynamic characteristics for one speed with various loads, or one load with various speeds, there may be obtained by simple computation with good approximation the hydrodynamic characteristics for a different speed or for a different load. (These considerations may be of use in solving certain problems on the stability of planning.) This permits extrapolating the curve of resistance against speed for large speeds inaccessible in the tank tests or for other loads which were not tested. The data obtained by computation are in good agreement with the test results. Problems regarding the optimum trim angle or the optimum width in the case of planning of a flat plate are considered from the point of view of the minimum resistance for a given load on the water and planning speeds. Formulas and graphs are given for the optimum value of the planning coefficient and the corresponding values of the trim angle and width of the flat plate.

  19. Mass Effects on the Nucleon Sea Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Myong

    Nucleon sea structure functions are studied using Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations with the massive gluon-quark splitting kernels for strange and charm quarks, the massless gluon-quark splitting kernels for up and down quarks, and the massless kernels for all other splitting parts. The SU(2)f flavor symmetry for two light quarks, ``up'' and ``down'', is assumed. Glück-Reya-Vogt (GRV) and Martin-Roberts-Stirling (MRS) sets are chosen to be the base structure functions at Q02=3 GeV2. We evolve the sea structure functions from Q02=3 GeV2 to Q2=50 GeV2 using the base structure function sets and DGLAP equations. Some (about 10%) enhancement is found in the strange quark distribution functions at low x (<0.1) in leading order of the DGLAP equations compared to results directly from those structure function sets at the value of Q2=50 GeV2. We provide the value of κ and also show the behavior of κ (x)=2s(x)/(¯ u(x)+¯ d(x)) after the evolution of structure functions.

  20. Can reduced predation offset negative effects of sea louse parasites on chum salmon?

    PubMed

    Peacock, Stephanie J; Connors, Brendan M; Krkosek, Martin; Irvine, James R; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-02-07

    The impact of parasites on hosts is invariably negative when considered in isolation, but may be complex and unexpected in nature. For example, if parasites make hosts less desirable to predators then gains from reduced predation may offset direct costs of being parasitized. We explore these ideas in the context of sea louse infestations on salmon. In Pacific Canada, sea lice can spread from farmed salmon to migrating juvenile wild salmon. Low numbers of sea lice can cause mortality of juvenile pink and chum salmon. For pink salmon, this has resulted in reduced productivity of river populations exposed to salmon farming. However, for chum salmon, we did not find an effect of sea louse infestations on productivity, despite high statistical power. Motivated by this unexpected result, we used a mathematical model to show how a parasite-induced shift in predation pressure from chum salmon to pink salmon could offset negative direct impacts of sea lice on chum salmon. This shift in predation is proposed to occur because predators show an innate preference for pink salmon prey. This preference may be more easily expressed when sea lice compromise juvenile salmon hosts, making them easier to catch. Our results indicate how the ecological context of host-parasite interactions may dampen, or even reverse, the expected impact of parasites on host populations.

  1. Can reduced predation offset negative effects of sea louse parasites on chum salmon?

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Stephanie J.; Connors, Brendan M.; Krkošek, Martin; Irvine, James R.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of parasites on hosts is invariably negative when considered in isolation, but may be complex and unexpected in nature. For example, if parasites make hosts less desirable to predators then gains from reduced predation may offset direct costs of being parasitized. We explore these ideas in the context of sea louse infestations on salmon. In Pacific Canada, sea lice can spread from farmed salmon to migrating juvenile wild salmon. Low numbers of sea lice can cause mortality of juvenile pink and chum salmon. For pink salmon, this has resulted in reduced productivity of river populations exposed to salmon farming. However, for chum salmon, we did not find an effect of sea louse infestations on productivity, despite high statistical power. Motivated by this unexpected result, we used a mathematical model to show how a parasite-induced shift in predation pressure from chum salmon to pink salmon could offset negative direct impacts of sea lice on chum salmon. This shift in predation is proposed to occur because predators show an innate preference for pink salmon prey. This preference may be more easily expressed when sea lice compromise juvenile salmon hosts, making them easier to catch. Our results indicate how the ecological context of host–parasite interactions may dampen, or even reverse, the expected impact of parasites on host populations. PMID:24352951

  2. Quantifying the Effects of Predator and Prey Body Size on Sea Star Feeding Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Rebecca A; Harley, Christopher D G

    2015-06-01

    Body size plays a crucial role in determining the strength of species interactions, population dynamics, and community structure. We measured how changes in body size affect the trophic relationship between the sea star Pisaster ochraceus and its prey, the mussel Mytilus trossulus. We tested the effects of a wide range of predator and prey sizes on sea stars' prey-size preference, feeding rate, and prey tissue consumption. We found that preferred prey size increased with sea star size. Pisaster consumption rate (mussels consumed per day) and tissue intake rate (grams of tissue consumed per day) also increased with sea star size. Pisaster consumption rate, but not tissue intake rate, decreased with increasing mussel size. Juvenile sea stars preferred the most profitable prey sizes-that is, those that maximized tissue consumed per unit handling time. When adult sea stars were offered larger, more profitable mussels, tissue intake rates (grams per day) tended to increase, although this relationship was not statistically significant. Our results indicate that the Pisaster-Mytilus interaction depends on the sizes of both predator and prey, that predation rates are sensitive to even small changes in body size, and that shifts in size distributions may affect predator energetics and prey numbers differently depending on the factors that limit tissue consumption rates.

  3. Long-Term Internal Variability Effects on Centennial Dynamic Sea Level Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Bordbar, Mohammad; Martin, Thomas; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's surface is warming in response to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). Sea level rise is one of the most pressing aspects of global warming with far-reaching consequences for coastal societies. However, sea level rise did and will strongly vary from coast to coast. Here we investigate the long-term internal variability effects on centennial projections of dynamic sea level (DSL), the local departure from the globally averaged sea level. A large ensemble of global warming integrations was conducted with a climate model, where each ensemble member was forced by identical CO2-increase but started from different atmospheric and oceanic initial conditions taken from an unforced millennial control run. In large parts of the mid- and high latitudes, the ensemble spread of the projected centennial DSL trends is of the same order of magnitude as the globally averaged steric sea level rise, suggesting internal variability cannot be ignored when assessing 21st century DSL changes. This conclusion is also supported by analyzing projections with other climate models. The ensemble spread is strongly reduced in the mid- to high latitudes if only the atmospheric initial conditions are perturbed; suggesting uncertainty in the projected centennial DSL trends there is largely due to the lack of ocean information. Thus climate model projections of regional sea level would benefit from ocean initialization.

  4. Effects of brevetoxin exposure on the immune system of loggerhead sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Leggett, Stephanie R; Carter, Barbara J; Colle, Clarence

    2010-05-10

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, occur almost annually off the Florida coast. These blooms, commonly called "red tides", produce a group of neurotoxins collectively termed brevetoxins. Many species of sealife, including sea turtles, are severely impacted by brevetoxin exposure. Effects of brevetoxins on immune cells were investigated in rescued loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, as well as through in vitro experiments using peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) collected from captive sea turtles. In rescued animals, plasma brevetoxin concentrations were measured using a competitive ELISA. Plasma lysozyme activity was measured using a turbidity assay. Lysozyme activity correlated positively with plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Differential expression of genes affected by brevetoxin exposure was determined using two separate suppression subtractive hybridization experiments. In one experiment, genes from PBL collected from sea turtles rescued from red tide toxin exposure were compared to genes from PBL collected from healthy captive loggerhead sea turtles. In the second experiment, PBL from healthy captive loggerhead sea turtles were exposed to brevetoxin (500 ng PbTx-2/ml) in vitro for 18 h and compared to unexposed PBL. Results from the subtraction hybridization experiment conducted with red tide rescued sea turtle PBL indicated that genes involved in oxidative stress or xenobiotic metabolism were up-regulated. Using quantitative real-time PCR, a greater than 2-fold increase in superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin and greater than 10-fold increase in expression of thiopurine S-methyltransferase were observed. Results from the in vitro subtraction hybridization experiment indicated that genes coding for cytochrome c oxidases were the major up-regulated genes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, a greater than 8-fold increase in expression of beta-tubulin and greater than 3-fold increase in expression of ubiquinol were observed. Brevetoxin

  5. Effect on Intestinal Growth of the Population of Cellobiose-Oligosaccharides Obtained by Enzymatic Reaction with Dextransucrase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although the synthesis of oligosaccharides obtained by reactions catalyzed by dextransucrase using sucrose as donor and different carbohydrates as acceptors has been widely studied, the effect of many of these carbohydrates in the growth of intestinal flora has not yet been evaluated. Such is the c...

  6. 29 CFR 500.4 - Effect of prior judgments and final orders obtained under the Farm Labor Contractor Registration...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of prior judgments and final orders obtained under the Farm Labor Contractor Registration Act. 500.4 Section 500.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL...

  7. Effect of the tidal mixing on the average climatic characteristics of the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, B. A.; Sofina, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of two numerical experiments on the determination of the climate of the Barents Sea obtained using the 3D finite element model hydrostatic model QUODDY-4 are presented. One of the experiments is carried out with the wind + thermohaline + tidal forcing, while the second is conducted without taking into account the tidal component. It is shown that the climate in the Barents Sea is experiencing significant changes associated with the tidal forcing. Thus, maximum differences between two solutions are approximately ±1.0°C for the temperature and ±0.4‰ for seawater salinity at the pycnocline depth. The same conclusion follows from the comparison of the diapycnal diffusion coefficient that characterizes the influence of internal tidal waves and the "background" diffusion coefficient determined by total forcing (including tidal forcing). Predicted values of the background diffusion coefficient are of the same order of magnitude as the ones observed by microstructural measurements of shear in velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity of sea water in the centers of intense mixing in the marginal zone of the sea ice in the Barents Sea.

  8. Proliferative effect of whey from cows' milk obtained at two different stages of pregnancy measured in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina S; Andersen, Charlotte; Sejrsen, Kris; Purup, Stig

    2012-02-01

    Dietary estrogens may play a role in the etiology of hormone-dependent cancers like breast cancer. Cow's milk contains various endogenous estrogens and feed derived phytoestrogens that potentially contribute to an estrogenic effect of milk in consumers, and therefore we evaluated the effect of milk (whey) in a proliferation assay with estrogen-sensitive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Milk samples were obtained from 22 cows representing different stages of pregnancy (first and second half) and whey was produced from the milk. 0·1, 0·25 or 0·5% whey was included in the cell culture medium and after 6 days of treatment cell proliferation was assessed by a colorimetric method with a fluorometer. Whey induced significant (P<0·05) proliferative effects compared with control cells with no added whey at all concentrations tested. There was no difference in the proliferative effect of whey depending on the stage of pregnancy from which the milk was obtained. We did not observe anti-proliferative effects when whey was tested in the presence of 10 pm estradiol in the medium. In conclusion, these results indicate that whey, irrespective of the pregnancy stage from which the milk was obtained induced a significant proliferative response in MCF-7 cells and no anti-proliferative effect, which may be caused, at least in part, by estrogens present in milk. The implications of our findings in relation to for example breast cancer will have to be studied further in other model systems preferentially in vivo.

  9. The impact of temporal variability of excess sludge characteristics on the effects obtained in the process of its ultrasonic disintegration.

    PubMed

    Tytła, Malwina; Zielewicz, Ewa

    2017-09-13

    This paper aimed to indicate the characteristics of excess sludge, which have the greatest impact on the effects obtained during its ultrasonic disintegration (UD). The direct and technological effects observed after sludge disintegration and anaerobic digestion (AD) depend on the factors affecting the quality of its matrix and simply on the parameters of a disintegrator. Sludge samples originate from a Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Gliwice, and were collected after mechanical thickening by a monthly period. This approach allowed to observe the temporal changes of sludge characteristics, in a continuous manner. To evaluate the achieved disintegration effects, the following indicators were used: degree of disintegration (DDCOD) and the author's indicators describing the direct and technological effects of UD (IDi, ITi, ITd), based on the changes in the sludge characteristics. Disintegration was carried out by means of an ultrasonic device equipped with a thin sonotrode. AD was conducted under mesophilic conditions for 20 days. Statistical analysis confirmed that the most important parameters of sludge, which determine obtained effects, were total and volatile solids, capillary suction time, concentration of chemical oxygen demand and pH value. The investigations have also showed that the increase in sludge temperature during its disintegration has a significant impact on the magnitude of other effects obtained in the process.

  10. Assessment of Aerosol Optical Property and Radiative Effect for the Layer Decoupling Cases over the Northern South China Sea During the 7-SEAS Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pani, Shantau Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lolli, Simone; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chantara, Somporn; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effect can be modulated by the vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols, particularly when aerosol layers are decoupled. Direct aerosol radiative effects over the northern South China Sea (SCS) were assessed by incorporating an observed data set of aerosol optical properties obtained from the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/Dongsha Experiment into a radiative transfer model. Aerosol optical properties for a two-layer structure of aerosol transport were estimated. In the radiative transfer calculations, aerosol variability (i.e., diversity of source region, aerosol type, and vertical distribution) for the complex aerosol environment was also carefully quantified. The column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500nm was 0.1-0.3 for near-surface aerosols and increased 1-5 times in presence of upper layer biomass-burning aerosols. A case study showed the strong aerosol absorption (single-scattering albedo (omega) approx. = 0.92 at 440nm wavelength) exhibited by the upper layer when associated with predominantly biomass-burning aerosols, and the omega (approx. = 0.95) of near-surface aerosols was greater than that of the upper layer aerosols because of the presence of mixed type aerosols. The presence of upper level aerosol transport could enhance the radiative efficiency at the surface (i.e., cooling) and lower atmosphere (i.e., heating) by up to -13.7 and +9.6W/sq m2 per AOD, respectively. Such enhancement could potentially modify atmospheric stability, can influence atmospheric circulation, as well as the hydrological cycle over the tropical and low-latitude marginal northern SCS.

  11. Assessment of aerosol optical property and radiative effect for the layer decoupling cases over the northern South China Sea during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lolli, Simone; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chantara, Somporn; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The aerosol radiative effect can be modulated by the vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols, particularly when aerosol layers are decoupled. Direct aerosol radiative effects over the northern South China Sea (SCS) were assessed by incorporating an observed data set of aerosol optical properties obtained from the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/Dongsha Experiment into a radiative transfer model. Aerosol optical properties for a two-layer structure of aerosol transport were estimated. In the radiative transfer calculations, aerosol variability (i.e., diversity of source region, aerosol type, and vertical distribution) for the complex aerosol environment was also carefully quantified. The column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm was 0.1-0.3 for near-surface aerosols and increased 1-5 times in presence of upper layer biomass-burning aerosols. A case study showed the strong aerosol absorption (single-scattering albedo (ω) ≈ 0.92 at 440 nm wavelength) exhibited by the upper layer when associated with predominantly biomass-burning aerosols, and the ω (≈0.95) of near-surface aerosols was greater than that of the upper layer aerosols because of the presence of mixed type aerosols. The presence of upper level aerosol transport could enhance the radiative efficiency at the surface (i.e., cooling) and lower atmosphere (i.e., heating) by up to -13.7 and +9.6 W m-2 per AOD, respectively. Such enhancement could potentially modify atmospheric stability, can influence atmospheric circulation, as well as the hydrological cycle over the tropical and low-latitude marginal northern SCS.

  12. Effect of seasonal changes on the gelling properties of farmed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Carlos L; Mendes, Rogério O; Vaz-Pires, Paulo; Nunes, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    The effect of seasonal changes (summer versus winter) upon the quality of heat-induced gel products from farmed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was studied. Moreover, the effect of microbial transglutaminase addition (0.5%, w/w) on the quality was assessed. Fat content of gel products attained from sea bass grown during summer was higher (12.0% versus 7.6%). Textural properties of the gels from the summer fish were higher. Protein of gels from winter fish was less soluble in SDS + DTT (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS; dithiothreitol, DTT). Contrary to some literature, higher fat level may have played a protective role during processing. Accordingly, season via fat content variation had a strong effect on the gelling ability of heat-induced gels prepared from sea bass.

  13. Modelling the increased frequency of extreme sea levels in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta due to sea level rise and other effects of climate change.

    PubMed

    Kay, S; Caesar, J; Wolf, J; Bricheno, L; Nicholls, R J; Saiful Islam, A K M; Haque, A; Pardaens, A; Lowe, J A

    2015-07-01

    Coastal flooding due to storm surge and high tides is a serious risk for inhabitants of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta, as much of the land is close to sea level. Climate change could lead to large areas of land being subject to increased flooding, salinization and ultimate abandonment in West Bengal, India, and Bangladesh. IPCC 5th assessment modelling of sea level rise and estimates of subsidence rates from the EU IMPACT2C project suggest that sea level in the GBM delta region may rise by 0.63 to 0.88 m by 2090, with some studies suggesting this could be up to 0.5 m higher if potential substantial melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet is included. These sea level rise scenarios lead to increased frequency of high water coastal events. Any effect of climate change on the frequency and severity of storms can also have an effect on extreme sea levels. A shelf-sea model of the Bay of Bengal has been used to investigate how the combined effect of sea level rise and changes in other environmental conditions under climate change may alter the frequency of extreme sea level events for the period 1971 to 2099. The model was forced using atmospheric and oceanic boundary conditions derived from climate model projections and the future scenario increase in sea level was applied at its ocean boundary. The model results show an increased likelihood of extreme sea level events through the 21st century, with the frequency of events increasing greatly in the second half of the century: water levels that occurred at decadal time intervals under present-day model conditions occurred in most years by the middle of the 21st century and 3-15 times per year by 2100. The heights of the most extreme events tend to increase more in the first half of the century than the second. The modelled scenarios provide a case study of how sea level rise and other effects of climate change may combine to produce a greatly increased threat to life and property in the GBM delta by the end

  14. Effects of closed trawl fishery areas on some elasmobranch species in the Cantabrian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cabello, C.; Sánchez, F.; Serrano, A.; Olaso, I.

    2008-07-01

    This study examines the effects of certain closed areas to the trawl fishery on some Rajidae species and small-spotted catshark in the southern area of the Bay of Biscay. The results are based on abundance index (number/haul) and catch length composition obtained from a series of bottom trawl surveys carried out in the area (1993-2005). Abundance trends are similar considering or not closed areas, but with much lower values excluding closed areas. The length distributions revealed that in some of the species like Scyliorhinus canicula the larger specimens were the most affected by this decrease in number. Finally, the effects and consequences of one of these marine protected areas (MPAs), an artificial reef were examined in more detail for all the fishes and invertebrates. The analysis of the yield series showed an increase in total biomass after the placement of the reefs not only for S. canicula and rays but also teleosts fishes like Pagellus acarne, Trachurus trachurus, Mullus surmuletus and Trachinus draco and particularly invertebrates (sea urchins). On the contrary, the main target species of the trawl fishery (hake, monkfish and megrim among others) did not increase.

  15. Effects and risk evaluation of oil spillage in the sea areas of Changxing Island.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanxi; Xu, Jianling; Zhao, Wenkui; Zhang, Jiquan

    2014-08-19

    This paper evaluated the oil spillage risk in the waters near the island of Changxing in Dalian (China) based on the established risk assessment index. Four wind regimes (windless, northerly wind, westerly wind and southerly wind) were selected as weather conditions for the dynamic prediction of oil drift. If an oil spill occurs near the Koumen (a place near the island of Changxing), the forecast and evaluation are conducted based on a three-dimensional mathematical model of oil spillage, and the results obtained show the scope of the affected area when winds from various directions are applied. The oil spillage would, under various conditions, flow into the northern and western sea area of Changxing Island Bay, namely the Dalian harbor seal National Nature Reserve, and create adverse effects on the marine ecological environment. The rationality of combining the established oil spillage risk comprehensive index system with model prediction is further confirmed. Finally, preventive measures and quick fixes are presented in the case of accidental oil spillages. The most effective method to reduce environment risk is to adopt reasonable preventive measures and quick fixes.

  16. Effects and Risk Evaluation of Oil Spillage in the Sea Areas of Changxing Island

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanxi; Xu, Jianling; Zhao, Wenkui; Zhang, Jiquan

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluated the oil spillage risk in the waters near the island of Changxing in Dalian (China) based on the established risk assessment index. Four wind regimes (windless, northerly wind, westerly wind and southerly wind) were selected as weather conditions for the dynamic prediction of oil drift. If an oil spill occurs near the Koumen (a place near the island of Changxing), the forecast and evaluation are conducted based on a three-dimensional mathematical model of oil spillage, and the results obtained show the scope of the affected area when winds from various directions are applied. The oil spillage would, under various conditions, flow into the northern and western sea area of Changxing Island Bay, namely the Dalian harbor seal National Nature Reserve, and create adverse effects on the marine ecological environment. The rationality of combining the established oil spillage risk comprehensive index system with model prediction is further confirmed. Finally, preventive measures and quick fixes are presented in the case of accidental oil spillages. The most effective method to reduce environment risk is to adopt reasonable preventive measures and quick fixes. PMID:25153473

  17. Combined Effects of Nutrient Load Reduction and Climate Scenarios for the Baltic Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Chantal; Strömqvist, Johan; Dahné, Joel; Arheimer, Berit

    2010-05-01

    yearly volumes of discharge, total nitrogen and total phosphorus also compare well to published figures for total fluxes to the Baltic Sea (Helcom PLC-group, 2008). The validated model is used as a tool to examine the effects of different climate and remedial measure scenarios for both the land regions of the model domain, and influxes to the Baltic Sea. Generally, results show a lessened effect of the remedial scenarios tested for future climate scenarios at the end of this century.

  18. Cytoprotective Effects of Lysophospholipids from Sea Cucumber Holothuria atra

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Furukawa, Ayumi; Shiga, Ikumi; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ishii, Toshiaki; Hongo, Yayoi; Takahashi, Shunya; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Lysophospholipids are important signaling molecules in animals and metazoan cells. They are widely distributed among marine invertebrates, where their physiological roles are unknown. Sea cucumbers produce unique lysophospholipids. In this study, two lysophospholipids were detected in Holothuria atra for the first time, lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, with nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses. The lipid fraction of H. atra contained lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, and inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis in the macrophage cell line J774A.1. The antioxidant activity of the lysophospholipid-containing lipid fraction of H. atra was confirmed with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. Our results suggest that the lysophospholipids from H. atra are potential therapeutic agents for the inflammation induced by oxidative stress. PMID:26275144

  19. Effects of heavy metals on sea urchin embryo development. 1. Tracing the cause by the effects.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naomasa; Okamura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    The toxicity of the polluted waters originating from a disused lead mine was evaluated using both sea urchin bioassays and heavy metal analysis. Samples from three polluted waters (a seawater and two freshwaters) were collected from the mine area and one seawater sample was taken from a non-contaminated reference site. The test waters contained higher concentrations of heavy metals such as manganese, lead, cadmium, zinc, chromium, nickel, iron, and copper than did ambient seawater. The three test waters had inhibitory effects, in a dose-dependent manner, on the first cleavage of sea urchin embryos and on pluteus formation during the development. Some malformations, such as a radialized pluteus, exo-gastrula, and spaceship Apollo-like embryos were induced by the test waters without dilution. Zinc alone also induced the same anomaly. Zinc in the test seawater was ascertained as one of the metals that caused the anomalies, but not all of the toxicity was caused by zinc. It was speculated that interactive effects, involving zinc and possibly manganese and nickel, were occurring.

  20. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Falugi, C.; Grattarola, M.; Prestipino, G.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic signals on the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have been studied. The duration and repetition of the pulses were similar to those used for bone healing in clinical practice. A sequence of pulses, applied for a time ranging from 2 to 4 h, accelerates the cleavages of sea urchin embryo cells. This effect can be quantitatively assessed by determining the time shifts induced by the applied electromagnetic field on the completion of the first and second cleavages in a population of fertilized eggs. The exposed embryos were allowed to develop up to the pluteus stage, showing no abnormalities.

  1. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins.

    PubMed Central

    Falugi, C; Grattarola, M; Prestipino, G

    1987-01-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic signals on the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have been studied. The duration and repetition of the pulses were similar to those used for bone healing in clinical practice. A sequence of pulses, applied for a time ranging from 2 to 4 h, accelerates the cleavages of sea urchin embryo cells. This effect can be quantitatively assessed by determining the time shifts induced by the applied electromagnetic field on the completion of the first and second cleavages in a population of fertilized eggs. The exposed embryos were allowed to develop up to the pluteus stage, showing no abnormalities. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:3607217

  2. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  3. Effects of sea ice on atmospheric pCO2: A revised view and implications for glacial and future climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoting; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2010-06-01

    Sea ice is a key component in the global carbon cycle and climate system. In the traditional view, the sole effect of expanded sea ice coverage is to reduce the atmospheric pCO2 by inhibiting air-sea gas exchange. However, this view neglects the effect that sea ice capping has on the biological production. By limiting light for photosynthesis, larger sea ice coverage would reduce the strength of the biological pump and therefore increase atmospheric pCO2. Recently, Kurahashi-Nakamura et al. (2007) suggested that the opposing impact of biology on atmospheric pCO2 will more than offset the gas exchange effect, such that atmospheric pCO2 will actually increase with larger sea ice coverage. In an effort to resolve this controversy, we use an intermediate-complexity, global model of biogeochemistry and climate to determine the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 concentration to changes in the sea ice coverage, driven by prescribed changes in sea ice albedo. When sea ice in our model is increased by 34% globally relative to the control run, gas solubility, ice capping effect and stratification increase, while biological production decreases; overall atmospheric pCO2 is reduced by 9.4 ppmv. Our results broadly support the notion that the biological response of sea ice capping is as important as its physical response. Furthermore, we show that the overall change in atmospheric pCO2 is indeed inversely related to sea ice coverage, but it is not because sea ice caps off gas exchange but because gas solubility is increased by lower temperatures that accompany sea ice expansion in our model simulations.

  4. Effect of retreating sea ice on Arctic cloud cover in simulated recent global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, M.; Nozawa, T.; Ogura, T.; Takata, K.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of sea ice reduction on Arctic cloud cover in historical simulations with the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model MIROC5. During simulated global warming since the 1970s, the Arctic sea ice extent has reduced substantially, particularly in September. This simulated reduction is consistent with satellite observation results. However, the Arctic cloud cover increases significantly during October at grids with significant reductions in sea ice because of the enhanced heat and moisture flux from the underlying ocean. Cloud fraction increases in the lower troposphere. However, the cloud fraction in the surface thin layers just above the ocean decreases despite the increased moisture because the surface air temperature rises strikingly in the thin layers and the relative humidity decreases. As the cloud cover increases, the cloud radiative effect in surface downward longwave radiation (DLR) increases by approximately 40-60 % compared to a change in clear-sky surface DLR. These results suggest that an increase in the Arctic cloud cover as a result of a reduction in sea ice could further melt the sea ice and enhance the feedback processes of the Arctic amplification in future projections.

  5. Clastogenic effect of extracts obtained from Crotalaria retusa L. and Crotalaria mucronata Desv. on mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, L R; Silva, A R; Bautista, A R; Costa, S L; Sales, L A; Rios, A C; Salvadori, D M

    1993-08-01

    This work has evaluated the clastogenicity of six extracts (tea and aqueous extract of leaves, tea, aqueous and methanolic extracts of dried fruit, and tea of unripe fruit) obtained from Crotalaria retusa L. and three extracts (tea and methanolic extract of dried fruit, and tea of unripe fruit) obtained from Crotalaria mucronata Desv. The extracts were injected intraperitoneally into mice, and the animals were killed 24 h after treatment for preparation of bone marrow cells. The extracts obtained from fruits of Crotalaria retusa were found to cause a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in mice. On the other hand, no statistically significant increase in the frequency of aberrant cells was observed for the animals treated with leaf extracts obtained from Crotalaria retusa and with extracts from fruits of Crotalaria mucronata. The possibility that the pyrrolizidine alkaloid, monocrotaline, present in Crotalaria retusa exerts a clastogenic effect on mouse bone marrow cells is discussed. Our conclusion is based on studies using intraperitoneal treatments. Effects of oral exposure to extracts of Crotalaria retusa are unknown.

  6. Comparative effects of slow freezing and vitrification on cryosurvival of spermatozoa obtained from west African dwarf goat bucks.

    PubMed

    Daramola, J O; Adekunle, E O

    2016-01-01

    Slow freezing and vitrification are used to improve the viability of spermatozoa from various species but comparative effects of these cryoprotocols have never been evaluated for spermatozoa obtained from West African Dwarf (WAD) goat bucks. This study evaluated the comparative effects of slow freezing and vitrification on the viability of spermatozoa of WAD goat bucks. Semen samples collected with the aid of artificial vagina were allocated to slow freezing and vitrification protocols and cryopreserved for 30 days in liquid nitrogen. Consistent higher (P<0.05) sperm motility, acrosome integrity, membrane integrity, live sperm, acrosome reaction and capacitation in slow freezing compared to vitrification. Abnormal sperm cells and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations reduced (P<0.05) in slow freezing compared to vitrification. Higher (P<0.05) arginase activity was observed in slow freezing compared to vitrification. The findings indicated that spermatozoa obtained from WAD goat bucks were better preserved in slow freezing compared to vitrification.

  7. The effects of continental growth on global sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S.; Stegman, D. R.; Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's oceans have played an important role in the evolution of life and tectonics on Earth, and yet our understanding of basic connections between these remains limited. One of the central, and still unanswered questions, is whether Earth's oceans have been present over all of Earth's history, and how deep were any oceans that may have existed. Global tectonics provides a large influence on the long term fluctuations in sea level through varying the volume of ocean basins. The volume of ocean basins over time can be estimated from the seafloor age distribution as observed in plate reconstructions, which gives the proportion of younger, elevated seafloor to older, subsided seafloor. First we establish a relationship between sea level and the age-area distribution of oceanic crust using reconstructed oceanic plate age for recent 140 Myr from Müller et al. (2008), accounting for other major contributions such as the volume of ice sheets, the presence of large igneous provinces on the seafloor and thickness of sediments on the seafloor. We then extend this methodology back into earlier times during Earth's history by using synthetic plate reconstructions derived from numerical models of mantle convection in 3D spherical geometry. To approximate conditions for earlier in Earth's history, we consider that the Rayleigh number would have been higher in the past, resulting in faster surface velocities and, on-average, younger seafloor. Thus, we vary the surface velocity from the modern day value of 4 cm/yr to what is predicted for early Earth conditions of 80 cm/yr (corresponding to Rayleigh number of 10^8 to 10^10, respectively). Coltice et al. (2014) showed that the shape of seafloor age distribution is influenced by the growth of continental area over time, with an increasingly younger-aged, triangular shaped distribution favored for increasing continental surface. We vary the amount of continents on Earth from 0, 10%, to 30% of surface area of the Earth. These

  8. Effect of water temperature on sea lamprey growth and lake trout survival

    SciTech Connect

    Swink, W.D. )

    1993-11-01

    Percent mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush subjected to single sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus attacks did not differ significantly between lower-temperature (mortality = 54%; temperature [le] 10[degrees]C; N = 33) and higher-temperature (mortality = 69%; temperature = 12.8-14.4[degrees]C; N = 45) laboratory studies conducted from 1 June to 28 November 1989. However, sea lampreys fed longer and killed fewer fish in colder water (mean attachment 467.0 h; 18 fish killed) than in warmer water (mean attachment 161.7 h; 31 fish killed), probably because food consumption was lower in colder water. These results indicate that the number of fish killed by sea lampreys could be much greater in warmer water and that temperature must be considered when fish losses from sea lamprey attacks are estimated. Previous studies (Swink and Hanson 1989; Swink 1990) of the effects of single sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus attacks on lake trout Salvelinus namaycush showed significantly less lake trout mortality at temperatures of 10[degrees]C and lower than at higher temperatures. The reduced host mortality, however, could not be attributed solely to lower temperature because warmwater and coldwater attacks occurred during different seasons. In those studies, the author was unable to hold water temperature at 10[degrees]C or less in late summer and early fall, when most fish are killed by sea lampreys in the Great Lakes (Christie and Kolenosky 1980; Bergstedt and Schneider 1988). Modifications to the fish holding facilities at the Hammond Bay Biological Station in 1988 allowed maintenance of a limited amount of water at 10[degrees]C or less throughout the year. Hence, the objective of this study was to compare sea lamprey-induced mortality of lake trout at 10[degrees]C or less with that at 12.8-14.4[degrees]C during the normal feeding season (June through November). 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guihua; Shirai, Nobuya; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Hiramitsu; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    The effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance was investigated in aged mice. Fifty three-week-old male Crlj:CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed one of three experimental diets containing either 6% lard, 6% fish oil, or 6% sea snake lipids for 16 wk. The swimming exercise was carried out in an acrylic plastic tank filled with 25 cm of water maintained at 23(o)C. Swimming times to exhaustion were measured with a load of 2% of their body weights attached to the tails of the mice. The swimming times to exhaustion of the group that were fed the sea snake lipid diet tended to be longer than those of the lard diet group, and were significantly improved compared with the fish oil diet group (p<0.05). The plasma and muscle lactate levels were significantly lower in the sea snake lipid diet group than in the lard and fish oil diet groups (p<0.05). The liver glycogen and plasma glucose levels of the sea snake lipid diet group did not differ markedly from those of the lard diet group (p>0.05), and were significantly higher than those of the fish oil diet group (p<0.05). These results suggest that an intake of sea snake lipids but not the fish oil, which is also rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), is useful for improving the swimming endurance of aged mice by attenuating lactate production and/or enhancing lactate clearance during swimming exercise, and the n-3 PUFAs contained in the sea snake lipids did little or nothing for this improved endurance.

  10. Simulations of Sea Level Rise Effects on Complex Coastal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.; Saha, B.; Donoghue, J. F.; Reed, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    It is now established that complex coastal systems with elements such as beaches, inlets, bays, and rivers adjust their morphologies according to time-varying balances in between the processes that control the exchange of sediment. Accelerated sea level rise introduces a major perturbation into the sediment-sharing systems. A modeling framework based on a new SL-PR model which is an advanced version of the aggregate-scale CST Model and the event-scale CMS-2D and CMS-Wave combination have been used to simulate the recent evolution of a portion of the Florida panhandle coast. This combination of models provides a method to evaluate coefficients in the aggregate-scale model that were previously treated as fitted parameters. That is, by carrying out simulations of a complex coastal system with runs of the event-scale model representing more than a year it is now possible to directly relate the coefficients in the large-scale SL-PR model to measureable physical parameters in the current and wave fields. This cross-scale modeling procedure has been used to simulate the shoreline evolution at the Santa Rosa Island, a long barrier which houses significant military infrastructure at the north Gulf Coast. The model has been used to simulate 137 years of measured shoreline change and to extend these to predictions of future rates of shoreline migration.

  11. Effects of sea ice extent on Arctic precipitation through deuterium excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Posmentier, E. S.; Michel, F.; Feng, X.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice is a fundamental component of climate dynamics as it is involved in a number of feedback processes within the climate system. One major feedback is the effect of sea ice on the Arctic hydrologic cycle. With a declining sea ice extent, the atmosphere can interact with the more open Arctic Ocean and northern seas. As a result, additional evaporation from the sea surface in the Arctic region and additional precipitation on land are expected. Under today's changing climate, precipitation amounts have been observed to be increasing at many locations across the Arctic. In order to determine how much of this increase is due to the newly available Arctic moisture source from opening sea ice, we use the hydrogen (δD) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition of precipitation measured at a variety of stations around the Arctic to trace the sources of moisture. The deuterium excess (d = δD - 8*δ18O) of precipitation is determined primarily by the conditions at the source of evaporation, such as the sea surface temperature (SST) and relative humidity (RH). By using monthly datasets of d-excess from various sites around the Arctic, we determined the change in moisture source over the period of 1989 to 2009 as a result of declining sea ice extent. The typical subtropical moisture source has a relatively high d-excess because of the warm SST and low RH, while the Arctic moisture source has a much lower d-excess due to the cold SST and high RH. On average, the d-excess of precipitation at our sites was 7‰ lower in the summer/fall months than the winter/spring months. This seasonal range of d-excess is 3‰ greater than the seasonal range of the subtropics source, and thus points to a seasonally varying amount of moisture from an additional cool moisture source. We attribute this to the variations in the contribution of Arctic moisture sources that may be controlled by sea ice conditions. By determining the d-excess of the typical Arctic and subtropical moisture sources

  12. Metallic nickel nanoparticles and their effect on the embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Kanold, Julia Maxi; Wang, Jiabin; Brümmer, Franz; Šiller, Lidija

    2016-05-01

    The presence of nanoparticles in many industrial applications and daily products is making it nowadays crucial to assess their impact when exposed to the environment. Metallic nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) are of high industrial interest due to their ability to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to carbonic acid at ambient conditions. We characterized metallic Ni NPs by XRD, HRTEM and EDS and determined the solubility of free nickel ions from 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs in seawater by ICP-MS over 96 h, which was below 3%. Further, embryonic development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was investigated for 48 h in the presence of metallic Ni NPs (0.03 mg/L to 3 mg/L), but no lethal effects were observed. However, 3 mg/L metallic Ni NPs caused a size reduction similar to 1.2 mg/L NiCl2*6 H2O. The obtained results contribute to current studies on metallic Ni NPs and point to their consequences for the marine ecosystem.

  13. Effect of sea buckthorn protein on the intestinal microbial community in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huaibo; Shi, Fangfang; Meng, Lina; Wang, Wenjuan

    2017-09-23

    This study investigated the intestinal microbial community distribution of Type 2 diabetic mice and discussed the effects of the sea buckthorn protein on the regulation of gut microbes. Date was collected for 12 cases of normal mice (NC group), 12 cases of Type 2 diabetic mice (DC group), and 12 cases of highly concentrated sea buckthorn seed protein dosed mice (SSPH group). This study analysed fecal samples, measured faecal pH value, and cultivated and determined intestinal bacteria count. This investigation also included the extraction of faecal samples for genomic DNA, PCR amplification of bacterial V3 16S rDNA products by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE map analysis of intestinal flora, determination of intestinal bacteria richness, Shannon-Wiener index and evenness index, and image similarity cluster analysis with UPGMA clustering. This study analysed and elucidated differences between the normal mice group, diabetic mice group, and sea buckthorn protein supplemented group, and the structures of respective intestinal flora. The mice supplemented with sea buckthorn protein exhibited an obvious drop in body weight and blood glucose levels. The Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Clostridium coccoides populations recovered. The amplification of the 16S rDNA gene V3 region revealed that the species of intestinal microbes in the treatment group were adjusted to a certain extent. Analysis by ARDRA confirmed that sea buckthorn protein could increase type 2 diabetes in mice intestinal microorganism diversity (H) and simpson (E). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Geologic effects and coastal vulnerability to sea-level rise, erosion, and storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S.J.; Gutierrez, B.T.; Thieler, E.R.; Pendleton, E.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of natural and human factors are driving coastal change and making coastal regions and populations increasingly vulnerable. Sea level, a major agent of coastal erosion, has varied greatly from -120 m below present during glacial period low-stands to + 4 to 6 m above present during interglacial warm periods. Geologic and tide gauge data show that global sea level has risen about 12 to 15 cm during the past century with satellite measurements indicating an acceleration since the early 1990s due to thermal expansion and ice-sheet melting. Land subsidence due to tectonic forces and sediment compaction in regions like the mid-Atlantic and Louisiana increase the rate of relative sea-level rise to 40 cm to 100 cm per century. Sea- level rise is predicted to accelerate significantly in the near future due to climate change, resulting in pervasive impacts to coastal regions and putting populations increasingly at risk. The full implications of climate change for coastal systems need to be understood better and long-term plans are needed to manage coasts in order to protect natural resources and mitigate the effects of sea-level rise and increased storms on human infrastructure. Copyright ASCE 2008.

  15. Effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guihua; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of mice. Twelve-week-old male Crlj: CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed one of three experimental diets containing 6% lard, fish oil or sea snake lipids for 16 weeks. Swimming exercise was conducted in an acrylic plastic tank filled with 25 cm of water maintained at 23 degrees C. Every 4 weeks, the mice were made to perform swimming exercises with loads attached to their tails, corresponding to approximately 1 or 2% of their body weights. The group fed the sea snake lipid diet exhibited significantly improved swimming endurance compared with the lard diet group (p < 0.05); however, this result was not observed in the fish oil diet group. In the sea snake lipid diet group, plasma and muscle lactates were significantly lower, and plasma glucose and muscle glycogen were significantly higher than in the lard diet group (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the intake of sea snake lipids enhanced the swimming endurance of the mice by delaying the accumulation of lactate during swimming exercise. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Immersion booster vaccination effect on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, P

    2006-02-01

    In each challenge 30 sea bass juveniles (mean weight 3.3 +/- 0.2 g SD) were used. During the whole experiment (water T: 18 +/- 1 degrees C) the fish were held in four 50l seawater independent recirculation systems (one fish group per 50l system). The protection to the pathogen Vibrio anguillarum was tested on booster vaccinated sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) juveniles. The vaccination was performed by immersion for 60 s in a commercial anti-V. anguillarum vaccine suspension. Booster vaccination took place 60 days after the initial immunization. Thirty days after the booster vaccination all the fish received intraperitoneally (IP) 3.0 x 10(6) cfu/fish (colony forming units) virulent V. anguillarum bacteria. The booster vaccination showed a strong protection effect on the challenged sea bass. In the next 20 days after the challenge the mortality was 0% among the booster vaccinated sea bass, 10% among the once vaccinated fish and 50% in the control group (unvaccinated fish). No mortality was observed among the unvaccinated sea bass injected IP with sterile normal saline by the challenge.

  17. A lower trophic ecosystem model including iron effects in the Okhotsk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, Takeshi; Kishi, Michio J.; Ono, Yukiko; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2007-09-01

    We applied a three-dimensional ecosystem-physical coupled model including iron the effect to the Okhotsk Sea. In order to clarify the sources of iron, four dissolved iron compartments, based on the sources of supply, were added to Kawamiya et al.'s [1995, An ecological-physical coupled model applied to Station Papa. Journal of Oceanography, 51, 635-664] model (KKYS) to create our ecosystem model (KKYS-Fe). We hypothesized that four processes supply iron to sea water: atmospheric loadings from Northeastern Asia, input from the Amur River, dissolution from sediments and regeneration by zooplankton and bacteria. We simulated one year, from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2001, using both KKYS-Fe and KKYS. KKYS could not reproduce the surface nitrate distribution after the spring bloom, whereas KKYS-Fe agreed well with observations in the northwestern Pacific because it includes iron limitation of phytoplankton growth. During the spring bloom, the main source of iron at the sea surface is from the atmosphere. The contribution of riverine iron to the total iron utilized for primary production is small in the Okhotsk Sea. Atmospheric deposition, the iron flux from sediment and regeneration of iron in the water column play important roles in maintaining high primary production in the Okhotsk Sea.

  18. Salinization processes in an alluvial coastal lowland plain and effect of sea water level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Nguyen Cao; Hang, Nguyen Thi Minh; Araki, Hiroyuki; Yamanishi, Hiroyuki; Koga, Kenichi

    2006-03-01

    In coastal areas, groundwater and aquifer systems are easily prone to pollution and contamination. Moreover, sea level rises also threaten the viability of many coastal zones and small islands. In the Shiroishi lowland plain, southwestern Kyushu Island of Japan, some environmental problems such as land subsidence and salinity intrusion due to over pumping of groundwater have long been recognized as water problems and become causes for public concern. In this study, an integrated surface and groundwater model was established and applied to the Shiroishi site to simulate groundwater flow hydraulics and predict the salinity intrusion process in the alluvial lowland plain. The simulated results show that groundwater levels in the aquifer greatly vary in response to varying climatic and pumping conditions. It is also found that sea water intrusion would be expected along the coast if the current rates of groundwater exploitation continue. Furthermore, sea water intrusion with a relative rise in sea water level due to aquifer compression and global climatic change was also considered. As a result, sea water intrusion appears to extend much farther in land from the coast compared to a reference case. The study also suggests a possible alternative to mitigate the inverse effects by pumping groundwater.

  19. Effects of long-term variability on projections of twenty-first century dynamic sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, Mohammad H.; Martin, Thomas; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    Sea-level rise is one of the most pressing aspects of anthropogenic global warming with far-reaching consequences for coastal societies. However, sea-level rise did and will strongly vary from coast to coast. Here we investigate the long-term internal variability effects on centennial projections of dynamic sea level (DSL), the local departure from the globally averaged sea level. A large ensemble of global warming integrations has been conducted with a climate model, where each realization was forced by identical CO2 increase but started from different atmospheric and oceanic initial conditions. In large parts of the mid- and high latitudes, the ensemble spread of the projected centennial DSL trends is of the same order of magnitude as the globally averaged steric sea-level rise, suggesting that internal variability cannot be ignored when assessing twenty-first-century DSL trends. The ensemble spread is considerably reduced in the mid- to high latitudes when only the atmospheric initial conditions differ while keeping the oceanic initial state identical; indicating that centennial DSL projections are strongly dependent on ocean initial conditions.

  20. Effects of protracted cadmium exposure on gametes of the purple sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W.J. III; Engel, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Gametes and larvae of sea urchins and more specifically Arbacia punctulata have been used extensively in embryological studies and toxicity bioassay testing. Most of the experiments and bioassays have used the fertilized eggs of different sea urchin species and measured abnormal growth, malformations, or changes in the rates of growth as a function of contaminant exposure. Guida demonstrated that cupric ion activities of <10{sup -10.5} M caused reductions in the rates of growth of Arbacia Punctulata larvae and caused incomplete or malformed pluteal skeletons. These effects occurred at cupric ion concentrations that were in the same ranges as some measured in the more contaminated estuaries in the northeastern U.S. Sunda and coworkers also used sea urchin embryonic development to test potential trace metal toxicity in water samples collected from those same estuaries, and demonstrated toxicity potentially attributable to dissolved trace metals in the water column. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if protracted sublethal exposure of sexually mature sea urchins to dissolved cadmium in sea water would affect the viability of eggs and sperm, and whether it would affect fertilization and embryonic development and ultimately the larvae. The results of the experiments support the hypothesis that spermatogenesis and oogenesis were affected by cadmium exposure.

  1. Effects of future Arctic sea ice decline on Greenland ice sheet melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaino, Miren; Michailidou, Egli

    2017-04-01

    CMIP5 models project substantial reduction of the Arctic sea ice cover during the current century, including the onset of a seasonally ice free Arctic. In this study we explore the effects of future Arctic sea-ice change on the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). For this, we use 1850-2100 simulations from the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 corresponding to historical and RCP8.5 scenarios. We examine the impact of Arctic change on the surface energy and mass budgets of the Greenland ice sheet. We distinguish between winter Arctic change and Greenland-melt-season (Spring and Summer) future climate change. We find a substantial reduction in summer incoming shortwave radiation over the GrIS both for clear-sky and all-sky conditions, that reduces the energy available for melt. Because of the large amount of energy that is used during summer to melt sea-ice, we find no amplified summer warming in the ocean around Greenland, except where summer-long ice-free conditions develop. The different nature of the processes controlling sea-ice change along the western and eastern Greenland coast is examined. We find no links in the timing of major sea-ice change and Greenland snow and ice melt, and justify why such a linkage is absent.

  2. Effect of Fluid Bypassing on the Experimentally Obtained Darcy and Non-Darcy Permeability Parameters of Ceramic Foam Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Shahin; Saffari Pour, Mohsen; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Jönsson, Pӓr Göran

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic foam filters (CFFs) are used to remove solid particles and inclusions from molten metal. In general, molten metal which is poured on the top of a CFF needs to reach a certain height to build the required pressure (metal head) to prime the filter. To estimate the required metal head, it is necessary to obtain permeability coefficients using permeametry experiments. It has been mentioned in the literature that to avoid fluid bypassing, during permeametry, samples need to be sealed. However, the effect of fluid bypassing on the experimentally obtained pressure gradients seems not to be explored. Therefore, in this research, the focus was on studying the effect of fluid bypassing on the experimentally obtained pressure gradients as well as the empirically obtained Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients. Specifically, the aim of the research was to investigate the effect of fluid bypassing on the liquid permeability of 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina CFFs. In addition, the experimental data were compared to the numerically modeled findings. Both studies showed that no sealing results in extremely poor estimates of the pressure gradients and Darcy and non-Darcy permeability coefficients for all studied filters. The average deviations between the pressure gradients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples were calculated to be 57.2, 56.8, and 61.3 pct. The deviations between the Darcy coefficients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples found to be 9, 20, and 31 pct. The deviations between the non-Darcy coefficients of the sealed and unsealed 30, 50, and 80 PPI samples were calculated to be 59, 58, and 63 pct.

  3. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Obtaining Blood Cultures in Children Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Annie Lintzenich; Simpson, Annie N; Heine, Daniel; Teufel, Ronald J

    2015-12-01

    To determine the clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of universal vs targeted approach to obtaining blood cultures in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision tree to compare 2 approaches to ordering blood cultures in children hospitalized with CAP: obtaining blood cultures in all children admitted with CAP (universal approach) and obtaining blood cultures in patients identified as high risk for bacteremia (targeted approach). We searched the literature to determine expected proportions of high-risk patients, positive culture rates, and predicted bacteria and susceptibility patterns. Our primary clinical outcome was projected rate of missed bacteremia with associated treatment failure in the targeted approach. Costs per 100 patients and annualized costs on the national level were calculated for each approach. The model predicts that in the targeted approach, there will be 0.07 cases of missed bacteremia with treatment failure per 100 patients, or 133 annually. In the universal approach, 118 blood cultures would need to be drawn to identify 1 patient with bacteremia, in which the result would lead to a meaningful antibiotic change compared with 42 cultures in the targeted approach. The universal approach would cost $5178 per 100 patients or $9,214,238 annually. The targeted approach would cost $1992 per 100 patients or $3,545,460 annually. The laboratory-related cost savings attributed to the targeted approach would be projected to be $5,668,778 annually. This decision analysis model suggests that a targeted approach to obtaining blood cultures in children hospitalized with CAP may be clinically effective, cost-saving, and reduce unnecessary testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reviews and syntheses: Ice acidification, the effects of ocean acidification on sea ice microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMinn, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Sea ice algae, like some coastal and estuarine phytoplankton, are naturally exposed to a wider range of pH and CO2 concentrations than those in open marine seas. While climate change and ocean acidification (OA) will impact pelagic communities, their effects on sea ice microbial communities remain unclear. Sea ice contains several distinct microbial communities, which are exposed to differing environmental conditions depending on their depth within the ice. Bottom communities mostly experience relatively benign bulk ocean properties, while interior brine and surface (infiltration) communities experience much greater extremes. Most OA studies have examined the impacts on single sea ice algae species in culture. Although some studies examined the effects of OA alone, most examined the effects of OA and either light, nutrients or temperature. With few exceptions, increased CO2 concentration caused either no change or an increase in growth and/or photosynthesis. In situ studies on brine and surface algae also demonstrated a wide tolerance to increased and decreased pH and showed increased growth at higher CO2 concentrations. The short time period of most experiments (< 10 days), together with limited genetic diversity (i.e. use of only a single strain), however, has been identified as a limitation to a broader interpretation of the results. While there have been few studies on the effects of OA on the growth of marine bacterial communities in general, impacts appear to be minimal. In sea ice also, the few reports available suggest no negative impacts on bacterial growth or community richness. Sea ice ecosystems are ephemeral, melting and re-forming each year. Thus, for some part of each year organisms inhabiting the ice must also survive outside of the ice, either as part of the phytoplankton or as resting spores on the bottom. During these times, they will be exposed to the full range of co-stressors that pelagic organisms experience. Their ability to continue to make

  5. Thermodynamic and functional characteristics of deep-sea enzymes revealed by pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Miyashita, Yurina; Kato, Chiaki

    2013-09-01

    Hydrostatic pressure analysis is an ideal approach for studying protein dynamics and hydration. The development of full ocean depth submersibles and high pressure biological techniques allows us to investigate enzymes from deep-sea organisms at the molecular level. The aim of this review was to overview the thermodynamic and functional characteristics of deep-sea enzymes as revealed by pressure axis analysis after giving a brief introduction to the thermodynamic principles underlying the effects of pressure on the structural stability and function of enzymes.

  6. Effect of nutrition and Enteromyxum leei infection on gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata intestinal carbohydrate distribution.

    PubMed

    Estensoro, Itziar; Redondo, María José; Salesa, Beatriz; Kaushik, Savasidam; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna

    2012-08-13

    The effect of a practical plant protein-based diet containing vegetable oils (VO) as the major lipid source on the mucosal carbohydrate pattern of the intestine was studied in gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata challenged with the myxosporean parasite Enteromyxum leei. Fish fed for 9 mo either a fish oil (FO) diet or a blend of VO at 66% of replacement (66VO diet) were exposed to parasite-contaminated water effluent. Samples of the anterior, middle and posterior intestine (AI, MI and PI, respectively) were obtained for parasite diagnosis and histochemistry. Fish were categorised as control (C, not exposed), early (E) or late (L) infected. Mucin and lectin histochemistry was applied to detect the different types of mucins and sialic acid in goblet cells (GC), the brush border and enterocytes. The number of GC stained with periodic acid Schiff (PAS), alcian blue (AB), aldehyde fuchsin-alcian blue (AF-AB), for the detection of neutral, acidic, sulphated and carboxylic mucins, and with the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), were counted in digital images. The 66VO diet produced a significant decrease of GC with neutral and acidic mucins in the AI and MI, and also of those with carboxylic mucins and sialic acid in the MI. Sulphated mucins and sialic acid were less abundant in the AI than in the MI and PI in the C-66VO treatment. E. leei infection had a strong effect on the number of GC, as E and L infected fish had a significant decrease of GC positive for all the stains versus C fish in PI. Time and diet effects were also observed, since the lowest values were mostly registered in E-66VO fish in PI. In conclusion, though GC depletion was mainly induced by enteromyxosis, an effect of the diet was also observed. Thus, the diet can be a predisposing factor that worsens the disease course.

  7. Evidence of Season-Dependency in Vegetation Effects on Macrofauna in Temperate Seagrass Meadows (Baltic Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Jankowska, Emilia; Kotwicki, Lech; Balazy, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Seagrasses and associated macrophytes are important components of coastal systems as ecosystem engineers, habitat formers, and providers of food and shelter for other organisms. The positive impacts of seagrass vegetation on zoobenthic abundance and diversity (as compared to bare sands) are well documented, but only in surveys performed in summer, which is the season of maximum canopy development. Here we present the results of the first study of the relationship between the seasonal variability of seagrass vegetation and persistence and magnitude of contrasts in faunal communities between vegetated and bare sediments. The composition, abundance, biomass, and diversity of macrozoobenthos in both habitats were compared five times throughout the year in temperate eelgrass meadows in the southern Baltic Sea. Significant positive effects of macrophyte cover on invertebrate density and biomass were recorded only in June, July, and October when the seagrass canopy was relatively well developed. The effects of vegetation cover on faunal species richness, diversity, and composition persisted throughout the year, but the magnitude of these effects varied seasonally and followed changes in macrophyte biomass. The strongest effects were observed in July and coincided with maximums in seagrass biomass and the diversity and biomass of other macrophytes. These observations indicate that in temperate, clearly seasonal systems the assessment of macrophyte impact cannot be based solely on observations performed in just one season, especially when that season is the one in which macrophyte growth is at its maximum. The widely held belief that macrophyte cover strongly influences benthic fauna in marine coastal habitats, which is based on summer surveys, should be revisited and complemented with information obtained in other seasons. PMID:25000560

  8. Manifestation of sea quark effects in the strong coupling constant in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Onogi, T.; Ukawa, A. Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University , Kyoto 606 Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 724 Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 400 National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Ibaraki 305 )

    1995-01-02

    We demonstrate that sea quark effects of a magnitude expected from renormalization group considerations are clearly visible in the strong coupling constant measured in current full QCD simulations. Building on this result an estimate of [alpha] (5)/MS ([ital M][sub [ital Z

  9. Effects of wildfire on sea otter (Enhydra lutris) gene transcript profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Kolden, Crystal A.; Saarinen, Justin A.; Bodkin, James L.; Murray, Michael J.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Wildfires have been shown to impact terrestrial species over a range of temporal scales. Little is known, however, about the more subtle toxicological effects of wildfires, particularly in downstream marine or downwind locations from the wildfire perimeter. These down-current effects may be just as substantial as those effects within the perimeter. We used gene transcription technology, a sensitive indicator of immunological perturbation, to study the effects of the 2008 Basin Complex Fire on the California coast on a sentinel marine species, the sea otter (Enhydra lutris). We captured sea otters in 2008 (3 mo after the Basin Complex Fire was controlled) and 2009 (15 mo after the Basin Complex Fire was controlled) in the adjacent nearshore environment near Big Sur, California. Gene responses were distinctly different between Big Sur temporal groups, signifying detoxification of PAHs, possible associated response to potential malignant transformation, and suppression of immune function as the primary responses of sea otters to fire in 2008 compared to those captured in 2009. In general, gene transcription patterns in the 2008 sea otters were indicative of molecular reactions to organic exposure, malignant transformation, and decreased ability to respond to pathogens that seemed to consistent with short-term hydrocarbon exposure.

  10. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea...OBJECTIVES This year our objective has been to investigate properties of the acoustic vector field within a waveguide as they are influenced by the...refraction. Preliminary results were first discussed at the TREX workshop in November 2014 (Indianapolis) and at the Acoustical Society of America

  11. Effects of Light and Covering Behavior on PAX6 Expression in the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong; Ji, Nanjing; Sun, Ping; Feng, Wenping; Wei, Jing; Chang, Yaqing

    2014-01-01

    We studied the diel expression pattern of PAX6 (a structural gene that is commonly involved in the eye development and photoreception of eye forming animals) and the effects of light and covering behavior on PAX6 expression in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius. We confirmed that aphotic condition significantly reduced covering behavior in S. intermedius. The diel expression pattern of PAX6 was significantly different in S. intermedius under photic and aphotic conditions. The gene expression of PAX6 significantly deceased in covered S. intermedius both under natural light and in darkness. The present finding provides valuable insight into the probable link between covering and PAX6 expression of sea urchins. Further studies are required to investigate the detailed expression network of light detection involved genes in order to fully reveal the molecular mechanism of the light-induced covering behavior of sea urchins. PMID:25333874

  12. Impacts of wind forcing on sea level variations in the East China Sea: Local and remote effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfang; Zuo, Juncheng; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Meixiang

    2016-02-01

    The regional sea level variation in the East China Sea (ECS) was influenced not only by local factors but also by remote wind from adjoining ocean with the oceanic connectivity influenced by upper-ocean circulation. The satellite altimeter observations showed that from 1993 to 2008, the inter-annual sea level variation in the ECS was negatively related to the strength of Kuroshio. To investigate the relative role of local and remote wind, two sensitive experiments were carried out using the POP model. Model experiments revealed that wind-induced redistributions of water played a significant role in the sea level variation of the ECS. The seasonal variations were induced by both local winds and remote Pacific wind stress with approximately equal contribution. However, on the inter-annual sea level variations, the remote wind forcing over the North Pacific could contribute substantially more than that of local wind which modulated sea level immediately. Remote wind influenced the China Sea in forms of changing of wind stress curl and ocean currents, which influenced the intensity of the Kuroshio, especially during El Nino episodes.

  13. Effects of large sea-level variations in connected basins: the Dacian - Black Sea system of the Eastern Paratethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, I.; Matenco, L.; Dinu, C.; Cloetingh, S.

    2012-04-01

    Sea-level changes provide an important control on the interplay between accommodation space and sediment supply, in particular for shallow-water basins where the available space is limited. Sediment exchange between connected basins separated by a subaqueous sill (bathymetric threshold) is still not well understood. When sea-level falls below the bathymetric level of this separating sill, the shallow-water basin evolution is controlled by its erosion and rapid fill. Once this marginal basin is filled, the sedimentary depocenter shifts to the open marine basin (outward shift). With new accommodation space created during the subsequent sea-level rise, sediment depocenter shifts backwards to the marginal basin (inward shift). This new conceptual model is tested here in the context of Late Miocene to Quaternary evolution of the open connection between Dacian and Black Sea basins. By the means of seismic sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Miocene-Pliocene evolution of this Eastern Paratethys domain, this case study demonstrates these shifts in sedimentary depocenter between basins. An outward shift occurs with a delay that corresponds to the time required to fill the remaining accommodation space in the Dacian Basin below the sill that separates it from the Black Sea. This study provides novel insight on the amplitude and sedimentary geometry of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) event in the Black Sea. A large (1.3 - 1.7km) sea-level drop is demonstrated by quantifying coeval sedimentation patterns that change to mass-flows and turbiditic deposits in the deep-sea part of this main sink. The post-MSC sediment routing continued into the present-day pattern of Black Sea rivers discharge.

  14. Antitumour and apoptotic effects of a novel Tris-peptide complex obtained after isolation of Raoultella ornithinolytica extracellular metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, M J; Grzywnowicz, K; Rzymowska, J; Lewtak, K; Szewczyk, R; Mendyk, E; Keller, R

    2015-06-01

    The characterization of the antitumour activity and chemical identification of the compounds obtained after the isolation of extracellular metabolites of bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica. The fraction with anticancer activity against the HeLa cell line, T47D and TOV-112D was obtained from the supernatants of R. ornithinolytica culture using ion-exchange chromatography, and separated by Sephadex G-50 medium gel filtration into two subfractions. The obtained compounds were analysed using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS/MS spectrometry. The antitumour activity of the two subfractions was analysed using 5-bromo-2-deoxy-uridine kit. The subfraction with the highest activity against HeLa cells was identified as Tris-peptide complex. The amino acid sequence of the peptide from the complex was found to be TDAPSFSDIPN and molecular weight was estimated at 1430·6576 Da. Cytotoxic, cytopathic and apoptotic effects in HeLa cells treated with the active complex were observed; however, the cytotoxic effect against normal human skin fibroblasts was minimal. The Tris-peptide complex from R. ornithinolytica showed selective antitumour activity against the HeLa cell line. The Tris-peptide complex due to the high selectivity can be used in biomedicine, and its derivatives may contribute to the development of new anticancer compounds. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Vasorelaxant activity of extracts obtained from Apium graveolens: Possible source for vasorelaxant molecules isolation with potential antihypertensive effect

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Vergara-Galicia; Ángel, Jimenez-Ramirez Luis; Adrián, Tun-Suarez; Francisco, Aguirre-Crespo; Anuar, Salazar-Gómez; Samuel, Estrada-Soto; Ángel, Sierra-Ovando; Emmanuel, Hernandez-Nuñez

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate vasorelaxant effect of organic extracts from Apium graveolens (A. graveolens) which is a part of a group of plants subjected to pharmacological and phytochemical study with the purpose of offering it as an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. Methods An ex vivo method was employed to assess the vasorelaxant activity. This consisted of using rat aortic rings with and without endothelium precontracted with norepinephrine. Results All extracts caused concentration-dependent relaxation in precontracted aortic rings with and without endothelium; the most active extracts were Dichloromethane and Ethyl Acetate extracts from A. graveolens. These results suggested that secondary metabolites responsible for the vasorelaxant activity belong to a group of compounds of medium polarity. Also, our evidence showed that effect induced by dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts from A. graveolens is mediated probably by calcium antagonism. Conclusions A. graveolens represents an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. PMID:24075341

  16. Effects of sea-level rise on ground water flow in a coastal aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, J.P.; Garabedian, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of sea-level rise on the depth to the fresh water/salt water interface were simulated by using a density-dependent, three-dimensional numerical ground water flow model for a simplified hypothetical fresh water lens that is similar to shallow, coastal aquifers found along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Simulations of sea-level rise of 2.65 mm/year from 1929 to 2050 resulted in an increase in water levels relative to a fixed datum, yet a net decrease in water levels relative to the increased sea-level position. The net decrease in water levels was much greater near a gaining stream than farther from the stream. The difference in the change in water levels is attributed to the dampening effect of the stream on water level changes in response to sea-level rise. In response to the decreased water level altitudes relative to local sea level, the depth to the fresh water/salt water interface decreased. This reduction in the thickness of the fresh water lens varied throughout the aquifer and was greatly affected by proximity to a ground water fed stream and whether the stream was tidally influenced. Away from the stream, the thickness of the fresh water lens decreased by about 2% from 1929 to 2050, whereas the fresh water lens thickness decreased by about 22% to 31% for the same period near the stream, depending on whether the stream was tidally influenced. The difference in the change in the fresh water/salt water interface position is controlled by the difference in the net decline in water levels relative to local sea level. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  17. Rapid rise in effective sea-level in southwest Bangladesh: Its causes and contemporary rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, John; Orford, Julian D.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence is presented from three estuarine tide gauges located in the Sundarban area of southwest Bangladesh of relative sea level rise substantially in excess of the generally accepted rates from altimetry, as well as previous tide-gauge analyses. It is proposed that the difference arises from the use of Relative Mean Sea Level (RMSL) to characterise the present and future coastal flood hazard, since RMSL can be misleading in estuaries in which tidal range is changing. Three tide gauges, one located in the uninhabited mangrove forested area (Sundarban) of southwest Bangladesh, the others in the densely populated polder zone north of the present Sundarban, show rates of increase in RMSL ranging from 2.8 mm a- 1 to 8.8 mm a- 1. However, these trends in RMSL disguise the fact that high water levels in the polder zone have been increasing at an average rate of 15.9 mm a- 1 and a maximum of 17.2 mm a- 1. In an area experiencing tidal range amplification, RMSL will always underestimate the rise in high water levels; consequently, as an alternative to RMSL, the use of trends in high water maxima or ‘Effective Sea Level Rise’ (ESLR) is adopted as a more strategic parameter to characterise the flooding hazard potential. The rate of increase in ESLR is shown to be due to a combination of deltaic subsidence, including sediment compaction, and eustatic sea level rise, but principally as a result of increased tidal range in estuary channels recently constricted by embankments. These increases in ESLR have been partially offset by decreases in fresh water discharge in those estuaries connected to the Ganges. The recognition of increases of the effective sea level in the Bangladesh Sundarban, which are substantially greater than increases in mean sea level, is of the utmost importance to flood management in this low-lying and densely populated area.

  18. Effects of early sea-floor processes on the taphonomy of temperate shelf skeletal carbonate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Abigail M.; Nelson, Campbell S.

    2003-10-01

    reversed. It produces both information and material. Bioerosion, in contrast, is destructive and permanent. In temperate areas bioerosion may destroy even very large shells during their long residence at the sea floor, on the order of hundreds to thousands of years. Overall, processes on the temperate sea floor may combine to destroy more carbonate than they produce, and the preservation potential of temperate shelf carbonate into the rock record may be significantly affected. Where preservation does occur in such a destructive regime, the effects of early sea-floor processes will be key determinants of the deposit, resulting in a "taphofacies" characteristic of temperate shelf carbonate sediments.

  19. Effects of North Sea oil and alkylphenols on biomarker responses in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Sturve, Joachim; Hasselberg, Linda; Fälth, Herman; Celander, Malin; Förlin, Lars

    2006-06-01

    A consequence of oil drilling at sea is the release of produced water contaminated with e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and alkylphenols. In the present study, juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to North Sea oil, nonylphenol and a combination of the North Sea oil and an alkylphenol mixture in a flow-through system. A suite of hepatic biomarkers were analysed. Exposure to North Sea oil resulted in strong induction of CYP1A protein levels and EROD activities. Exposure to nonylphenol, on the other hand, resulted in decreased CYP1A levels and EROD activities. Thus, nonylphenol appears to down-regulate CYP1A expression in Atlantic cod. Combined exposure to North Sea oil with an alkylphenol mixture resulted in lower EROD induction, compared to that in fish exposed to North Sea oil alone. This difference was not statistically significant, but still we believe that the alkylphenols have inhibited CYP1A activities in the fish which may have compromised CYP1A mediated metabolism of other xenobiotics, including PAH. CYP3A protein levels were lower, compared to controls, in fish exposed to nonylphenol and the combination of North Sea oil and alkylphenol mixture. In contrast, the oil alone had no effect on CYP3A protein content. North Sea oil exposure, alone or in combination with alkylphenols, caused oxidative stress observed as elevated levels of GSSG content and GR and CAT activities. Interestingly, exposure to nonylphenol resulted in a marked depletion of total glutathione levels. This apparent depletion may be a consequence of increased conjugation of glutathione to nonylphenol followed by excretion. An increase in conjugation enzyme GST activity was observed in the nonylphenol exposed group, although the difference was not significant. No sign of oxidative damage, measured as lipid peroxidation, was observed in any of the exposures experiments. This study suggests that North Sea oil may lead to oxidative stress and altered CYP1A and CYP3A expression

  20. Cooling rate effects on thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of bio-hydroxyapatite obtained from bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Palechor-Ocampo, Anderzon F; Londoño-Restrepo, Sandra M; Millán-Malo, Beatriz M; Rodriguez-García, Mario E

    2016-02-01

    This article is focused on the study of cooling rate effects on the thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) obtained from bovine bone. A three-step process was used to obtain BIO-HAp: hydrothermal, calcinations, and cooling. Calcined samples in a furnace and cooling in air (HAp-CAir), water (HAp-CW), and liquid nitrogen (HAp-CN2), as well as an air cooled sample inside the furnace (HAp-CFAir), were studied. According to this study, the low cooling rate that was achieved for air cooled samples inside the furnace produce single crystal BIO-HAp with better crystalline quality; other samples exhibited polycrystalline structures forming micron and submicron grains. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of thermal treatment on TL response of CaSO₄:Dy obtained using a new preparation method.

    PubMed

    González, P R; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Furetta, C; Azorín, J; Alcántara, B C

    2013-05-01

    We report the effect of thermal treatment on thermoluminescent (TL) sensitivity property of CaSO4:Dy obtained by a new preparation method at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico. Samples of phosphor powder were subjected to different thermal treatments respectively at 773, 873, 973 and 1,173K for 1h and then irradiated from 0.1 to 1,000 Gy gamma doses. Low energy dependence was analyzed too by irradiating with X-rays in the range of 16-145 keV. The results were normalized to the energy (1,252 keV) of (60)Co and they were compared with those obtained using the commercial dosimeters TLD-100. Also the kinetic parameters were determined by deconvolution of glow curve. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  3. The Potential Effect of Sea Level Rise on Coastal Property Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that one consequence of increasing global sea level is that the frequency of flooding at low-lying coastal sites will increase. We review recent evidence that the effects coastal geometry will create substantial spatial variations in the changes in flooding frequency with scales of order 100km. Using a simple model of the evolution of coastal property values we demonstrate that a consequence of sea level rise is that the appreciation of coastal properties will peak, and then decline relative to higher properties. The time when the value reach a maximum is shown to depend upon the demand for the coastal property, and the local rate of change of flooding frequency due to sea level rise. The simple model is then extended to include, in an elementary manner, the effects on the value of adjacent but higher properties. We show that the effect of increased flooding frequency of the lower properties leads to an accelerated appreciation of the value of upland properties and an accelerated decline in the value of the coastal properties. We then provide some example calculations for selected sites. We conclude with a discussion of comparisons of the prediction of the analyses to recent data, and then comments on the impact of sea level rise on tax base of coastal communities.

  4. Parental Effect of Long Acclimatization on Thermal Tolerance of Juvenile Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Lin; Yu, Shan-Shan; Dong, Yun-Wei

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the thermal resistance of marine invertebrates to elevated temperatures under scenarios of future climate change, it is crucial to understand parental effect of long acclimatization on thermal tolerance of offspring. To test whether there is parental effect of long acclimatization, adult sea cucumbers (Apostichopus japonicus) from the same broodstock were transplanted southward and acclimatized at high temperature in field mesocosms. Four groups of juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced different durations of high temperature acclimatization were established. Upper thermal limits, oxygen consumption and levels of heat shock protein mRNA of juveniles was determined to compare thermal tolerance of individuals from different groups. Juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced high temperature could acquire high thermal resistance. With the increase of parental exposure duration to high temperature, offspring became less sensitive to high temperature, as indicated by higher upper thermal limits (LT50), less seasonal variations of oxygen consumption, and stable oxygen consumption rates between chronic and acute thermal stress. The relatively high levels of constitutive expression of heat-shock proteins should contribute to the high thermal tolerance. Together, these results indicated that the existence of a parental effect of long acclimatization would increase thermal tolerance of juveniles and change the thermal sensitivity of sea cucumber to future climate change.

  5. Parental Effect of Long Acclimatization on Thermal Tolerance of Juvenile Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yun-wei

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the thermal resistance of marine invertebrates to elevated temperatures under scenarios of future climate change, it is crucial to understand parental effect of long acclimatization on thermal tolerance of offspring. To test whether there is parental effect of long acclimatization, adult sea cucumbers (Apostichopus japonicus) from the same broodstock were transplanted southward and acclimatized at high temperature in field mesocosms. Four groups of juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced different durations of high temperature acclimatization were established. Upper thermal limits, oxygen consumption and levels of heat shock protein mRNA of juveniles was determined to compare thermal tolerance of individuals from different groups. Juvenile sea cucumbers whose parents experienced high temperature could acquire high thermal resistance. With the increase of parental exposure duration to high temperature, offspring became less sensitive to high temperature, as indicated by higher upper thermal limits (LT50), less seasonal variations of oxygen consumption, and stable oxygen consumption rates between chronic and acute thermal stress. The relatively high levels of constitutive expression of heat-shock proteins should contribute to the high thermal tolerance. Together, these results indicated that the existence of a parental effect of long acclimatization would increase thermal tolerance of juveniles and change the thermal sensitivity of sea cucumber to future climate change. PMID:26580550

  6. Incorporating Infrastructure and Vegetation Effects on Sea Level Rise Predictions in Low-Gradient Coastal Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Sandi Rojas, S.; Trivisonno, F.; Saco, P. M.; Riccardi, G.

    2015-12-01

    At the regional and global scales, coastal management and planning for future sea level rise scenarios is typically supported by modelling tools that predict the expected inundation extent. These tools rely on a number of simplifying assumptions that, in some cases, may result in important overestimation or underestimation of the inundation extent. One of such cases is coastal wetlands, where vegetation strongly affects both the magnitude and the timing of inundation. Many coastal wetlands display other forms of flow restrictions due to, for example, infrastructure or drainage works, which also alters the inundation patterns. In this contribution we explore the effects of flow restrictions on inundation patterns under sea level rise conditions in coastal wetlands. We use a dynamic wetland evolution model that not only incorporates the effects of flow restrictions due to culverts, bridges and weirs as well as vegetation, but also considers that vegetation changes as a consequence of increasing inundation. We apply our model to a coastal wetland in Australia and compare predictions of our model to predictions using conventional approaches. We found that some restrictions accentuate detrimental effects of sea level rise while others moderate them. We also found that some management strategies based on flow redistribution that provide short term solution may result more damaging in the long term if sea level rise is considered.

  7. Antibacterial Effects of Antimicrobials Used in Regenerative Endodontics against Biofilm Bacteria Obtained from Mature and Immature Teeth with Necrotic Pulps.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jordon C; Troxel, Alex; Ehrlich, Ygal; Spolnik, Kenneth; Bringas, Josef S; Gregory, Richard L; Yassen, Ghaeth H

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the direct and residual antibacterial effects of intracanal antimicrobials against bacterial biofilms obtained from infected mature and immature teeth with necrotic pulps. Sterile dentin slabs (n = 100) were inoculated with bacterial biofilms obtained from root canals of an immature or a mature tooth with pulpal necrosis and incubated anaerobically for 3 weeks (n = 50 per biofilm). Dentin infected with each type of biofilm received 1 week of treatment with 1 or 5 mg/mL double antibiotic paste (DAP) in methylcellulose hydrogels, calcium hydroxide, or placebo paste or received no treatment (n = 10). The pastes were removed, and biofilm disruption assays were performed. Additional dentin slabs (n = 100) were pretreated with the same treatments (n = 20). The pastes were rinsed off, and the samples were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline for 1 week. Thereafter, samples from the treatment groups were infected with bacterial biofilm from both clinical sources mentioned earlier (n = 10 per biofilm) and incubated anaerobically for 3 weeks before conducting biofilm disruption assays. Uninfected dentin slabs were used for both antibacterial experiments as negative control groups (n = 20). All antimicrobials showed significant direct antibacterial effects regardless of the biofilm source. Dentin pretreated with 5 mg/mL DAP provided significantly higher residual antibacterial effects in comparison with all other groups regardless of the source of biofilm. Dentin pretreated with calcium hydroxide did not show any residual antibacterial effects. Tested antimicrobials showed significant direct antibacterial effects. Only 5 mg/mL DAP exhibited significant residual antibacterial effects against bacterial biofilms from an infected root canal of an immature tooth. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of heavy metal pollution on foraminifers in the Marmara Sea (Balıkesir-Canakkale-Tekirdag, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal Yumun, Zeki

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT This study aims to investigate the effects of heavy metal pollution on Holocene foraminiferal assemblages in the sediments of Marmara Sea (Balikesir-Canakkale-Tekirdag, Turkey). For this purpose four drilling samples, one from Bandirma (Balikesir/Turkey), two from Erdek Bay (Erdek-Bandirma/Turkey) and one from Tekirdag (Turkey) have been taken. Additionally core samples taken from 43 different locations in the Western Marmara Sea also have been examined. Foraminiferal assemblages were identified and changes in heavy metal concentrations were determined (spatially) in the vertical direction by means of drilling samples; in the vertical direction for geochronology and in the horizontal direction by the areal distribution of the core samples. In this research an average value defined as Pollution Index (PI) was used for the first time in order to summarize the results of geochemical analyses. Within the scope of this method, the pollution index value is obtained by dividing the sum of average value ratios of heavy metal measurement values by the number of measurements. It was observed that the number of individuals and species decreased where the heavy metal measured values (MV) were higher than the pollution index and increased where the heavy metal values were lower than the pollution index when obtained index value was correlated separately with the numbers of foraminifer individuals and species. It was also observed that foraminifera were completely absent in some locations where PI was less than MV. Morphological changes were observed in three foraminifer species, Elphidium crispum, Massilina secans, and Ammonia compacta, in the core samples taken in areas where industrial wastes are discharged into the southern parts of the Marmara Sea. At some locations, between Misakca-Denizkent, and Erdek-Balikesir, Turkey, where the heavy metal density was high it haven't been any foraminifer species were achieved. The pollution index (PI) value measured in this

  9. Effects of Manisa propolis on telomerase activity in leukemia cells obtained from the bone marrow of leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Cogulu, O; Biray, C; Gunduz, C; Karaca, E; Aksoylar, S; Sorkun, K; Salih, B; Ozkinay, F

    2009-11-01

    Propolis is a resinous material collected by honeybees and obtained from beehives that has anticancer effects by inducing apoptosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of propolis on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in the leukemia cells obtained from leukemia patients. Four different bone marrow cell cultures from each of four leukemia cases were prepared. The 60 ng/ml, 30 ng/ml and 15 ng/ml working concentrations of propolis were administered to three cultures of each patient, while one culture contained only culture medium. hTERT mRNA expression levels of cells were detected at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h using the LightCycler 2.0 instrument. A significant decrease in hTERT expression levels was observed in the 60 ng/ml concentration of propolis. In conclusion, Manisa propolis may also have a potential effect on the expression of hTERT in leukemia-particularly owing to its constituent chrysin.

  10. Barometric effects on tabular iceberg drift in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Ian D.

    The Inverse Barometer Effect (IBE) was observed in the nineteenth century by Sir James Clark Ross (Ross, 1854a), as deviations in sea-surface elevation in response to deviations in atmospheric pressure. This effect embodies the inverse relationship between sea-surface height (relative to long-term mean sea level) and atmospheric surface pressure. This thesis addresses the hypothesis that icebergs in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica are influenced by the same forces that create the IBE. This hypothesis is motivated by studies of icebergs in the Ross Sea, where drift data suggest that icebergs are drawn into temporary holding zones, or "Iceberg Parking Lots" situated where the surface pressure tends to display persistent, annual average low pressure. A physical explanation for the IBE's influence on icebergs is that they are often able to travel up the sea-surface slope induced by the IBE below atmospheric lows against the gravitational pull because of the pressure gradient force of the atmosphere acting on the iceberg's freeboard (the part of the iceberg that is above the waterline). Here, I evaluate the validity of the hypothesized IBE-iceberg relationship using a combined approach of data analysis and modeling. I have examined atmospheric surface pressure and wind records taken directly from the surfaces of four Ross Sea icebergs---B15A, B15K, C16, and B15J, and I have also built, and experimented with, models that predict iceberg drift response to atmospheric surface pressure and surface winds, using observed pressures and winds from B15A and B15J as model forcing. I additionally performed various experiments on a large, idealized tabular iceberg's physical sensitivity to the IBE using a model that treats atmospheric pressure and winds in an idealized, theoretical manner. I discovered that the IBE is indeed a significant influence on iceberg drift in and around Lewis Bay, just to the north of Ross Island, which will further our understanding of these icebergs

  11. Effects of neotectonic and sedimentary processes on the seafloor geomorphology of the Tekirdag Basin of the western Marmara Sea (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Mustafa; Yigit-Faridfathi, Füsun

    2010-05-01

    This study forms part of a project (TUBITAK YDABCAG 101Y071) with the main purpose of investigation of late Quaternary slope stability, sediment mass movements and turbidite formations in the tectonically active Tekirdag Basin and its margins from the western Marmara Sea. The results were also intended to relate to the major earthquakes and sea-level changes. During this project, in 2001 aboard the former R/V MTA Sismik-1, a total of 100 km seismic reflection profiles were obtained along three tracklines representing from shelf to slope to deep basin environments. A multichannel airgun seismic system and well-known methods and principles of seismic stratigraphy was used for interpretations. At 11 sites from 29 to 1111 m water depths gravity sediment cores were taken having 100 to 359 cm recoveries and textural and structural characteristics were determined using standard petrographic methods. The NEE-SWW directed seismic profile (TKD-01) which runs parallel to the North Anatolian Fault zone displayed syntectonic sedimentation with negative flower structure that increased in thickness toward the Ganos Fault and pinched out in the east. ENE section of this profile also bears structures of underwater landslides with slump facies. Seismic profile TKD-02 which crosses the Tekirdag Basin in WNW-ESE direction most likely displays major 3 fault segments of the NAF zone. Many faults and syntectonic sedimentation structure can be recognized on this profile. A morphological feature of a sediment wedge or former lowstand delta at the present shelf edge can be related to the effects of last sea-level change. Mounded and chaotic seismic reflection configurations which indicate channel and slope-front fill as well as slump facies are thought to reflect submarine slides and slumps. Other morphological features such as incised submarine valleys or channels running E-W direction are also present on this profile. The seismic profile (TKD-03) runs from NNW to SSE across the basin and

  12. Assessing the effects of changing demographic and consumption patterns on sea tenure regimes in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Shankar

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates how sea tenure institutions in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands, mediate among population, consumption, and the environment. The focus is on explaining how growth in population and consumption alter sea tenure regimes, and the factors that shape either their institutional robustness or vulnerability. The paper also addresses the regional differences among sea tenure institutional arrangements, the processes that are producing them, and the social and environmental outcomes of these institutions as they engage external forces and internal changes. A major question is how existing forms of sea tenure respond comparatively when faced with parallel demographic and economic transformations? Two villages representing different sea tenure arrangements within the Roviana Lagoon are compared. Results show that inhabitants in these villages perceive their systems of sea tenure governance similarly; yet their managerial responses to changes brought about by growth in population and consumption differ, and the responses produce contrasting environmental effects.

  13. The effects of changing winds and temperatures on the oceanography of the Ross Sea in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Walker O.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Klinck, John M.

    2014-03-01

    The Ross Sea is critically important in regulating Antarctic sea ice and is biologically productive, which makes changes in the region's physical environment of global concern. We examined the effects of projected changes in atmospheric temperatures and winds on aspects of the ocean circulation likely important to primary production using a high-resolution sea ice-ocean-ice shelf model of the Ross Sea. The modeled summer sea-ice concentrations decreased by 56% by 2050 and 78% by 2100. The duration of shallow mixed layers over the continental shelf increased by 8.5 and 19.2 days in 2050 and 2100, and the mean summer mixed layer depths decreased by 12 and 44%. These results suggest that the annual phytoplankton production in the future will increase and become more diatomaceous. Other components of the Ross Sea food web will likely be severely disrupted, creating significant but unpredictable impacts on the ocean's most pristine ecosystem.

  14. Effects of sea level rise on deltaic coastal marshlands, Mississippi River deltaic plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.E.; Penland, S. ); Roberts, H.H.; Coleman, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Low-relief deltaic coastal plains commonly experience land loss because of the cumulative effects of natural and human-induced processes. Although it is difficult to separate the individual factors within the overall process, interplay between these factors can result in a rate of relative sea level rise greater than the natural rate of coastal-plain aggradation that causes land loss. Between 1956 and 1978, about 11,400 and 2,490 ha of marsh were lost in east Texas and Mississippi, respectively. Louisiana's loss was 18,755 ha. Relative sea level rise over the last 65 yr has averaged 0.23 cm/yr in the Gulf and as much as 1-1.5 cm/yr in the delta plain. The Environmental Protection Agency predicts the rate of sea level rise to increase over the next century. Rates of relative sea level rise for the Gulf of Mexico are expected to increase from 0.23-1.5 cm/yr to 0.6-3.7 cm/yr. The current rate of relative sea level rise and land loss in the subsiding Mississippi delta is a response that can be expected for many US coastal areas over the next century. With the predicted change, the Mississippi River delta complex will experience dramatically increased rates of land loss. Isles Dernieres will disappear by the year 2000, and Plaquemines and Terrebonne marshes will be gone between 2020 and 2080. Based on the lowest predicted sea level rise rate, by the year 2100, the delta plain could be reduced from 150.9 {times} 10{sup 3} ha to 29.8 x 10{sup 3} ha or to 4.9 {times} 10{sup 3} ha if calculations are based on the highest rate.

  15. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the saponin and sapogenins obtained from the stem of Akebia quinata.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongwon; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2005-01-01

    The stem of Akebia quinata Decasisne (Lardizabalaceae) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease. It has been reported that saponins in medicinal plants may act as bioactive components after biodegradation to sapogenins in the gastrointestinal tract. To find the active components, we obtained the methanol (MeOH) extract from A. quinata stems and fractionated this extract into CHCl(3), butanol (BuOH), and H(2)O fractions. A saponin-containing BuOH fraction was refluxed in an acidic solution to yield the hydrolyzed fraction. Silica gel column chromatography separated kalopanaxsaponin A (1) from the BuOH fraction, and oleanolic acid (2) and hederagenin (3) were obtained from the hydrolyzed fraction. The antinociceptive effect was tested by hot plate-writhing and tail-flicks methods using mice, and the anti-inflammatory effect was assayed using carrageenan-induced rat edema against the following samples: the MeOH extract of A. quinata stems, its fractions, the isolated saponin, kalopanaxsaponin A, and the sapogenins hederagenin and oleanolic acid. The MeOH extract exhibited antinociceptive/anti-inflammatory effects by oral administration of 100 and 250 mg/kg doses, indicating that the MeOH extract has an antinociceptive/anti-inflammatory activity. The BuOH fraction (crude saponin) also significantly exhibited those bioactivities. Treatments with 10 and 30 mg/kg perorally of these two sapogenins produced significant antinociceptive/ anti-inflammatory effects in the rat, suggesting that the sapogenins may act as resultant active compounds. Compounds 2 and 3 inhibited dye leakage into the peritoneal cavity induced by acetic acid, and the latter was more active than the former. The anti-inflammtory effects were further supported by the reduction of carrageenan-induced lipid peroxidation and hydroxy radical content in serum. These results suggest that the antinociceptive/anti-inflammatory properties of the stem of A. quinata can be attributed to the

  16. The Effects of Different Electrode Types for Obtaining Surface Machining Shape on Shape Memory Alloy Using Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. G.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, G. C.; Lee, E. S.

    2017-06-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is important material used for the medicine and aerospace industry due to its characteristics called the shape memory effect, which involves the recovery of deformed alloy to its original state through the application of temperature or stress. Consumers in modern society demand stability in parts. Electrochemical machining is one of the methods for obtained these stabilities in parts requirements. These parts of shape memory alloy require fine patterns in some applications. In order to machine a fine pattern, the electrochemical machining method is suitable. For precision electrochemical machining using different shape electrodes, the current density should be controlled precisely. And electrode shape is required for precise electrochemical machining. It is possible to obtain precise square holes on the SMA if the insulation layer controlled the unnecessary current between electrode and workpiece. If it is adjusting the unnecessary current to obtain the desired shape, it will be a great contribution to the medical industry and the aerospace industry. It is possible to process a desired shape to the shape memory alloy by micro controlling the unnecessary current. In case of the square electrode without insulation layer, it derives inexact square holes due to the unnecessary current. The results using the insulated electrode in only side show precise square holes. The removal rate improved in case of insulated electrode than others because insulation layer concentrate the applied current to the machining zone.

  17. Effects of sea water on elongated duration of ground motion as well as variation in its amplitude for offshore earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoriki, Masaru; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of sea water on the propagation of seismic waves using a 3-D finite-difference-method simulation of seismic wave propagation following offshore earthquakes. When using a 1-D layered structure, the simulation results showed strong S- to P-wave conversion at the sea bottom; accordingly, S-wave energy was dramatically decreased by the sea water layer. This sea water de-amplification effect had strong frequency dependence, therefore resembling a low-pass filter in which the cut-off frequency and damping coefficients were defined by the thickness of the sea water layer. The sea water also acted to elongate the duration of Rayleigh wave packet. The importance of the sea water layer in modelling offshore earthquakes was further demonstrated by a simulation using a realistic 3-D velocity structure model with and without sea water for a shallow (h = 14 km) outer-rise Nankai Trough event, the 2004 SE Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw = 7.2). Synthetic seismograms generated by the model when sea water was included were in accordance with observed seismograms for long-term longer period motions, particularly those in the shape of Rayleigh waves.

  18. Genotoxic and developmental effects in sea urchins are sensitive indicators of effects of genotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.L. . Energy and Environment Division); Hose, J.E. . Dept. of Biology); Knezovich, J.P. . Health and Ecological Assessment Division)

    1994-07-01

    Purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) gametes and embryos were exposed to three known mutagenic chemicals (phenol, benzidine,and pentachlorophenol) over concentration ranges bracketing the effect levels for fertilization success. Normal development and cytogenetic effects (anaphase aberrations) were assessed after the cultures were allowed to develop for 48 h. Using radiolabeled chemicals, the authors also characterized concentrations in the test water as well as doses in the embryos following 2- and 48-h exposures. The authors observed dose responses for all chemicals and all responses, except for phenol, which showed no significant effect on development. Fertilization success was never the most sensitive end point. anaphase aberrations were the most sensitive response for phenol, with an LOEC of 2.5 mg/L exposure concentration. Anaphase aberrations and development were equivalent in sensitivity for benzidine within the tested dose range, and an LOEC of <0.1 mg/L was observed. Development was the most sensitive reasons for pentachlorophenol (LOEC 1 mg/L). the LOEC values for this study were generally lower than comparable data for aquatic life or human health protection. The authors conclude that genotoxicity and development evaluations should be included in environmental management applications and that tests developed primarily for human health protection do not reliably predict the effects of toxic substances on aquatic life.

  19. Thermodynamical effects accompanied freezing of two water layers separated by sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The process of melt pond freezing is very important for generation of sea ice cover thermodynamic and mass balance during winterperiod. However, due to significant difficulties of field measurements the available data of model estimations still have no instrumental confirmation. In May 2009 the authors carried out laboratory experiment on freezing of limited water volume in the University Centre in Svalbard ice tank. In the course of experiment fresh water layer of 27.5 cm thickness at freezing point poured on the 24 cm sea ice layer was cooled during 50 hours at the temperature -10º C and then once again during 60 hours at -20º C. For revealing process typical characteristics the data of continuous measurements of temperature and salinity in different phases were compared with data of numerical computations obtained with thermodynamic model which was formulated in the frames of 1-D equation system (infinite extension of water freezing layer) and adapted to laboratory conditions. The known surprise of the experiment became proximity of calculated and measured estimates of process dynamics that confirmed the adequacy of the problem mathematical statement (excluding probably process finale stage). This effect can be explained by formation of cracks on the upper layer of ice at sharp decreases of air temperature, which temporary compensated hydrostatic pressure growth during freezing of closed water volume. Another compensated mechanism can be migration of brine through the lower layer of ice under influence of vertical pressure gradient and also rejection of gas dissolved in water which increased its compressibility. During 110 hours cooling thickness of water layer between ice layers reduced approximately to 2 cm. According to computations this layer is not chilled completely but keeps as thin brine interlayer within ice body whose thickness (about units of mm) is determined by temperature fluctuations of cooled surface. Nevertheless, despite good coincidence of

  20. Immediate and delayed effects of treatment at the Dead Sea in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elkayam, O; Ophir, J; Brener, S; Paran, D; Wigler, I; Efron, D; Even-Paz, Z; Politi, Y; Yaron, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and delayed effects of balneotherapy at the Dead Sea on patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A total of 42 patients with PsA were treated at the Dead Sea for 4 weeks. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups: group 1 (23 patients) and group 2 (19 patients). Both groups received daily exposure to sun ultraviolet rays and regular bathing at the Dead Sea. Group 1 was also treated with mud packs and sulfur baths. Patients were assessed by a dermatologist and a rheumatologist 3 days before arrival, at the end of treatment, and at weeks 8, 16, and 28 from the start of treatment. The clinical indices assessed were morning stiffness, right and left hand grip, number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, Schober test, distance from finger to floor when bending forward, patient's self-assessment of disease severity, inflammatory neck and back pain and psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score. Comparison between groups disclosed a similar statistically significant improvement for variables such as PASI, morning stiffness, patient self-assessment, right and left grip, Schober test and distance from finger to floor when bending forward. For variables such as tender and swollen joints, and inflammatory neck and back pain, improvement over time was statistically significant in group 1. Addition of mud packs and sulfur baths to sun ultraviolet exposure and Dead Sea baths seems to prolong beneficial effects and improves inflammatory back pain.

  1. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masahiko Katsuya, Yoshio Sakata, Osami

    2016-07-27

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal structure.

  2. Effect of replacement of corn starch by whey protein isolate in biodegradable film blends obtained by extrusion.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Viviane Machado; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Marconcini, José Manoel; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Neto, Alfredo Rodrigues Sena; Pereira, Tamara Coelho; Pereira, Camila Ferreira Gonçalves

    2017-02-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing corn starch by whey protein isolated (WPI) in biodegradable polymer blends developed by extrusion. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of a Vh-type crystalline arrangement. The films were homogeneous, indicating strong interfacial adhesion between the protein and the thermoplastic starch matrix (TPS) as observed in scanning electron microscopy. The addition of WPI on TPS matrix promoted an increase in the thermal stability of the materials. It was observed 58.5% decrease in the water vapor permeability. The effect of corn starch substitution by WPI on mechanical properties resulted in a more resistant and less flexible film when compared the TPS film. The addition of WPI caused greenish yellow color and less transparent films. The substitution of corn starch by WPI made it possible to obtain polymer blends with improved properties and represents an innovation for application as a packaging material.

  3. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-04-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution NEMO model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force and the sea-state dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water level and current predictions.

  4. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state-dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water-level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state-dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water-level and current predictions.

  5. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Satoshi, Ii; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation × 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  6. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Ii, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation x 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  7. Leaf area index retrieval using gap fractions obtained from high resolution satellite data: Comparisons of approaches, scales and atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsamo, Alemu

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the large scale LAI inversion algorithms using red and near infrared reflectance obtained from high resolution satellite imagery. Radiances in digital counts were obtained in 10 m resolution acquired on cloud free day of August 23, 2007, by the SPOT 5 high resolution geometric (HRG) instrument on mostly temperate hardwood forest located in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence forest in Southern Quebec. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), scaled difference vegetation index (SDVI) and modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI) were applied to calculate gap fractions. LAI was inverted from the gap fraction using the common Beer-Lambert's law of light extinction under forest canopy. The robustness of the algorithm was evaluated using the ground-based LAI measurements and by applying the methods for the independently simulated reflectance data using PROSPECT + SAIL coupled radiative transfer models. Furthermore, the high resolution LAI was compared with MODIS LAI product. The effects of atmospheric corrections and scales were investigated for all of the LAI retrieval methods. NDVI was found to be not suitable index for large scale LAI inversion due to the sensitivity to scale and atmospheric effects. SDVI was virtually scale and atmospheric correction invariant. MSAVI was also scale invariant. Considering all sensitivity analysis, MSAVI performed best followed by SDVI for robust LAI inversion from high resolution imagery.

  8. An Electrothermodynamic Model with Distributed Properties for Effective Permittivities of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Arcone, S. A.; Gow, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a model to calculate the temperature dependence of effective permittivities for sea ice, a heterogeneous medium containing multiphase scatterers. With the strong permittivity fluctuation approach the model accounts for the electrodynamic scattering effect together with the quasi-static characteristics of multiple species and subspecies of inhomogeneities with distributed orientations, sizes, and shapes. Because of a preferential direction in the orientation distribution, the medium is effectively anisotropic. The size distribution is described with a probability density function in terms of normalized volumetric sizes. Scatterer shapes are nonuniform and have a general ellipsoidal form characterized by arbitrary axial ratios of correlation lengths which are related to physical geometries of the scatterers. In this formulation, sea ice consisting of solid ice, liquid brine, and gaseous inclusions is modeled to derive effective permittivities with thermodynamic phase redistribution and structural metamorphism. Theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data at the C band frequency of 4.8 GHz for saline ice undergoing warming and cooling cycles. A competitive effect between the increase of liquid brine and the shape rounding of ellipsoidal scatterers at increasing temperatures explains the trend observed in measured data. Sensitivities of effective permittivities to structural and physical parameters characterizing sea ice are also studied.

  9. Effects of the Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution on Polar Ocean Properties and Air-Sea Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific studies have demonstrated that sub-mesoscale ocean eddies, motions characterized by Rossby and Richardson numbers around 1, are important in determining the vertical density structure of the ocean, particularly in the mixed layer. Instabilities excited at the sub-mesoscale have timescales of days and length scales of less than 10 kilometers, and enhance ocean restratification by slumping lateral density gradients. In the polar oceans, a unique mechanism exists that may generate motions on these scales. Individual floes of sea ice may create lateral gradients in the ocean surface heat flux and wind stress curl, acting as an insulator and physical barrier between the ocean and the atmospheric processes that destabilize it. The "floe size distribution" describes the fraction of the ocean surface area covered by sea ice floes, as a function of the sea ice floe size, and determines the length scales over which gradients in atmospheric forcing are transmitted to the ocean. It may therefore play a significant role in exciting or inhibiting sub-mesoscale eddies, and consequently in restratification and air-sea exchange. Current GCMs simulate ice cover using grid-scale ice fraction alone, and lack information about the floe size distribution and of ice length scales that may be important in setting the larger-scale statistics of these motions. An important factor in determining the properties of the upper polar oceans might therefore be missing from modern GCMs. We consider this possibility by examining sub-mesoscale resolving ocean GCM experiments coupled to an energy-balanced atmosphere and idealized model of floes of sea ice. Varying the floe size distribution with a fixed sea ice fraction, we find that the length scales of individual floes and the floe size distribution itself play an important role in setting the steady-state ocean stratification, temperature, and air-sea exchange.

  10. Keeping your seed head above water - EPA's research on the effects of sea level rise on sea grasses and emergent marshes in the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global climate change, including sea-level rise (SLR), will have profound effects on estuarine fish, shellfish, and wildlife populations and their habitats. To develop an understanding of these potential impacts, the U.S. EPA at Newport, Oregon is participating in a joint researc...

  11. Keeping your seed head above water - EPA's research on the effects of sea level rise on sea grasses and emergent marshes in the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global climate change, including sea-level rise (SLR), will have profound effects on estuarine fish, shellfish, and wildlife populations and their habitats. To develop an understanding of these potential impacts, the U.S. EPA at Newport, Oregon is participating in a joint researc...

  12. Invertebrate bioassays with North Sea water samples. I. Structural effects on embryos and larvae of serpulids, oysters and sea urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöckner, K.; Rosenthal, H.; Willführ, J.

    1985-03-01

    Structural effects of bottom and surface water samples from two dumping grounds in the inner German Bight on the development of three meroplanktonic organisms (Pomatoceros triqueter: Polychaeta, Psammechinus miliaris: Echinodermata and Crassostrea gigas, Mollusca) were investigated. The titaniumdioxide dumping site was sampled immediately after dumping (within the visible waste trail 1 km behind the vessel), and 10 h after dumping. Samples were taken in the sewage sludge deposition area in the intervals between the usual dumping activities, regardless of the exact dumping schedule. The preserved bioassay test organisms were inspected microscopically to count percentages of “normal” larval hatch in test water samples, reference water samples and laboratory aged control water samples (5 to 10 replicates). The relative water quality at various dumping sites was expressed in terms of “net risk”-values (Woelke, 1972) compared to hatching rates observed in the controls. Larval development of P. triqueter was significantly suppressed (up to -22 % “net risk”) in trail water of the titanium dioxide dump site while the development of sea urchin larvae was still affected in the 10 h surface samples. Hatching of all test organisms in bottom-water samples from the centre of the sewage sludge dump site was affected to different degrees when compared to reference areas about 4 km north or 6 km northwest of the dumping area. The general usefulness of standardized bioassay procedures in pollution monitoring programmes is discussed. The results presented here call for further verification to minimize experimental background variability and to enlarge the catalogue of suitable effects criteria.

  13. Effects of sea surface warming on marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Boyce, Daniel G; Hofmann, Matthias; Matthiessen, Birte; Sommer, Ulrich; Worm, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Ocean warming has been implicated in the observed decline of oceanic phytoplankton biomass. Some studies suggest a physical pathway of warming via stratification and nutrient flux, and others a biological effect on plankton metabolic rates; yet the relative strength and possible interaction of these mechanisms remains unknown. Here, we implement projections from a global circulation model in a mesocosm experiment to examine both mechanisms in a multi-trophic plankton community. Warming treatments had positive direct effects on phytoplankton biomass, but these were overcompensated by the negative effects of decreased nutrient flux. Zooplankton switched from phytoplankton to grazing on ciliates. These results contrast with previous experiments under nutrient-replete conditions, where warming indirectly reduced phytoplankton biomass via increased zooplankton grazing. We conclude that the effect of ocean warming on marine plankton depends on the nutrient regime, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding global change in marine ecosystems.

  14. First assessment of effects of air-gun seismic shooting on marine resources in the central Adriatic sea

    SciTech Connect

    La Bella, G.; Cannata, S.; Froglia, C.

    1996-11-01

    A series of investigations were carried out to test the effects of air-gun seismic shooting on main fishery resources of the Adriatic Sea during summer 1995. The energy source used for the trial was formed by one air-gun array made up by two sub-arrays consisting in 8 air-guns each developing a total volume of c.a. 2500 i{sup 3} at 2000 psi with an amplitude of 60 bar/m. The interval between two was of 25 s. The intensity was of 210 dB re 1 mPa-m/Hz. Acoustical and spectral analysis were performed simultaneously in the surveyed areas to correlate fishery and behavior observations with sound pattern of the energization. Main results were: (1) Analysis of trawl catch data evidenced no significant changes before and after the air-gun seismic profiling. (2) Echosurvey relative estimate of pelagic biomass, performed simultaneously to trawling operations, failed to evidence any significant change in the pelagic biomass subsequent to the seismic shooting. (3) Small differences were observed in the trammel net catch composition, but one single set of pre-post fishing operations could be done in the study period. (4) Similar density estimate were obtained from dredge surveys performed by an hydraulic dredger before and after air-gun seismic profiling over a clam bed in 14 in depth. (5) Video recording of captive fish, kept into cages moored on the sea bottom at 12 in depth, evidenced a Behavioral response to the approach of the sound source; but no lethal event was recorded on captive sea-bass immediately after the seismic shooting. (6) Biochemical and histological analysis were performed to verify if it is to be related to the captive condition or is somewhat consequent to the air-gun energization. These results confirm that no relevant effects are induced on fishery resources by seismic air-gun shooting.

  15. Predicting the biological effects of mobile phone radiation absorbed energy linked to the MRI-obtained structure.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Dejan; Zigar, Darko; Petković, Dejan; Sokolović, Dušan; Dinđić, Boris; Cvetković, Nenad; Jovanović, Jovica; Dinđić, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The nature of an electromagnetic field is not the same outside and inside a biological subject. Numerical bioelectromagnetic simulation methods for penetrating electromagnetic fields facilitate the calculation of field components in biological entities. Calculating energy absorbed from known sources, such as mobile phones when placed near the head, is a prerequisite for studying the biological influence of an electromagnetic field. Such research requires approximate anatomical models which are used to calculate the field components and absorbed energy. In order to explore the biological effects in organs and tissues, it is necessary to establish a relationship between an analogous anatomical model and the real structure. We propose a new approach in exploring biological effects through combining two different techniques: 1) numerical electromagnetic simulation, which is used to calculate the field components in a similar anatomical model and 2) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is used to accurately locate sites with increased absorption. By overlapping images obtained by both methods, we can precisely locate the spots with maximum absorption effects. This way, we can detect the site where the most pronounced biological effects are to be expected. This novel approach successfully overcomes the standard limitations of working with analogous anatomical models.

  16. Projected Climate change effects on North Sea and Baltic Sea: CMIP3 and CMIP5 Model-Based Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpadas, Dhanya; Schrum, Corinna; Daewel, Ute

    2015-04-01

    Climate change impacts on the marine biogeochemistry and lower trophic level dynamics in the North Sea and Baltic Sea have been assessed using regional downscaling in a number of recent studies. However, most of these where only forced by physical conditions from Global Climate Models and regional downscaling considering the climate change impact on oceanic nutrient conditions from Global Earth System Models (ESMs) are rare and so far solely based on CMIP3-generation climate models. The few studies published show a large range in projected future primary production and hydrodynamic condition. With the addition of CMIP5 models and scenarios, the demand to explore the uncertainty in regional climate change projections increased. Moreover, the question arise how projections based on CMIP5-generation models compare to earlier projections and multi-model ensembles comprising both, AR4 and AR5 generation forcing models are increasingly asked for. Here, we investigated the potential future climate change impacts to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea ecosystem using a coherent regional downscaling strategy based on the regional coupled bio-physical model ECOSMO. ECOSMO was forced by output from different ESMs from both CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. Multi-model ensembles using CMIP3/A1B and CMIP5/RCP4.5 scenarios are examined, where the selected CMIP5 models are the successors of the chosen CMIP3 models. Comparing projected changes with the present day reference condition, all these simulations predicted an increase in Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in both North Sea and Baltic Sea, reduction in sea ice in the Baltic, decrease in primary production in the North Sea and an increase in primary production in the Baltic Sea. Despite these largely consistent results on the direction of the projected changes, our results revealed a broad range in the amplitude of projected climate change impacts. Our study strengthens the claim that the choice of the ESM is a major factor for regional

  17. The Effect of the South Asia Monsoon on the Wind Sea and Swell Patterns in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semedo, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    Ocean surface gravity waves have a considerable impact on coastal and offshore infrastructures, and are determinant on ship design and routing. But waves also play an important role on the coastal dynamics and beach erosion, and modulate the exchanges of momentum, and mass and other scalars between the atmosphere and the ocean. A constant quantitative and qualitative knowledge of the wave patterns is therefore needed. There are two types of waves at the ocean surface: wind-sea and swell. Wind-sea waves are growing waves under the direct influence of local winds; as these waves propagate away from their generation area, or when their phase speed overcomes the local wind speed, they are called swell. Swell waves can propagate thousands of kilometers across entire ocean basins. The qualitative analysis of ocean surface waves has been the focus of several recent studies, from the wave climate to the air-sea interaction community. The reason for this interest lies mostly in the fact that waves have an impact on the lower atmosphere, and that the air-sea coupling is different depending on the wave regime. Waves modulate the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass across the air-sea interface, and this modulation is different and dependent on the prevalence of one type of waves: wind sea or swell. For fully developed seas the coupling between the ocean-surface and the overlaying atmosphere can be seen as quasi-perfect, in a sense that the momentum transfer and energy dissipation at the ocean surface are in equilibrium. This can only occur in special areas of the Ocean, either in marginal seas, with limited fetch, or in Open Ocean, in areas with strong and persistent wind speed with little or no variation in direction. One of these areas is the Arabian Sea, along the coasts of Somalia, Yemen and Oman. The wind climate in the Arabian sea is under the direct influence of the South Asia monsoon, where the wind blows steady from the northeast during the boreal winter, and

  18. [Effect of stock abundance and environmental factors on the recruitment success of small yellow croaker in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zun-lei; Yuan, Xing-wei; Yang, Lin-lin; Yan, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Jia-hua

    2015-02-01

    Multiple hypotheses are available to explain recruitment rate. Model selection methods can be used to identify the best model that supports a particular hypothesis. However, using a single model for estimating recruitment success is often inadequate for overexploited population because of high model uncertainty. In this study, stock-recruitment data of small yellow croaker in the East China Sea collected from fishery dependent and independent surveys between 1992 and 2012 were used to examine density-dependent effects on recruitment success. Model selection methods based on frequentist (AIC, maximum adjusted R2 and P-values) and Bayesian (Bayesian model averaging, BMA) methods were applied to identify the relationship between recruitment and environment conditions. Interannual variability of the East China Sea environment was indicated by sea surface temperature ( SST) , meridional wind stress (MWS), zonal wind stress (ZWS), sea surface pressure (SPP) and runoff of Changjiang River ( RCR). Mean absolute error, mean squared predictive error and continuous ranked probability score were calculated to evaluate the predictive performance of recruitment success. The results showed that models structures were not consistent based on three kinds of model selection methods, predictive variables of models were spawning abundance and MWS by AIC, spawning abundance by P-values, spawning abundance, MWS and RCR by maximum adjusted R2. The recruitment success decreased linearly with stock abundance (P < 0.01), suggesting overcompensation effect in the recruitment success might be due to cannibalism or food competition. Meridional wind intensity showed marginally significant and positive effects on the recruitment success (P = 0.06), while runoff of Changjiang River showed a marginally negative effect (P = 0.07). Based on mean absolute error and continuous ranked probability score, predictive error associated with models obtained from BMA was the smallest amongst different

  19. The physiological effects and quality of chest compressions during CPR at sea level and high altitude.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chen, Yu-Long; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Lai, Kuan-Cheng; Liao, Wen-I; Li, Ling-Yuan; Kao, Wei-Fong; Fan, Ju-Sing; Chen, Ying-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    Rescuers that undergo acute ascent without acclimatization can experience acute mountain sickness. Although performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a short period requires intensive effort at sea level, performing CPR at high altitude is even more exhausting and can endanger the rescuer. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to compare the quality of resuscitation in health professionals at high altitude (3100 m) and that at sea level. Thirty-eight participants were asked to performed continuous chest compression CPR (CCC-CPR) for 5 minutes at sea level and at high altitude. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of the chest compressions (CCs), including the depth and rate thereof. At high altitude, rescuers showed a statistically significant decrease in blood oxygen saturation and an increase in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and fatigue, as measured with the Borg score, after CCC-CPR compared with resting levels. The analysis of the time-dependent deterioration in the quality of CCC-CPR showed that the depth of CCs declined from the mean depth of the first 30 seconds after CCC-CPR to that at more than 120 seconds after CCC-CPR at both sea level and high altitude. The average number of effective CCs declined after CCC-CPR was performed for 1 minute at sea level and high altitude. The quality of CC rapidly declined at high altitude. At high altitude, the average number of effective CC decreases; and this decrease became significant after continuous CCs had been performed for 1 minute. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced wintertime greenhouse effect reinforcing Arctic amplification and initial sea-ice melting.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunfeng; Liang, Shunlin; Chen, Xiaona; He, Tao; Wang, Dongdong; Cheng, Xiao

    2017-08-16

    The speeds of both Arctic surface warming and sea-ice shrinking have accelerated over recent decades. However, the causes of this unprecedented phenomenon remain unclear and are subjects of considerable debate. In this study, we report strong observational evidence, for the first time from long-term (1984-2014) spatially complete satellite records, that increased cloudiness and atmospheric water vapor in winter and spring have caused an extraordinary downward longwave radiative flux to the ice surface, which may then amplify the Arctic wintertime ice-surface warming. In addition, we also provide observed evidence that it is quite likely the enhancement of the wintertime greenhouse effect caused by water vapor and cloudiness has advanced the time of onset of ice melting in mid-May through inhibiting sea-ice refreezing in the winter and accelerating the pre-melting process in the spring, and in turn triggered the positive sea-ice albedo feedback process and accelerated the sea ice melting in the summer.

  1. Sea-land breeze in a coastal city and its effect on pollen transport.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, María I; Pérez, Claudio F; Gardiol, Jesús M

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the sea-land breeze in Mar del Plata (Argentina) to characterize the periods of the year when the breeze affects pollen transport, particularly the dispersion of airborne Poaceae pollen between urban and rural areas. In order to analyse the sea breeze circulation, hourly data from coastal, urban and rural meteorological stations were used. The effect of the sea breeze on the particulate matter was analysed from syncronic hourly airborne pollen records from an urban and a rural area. A sea-land breeze appeared between spring and early autumn in the hours of greatest diurnal warming. Results showed that the surface wind direction most probably associated with this phenomenon is NE and E, the time of occurrence shifting to new directions following the counterclockwise rotation, according to theoretical models for the Southern Hemisphere. Poaceae emission takes place in the morning, during the hours of maximum insolation. However, after the occurrence of the breeze, a rise in pollen concentration between 2000 hours and 0200 hours is detected because of pollen reentrainment brought about by air recirculation. The results showed that breeze transport brings a regional component to pollen assemblage.

  2. The Effects of Highly Detailed Urban Roughness Parameters on a Sea-Breeze Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varquez, Alvin Christopher G.; Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effects of detailed urban roughness parameters on a sea-breeze simulation. An urban roughness database, constructed using a new aerodynamic parametrization derived from large-eddy simulations, was incorporated as a surface boundary condition in the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length at several densely built-up urban grids were three times larger than conventional values due to the consideration of building-height variability. A comparison between simulations from the modified model and its default version, which uses uniform roughness parameters within a conventional method, was conducted for a 2-month period during summer. Results showed a significant improvement in the simulation of surface wind speed but not with temperature. From the 2-month study period, a day with an evident sea-breeze penetration was selected and simulated at higher temporal resolution. Sea-breeze penetration weakened and was more delayed over urbanized areas. The slow sea-breeze penetration also lessened heat advection downwind allowing stronger turbulent mixing and a deeper boundary layer above urban areas. Horizontal wind-speed reduction due to the increased urban surface drag reached heights of several hundreds of metres due to the strong convection.

  3. Discrimination of sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea: Secondary grain-size effect and REE proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hoi-Soo; Lim, Dhongil; Jeong, Do-Hyun; Xu, Zhaokai; Li, Tiegang

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed grain size and elemental concentrations (Al, Mg, Fe, and rare earth elements (REEs)) in 91 surface sediments to elucidate sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea. Elemental concentrations were normalized by Al concentration (Celement/CAl) to minimize the sediment grain-size effect (GSE). However, noticeable linear relationships between Al concentration (or mean grain size) and the ratio (e.g., Mg/Al or Fe/Al) appeared unexpectedly in pair diagrams. The spatial distribution patterns of Fe/Al and Mg/Al ratios were also similar to the pattern of mean grain size. This implies that the GSE was not removed completely, even after the normalization process. Thus, great care must be taken when applying the ratios of Celement/CAl as a proxy of sediment provenance. To improve provenance discrimination of the sediments in the Yellow Sea, the difference between the REE distribution patterns of Chinese and Korean river sediments, expressed as δ (δ = REE∗(La) - REE∗(Lu)), was calculated, and the spatial distribution patterns of the δ values were mapped. The δ values gradually increased from the western to the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, except for low δ values in the southeastern part of the Yellow Sea. This result indicates that the majority of Chinese and Korean river sediments are accumulating near to their respective coasts, except for a deposit along the southwestern coast of Korea in which a considerable amount of sediment from Chinese rivers has been accumulating.

  4. Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: Might they be connected

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M. )

    1989-05-19

    Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustement to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {plus minus} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  5. The cloud cover fraction obtained from a ground CCD camera and its effect on a radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. P.; Pereira, E. B.; Martins, F. R.; Chagas, R. C.; Freitas, W. S., Jr.

    2003-04-01

    Clouds are the major factor that rules the solar irradiance over Earth's surface. They interact with solar radiation in the shortwave spectra and with terrestrial radiation emitted by Earth's surface in the longwave range. Information about cloud cover is a very important input data for radiative transfer models and great effort is being made to improve methods to get this information. This paper reports the effects on a radiative transfer model by using the simple cloud fraction obtained by a ground set CCD camera instead of the satellite derived cloud index. The BRASIL-SR model is a radiative transfer model that calculates surface solar irradiance, using a normalized cloud index determined by statistical analyses of satellites images and from climatological values of temperature and albedo. Cloud fraction was obtained from digital images collected by a ground set CCD (Charge Coupled Device) camera, in the visible range (0.4mm - 0.7mm) as RGB (Red - Green - Blue) compositions. The method initially transforms the image attributes from the RGB space to the IHS (Intensity - Hue - Saturation) space. The algorithm defines threshold values for the saturation component of the IHS system to classify a pixel as cloudy or clear sky. Clear skies are identified by high values of saturation in the visible range while cloudy condition presents a mixture of several wavelengths and consequently lower saturation values. Results from the CCD camera and from the satellite were compared with the Kt and Kd from pyranometer data obtained from a local BSRN radiation station at Florianópolis (27º 28'S, 48º 29'W) and show that cloud fraction is only a poor information about the cloud sky status since it does not bear any information on the cloud optical depth which is needed in most radiative transfer models such as the one used in this paper (the BRASIL-SR).

  6. The study of the hydrological regime extreme effects of the Caspian Sea during the XX-XXI centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaitskaya, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The Caspian Sea - the unique largest enclosed inland body of water on Earth. Significant periodic sea level fluctuations are a typical feature of the sea. In the XIX-XX centuries a number of comprehensive studies of the Caspian Sea was carried out. The results are published in the papers, monographs and climatic atlases. But a number of fundamental questions about the features of the hydrological regime of the Caspian Sea is still open: 1. How does the water circulation change during the level variations? 2. What is the effect of heterogeneity of evaporation from the water surface on the formation of the flow field in the conditions of long-term level changes? 3. How does the water salinity regime change depending on the sea level position, water circulation, river flow and different climatic influences? 4. What is the effect of extreme events (multi-hazards) (ice, storms, destruction of the coasts) on coastal infrastructure? In 2016, the project aims to study hydrological regime extreme effects of the Caspian Sea was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research. Within this project all of the above problems will be solved. Geographic information system "Caspian Sea" for the storage and data processing, including a database of primary oceanographic information for the period of instrumental observations (1897-2013), cartographic database (1921-2011) and tools for multidimensional analysis of spatio-temporal information is the basis of the study. The scheme of interconnected hydrodynamic models (Caspian Sea MODel - Ocean Model - Wind wave model) was developed. The important factors are taken into account in the structure of the models: long-term and seasonal dynamics of the sea waves parameters, new long-term values of evaporation from the shallow waters areas of the Caspian Sea, water circulation. Schemes of general seasonal circulation of the Caspian Sea and the Northern Caspian at different positions of the sea level in XX-XXI centuries using

  7. Basis set effects on the intermolecular interaction energies of methane dimers obtained by the Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Tanabe, Kazutoshi )

    1991-03-21

    Intermolecular interaction energies of methane dimer were calculated by using several basis sets up to 6-311G(3d,4p) with electron correlation energy correction by the Moeller-Plesset perturbation method and basis set superposition error (BSSE) correction by the counterpoise method to evaluate the basis set effect. The calculated interaction energies depended on the basis set considerably. Whereas the interaction energies of repulsive component calculated at HF level were not affected by the change of basis set, the dispersion energy component dependent greatly on the basis set used. The dispersion energies calculated with the Moeller-Plesset second- and third-order perturbation by using 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set were 0-10% and 4-6% smaller than those obtained with the fourth-order (MP4(SDTQ)) perturbation, respectively. The BSSE's calculated by the counterpoise method were still about 30% of the calculated intermolecular interaction energies for the conformers of energy minima event at the MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2d,2p) level. The calculated interaction potentials of dimers at the MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2d,2p) level were considerably shallower than those obtained by MM2 force fields but were close to the potentials given by the Williams potential and by the recently reported MM3 force field.

  8. Effect of hyaluronan on developmental competence and quality of oocytes and obtained blastocysts from in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Opiela, Jolanta; Romanek, Joanna; Lipiński, Daniel; Smorąg, Zdzisław

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of hyaluronan (HA) during IVM on meiotic maturation, embryonic development, and the quality of oocytes, granulosa cells (GC), and obtained blastocysts. COCs were matured in vitro in control medium and medium with additional 0.035% or 0.07% of exogenous HA. The meiotic maturity did not differ between the analysed groups. The best rate and the highest quality of obtained blastocysts were observed when 0.07% HA was used. A highly significant difference (P < 0.001) was noted in the mean number of apoptotic nuclei per blastocyst and in the DCI between the 0.07% HA and the control blastocysts (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that addition of 0.035% HA and 0.07% HA to oocyte maturation media does not affect oocyte nuclear maturation and DNA fragmentation. However, the addition of 0.07% HA during IVM decreases the level of blastocysts DNA fragmentation. Finally, our results suggest that it may be risky to increase the HA concentration during IVM above 0.07% as we found significantly higher Bax mRNA expression levels in GC cultured with 0.07% HA. The final concentration of HA being supplemented to oocyte maturation media is critical for the success of the IVP procedure.

  9. Beaufort Sea: information update

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.R.

    1988-04-01

    The report is based on a multi-disciplinary meeting held March 6-7, 1985, as part of preparations for the Beaufort Sea Sale 97. The chapters are based on presentations given: The causeway effect: Modification of nearshore thermal regime resulting from causeways; Summertime sea ice intrusions in the Chukchi Sea; The deepwater limit of ice gouging on the Beaufort Sea shelf; Distribution, abundance, migration, harvest, and stock identity of Belukha Whales in the Beaufort Sea; Ringed seals in the Beaufort Sea; Beaufort Sea socioeconomics; The Baffin Island Oil Spill, (BIOS) Project.

  10. Determination of chemical composition and genotoxic effects of essential oil obtained from Nepeta nuda on Zea mays seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bozari, Sedat; Agar, Guleray; Aksakal, Ozkan; Erturk, Filiz A; Yanmis, Derya

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to determine the genotoxic potential of essential oil (EO) obtained from Nepeta nuda. The chemical content of EO was measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The most abundant contents were 4aα,7β,7aα-nepetalactone (18.10%), germacrene (15.68%) and elemol (14.38%). For genotoxic effects of EO, Zea mays' seeds were exposed to four different concentrations of this oil. Inhibition of root and stem growth were observed with an increase in EO concentrations. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to determine the genotoxic effects of EO. Some changes occurred in RAPD profiles of germinated EO-treated seeds. Even though total soluble protein quantity vary, the data observed from the protein profiles of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that there was a little differentiation between band profiles of treated samples and control group. We concluded that the basis of interactions between plants, like allelopathy, may be related with genotoxic effects of EO.

  11. Inhibitory 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors involved in pressor effects obtained by stimulation of sympathetic outflow from spinal cord in pithed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Morán, A; Velasco, C; Salvador, T; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    1994-01-01

    1. A study was made of the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on pressor response induced in vivo by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord of pithed rats. All animals had been pretreated with atropine. Intravenous infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1 reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation at intervals of 10 min over the 1 h of infusion. 2. This inhibitory action of 5-HT was depressed by cyproheptadine and methiothepin but was not modified by ketanserin or MDL-72222. By contrast, the inhibitory action of 5-HT was lost in pithed rats that had been pretreated with exogenous noradrenaline. 3. The 5-HT1 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide, produced a variable but significant increase in the pressor response. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist, m-CPP, did not modify the pressor sympathetic response. 4. Our results suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine interferes with sympathetic neurotransmission by inhibiting pressor effects as a result of stimulation of the complete sympathetic outflow, and that this inhibition is mainly through a presynaptic 5-HT1 mechanism. PMID:7889292

  12. Effect of the γ-radiation on phenol fractions obtained from the leaves of Echinodorus macrophyllus Mich.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. M.; Dias, M. D.; Pereira, M. T.; Takahashi, J. A.; Ferraz, V. P.; Piló-Veloso, D.; Alcântara, A. F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Echinodorus macrophyllus Mich. (Chapéu-de-couro) is popularly used as diuretic, anti-arrhythmic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-rheumatic agents. Leaves of this species are largely commercialized and show high level of microbiological contamination (bacteria and fungi). This work describes the effect of the 60Co γ-radiation on the phenol fractions obtained from the leaves of E. macrophyllus. trans-Ferulic acid, ( E)-caffeoyltartronic acid, 6- C-(1 -hexitol)-apigenin, and 6- C-(1 -hexitol)-luteolin were isolated by preparative HPLC. HPLC chromatograms showed concentration changes of some phenolic constituents, suggesting the formation of radiolytic products. The phenol fractions were active against Bacillus subitilis and Staphylococcus aureus and showed high antioxidant activity. However, the antibacterial and antioxidant activities reduced when the absorbed dose was increased.

  13. Effect of pyrolysis temperature and heating rate on biochar obtained from pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Biochar is carbon-rich product generated from biomass through pyrolysis. In this study, the effects of pyrolysis temperature and heating rate on the yield and physicochemical and morphological properties of biochars obtained from safflower seed press cake were investigated. The results showed that the biochar yield and quality depend principally on the applied temperature where pyrolysis at 600 °C leaves a biochar with higher fixed carbon content (80.70%) and percentage carbon (73.75%), and higher heating value (30.27 MJ kg(-1)) in comparison with the original feedstock (SPC) and low volatile matter content (9.80%). The biochars had low surface areas (1.89-4.23 m(2)/g) and contained predominantly aromatic compounds. The biochar could be used for the production of activated carbon, in fuel applications, and water purification processes.

  14. Effect of coagulants on the quality of chhana and rasogolla obtained from admixture of buffalo milk and butter milk.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Gupta, V K; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Suryamani

    2015-03-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the effect of different coagulant (lactic acid, citric acid and calcium lactate) on yield, sensory and textural characteristics of chhana and rasogolla made from admixture of buffalo milk and sweet cream butter milk (SCBM). The highest yield of chhana was observed with calcium lactate whereas the minimum yield was found with citric acid. There was no significant difference found with respect to flavour and colour and appearances scores, however, significant (p < 0.01) difference found in body and texture of chhana samples prepared with different coagulant. In addition to that, significant (p < 0.05) difference observed with respect to body and texture, flavour and porosity of rasogolla, but no significant difference was observed in colour and appearance as well as sweetness of rasogolla prepared with chhana obtained from varying coagulants. Among different coagulants, citric acid was found best suitable for chhana as well as rasogolla making.

  15. Relativistically corrected geometries obtained with analytical gradients: normalized elimination of the small component using an effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2003-03-01

    For the quasi-relativistic normalized elimination of small component using an effective potential (NESC-EP) method, analytical energy gradients were developed, programmed, and implemented in a standard quantum chemical program package. NESC-EP with analytical gradients was applied to determine geometry, vibrational frequencies, and dissociation enthalpies of ferrocene, tungsten hexafluoride, and tungsten hexacarbonyle. Contrary to non-relativistic calculations and calculations carried out with RECPs for the same compounds, NESC-EP provided reliable molecular properties in good agreement with experiment. The computational power of NESC-EP results from the fact that reliable relativistic corrections are obtained at a cost level only slightly larger than that of a non-relativistic calculation.

  16. Substrate-independent sequential deposition process to obtain the lotus effect based on mussel-inspired polydopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Junfei; Pan, Bing; Chen, Yiwei; Xie, Chan; Xue, Mingshan; Wang, Fajun; Li, Wen

    2015-02-01

    A substrate-independent route to achieve the lotus effect on a variety of substrates is proposed based on mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA), and was tested on titanium alloy, polypropylene and silicon substrates. The substrates were firstly coated with PDA and then sequentially transferred to aqueous CuCl2 and AgNO3 solutions for copper and silver deposition. Finally, the samples were passivated by the low-surface-energy molecules of 1-dodecanethiol, and surface superhydrophobicity (contact angle > 160°; sliding angle between 1° and 2°) could be obtained. Due to the strong adhesion of PDA to a wide range of materials, it is expected that this deposition process can be applied to a variety of other substrates including metal, polymer, and inorganic-nonmetallic materials.

  17. Cytotoxic effect of natural trans-resveratrol obtained from elicited Vitis vinifera cell cultures on three cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Almagro, Lorena; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, Maria A; Gómez-Ros, Laura V

    2012-12-01

    trans-Resveratrol (trans-R) has been reported to be a potential cancer chemopreventive agent. Although its cytotoxic activity against different cancer cell lines has been tested, its effect on human acute leukemia cell lines has scarcely been investigated, and only a few in vitro studies were performed using human breast epithelial cell lines. Due to its potential value for human health, demand for trans-R has rapidly increased, and new biotechnological strategies to obtain it from natural edible sources have been developed. Thus, grapevine cell cultures represent a reliable system of trans-R production since they biosynthesize trans-R constitutively or in response to elicitation. In addition, there are no studies deepen on the inhibitory effect of trans-R, produced by elicited grapevine cell cultures, on growth of human tumor cell lines. In this work, the effect of trans-R extracted from the culture medium, after elicitation of grapevine cell cultures, was tested on two human acute lymphocytic and monocytic leukemia cell lines, and one human breast cancer cell line. The effect of trans-R on cell proliferation was not only dose- and time-dependent but also cell type-dependent, as seen from the different degrees of susceptibility of cancer cell lines tested. As regards the effect of trans-R on cell cycle distribution, low trans-R concentrations increased cells in the S phase whereas a high trans-R concentration increased G₀/G₁ phase in all cell lines. Perturbation of the cell cycle at low trans-R concentrations did not correlate with the induction of cell death, whereas a high trans-R concentration, cell proliferation decreased as a result of increasing apoptosis in the three cell lines. In leukemia cells, trans-R up-regulated the expression of caspase-3 while trans-R-induced apoptosis in breast cells occur through a caspase-3-independent mechanism mediated by a down-regulation of Bcl-2.

  18. Trypanocidal activity of guaianolide obtained from Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz-Bip. and its combinational effect with benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Cogo, Juliana; Caleare, Angelo de Oliveira; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias; Ferreira, Izabel Cristina Piloto; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro antiprotozoal activity of a guaianolide (11,13-dehydrocompressanolide) isolated from Tanacetum parthenium against Trypanosoma cruzi and investigated the possible combinational effect of guaianolide and benznidazole. The isolated compound was shown to be effective against T. cruzi, with IC₅₀ values of 18.1±0.8 and 66.6±1.3 μM against the multiplicative epimastigote and amastigote forms, respectively. The best results were obtained against trypomastigotes, with an EC₅₀ of 5.7±0.7 μM. The guaianolide presented no toxicity in LLCMK₂ cells (CC₅₀ of 93.5 μM) and was 16.4-fold more selective for trypomastigotes. The study of the combinational effect of benznidazole and guaianolide revealed the presence of a synergistic effect against the epimastigote form and marginal additive effect against the trypomastigote form. Striking morphological changes were observed in epimastigotes treated with guaianolide, such as thinning and stretching of the cell body and flagellum and changes in the format of the cell body with apparent leakage of the cytoplasmic content in trypomastigote forms. The ultrastructural analysis of epimastigotes revealed the presence of membranes that involved organelles and formation of myelin-like figures. Flow cytometry revealed a cell volume reduction and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. However, no major changes in cell membrane integrity were found in the epimastigote form treated with guaianolide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxygen depletion in coastal seas and the effective spawning stock biomass of an exploited fish species.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, H-H; von Dewitz, B; Dierking, J; Haslob, H; Makarchouk, A; Petereit, C; Voss, R

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions may have previously underappreciated effects on the reproductive processes of commercially exploited fish populations, for example eastern Baltic cod, that are living at the physiological limits of their distribution. In the Baltic Sea, salinity affects neutral egg buoyancy, which is positively correlated with egg survival, as only water layers away from the oxygen consumption-dominated sea bottom contain sufficient oxygen. Egg buoyancy is positively correlated to female spawner age/size. From observations in the Baltic Sea, a field-based relationship between egg diameter and buoyancy (floating depth) could be established. Hence, based on the age structure of the spawning stock, we quantify the number of effective spawners, which are able to reproduce under ambient hydrographic conditions. For the time period 1993-2010, our results revealed large variations in the horizontal extent of spawning habitat (1000-20 000 km(2)) and oxygen-dependent egg survival (10-80%). The novel concept of an effective spawning stock biomass takes into account offspring that survive depending on the spawning stock age/size structure, if reproductive success is related to egg buoyancy and the extent of hypoxic areas. Effective spawning stock biomass reflected the role of environmental conditions for Baltic cod recruitment better than the spawning stock biomass alone, highlighting the importance of including environmental information in ecosystem-based management approaches.

  20. Oxygen depletion in coastal seas and the effective spawning stock biomass of an exploited fish species

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, H.-H.; von Dewitz, B.; Dierking, J.; Haslob, H.; Makarchouk, A.; Petereit, C.; Voss, R.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions may have previously underappreciated effects on the reproductive processes of commercially exploited fish populations, for example eastern Baltic cod, that are living at the physiological limits of their distribution. In the Baltic Sea, salinity affects neutral egg buoyancy, which is positively correlated with egg survival, as only water layers away from the oxygen consumption-dominated sea bottom contain sufficient oxygen. Egg buoyancy is positively correlated to female spawner age/size. From observations in the Baltic Sea, a field-based relationship between egg diameter and buoyancy (floating depth) could be established. Hence, based on the age structure of the spawning stock, we quantify the number of effective spawners, which are able to reproduce under ambient hydrographic conditions. For the time period 1993–2010, our results revealed large variations in the horizontal extent of spawning habitat (1000–20 000 km2) and oxygen-dependent egg survival (10–80%). The novel concept of an effective spawning stock biomass takes into account offspring that survive depending on the spawning stock age/size structure, if reproductive success is related to egg buoyancy and the extent of hypoxic areas. Effective spawning stock biomass reflected the role of environmental conditions for Baltic cod recruitment better than the spawning stock biomass alone, highlighting the importance of including environmental information in ecosystem-based management approaches. PMID:26909164

  1. Chemical composition and phytotoxic effects of essential oils obtained from Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) swingle cultivated in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Ayeb-Zakhama, Asma; Ben Salem, Saoussen; Sakka-Rouis, Lamia; Flamini, Guido; Ben Jannet, Hichem; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2014-08-01

    Ailanthus altissima Mill. Swingle (Simaroubaceae), also known as tree of heaven, is used in the Chinese traditional medicine as a bitter aromatic drug for the treatment of colds and gastric diseases. In Tunisia, Ailanthus altissima is an exotic tree, which was introduced many years ago and used particularly as a street ornamental tree. Here, the essential oils of different plant parts of this tree, viz., roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and samaras (ripe fruits), were obtained by hydrodistillation. In total, 69 compounds, representing 91.0-97.2% of the whole oil composition, were identified in these oils by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The root essential oil was clearly distinguishable for its high content in aldehydes (hexadecanal (1); 22.6%), while those obtained from flowers and leaves were dominated by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (74.8 and 42.1%, resp.), with caryophyllene oxide (4) as the major component (42.5 and 22.7%, resp.). The samara oil was rich in the apocarotenoid derivative hexahydrofarnesyl acetone (6; 58.0%), and the oil obtained from stems was characterized by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (54.1%), mainly β-caryophyllene (18.9%). Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses separated the five essential oils into four groups, each characterized by the major oil constituents. Contact tests showed that the germination of lettuce seeds was totally inhibited by all the essential oils except of the samara oil at a dose of 1 mg/ml. The flower oil also showed a significant phytotoxic effect against lettuce germination at 0.04 and 0.4 mg/ml (-55.0 ± 3.5 and -85.0 ± 0.7%, resp.). Moreover, the root and shoot elongation was even more affected by the oils than germination. The inhibitory effect of the shoot and root elongation varied from -9.8 to -100% and from -38.6 to -100%, respectively. Total inhibition of the elongation (-100%) at 1 mg/ml was detected for all the oils, with the exception of the samara oil (-74.7 and -75.1% for roots and shoots, resp

  2. Effect of dietary ascorbate on lipogenesis and lipolysis activities in black sea bream, Acanthopagrus schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Om, A D; Yoshimatsu, T; Umino, T; Nakagawa, H; Sakamoto, S

    2010-09-01

    To assess the effect of dietary ascorbate on lipid metabolism, 1-year black sea bream (Acanthopagrus schlegelii) were reared on a casein-based purified diet and an ascorbate fortified diet (1,100 mg of L: -ascorbyl-2- monophosphate-Mg/kg diet). The fortified ascorbate was effectively incorporated into the fish body and elevated muscle carnitine content. Fortifications of dietary ascorbate depressed activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase as lipogenic enzymes in the hepatopancreas and intraperitoneal fat body. Starvation after feeding experiment activated carnitine palmitoyltransferase as a lipolysis enzyme in the hepatopancreas in both control and vitamin C(VC) groups, while the lipolysis activity was significantly higher in VC group. These results confirmed that dietary ascorbate depressed lipogenesis and activated lipolysis, i.e., influenced the lipid metabolism of black sea bream.

  3. The effect of radioactive waste storage in Andreev Bay on contamination of the Barents Sea ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Ilyin, G. V.; Usyagina, I. S.; Moiseev, D. V.; Dahle, Salve; Kasatkina, N. E.; Valuyskaya, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of temporary radioactive waste storage on the ecological status of the sea and biota in the littoral of Andreev and Malaya Andreev bays and near the shore of Motovskii Gulf (including the mouth part of the Zapadnaya Litsa Bay) was analyzed. The littoral sediments contaminated by the 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, and 239,240Pu isotopes are located in the zones of constant groundwater discharge on the shores of Andreev and Malaya Andreev bays. The littoral slopes and bottom depressions of the bays accumulate finely dispersed terrigenous material and 137Cs. The investigations have shown that the storage does not exert a significant adverse effect on the radioactive conditions and the status of the sea ecosystems beyond Andreev Bay.

  4. An air/sea flux model including the effects of capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An improved model of the air/sea interface is developed. The improvements consist in including the effect of capillary (surface tension) waves on the tropical surface fluxes and the consideration of the sea state, both of which increase the magnitude of tropical surface fluxes. Changes in surface stress are most significant in the low wind-speed regions, which include the areas where westerly bursts occur. It is shown that the changes, from the regular wind conditions to those of a westerly burst or El-Nino, can double when the effects of capillary waves are considered. This implies a much stronger coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere than is predicted by other boundary layer models.

  5. The Effects of Changing Sea Ice on Marine Mammals and Their Hunters in Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, H.; Quakenbush, L.; Nelson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Marine mammals are important sources of food for indigenous residents of northern Alaska. Changing sea ice patterns affect the animals themselves as well as access by hunters. Documenting the traditional knowledge of Iñupiaq and Yupik hunters concerning marine mammals and sea ice makes accessible a wide range of information and insight relevant to ecological understanding, conservation action, and the regulation of human activity. We interviewed hunters in villages from northern Bering Sea to the Beaufort Sea, focusing on bowhead whales, walrus, and ice seals. Hunters reported extensive changes in sea ice, with resulting effects on the timing of marine mammal migrations, the distribution and behavior of the animals, and the efficacy of certain hunting methods, for example the difficulty of finding ice thick enough to support a bowhead whale for butchering. At the same time, hunters acknowledged impacts and potential impacts from changing technology such as more powerful outboard engines and from industrial activity such as shipping and oil and gas development. Hunters have been able to adapt to some changes, for example by hunting bowhead whales in fall as well as spring on St. Lawrence Island, or by focusing their hunt in a shorter period in Nuiqsut to accommodate work schedules and worse weather. Other changes, such as reduced availability of ice seals due to rapid retreat of pack ice after spring break-up, continue to defy easy responses. Continued environmental changes, increased disturbance from human activity, and the introduction of new regulations for hunting may further challenge the ability of hunters to provide food as they have done to date, though innovation and flexibility may also provide new sources of adaptation.

  6. Predicting the Turbulent Air-Sea Surface Fluxes, Including Spray Effects, from Weak to Strong Winds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Engineering Laboratory started in FY12 a project to study spray icing of offshore structures that is funded under ONR’s Arctic program. In January...20295. [in press, refereed] Jones, K. F., and E. L Andreas, 2012: Sea spray concentrations and the icing of fixed offshore structures . Quarterly...Including Spray Effects, from Weak to Strong Winds Edgar L Andreas NorthWest Research Associates, Inc. 25 Eagle Ridge Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766

  7. Effects of the winter of 1976-1977 on the northwestern sargasso sea.

    PubMed

    Leetmaa, A

    1977-10-14

    A survey was conducted in the northwestern Sargasso Sea during the spring to assess the effect and extent of the winter cooling of 1976 to 1977 on the ocean. Newly formed, well-mixed layers of 18 degrees C water as deep as 550 meters were observed. The main thermocline south of the Gulf Stream was 100 to 150 meters deeper than it is on the average, which implies significant changes in the baroclinic transports.

  8. Effects of sensor position on kinematic data obtained with an inertial sensor system during gait analysis of trotting horses.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Valerie J; Frisbie, David D; Kawcak, Christopher E; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of altering location of right forelimb and pelvic sensors on kinematic data obtained with a commonly used inertial sensor system during gait analysis of trotting horses. DESIGN Experimental study. ANIMALS 12 horses with mild to moderate lameness of at least 1 hind limb, with or without lameness of the forelimbs. PROCEDURES All horses were examined while trotting on a high-speed treadmill. The right forelimb sensor was tested at 3 anatomic locations in random order: dorsal midline and 2 cm medial and lateral to that midline. During another treadmill session, the pelvic sensor was tested at 5 anatomic locations in random order: dorsal midline, 2 cm to the right and left of midline, and 2 cm cranial and caudal to the tubera sacrale on the midline. Laterality of the pelvic sensor was analyzed in 2 ways: sensor toward the right or left and sensor toward or away from the lame or lamest hind limb. Maximum and minimum differences in head and pelvic motion and vector sum values were ranked and compared with values for the midline location by means of mixed-model ANOVA. RESULTS Altering the location of the right forelimb sensor by 2 cm medially or laterally had no significant effect on forelimb or hind limb kinematics. However, location of the pelvic sensor had a significant effect on minimum difference in pelvic motion, regardless of whether the data were analyzed by laterality (right vs left) or toward versus away from the lame hind limb. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study indicated that a 2-cm change in the location of the pelvic sensor during kinematic gait analysis had a significant effect on hind limb kinematic data of the system used. Therefore, placement of this sensor needs to be anatomically accurate.

  9. Gastroprotective effect of alpha-pinene and its correlation with antiulcerogenic activity of essential oils obtained from Hyptis species

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marcelo de Almeida; Magalhães, Rafael Matos; Torres, Danielle Mesquita; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Mota, Francisca Sheila Xavier; Oliveira Coelho, Emanuela Maria Araújo; Moreira, Henrique Pires; Lima, Glauber Cruz; Araújo, Pamella Cristina da Costa; Cardoso, José Henrique Leal; de Souza, Andrelina Noronha Coelho; Diniz, Lúcio Ricardo Leite

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-pinene (α-pinene) is a monoterpene commonly found in essential oils with gastroprotective activity obtained from diverse medicinal plants, including Hyptis species. The genus Hyptis (lamiaceae) consists of almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. In the north and northeastern Brazil, some Hyptis species are used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal disturbances. Objective: The present study has investigated the gastoprotective effect of purified α-pinene in experimental gastric ulcer induced by ethanol and indomethacin in mice. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcers were induced in male Swiss mice (20-30 g) by oral administration of absolute ethanol or indomethacin 45 min after oral pretreatment with vehicle, standard control drugs or α-pinene (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg). One hour after the ulcerative challenges, the stomach were removed, and gastric lesions areas measured. The effects of α-pinene on the gastric juice acidity were determined by pylorus ligation model. The gastrointestinal motility and mucus depletion were determined by measuring the gastric levels of phenol red and alcian blue, respectively. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of gastric mucosa of the experimental groups were used for histology analysis. Results: α-pinene pretreatment inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions, reduced volume and acidity of the gastric juice and increased gastric wall mucus (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we showed an interesting correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species (P Pearson = 0.98). Conclusion: Our data showed that the α-pinene exhibited significant antiulcerogenic activity and a great correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species was also observed. PMID:25709221

  10. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  11. The dynamic effects of sea level rise on low-gradient coastal landscapes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Davina L.; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Bilskie, Matthew V.; Alizad, Karim; Wang, Dingbao

    2015-06-01

    Coastal responses to sea level rise (SLR) include inundation of wetlands, increased shoreline erosion, and increased flooding during storm events. Hydrodynamic parameters such as tidal ranges, tidal prisms, tidal asymmetries, increased flooding depths and inundation extents during storm events respond nonadditively to SLR. Coastal morphology continually adapts toward equilibrium as sea levels rise, inducing changes in the landscape. Marshes may struggle to keep pace with SLR and rely on sediment accumulation and the availability of suitable uplands for migration. Whether hydrodynamic, morphologic, or ecologic, the impacts of SLR are interrelated. To plan for changes under future sea levels, coastal managers need information and data regarding the potential effects of SLR to make informed decisions for managing human and natural communities. This review examines previous studies that have accounted for the dynamic, nonlinear responses of hydrodynamics, coastal morphology, and marsh ecology to SLR by implementing more complex approaches rather than the simplistic "bathtub" approach. These studies provide an improved understanding of the dynamic effects of SLR on coastal environments and contribute to an overall paradigm shift in how coastal scientists and engineers approach modeling the effects of SLR, transitioning away from implementing the "bathtub" approach. However, it is recommended that future studies implement a synergetic approach that integrates the dynamic interactions between physical and ecological environments to better predict the impacts of SLR on coastal systems.

  12. The dynamic effects of sea level rise on low-gradient coastal landscapes: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passeri, Davina; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Bilskie, Matthew V.; Alizad, Karim; Wang, Dingbao

    2015-01-01

    Coastal responses to sea level rise (SLR) include inundation of wetlands, increased shoreline erosion, and increased flooding during storm events. Hydrodynamic parameters such as tidal ranges, tidal prisms, tidal asymmetries, increased flooding depths and inundation extents during storm events respond nonadditively to SLR. Coastal morphology continually adapts toward equilibrium as sea levels rise, inducing changes in the landscape. Marshes may struggle to keep pace with SLR and rely on sediment accumulation and the availability of suitable uplands for migration. Whether hydrodynamic, morphologic, or ecologic, the impacts of SLR are interrelated. To plan for changes under future sea levels, coastal managers need information and data regarding the potential effects of SLR to make informed decisions for managing human and natural communities. This review examines previous studies that have accounted for the dynamic, nonlinear responses of hydrodynamics, coastal morphology, and marsh ecology to SLR by implementing more complex approaches rather than the simplistic “bathtub” approach. These studies provide an improved understanding of the dynamic effects of SLR on coastal environments and contribute to an overall paradigm shift in how coastal scientists and engineers approach modeling the effects of SLR, transitioning away from implementing the “bathtub” approach. However, it is recommended that future studies implement a synergetic approach that integrates the dynamic interactions between physical and ecological environments to better predict the impacts of SLR on coastal systems.

  13. The subtle effects of sea water acidification on the amphipod Gammarus locusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauton, C.; Tyrrell, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of increases in pCO2 on the growth and molecular physiology of the neritic amphipod Gammarus locusta, which has a cosmopolitan distribution in estuaries. Amphipods were reared from juvenile to mature adult in laboratory microcosms at three different levels of pH in nominal range 8.1-7.6. Growth rate was estimated from weekly measures of body length. At sexual maturity the amphipods were sacrificed and assayed for changes in the expression of genes coding for a heat shock protein (hsp70 gene) and the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh gene). The data show that the growth and survival rate of this species is not significantly impacted by a decrease in sea water pH of up to 0.5 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of growth in acidified sea water on the expression of the hsp70 gene. However, there was a consistent and significant increase in the expression of the gapdh gene at a pH of ~7.5 which indicated a possible disruption to oxidative metabolic processes. It was concluded that future predicted changes in sea water pH may have subtle effects on the physiology and metabolism of coastal and marine species which may be overlooked in studies of whole organism response.

  14. Giving advice on cost effective measures for a cleaner Baltic Sea: a challenge for science.

    PubMed

    Wulff, F; Bonsdorff, E; Gren, I M; Johansson, S; Stigebrandt, A

    2001-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is one of the world's seas that is most severely affected by human activities. Although there is an international agreement that nutrient input to the Baltic should be reduced, the measures taken so far have not resulted in major reductions in nutrient inputs nor in environmental improvements. The reasons for this are partly due to lack of knowledge on large-scale relationships and couplings between physics, biogeochemistry and ecological properties. But there is also a lack of overall drainage basin-wide analyses on cost-effective measures. There is a danger in making the wrong decisions, e.g. implement reduction schemes that are at worst ineffective or at best, far from cost effective. Researchers from many disciplines are faced with a common challenge: To develop a decision-support system, which can be used as the scientific base for cost-effective measures for the entire Baltic Sea. Such an effort is now being made within the research program MARE (http://www.mare.su.se).

  15. Infrastructure effects on estuarine wetlands increase their vulnerability to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose; Saco, Patricia; Sandi, Steven; Saintilan, Neil; Riccardi, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    At the regional and global scales, coastal management and planning for future sea level rise scenarios is typically supported by modelling tools that predict the expected inundation extent. These tools rely on a number of simplifying assumptions that, in some cases, may result in important miscalculation of the inundation effects. One of such cases is estuarine wetlands, where vegetation strongly depends on both the magnitude and the timing of inundation. Many coastal wetlands display flow restrictions due to infrastructure or drainage works, which produce alterations to the inundation patterns that can not be captured by conventional models. In this contribution we explore the effects of flow restrictions on inundation patterns under sea level rise conditions in estuarine wetlands. We use a spatially-distributed dynamic wetland ecogeomorphological model that not only incorporates the effects of flow restrictions due to culverts, bridges and weirs as well as vegetation, but also considers that vegetation changes as a consequence of increasing inundation. We also consider the ability of vegetation to capture sediment and produce accretion. We apply our model to an estuarine wetland in Australia and show that our model predicts a much faster wetland loss due to sea level rise than conventional approaches.

  16. In vitro effects of fermented papaya (Carica papaya, L.) on platelets obtained from patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, F; Nanetti, L; Montecchiani, G; Borroni, F; Salvolini, E; Faloia, E; Ferretti, G; Mazzanti, L; Vignini, A

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with insulin resistance pathogenesis, insulin secretion deficiency, and complication onset. Fermented papaya preparation (FPP), a dietary supplement obtained by fermentation of the papaya fruit, may be used as an antioxidant in the prevention of diabetic complications. Platelets from 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) and 15 healthy subjects were analyzed to evaluate the in vitro effects of FPP incubation. Na(+)/K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity, membrane fluidity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and conjugated diene levels were determined. In vitro FPP incubation improved platelet function, by enhancing Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity, and ameliorated the antioxidant system functionality, through an increase in TAC and SOD activity and a parallel decrease in conjugated diene levels in patients with DM 2. Our data suggest that the incubation with FPP may have a protective effect on platelets from patients with DM 2, by preventing the progression of oxidative damage associated with diabetes and its complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Temperature and Pore Structure on High Surface Area-Activated Carbon Obtained from Peanut Shells.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, D; Lee, Y S

    2016-03-01

    Activated carbon was synthesized from peanut shells by treating with H3PO4 with an intention to enhance the surface area and to find its electrochemical performance in EDLC as electrode material. The powdered peanut shells were pyrolyzed at three different temperatures namely 300 degrees C, 600 degrees C and 800 degrees C respectively. The structural and surface properties of the pyrolyzed carbon materials were studied using N2 adsorption/desorption, Raman, TEM and SEM analysis. There has been remarkable increase in the surface area of the carbon pyrolyzed at 600 degrees C due to the effect of pore generations. The surface area of the 600 degrees C pyrolyzed sample was found to be 1629 m2/g. The electrochemical properties of all the samples were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The system showed excellent cycleability and a maximum specific capacitance of 291 Fg(-1) was obtained in a 0.1 M H2SO4 electrolyte solution. The effects of the various properties of the activated carbon on the EDLC performance are discussed.

  18. Observations of the 18.6-year cycle effects on the sea-level oscillations in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, P.; De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the physical processes that generate the ocean tides, whose understanding has important influence on the marine activities. We analyze historical sea-level oscillations, continuously recorded from six stations in the North Atlantic Ocean spanning a time period of eighty years from 1926. In this paper, an Independent-Component-Analysis-based approach is adopted to obtain a clear identification of the main tidal constituents in term of waveform in time domain from the simultaneously recorded signals. This technique separates at most six nonlinear tidal components which are weakly superimposed. The fundamental objective is to extract information on the degree of complexity of the involved dynamics and on the very long-term tidal constituents. This is particularly significant to understand the response of the ocean to the tidal forcing. We put the emphasis on the near-bidecadal time scale and its influence on the short-periods tides. In details the Moon 18.6 y nodal cycle modulation acts in the ocean in quite an analogous manner to the fortnightly modulation in many shallow seas. Our results give new insights into the evidence for an 18.6 y effect in the climate/ocean variation whose physical mechanism details remain murky.

  19. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  20. The Anthropogenic Effects of Hydrocarbon Inputs to Coastal Seas: Are There Potential Biogeochemical Impacts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. R.; Rivkin, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon discharges related to fossil fuel exploitation have the potential to alter microbial processes in the upper ocean. While the ecotoxicological effects of such inputs are commonly evaluated, the potential for eutrophication from the constituent organic and inorganic nutrients has been largely ignored. Hydrocarbons from natural seeps and anthropogenic sources represent a measurable source of organic carbon for surface waters. The most recent (1989-1997) estimate of average world-wide input of hydrocarbons to the sea is 1.250 x 1012 g/yr ≈ 1.0 x 1012g C/year. Produced water from offshore platforms is the largest waste stream from oil and gas exploitation and contributes significant quantities of inorganic nutrients such as N, P and Fe. In coastal areas where such inputs are a significant source of these nutrients, model studies show the potential to shift production toward smaller cells and net heterotrophy. The consequences of these nutrient sources for coastal systems and semi enclosed seas are complex and difficult to predict, because (1) there is a lack of comprehensive data on inputs and in situ concentrations and (2) the is no conceptual or quantitative framework to consider their effects on ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we use examples from the North Sea (produced water discharges 1% total riverine input and NH4 3% of the annual riverine nitrogen load), the South China Sea (total petroleum hydrocarbons = 10-1750 μg/l in offshore waters), and the Gulf of Mexico (seeps = 76-106 x 109 gC/yr, Macondo blowout 545 x 109 gC) to demonstrate how hydrocarbon and produced water inputs can influence basin scale biogeochemical and ecosystem processes and to propose a framework to consider these effects on larger scales.

  1. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  2. Biological effects: Marine mammals and sea turtles (chapter 14). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Haebler, R.

    1994-01-01

    All spills are different, varying in type and amount of oil spilled, species exposed, and geographic and atmospheric conditions. It is important to understand as much as possible about both the natural history and characteristics of various species and the specific effects oil has on wildlife. Doing so improves the ability to extrapolate from one spill to another and improves prediction of types and severity of effects to wildlife. This chapter presents an overview of the biological effects of oil on marine mammals and sea turtles.

  3. Effects of pH, CO2 and organic phosphates on oxygen affinity of sea turtle hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, P L; Lapennas, G N

    1982-04-01

    The affinities of adult-type hemoglobins of green (Chelonia mydas) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles were determined at 25.7 degrees C as a function of pH, PCO2 and each of the organic phosphates found in erythrocytes of these species (ATP, IHP (substitute for IPP) and DPG). Each species showed a single hemoglobin band in cellulose acetate electrophoresis which isoelectric focusing resolved into one major and three minor components having isoelectric points near pH 7.2. Oxygen binding curves were recorded using a modified 'Hemoscan' (Instrument Division, Travenol Laboratories, Savage, MD). Hemolysates were kept saturated with CO during preparation to prevent methemoglobin formation. CO was driven off immediately before performing each oxygen binding determination, using the photodissociative effect of the Hemoscan light beam. In both species, phosphate-free hemoglobin has higher affinity than whole blood, and had lower pH sensitivity. CO2 (37 Torr) reduces affinity, particularly in the green sea turtle, and eliminates pH sensitivity. Each organic phosphate tested reduces affinity, with IHP being most effective at a given concentration and DPG least effective. Organic phosphates are most effective at low pH, and restore both pH sensitivity and oxygen affinity to whole-blood levels taking into account the difference between plasma and intracellular pH. Reasons are suggested why the organic phosphate effect was not detected in a previous study. Hemolysates of both species are distinctive in giving upward-curving Hill plots, with n = 1 asymptotes at low saturation that are insensitive to pH, CO2 and organic phosphates. The oxygen affinities corresponding to these asymptotes are about 100 Torr in both species. Results are compared to oxygen dissociation curves obtained from whole blood.

  4. Effects of garlic and ginger oils on hematological and biochemical variables of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Sevdan; Ergün, Sebahattin

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of garlic and ginger oils on hematological and biochemical health characteristics of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Fish were exposed to garlic oil (0.01 or 0.02 mL/L), ginger oil (0.01 or 0.02 mL/L), or a combination of the two oils (each oil at a concentration of 0.005 or 0.01 mL/L) for 96 h via bath immersion. Results showed that the red blood cell count, hematocrit (%), hemoglobin (Hb) concentration (g/dL), mean corpuscular volume (μm(3)), mean corpuscular Hb (pg), and mean corpuscular Hb concentration (%) were not significantly affected by herb oil exposure. However, some changes in biochemical variables were observed. Sea bass exposed to the 0.005-mL/L garlic oil-ginger oil mixture exhibited a significant increase in serum glucose. Serum total protein and albumin levels decreased in sea bass that were exposed to a garlic oil-ginger oil mixture (0.005 or 0.01 mL/L) or to garlic oil at 0.02 mL/L. Serum globulin levels decreased and triglyceride levels increased in sea bass exposed to 0.02-mL/L garlic oil or to the 0.01-mL/L mixture. The serum lipase level decreased and the cholesterol level increased in fish that were exposed to 0.02-mL/L garlic oil. In summary, ginger oil at 0.01-0.02 mL/L can be used without negative effects, while the garlic oil or garlic oil-ginger oil mixture should be applied at a concentration below 0.005 mL/L for bath immersion of sea bass. This is the first study to examine how garlic oil and ginger oil exposure via bath immersion affects the hematological and biochemical status of sea bass.

  5. Climate change scenarios and the effect of sea-level rise for Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kont, Are; Jaagus, Jaak; Aunap, Raivo

    2003-03-01

    Climate warming due to the enhanced greenhouse effect is expected to have a significant impact on natural environment and human activity in high latitudes. Mostly, it should have a positive effect on human activity. The main threats in Estonia that could be connected with sea-level rise are the flooding of coastal areas, erosion of sandy beaches and the destruction of harbour constructions. Possible climate change and its negative impacts in the coastal regions of Estonia are estimated in this paper. Climate change scenarios for Estonia were generated using a Model for the Assessment of Greenhouse-gas Induced Climate Change (MAGICC) and a regional climate change database—SCENanario GENerator (SCENGEN). Three alternative emission scenarios were combined with data from 14 general circulation model experiments. Climate change scenarios for the year 2100 indicate a significant increase in air temperature (by 2.3-4.5 °C) and precipitation (by 5-30%) in Estonia. The highest increase is expected to take place during winter and the lowest increase in summer. Due to a long coastline (3794 km) and extensive low-lying coastal areas, global climate change through sea-level rise will strongly affect the territory of Estonia. A number of valuable natural ecosystems will be in danger. These include both marine and terrestrial systems containing rare plant communities and suitable breeding places for birds. Most sandy beaches high in recreational value will disappear. However, isostatic land uplift and the location of coastal settlements at a distance from the present coastline reduce the rate of risk. Seven case study areas characterising all the shore types of Estonia have been selected for sea-level rise vulnerability and adaptation assessment. Results and estimates of vulnerability to 1.0-m sea-level rise by 2100 are presented in this paper. This is the maximum scenario according to which the actually estimated relative sea-level rise would vary from 0.9 m (SW Estonia) to 0

  6. Understanding the Effects of Sea-Level Rise on Coastal Wetlands: The Human Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Denise

    2010-05-01

    In the 21st century coastal systems are subject to the pressures of centuries of population growth and resource exploitation. In 2003, in the US approximately 153 million people (53 percent of the population) lived in coastal counties, an increase of 33 million people since 1980 and this is expected to increase by approximately 7 million by the year 2008. Eight of the world's top ten largest cities are located at the coast, 44 % of the world's population (more people than inhabited the entire globe in 1950) live within 150 km of the coast and in 2001 over half the world's population lived within 200 km of a coastline. . Increased population density at the coasts often brings pollution and habitat degradation - decreasing the value of many of the resources that initially attract the coastal development - and it also means the effect of sea-level rise on coastal geomorphic systems must be seen in the context of additional human pressures. For global sea-level debate centers on the magnitude and rate of the rise around most of the world; the exception being those areas still experiencing falling sea-levels due to isostatic rebound. Many coastal island states are clearly vulnerable. While the ‘lurid and misleading maps' of the 1980's used by many to indicate areas to be flooded by rising seas in the future, have been replaced by more considered discussion of the response of coastal dynamics to rising seas there is still considerable debate about the amount of sea-level rise shorelines will experience in the 21st century. For coastal wetlands four main sets of physical factors - fine sediment regime; tidal conditions; coastal configuration; and relative sea-level change - define the geomorphic context for coastal marsh development and survival during the 21st century. Each of these factors is influenced by changes in climate and human alterations to coastal and inshore environments. In turn changes in sediment dynamics are mediated by both physical forcing and biotic

  7. Effects of Clouds and Sea Ice on the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M. F.; Warren, S. G.

    2005-12-01

    Downward solar irradiance at the sea surface, measured on 18 voyages of an icebreaker in the Southern Ocean, is used to infer transmittance of solar radiation by clouds. Together with surface albedo estimated from coincident sea-ice reports, downward and net shortwave cloud radiative forcings are computed. The net forcing at a solar zenith angle of 60 degrees is typically -250 watts per square meter over open ocean, but only half this value over sea ice because of the higher surface albedo and less-frequent occurrence of clouds. Frequency distributions of effective optical depth are fitted by decaying exponentials, giving a characteristic optical depth of 15 at 47 S, increasing to 24 in the region of maximum cloud cover at 58 S, and decreasing to 11 at 67 S near the coast of Antarctica. This effective optical depth is a convenient intermediate quantity that can be used to compute what the transmittance of this same cloud field would be under different conditions of solar illumination and surface albedo. The distributions of optical depth are used, together with distributions of surface albedo from Brandt et al. (2005), to estimate the geographical and seasonal variations of shortwave irradiance and cloud radiative forcing at the surface, both for the present climate and for altered surface and cloud conditions. Poleward of 67 S in spring, ice causes a greater reduction of solar energy input to the surface than does cloud. However, in summer the clouds are more important than ice at all latitudes in the Southern Ocean. In the present climate the clouds are optically thicker over open water than over sea ice, suggesting a possible negative feedback if the sea-ice area shrinks with climatic warming. The changes to the solar energy budget caused by removing sea ice are therefore computed both with and without cloud-thickness changes. Compared to the present climate in spring, removing sea ice results in an increase in irradiance reaching the ocean surface, regardless

  8. In silico assessment of adverse effects of a large set of 6-fluoroquinolones obtained from a study of tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tusar, Marjan; Minovski, Nikola; Fjodorova, Natalja; Novic, Marjana

    2012-09-01

    Among the different chemotherapeutic classes available today, the 6-fluoroquinolone (6-FQ) antibacterials are still one of the most effective cures in fighting tuberculosis (TB). Nowadays, the development of novel 6-FQs for treatment of TB mainly depends on understanding how the structural modifications of the main quinolone scaffold at specific positions affect the anti-mycobacterial activity. Alongside the structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the 6-FQ antibacterials, which can be considered as a golden rule in the development of novel active antitubercular 6-FQs, the structure side effects relationship (SSER) of these drugs must be also taken into account. In the present study we focus on a proficient implementation of the existing knowledge-based expert systems for design of novel 6-FQ antibacterials with possible enhanced biological activity against Mycobaterium tuberculosis as well as lower toxicity. Following the SAR in silico studies of the quinolone antibacterials against M. tuberculosis performed in our laboratory, a large set of 6-FQs was selected. Several new 6-FQ derivatives were proposed as drug candidates for further research and development. The 6- FQs identified as potentially effective against M. tuberculosis were subjected to an additional SSER study for prediction of their toxicological profile. The assessment of structurally-driven adverse effects which might hamper the potential of new drug candidates is mandatory for an effective drug design. We applied publicly available knowledge-based (expert) systems and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models in order to prepare a priority list of active compounds. A preferred order of drug candidates was obtained, so that the less harmful candidates were identified for further testing. TOXTREE expert system as well as some QSAR models developed in the framework of EC funded project CAESAR were used to assess toxicity. CAESAR models were developed according to the OECD

  9. The distribution of deep-sea sponge aggregations in the North Atlantic and implications for their effective spatial management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Kerry-Louise; Piechaud, Nils; Downie, Anna-Leena; Kenny, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Sponge aggregations have been recognised as key component of shallow benthic ecosystems providing several important functional roles including habitat building and nutrient recycling. Within the deep-sea ecosystem, sponge aggregations may be extensive and available evidence suggests they may also play important functional roles, however data on their ecology, extent and distribution in the North Atlantic is lacking, hampering conservation efforts. In this study, we used Maximum Entropy Modelling and presence data for two deep-sea sponge aggregation types, Pheronema carpenteri aggregations and ostur aggregations dominated by geodid sponges, to address the following questions: 1) What environmental factors drive the broad-scale distribution of these selected sponge grounds? 2) What is the predicted distribution of these grounds in the northern North Atlantic, Norwegian and Barents Sea? 3) How are these sponge grounds distributed between Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) and High Seas areas? 4) What percentage of these grounds in High Seas areas are protected by the current High Seas MPA network? Our results suggest that silicate concentration, temperature, depth and amount of particulate organic carbon are the most important drivers of sponge distribution. Most of the sponge grounds are located within national EEZs rather than in the High Seas. Coordinated conservation planning between nations with significant areas of sponge grounds such as Iceland, Greenland and Faroes (Denmark), Norway (coastal Norway and Svalbard), Portugal and the UK, should be implemented in order to effectively manage these communities in view of the increasing level of human activity within the deep-sea environment.

  10. Effects of carbon dioxide sequestration on California margin deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Erin R.; Kennett, James P.; Hill, Tessa M.; Barry, James P.

    2009-09-01

    Abstract Deep-sea sequestration of CO2 is being considered as a possible mitigation tool to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations and its associated negative effects. This study investigated potential effects of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) injection on deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminifera are ideal for this ecological impact investigation because of differing test composition (calcareous and non-calcareous) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The experiment was conducted on August-September 2003, at 3600 m off the coast of Monterey Bay, California, aboard the R/V Western Flyer using the ROV Tiburon. The pH of the site was monitored throughout the experiment. Sediment push-cores were collected (both from the experimental and control sites) and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Effects of CO2 injection on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (to 10 cm depth below sea floor) and horizontally (up to 10 m from CO2 injection sites), as well as between live and dead individuals. Within corrals (containing the injected CO2) and their underlying sediments, severe pH changes (near 4.0 units) were recorded. This compares with a record of small average reductions in ocean pH (-0.05 units) combined with large episodic excursions (-1.7 units) over the experimental area due to the injection of CO2. Exposure to this gradient of low pH caused increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms within corrals, as far as 5 m from the injection site, and to at least 10 cm depth in the sediments. This experiment revealed several major effects of CO2 injection on foraminiferal assemblages in surficial sediments: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal species richness decreases in both stained and unstained specimens; and 3) relative percentage of stained (live) forms in the remaining tests increases. Down-core trends (to 10 cm below sea floor) have revealed

  11. Intense sea-effect snowfall case on the western coast of Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Taru; Perttula, Tuuli; Jylhä, Kirsti; Luomaranta, Anna

    2017-07-01

    A new national daily snowfall record was measured in Finland on 8 January 2016 when it snowed 73 cm (31 mm as liquid water) in less than a day in Merikarvia on the western coast of Finland. The area of the most intense snowfall was very small, which is common in convective precipitation. In this work we used hourly weather radar images to identify the sea-effect snowfall case and to qualitatively estimate the performance of HARMONIE, a non-hydrostatic convection-permitting weather prediction model, in simulating the spatial and temporal evolution of the snowbands. The model simulation, including data assimilation, was run at 2.5 km horizontal resolution and 65 levels in vertical. HARMONIE was found to capture the overall sea-effect snowfall situation quite well, as both the timing and the location of the most intense snowstorm were properly simulated. Based on our preliminary analysis, the snowband case was triggered by atmospheric instability above the mostly ice-free sea and a low-level convergence zone almost perpendicular to the coastline. The simulated convective available potential energy (CAPE) reached a value of 87 J kg-1 near the site of the observed snowfall record.

  12. Effects of different microbes on fermenting feed for sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Wang, Yingeng; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Meijie; Rong, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    The effects of different microbes on fermenting feed for sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) were compared to select the optimal fermentation strain in this study. Saccharomgces cerevisae, Candida utilis, Bacillus subtilis and Geotrichum candidum were independently added into the experimental compound feed, while only saline was mixed with the control feed. The fermentation treatments were inoculated with 10% seed solution under the condition of 25°C and 70% water content, which lasted for 5 days to elucidate the optimal microbe strain for fermenting effect. Physicochemical indexes and sensorial characteristics were measured per day during the fermentation. The indexes included dry matter recovery (DMR), crude protein (CP), the percentage of amino acid nitrogen to total nitrogen (AA-N/tN), the percentage of ammonia nitrogen to total nitrogen (NH3-N/tN), and the ratio of fermentation strains and vibrios to the total microbes, color, smell and viscosity. The results showed that DMR, CP and AA-N/tN of the S. cerevisae group reached the highest level on day 3, but the ratio of fermentation strain was second to C. utilis group. In addition, its NH3-N/tN and the ratio of vibrios were maintained at low levels, and the sensory evaluation score including smell, color and viscosity was the highest in S. cerevisae group on day 3. Therefore, S. cerevisae could be the optimal strain for the feed fermentation for sea cucumber. This research developed a new production method of fermentation feed for sea cucumber.

  13. Olfactory Enrichment in California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus): An Effective Tool for Captive Welfare?

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Mystera M; Lauderdale, Lisa K; Pulis, Kelly; Solangi, Moby; Hoffland, Tim; Lyn, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    In the wild, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are exposed to a wide variety of sensory information, which cannot be replicated in captive environments. Therefore, unique procedures are necessary for maintaining physiological and psychological health in nonhuman animals in captivity. The effects of introducing natural scents to captive enclosures have been investigated in a variety of species, yet they have not been examined in marine mammals. This project explored the behavioral effect of scent added to the environment, with the goal of improving the welfare of sea lions in captivity. Two scent types were introduced: (a) natural scents, found in their native environment, and (b) non-natural scents, not found in their native environment. This study examined not only scent enrichment but also the possible evolutionary underpinnings of pinniped olfaction. Scent enrichment was found to significantly impact sea lion behavior as demonstrated by a reduction in pattern swimming, an increase in habitat utilization, and a reduction in stereotypical behavior. However, there were no differences in behavior between natural and non-natural scent conditions.

  14. Numerical study of the daytime urban effect and its interaction with the sea breeze

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikado, Hiroshi )

    1992-10-01

    Under light gradient-wind conditions, the heat-island effect associated with large urban areas is characterized by a temperature rise after sunrise over the land (Delta theta L) and a temperature difference between the urban and rural areas (Delta theta) during the day, whereas by only Delta theta during the night. A numerical experiment using a two-dimensional hydrostatic boundary-layer model was performed to examine the basic characteristics of the daytime heat-island circulation. The results show that a daytime circulation can develop that is much stronger than the nocturnal circulation in spite of a generally smaller value of Delta theta. The circulation decays under the influence of a moderate gradient wind. On the other hand, it persists in the sea-breeze system, and has a notable effect on the sea-breeze pattern. Some characteristics of the sea breeze observed in the Tokyo metropolitan area, such as formation of a suburban stagnant region, frontal intensification, and the delay of its advance inland, were well simulated with the simplified model. Trajectory analyses for air parcels passing over the coastal city indicate that the heat island could prevent the dispersion of urban pollutants and delay their inland transport. 29 refs.

  15. Physiologic and clinicopathologic effects of crude oil on loggerhead sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Lutcavage, M E; Lutz, P L; Bossart, G D; Hudson, D M

    1995-05-01

    The physiologic and clinicopathologic effects of weathered South Louisiana crude oil exposure were studied in the laboratory in juvenile loggerhead sea turtles. Sea turtles ingested oil incidentally, and oil was observed clinging to the nares, eyes, and upper esophagus, and was found in the feces. Oiled turtles had up to a four-fold increase in white blood cell counts, a 50% reduction in red blood cell counts, and red blood cell polychromasia. Most serum blood chemistries (e.g., BUN, protein) were within normal ranges, although glucose returned more slowly to baseline values than in the controls. Gross and histologic changes were present in the skin and mucosal surfaces of oiled turtles, including acute inflammatory cell infiltrates, dysplasia of epidermal epithelium, and a loss of cellular architectural organization of hte skin layers. The cellular changes in the epidermis are of particular concern because they may increase susceptibility to infection. Although many of the observed physiological insults resolved with a 21-day recovery period, the long-term biological effects of oil on sea turtles remain completely unknown.

  16. The effects of two analgesic regimes on behavior after abdominal surgery in Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kristen A; Horning, Markus; Mellish, Jo-Ann E; Weary, Daniel M

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the effects of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment protocols on the behavioral responses of juvenile Steller sea lions after abdominal surgery. Sea lions were randomly assigned to one of two treatments designed to control post-operative pain. The flunixin group (n=6) received flunixin meglumine (1mg/kg) administered as a single intramuscular (IM) injection before extubation from surgery. The carprofen group (n=5) received carprofen (4.4 mg/kg) as an IM injection before extubation, then orally at 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. Seven behaviors related to post-operative pain were monitored by observers, blinded to treatment, for a total of 10 days (3 days pre-, day of surgery, and 6 days post-surgery). All seven behaviors changed after surgery regardless of NSAID treatment, two of which returned to baseline within 6 days of surgery. Only one behavior was mildly affected by analgesic treatment: sea lions in the carprofen group tended to spend less time lying down in Days 1-3 following surgery (i.e., the days which they received oral carprofen). These results suggested that neither treatment, at the dose administered, was effective in controlling pain in the days following this surgery.

  17. Arctic sea ice decline and continental cold anomalies: Upstream and downstream effects of Greenland blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodan; Luo, Dehai

    2017-04-01

    The regression shows that the surface air temperature (SAT) in response to the Arctic sea ice decline has three cold anomaly centers: central-eastern Asia, North Europe and eastern North America (mainly eastern United States). The physical cause of the Greenland blocking (GB) affecting cold SAT anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) continents is examined. It is found that westward-moving Greenland blocking (WGB) events increase significantly and its upstream region that is attributed to intensified Arctic warming over Greenland. In addition, the modest decline of the BDL sea ice is found to favor quasi-stationary Greenland blocking (QGB) events. The composite analysis reveals that the WGB has a strong upstream effect on NH cold anomalies, whereas the QGB acts as a major downstream effect. For the WGB, an intense cold anomaly seen over the eastern North America, while a weak cold anomaly over the North Europe. It is concluded that the cold air outbreaks over the eastern North America should be more frequent under a strong declining condition of the BDL sea ice.

  18. Wind effect on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation via sea ice and vertical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haijun; Wang, Kun; Dai, Haijin; Wang, Yuxing; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Effects of wind and fresh water on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) are investigated using a fully coupled climate model. The AMOC can change significantly when perturbed by either wind stress or freshwater flux in the North Atlantic. This study focuses on wind stress effect. Our model results show that the wind forcing is crucial in maintaining the AMOC. Reducing wind forcing over the ocean can cause immediately weakening of the vertical salinity diffusion and convection in the mid-high latitudes Atlantic, resulting in an enhancement of vertical salinity stratification that restrains the deep water formation there, triggering a slowdown of the thermohaline circulation. As the thermohaline circulation weakens, the sea ice expands southward and melts, providing the upper ocean with fresh water that weakens the thermohaline circulation further. The wind perturbation experiments suggest a positive feedback between sea-ice and thermohaline circulation strength, which can eventually result in a complete shutdown of the AMOC. This study also suggests that sea-ice variability may be also important to the natural AMOC variability on decadal and longer timescales.

  19. Effects of sea-level rise on barrier island groundwater system dynamics: ecohydrological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Thieler, E. Robert; Gesch, Dean B.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    We used a numerical model to investigate how a barrier island groundwater system responds to increases of up to 60 cm in sea level. We found that a sea-level rise of 20 cm leads to substantial changes in the depth of the water table and the extent and depth of saltwater intrusion, which are key determinants in the establishment, distribution and succession of vegetation assemblages and habitat suitability in barrier islands ecosystems. In our simulations, increases in water-table height in areas with a shallow depth to water (or thin vadose zone) resulted in extensive groundwater inundation of land surface and a thinning of the underlying freshwater lens. We demonstrated the interdependence of the groundwater response to island morphology by evaluating changes at three sites. This interdependence can have a profound effect on ecosystem composition in these fragile coastal landscapes under long-term changing climatic conditions.

  20. Transequatorial effects of sea surface temperature anomalies in a global general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1972-01-01

    The global response of the atmosphere to a persistent anomalous pool of warm sea surface temperatures in the extratropical Pacific Ocean is examined in terms of the meridional pole-to-pole profile of the zonally-averaged 600 mb surface for periods up to 90 days. Following an initial hydrostatic inflation of the isobaric surface in the latitude of the warm pool, effects spread poleward within the hemisphere, then begin to appear after about two to three weeks in high latitudes of the opposite hemisphere, but with little or no response in the tropics. The same sea temperature anomaly field generates a stronger response in winter than in summer, and a very different reaction when located in the Southern Hemisphere than when in the Northern Hemisphere.

  1. Effect of stratification on wind drift of river runoff in the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbas, N. V.; Zavialov, P. O.

    2015-11-01

    The formation mechanism of the Yenisei and Ob Rivers floodwater lens (detected in the Kara Sea near the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya in September to October 2007) by wind drift is examined. Numerical calculations of the trajectories of Lagrangian floats launched at the north part of the Yenisei and Ob seaside and transported by drift currents have been performed using actual wind-forcing data. Four different algorithms have been used for calculating the surface drift velocity and the relative wind direction; two account for the effect of density stratification due to the presence of a layer of fresh water on the sea surface. It has been shown that only wind-drift models that take into account the presence of stratification are able to explain the transport of the Yenisei and Ob floodwater to the point of lens detection.

  2. Model calculations of the effects of present and future emissions of air pollutants from shipping in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonson, J. E.; Jalkanen, J. P.; Johansson, L.; Gauss, M.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2014-08-01

    Land-based emissions of air pollutants in Europe have steadily decreased over the past two decades, and this decrease is expected to continue. Within the same time span emissions from shipping have increased, although recently sulphur emissions, and subsequently particle emissions, have decreased in EU ports and in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, defined as SECAs (Sulphur Emission Control Areas). The maximum allowed sulphur content in marine fuels in EU ports is now 0.1%, as required by the European Union sulphur directive. In the SECAs the maximum fuel content of sulphur is currently 1% (the global average is about 2.4%). This will be reduced to 0.1% from 2015, following the new IMO rules (International Maritime Organisation). In order to assess the effects of ship emissions in and around the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, regional model calculations with the EMEP air pollution model have been made on a 1/4° longitude × 1/8° latitude resolution, using ship emissions in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea that are based on accurate ship positioning data. The effects on depositions and air pollution and the resulting number of years of life lost (YOLL) have been calculated by comparing model calculations with and without ship emissions in the two sea areas. The calculations have been made with emissions representative of 2009 and 2011, i.e. before and after the implementation of stricter controls on sulphur emissions from mid 2010. The calculations with present emissions show that per person, an additional 0.1-0.2 years of life lost is estimated in areas close to the major ship tracks with present emission levels. Comparisons of model calculations with emissions before and after the implementation of stricter emission control on sulphur show a general decrease in calculated particle concentration. At the same time, however, an increase in ship activity has resulted in higher emissions and subsequently air concentrations, in particular of NOx, especially in and

  3. Accounting for the effect of TDS and NCG on Salton Sea reservoir response

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    The Salton Sea reservoir, located in Imperial County, Ca., is unique in several ways from most liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that have been developed to date. One of these differences is the presence of hyper-saline brines containing up to 28% TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) and up to 0.2% NCG (Non-Condensible Gas). A simple material and energy balance model has been developed to study the effect of TDS and NCG on Salton Sea reservoir response. This study demonstrated that during the development of a two-phase system the partitioning of the NCG into the vapor phase and the consequential concentration of the TDS in the brine drastically alters the reservoir fluid properties. In modeling pressure depletion of hyper-saline reservoirs, such as the Salton Sea, these changes in reservoir fluid composition were shown to seriously affect the simulation results. As a result of these findings, a compositional fluid property package was developed using published data on H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl mixtures. This fluid property package was then incorporated into the simulation program used by Unocal. Validation of the fluid property package in this simulation program was made using measured reservoir temperature, surface enthalpy, and surface flash data. The development of a compositional simulation program for geothermal applications has advanced our ability to study depletion mechanisms that are sensitive to compositional changes. This program is currently being used to study the effect of injection and steam cap development on long term operations and to develop a field model of the Salton Sea reservoir.

  4. No observed effect of ocean acidification on nitrogen biogeochemistry in a summer Baltic Sea plankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Allanah J.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Bach, Lennart T.; Boxhammer, Tim; Czerny, Jan; Haunost, Mathias; Schulz, Kai-Georg; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation by filamentous cyanobacteria supplies significant amounts of new nitrogen (N) to the Baltic Sea. This balances N loss processes such as denitrification and anammox, and forms an important N source supporting primary and secondary production in N-limited post-spring bloom plankton communities. Laboratory studies suggest that filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria growth and N2-fixation rates are sensitive to ocean acidification, with potential implications for new N supply to the Baltic Sea. In this study, our aim was to assess the effect of ocean acidification on diazotroph growth and activity as well as the contribution of diazotrophically fixed N to N supply in a natural plankton assemblage. We enclosed a natural plankton community in a summer season in the Baltic Sea near the entrance to the Gulf of Finland in six large-scale mesocosms (volume ˜ 55 m3) and manipulated fCO2 over a range relevant for projected ocean acidification by the end of this century (average treatment fCO2: 365-1231 µatm). The direct response of diazotroph growth and activity was followed in the mesocosms over a 47 day study period during N-limited growth in the summer plankton community. Diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria abundance throughout the study period and N2-fixation rates (determined only until day 21 due to subsequent use of contaminated commercial 15N-N2 gas stocks) remained low. Thus estimated new N inputs from diazotrophy were too low to relieve N limitation and stimulate a summer phytoplankton bloom. Instead, regeneration of organic N sources likely sustained growth in the plankton community. We could not detect significant CO2-related differences in neither inorganic nor organic N pool sizes, or particulate matter N : P stoichiometry. Additionally, no significant effect of elevated CO2 on diazotroph activity was observed. Therefore, ocean acidification had no observable impact on N cycling or biogeochemistry in this N-limited, post-spring bloom

  5. Sea lice treatments on salmon farms have no adverse effects on zooplankton communities: a case study.

    PubMed

    Willis, K J; Gillibrand, P A; Cromey, C J; Black, K D

    2005-08-01

    The long-term effects of the sea lice treatment products Excis and Slice on zooplankton communities in a Scottish sea loch were investigated at a commercially operating salmon farm over 31 months. Cypermethrin and emamectin benzoate are the active ingredients in Excis and Slice respectively, which are widely used to control ectoparasitic sea lice on farmed salmon. Excis and Slice treatments did not cause basin-wide effects on the zooplankton community. For both formulations, no adverse affects on zooplankton were detected, instead observed changes in zooplankton abundance and community composition displayed natural seasonal cycles of abundance. Water column concentrations of cypermethrin and emamectin benzoate following sea lice treatments at the fish farm were predicted using models. Cypermethrin concentrations of 3000 ng/l were predicted for short periods immediately after each cage treatment assuming no particle adhesion. The 3-h and 24-h Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) were exceeded for 10 h and 32 h respectively on the second day when five cages were treated. However, cypermethrin concentrations higher than 0.5 ng/l (24-h EQS) were predicted to occur over <2% of the total basin area on each treatment day. The 3-h EQS (16 ng/l) was exceeded in <0.3% of the basin on each treatment day. The concentration of soluble emamectin benzoate present in the water column was predicted from modelled deposition footprints and sediment concentrations to be of order 10(-3) ng/l. Predicted concentrations of both chemicals were generally lower than those causing toxicity to copepods in previous laboratory studies and further support the results of this field study that environmental concentrations of Excis and Slice do not adversely impact zooplankton communities.

  6. Metabolic Effects of Insulin and IGFs on Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat, Núria; Capilla, Encarnación; Navarro, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of gilthead sea bream myocytes were performed in order to examine the relative metabolic function of insulin compared with IGF-I and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factors, IGFs) at different stages in the cell culture. In these cells, the in vitro effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and l-alanine uptake were studied in both myocytes (day 4) and small myotubes (day 9). 2-DG uptake in gilthead sea bream muscle cells was increased in the presence of insulin and IGFs in a time dependent manner and along with muscle cell differentiation. On the contrary, l-alanine uptake was also stimulated by insulin and IGFs but showed an inverse pattern, being the uptake higher in small myocytes than in large myotubes. The results of preincubation with inhibitors (PD-98059, wortmannin, and cytochalasin B) on 2-DG uptake indicated that insulin and IGFs stimulate glucose uptake through the same mechanisms, and evidenced that mitogenesis activator protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways mediate the metabolic function of these peptides. In the same way, we observed that GLUT4 protein synthesis was stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs in gilthead sea bream muscle cells in a different manner at days 4 or 9 of the culture. In summary we describe here, for the first time, the effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-DG and l-alanine uptake in primary culture of gilthead sea bream muscle cells. We show that both MAPK and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways are needed in order to control insulin and IGFs actions in these cells. Moreover, changes in glucose uptake can be explained by the action of the GLUT4 transporter, which is stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs throughout the cell culture. PMID:22654873

  7. No observed effect of ocean acidification on nitrogen biogeochemistry in a summer Baltic Sea plankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A. J.; Achterberg, E. P.; Bach, L. T.; Boxhammer, T.; Czerny, J.; Haunost, M.; Schulz, K.-G.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation by filamentous cyanobacteria supplies significant amounts of new nitrogen (N) to the Baltic Sea. This balances N loss processes such as denitrification and anammox and forms an important N source supporting primary and secondary production in N-limited post-spring bloom plankton communities. Laboratory studies suggest that filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria growth and N2-fixation rates are sensitive to ocean acidification with potential implications for new N supply to the Baltic Sea. In this study, our aim was to assess the effect of ocean acidification on diazotroph growth and activity as well as the contribution of diazotrophically-fixed N to N supply in a natural plankton assemblage. We enclosed a natural plankton community in a summer season in the Baltic Sea near the entrance to the Gulf of Finland in six large-scale mesocosms (volume ~ 55 m3) and manipulated fCO2 over a range relevant for projected ocean acidification by the end of this century (average treatment fCO2: 365-1231 μatm). The direct response of diazotroph growth and activity was followed in the mesocosms over a 47 day study period during N-limited growth in the summer plankton community. Diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria abundance throughout the study period and N2-fixation rates (determined only until day 21 due to subsequent use of contaminated commercial 15N-N2 gas stocks) remained low. Thus estimated new N inputs from diazotrophy were too low to relieve N limitation and stimulate a summer phytoplankton bloom. Instead regeneration of organic N sources likely sustained growth in the plankton community. We could not detect significant CO2-related differences in inorganic or organic N pools sizes, or particulate matter N : P stoichiometry. Additionally, no significant effect of elevated CO2 on diazotroph activity was observed. Therefore, ocean acidification had no observable impact on N cycling or biogeochemistry in this N-limited, post-spring bloom plankton

  8. Some physical effects of reaction rate on PbS thin films obtained by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altıokka, Barış; Baykul, Mevlana Celalettin; Altıokka, Mehmet Rıza

    2013-12-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline lead sulfide (PbS) have been deposited on glass substrates at 303±1 K using chemical bath deposition (CBD). The precipitation of PbS on solid surfaces under four different reaction conditions was performed using a sodium sulfite (Na2SO3) compound as an inhibitor. The kinetics model for the reaction between Pb2+ and S2- was developed according to the amounts of Pb2+ concentrations measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) during the precipitation of PbS. The surface morphologies of PbS thin films were studied with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was found that the precipitation rate effects the formation of pinhole. To obtain a good quality of thin films the optimum concentration of lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), thiourea (CS(NH2)2) and Na2SO3 in the final solution was determined to be 0.0089, 0.1460, 0.510 and 0.00023 M, respectively. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The XRD results showed that the films formed galena cubic structures which represent the natural mineral of PbS. The crystallite sizes of the films were found to be between 23 and 37 nm.

  9. Effect of protease EPg222 obtained from Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from dry-cured ham in pieces of pork loins.

    PubMed

    Benito, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Sosa, María J; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2003-01-01

    The fungal protease EPg222 obtained from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 isolated from dry-cured ham, was assayed for proteolytic activity in a meat model system based on sterile pieces of pork loins for 32 days. Treated samples showed a significative reduction of total high ionic strength-soluble proteins during the incubation period, as compared with a control incubated without enzyme, both on the surface and in the depth. SDS-PAGE analysis of this protein fraction showed higher hydrolysis of the main myofibrillar proteins H-meromyosin, actin, and tropomyosin in treated samples. Non-protein and amino acidic nitrogen were detected in higher amounts in enzyme-added than in control pieces of loins, both on the surface and in the depth. Thus, addition of enzyme EPg222 to whole pieces of meat results in an increase of protein hydrolysis. The effect of this enzyme could be of great interest for stimulating proteolysis in whole dry-cured meat pieces.

  10. Luteolin, quercetin, genistein and quercetagetin inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Torras-Ceballos, Alfredo; Gómez-Mora, Juan Arturo; Fernández-Rojas, Berenice

    2017-01-01

    One of the microorganisms from dental plaque associated with severe inflammatory responses in infectious endocarditis is Porphyromonas gingivalis. It is a Gram-negative bacteria harvested from chronic periodontitis patients. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from P. gingivalis promotes the expressions of interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Flavonoids are thought to participate in processes that control inflammation, such as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We investigated the effects of luteolin, quercetin, genistein and quercetagetin on cardiomyoblasts treated with LPS alone or in combination with following inhibitors p38 (SB203580), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and PKC (Calphostin C) for 1 h. The kinase activation and COX-2 expression levels were determined at the gene and protein levels. These flavonoids are considered to inhibit the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the degradation of inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (IκB-α). They also play a role in COX-2 expression. We conclude that the tested flavonoids inhibit inflammatory responses induced by LPS in H9c2 cells.

  11. Hypolipidemic effect in cholesterol-fed rats of a soluble fiber-rich product obtained from cocoa husks.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sonia; Moulay, Leila; Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Vilanova, Olga; Muguerza, Begoña; Goya, Luis; Bravo, Laura

    2008-08-27

    A new soluble cocoa fiber product (SCFP), obtained after enzymatic treatment of cocoa husks, was characterized and its potential health effects studied in an animal model of dietary-induced hypercholesterolemia. The SCFP was rich in soluble dietary fiber (DF) and antioxidant polyphenols. Consumption of a cholesterol-rich diet containing the SCFP as a source of DF resulted in lower food intake and body weight gain in comparison with control groups consuming cholesterol-free or cholesterol-rich diets with cellulose as DF. The cholesterol-rich diet caused remarkable hypercholesterolemia. However, the SCFP diminished the negative impact of the cholesterol-rich diet, buffering the decrease of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and the increase of total and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde levels) induced by the fatty diet. The SCFP also decreased triglyceride levels to values lower than those in the group fed the cholesterol-free diet. These results put forward the potential application of the SCFP as a dietary supplement or functional food ingredient.

  12. Occurrence Rates and Heating Effects of Tangential and Rotational Discontinuities as Obtained from Three-dimensional Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Yang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2015-05-01

    MHD discontinuities are ubiquitous in the solar wind and are often found at the origin of turbulence intermittency. They may also play a key role in the turbulence dissipation and heating of the solar wind. The tangential discontinuities (TDs) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) are the two most important types of discontinuities. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been observationally investigated. Here, we present numerical results from a three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy and we define new methods for identifying and distinguishing TDs and RDs. Three statistical results obtained for the relative occurrence rates and heating effects are highlighted: (1) RDs tend to take up the majority of the discontinuities along with time; (2) the thermal states embedding TDs tend to be associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilities while RDs do not; (3) TDs have a higher average T as well as perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot }. The simulation shows that TDs and RDs evolve and contribute to solar wind heating differently. These results will improve our understanding of the mechanisms that generate discontinuities and cause plasma heating.

  13. Assessing bio-physical effects of Offshore Wind Farms on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem using a TRIAXUS ROTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floeter, Jens; Callies, Ulrich; Dudeck, Tim; Eckhardt, André; Gloe, Dominik; Hufnagl, Marc; Ludewig, Elke; Möller, Klas O.; North, Ryan P.; Pohlmann, Thomas; Riethmüller, Rolf; Temming, Axel; van Beusekom, Justus; Walter, Bettina; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs) on marine ecosystem functioning are largely unknown. OWF foundations may lead to locally increased turbulence levels in the pelagic zone, and as turbines deflect the wind field, the extraction of energy may induce up- and downwelling dipoles in the water column. As a consequence, upwelling cells and locally increased vertical mixing will likely transport nutrients and phytoplankton into the nutrient-depleted surface layer of the stratified water column in summer. Subsequently, locally enhanced primary production could potentially be channelled to higher trophic levels and may lead to an increased habitat quality for demersal & pelagic fish. Here, we present field measurements that allow us to assess the bio-physical effects of OWFs on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem. Data were obtained using a TRIAXUS (a remotely operated towed vehicle, ROTV) during a survey in summer 2014, which included three OWFs located in water depths between 20m and 40m. TRIAXUS is designed to record high-frequency synoptic measurements of biological and physical oceanographic properties. The instrument is equipped with CTD, oxygen, light and fluorescence sensors as well as a Laser Optical Plankton Counter (LOPC) and a Video Plankton Recorder (VPR). Fisheries hydroacoustic and ADCP data were recorded in parallel. Hydrodynamic modelling supported the analysis by backtracking the drift routes of water bodies from which nutrient contents were analysed. To isolate the OWF effects from natural variability in the bio-physical properties of the German Bight, we also analysed spatially and seasonally similar SCANFISH transect data from pre-OWF years (2010, 2011). The survey provided first insights into the potential bio-physical effects of OWFs on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem, e.g., small scale areas of increased mixing, local upwelling and changes in the magnitude of the surface layer with distinct phytoplankton discontinuities.

  14. Estimation of the penetration effects of the Ka-band radar signal into the Arctic sea ice snowpack.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Kévin; Fleury, Sara; Kouraev, Alexei; Rémy, Frédérique; Zakharova, Elena; Blumstein, Denis

    2015-04-01

    In the context of quantifying Arctic sea ice volume at global scale, altimetry provides a unique tool to estimate sea ice thickness through the freeboard method that mainly consists in evaluating the thickness of emerged sea ice. Most of the altimeters employed to retrieve sea ice thickness operate at Ku-band frequency (13.6 Ghz). Over Arctic sea ice and at this frequency, the radar signal is only slightly affected by scattering and absorbtion due to the presence of snow over the ice. Therefore, it is commonly admitted that most of the return echo comes from the ice surface. Launched in February 2013, the Saral-AltiKa mission carries a Ka-band (36.5 Ghz) altimeter that is a great opportunity to expand the study of sea ice thickness. However, unlike the Ku-band operating systems, most of the Ka-band signal does not reach the sea ice surface and is scattered by overlying snow layers. For this reason and in order to obtain the best estimate of sea ice thickness with Ka-band radar, it is crucial to evaluate the bias due to penetration of the radar signal into the snowpack at this frequency. We combine both Ku and Ka band radar observations to study the influence of radar penetration into the snow and estimate the extinction coefficient over Arctic sea ice. Our results are of the same order of magnitude of what is found in Antarctica. This research has been done in the framework of CNES TOSCA SICKays and IDEX Transversalité InHERA projects.

  15. Effects of Cross-axis Wind Jet Events on the Northern Red Sea Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V. V.; Bower, A. S.; Farrar, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Despite its small size, the Red Sea has a complex circulation. There are boundary currents in both sides of the basin, a meridional overturning circulation, water mass formation in the northern part and an intense eddy activity. This complex pattern is driven by strong air-sea interactions. The Red Sea has one of the largest evaporation rates of the global oceans (2m/yr), an intricate and seasonally varying wind pattern. The winds blowing over the Northern Rea Sea (NRS, north of 20N) are predominantly southeastward along the main axis all year round; in the southern, they reverse seasonally due to the monsoonal regime. Although the winds are mostly along-axis in the NRS, several works have shown that sometimes during the boreal winter, the winds blow in a cross-axis direction. The westward winds from Saudi Arabia bring relatively cold dry air and dust from the desert, enhancing heat loss and evaporation off the Red Sea. These wind-jet events may contribute to increased eddy activity and are a trigger for water mass formation. Despite that, our knowledge about the cross-axis winds and their effect on NRS circulation is still incipient. In the present work we analyze 10-years of Quikscat scatterometer winds and altimetric sea surface height anomalies, together with 2-yrs of mooring data, to characterize the westward wind jet events and their impacts on the circulation. We show that the cross-axis winds are, indeed, an important component of the wind regime, explaining 11% of wind variability of the NRS (well-described by a 2nd EOF mode). The westward events occur predominantly in the winter, preferentially in January (about 15 events in 10-years) and have a mean duration of 4-5 days, with a maximum of 12 days (north of 22N). There are around 6 events per year, but in 2002-2003 and 2007-2008, twice more events were detected. The westward wind events are found to strongly modify the wind stress curl, causing a distinct positive/negative curl pattern along the main axis

  16. Effects of recent decreases in arctic sea ice on an ice-associated marine bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoky, George J.; Lukacs, Paul M.; Druckenmiller, Matthew L.

    2015-08-01

    Recent major reductions in summer arctic sea ice extent could be expected to be affecting the distributions and life histories of arctic marine biota adapted to living adjacent to sea ice. Of major concern are the effects of ice reductions, and associated increasing SST, on the most abundant forage fish in the Arctic, Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), the primary prey for the region's upper trophic level marine predators. The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) is an ice-obligate diving seabird specializing in feeding on Arctic cod and has been studied annually since 1975 at a breeding colony in the western Beaufort Sea. The data set is one of the few allowing assessment of the response of an upper trophic marine predator to recent decadal changes in the region's cryosphere. Analysis of oceanographic conditions north of the colony from 1975 to 2012 for the annual period when parents provision young (mid-July to early September), found no major regime shifts in ice extent or SST until the late 1990s with major decreases in ice and increases in SST in the first decade of the 21st Century. We examined decadal variation in late summer oceanographic conditions, nestling diet and success, and overwinter adult survival, comparing a historical period (1975-1984) with a recent (2003-2012) one. In the historical period sea ice retreated an average of 1.8 km per day from 15 July to 1 September to an average distance of 95.8 km from the colony, while in the recent period ice retreat averaged 9.8 km per day to an average distance of 506.9 km for the same time period. SST adjacent to the island increased an average of 2.9 °C between the two periods. While Arctic cod comprised over 95% of the prey provided to nestlings in the historical period, in the recent period 80% of the years had seasonal decreases, with Arctic cod decreasing to <5% of the nestling diet, and nearshore demersals, primarily sculpin (Cottidae), comprising the majority of the diet. A five-fold increase in

  17. Activity of R(+) limonene on the maximum growth rate of fish spoilage organisms and related effects on shelf-life prolongation of fresh gilthead sea bream fillets.

    PubMed

    Giarratana, Filippo; Muscolino, Daniele; Beninati, Chiara; Ziino, Graziella; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Panebianco, Antonio

    2016-11-21

    R(+)limonene (LMN) is the major aromatic compound in essential oils obtained from oranges, grapefruits, and lemons. The improvement of preservation techniques to reduce the growth and activity of spoilage microorganisms in foods is crucial to increase their shelf life and to reduce the losses due to spoilage. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of LMN on the shelf life of fish fillets. Its effectiveness was preliminarily investigated in vitro against 60 strains of Specific Spoilage Organisms (SSOs) and then on gilt-head sea bream fillets stored at 2±0.5°C for 15days under vacuum. LMN showed a good inhibitory effect against tested SSOs strains. On gilt-head sea bream fillets, LMN inhibited the growth SSOs effectively, and its use resulted in a shelf-life extension of ca. 6-9days of treated fillets, compared to the control samples. The LMN addition in Sparus aurata fillets giving a distinctive smell and like-lemon taste to fish fillets that resulted pleasant to panellists. Its use contributed to a considerable reduction of fish spoilage given that the fillets treated with LMN were still sensory acceptable after 15days of storage. LMN may be used as an effective antimicrobial system to reduce the microbial growth and to improve the shelf life of fresh gilt-head sea bream fillets.

  18. Effects of surface current-wind interaction in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation simulation of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Heiner; Löptien, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Deoxygenation in the Baltic Sea endangers fish yields and favours noxious algal blooms. Yet, vertical transport processes ventilating the oxygen-deprived waters at depth and replenishing nutrient-deprived surface waters (thereby fuelling export of organic matter to depth) are not comprehensively understood. Here, we investigate the effects of the interaction between surface currents and winds on upwelling in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation model of the Baltic Sea. Contrary to expectations we find that accounting for current-wind effects inhibits the overall vertical exchange between oxygenated surface waters and oxygen-deprived water at depth. At major upwelling sites, however (e.g. off the southern coast of Sweden and Finland) the reverse holds: the interaction between topographically steered surface currents with winds blowing over the sea results in a climatological sea surface temperature cooling of 0.5 K. This implies that current-wind effects drive substantial local upwelling of cold and nutrient-replete waters.

  19. Proceedings of a workshop on cetaceans and sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico: study planning for effects of Outer Continental Shelf development

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.E.; Adams, J.K.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to assemble scientists knowledgeable about cetaceans, sea turtles, and the Gulf of Mexico to discuss the potential impacts of offshore oil and gas development on these animals and make recommendations for future research. The workshop began with brief presentations about the environment of the Gulf of Mexico and the cetaceans and sea turtles found there, and a review of petroleum effects on these animals. The following points were then discussed: (1) ways in which cetaceans and sea turtles have been or could be affected, either directly or indirectly by activities and events associated with offshore oil and gas development were identified; (2) the types and specificity of data needed to predict, detect, and mitigate possible adverse effects were identified; (3) the advantages and disadvatages of various methods that might be used to obtain needed data were discussed; and (4) specific research and monitoring programs that would be required to obtain needed data, including the necessary expertise, level of effort, equipment, and facilities were identified.

  20. Foehn-induced effects on local dust pollution, frontal clouds and solar radiation in the Dead Sea valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Starobinets, Boris; Savir, Amit; Alpert, Pinhas; Kaplan, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Despite the long history of investigation of foehn phenomena, there are few studies of the influence of foehn winds on air pollution and none in the Dead Sea valley. For the first time the foehn phenomenon and its effects on local dust pollution, frontal cloudiness and surface solar radiation were analyzed in the Dead Sea valley, as it occurred on 22 March 2013. This was carried out using both numerical simulations and observations. The foehn winds intensified local dust emissions, while the foehn-induced temperature inversion trapped dust particles beneath this inversion. These two factors caused extreme surface dust concentration in the western Dead Sea valley. The dust pollution was transported by west winds eastward, to the central Dead Sea valley, where the speed of these winds sharply decreased. The transported dust was captured by the ascending airflow contributing to the maximum aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the central Dead Sea valley. On the day under study, the maximum surface dust concentration did not coincide with the maximum AOD: this being one of the specific effects of the foehn phenomenon on dust pollution in the Dead Sea valley. Radar data showed a passage of frontal cloudiness through the area of the Dead Sea valley leading to a sharp drop in noon solar radiation. The descending airflow over the downwind side of the Judean Mountains led to the formation of a cloud-free band followed by only the partial recovery of solar radiation because of the extreme dust pollution caused by foehn winds.

  1. Impact of the Inverse Barometer Effect on Iceberg Drift in the Ross Sea Region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, I. D.

    2006-12-01

    The Inverse Barometer Effect (IBE) has been observed since the 19^{th} century, first by Sir James Clark Ross [Wunsch and Stammer, 1997], as deviations in sea-surface elevation in response to deviations in atmospheric pressure. This effect is expressed by the formula η=-Δ p/(ρo× g), in which η represents the deviation in sea-surface height, Δ p is the deviation in atmospheric pressure, ρo is the ocean water density, and g is the gravitational acceleration. It has been hypothesized that icebergs in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica are influenced by the same forces that create the IBE. This hypothesis is supported by studies of icebergs in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, where drift data suggest that icebergs are drawn into temporary holding zones, or "iceberg graveyards" situated where the atmosphere tends to have persistent (annual average) low pressure. A physical explanation for the IBE influence on icebergs is that they are able to travel up the sea-surface slope induced by the IBE below atmospheric lows against the gravitational pull because of the pressure gradient force acting on the iceberg's freeboard (the part that is above the waterline). Here, I evaluate the validity of the hypothesized iceberg/IBE relationship using a numerical model of iceberg drift. I have run several experiments to determine how much influence the IBE would have on the movement of an iceberg the shape of B15A, as opposed to the influence wielded by the other major forces acting on the iceberg such as wind and ocean drag, and the Coriolis force. I have for now approached this problem from a theoretical standpoint, building models that employ geostrophic and Ekman approximations to create a wind and ocean current field, and I have placed the iceberg in a variety of pressure fields with one to multiple stationary or moving low pressure systems of varying or constant intensity. If time permits, I shall attempt to evaluate the effects of recorded wind data and use an actual mean

  2. Combined effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation on sea surface temperature in the Alborán Sea.

    PubMed

    Báez, José C; Gimeno, Luis; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco; Real, Raimundo

    2013-01-01

    We explored the possible effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) on interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the Alborán Sea, both separately and combined. The probability of observing mean annual SST values higher than average was related to NAO and AO values of the previous year. The effect of NAO on SST was negative, while that of AO was positive. The pure effects of NAO and AO on SST are obscuring each other, due to the positive correlation between them. When decomposing SST, NAO and AO in seasonal values, we found that variation in mean annual SST and mean winter SST was significantly related to the mean autumn NAO of the previous year, while mean summer SST was related to mean autumn AO of the previous year. The one year delay in the effect of the NAO and AO on the SST could be partially related to the amount of accumulated snow, as we found a significant correlation between the total snow in the North Alborán watershed for a year with the annual average SST of the subsequent year. A positive AO implies a colder atmosphere in the Polar Regions, which could favour occasional cold waves over the Iberian Peninsula which, when coupled with precipitations favoured by a negative NAO, may result in snow precipitation. This snow may be accumulated in the high peaks and melt down in spring-summer of the following year, which consequently increases the runoff of freshwater to the sea, which in turn causes a diminution of sea surface salinity and density, and blocks the local upwelling of colder water, resulting in a higher SST.

  3. Abundance of small individuals influences the effectiveness of processing techniques for deep-sea nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, D.; Probert, P. K.; Berkenbusch, K.; Nodder, S. D.; Pilditch, C. A.

    2010-10-01

    Nematodes are the most abundant metazoans of deep-sea benthic communities, but knowledge of their distribution is limited relative to larger organisms. Whilst some aspects of nematode processing techniques, such as extraction, have been extensively studied, other key elements have attracted little attention. We compared the effect of (1) mesh size (63, 45, and 32 μm) on estimates of nematode abundance, biomass, and body size, and (2) microscope magnification (50× and 100×) on estimates of nematode abundance at bathyal sites (250-3100 m water depth) on the Challenger Plateau and Chatham Rise, south-west Pacific Ocean. Variation in the effectiveness of these techniques was assessed in relation to nematode body size and environmental parameters (water depth, sediment organic matter content, %silt/clay, and chloroplastic pigments). The 63-μm mesh retained a relatively low proportion of total nematode abundance (mean±SD=55±9%), but most of nematode biomass (90±4%). The proportion of nematode abundance retained on the 45-μm mesh in surface (0-1 cm) and subsurface (1-5 cm) sediment was significantly correlated ( P<0.01) with %silt/clay ( R2=0.39) and chloroplastic pigments ( R2=0.29), respectively. Variation in median nematode body weight showed similar trends, but relationships between mean nematode body weight and environmental parameters were either relatively weak (subsurface sediment) or not significant (surface sediment). Using a low magnification led to significantly lower (on average by 43%) nematode abundance estimates relative to high magnification ( P<0.001), and the magnitude of this difference was significantly correlated ( P<0.05) with total nematode abundance ( R2p=0.53) and the number of small (≤250 μm length) individuals ( R2p=0.05). Our results suggest that organic matter input and sediment characteristics influence the abundance of small nematodes in bathyal communities. The abundance of small individuals can, in turn, influence abundance

  4. Inhibitory effects of sea buckthorn procyanidins on fatty acid synthase and MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Nie, Fangyuan; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is overexpressed in many human cancers including breast cancer and is considered to be a promising target for therapy. Sea buckthorn has long been used to treat a variety of maladies. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of sea buckthorn procyanidins (SBPs) isolated from the seeds of sea buckthorn on FAS and FAS overexpressed human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. The FAS activity and FAS inhibition were measured by a spectrophotometer at 340 nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) absorption. We found that SBP potently inhibited the activity of FAS with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.087 μg/ml. 3-4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,3-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to test the cell viability. SBP reduced MDA-MB-231 cell viability with an IC50 value of 37.5 μg/ml. Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide dual staining and flow cytometric analysis showed that SBP induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis. SBP inhibited intracellular FAS activity with a dose-dependent manner. In addition, sodium palmitate could rescue the cell apoptosis induced by SBP. These results showed that SBP was a promising FAS inhibitor which could induce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via inhibiting FAS. These findings suggested that SBP might be useful for preventing or treating breast cancer.

  5. Effect of regulation of the Nile River on the bioproductivity of Southeastern Mediterranean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wadia, W.

    1982-01-01

    The Nile River previously brought a large quantity of dissolved nutrients and organic matter into the Southeastern Mediterranean Sea. Since completion of the Aswan hydrocomplex, reduction in the river flow has caused significant change in the distribution of the physico-chemical indices of the sea water as well as in the formation and distribution of the water masses in the region located north of the Nile delta. In recent years changes have been recorded in the dynamics and distribution of water temperature. From 1966 the sediment runoff of the Nile began dropping sharply due not only to reduction in the volume of river water reaching the sea, but also due to a significant reduction in the suspended particles in the flow. This has had a harmful effect on the formation and dynamics of grounds and banks near the delta and north of it. The reproduction of the shrimp in the area has changed significantly in timing and the food supplies for the young shrimp have deteriorated. Shrimp catches in 1966 were half what they had been in 1963. Commercial fishes have also decreased in numbers. Thus all links of the trophic chain have been affected from the phytoplankton to the pelagic and benthic fishes. 11 references, 3 tables.

  6. Spontaneous generation of reactive oxygen species and effect on motility and fertilizability of sea urchin spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Makoto; Sato, Taizo; Hino, Akiya

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by spermatozoa in two species of sea urchin. ROS generation was accompanied by the initiation of motility and respiration and influenced the motility and fertilizability of spermatozoa. The sea urchin performs external fertilization in aerobic seawater. Sperm motility was initiated after spawning through Na+/H+ exchange. ROS generation was dependent on the respiration and sperm concentration and its generation was first observed at initiation of motility, via activation of respiration through ATP/ADP transport. The ROS generation rate increased at higher dilution ratios of spermatozoa, in a manner that was synchronous with the respiratory rate. This phenomenon resembled the previously defined 'sperm dilution effect' on respiration. The loss of motility and fertilizability was induced not only by treatment with hydrogen peroxide but also by sperm dilution. Storage of spermatozoa with a higher dilution ratio also accelerated the decrease in fertilizability. Thus, optimum sea urchin fertilizability is maintained by storage of undiluted spermatozoa on ice, in order to minimize oxidative stress and to maximize longevity.

  7. The effects of dietary lead on growth, bioaccumulation and antioxidant capacity in sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ren, Tongjun; Han, Yuzhe; Zhao, Yang; Liao, Mingling; Wang, Fuqiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang

    2015-09-01

    Three different diets amended with lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] (100, 500 and 1000mg Pb/kg dry weight) and a Pb-free control diet (1.03mg Pb/kg dry weight) were fed to sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) for 30 days. The patterns of Pb accumulation over time were determined in various tissues (body wall, intestine and respiratory tree), as well as growth performance and antioxidant enzymes activities. Pb accumulation in body wall and intestine increased with time in all dietary Pb treatments. When fed the highest Pb diet, the body wall exhibited the greatest Pb burden (16.37mg Pb/kg tissue wet weight), while Pb content in the intestine (2.68mg Pb/kg tissue wet weight) and the respiratory tree (1.78mg Pb/kg tissue wet weight) were lower than Pb content in the body wall by day 30. The body weight gain (BWG), specific growth rate (SGR) and survival rate (SR) had not been affected by 30 days oral administration of Pb supplemented diet. However, the antioxidant enzymes activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)] of test groups were lower than control group in body wall and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the body wall was opposite after 30 days in sea cucumbers. In summary, this work reports toxic effects in sea cucumber, A. japonicus, after dietary exposure to Pb.

  8. Cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel: effects of wind on snow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, Hannu

    2015-08-01

    Wintertime cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel or a long lake can become destructive if the related bands of heavy snowfall hit onto land. The forcing for such bands is studied with a 2D numerical model set across an east-west sea channel at 60oN (`Gulf of Finland'), varying the basic geostrophic wind V g. Without any V g opposite coastal land breezes emerge with convergence. This results in a quasi-steady rising motion w max ~ 7.5 cm/s at 600 m in the middle of the gulf, which can force a snow band. During weak V g, the rising motion is reduced but least so for winds from 60o to 80o (~ENE), when modest alongshore bands could exist near the downstream (Estonian) coast. During V g of 4-6 m/s from any direction, the land breezes and rising motions are reduced more effectively, so snow bands are not expected during moderate basic flow. In contrast, during a strong V g of 20-25 m/s from 110o to 120o (~ESE) the land breeze perturbations are intense with w max up to 15-18 cm/s. The induced alongshore bands of heavy snowfall are located in these cases at the sea but quite close to the downstream (Finnish) coast. They can suddenly make a landfall if the basic wind turns clockwise.

  9. Experimental Sea Slicks in the Marsen (Maritime Remote Sensing) Exercise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-30

    Experimental slicks with various surface properties were generated in the North Sea as part of the MARSEN (Maritime Remote Sensing ) exercise. The one...with remote sensing instrumentation. Because of the numerous effects of surface films on air-sea interfacial processes, these experiments were designed...information was obtained on the influence of sea surface films on the interpretation of signals received by remote sensing systems. Criteria for the

  10. Indirect effects of sea otters on rockfish (Sebastes spp.) in giant kelp forests.

    PubMed

    Markel, Russell W; Shurin, Jonathan B

    2015-11-01

    Sea otters are a classic example of a predator controlling ecosystem productivity through cascading effects on basal, habitat-forming kelp species. However, their indirect effects on other kelp-associated taxa like fishes are poorly understood. We examined the effects of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) reintroduction along the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada on giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) distributions and the trophic niches and growth of two common kelp forest fishes, black (Sebastes melanops) and copper (S. caurinus) rockfishes. We sampled 47 kelp forests, and found that red sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) were eliminated in the presence of otters, and that kelp forests were 3.7 times deeper and 18.8 times larger. Despite order-of-magnitude differences in kelp forest size, adult black and copper rockfishes contained less kelp-derived carbon in their tissues (as measured by stable isotopes of C and N) in regions with otters. Adults of both species had higher mean trophic positions in the presence of otters, indicating more frequent consumption of higher trophic level prey such as fishes. Smaller trophic niche space of rockfishes in the presence of otters indicated a higher degree of trophic specialization. Juvenile black rockfishes rapidly shifted to higher kelp-carbon contents, trophic positions, and body condition factors after settling in kelp forests. The relationships of growth to length, percentage of kelp carbon, and trophic position varied between the two regions, indicating that potential effects of kelp forest size on trophic ontogeny may also affect individual performance. Our results provide evidence that the indirect effects of otters on rockfishes arise largely through the creation of habitat for fishes and other prey rather than a direct trophic connection through invertebrates or other consumers of kelp productivity.

  11. Evaluating the Joint Effect of Sea Level and Wind Waves to Predict Extreme Coastal Flooding Risks in the Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijala, U.; Bjorkqvist, J. V.; Kahma, K. K.; Pellikka, H.; Johansson, M. M.; Särkkä, J.

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation of coastal flooding risks has a crucial role in supporting secure planning, building and operation of densely populated and vulnerable coastal areas. Global mean sea level rise predictions together with past short-term sea level variability form the basis of the sea level projections and flooding probabilities for the future. However, the coastal effect of the sea level is also affected by the wave conditions. Coastal wave height may vary significantly locally as the wave field is affected by the islands, shape of the shoreline and topography of the seabed. In this study, we present a method to combine sea level events with wind-generated waves by using a method based on location-specific probability distributions. Our outcome gives an estimate for the maximum wave crest elevation at a steep shore during a storm surge. Simply summing the maximum sea level and maximum wave height components together might result in an overestimation of the joint effect, thus a method based on probability distributions is sensible. The wave statistics of our study are constructed of individual wave buoy measurements conducted during 2012-2014 at multiple sites outside Helsinki, the capital of Finland, which is located on the coast of the Gulf of Finland in the Baltic Sea. An estimate of short-term sea level variability is based on the last 30 years (1986-2015) of hourly data from the Helsinki tide gauge. Predictions for the future long-term mean sea level changes at Helsinki are based on scenarios including the most recent knowledge of the global mean sea level rise, local land uplift, and changes in the total water amount in the Baltic Sea. The method developed in this study gives a new tool for evaluating utmost coastal flood events by combining sea level with the wave height information. The method can be used to evaluate risk levels of different coastal infrastructure and can be applied to any coastal areas where adequate sea level and wave data are available.

  12. Quantifying the impact of basin dynamics on the regional sea level rise in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubryakov, Arseny A.; Stanichny, Sergey V.; Volkov, Denis L.

    2017-06-01

    Satellite altimetry measurements show that the magnitude of the Black Sea sea level trends is spatially uneven. While the basin-mean sea level rise from 1993 to 2014 was about 3.15 mm yr-1, the local rates of sea level rise varied from 1.5-2.5 mm yr-1 in the central part to 3.5-3.8 mm yr-1 at the basin periphery and over the northwestern shelf and to 5 mm yr-1 in the southeastern part of the sea. We show that the observed spatial differences in the dynamic sea level (anomaly relative to the basin-mean) are caused by changes in the large- and mesoscale dynamics of the Black Sea. First, a long-term intensification of the cyclonic wind curl over the Black Sea, observed in 1993-2014, strengthened divergence in the center of the basin and led to the rise of the sea level in coastal and shelf areas and a lowering in the basin's interior. Second, an extension of the Batumi anticyclone to the west resulted in ˜ 1.2 mm yr-1 higher rates of sea level rise in the southeastern part of the sea. Further, we demonstrate that the large-scale dynamic sea level variability in the Black Sea can be successfully reconstructed using the wind curl obtained from an atmospheric reanalysis. This allows for the correction of historical tide gauge records for dynamic effects in order to derive more accurate estimates of the basin-mean sea level change in the past, prior to the satellite altimetry era.

  13. The Effect of Changes in Polar Sea Ice on Emissions of Marine Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrai, P.; Gabric, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud radiative effects remain a major weakness in our understanding of the climate system and consequently in developing accurate climate projections. This is mainly true for Arctic low-level clouds in their key role of regulating surface energy fluxes which affect the freezing and melting of sea ice. The radiative properties of clouds are strongly dependent on the number concentration of airborne water-soluble particles, known as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In the Arctic, the aerosol-cloud-radiation relationship is more complex than elsewhere and the clouds constitute a warming factor for climate, rather than cooling, most of the year. This is due to the semi-permanent ice cover, which raises the albedo of the surface, and the clean Arctic air, which decreases the albedo of the clouds. There has been much discussion on the relative magnitude of the biogenic source of polar CCN: Primary organic marine aerosols and/or sulfate-containing aerosols, derived from marine emissions. Regional field measurements and pan- (Ant)Arctic model simulations don't necessarily agree. Arctic CCN are formed primarily by aggregates of marine organic material and may grow in mass by condensation. Southern Ocean aerosols may be dominated by sulfate particles and organic particles at lower and higher Antarctic latitudes, respectively. The interaction of polar marine microorganisms, seasonality, sea ice cover, presence or absence of sea spray, and atmospheric heterogeneous processes combine to control natural aerosol concentrations and mass, thus modulating the sensitivity of cloud properties, including their reflectivity and the resulting regional radiation budget. We discuss Arctic and Antarctic field and satellite observations and establish a strong and fundamental link between the biology at the ocean/sea ice interface, clouds and climate over polar regions.

  14. Modelling climate change effects on benthos: Distributional shifts in the North Sea from 2001 to 2099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Michael; Mathis, Moritz; Kröncke, Ingrid; Neumann, Hermann; Pohlmann, Thomas; Reiss, Henning

    2016-06-01

    In the marine realm, climate change can affect a variety of physico-chemical properties with wide-ranging biological effects, but the knowledge of how climate change affects benthic distributions is limited and mainly restricted to coastal environments. To project the response of benthic species of a shelf sea (North Sea) to the expected climate change, the distributions of 75 marine benthic species were modelled and the spatial changes in distribution were projected for 2099 based on modelled bottom temperature and salinity changes using the IPCC scenario A1B. Mean bottom temperature was projected to increase between 0.15 and 5.4 °C, while mean bottom salinity was projected to moderately increase by 1.7. The spatial changes in species distribution were modelled with Maxent and the direction and extent of these changes were assessed. The results showed a latitudinal northward shift for 64% of the species (maximum 109 km; brittle star Ophiothrix fragilis) and a southward shift for 36% (maximum 101 km; hermit crab Pagurus prideaux and the associated cloak anemone Adamsia carciniopados; 105 km). The relatively low rates of distributional shifts compared to fish or plankton species were probably influenced by the regional topography. The environmental gradients in the central North Sea along the 50 m depth contour might act as a 'barrier', possibly resulting in a compression of distribution range and hampering further shifts to the north. For 49 species this resulted in a habitat loss up to 100%, while only 11 species could benefit from the warming in terms of habitat gain. Particularly the benthic communities of the southern North Sea, where the strongest temperature increase was projected, would be strongly affected by the distributional changes, since key species showed northward shifts and high rates of habitat loss, with potential ramifications for the functioning of the ecosystem.

  15. Effects of environmental enrichment on reproductive performance and quantity and morphology of cumulus-oocyte complexes obtained from Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Joana; Oliveira, Iáskara Vieira de; Fank, Juliana; Paim, Lia Mara Gomes; Zandoná, Marília Remuzzi; Lopes, Eliana Franco; Mello, Fernanda Bastos de; Oliveira, Alexandre Tavares Duarte de

    2017-05-01

    Several researchers have observed that environmental enrichment (EE) can be effective in reducing stressful conditions and abnormal behavior and may provide better reproductive performance in rodents. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the reproductive performance of Wistar rats reared in three different housing conditions. Animals were separated into breeding pairs, one pair per cage and pairs randomly assigned to three experimental groups (ten couples per group): control group were provided cages without any environmental enrichment; PVC group with PVC pipe; and cardboard roll group with a commercially available cardboard tube. To compare the reproductive performance of the three groups, the following were evaluated: number of pups/litter; number of litters; parturition interval; occurrence of cannibalism; weight gain of offspring; as well as the quantity and quality of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) obtained after superovulation of the females born from the first, second and last pregnancy in all groups. Moreover, the plasma level of corticosterone in breeding animals was measured. A total of 60 male rats randomly selected from the first- and last-born litters (20 males from each group) were first tested in an elevated plus-maze (EPM) and on the following day, were tested in an open field test (OFT). Significant differences were found in the number and morphological classification of COCs. In the control group, the number of oocytes in grade 4 (unusual shapes and very heterogeneous ooplasm, presenting no layers of surrounding cumulus cells [13]) presented statistically higher rates (225/2535, 8.9%) compared to the other groups, as well as the number of competent oocytes was higher in the enriched groups (p = 0.001). Moreover, we find that the males of cardboard roll group differed significantly in weight gain compared to PVC group (p = 0.008). In addition to this, we did not detect occurrence of cannibalism in this group. Our findings suggest

  16. The effects of time compositing on obtaining clear-sky coverage for infrared temperature and moisture profiling from geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Shenk, W.E. ); Hope, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    The impact of time compositing on infrared profiling from geosynchronous orbit was evaluated for two convective outbreak cases. Time compositing is the accumulation of the data from several successive images taken at short intervals to provide a single field of measurements with the temporal resolution equal to the time to take all of the images. This is especially effective when the variability of the measurement is slow compared to the image interval. Time compositing should be able to reduce the interference of clouds for infrared measurements since clouds move and change. The convective outbreak cases were on 4 and 21 May 1990 over the eastern Midwest and southeastern United States, respectively. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite imagery was used to outline clear areas at hour intervals by two independent analysts. Time compositing was done every 3 h (1330-1530 UTC; 1630-1830 UTC) and over the full 5-h period. For both cases, a significant increase in coverage was measured with each 3-h compositing (about a factor of 2) and a further increase over the full period (approximately a factor of 3). The increase was especially useful in areas of broken cloud cover where large gaps between potential profiling areas on each image were reduced. To provide information on measurement variability over local areas, the regions where the clear-area analyses were done subdivided into 0.5[degrees] latitude-longitude boxes, and if some portion of each box was clear, it was assumed that at least one profile could be obtained within the box. In the largest clear areas, at least some portion was clear every hour. Even in the cloudier regions, multiple clear looks possible during the entire period. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Human impacts overwhelm the effects of sea-level rise on Basque coastal habitats (N Spain) between 1954 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chust, Guillem; Borja, Ángel; Liria, Pedro; Galparsoro, Ibon; Marcos, Marta; Caballero, Ainhoa; Castro, Raúl

    2009-10-01

    According to coastal measurements, global mean sea-level has risen at a rate of 1.8 mm yr -1 between 1950 and 2000, with large spatial variability at regional scales. Within the Bay of Biscay, trends computed from coastal tide gauges records have revealed that sea-level rise is accelerating over this period of time; this is in agreement with rates obtained from satellite imagery in the open ocean since 1993. The objectives of the present study are: (1) to assess the evidence of the relative sea-level rise on coastal morphology and habitats in the Gipuzkoan littoral zone (Basque coast, northern Spain) for the period 1954-2004, and (2) to evaluate the relative contribution of local anthropogenic versus sea-level rise impacts for explaining inter-supratidal habitat changes. A high-resolution airborne laser altimetry data (LIDAR) has been used to derive a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of 15-cm vertical resolution. Coastal habitats were mapped for two periods, using historic airborne photography (1954) and high-resolution imagery (2004). Analysis of tide gauge records from Santander (northern Spain) has revealed that relative mean sea-level has been rising at a rate of 2.08 ± 0.33 mm yr -1 from 1943 to 2004; this is consistent with sea-level trends from other measurements within the area (St. Jean de Luz and Bilbao), obtained over shorter periods of time, and with previous results obtained in the Bay of Biscay. Based upon this sea-level trend and by means of a LIDAR-based DTM, the results have indicated that the predicted change along the Gipuzkoan coast due to sea-level rise was of 11.1 ha within the 50-yr period. In contrast, comparison of historical and recent orthophotography has detected only 2.95 ha of change, originated possibly from sea-level rise, and 98 ha transformed by anthropogenic impacts. Hence, coastal changes due to sea-level rise might be overwhelmed by excessive human impacts, at the spatial and temporal scales of the analysis. This work highlights

  18. Effects of dendritic core-shell glycoarchitectures on primary mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts obtained from different human donors.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Stefan; Striegler, Christin; Dakischew, Olga; Schütz, Iris; Szalay, Gabor; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiß, Christian; Appelhans, Dietmar; Lips, Katrin S

    2015-10-08

    The biological impact of novel nano-scaled drug delivery vehicles in highly topical therapies of bone diseases have to be investigated in vitro before starting in vivo trials. Highly desired features for these materials are a good cellular uptake, large transport capacity for drugs and a good bio-compatibility. Essentially the latter has to be addressed as first point on the agenda. We present a study on the biological interaction of maltose-modified poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI-Mal) on primary human mesenchymal stem cell, harvested from reaming debris (rdMSC) and osteoblasts obtained from four different male donors. PEI-Mal-nanoparticles with two different molecular weights of the PEI core (5000 g/mol for PEI-5k-Mal-B and 25,000 g/mol for PEI-25k-Mal-B) have been administered to both cell lines. As well dose as incubation-time dependent effects and interactions have been researched for concentrations between 1 μg/ml to 1 mg/ml and periods of 24 h up to 28 days. Studies conducted by different methods of microscopy as light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission-electron-microscopy and quantitative assays (LDH and DC-protein) indicate as well a good cellular uptake of the nanoparticles as a particle- and concentration-dependent impact on the cellular macro- and micro-structure of the rdMSC samples. In all experiments PEI-5k-Mal-B exhibits a superior biocompatibility compared to PEI-25k-Mal-B. At higher concentrations PEI-25k-Mal-B is toxic and induces a directly observable mitochondrial damage. The alkaline phosphatase assay (ALP), has been conducted to check on the possible influence of nanoparticles on the differentiation capabilities of rdMSC to osteoblasts. In addition the production of mineralized matrix has been shown by von-Kossa stained samples. No influence of the nanoparticles on the ALP per cell has been detected. Additionally, for all experiments, results are strongly influenced by a large donor-to-donor variability of the four different rd

  19. Effects of deep-water coral banks on the abundance and size structure of the megafauna in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onghia, G.; Maiorano, P.; Sion, L.; Giove, A.; Capezzuto, F.; Carlucci, R.; Tursi, A.

    2010-03-01

    The Santa Maria di Leuca (SML) coral banks represent a rare example of living Lophelia-Madrepora-bearing coral mounds in the Mediterranean Sea. They are located between 350 and 1100 m in depth, in the northern Ionian Sea (eastern-central Mediterranean). Using a multi-beam echo sounder, side-scan sonar, high-resolution seismics and underwater video, the zones were identified for the sampling demersal fauna without damaging the coral colonies. During September-October 2005 experimental samplings were carried out with longlines and trawl nets inside the coral habitat and outside, where fishery exploitation occurs. No significant differences were shown between the abundance of fish recorded using longlines in the coral and non-coral habitat even though some selachians and teleosts were more abundant in the former than in the latter. Large specimens of rockfish ( Helicolenus dactylopterus) and blackspot seabream ( Pagellus bogaraveo) were commonly caught using longlines in the coral habitat. Data from trawling revealed refuge effects in the coral habitat and fishing effects outside. Significant differences were detected between the recorded abundances in the two study areas. Greater densities and biomasses were obtained inside the coral area, and fish size spectra and size distributions indicate a greater abundance of large fish inside the coral habitat. The SML coral habitat is a spawning area for H. dactylopterus. The remarkable density of the young-of-the-year of the deep-water shark Etmopterus spinax as well as of Merluccius merluccius, Micromesistius poutassou, Phycis blennoides and H. dactylopterus, indicates that the coral habitat also acts as nursery area for these demersal species, which are exploited outside. Considering the evidence of the negative impact of bottom trawling and, to a lesser extent, of longlining, the coral banks can provide a refuge for the conservation of unique species and habitats as well as in providing benefit to adjacent fisheries

  20. Potential adverse health effects of persistent organic pollutants on sea turtles: evidences from a cross-sectional study on Cape Verde loggerhead sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Camacho, María; Luzardo, Octavio P; Boada, Luis D; López Jurado, Luis F; Medina, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Orós, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    The Cape Verde nesting population of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) is the third largest population of this species in the world. For conservation purposes, it is essential to determine how these reptiles respond to different types of anthropogenic contaminants. We evaluated the presence of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the plasma of adult nesting loggerheads from Boa Vista Island, Cape Verde, and studied the effects of the contaminants on the health status of the turtles using hematological and biochemical parameters. All turtles had detectable levels of non-dioxin like PCBs, whereas dioxin-like congeners (DL-PCBs) were detected in only 30% of the turtles. Packed cell volume decreased with higher concentrations of PCBs, which suggests that PCB exposure could result in anemia in sea turtles. In addition, a negative association between some OCPs and white blood cells (WBC) and thrombocyte estimate was noted. The DDT-metabolite, p,p'-DDE was negatively correlated with the Na/K ratio and, additionally, a number of correlations between certain PAHs and electrolyte balances were found, which suggest that exposure to these environmental contaminants could affect the kidneys and salt glands in sea turtles. Additionally, several correlations were observed between these environmental pollutants (OCPs and PAHs) and enzyme activity (GGT, ALT, ALP and amylase) and serum protein levels, pointing to the possibility that these contaminants could induce adverse metabolic effects in sea turtles. Our results indicate that anthropogenic pollutants are present in the Cape Verde loggerhead turtle nesting population and could exert negative effects on several health parameters. Because of the importance of this loggerhead nesting population, protective regulations at national and international levels as well as international action are necessary for assuring the conservation of this population.

  1. Steep Gravel Bedload Rating Curves Obtained From Bedload Traps Shift Effective Discharge to Flows Much Higher Than "Bankfull"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Swingle, K. W.; Abt, S. R.; Cenderelli, D.

    2012-12-01

    Effective discharge (Qeff) is defined as the flow at which the product of flow frequency and bedload transport rates obtains its maximum. Qeff is often reported to correspond with bankfull flow (Qbf), where Qeff approximates the 1.5 year recurrence interval flow (Q1.5). Because it transports the majority of all bedload, Qeff is considered a design flow for stream restoration and flow management. This study investigates the relationship between Qeff and Q1.5 for gravel bedload in high elevation Rocky Mountain streams. Both the flow frequency distribution (FQ = a × Qbin-b) where Qbin is the flow class, and the bedload transport rating curve (QB = c × Qd) can be described by power functions. The product FQ × QB = (a × c × Q(-b + d)) is positive if d + -b >0, and negative if d + -b <0. FQ × QB can only attain a maximum (=Qeff) if either FQ or QB exhibit an inflection point. In snowmelt regimes, low flows prevail for much of the year, while high flows are limited to a few days, and extreme floods are rare. In log-log plotting scale, this distribution causes the longterm flow frequency function FQ to steepen in the vicinity of Q1.5. If the bedload rating curve exponent is small, e.g., = 3 as is typical of Helley-Smith bedload samples, d + -b shifts from >0 to <0, causing FQ × QB to peak, and Qeff to be around Q1.5. For measurements thought to be more representative of actual gravel transport obtained using bedload traps and similar devices, large rating curve exponents d of 6 - 16 are typical. In this case, d + -b remains >0, and FQ × QB reaches its maximum near the largest flow on record (Qeff,BT = Qmax). Expression of FQ by negative exponential functions FQ = k × e(Qbin×-m) smooths the product function FQ × QB that displays its maximum as a gentle hump rather than a sharp peak, but without drastically altering Qeff. However, a smooth function FQ × QB allows Qeff to react to small changes in rating curve exponents d. As d increases from <1 to >10, Qeff

  2. Effect of eustatic sea-level changes on saltwater-freshwater relations in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meisler, Harold; Leahy, P. Patrick; Knobel, LeRoy L.

    1984-01-01

    A finite-difference computer model was used to analyze the effect of eustatic sea-level changes on the development of the transition zone between fresh ground water and underlying saltwater in the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. The model simulates, in cross section, the sedimentary wedge from the Delaware River estuary in New Jersey to the Continental Slope. Simulated steady-state freshwater flow is separated from static saltwater by a sharp interface. The model was used to test the sensitivity of the simulated interface position to anisotropy as well as to sea-level elevation. Increasing anisotropy causes the interface to be shallower and extend farther offshore. Lowering sea level causes the interface to be deeper and to extend farther offshore. Simulations using hydraulic conductivities based on available data suggest that the transition zone is not in equilibrium with present sea level. The position of the transition zone probably reflects a long-term average sea level of between 50 and 100 ft below present sea level. The cyclic movement of salty ground water in response to sea-level fluctuations during the Quaternary and Late Tertiary caused the saltwater to mix with freshwater, thus producing a broad transition zone. The freshwater is predominantly sodium bicarbonate in character. The saltwater, from New Jersey to Virginia, probably is a sodium calcium chloride brine. In North Carolina, it is primarily seawater.

  3. Limited effectiveness of solar radiation management geoengineering in preventing sea-level rise from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick; Keller, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is an important contributor to present-day sea level rise, and the ice sheet's importance for sea level rise will likely increase with Arctic temperatures. Some scientists have recently suggested that geoengineering, the deliberate management of Earth's climate, could prevent sea level rise from the ice sheets. Previous efforts to assess geoengineering's effects on the GIS and sea level rise have broken important new ground, but neglect key feedbacks and/or are silent on the short-term effects of geoengineering that are perhaps most important for decision-making. Here, we use a simplified, three-dimensional model of the GIS (SICOPOLIS by Ralf Greve) to examine the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet under plausible geoengineering scenarios. We find that i) the GIS generally continues to melt over the first 100 yr after geoengineering initiation; ii) reductions in GIS sea level contributions over these first 100 yr are small; and iii) there is a delay of decades to centuries between the initiation of aggressive geoengineering and any regrowth of the ice sheet, and the rate of this regrowth is slow. However, geoengineering produces appreciable reductions in the rate of sea level rise contributions from the GIS within the first few decades. Our results suggest that past studies have overestimated the effectiveness of geoengineering in preventing mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet and in reversing sea level rise once it has occurred. We comment on the importance of feedbacks in the ice sheet system in assessing geoengineering's effectiveness in reducing sea level rise from the GIS.

  4. Short Lived Climate Pollutants cause a Long Lived Effect on Sea-level Rise: Analyzing climate metrics for sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterner, E.; Johansson, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change depends on the increase of several different atmospheric pollutants. While long term global warming will be determined mainly by carbon dioxide, warming in the next few decades will depend to a large extent on short lived climate pollutants (SLCP). Reducing emissions of SLCPs could contribute to lower the global mean surface temperature by 0.5 °C already by 2050 (Shindell et al. 2012). Furthermore, the warming effect of one of the most potent SLCPs, black carbon (BC), may have been underestimated in the past. Bond et al. (2013) presents a new best estimate of the total BC radiative forcing (RF) of 1.1 W/m2 (90 % uncertainty bounds of 0.17 to 2.1 W/m2) since the beginning of the industrial era. BC is however never emitted alone and cooling aerosols from the same sources offset a majority of this RF. In the wake of calls for mitigation of SLCPs it is important to study other aspects of the climate effect of SLCPs. One key impact of climate change is sea-level rise (SLR). In a recent study, the effect of SLCP mitigation scenarios on SLR is examined. Hu et al (2013) find a substantial effect on SLR from mitigating SLCPs sharply, reducing SLR by 22-42% by 2100. We choose a different approach focusing on emission pulses and analyse a metric based on sea level rise so as to further enlighten the SLR consequences of SLCPs. We want in particular to understand the time dynamics of SLR impacts caused by SLCPs compared to other greenhouse gases. The most commonly used physical based metrics are GWP and GTP. We propose and evaluate an additional metric: The global sea-level rise potential (GSP). The GSP is defined as the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a forcer to the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a CO2. GSP is evaluated and compared to GWP and GTP using a set of climate forcers chosen to cover the whole scale of atmospheric perturbation life times (BC, CH4, N2O, CO2 and SF6). The study

  5. The effects of metal ion PCR inhibitors on results obtained with the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit.

    PubMed

    Combs, Laura Gaydosh; Warren, Joseph E; Huynh, Vivian; Castaneda, Joanna; Golden, Teresa D; Roby, Rhonda K

    2015-11-01

    Forensic DNA samples may include the presence of PCR inhibitors, even after extraction and purification. Studies have demonstrated that metal ions, co-purified at specific concentrations, inhibit DNA amplifications. Metal ions are endogenous to sample types, such as bone, and can be introduced from environmental sources. In order to examine the effect of metal ions as PCR inhibitors during quantitative real-time PCR, 2800 M DNA was treated with 0.0025-18.750 mM concentrations of aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, nickel, and lead. DNA samples, both untreated and metal-treated, were quantified using the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit. Quantification cycle (Cq) values for the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA and internal PCR control (IPC) assays were measured and the estimated concentrations of human DNA were obtained. Comparisons were conducted between metal-treated and control DNA samples to determine the accuracy of the quantification estimates and to test the efficacy of the IPC inhibition detection. This kit is most resistant to the presence of calcium as compared to all metals tested; the maximum concentration tested does not affect the amplification of the IPC or quantification of the sample. This kit is most sensitive to the presence of aluminum; concentrations greater than 0.0750 mM negatively affected the quantification, although the IPC assay accurately assessed the presence of PCR inhibition. The Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit accurately quantifies human DNA in the presence of 0.5000 mM copper, iron, nickel, and lead; however, the IPC does not indicate the presence of PCR inhibition at this concentration of these metals. Unexpectedly, estimates of DNA quantity in samples treated with 18.750 mM copper yielded values in excess of the actual concentration of DNA in the samples; fluorescence spectroscopy experiments indicated this increase was not a direct interaction between the copper metal and 6-FAM dye used to label the probe that

  6. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  7. Effect of different organic farming methods on the phenolic composition of sea buckthorn berries.

    PubMed

    Heinäaho, Merja; Hagerman, Ann E; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2009-03-11

    The effects of different organic cultivation methods on the berry phenolics of two Finnish sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. rhamnoides ) cultivars, 'Terhi' and 'Tytti', were studied in an experimental field at a coastal area in Merikarvia, western Finland. Cultivation methods included different fertilizers (designed for organic cultivation), mulches (organic and plastic), and land contours (flat land versus ridged beds). Two experiments were conducted: The first, a fertilization experiment, allowed for the estimation of the effects of cultivar, fertilizer, land contour, and all of their interactions. The second experiment, a mulch experiment, allowed for the estimation of the effects of mulch, land contours, and their interactions for the cultivar 'Tytti'. Berry phenolics were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the cultivars and cultivation methods. The concentrations of quercetin derivatives 1-3, isorhamnetin 3,7-diglucoside, quercetin-3-glucoside-7-rhamnoside, quercetin 3-glucoside, isorhamnetin 3-glucoside, and flavonoid derivative 3 were higher in 'Tytti' than in 'Terhi', while concentrations of isorhamnetin-glucoside 2 and 3 were higher in 'Terhi' than in 'Tytti'. Flat land increased the concentrations of isorhamnetin 3,7-diglucoside, isorhamnetin-glucoside 1, quercetin derivatives 2 and 4, and condensed tannins. Mulch did not have any significant effect on the concentrations of phenolic compounds. These results indicate that the phenolic accumulation in berries of studied sea buckthorn cultivars seems to be mainly dependent upon cultivar selection and soil structure.

  8. Incubation temperature effects on hatchling performance in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leah R; Godfrey, Matthew H; Owens, David W

    2014-01-01

    Incubation temperature has significant developmental effects on oviparous animals, including affecting sexual differentiation for several species. Incubation temperature also affects traits that can influence survival, a theory that is verified in this study for the Northwest Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). We conducted controlled laboratory incubations and experiments to test for an effect of incubation temperature on performance of loggerhead hatchlings. Sixty-eight hatchlings were tested in 2011, and 31 in 2012, produced from eggs incubated at 11 different constant temperatures ranging from 27°C to 33°C. Following their emergence from the eggs, we tested righting response, crawling speed, and conducted a 24-hour long swim test. The results support previous studies on sea turtle hatchlings, with an effect of incubation temperature seen on survivorship, righting response time, crawling speed, change in crawl speed, and overall swim activity, and with hatchlings incubated at 27°C showing decreased locomotor abilities. No hatchlings survived to be tested in both years when incubated at 32°C and above. Differences in survivorship of hatchlings incubated at high temperatures are important in light of projected higher sand temperatures due to climate change, and could indicate increased mortality from incubation temperature effects.

  9. Incubation Temperature Effects on Hatchling Performance in the Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta)

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Leah R.; Godfrey, Matthew H.; Owens, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Incubation temperature has significant developmental effects on oviparous animals, including affecting sexual differentiation for several species. Incubation temperature also affects traits that can influence survival, a theory that is verified in this study for the Northwest Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). We conducted controlled laboratory incubations and experiments to test for an effect of incubation temperature on performance of loggerhead hatchlings. Sixty-eight hatchlings were tested in 2011, and 31 in 2012, produced from eggs incubated at 11 different constant temperatures ranging from 27°C to 33°C. Following their emergence from the eggs, we tested righting response, crawling speed, and conducted a 24-hour long swim test. The results support previous studies on sea turtle hatchlings, with an effect of incubation temperature seen on survivorship, righting response time, crawling speed, change in crawl speed, and overall swim activity, and with hatchlings incubated at 27°C showing decreased locomotor abilities. No hatchlings survived to be tested in both years when incubated at 32°C and above. Differences in survivorship of hatchlings incubated at high temperatures are important in light of projected higher sand temperatures due to climate change, and could indicate increased mortality from incubation temperature effects. PMID:25517114

  10. Effects of food origin and availability on sea urchin condition and feeding behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livore, Juan P.; Connell, Sean D.

    2012-02-01

    The origin of food is recognised to be an important trait for sedentary consumers that have little control over the source of their food. Elevated herbivory in sea urchins is often linked to poor gonad condition as provoked by reduced food availability, but there is little recognition of the possibility that the origin of food may contribute to their poor condition and elevated feeding. This study assesses the possibility that variation in food availability and origin may together affect urchin condition and feeding rates such that they account for more intensive grazing (by Heliocidaris erythrogramma) on sheltered than exposed coasts (South Australia). We experimentally tested the hypothesis that reduced food availability from sheltered coasts would result in poor gonad condition and greater feeding rate; whilst enhanced food availability from exposed coasts would result in better condition and reduced feeding rates. We found that reduced food had negative effects on condition and positive effects on feeding rates independently of coastal source. Greater food availability did not equate to better condition, rather it was the delivery of more food from exposed than sheltered coasts that translated into the better gonad condition and lower feeding rates. These results suggest that plant origin and availability could help explain the greater impacts of these urchins on sheltered coasts. Whilst other factors such as water energy and sea urchin density may contribute to variation in herbivory our results suggest that origin of food may also play a role in sea urchin condition and behaviour. Understanding how such traits link to large scale features of the environment may improve models that account for variation in strength of consumer effects across landscapes.

  11. The subtle effects of sea water acidification on the amphipod Gammarus locusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauton, C.; Tyrrell, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-08-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of increases in pCO2 on the survival, growth and molecular physiology of the neritic amphipod Gammarus locusta which has a cosmopolitan distribution in estuaries. Amphipods were reared from juvenile to mature adult in laboratory microcosms at three different levels of pH in nominal range 8.1-7.6. Growth rate was estimated from weekly measures of body length. At sexual maturity the amphipods were sacrificed and assayed for changes in the expression of genes coding for a heat shock protein (hsp70 gene) and the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh gene). The data show that the growth and survival of this species is not significantly impacted by a decrease in sea water pH of up to 0.5 units. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of growth in acidified sea water on the sustained expression of the hsp70 gene. There was a consistent and significant increase in the expression of the gapdh gene at a pH of ~7.5 which, when combined with observations from other workers, suggests that metabolic changes may occur in response to acidification. It is concluded that sensitive assays of tissue physiology and molecular biology should be routinely employed in future studies of the impacts of sea water acidification as subtle effects on the physiology and metabolism of coastal marine species may be overlooked in conventional gross "end-point" studies of organism growth or mortality.

  12. Magnitude and origin of the anthropogenic CO2 increase and 13C Suess effect in the Nordic seas since 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Bellerby, Richard G. J.; Johannessen, Truls; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Brown, Kelly R.; Olsson, K. Anders; Olafsson, Jon; Nondal, Gisle; KivimäE, Caroline; Kringstad, Solveig; Neill, Craig; Olafsdottir, Solveig

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluates the anthropogenic changes of CO2 (ΔCant) and δ13C (Δδ13Cant) in the Nordic seas, the northern limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, that took place between 1981 and 2002/2003. The changes have been determined by comparing data obtained during the Transient Tracers in the Ocean, North Atlantic Study (TTO-NAS) with data obtained during the Nordic seas surveys of R/V Knorr in 2002 and R/V G.O. Sars in 2003 using an extended multilinear regression approach. The estimated Δδ13Cant and ΔCant and their relationship to each other and to water mass distribution suggest that the Polar Water entering the Nordic seas from the north is undersaturated with respect to the present atmospheric anthropogenic CO2 levels and promotes a local uptake of Cant within the Nordic seas. In contrast, the Atlantic Water entering from the south appears equilibrated. It carries with it anthropogenic carbon which will be sequestered at depth as the water overturns. This preequilibration leaves no room for further uptake of Cant in the parts of the Nordic seas dominated by Atlantic Water. The upper ocean pCO2 in these regions appears to have increased at a greater rate than the atmospheric pCO2 over the last 2 decades; this is reconcilable with a large lateral advective supply of Cant.

  13. Effects of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove population dynamics: a lesson from Sonneratia alba.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuchen; Li, Jianfang; Yang, Shuhuan; Li, Xinnian; Fang, Lu; Zhong, Cairong; Duke, Norman C; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2017-01-18

    A large-scale systematical investigation of the influence of Pleistocene climate oscillation on mangrove population dynamics could enrich our knowledge about the evolutionary history during times of historical climate change, which in turn may provide important information for their conservation. In this study, phylogeography of a mangrove tree Sonneratia alba was studied by sequencing three chloroplast fragments and seven nuclear genes. A low level of genetic diversity at the population level was detected across its range, especially at the range margins, which was mainly attributed to the steep sea-level drop and associated climate fluctuations during the Pleistocene glacial periods. Extremely small effective population size (Ne) was inferred in populations from both eastern and western Malay Peninsula (44 and 396, respectively), mirroring the fragility of mangrove plants and their paucity of robustness against future climate perturbations and human activity. Two major genetic lineages of high divergence were identified in the two mangrove biodiversity centres: the Indo-Malesia and Australasia regions. The estimated splitting time between these two lineages was 3.153 million year ago (MYA), suggesting a role for pre-Pleistocene events in shaping the major diversity patterns of mangrove species. Within the Indo-Malesia region, a subdivision was implicated between the South China Sea (SCS) and the remaining area with a divergence time of 1.874 MYA, corresponding to glacial vicariance when the emerged Sunda Shelf halted genetic exchange between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during Pleistocene sea-level drops. Notably, genetic admixture was observed in populations at the boundary regions, especially in the two populations near the Malacca Strait, indicating secondary contact between divergent lineages during interglacial periods. These interregional genetic exchanges provided ample opportunity for the re-use of standing genetic variation

  14. Effects of Relative Mean Sea Level Variations on Tidal Networks Generated on Experimental Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanon, L.; Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, A.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of laboratory experiments carried out in a large experimental apparatus aimed at reproducing a typical lagoonal environment subject to tidal forcings. The experimental apparatus consists of two adjoining basins reproducing the sea and the lagoon. The tide is generated at the sea by a vertical steel sharp-edge weir, oscillating vertically. The weir is driven by an ad hoc developed software which continuously corrects the weir motion on the basis of water levels measured at the sea, allowing us to generate a sinusoidal tide of fixed amplitude and period, oscillating around mean water level. The bottom of the lagoon is covered by a layer of cohesionless plastic grains, with a density of 1041 kg/m3. The cohesionless plastic grains are characterized by a nearly uniform grain size distribution, with a median grain size of 0.8 mm. The lack of external sediment supply, the absence of vegetation, and the prevalence of bedload transport prevent any deposition processes and lateral surface accretion, attributing a purely erosive character to the experimental lagoon. As a consequence, in this experimental lagoon the main morphodynamic process responsible for tidal network initiation and development is the differential erosion between the channels and the adjacent surface. The experiments were designed in order to analyze the effects of mean sea level variations on channel network dynamics, focusing on the changes of the relevant geomorphic characteristics of the experimental networks, such as e.g. drainage density, based on the probability distribution of unchanneled lengths, and flowing tidal prism. Our results suggest that a decrease in the tidal prism leads to network retreat and contraction of channel cross sections. Conversely, an increase in the tidal prism promotes network re-incision and re-expansion of channel cross sections. In general, contractions and expansions tend to occur within the same planar blueprint and the network re-expands cutting

  15. Effect of Late Holocene sea level change and deltaic lobe-shifting, Apalachicola Delta, northwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, J.F. . Geology Dept.); White, N.M. . Dept. of Anthropology)

    1993-03-01

    Late Holocene environmental changes in the lower Apalachicola River region of the northwest Florida appear to be related to deltaic lobe-shifting and sea level change. Sedimentologic, archaeologic and seismic evidence all indicate a major shift in deltaic deposition approximately 2,000 years ago. The effect is observed in the mid-region of the modern Apalachicola Delta as a pronounced change from estuarine to freshwater conditions. On the barrier island chain flanking the delta the result was a change in depositional patterns with a shift in the sediment supply.

  16. The Effects of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration on Deep-sea Foraminifera in two California Margin Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Erin R

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep-sea sequestration of CO2 is being considered as a possible mitigation tool to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations and its associated negative effects. This study is the first to investigate potential effects of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) injection on deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminifera are ideal for this ecological impact investigation because of differing test composition (calcareous and non-calcareous) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The experiment was conducted August-September 2003, at 3600m off the coast of Monterey Bay, California, aboard the R/V Western Flyer using the ROV Tiburon. The pH of the site was monitored throughout the experiment by Seabird CTDs. Sediment push-cores were collected (both from the experimental and control sites) and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Effects of CO2 injection on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (to 10cm depth below sea floor) and horizontally (up to 10m from CO2 injection sites), as well as between live and dead individuals. Within the corrals and underlying sediments severe pH changes (to near 4.0) were seen while over the experimental area small average reductions in ocean pH (-0.05 units) and large episodic excursions (-1.7 units) were measured resulting from CO2 injection. Exposure to this gradient of low pH caused increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms within corrals, as far as 5m from the injection site, and to at least 10cm depth in the sediments. This experiment revealed several major effects of CO2 injection on foraminiferal assemblages in surficial sediments: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal species richness decreases in both stained and unstained specimens; and 3) percentage of stained (live) forms increases. Down-core trends (to 10cm below sea floor) have revealed: 1) percent agglutinated forms decline and calcareous forms increase

  17. Toxic effects of new antifouling compounds on tunicate haemocytes I. Sea-nine 211 and chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Ballarin, Loriano

    2008-01-31

    After the definitive ban on tin-based antifouling substances, new organic compounds have recently been introduced in antifouling paint formulations, as either principal or booster biocides. In most cases, previous risk assessment of these biocides has been inadequate so that their possible effects on aquatic ecosystems is a matter of great concern. We studied the effects of two new organic biocides often associated in paint formulations, Sea-Nine 211 (4,5 dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazoline-3-one) and chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile), on haemocytes of the compound ascidian Botryllus schlosseri exposed for 60 min to various concentrations (from 0.1 to 10 microM) of the xenobiotics. This species had previously proved to be a good bioindicator of organotin compounds. Both compounds, at concentrations of 1 and 10 microM, altered the morphology of phagocytes, and these changes were closely related to disrupting effects on cytoskeletal components. At the same concentrations, phagocytosis, which requires cytoskeletal modifications for pseudopod formation, was severely hindered. Both compounds were able to induce apoptosis of Botryllus blood cells, probably as a consequence of severe oxidative stress related to the reported decrease of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) content. In the case of Sea-Nine 211, a substantial increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and a negative effect on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity may also be involved in the activation of the cell death machinery. Cytochrome-c-oxidase was also significantly inhibited by the two biocides, indicating perturbation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Isodynamic mixtures of Sea-Nine 211 and chlorothalonil were used to evaluate the occurrence of interactions between the two compounds. Results suggest the combined action of partial additivity when cell-spreading and cytochrome-c-oxidase activity were considered, and were indicative of antagonism in the case of the GSH depletion. On the whole, our

  18. Predicting the Turbulent Air-Sea Surface Fluxes, Including Spray Effects, from Weak to Strong Winds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    for UN10 above about 20 m/s. Mueller and Veron (2009) likewise produced the roll off in CDN10 by modeling just wind-wave coupling and flow...E. F. Bradley, D . P. Rogers, J. B. Edson, and G. S. Young, 1996: Bulk parameterization of air-sea fluxes for Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere...effect of spray on the dynamics of the marine atmospheric surface layer in strong winds. Izv., Atmos. Oceanic Phys., 47, 119–127. Jarosz, E., D . A

  19. Space use of a dominant Arctic vertebrate: Effects of prey, sea ice, and land on Pacific walrus resource selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beatty, William; Jay, Chadwick V.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Taylor, Rebecca L.; Blanchard, Arny L.; Jewett, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Sea ice dominates marine ecosystems in the Arctic, and recent reductions in sea ice may alter food webs throughout the region. Sea ice loss may also stress Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens), which feed on benthic macroinvertebrates in the Bering and Chukchi seas. However, no studies have examined the effects of sea ice on foraging Pacific walrus space use patterns. We tested a series of hypotheses that examined walrus foraging resource selection as a function of proximity to resting substrates and prey biomass. We quantified walrus prey biomass with 17 benthic invertebrate families, which included bivalves, polychaetes, amphipods, tunicates, and sipunculids. We included covariates for distance to sea ice and distance to land, and systematically developed a series of candidate models to examine interactions among benthic prey biomass and resting substrates. We ranked candidate models with Bayesian Information Criterion and made inferences on walrus resource selection based on the top-ranked model. Based on the top model, biomass of the bivalve family Tellinidae, distance to ice, distance to land, and the interaction of distances to ice and land all positively influenced walrus foraging resource selection. Standardized model coefficients indicated that distance to ice explained the most variation in walrus foraging resource selection followed by Tellinidae biomass. Distance to land and the interaction of distances to ice and land accounted for similar levels of variation. Tellinidae biomass likely represented an index of overall bivalve biomass, indicating walruses focused foraging in areas with elevated levels of bivalve and tellinid biomass. Our results also emphasize the importance of sea ice to walruses. Projected sea ice loss will increase the duration of the open water season in the Chukchi Sea, altering the spatial distribution of resting sites relative to current foraging areas and possibly affecting the spatial structure of benthic communities.

  20. Intermittent sea-level acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, M.; Spada, G.

    2013-10-01

    Using instrumental observations from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), we provide a new assessment of the global sea-level acceleration for the last ~ 2 centuries (1820-2010). Our results, obtained by a stack of tide gauge time series, confirm the existence of a global sea-level acceleration (GSLA) and, coherently with independent assessments so far, they point to a value close to 0.01 mm/yr2. However, differently from previous studies, we discuss how change points or abrupt inflections in individual sea-level time series have contributed to the GSLA. Our analysis, based on methods borrowed from econometrics, suggests the existence of two distinct driving mechanisms for the GSLA, both involving a minority of tide gauges globally. The first effectively implies a gradual increase in the rate of sea-level rise at individual tide gauges, while the second is manifest through a sequence of catastrophic variations of the sea-level trend. These occurred intermittently since the end of the 19th century and became more frequent during the last four decades.

  1. Protective effects of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) against experimental Vibrio splendidus infection in the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Jing, Kailin; Wang, Xitao; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Meixia; Li, Zhen; Xu, Le; Wang, Lili; Xu, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is one of the most harmful pathogens associated with skin ulceration syndrome in the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) due to its high virulence and frequency of appearance. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) against V. splendidus infection in the sea cucumber. Whole V. splendidus cells were used as an immunogen to immunize 20 White Leghorn hens (25 weeks old). IgY was produced from egg yolks obtained from these immunized hens using water dilution, two-step salt precipitation and ultrafiltration. The purity of the IgY produced was approximately 83%. Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated a high specificity for IgY with a maximum antibody titer of 320,000. The growth of V. splendidus in liquid medium was significantly inhibited by IgY in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 mg/mL. The protective effects of IgY were evaluated in sea cucumber by intraperitoneally injecting anti-V. splendidus IgY antibodies (10 mg/mL) or immersing the sea cucumber in aqueous IgY (1 g/L) after an intraperitoneal injection of V. splendidus. Intraperitoneal injection resulted in an 80% survival while immersion resulted in a 75% survival during the 11-day experimental period. The survival rates were significantly higher than the positive control and the non-specific IgY group (P < 0.05). As well, the bacterial burden in the respiratory tree, intestine and coelomic liquid was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in sea cucumber treated with specific IgY than those treated with non-specific IgY. The phagocytosis of coelomocytes for V. splendidus in the presence of specific IgY was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that obtained with non-specific IgY or without IgY, suggesting that specific IgY enhanced phagocytic activity. The current work suggests that specific IgY has potential for protecting sea cucumbers against V. splendidus infection. Copyright © 2015

  2. Effect of the temperature variation between Mediterranean Sea and Syrian deserts on the dust storm occurrence in the western half of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanollahi, Jamil; Kaboodvandpour, Shahram; Qhavami, Samira; Mohammadi, Bakhtiyar

    2015-03-01

    Recent dust storms have caused crises in western Iran, which necessitate the prediction of these storms a few days before their occurrence. This is the first study of its type that analyzes the effect of temperature differences between the Mediterranean Sea surface and Syrian deserts (creation zone of the dusts storms) on the formation of dust storms in the west of Iran. The study also seeks to identify any changes in the atmospheric temperature created by the extreme dust storm of July 5, 2009 in west of Iran (Sanandaj City). In this study, the MODIS images from 2000 to 2008, and particulate matter data of the Sanandaj station from 2008 to 2012 were utilized to identify the dust storm days. The Mediterranean Sea surface temperature data were extracted from NOAA satellites for dust storm days up to four days preceding them. The web site of world weather was used to obtain the temperature of Damascus, Syria station as the selected land station. According to the results, significant differences were acquired between surface temperatures of Damascus station and the Mediterranean Sea in the dust storm days and up to three days before them. As the dust storm days approached, a rising trend was observed in changes of the temperature difference between land and sea. Thermal map analysis of the atmosphere of the Syrian deserts on July 5, 2009 showed significant decrease in the levels of 1000 hPa and 500 hPa but for the days preceding it no significant changes were observed. It can be concluded that the temperature difference between the Mediterranean Sea surface and the Syrian deserts four days before the dust storm occurrences is the important factor in predicting this event.

  3. Relative effects of gamete compatibility and hydrodynamics on fertilization in the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis.

    PubMed

    Kregting, Louise T; Thomas, Florence I M; Bass, Anna L; Yund, Philip O

    2014-08-01

    Intraspecific variation in gamete compatibility among male/female pairs causes variation in the concentration of sperm required to achieve equivalent fertilization levels. Gamete compatibility is therefore potentially an important factor controlling mating success. Many broadcast-spawning marine invertebrates, however, also live in a dynamic environment where hydrodynamic conditions can affect the concentration of sperm reaching eggs during spawning. Thus flow conditions may moderate the effects of gamete compatibility on fertilization. Using the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis as a model system, we assessed the relative effects of gamete compatibility (the concentration of sperm required to fertilize 50% of the eggs in specific male/female pairs; F50) and the root-mean-square of total velocity (urms; 0.01-0.11 m s(-1)) on fertilization in four locations near a spawning female (water column, wake eddy, substratum, and aboral surface) in both unidirectional and oscillatory flows. Percent fertilization decreased significantly with increasing urms at all locations and both flow regimes. However, although gamete compatibility varied by almost 1.5 orders of magnitude, it was not a significant predictor of fertilization for most combinations of position and flow. The notable exception was a significant effect of gamete compatibility on fertilization on the aboral surface under unidirectional flow. Our results suggest that selection on variation in gamete compatibility may be strongest in eggs fertilized on the aboral surface of sea urchins and that hydrodynamic conditions may add environmental noise to selection outcomes.

  4. Effects of different organic farming methods on the concentration of phenolic compounds in sea buckthorn leaves.

    PubMed

    Heinäaho, Merja; Pusenius, Jyrki; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2006-10-04

    The effects of different cultivation methods on the amount of phenolic compounds in leaves of 1-year-old seedlings of two Finnish sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. rhamnoides) cultivars 'Terhi' and 'Tytti' were studied in a field experiment established at coastal area in Merikarvia, western Finland. The cultivation methods included different fertilizers (suitable for organic cultivation), mulches (organic and plastic), and land contours (flat vs low hill surface). Two experiments were conducted. The first allowed the estimation of the effects of cultivar, fertilizer, surface contour, and all their interactions, while the other allowed the estimation of the effects of mulches, land contours, and their interactions for the cultivar 'Tytti'. Eleven different hydrolyzable tannins, pentagalloylglucose, and 14 other phenolic compounds were detected by chemical analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The amount of phenolic compounds varied between different land contours and mulches. The concentrations of gallic acid, pentagalloylglucose, quercetin-3-rhamnoside, monocoumaroyl astragalin A, total hydrolyzable tannins, and condensed tannins were significantly higher on the flat surface than on the low hill surface. The plastic mulch decreased the concentration of gallic acid, hydrolyzable tannins, and condensed tannins compared to the other mulches used. These results suggest ways to cultivate sea buckthorn to produce large amounts of valuable chemicals, especially tannins in the leaves.

  5. Effect of redox conditions on bacterial community structure in Baltic Sea sediments with contrasting phosphorus fluxes.

    PubMed

    Steenbergh, Anne K; Bodelier, Paul L E; Slomp, Caroline P; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus release from sediments can exacerbate the effect of eutrophication in coastal marine ecosystems. The flux of phosphorus from marine sediments to the overlying water is highly dependent on the redox conditions at the sediment-water interface. Bacteria are key players in the biological processes that release or retain phosphorus in marine sediments. To gain more insight in the role of bacteria in phosphorus release from sediments, we assessed the effect of redox conditions on the structure of bacterial communities. To do so, we incubated surface sediments from four sampling sites in the Baltic Sea under oxic and anoxic conditions and analyzed the fingerprints of the bacterial community structures in these incubations and the original sediments. This paper describes the effects of redox conditions, sampling station, and sample type (DNA, RNA, or whole-cell sample) on bacterial community structure in sediments. Redox conditions explained only 5% of the variance in community structure, and bacterial communities from contrasting redox conditions showed considerable overlap. We conclude that benthic bacterial communities cannot be classified as being typical for oxic or anoxic conditions based on community structure fingerprints. Our results suggest that the overall structure of the benthic bacterial community has only a limited impact on benthic phosphate fluxes in the Baltic Sea.

  6. The Effect of Having Previously Attended Junior Kindergarten on "Draw-A-Classroom" Test Scores Obtained in Senior Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Rex S.

    Data are presented which show the degree to which specific prior exposure to a learning situation (Junior Kindergarten) is reflected in the scores of children who had this experience compared to a group of their peers who did not. Scores obtained in Senior Kindergarten on the Draw-a-Classroom Test (DAC) are used as the measurement method. The…

  7. Deep sea waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kester, D.R.; Burt, W.V.; Capuzzo, J.M.; Park, P.K.; Ketchum, B.W.; Duedall, I.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book presents papers on the marine disposal of wastes. Topics considered include incineration at sea, the modelling and biological effects of industrial wastes, microbial studies of ocean dumping, deep-sea mining wastes, the chemical analysis of ferromanganese nodules, and economic aspects of deep-sea disposal.

  8. The effects of sea-level rise on water quality in coastal floodplain sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Vanessa; Johnston, Scott; Burton, Edward; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh; Slavich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Sea level has risen approximately 1.2 mm/year over the last 100 years (Hennessy et al. 2004) and is predicted to rise up to 80 cm by 2100 relative to 1990 sea levels (IPCC 2007). The number of extreme events related to sea level such as higher sea levels and increased inter-annual variability have also increased in frequency in the same time period (Hennessy et al. 2004). Globally, large areas of coastal and estuarine floodplains are underlain by sulfidic sediments and acid sulfate soils (ASS). These sediments frequently contain high concentrations of acidity and trace metals. A significant portion of the stored acidity occurs in the form of exchangeable and hydrolysable acidic metal cations such as Al and Fe. Watertables in these environments are often close to the surface and intercepted by relatively shallow drains. Due to their low elevation and locations, these floodplains are highly susceptible to pulses of saline water caused by saltwater intrusion, storm surge and rising sea levels. Construction of extensive drainage systems has further increased the susceptibility of the floodplain to seawater inundation by increasing connectivity to the estuarine channel. This risk is likely to increase in the future with predicted increases in sea level and extreme events due to climate change. This study uses both batch experiments to determine the effects of increasing ionic strength on exchange processes and trace metal desorption in oxidised floodplain sediments and sulfidic drain sediments, and intact soil cores to determine the surface water-porewater interactions over the short term following seawater inundation in coastal floodplain sediments. We found that that saline inundation of oxidised ASS floodplain sediments, even by relatively brackish water may cause rapid, shorter-term water quality changes and a pulse release of acidity due to desorption of acidic metal cations (Wong et al. 2010). We also found that trace metals can be mobilised from sulfidic

  9. Density-dependent changes in effective area occupied for sea-bottom-associated marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Thorson, James T; Rindorf, Anna; Gao, Jin; Hanselman, Dana H; Winker, Henning

    2016-10-12

    The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution theory) or the basin model (BM; positive abundance-area relationship, supported by density-dependent habitat selection theory). The BM implies that fishes move towards preferred habitat as the population declines. We estimate the average relationship using bottom trawl data for 92 fish species from six marine regions, to determine whether the BM or PDM provides a better description for sea-bottom-associated fishes. We fit a spatio-temporal model and estimate changes in effective area occupied and abundance, and combine results to estimate the average abundance-area relationship as well as variability among taxa and regions. The average relationship is weak but significant (0.6% increase in area for a 10% increase in abundance), whereas only a small proportion of species-region combinations show a negative relationship (i.e. shrinking area when abundance increases). Approximately one-third of combinations (34.6%) are predicted to increase in area more than 1% for every 10% increase in abundance. We therefore infer that population density generally changes faster than effective area occupied during abundance changes. Gadiformes have the strongest estimated relationship (average 1.0% area increase for every 10% abundance increase) followed by Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes, and the Eastern Bering Sea shows a strong relationship between abundance and area occupied relative to other regions. We conclude that the BM explains a small but important portion of spatial dynamics for sea-bottom-associated fishes, and that many individual populations merit cautious management during population declines, because a compressed range may increase the efficiency of harvest.

  10. The Seagrass Effect Turned Upside Down Changes the Prospective of Sea Urchin Survival and Landscape Implications.

    PubMed

    Farina, Simone; Guala, Ivan; Oliva, Silvia; Piazzi, Luigi; Pires da Silva, Rodrigo; Ceccherelli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat structure plays an important mediating role in predator-prey interactions. However the effects are strongly dependent on regional predator pools, which can drive predation risk in habitats with very similar structure in opposite directions. In the Mediterranean Sea predation on juvenile sea urchins is commonly known to be regulated by seagrass structure. In this study we test whether the possibility for juvenile Paracentrotus lividus to be predated changes in relation to the fragmentation of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica (four habitat classes: continuous, low-fragmentation, high-fragmentation and rocks), and to the spatial arrangement of such habitat classes at a landscape scale. Sea urchin predation risk was measured in a 20-day field experiment on tethered individuals placed in three square areas 35×35 m2 in size. Variability of both landscape and habitat structural attributes was assessed at the sampling grain 5×5 m2. Predation risk changed among landscapes, as it was lower where more 'rocks', and thus less seagrass, were present. The higher risk was found in the 'continuous' P. oceanica rather than in the low-fragmentation, high-fragmentation and rock habitats (p-values = 0.0149, 0.00008, and 0.0001, respectively). Therefore, the expectation that juvenile P. lividus survival would have been higher in the 'continuous' seagrass habitat, which would have served as shelter from high fish predation pressure, was not met. Predation risk changed across habitats due to different success between attack types: benthic attacks (mostly from whelks) were overall much more effective than those due to fish activity, the former type being associated with the 'continuous' seagrass habitat. Fish predation on juvenile sea urchins on rocks and 'high-fragmentation' habitat was less likely than benthic predation in the 'continuous' seagrass, with the low seagrass patch complexity increasing benthic activity. Future research should be aimed at investigating, derived from

  11. The Seagrass Effect Turned Upside Down Changes the Prospective of Sea Urchin Survival and Landscape Implications

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Simone; Guala, Ivan; Oliva, Silvia; Piazzi, Luigi; Pires da Silva, Rodrigo; Ceccherelli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat structure plays an important mediating role in predator-prey interactions. However the effects are strongly dependent on regional predator pools, which can drive predation risk in habitats with very similar structure in opposite directions. In the Mediterranean Sea predation on juvenile sea urchins is commonly known to be regulated by seagrass structure. In this study we test whether the possibility for juvenile Paracentrotus lividus to be predated changes in relation to the fragmentation of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica (four habitat classes: continuous, low-fragmentation, high-fragmentation and rocks), and to the spatial arrangement of such habitat classes at a landscape scale. Sea urchin predation risk was measured in a 20-day field experiment on tethered individuals placed in three square areas 35×35 m2 in size. Variability of both landscape and habitat structural attributes was assessed at the sampling grain 5×5 m2. Predation risk changed among landscapes, as it was lower where more ‘rocks’, and thus less seagrass, were present. The higher risk was found in the ‘continuous’ P. oceanica rather than in the low-fragmentation, high-fragmentation and rock habitats (p-values = 0.0149, 0.00008, and 0.0001, respectively). Therefore, the expectation that juvenile P. lividus survival would have been higher in the ‘continuous’ seagrass habitat, which would have served as shelter from high fish predation pressure, was not met. Predation risk changed across habitats due to different success between attack types: benthic attacks (mostly from whelks) were overall much more effective than those due to fish activity, the former type being associated with the ‘continuous’ seagrass habitat. Fish predation on juvenile sea urchins on rocks and ‘high-fragmentation’ habitat was less likely than benthic predation in the ‘continuous’ seagrass, with the low seagrass patch complexity increasing benthic activity. Future research should be aimed at

  12. Model calculations of the effects of present and future emissions of air pollutants from shipping in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonson, J. E.; Jalkanen, J. P.; Johansson, L.; Gauss, M.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Land-based emissions of air pollutants in Europe have steadily decreased over the past two decades, and this decrease is expected to continue. Within the same time span emissions from shipping have increased in EU ports and in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, defined as SECAs (sulfur emission control areas), although recently sulfur emissions, and subsequently particle emissions, have decreased. The maximum allowed sulfur content in marine fuels in EU ports is now 0.1%, as required by the European Union sulfur directive. In the SECAs the maximum fuel content of sulfur is currently 1% (the global average is about 2.4%). This will be reduced to 0.1% from 2015, following the new International Maritime Organization (IMO) rules. In order to assess the effects of ship emissions in and around the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, regional model calculations with the EMEP air pollution model have been made on a 1/4° longitude × 1/8° latitude resolution, using ship emissions in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea that are based on accurate ship positioning data. The effects on depositions and air pollution and the resulting number of years of life lost (YOLLs) have been calculated by comparing model calculations with and without ship emissions in the two sea areas. In 2010 stricter regulations for sulfur emissions were implemented in the two sea areas, reducing the maximum sulfur content allowed in marine fuels from 1.5 to 1%. In addition ships were required to use fuels with 0.1 % sulfur in EU harbours. The calculations have been made with emissions representative of 2009 and 2011, i.e. before and after the implementation of the stricter controls on sulfur emissions from 2010. The calculations with present emissions show that per person, an additional 0.1-0.2 years of life lost is estimated in areas close to the major ship tracks with current emission levels. Comparisons of model calculations with emissions before and after the implementation of stricter emission control on

  13. Effects of endogenous cysteine proteinases on structures of collagen fibres from dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Fei; Song, Liang; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Li, Dong-Mei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Konno, Kunihiko; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-10-01

    Autolysis of sea cucumber, caused by endogenous enzymes, leads to postharvest quality deterioration of sea cucumber. However, the effects of endogenous proteinases on structures of collagen fibres, the major biologically relevant substrates in the body wall of sea cucumber, are less clear. Collagen fibres were prepared from the dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus), and the structural consequences of degradation of the collagen fibres caused by endogenous cysteine proteinases (ECP) from Stichopus japonicus were examined. Scanning electron microscopic images showed that ECP caused partial disaggregation of collagen fibres into collagen fibrils by disrupting interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed increased structural disorder of fibrillar collagen caused by ECP. SDS-PAGE and chemical analysis indicated that ECP can liberate glycosaminoglycan, hydroxyproline and collagen fragments from collagen fibres. Thus ECP can cause disintegration of collagen fibres by degrading interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sea ice effective microwave emissivities from satellite passive microwave and infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Near-simultaneous images from the temperature-humidity IR radiometer and dual-polarization scanning multichannel microwave radiometer of the Nimbus 7 satellite are used to investigate microwave sea ice emissivities on a global scale. Emissivities in several Arctic region study areas are found to be approximately constant during a nine-month pereiod covering the fall, winter and spring months, in the cases of both first-year and multiyear ice. During the onset of summer, emissivity increases of about 30 percent are observed at 37 GHz in multiyear ice. A multichannel cluster analysis over very large study areas during winter indicates considerable variability in emissivities of consolidated ice clusters at 37 GHz, and only 1/3 as much variability at 18 GHz. If the variability within each cluster is quantified and taken into account by means of multispectral analysis, data on ice thickness and surface characteristics may also be obtained.

  15. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  16. Limited effects of a keystone species: Trends of sea otters and kelp forests at the Semichi Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konar, B.

    2000-01-01

    Sea otters are well known as a keystone species because of their ability to transform sea urchin-dominated communities into kelp-dominated communities by preying on sea urchins and thus reducing the intensity of herbivory. After being locally extinct for more than a century, sea otters re-colonized the Semichi Islands in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska in the early 1990s. Here, otter populations increased to about 400 individuals by 1994, but rapidly declined to about 100 by 1997. Roughly 7 yr after initial otter re-colonization, there were only marginal changes in sea urchin biomass, mean maximum test size, and kelp density. These small changes may be the first steps in the cascading effects on community structure typically found with the invasion of a keystone species. However, no wholesale change in community structure occurred following re-colonization and growth of the sea otter population. Instead, this study describes a transition state and identifies factors such as keystone species density and residence time that can be important in dictating the degree to which otter effects are manifested.

  17. Pressure effects on regional mean sea level trends in the German Bight in the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Frauke; Weisse, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The effect of large-scale atmospheric pressure changes on regional mean sea level projections in the German Bight in the twenty-first century are considered. A developed statistical model is applied to climate model data of sea level pressure for the twenty-first century to assess the potential contribution of large-scale atmospheric changes to future sea level changes in the German Bight. Using 78 experiments, an ensemble mean of 1.4-cm rise in regional mean sea level is estimated until the end of the twenty-first century. Changes are somewhat higher for realisations of the special report on emission scenarios (SRES) A1B and A2, but generally do not exceed a few centimeters. This is considerably smaller than the changes expected from steric and self-gravitational effects. Large-scale changes in sea level pressure are thus not expected to provide a substantial contribution to twenty-first century sea level changes in the German Bight.

  18. Effect of concentrate supplementation levels on growth and slaughter characteristics of SEA and SEA × Norwegian goats under on-farm conditions.