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Sample records for sea floor monitoring

  1. Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this poster presentation is to develop technologies to enable fundamental research into understanding the potential for and limits to chemolithoautotrophic life. The Medusa Isosampler (isobaric sampler), for sampling fluids eminating from deep sea hydrothermal vents and cold seep sites analogous to extraterrestrial environments, is described by the presentation. The following instruments are integrated with the isosampler, and also described: in situ flow-through chemical sensor, intrinsic fluorescent-based microbial detector, isotope ratio spectral detector.

  2. The Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, F. T.; Schultz, A.; Gupta, M.; Powers, L.; Klinkhammer, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System (MSMS) is a technology development project that is designed to enable fundamental research into understanding the potential for and limits to chemolithoautotrophic life. This is life within which inorganic carbon is converted to organic carbon and where only inorganic compounds serve as electron acceptors and electron donors. Such life forms are postulated to be capable of surviving in a Europan ocean. If we can prove that such life forms exist on Earth it would provide credence to the hypothesis that they might exist on other planets or moons in our Solar System. It has been hypothesized that one environment which might foster such life is associated with sub-seafloor hydrothermal vent structures. The goal of the MSMS project is to develop an instrument capable of testing this hypothesis. The MSMS instrument is an evolution of a sea floor monitoring system developed by Dr. Adam Schultz. Its design is the result of many generations of hardware and dive programs. Medusa provides the capability to measure and sample effluent and influent sea floor hydraulic flows associated with hydrothermal vent structures, active sea mounds, and sea floor bore holes. Through this proposal we are developing the next generation Medusa system and initiating the integration of several select chemical and biological sensors into the Medusa backbone. These sensors are an in situ flow-through spectral chemistry system, a cavity ringdown 12C/13C system, and an intrinsic fluorescence instrument. der way. This instrument can be used to target and discriminate between biological samples for automated sample collection

  3. A Sea Floor Penetrometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    processed through an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter, and stored in the memory of a mini-computer. Computer algorithms are applied to the deceleration data to provide real-time sea floor classification.

  4. Monitoring of Sea Floor Dynamics by the Application of Geodetic Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorst, L.

    2003-04-01

    detection capability of smaller scale dynamics can be applied by scientists that wish to investigate the sea floor on a more detailed level than sand waves. The analysis possibilities can be illustrated by several examples, using data collected on the Netherlands continental shelf, in areas with and without a sand wave pattern. E.g., an example containing deliberately wrongly chosen critical values gives insight in the advantages and dangers of this method for sea floor dynamics monitoring. References: Caspary, W.F., 'Concepts of Network and Deformation Analysis'. Monograph 11, Kensington, Australia: University of New South Wales, School of Surveying, 1987. Chilès, Jean-Paul, and Pierre Delfiner, 'Geostatistics, modelling spatial uncertainty'. New York: John Wiley &Sons, 1999. Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H., and G. Matthijs van den Brink, 'Comparison between predicted and observed sand waves and sand banks in the North Sea'. In: Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 106, no. C5, pp.9327-9338, May 2001. International Hydrographic Organization, 'IHO Standards for Hydrographic Surveys, Special Publication no.44, 4th Edition'. Monaco: International Hydrographic Bureau, April 1998.

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors

  6. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  7. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  11. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  12. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being

  13. A Sea Floor Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Zumberge

    2005-12-31

    In the North Sea natural gas production field at Sleipner, CO{sub 2} is being separated from natural gas and injected into an underground saline aquifer, known as the Utsira formation, for environmental purposes. In this study, gravity measurements were made over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site in 2002 and again in 2005 on top of 30 concrete benchmarks on the seafloor to study the behavior and physical properties of the injected CO{sub 2}. As the gas is injected, pore space water is replaced by gas, altering the bulk density of the formation. This results in a change in gravitational acceleration observed on the overlying sea floor. Our gravity measurements show a repeatability of 4.3 {micro}Gal for 2003 and 3.5 {micro}Gal for 2005. Forward models of the gravity change are calculated based on both 3-D seismic data and reservoir simulation models from other studies. These forward models indicate that the magnitude of maximum gravity change is primarily related to CO{sub 2} density rather than flow geometry. The time-lapse gravity observations best fit a high temperature forward model based on the seismically determined CO{sub 2} geometry, suggesting that the 3-D reflection seismics are imaging the geometry of the injected CO{sub 2}, and that the in situ CO{sub 2} density is around 530 kg/m{sup 3}. Uncertainty in determining the average density using this technique is estimated to be {+-}65 kg/m{sup 3} (95% confidence), however, additional seismic surveys are needed before final conclusions can be drawn. Future gravity measurements will put better constraints on the CO{sub 2} density and continue to map out the CO{sub 2} flow.

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient

  15. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  16. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency

  17. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land.

  18. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  19. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge

    2003-06-13

    At the Sleipner gas field, excess CO{sub 2} is sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. A high precision micro-gravity survey was carried out on the seafloor to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. Simple modeling of the first year data give inconclusive results, thus a more detailed approach is needed. Work towards this is underway.

  20. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zuberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2003-11-17

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A three-week trip to Statoil Research Centre in Trondheim, Norway, was made in the summer of 2003. This visit consisted of gathering data and collaborating with scientists working on the Sleipner project. The trip ended with a presentation of the seafloor gravity results to date at a SACS2 (Saline Aquifer CO{sub 2} Storage 2) meeting. This meeting provided the perfect opportunity to meet and gather information from the world's experts on the Sleipner project.

  1. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Ola Eiken

    2004-11-29

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 3/18/04 to 9/19/04. During this time, we participated in several CO{sub 2} sequestration-related meetings and conferences. On March 29, 2004, we participated in the 2004 Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting for the Department of Energy in Pittsburgh, PA. During the week of May 2, 2004, we attended and presented at the Third Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in Alexandria, VA. Finally, during the week of August 8, 2004, we took part in the U.S.-Norway, CO{sub 2} Summer School in Santa Fe, NM. Additional modeling was also completed, examining the seismic velocity pushdown estimates from the gravity models and the expected deformation of the seafloor due to the injected CO{sub 2}.

  2. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner

    2005-12-13

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 4.3 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. This report covers 3/19/05 to 9/18/05. During this time, gravity and pressure modeling were completed and graduate student Scott Nooner finished his Ph.D. dissertation, of which this work is a major part. Three new ROVDOG (Remotely Operated Vehicle deployable Deep Ocean Gravimeter) instruments were also completed with funding from Statoil. The primary changes are increased instrument precision and increased data sampling rate. A second gravity survey was carried out from August to September of 2005, allowing us to begin examining the time-lapse gravity changes caused by the injection of CO{sub 2} into the underground aquifer, known as the Utsira formation. Preliminary processing indicates a repeatability of 3.6 {micro}Gal, comparable to the baseline survey.

  3. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2004-05-19

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/03 to 3/18/04. During this time, significant advancement in the 3-D gravity forward modeling code was made. Testing of the numerical accuracy of the code was undertaken using both a sheet of mass and a frustum of a cone for test cases. These were chosen because of our ability to do an analytic calculation of gravity for comparison. Tests were also done to determine the feasibility of using point mass approximations rather than cuboids for the forward modeling code. After determining that the point mass approximation is sufficient (and over six times faster computationally), several CO{sub 2} models were constructed and the time-lapse gravity signal was calculated from each. From these models, we expect to see a gravity change ranging from 3-16 {micro}Gal/year, depending on reservoir conditions and CO{sub 2} geometry. While more detailed modeling needs to be completed, these initial results show that we may be able to learn a great deal about the state of the CO{sub 2} from the time-lapse gravity results. Also, in December of 2003, we presented at the annual AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  4. Pulsations, interpulsations, and sea-floor spreading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is postulated that worldwide transgressions (pulsations) and regressions (interpulsations) through the course of geologic time are related to the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems and to sea-floor spreading. Two multiple working hypotheses are advanced to explain major transgressions and regressions and the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems. One hypothesis interrelates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to the hypothesis of sub-Mohorovicic serpentinization. The second hypothesis relates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to a hypothesis involving thermal expansion and contraction.

  5. Pulsations, interpulsations, and sea-floor spreading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is postulated that worldwide transgressions (pulsations) and regressions (interpulsations) through the course of geologic time are related to the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems and to sea-floor spreading. Two multiple working hypotheses are advanced to explain major transgressions and regressions and the elevation and subsidence of oceanic ridge systems. One hypothesis interrelates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to the hypothesis of sub-Mohorovicic serpentinization. The second hypothesis relates the sea-floor spreading hypothesis to a hypothesis involving thermal expansion and contraction.

  6. Extending the sub-sea-floor biosphere.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Erwan G; Bonavita, Marie-Anne Cambon; Querellou, Joël; Cragg, Barry A; Webster, Gordon; Prieur, Daniel; Parkes, R John

    2008-05-23

    Sub-sea-floor sediments may contain two-thirds of Earth's total prokaryotic biomass. However, this has its basis in data extrapolation from ~500-meter to 4-kilometer depths, whereas the deepest documented prokaryotes are from only 842 meters. Here, we provide evidence for low concentrations of living prokaryotic cells in the deepest (1626 meters below the sea floor), oldest (111 million years old), and potentially hottest (~100 degrees C) marine sediments investigated. These Newfoundland margin sediments also have DNA sequences related to thermophilic and/or hyperthermophilic Archaea. These form two unique clusters within Pyrococcus and Thermococcus genera, suggesting unknown, uncultured groups are present in deep, hot, marine sediments (~54 degrees to 100 degrees C). Sequences of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea were also present, suggesting a deep biosphere partly supported by methane. These findings demonstrate that the sub-sea-floor biosphere extends to at least 1600 meters below the sea floor and probably deeper, given an upper temperature limit for prokaryotic life of at least 113 degrees C and increasing thermogenic energy supply with depth.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, shows a sample of the sea grass she collected from the floor of the Banana River. She is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, shows a sample of the sea grass she collected from the floor of the Banana River. She is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, holds a sample of the sea grass she collected from the floor of the Banana River. She is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Karen Holloway-Adkins, KSC wildlife specialist, holds a sample of the sea grass she collected from the floor of the Banana River. She is studying the life history of sea turtles, especially what they eat, where they lay their eggs and what factors might harm their survival. On the boat trip she is also monitoring the growth of sea grasses and algae and the water quality of estuaries and lagoons used by sea turtles and other aquatic wildlife.

  9. The installation of a sub sea floor observatory using the sea floor drill rig MeBo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wefer, G.; Freudenthal, T.; Kopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    Sea floor drill rigs that can be deployed from standard research vessels are bridging the gap between dedicated drill ships that are used for deep drillings in the range of several hundred meters below sea floor and conventional sampling tools like gravity corers, piston corer or dredges that only scratch the surface of the sea floor. A major advantage of such robotic drill rigs is that the drilling action is conducted from a stable platform at the sea bed independent of any ship movements due to waves, wind or currents. At the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen we developed the sea bed drill rig MeBo that can be deployed from standard research vessels. The drill rig is deployed on the sea floor and controlled from the vessel. Drilling tools for coring the sea floor down to 70 m can be stored on two magazines on the rig. A steel-armoured umbilical is used for lowering the rig to the sea bed in water depths up to 2000 m in the present system configuration. It was successfully operated on ten expeditions since 2005 and drilled more than 1000 m in different types of geology including hemipelagic mud, glacial till as well as sedimentary and crystalline rocks. MeBo boreholes be equipped with sensors and used for long term monitoring are planned. Depending on the scientific demands, a MeBoCORK monitoring system will allow in situ measurements of eg. temperature and pressure. The "MeBoCORK" will be equipped with data loggers and data transmission interface for reading out the collected data from the vessel. By additional payload installation on the MeBoCORK with an ROV it will be possible to increase the energy capacity as well as to conduct fluid sampling in the bore hole for geochemical analyses. It is planned to install a prototype of this additional payload with the MARUM ROV QUEST4000M during the following R/V SONNE cruise in July 2012.

  10. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station

  11. Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the development of an instrument to enable fundamental research into understanding the potential for and limits to chemolithoautrophic life. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Relevance to NASA Missions; 3) Technology Requirements; 4) Medusa System Description; 5) Medusa Components; 6) Medusa Science Capabilities; 7) Medusa Capabilities; and 8) Schedule

  12. Drilling cores on the sea floor with the remote-controlled sea floor drilling rig MeBo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, T.; Wefer, G.

    2013-12-01

    The sea floor drill rig MeBo (acronym for Meeresboden-Bohrgerät, German for sea floor drill rig) is a robotic drill rig that is deployed on the sea floor and operated remotely from the research vessel to drill up to 80 m into the sea floor. It was developed at the MARUM Research Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at Bremen University. The complete system - comprising the drill rig, winch, control station, and the launch and recovery system - is transported in six containers and can be deployed worldwide from German and international research ships. It was the first remote-controlled deep sea drill rig to use a wireline coring technique. Compared to drilling vessels this technology has the advantage of operating from a stable platform at the sea bed, which allows for optimal control over the drilling process. Especially for shallow drillings in the range of tens to hundreds of metres, sea bed drill rigs are time-efficient since no drill string has to be assembled from the ship to the sea floor before the first core can be taken. The MeBo has been successfully operated, retrieving high-quality cores at the sea bed for a variety of research fields, including slope stability studies and palaeoclimate reconstructions. Based on experience with the MeBo, a rig is now being built that will be able to drill to a depth of 200 m.

  13. Sea floor engineering geomorphology: recent achievements and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, David B.; Hooper, James R.

    1999-12-01

    New mapping technology is providing perspectives of the sea floor "as if there were no ocean", revealing that ocean floors exhibit a wide variety of relief, sediment properties, and active geologic processes such as erosion, faulting, fluid expulsion, and landslides. The development of coastal and offshore resources, such as oil and gas and minerals, involves sea floor engineering in remote, complex, and sometimes hazardous environments. Optimum engineering design and construction practice require detailed surveys of sea floor geomorphology, geologic conditions on the sea bed and to various depths beneath it, combined with geotechnical properties of the sediments and oceanographic information. Integrated site survey models attempt to predict conditions and process frequencies and magnitudes relevant to the engineering design lifetimes of sea floor installations, such as cables, pipelines, production platforms, as well as supporting coastal infrastructure such as jetties, wharves, bridges and harbors. Recent use of deep water areas for oil and gas production, pipelines, and cable routes are also showing that the "world's greatest slopes", beyond the continental shelves contain exciting, exotic, and enigmatic geomorphological features and processes. Safe and cost-effective engineering use of these regions depends upon exciting new technical and conceptual advances for understanding sea floor geomorphology — a task which has barely begun.

  14. A sea-floor spreading event captured by seismometers.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, M; Cowen, J P; Baker, E T; Fornari, D J; Rubin, K H; Shank, T M; Waldhauser, F; Bohnenstiehl, D R; Forsyth, D W; Holmes, R C; Love, B; Perfit, M R; Weekly, R T; Soule, S A; Glazer, B

    2006-12-22

    Two-thirds of Earth's surface is formed at mid-ocean ridges, yet sea-floor spreading events are poorly understood because they occur far beneath the ocean surface. At 9 degrees 50'N on the East Pacific Rise, ocean-bottom seismometers recently recorded the microearthquake character of a mid-ocean ridge eruption, including precursory activity. A gradual ramp-up in activity rates since seismic monitoring began at this site in October 2003 suggests that eruptions may be forecast in the fast-spreading environment. The pattern culminates in an intense but brief (approximately 6-hour) inferred diking event on 22 January 2006, followed by rapid tapering to markedly decreased levels of seismicity.

  15. Drilling cores on the sea floor with the remote-controlled sea-floor drilling rig MeBo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, T.; Wefer, G.

    2013-07-01

    Sampling of the upper 50 to 200 m of the sea floor to address questions relating to marine mineral resources and gas hydrates, for geotechnical research in areas of planned offshore installations, to study slope stability, and to investigate past climate fluctuations, to name just a few examples, is becoming increasingly important both in shallow waters and in the deep sea. As a rule, the use of drilling ships for this kind of drilling is inefficient because before the first core can be taken a drill string has to be assembled extending from the ship to the sea floor. Furthermore, movement of the ship due to wave motion disturbs the drilling process and often results in poor core quality, especially in the upper layers of the sea floor. For these reasons, the MeBo drilling rig, which is lowered to the sea floor and operated remotely from the ship to drill up to 80 m into the sea floor, was developed at the MARUM Research Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at Bremen University. The complete system, comprising the drill rig, winch, control station, and the launch and recovery system, is transported in six containers and can be deployed worldwide from German and international research ships. It was the first remote-controlled deep sea drill rig that uses a wireline coring technique. Based on the experiences with the MeBo a rig is now being built that will be able to drill to a depth of 200 m.

  16. Sea Floor off San Diego, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Ocean-floor image generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; California State University, Monterey Bay; and Fugro Pelagos. To learn more, visit http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/2007/2959/.

  17. Geological Interpretation of the Sea Floor Offshore of Edgartown, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Foster, D.S.; Blackwood, D.S.; Williams, S.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Moser, M.S.; Glomb, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Gridded bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery together cover approximately 37.3 square kilometers of sea floor in the vicinity of Edgartown Harbor, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11346, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor stations and seismic-reflection lines subsequently occupied to verify them, 1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, 2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and 3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management (for example, windfarms, pipelines, and dredging) activities along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf.

  18. Views of the Sea Floor in Northern Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A sonar survey that produced unprecedented high-resolution images of the sea floor in northern Monterey Bay was conducted in 2005 and 2006. The survey, performed over 14 days by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), consisted of 172 tracklines and over 300 million soundings and covered an area of 12.2 km2 (4.7 mi2). The goals of this survey were to collect high-resolution bathymetry (depth to the sea floor) and acoustic backscatter data (amount of sound energy bounced back from the sea floor, which provides information on sea-floor hardness and texture) from the inner continental shelf. These data will provide a baseline for future change analyses, geologic mapping, sediment- and contaminant-transport studies, benthic-habitat delineation, and numerical modeling efforts. The survey shows that the inner shelf in this area is extremely varied in nature, encompassing flat sandy areas, faults, boulder fields, and complex bedrock ridges that support rich marine ecosystems. Furthermore, many of these complex bedrock ridges form the ?reefs? that result in a number of California?s classic surf breaks.

  19. NASA OMG Mission Maps Sea Floor Depth off Greenland Coast

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-08

    This image shows a region of the sea floor off the coast of northwest Greenland mapped as part of NASA Oceans Melting Greenland OMG mission. The data shown here will be used to understand the pathways by which warm water can reach glacier edges.

  20. Detection of diffuse sea floor venting using structured light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, G.; Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Efficiently identifying and localizing diffuse sea floor venting at hydrothermal and cold seep sites is often difficult. Actively venting fluids are usually identified by a temperature induced optical shimmering seen during direct visual inspections or in video data collected by vehicles working close to the sea floor. Relying on such direct methods complicates establishing spatial relations between areas within a survey covering a broad area. Our recent work with a structured light laser system has shown that venting can also be detected in the image data in an automated fashion. A structured light laser system consists of a camera and sheet laser projected at the sea floor. The camera and laser are fixed to a rigid calibrated mount such that the optical axis of the camera and the laser plane intersect at some distance away from the camera, typically 2 to 5 meters. The position of the laser line, visible on the sea floor in the image, can be extracted using standard computer vision techniques (Fig. 1) and used to determine the height of the bottom along the laser line. By collecting images in a survey pattern at a high frame rate, typically 20 to 30 Hz, a bathymetric map can be produced using the individual profiles. In the presence of venting, temperature anomalies refract the laser sheet such that it does not project a crisp and clear line on the sea floor. The laser will instead appear blurred and visible over a larger section of the image. By processing the images to segment out clear laser lines from refracted lines it is possible to identify areas of venting. Our initial approach uses calculated image moments relative to the peak intensity level detected in each column of the image matrix. In the presence of venting the calculated moments differ from those of the undistorted laser shining on the sea floor. Test results from the Kolumbo submarine volcano near Santorini, Greece demonstrate this approach and show the utility of the method for survey work. Test

  1. Automated sea floor extraction from underwater video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Lauren; Rahmes, Mark; Stiver, James; McCluskey, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ocean floor mapping using video is a method to simply and cost-effectively record large areas of the seafloor. Obtaining visual and elevation models has noteworthy applications in search and recovery missions. Hazards to navigation are abundant and pose a significant threat to the safety, effectiveness, and speed of naval operations and commercial vessels. This project's objective was to develop a workflow to automatically extract metadata from marine video and create image optical and elevation surface mosaics. Three developments made this possible. First, optical character recognition (OCR) by means of two-dimensional correlation, using a known character set, allowed for the capture of metadata from image files. Second, exploiting the image metadata (i.e., latitude, longitude, heading, camera angle, and depth readings) allowed for the determination of location and orientation of the image frame in mosaic. Image registration improved the accuracy of mosaicking. Finally, overlapping data allowed us to determine height information. A disparity map was created using the parallax from overlapping viewpoints of a given area and the relative height data was utilized to create a three-dimensional, textured elevation map.

  2. 35. Credit JTL. Third floor, side view of Monitor Dustless ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Credit JTL. Third floor, side view of Monitor Dustless Receiving Separator, by Huntley, Cranson and Hammond, (Silver Creek NY) capacity of 100 barrels/day. - Bunker Hill Mill, County Route 26, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, WV

  3. Sidescan sonar imagery and surficial geologic interpretation of the sea floor off Branford, Conneticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Paskevich, V.F.; Moser, M.S.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.; Christman, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP), Figure 1 - Map of Study Areahas produced detailed geologic maps of the sea floor in Long Island Sound, a major East Coast estuary surrounded by the most densely populated region of the United States. These studies have built upon cooperative research between the USGS and the State of Connecticut that was initiated in 1982. The current phase of this research program is directed toward studies of sea-floor sediment distribution, processes that control sediment distribution, nearshore environmental concerns, and the relation of benthic community structures to the sea-floor geology. Anthropogenic wastes, toxic chemicals, and changes in land-use patterns resulting from residential, commercial, and recreational development have stressed the environment of the Sound, causing degradation and potential loss of benthic habitats (Koppelman and others, 1976; Long Island Sound Study, 1994). Detailed maps of the sea floor are needed to help evaluate the extent of adverse impacts and to help wisely manage resources in the future. Therefore, in a continuing effort to better understand Long Island Sound, we are constructing and interpreting sidescan sonar mosaics (complete-coverage acoustic images of the sea floor) within specific areas of special interest (Poppe and Polloni, 1998). The mosaic presented herein, which was produced during survey H11043 by NOAA 's Atlantic Hydrographic Branch, covers approximately 41.1 km2 of the sea floor in north-central Long Island Sound off Branford, Connecticut. Shell bed provides shelter for juvenille skate.The mosaic and its interpretation serve many purposes, including: (1) defining the geological variability of the sea floor, which is one of the primary controls of benthic habitat diversity; (2) improving our understanding of the processes that control the

  4. The Sea Floor: A Living Learning Residential Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guentzel, J. L.; Rosch, E.; Stoughton, M. A.; Bowyer, R.; Mortensen, K.; Smith, M.

    2016-02-01

    Living learning communities are collaborations between university housing and academic departments designed to enhance the overall student experience by integrating classroom/laboratory learning, student life and extracurricular activities. At Coastal Carolina University, the residential community associated with the Marine Science program is known as the Sea Floor. Students selected to become members of the Sea Floor remain "in residence" for two consecutive semesters. These students are first-time freshman that share a common course connection. This course is usually Introduction to Marine Science (MSCI 111) or MSCI 399s, which are one credit field/laboratory centered internships. The common course connection is designed so residents can establish and maintain an educational dialog with their peers. Activities designed to enhance the students' networking skills and educational and social development skills include monthly lunches with marine science faculty and dinner seminars with guest speakers from academia, industry and government. Additionally, each semester several activities outside the classroom are planned so that students can more frequently interact with themselves and their faculty and staff partners. These activities include field trips to regional aquariums, local boat trips that include water sample collection and analysis, and an alternative spring break trip to the Florida Keys to study the marine environment firsthand. The resident advisor that supervises the Sea Floor is usually a sophomore or junior marine science major. This provides the residents with daily communication and mentoring from a marine science major that is familiar with the marine science program and residence life. Assessment activities include: a university housing community living survey, student interest housing focus groups, fall to spring and fall to fall retention, and evaluation of program advisors and program activities.

  5. Deep oceanic currents and sea floor interactions offshore SE Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raisson, François; Cazzola, Carlo; Ferry, Jean-Noel

    2016-04-01

    The Pamela Research program, which involves Total and Ifremer and their associated partners (French Universities, CNRS, IFPEN), is currently working to acquire new multidisciplinary data in the Mozambique Channel, in order to improve our knowledge and use this area as "laboratory" for comprehension of sedimentary/stratigraphical/geodynamical/structural and biological processes. The area comprised between the austral ocean and the southern tip of the African continent is a major place for Atlantic and Indian waters exchange, with high impact on the global climate (de Rujiter et al., 1999, Beal et al., 2011). Its prolongation toward the Mozambique Channel is a great playground to study effects of bottom currents on the sea floor. In this synthesis, we compile information about the major oceanic currents that occur at different water depth in the area, and we started listing the main published or ongoing studies, some of them in the scope of the Pamela project, related to sea floor interactions with bottom currents. These interactions are characterized by erosional features: submarine erosions, truncations, stratigraphic hiatuses, associated to depositional features: various types of contouritic drifts, sediment waves, asymmetric turbiditic levees etc. (Simpson et al., 1974, Uenzelmann-Neben et al., 2007, Uenzelmann-Neben & Huhn, 2009, Palermo et al., 2014). Movements of the main water masses in the Mozambique basin are strongly driven by thermohaline circulation but also sea floor topography and coast configuration: the Mozambique Current is not a persistent current but composed by southward moving anticyclonic eddies (De Rujiter et al., 2002, Ridderinkhof & de Rujiter, 2003, Swart et al., 2010, Halo et al., 2014). Deep currents flow northward along the western edge of the Mozambique basin: the North Atlantic Deep Waters (NADW) and the Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) flow along the Mozambican continental slope and form the Mozambique Undercurrent. A portion of

  6. Geologic interpretation and multibeam bathymetry of the sea floor in southeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Doran, Elizabeth F.; Moser, Marc S.; Stewart, Helen F.; Forfinski, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Uther L.; Keene, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    Digital terrain models (DTMs) produced from multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric data provide valuable base maps for marine geological interpretations (e.g. Todd and others, 1999; Mosher and Thomson, 2002; ten Brink and others, 2004; Poppe and others, 2006a,b). These maps help define the geological variability of the sea floor (one of the primary controls of benthic habitat diversity); improve our understanding of the processes that control the distribution and transport of bottom sediments, the distribution of benthic habitats and associated infaunal community structures; and provide a detailed framework for future research, monitoring, and management activities. The bathymetric survey interpreted herein (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) survey H11255) covers roughly 95 km? of sea floor in southeastern Long Island Sound (fig. 1). This bathymetry has been examined in relation to seismic reflection data collected concurrently, as well as archived seismic profiles acquired as part of a long-standing geologic mapping partnership between the State of Connecticut and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of this work was to use these geophysical data sets to interpret geomorphological attributes of the sea floor in terms of the Quaternary geologic history and modern sedimentary processes within Long Island Sound.

  7. The deep structure of a sea-floor hydrothermal deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Fouquet, Y.; Miller, D.J.; Bahr, J.M.; Baker, P.A.; Bjerkgard, T.; Brunner, C.A.; Duckworth, R.C.; Gable, R.; Gieskes, J.; Goodfellow, W.D.; Groschel-Becker, H. M.; Guerin, G.; Ishibashi, J.; Iturrino, G.; James, R.H.; Lackschewitz, K.S.; Marquez, L.L.; Nehlig, P.; Peter, J.M.; Rigsby, C.A.; Schultheiss, P.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Summit, M.; Teagle, D.A.H.; Urbat, M.; Zuffa, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at the crests of mid-ocean ridges plays an important role in transferring heat from the interior of the Earth. A consequence of this hydrothermal circulation is the formation of metallic ore bodies known as volcanic-associated massive sulphide deposits. Such deposits, preserved on land, were important sources of copper for ancient civilizations and continue to provide a significant source of base metals (for example, copper and zinc). Here we present results from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 169, which drilled through a massive sulphide deposit on the northern Juan de Fuca spreading centre and penetrated the hydrothermal feeder zone through which the metal-rich fluids reached the sea floor. We found that the style of feeder-zone mineralization changes with depth in response to changes in the pore pressure of the hydrothermal fluids and discovered a stratified zone of high-grade copper-rich replacement mineralization below the massive sulphide deposit. This copper-rich zone represents a type of mineralization not previously observed below sea-floor deposits, and may provide new targets for land-based mineral exploration.

  8. Possibility of tilt observation at the sea floor by using the BBOBST-NX system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Ito, A.; Sugioka, H.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1999, we had developed the broadband ocean bottom seismometer (BBOBS) and its new generation system (BBOBS-NX), and, with them, performed several practical observations to create a new category of the ocean floor broadband seismology. Now, the BBOBS data is proved to be acceptable for broadband seismic analyses. In these studies, the period range mostly used is about 10 - 200 s, but in longer period range, i.e. geodetic range, is unknown region in the sea floor observation. High mobility of our BBOBS and BBOBS-NX can be a breakthrough to realize the geodetic observation network on the sea floor. Two kinds of attempts to expand observation range toward the geodetic one have been started since 2009, based on our BBOBS technology. One is for detecting vertical displacement by attaching an absolute pressure gauge (APG) in the BBOBS system. The highly stable frequency oscillator within the OBS recorder is adequate for precise pressure measurement of the APG. This BBOBS+APG system has been operated since 2009. In this presentation, we will report results of several test experiments for the tilt observation just beneath the sea floor by using the BBOBS-NX system, as the second one. The tilt is measured by using two horizontal mass position signals of the sensor. The first test observation was performed by using the same sensor of the BBOBS-NX at the land observatory in 2010. The result was comparable with that of the water tube tilt-meter there. After the in situ test for 2 months at the sea floor in the Shikoku Basin in 2012, we started the practical tilt observation at the sea floor off Boso peninsula (KAP3 site) as the feasibility study between April 2013 and April 2014. The deployment and recovery were performed by the ROV. In both observations, a Doppler current profiler was deployed nearby the BBOBST-NX to monitor bottom currents through the observation period. In January 2014, a slow slip event (SSE) occurred near the KAP3 site. The Mw of the SSE is 6.5, and

  9. Development of in-situ measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea floor (IMAGES)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, K.; Itoh, F.; Yamazaki, T.

    1984-05-01

    The effort of the research and devolopment of manganese nodule mining system from deep ocean floor has been concentrated in several countries this decade. Among many subsystems of the mining system it is said that the development of the collector system which harvests manganese nodule on the sea floor involves most difficult problems. The engineering properties of deep sea floor is one of the most important factors to develop efficient and safe collector system. The authors designed and fabricated insitu measuring apparatus of geotechnical elements of sea-floor (IMAGES) which measured some engineering properties of deep sea floor automatically. It is lowered to sea floor from surface ship with wire rope. After reaching on sea floor it starts vane test, cone test, and bearing capacity test. The data measured are recorded on the magnetic tape contained in a pressure vessel. After laboratory and shallow water tests IMAGES was tested in south Central Pacific manganese nodule province. But some units driven by underwater motor did not work enough on the sea floor and very limited data were collected. Presently many experiments to clarify the cause of this unexpected results are being carried out. After getting the answers the authors rearrange the IMAGES and try to collect data of in-situ deep sea floor engineering properties in Pacific again.

  10. Processing of airborne lidar bathymetry data for detailed sea floor mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulldahl, H. Michael

    2014-10-01

    Airborne bathymetric lidar has proven to be a valuable sensor for rapid and accurate sounding of shallow water areas. With advanced processing of the lidar data, detailed mapping of the sea floor with various objects and vegetation is possible. This mapping capability has a wide range of applications including detection of mine-like objects, mapping marine natural resources, and fish spawning areas, as well as supporting the fulfillment of national and international environmental monitoring directives. Although data sets collected by subsea systems give a high degree of credibility they can benefit from a combination with lidar for surveying and monitoring larger areas. With lidar-based sea floor maps containing information of substrate and attached vegetation, the field investigations become more efficient. Field data collection can be directed into selected areas and even focused to identification of specific targets detected in the lidar map. The purpose of this work is to describe the performance for detection and classification of sea floor objects and vegetation, for the lidar seeing through the water column. With both experimental and simulated data we examine the lidar signal characteristics depending on bottom depth, substrate type, and vegetation. The experimental evaluation is based on lidar data from field documented sites, where field data were taken from underwater video recordings. To be able to accurately extract the information from the received lidar signal, it is necessary to account for the air-water interface and the water medium. The information content is hidden in the lidar depth data, also referred to as point data, and also in the shape of the received lidar waveform. The returned lidar signal is affected by environmental factors such as bottom depth and water turbidity, as well as lidar system factors such as laser beam footprint size and sounding density.

  11. Presence of oxygen and aerobic communities from sea floor to basement in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, Steven; Inagaki, Fumio; Zarikian, Carlos Alvarez; Abrams, Lewis J.; Dubois, Nathalie; Engelhardt, Tim; Evans, Helen; Ferdelman, Timothy; Gribsholt, Britta; Harris, Robert N.; Hoppie, Bryce W.; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kallmeyer, Jens; Kim, Jinwook; Lynch, Jill E.; McKinley, Claire C.; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Morono, Yuki; Murray, Richard W.; Pockalny, Robert; Sauvage, Justine; Shimono, Takaya; Shiraishi, Fumito; Smith, David C.; Smith-Duque, Christopher E.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Steinsbu, Bjorn Olav; Suzuki, Yohey; Szpak, Michal; Toffin, Laurent; Uramoto, Goichiro; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; Zhang, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2015-04-01

    The depth of oxygen penetration into marine sediments differs considerably from one region to another. In areas with high rates of microbial respiration, O2 penetrates only millimetres to centimetres into the sediments, but active anaerobic microbial communities are present in sediments hundreds of metres or more below the sea floor. In areas with low sedimentary respiration, O2 penetrates much deeper but the depth to which microbial communities persist was previously unknown. The sediments underlying the South Pacific Gyre exhibit extremely low areal rates of respiration. Here we show that, in this region, microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence to depths of at least 75 metres below sea floor. Based on the Redfield stoichiometry of dissolved O2 and nitrate, we suggest that net aerobic respiration in these sediments is coupled to oxidation of marine organic matter. We identify a relationship of O2 penetration depth to sedimentation rate and sediment thickness. Extrapolating this relationship, we suggest that oxygen and aerobic communities may occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global sea floor. Subduction of the sediment and basalt from these regions is a source of oxidized material to the mantle.

  12. Sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments in southern Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Nardi, Matthew J.; Andring, Matthew A.

    2015-09-09

    Multibeam echosounder data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration along with sediment samples and still and video photography of the sea floor collected by the U.S. Geological Survey were used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in southern Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, as part of a long-term effort to map the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. Sea-floor features include rocky areas and scour depressions in high-energy environments characterized by erosion or nondeposition, and sand waves and megaripples in environments characterized by coarse-grained bedload transport. Two shipwrecks are also located in the study area. Much of the sea floor is relatively featureless within the resolution of the multibeam data; sedimentary environments in these areas are characterized by processes associated with sorting and reworking. This report releases bathymetric data from the multibeam echosounder, grain-size analyses of sediment samples, and photographs of the sea floor and interpretations of the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. It provides base maps that can be used for resource management and studies of topics such as benthic ecology, contaminant inventories, and sediment transport.

  13. Nondestructive imaging of fragile sea-floor vent deposit samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston Tivey, Margaret; Singh, Sandipa

    1997-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography was used to detail the internal structure of sea-floor hydrothermal vent samples. A third-generation industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner with a microfocus tube was used to scan a black smoker chimney and cores taken from a white smoker chimney and a block of Fe-rich sulfide. Images of the black smoker chimney clearly show sulfide- versus anhydrite-dominated areas. Display of pore space in three dimensions shows the complex geometry of the main flow conduit, and also much smaller (2 3 mm diameter) conduits within the chimney wall that parallel the main flow conduit. Images of the white smoker sample document the continuity of an anastomosing ˜1-mm-diameter flow conduit, and the pronounced anisotropy of porosity. Tube structures presumed to be casts of worm tubes are clearly evident in images of the Fe-rich sulfide sample. X-ray CT is an excellent technique for rapidly identifying the internal structure of porosity and mineralogy of fragile hydrothermal precipitates on scales of tens of microns to hundreds of millimeters, and data can be used to deduce styles of fluid flow and other processes involved in vent deposit formation.

  14. Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Johnson, K.R.; Barber, John H.

    1983-01-01

    A dense ampeliscid amphipod community in Chirikov Basin and around St. Lawrence Island in the northeastern Bering Sea has been outlined by summarizing biological studies, analyzing bioturbation in sediment samples, and examining sea floor photos and videotapes. The amphipod population is associated with a homogeneous, relict fine-grained sand body 0.10-1.5 m thick that is deposited during the marine transgression over the Bering land bridge 8,000-10,000 yr B.P. Modern current and water mass movements and perhaps whale feeding activity prevent modern deposition in this area. The distribution of the transgressive sand sheet, associated amphipod community and feeding gray whales mapped by aerial survey correlate closely with three types of sea-floor pits observed on high (500 kHz) and low (105 kHz) resolution side-scan sonar; they are attributed to gray whale feeding traces and their subsequent current scour modification. The fresh and modified feeding pits are present in 22,000 km2 of the basin and they cover a total of 2 to 18% of the sea floor in different areas of the feeding region. The smallest size class of pits approximates whale mouth gape size and is assumed to represent fresh whale feeding pits. Fresh feeding disturbance of the sea floor is estimated to average about 5.7% for a full feeding season. Combined with information that 34% of the measured benthic biomass is amphipod prey species, and calculating the number of gray whale feeding days in the Alaskan waters plus amount consumed per day, it can be estimated that Chirikov Basin, 2% of the feeding area, supplies a minimum of 5.3 to 7.1% of the gray whale's food resource in the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean. If a maximum of 50% of the fresh feeding features are assumed to be missed because they parallel side-scan beam paths, then a maximum whale food resource of 14.2% is possible in northeastern Bering Sea. Because of side-scan techniques and possible higher amphipod biomass estimates, a reasonable minimum

  15. Maps showing sea-floor topography, depth to bedrock, and sediment thickness, Penobscot Bay, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Scanlon, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    In the maps presented here, we illustrate and briefly describe the sea-floor topography, bedrock morphology, and variable sediment thickness within Penobscot Bay that were either produced or modified during the period of geologic change since late Wisconsinan time.

  16. How to build a model illustrating sea-floor spreading and subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes how to build a model of the outer 300 km (180 miles) of the Earth that can be used to develop a better understanding of the principal features of plate tectonics, including sea-floor spreading, the pattern of magnetic stripes frozen into the sea floor, transform faulting, thrust faulting, subduction, and volcanism. In addition to a paper copy of this report, the materials required are a cardboard shoebox, glue, scissors, straight edge, and safety razor blade.

  17. A marine dynamic penetrometer for the determination of sea floor geotechnical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, S.; Kaul, N. E.; Villinger, H. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present a seafloor lance penetration monitoring system: the Lance Insertion Retardation Meter (LIRmeter). The device can be used to infer geotechnical seafloor properties, such as bearing capacity by monitoring the deceleration of a free-fall penetrating lance. The deceleration record can be furthermore used to estimate mean grain size and mud content of the sea floor as well as total penetration depth. The LIRmeter is contained in a pressure vessel (440 x 110 mm) and equipped with accelerometers of different sensitivities to (i) determine sea floor resistance during penetration and (ii) to generate a depth axis. Typically, measurements are carried out in a pogo style fashion to allow a rapid measurement progress during field campaigns. The LIRmeter is intended to determine sea floor properties on the sole basis of deceleration measurements in order to achieve a mechanically and electronically robust system. Data is sampled at a resolution of 16 bit and at a rate of typically 500 Hz for each channel. The device can either be installed in any type of lance i.e. marine heat flow probes, gravity corers, piston corers or can be used in combination with a purpose built lance as a standalone instrument. It has a usable length of four meters, a total weight of 280 kg in air and can be operated up to full ocean depth (6000m). The bearing capacity of the sea floor is a critical factor for marine engineering projects such as burial of marine cables, pipeline laying and foundations. Knowledge of the mud content can provide constraints for the estimation of hydraulic conductivity. The identification of weak zones along a slope can moreover provide vital information for risk assessment studies. Traditionally, frame based, quasi static Cone Penetration Tests (CPT) or sampling methods like gravity coring are used to conduct these types of investigation. In comparison to established but time consuming and rather costly methods, the LIRmeter is intended (i) for near surface

  18. High resolution hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor maps (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, C.; Inglis, G.

    2013-12-01

    This abstract presents a method for creating hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor reconstructions at centimeter scale grid resolutions with robotic vehicles. Multibeam sonar and stereo vision are two common sensing modalities with complementary strengths that are well suited for data fusion. We have recently developed an automated two stage pipeline to create such maps. The steps can be broken down as navigation refinement and map construction. During navigation refinement a graph-based optimization algorithm is used to align 3D point clouds created with both the multibeam sonar and stereo cameras. The process combats the typical growth in navigation error that has a detrimental affect on map fidelity and typically introduces artifacts at small grid sizes. During this process we are able to automatically register local point clouds created by each sensor to themselves and to each other where they overlap in a survey pattern. The process also estimates the sensor offsets, such as heading, pitch and roll, that describe how each sensor is mounted to the vehicle. The end results of the navigation step is a refined vehicle trajectory that ensures the points clouds from each sensor are consistently aligned, and the individual sensor offsets. In the mapping step, grid cells in the map are selectively populated by choosing data points from each sensor in an automated manner. The selection process is designed to pick points that preserve the best characteristics of each sensor and honor some specific map quality criteria to reduce outliers and ghosting. In general, the algorithm selects dense 3D stereo points in areas of high texture and point density. In areas where the stereo vision is poor, such as in a scene with low contrast or texture, multibeam sonar points are inserted in the map. This process is automated and results in a hybrid map populated with data from both sensors. Additional cross modality checks are made to reject outliers in a robust manner. The final

  19. Gas hydrate that breaches the sea floor on the continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, I.R.; Guinasso, N.L. Jr.; Sassen, R.; Brooks, J.M.; Lee, L. ); Scott, K.T. )

    1994-08-01

    We report observations that concern formation and dissociation of gas hydrate near the sea floor at depths of [minus]540 m in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In August 1992, three lobes of gas hydrate were partly exposed beneath a thin layer of sediment. By May 1993, the most prominent lobe had evidently broken free and floated away, leaving a patch of disturbed sediment and exposed hydrate. The underside of the gas hydrate was about 0.2[degree]C warmer than ambient sea water and had trapped a large volume of oil and free gas. An in situ monitoring device, deployed on a nearby bed of mussels, recorded sustained releases of gas during a 44 day monitoring period. Gas venting coincided with a temporary rise in water temperature of 1[degree]C, which is consistent with thermally induced dissociation of hydrate composed mainly of methane and water. We conclude that the effects of accumulating buoyant force and fluctuating water temperature cause shallow gas hydrate alternately to check and release gas venting. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Geologic interpretation and multibeam bathymetry of the sea floor in the vicinity of the Race, eastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.; Doran, E.F.; Smith, S.M.; Stewart, H.F.; Forfinski, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    Digital terrain models (DTMs) produced from multibeam bathymetric data provide valuable base maps for marine geological interpretations (Todd and others, 1999; Mosher and Thomson, 2002; ten Brink and others, 2004; Poppe and others, 2006a, b, c, d). These maps help define the geological variability of the sea floor (one of the primary controls of benthic habitat diversity), improve our understanding of the processes that control the distribution and transport of bottom sediments and the distribution of benthic habitats and associated infaunal community structures, and provide a detailed framework for future research, monitoring, and management activities. The bathymetric survey interpreted herein (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) survey H11250) covers roughly 94 km² of sea floor in an area where a depression along the Orient Point-Fishers Island segment of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown Moraine forms the Race, the eastern opening to Long Island Sound. The Race also divides easternmost Long Island Sound from northwestern Block Island Sound (fig. 1). This bathymetry has been examined in relation to seismic reflection data collected concurrently, as well as archived seismic profiles acquired as part of a long-standing geologic mapping partnership between the State of Connecticut and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of this work was to use these acoustic data sets to interpret geomorphological attributes of the sea floor, and to use these interpretations to better understand the Quaternary geologic history and modern sedimentary processes.

  1. Sea-floor geology in northwestern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Woods, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 69-square-kilometer area of northwestern Block Island Sound, are used with sediment samples, and still and video photography of the sea floor, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 43 stations within this area, to interpret the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. Features on the sea floor include boulders, sand waves, scour depressions, modern marine sediments, and trawl marks. Boulders, which are often several meters wide, are found in patches in the shallower depths and tend to be overgrown with sessile flora and fauna. They are lag deposits of winnowed glacial drift, and reflect high-energy environments characterized by processes associated with erosion and nondeposition. Sand waves and megaripples tend to have crests that either trend parallel to shore with 20- to 50-meter (m) wavelengths or trend perpendicular to shore with several-hundred-meter wavelengths. The sand waves reflect sediment transport directions perpendicular to shore by waves, and parallel to shore by tidal or wind-driven currents, respectively. Scour depressions, which are about 0.5 m lower than the surrounding sea floor, have floors of gravel and coarser sand than bounding modern marine sediments. These scour depressions, which are conspicuous in the sidescan-sonar data because of their more highly reflective coarser sediment floors, are likely formed by storm-generated, seaward-flowing currents and maintained by the turbulence in bottom currents caused by their coarse sediments. Areas of the sea floor with modern marine sediments tend to be relatively flat to current-rippled and sandy.

  2. Integrating sea floor observatory data: the EMSO data infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Robert; Azzarone, Adriano; Carval, Thierry; Doumaz, Fawzi; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Marinaro, Giuditta; Rolin, Jean-Francois; Beranzoli, Laura; Waldmann, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The European research infrastructure EMSO is a European network of fixed-point, deep-seafloor and water column observatories deployed in key sites of the European Continental margin and Arctic. It aims to provide the technological and scientific framework for the investigation of the environmental processes related to the interaction between the geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere and for a sustainable management by long-term monitoring also with real-time data transmission. Since 2006, EMSO is on the ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) roadmap and has entered its construction phase in 2012. Within this framework, EMSO is contributing to large infrastructure integration projects such as ENVRI and COOPEUS. The EMSO infrastructure is geographically distributed in key sites of European waters, spanning from the Arctic, through the Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea to the Black Sea. It is presently consisting of thirteen sites which have been identified by the scientific community according to their importance respect to Marine Ecosystems, Climate Changes and Marine GeoHazards. The data infrastructure for EMSO is being designed as a distributed system. Presently, EMSO data collected during experiments at each EMSO site are locally stored and organized in catalogues or relational databases run by the responsible regional EMSO nodes. Three major institutions and their data centers are currently offering access to EMSO data: PANGAEA, INGV and IFREMER. In continuation of the IT activities which have been performed during EMSOs twin project ESONET, EMSO is now implementing the ESONET data architecture within an operational EMSO data infrastructure. EMSO aims to be compliant with relevant marine initiatives such as MyOceans, EUROSITES, EuroARGO, SEADATANET and EMODNET as well as to meet the requirements of international and interdisciplinary projects such as COOPEUS and ENVRI, EUDAT and iCORDI. A major focus is therefore set on standardization and

  3. Modelling Sea Floor Spreading Initiation and Depth Dependent Stretching at Rifted Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.; Tymms, V.

    2003-12-01

    Depth dependent stretching, in which upper crustal extension is much less than that of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle, has been observed at both non-volcanic and volcanic margins and is not predicted by existing quantitative models of rifted margin formation which are usually based on intra-continental rift models subjected to very large stretching factors. New conceptual and quantitative models of rifted margin formation are required. The timing of depth dependent stretching on the Norwegian margin suggests that depth dependent stretching of continental rifted margin lithosphere occurs during early sea-floor spreading rather than during pre-breakup rifting. These observations suggest that the main thinning of rifted margin lithosphere occurs during early sea-floor spreading rather than during pre-breakup rifting. Single-phase fluid-flow models have been applied successfully to sea-floor spreading at ocean ridges. A single-phase fluid-flow model of sea-floor spreading initiation has been developed to determine rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and thermal evolution resulting from early sea-floor spreading. The ocean-ridge initiation model uses an isoviscous corner-flow stream-function solution (Batchelor 1967) to predict the divergent lithospheric and asthenospheric fluid-flow field associated with early sea-floor spreading. The thinning of the rifted continental lithosphere is calculated by material advection in the newly initiated ocean ridge fluid-flow field. The model may also include the effects of pre-breakup pure-shear stretching of continental lithosphere. Rifted margin lithosphere thinning and thermal evolution is dependent on ocean-ridge spreading rate (Vx), the mantle upwelling velocity beneath the ridge axis (Vz), and the pre-breakup lithosphere beta stretching factor. The developed model predicts the thinning of the upper crust, lower crust and lithospheric mantle of the continental margin, and the history of rifted margin

  4. Sea-floor geology of Long Island Sound north of Duck Pond Point, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Glomb, K.A.; Doran, E.F.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection are mapping the sea floor in coastal areas of the northeastern United States. As part of the project, more than 100 square kilometers of multibeam-echosounder data, 23 sediment samples, bottom video, and 86 still photographs were obtained from an area in Long Island Sound north of Duck Pond Point, New York, in the study area of NOAA survey H11999. This report delineates the sediment types and sea-floor features found within this area in order to better understand the sea-floor processes occurring in this part of Long Island Sound. The sea floor in the study area is dominated by ubiquitous sand-wave fields and three northeast-southwest trending bathymetric depressions. Barchanoid and transverse sand waves, including sinusoidal, bifurcating, arced, and straight-crested morphologies, are variably present. Asymmetrical sand-wave profiles indicate a westward to southwestward direction of sediment transport in most of the study area; current ripples and megaripples on the stoss slopes of the sand waves indicate transport is ongoing. The majority of the sediment on the sea floor is sand, although bouldery, gravelly, and muddy sediments are also present. Gray, cohesive mud crops out on the walls of some of the scour depressions associated with the troughs of large sand waves. Clasts of the muddy sediment scattered on the sea floor around the depressions demonstrate the intensity of the scour and suggest erosion of the underlying distal deltaic sediments.

  5. Sediment distribution on the mid-ocean ridges with respect to spreading of the sea floor.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J; Ewing, M

    1967-06-23

    An abrupt change in sediment thickness between the crests and flanks of the mid-ocean ridges can be interpreted as a major discontinuity in the rates either of spreading of the sea floor or of accumulation of sediment. The preferable interpretation of the data is that the process of spreadig of the sea floor is intermittent and that the present cycle of spreading commenced around 10 million years ago. following a long period Of quiescence during which most of the observed sediments were deposited.

  6. Sea floor gouges and pits in deep fjords, Baffin Island: Possible mammalian feeding traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, F. J.; Syvitski, J. P. M.

    1989-06-01

    Pisces submersible dives within Baffin Island fjords have revealed the common occurrence of pits on the sea floor, at water depths between 40 and 326 m. The size of these pits are in the decimeter to meter range. Through indirect evidence (by comparison of morphologic features to pits or gouges of known origin) they are believed to be feeding traces of narwhal, beluga, or bowhead whales. If so, they are the deepest mammalian feeding traces yet reported. Bioerosion by large foraging mammals may be a more common sea floor process than previously thought.

  7. Effects of early sea-floor processes on the taphonomy of temperate shelf skeletal carbonate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Abigail M.; Nelson, Campbell S.

    2003-10-01

    Cool-water shelf carbonates differ from tropical carbonates in their sources, modes, and rates of deposition, geochemistry, and diagenesis. Inorganic precipitation, marine cementation, and sediment accumulation rates are absent or slow in cool waters, so that temperate carbonates remain longer at or near the sea bed. Early sea-floor processes, occurring between biogenic calcification and ultimate deposition, thus take on an important role, and there is the potential for considerable taphonomic loss of skeletal information into the fossilised record of cool-water carbonate deposits. The physical breakdown processes of dissociation, breakage, and abrasion are mediated mainly by hydraulic regime, and are always destructive. Impact damage reduces the size of grains, removes structure and therefore information, and ultimately may transform skeletal material into anonymous particles. Abrasion is highly selective amongst and within taxa, their skeletal form and structure strongly influencing resistance to mechanical breakdown. Dissolution and precipitation are the end-members of a two-way chemical equilibrium operating in sea water. In cool waters, inorganic precipitation is rare. There is conflicting opinion about the importance of diagenetic dissolution of carbonate skeletons on the temperate sea floor, but test maceration and early loss of aragonite in particular are reported. Dissolution may relate to undersaturated acidic pore waters generated locally by a combination of microbial metabolisation of organic matter, strong bioturbation, and oxidation of solid phase sulphides immediately beneath the sea floor in otherwise very slowly accumulating skeletal deposits. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that surface-to-volume ratio and skeletal mineralogy are both important in determining skeletal resistance to dissolution. Biological processes on the sea floor include encrustation and bioerosion. Encrustation, a constructive process, may be periodic or seasonal, and can be

  8. Aggregation of the Arctic copepod Calanus hyperboreus over the ocean floor of the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H. J.; Muyakshin, S.; Klages, M.; Auel, H.

    2006-02-01

    According to combined observations from vertical plankton tows, dredging with epibenthic nets 1 m above the ocean floor, video recordings and acoustic data from a scanning sonar obtained during descent and during deployment on the ocean floor, the calanoid copepod Calanus hyperboreus was aggregated in high concentrations near the ocean floor of the Greenland Sea between 2300 and 2500 m during late July and August. Concentrations were highest very close to the ocean floor and decreased rapidly further upward. These nearly mono-specific aggregations were apparently drifting in cloud-like formations with a horizontal extension of ca. 270 m with the near-bottom currents. Maximum abundances observed were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than in the water column. The biomass in the bottom 20 m layer was around 18% of the biomass in the rest of the water column. Stage composition, reduced metabolic rates and insensibility to mechanical stimuli indicate that these C. hyperboreus were representing the resting population. The fact that high concentrations were observed during deployments lasting >1 d and in 3 years suggests that aggregation near the ocean floor is a regular, rather than an extraordinary, pattern in the life history of C. hyperboreus in the Greenland Sea, but there is need for comparison with other seas and eventually other Calanus species.

  9. Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Emunah, M.; Hatfield, J.; Kiyasu, J.; Packard, E.; Ching, L.; Zhao, K.; Sanderson, L.; Turmon, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 2000, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, three separate Anthopluera sea anemone species, and two rockweed species. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the greatest amount of human impacts.

  10. Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P.G.; Parker, Castle E.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

  11. Integration of the stratigraphic aspects of very large sea-floor databases using information processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Clinton N.; Flocks, J.; Kulp, M.; ,

    2006-01-01

    Information-processing methods are described that integrate the stratigraphic aspects of large and diverse collections of sea-floor sample data. They efficiently convert common types of sea-floor data into database and GIS (geographical information system) tables, visual core logs, stratigraphic fence diagrams and sophisticated stratigraphic statistics. The input data are held in structured documents, essentially written core logs that are particularly efficient to create from raw input datasets. Techniques are described that permit efficient construction of regional databases consisting of hundreds of cores. The sedimentological observations in each core are located by their downhole depths (metres below sea floor - mbsf) and also by a verbal term that describes the sample 'situation' - a special fraction of the sediment or position in the core. The main processing creates a separate output event for each instance of top, bottom and situation, assigning top-base mbsf values from numeric or, where possible, from word-based relative locational information such as 'core catcher' in reference to sampler device, and recovery or penetration length. The processing outputs represent the sub-bottom as a sparse matrix of over 20 sediment properties of interest, such as grain size, porosity and colour. They can be plotted in a range of core-log programs including an in-built facility that better suits the requirements of sea-floor data. Finally, a suite of stratigraphic statistics are computed, including volumetric grades, overburdens, thicknesses and degrees of layering. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  12. Sea-floor character and surface processes in the vicinity of Quicks Hole, Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Butman, Bradford; Moser, M.S.; Stewart, H.F.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (MA CZM), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal sea floor. The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder and sidescan sonar surveys conducted in the vicinity of Quicks Hole, a passage through the Elizabeth Islands, which extend in a chain southwest off Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data (fig. 1). Basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment, sedimentary environments, and sea-floor features. Presented verification data include sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam and sidescan data, which cover an approximately 22.9-km2 area of sea floor that extends from Vineyard Sound on the south to Buzzards Bay on the north, were collected during NOAA hydrographic survey H11076 (fig. 1). Although originally collected for charting purposes, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities along this part of the Massachusetts coastline (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat.

  13. Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Great Round Shoal Channel, offshore Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Moser, M.S.; Stewart, H.F.; Glomb, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder and sidescan-sonar data collected in the vicinity of Great Round Shoal Channel, the main passage through shoals located at the eastern entrance to Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data (fig. 1). Basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment, sedimentary environments, and sea-floor features. Presented verification data include sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam and sidescan data, which together cover an approximately 39.9-km² area of sea floor, were collected during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hydrographic survey H11079 (fig. 1). Although originally collected for charting purposes, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities along this part of the Massachusetts coastline (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. This publication is the third in a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) digital reports describing the sea-floor geology around Cape Cod. The first focused on the area off the eastern shore of the outer Cape (Poppe and others, 2006); the second on a passage through the Elizabeth Islands (Poppe and others, 2007).

  14. Drilling gas hydrates with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Tim; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Wefer, Gerold

    2015-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are bound in marine gas hydrate deposits. Local conditions like pressure, temperature, gas and pore water compositions define the boundaries of gas hydrate stability within the ocean sediments. Depending on those conditions gas hydrates can occur within marine sediments at depth down to several hundreds of meters up to sea floor. These oceanic methane deposits are widespread along continental margins. By forming cement in otherwise soft sediments gas hydrates are stabilizing the seafloor on continental slopes. Drilling operations are required for understanding the distribution of gas hydrates as well as for sampling them to study the composition, microstructure and its geomechanical and geophysical properties. The sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo200 has the capability to drill down to 200 m below sea floor well within the depth of major gas hydrate occurrences at continental margins. This drill rig is a transportable sea floor drill rig that can be deployed from a variety of multi-purpose research vessels. It is deployed on the sea bed and controlled from the vessel. It is the second generation MeBo (Freudenthal and Wefer, 2013) and was developed from 2011 to 2014 by MARUM in cooperation with BAUER Maschinen GmbH. Long term experiences with the first generation MeBo70 that was operated since 2005 on 15 research expeditions largely contributed to the development of MeBo200. It was first tested in October 2014 from the research vessel RV SONNE in the North Sea. In this presentation the suitability of MARUM-MeBo for drilling marine gas hydrates is discussed. We report on experiences drilling gas hydrates on two research expeditions with MeBo70. A research expedition for sampling gas hydrates in the Danube Paleodelta with MeBo200 as well as technical developments for improving the suitability of MeBo for gas hydrate exploration works are planned within the project SUGAR3 funded by the Federal Government for Economy and Energy (BMWi). Freudenthal

  15. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  16. Side-scan sonar and submersible observations: New techniques for gleaning more information from sea-floor outcrops

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, J.; Hams, J.E.; Buck, S.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Advances in high resolution side-scan sonar imaging technology are so effective at imaging sea-floor geology that they have greatly improved the efficiency of a bottom sampling program The traditional sea-floor geology methodology of shooting a high-resolution seismic survey and sampling along the seismic grid was considered successful if outcrops were sampled on 20% of the attempts. A submersible was used sparingly because of the inability to consistently locate sea-floor outcrops. Side-scan sonar images have increased the sampling success ratio to 70-95% and allow the cost-effective use of a submersible even in areas of sparse sea-floor outcrops. In offshore basins this new technology has been used in consolidated and semiconsolidated rock terranes. When combined with observations from a two-man submersible, SCUBA traverses, seismic data, and traditional sea-floor bottom sampling techniques, enough data are provided to develop an integrated sea-floor geologic interpretation. On individual prospects, side-scan sonar has aided the establishment of critical dip in poor seismic data areas, located seeps and tar mounds, and determined erosional breaching of a prospect. Over a mature producing field, side-scan sonar has influenced the search for field extension by documenting the orientation and location of critical trapping cross faults. These relatively inexpensive techniques can provide critical data in any marine basin where rocks crop out on the sea floor.

  17. Photographs of the Sea floor Offshore of New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz; Schwab, William S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Mecray, Ellen L.; Middleton, Tammie J.

    2003-01-01

    This DVD-ROM contains photographs of the sea floor and sediment texture data collected as part of studies carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the New York Bight (Figure 1a (PDF format)). The studies were designed to map the sea floor (Butman, 1998, URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs133-98/) and to develop an understanding of the transport and long-term fate of sediments and associated contaminants in the region (Mecray and others, 1999, URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs114-99/). The data were collected on four research cruises carried out between 1996 and 2000 (Appendix I). The images and texture data were collected to provide direct observations of the sea floor geology and to aid in the interpretation of backscatter intensity data obtained from sidescan sonar and multibeam surveys of the sea floor. Preliminary descriptions of the sea floor geology in this region may be found in Schwab and others (2000, URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/of00-295/; 2003), Butman and others (1998, URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/of98-616/.), and Butman and others (2002, URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/of00-503/). Schwab and others (2000 URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/of00-295/; 2003) have identified 11 geologic units in New York Bight (Figure 2 (PDF format)). These units identify areas of active sediment transport, extensive anthropogenic influence on the sea floor, and various geologic units. Butman and others (2003) and Harris and others (in press) present the results of a moored array experiment carried out in the Hudson Shelf Valley to investigate the transport of sediments during winter. Summaries of these and other studies may be found at USGS studies in the New York Bight (URL: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/newyork/). This DVD-ROM contains digital images of bottom still photographs, images digitized from videos, sediment grain-size analysis results, and short QuickTime movies from video transects. The data are presented in tabular form and in an ESRI (Environmental

  18. Phosphatized calcareous conglomerate from the Kara Sea floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, G. N.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Pokrovsky, B. G.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Dmitrenko, O. B.; Oskina, N. S.

    2016-09-01

    Trawling of the bottom in the northeastern Kara Sea during cruise 125 of the R/V Professor Shtokman in 2013 recovered a block of cavernous, partly phosphatized carbonate rock consisting of biogenic carbonate material and partly crystallized diagenetic calcite. The fauna remains are mainly Oligocene-Pliocene planktonic and benthic foraminifers, with less common Oligocene-Miocene coccoliths and single wormlike organisms. Part of the phosphatized material in caverns is impregnated by manganese and iron oxides and enriched in heavy and trace metals. According to the oxygen isotopic composition, this rock formed under moderate temperature conditions. In terms of morphology, mineralogy, and the abundance of organic remains, the block is comparable to methanogenic carbonates found in other parts of the ocean, but shows no isotopically light carbon signatures typical of methane activity. This indicates the diversity of the carbon isotope composition of the Arctic carbonates.

  19. Bubbled lava from the floor of the Sea of Okhotsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, G. N.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Rashidov, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    A sample of bubbled lava raised from a submarine volcano in the Sea of Okhotsk was analyzed by means of electron microscopy and the ICP-MS technique. The outside of the sample is flecked with rounded micro- and macrocavities, and the inner part is characterized by a liquation structure. Along with this, the unstructured mass of the rock contains globular particles of nearly the same diameters as the cavities. The lava is close to andesites and volcanic ashes of Kamchatka Peninsula in the macro- and microelemental composition but different in the somewhat increased content of barium, strontium, lithium, niobium, tungsten, uranium, and thorium. It is suggested that the cavities were formed during the eruption of the submarine volcano owing to contact of the boiling gas-saturated lava with seawater accompanied by the ejection of ash, which was spread by marine currents over long distances.

  20. Gloria mosaic of the deep sea floor off the Atlantic coast of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlee, John S.; Dillon, William P.; Popenoe, Peter; Robb, James M.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1992-01-01

    This mosaic is a GLORIA (Geological LOng Range Inclined Asdic) view of the deep sea floor off the East Coast of the United States. It covers a surveyed region (fig. 1) of 195,000 square miles, an area nearly as large as Texas. The survey is part of a program to map the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the United States and its island territories (also including Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands) carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS). A detailed atlas of the East Coast data has been published (EEZ-SCAN 87 Scientific Staff, 1991), and, along with this report, provides an overall view of the morphology and texture of the sea floor in the EEZ beyond the Continental Shelf.

  1. Sea-Floor Mapping and Benthic Habitat GIS for the Elwha River Delta Nearshore, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Sagy, Yael; Finlayson, David; Harney, Jodi

    2008-01-01

    From March 1531, 2005, more than 252 km (19.5 km2) of seafloor offshore of the Elwha River Delta in the central Strait of Juan de Fuca was mapped by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. The purpose of this nearshore mapping was to (1) obtain high resolution bathymetry and acoustic reflectance properties of the seabed, (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the seafloor, and (3) construct maps of sea-floor geomorphology and habitat. Substrate distribution was characterized with video-supervised statistical classification of the sonar data. Substrate of the survey was dominated by mixed sand-gravel and sand. Numerous boulder reefs were observed west of the river mouth within Freshwater Bay, whereas the sea-floor immediately adjacent to the river mouth was dominated by sand.

  2. Global rates of marine sulfate reduction and implications for sub-sea-floor metabolic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Marshall W.; Mogollón, José M.; Kasten, Sabine; Zabel, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Sulfate reduction is a globally important redox process in marine sediments, yet global rates are poorly quantified. We developed an artificial neural network trained with 199 sulfate profiles, constrained with geomorphological and geochemical maps to estimate global sulfate-reduction rate distributions. Globally, 11.3 teramoles of sulfate are reduced yearly (~15% of previous estimates), accounting for the oxidation of 12 to 29% of the organic carbon flux to the sea floor. Combined with global cell distributions in marine sediments, these results indicate a strong contrast in sub-sea-floor prokaryote habitats: In continental margins, global cell numbers in sulfate-depleted sediment exceed those in the overlying sulfate-bearing sediment by one order of magnitude, whereas in the abyss, most life occurs in oxic and/or sulfate-reducing sediments.

  3. Sea-floor geology and topography offshore in northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Glomb, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry, covering approximately 52.9 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12012, these acoustic data and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data are interpreted (1) to define the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) as part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  4. Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Block Island Sound, offshore Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; McMullen, K.Y.; Blankenship, M.A.; Glomb, K.A.; Wright, D.B.; Smith, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 634 square kilometers of sea floor in Block Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic surveys H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139, these combined acoustic data and the sea-floor sediment sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2011-006-FA (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, wind farms and fisheries) along the Rhode Island inner continental shelf.

  5. Photographs of the Sea Floor of Western Massachusetts Bay, Offshore of Boston, Massachusett, July 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Butman, Bradford; Blackwood, Dann S.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains photographs and sediment sample analyses of the sea floor obtained at 142 sites in western Massachusetts Bay (Figure 1) during a research cruise (USGS cruise ISBL99024) aboard the Fishing Vessel (FV) Isabel S. (Figure 2) conducted July 18-21, 1999. These photographs and samples provide critical ground truth information for the interpretation of shaded relief and backscatter intensity maps created using data collected with a multibeam echo sounder system (Butman and others, in press, a, b, c; Valentine and others, in press, a, b, c). Collection of these photographs and samples was undertaken in support of a large project whose overall objective is to map and describe the sea floor of Massachusetts Bay.

  6. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Long Island Sound offshore of Orient Point, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Guberski, M.R.; Wood, D.A.; Doran, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP) are working cooperatively to map and interpret features of the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. This report presents multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar data obtained during NOAA survey H11446, which was conducted in a 12-km2 area in Long Island Sound offshore of Orient Point, NY. In addition, sediment and photographic data from 26 stations obtained during a USGS verification cruise are presented. Overall, the sea floor slopes gently seaward, but topography is more complex in sand-wave and boulder areas, which are evident in the multibeam and sidescan-sonar data from the study area. Sand waves generally have north-south-oriented crests with 10- to 20-m wavelengths. Sand-wave asymmetry indicates eastward net sediment transport in the east and westward net sediment transport in the northern and western parts of the study area. Areas with boulders on the sea floor are typically hummocky and are part of a glacial moraine system. Boulders are typically encrusted with seaweed, sponges, and anemones as shown in the bottom photography.

  7. Direct observation of a submarine volcanic eruption from a sea-floor instrument caught in a lava flow.

    PubMed

    Fox, C G; Chadwick, W W; Embley, R W

    2001-08-16

    Our understanding of submarine volcanic eruptions has improved substantially in the past decade owing to the recent ability to remotely detect such events and to then respond rapidly with synoptic surveys and sampling at the eruption site. But these data are necessarily limited to observations after the event. In contrast, the 1998 eruption of Axial volcano on the Juan de Fuca ridge was monitored by in situ sea-floor instruments. One of these instruments, which measured bottom pressure as a proxy for vertical deformation of the sea floor, was overrun and entrapped by the 1998 lava flow. The instrument survived-being insulated from the molten lava by the solidified crust-and was later recovered. The data serendipitously recorded by this instrument reveal the duration, character and effusion rate of a sheet flow eruption on a mid-ocean ridge, and document over three metres of lava-flow inflation and subsequent drain-back. After the brief two-hour eruption, the instrument also measured gradual subsidence of 1.4 metres over the next several days, reflecting deflation of the entire volcano summit as magma moved into the adjacent rift zone. These findings are consistent with our understanding of submarine lava effusion, as previously inferred from seafloor observations, terrestrial analogues, and laboratory simulations.

  8. Formation of magnetic single-domain magnetite in ocean ridge basalts with implications for sea-floor magnetism.

    PubMed

    Shau, Y H; Peacor, D R; Essene, E J

    1993-07-16

    Although magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading, the processes by which magnetic phases in ocean floor basalts are formed remain poorly constrained. Scanning transmission electron microscopic observations show that magnetic single-domain magnetite in sheeted dike basalts of Deep Sea Drilling Project hole 504B formed through oxidation-exsolution of ilmenite, exsolution of ulvöspinel lamellae, and recrystallization of end-member magnetite by interaction with convecting fluids. The data suggest that the sheeted dike basalts, with single-domain magnetite as an efficient and stable magnetic carrier, contribute significantly to sea-floor magnetism.

  9. Flattening of the sea-floor depth-age curve as a response to asthenospheric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason Phipps; Smith, Walter H. F.

    1992-10-01

    THE flattening of sea-floor depths from the √age dependence predicted by considering the cooling plate as a growing thermal boundary layer is a fundamental constraint on the evolution of oceanic lithosphere1. Previous explanations for the flattening have included reheating from convective instabilities that form beneath lithosphere older than ~80 Myr (ref. 2), thermal rejuvenation of lithosphere that passes over stationary hotspots3-5, or a whole-mantle flow forced by two converging plates6. We suggest here that the flattening of old ocean floors can perhaps best be explained as a dynamic phenomenon reflecting flow in asthenosphere underlying the oceanic lithosphere. Applying the model to the Pacific plate, we show that a solution for flow in an asthenosphere low-viscosity channel which is 'consumed' by plate accretion and the subduction of lithosphere at trenches, and replenished by near-ridge upwelling and near-ridge hotspots, generates the observed ~ 1 km of sea-floor flattening for asthenospheric viscosities of 2 × 1018 Pa s and an absolute Pacific plate motion of 100 mm yr-1. Our model can also explain the asymmetric subsidence of the South American and African plates away from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  10. Sea-floor features on Mississippi and Alabama outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Rezak, R.; Sager, W.W.; Laswell, J.S.; Gittings, S.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Approximately 400 mi{sup 2} were surveyed on the Alabama outer continental shelf during October 1987 and March 1988 using an Edo-Western 4 kHz High Resolution Subbottom Profiler, an EG and G Model 260 Seafloor Mapping System and Starfix Navigation. The mapping is part of a larger project, The Mississippi-Alabama Marine Ecosystems Study, funded by the US Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico Regional Office. Bathymetric maps and side-scan mosaics are being prepared from the raw data. Sea-floor features recognized on the side-scan and subbottom records include: (1) low topographic features - possibly bed-rock outcrops, and an enigmatic feature the authors are calling footprints, (2) moderate topographic features - low reefs or bed-rock outcrops, (3) major topographic features - pinnacles and large reefal masses, (4) pox - patches of closely spaced strong reflections with no relief, (5) ridges - closely spaced outcrops along clearly defined features such as shorelines and scarps (possibly truncated dunes or beach ridges), (6) patch reefs, closely spaced, which look like pox but have relief, (7) wave fields - closely spaced sand or gravel waves, and (8) wrecks - sunken rigs or platforms. Except for the wave fields, they believe that the remaining sea-floor features are relict and related to the post-Pleistocene rise of sea level.

  11. Sea-floor gouges caused by migrating gray whales off northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Field, M.E.; Tate, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Side-scan sonar records collected during March and April 1981 and 1982 off northern California contain elongate depressions whose sizes and shapes are similar to sea-floor gouges made by feeding gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) in the northern Bering Sea and in shallow embayments off British Columbia. The discovery of the whale gouges in the sonar records was unexpected, and supports some of the previous speculation that gray whales feed opportunistically during migration. Gouges occupy about 0.032% of the 7.6 km2 of sea floor that was surveyed, which represents about 575 metric tons of excavated material. Although seemingly minor in amount, the total amount of bottom sediment removed from the central and northern California continental shelf by gray whale activities year after year represents macroscale biologically induced erosion and could have significant geological implications in shelf erosion and depositional schemes. This is the only published evidence of benthic feeding by gray whales along their migration route off northern California. ?? 1987.

  12. Sea-floor observations in the tongue of the ocean, Bahamas: An Argo/SeaMARC survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, W.C.; Uchupi, E.; Ballard, Richard D.; Dettweiler, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    SeaMARC side-scan sonographs and Argo video and photographic data suggest that the recent sedimentary environment of the floor of the Tongue of the Ocean is controlled by an interplay of turbidity current flow from the south, sediment spill-over from the carbonate platform to the east (windward side), and rock falls from the west carbonate escarpment (lee side). The spill-over forms a sandy sedimentary deposit that acts as a topographic obstruction to the turbidity current flow from the south. This obstruction is expressed by the westward migration of a northwest-southeast oriented turbidity-current-cut channel. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  13. Shallow geology, sea-floor texture, and physiographic zones of Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Wayne E.; Foster, David S.; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Schwab, William C.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.

    2016-09-02

    Geologic, sediment texture, and physiographic zone maps characterize the sea floor of Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts. These maps were derived from interpretations of seismic-reflection profiles, high-resolution bathymetry, acoustic-backscatter intensity, bottom photographs/video, and surficial sediment samples collected within the 494-square-kilometer study area. Interpretations of seismic stratigraphy and mapping of glacial and Holocene marine units provided a foundation on which the surficial maps were created. This mapping is a result of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to characterize the surface and subsurface geologic framework offshore of Massachusetts.

  14. Giant larvacean houses: rapid carbon transport to the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Robison, Bruce H; Reisenbichler, Kim R; Sherlock, Rob E

    2005-06-10

    An unresolved issue in ocean science is the discrepancy between the food requirements of the animals living on the deep sea floor and their food supply, as measured by sediment traps. A 10-year time-series study of the water column off Monterey Bay, California, revealed that the discarded mucus feeding structures of giant larvaceans carry a substantial portion of the upper ocean's productivity to the deep seabed. These abundant, rapidly sinking, carbon-rich vectors are not detected by conventional sampling methods and thus have not been included in calculations of vertical nutrient flux or in oceanic carbon budgets.

  15. Shallow geology, sea-floor texture, and physiographic zones of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, David S.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Schwab, William C.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Andrews, Brian D.; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-07

    Geologic, sediment texture, and physiographic zone maps characterize the sea floor of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. These maps were derived from interpretations of seismic-reflection profiles, high-resolution bathymetry, acoustic-backscatter intensity, bottom photographs, and surficial sediment samples. The interpretation of the seismic stratigraphy and mapping of glacial and Holocene marine units provided a foundation on which the surficial maps were created. This mapping is a result of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to characterize the surface and subsurface geologic framework offshore of Massachusetts.

  16. Contribution of oceanic gabbros to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kikawa, E; Ozawa, K

    1992-10-30

    The contribution of oceanic gabbros, representative rocks for layer 3 of the oceanic crust, to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been controversial because of the large variation in magnetic properties. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 118 contains a continuous 500.7-meter section of oceanic gabbro that allows the relations between magnetization and petrologic characteristics, such as the degree of metamorphism and the magmatic evolution, to be clarified. The data suggest that oceanic gabbros, together with the effects of metamorphism and of magmatic evolution, account for a significant part of the marine magnetic anomalies.

  17. Marine litter on the floor of deep submarine canyons of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea: The role of hydrodynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubau, Xavier; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Rayo, Xavier; Rivera, Jesus; Amblas, David

    2015-05-01

    Marine litter represents a widespread type of pollution in the World's Oceans. This study is based on direct observation of the seafloor by means of Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives and reports litter abundance, type and distribution in three large submarine canyons of the NW Mediterranean Sea, namely Cap de Creus, La Fonera and Blanes canyons. Our ultimate objective is establishing the links between active hydrodynamic processes and litter distribution, thus going beyond previous, essentially descriptive studies. Litter was monitored using the Liropus 2000 ROV. Litter items were identified in 24 of the 26 dives carried out in the study area, at depths ranging from 140 to 1731 m. Relative abundance of litter objects by type, size and apparent weight, and distribution of litter in relation to depth and canyon environments (i.e. floor and flanks) were analysed. Plastics are the dominant litter component (72%), followed by lost fishing gear, disregarding their composition (17%), and metal objects (8%). Most of the observed litter seems to be land-sourced. It reaches the ocean through wind transport, river discharge and after direct dumping along the coastline. While coastal towns and industrial areas represent a permanent source of litter, tourism and associated activities relevantly increase litter production during summer months ready to be transported to the deep sea by extreme events. After being lost, fishing gear such as nets and long-lines has the potential of being harmful for marine life (e.g. by ghost fishing), at least for some time, but also provides shelter and a substrate on which some species like cold-water corals are capable to settle and grow. La Fonera and Cap de Creus canyons show the highest mean concentrations of litter ever seen on the deep-sea floor, with 15,057 and 8090 items km-2, respectively, and for a single dive litter observed reached 167,540 items km-2. While most of the largest concentrations were found on the canyon floors at

  18. Deserts on the sea floor: Edward Forbes and his azoic hypothesis for a lifeless deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas R; Rice, Tony

    2006-12-01

    While dredging in the Aegean Sea during the mid-19th century, Manxman Edward Forbes noticed that plants and animals became progressively more impoverished the greater the depth they were from the surface of the water. By extrapolation Forbes proposed his now infamous azoic hypothesis, namely that life would be extinguished altogether in the murky depths of the deep ocean. The whole idea seemed so entirely logical given the enormous pressure, cold and eternal darkness of this apparently uninhabitable environment. Yet we now know that the sea floor is teeming with life. Curiously, it took 25 years for the azoic hypothesis to fall from grace. This was despite the presence of ample contrary evidence, including starfishes, worms and other organisms that seemingly originated from the deep seabed. This is a tale of scientists ignoring observations that ran counter to their deep-seated, yet entirely erroneous, beliefs.

  19. High-resolution area-wide sea-floor mapping: The paleo Elbe valley (S North Sea) revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2014-05-01

    The North Sea Basin is shaped by multiple glacial advances and retreats that left complex sequences of glacio-fluvial and sub-glacial deposits, cut by sub-glacial tunnel valleys. Today, the submerged valley of the Elbe forms one of the most prominent structures of the southern North Sea. Flanked by huge moraine deposits of older glacials, the valley developed to its present form during the Weichselian sea-level lowstand (-130 m below present). Melt waters that discharged in north-westerly directions along the Scandinavian Ice Sheet fed the paleo Elbe at that time. During the Holocene the valley drowned in the rising sea. Here we present an area-wide high-resolution map of the seafloor and high-resolution shallow seismic data covering 1,600 km2 of the paleo Elbe valley (PEV) including its eastern levee. The data allow to shed new light on the PEV development including the historical process of sedimentary infill with the successive Holocene sea level rise in detail. Shallow seismic data with transect distances of 400 m and several cross sections allow 3-D visualization. The eastern flank of the valley is characterized by a relatively steep slope with one or more terraces. At its levee a significant sediment change is present on the modern sea floor, representing moraine and marine deposits. High resolution sidescan sonar data of this area show a much higher heterogeneity and complexity in sediment and habitat distribution as assumed before. Holocene marine sediments form a patchy and thin drape east of the valley floor. The western slip-off slope of the valley slope is much smoother than the eastern undercut slope. As yet, significant sedimentological changes at the present seafloor are not known for the western side of the PEV. Shallow seismic data show the base of the PEV. There are conspicuous internal seismic reflectors above the base, inclined in northeastern direction. They indicate a sedimentary infill of the valley from the southwest when the southern part

  20. Floor Probe/Contamination Monitor (NE Model FLP3D) Test and Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shourbaji, A.A.

    2003-06-27

    A floor contamination monitor model FLP3D manufactured by Saint-Gobain Crystals and Detectors UK Ltd. was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the test is to evaluate the monitor's performance as a mobile instrument capable of detecting alpha and/or beta contamination that may exist on a flat surface such as a floor. The monitor consists of a large area scintillation probe (600 cm{sup 2}) and a rate meter mounted on heavy-duty wheels with a 22 mm separation between the monitored surface and the probe. Performance was evaluated under normal and severe environmental conditions in terms of temperature and humidity variations, and exposure to RF and magnetic fields. Sensitivity measurements were also made to determine the probe's efficiency for detecting alpha and beta contamination. The overall performance of the floor monitor is considered satisfactory under the various environmental conditions with no major problems observed. The monitor is approximately 50% efficiency for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y with the source placed in contact with the detector's protective grille (0 mm) and at a distance of 22 mm. However, in its present physical configuration, the floor monitor is inefficient in detecting alpha contamination due to the 22 mm separation between the surface to be monitored and the detector's surface. The alpha detection efficiency can be enhanced to a reasonable vale by redesigning the brackets holding the heavy-duty wheels to reduce the height between the surface to be monitored and the surface of the probe to a few millimeters. For use at ORNL, this change is recommended.

  1. Preferred and Minimum Acceptable Listening Levels for Musicians while Using Floor and In-Ear Monitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federman, Jeremy; Ricketts, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact that changing on-stage music and crowd noise levels during musical performance had on preferred listening levels (PLLs) and minimum acceptable listening levels (MALLs) across both floor and in-ear monitors. Method: Participants for this study were 23- to 48-year-old musicians, with and without hearing loss,…

  2. Preferred and Minimum Acceptable Listening Levels for Musicians while Using Floor and In-Ear Monitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federman, Jeremy; Ricketts, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact that changing on-stage music and crowd noise levels during musical performance had on preferred listening levels (PLLs) and minimum acceptable listening levels (MALLs) across both floor and in-ear monitors. Method: Participants for this study were 23- to 48-year-old musicians, with and without hearing loss,…

  3. Mapping the Sea Floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS) Offshore of New York City

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    The area offshore of New York City has been used for the disposal of dredged material for over a century. The area has also been used for the disposal of other materials such as acid waste, industrial waste, municipal sewage sludge, cellar dirt, and wood. Between 1976 and 1995, the New York Bight Dredged Material Disposal Site, also known as the Mud Dump Site (MDS), received on average about 6 million cubic yards of dredged material annually. In September 1997 the MDS was closed as a disposal site, and it and the surrounding area were designated as the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS). The sea floor of the HARS, approximately 9 square nautical miles in area, currently is being remediated by placing a minimum 1-m-thick cap of clean dredged material on top of the surficial sediments that are contaminated from previous disposal of dredged and other materials. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to map the sea floor geology of the HARS and changes in the characteristics of the surficial sediments over time.

  4. The sea-floor spreading history of the eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Thomas S.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.

    1982-09-01

    The geologic history of the eastern Indian Ocean between northwest Australia and the Java Trench is known to involve two separate events of rifting and sea-floor spreading. Late Jurassic spreading in the Argo Abyssal Plain off northwest Australia was followed by Early Cretaceous spreading in the Cuvier and Perth Abyssal Plains off west Australia. However, the evolution and interaction of these events has not been clear. Mesozoic sea-floor spreading anomalies have been identified throughout the Argo Abyssal Plain that define a rifting event and subsequent northward spreading on the northwestern Australian margin at 155 m.y.b.p. Magnetic anomalies northwest of the Argo Abyssal Plain indicate a ridge jump to the south at about 130 m.y.b.p. that is approximately synchronous with east-west rifting along the southwestern Australian margin. The Joey Rise in the Argo Plain was probably formed by volcanism at the intersection of this new rift and the spreading ridge to the north. The southern and northern spreading systems were connected through the Exmouth Plateau which was stretched and faulted as spreading progressed. The RRR triple junction was formed at the intersection of the two spreading systems and appears to have migrated west along the northern edge of the Gascoyne Abyssal Plain. Spreading off northwest Australia cannot be easily related to simultaneous spreading in the west central Pacific via any simple tectonic scheme.

  5. Sea-floor geology and topography offshore in Eastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.; Ostapenko, A.J.; Doran, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    A gridded multibeam bathymetric dataset covers approximately 133.7 square kilometers of sea floor offshore in eastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11997, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during USGS cruise 2010-015-FA, are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major East Coast estuary. Results show the composition and terrain of the seabed and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. Bedrock outcrops, erosional outliers, lag deposits of boulders, scour depressions, and extensive gravel pavements are common in the eastern part of the study area. These features, which result from the near-constant exposure to strong tidal currents, indicate sedimentary environments dominated by processes associated with erosion. Large fields of transverse and barchanoid sand waves in the western part of the study area reflect slightly lower energy levels and sedimentary environments where processes associated with coarse bedload transport prevail.

  6. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Long Island Sound offshore of Plum Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Ostapenko, A.J.; Glomb, K.A.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working cooperatively to interpret surficial sea-floor geology along the coast of the Northeastern United States. NOAA survey H11445 in eastern Long Island Sound, offshore of Plum Island, New York, covers an area of about 12 square kilometers. Multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery from the survey, as well as sediment and photographic data from 13 stations occupied during a USGS verification cruise are used to delineate sea-floor features and characterize the environment. Bathymetry gradually deepens offshore to over 100 meters in a depression in the northwest part of the study area and reaches 60 meters in Plum Gut, a channel between Plum Island and Orient Point. Sand waves are present on a shoal north of Plum Island and in several smaller areas around the basin. Sand-wave asymmetry indicates that counter-clockwise net sediment transport maintains the shoal. Sand is prevalent where there is low backscatter in the sidescan-sonar imagery. Gravel and boulder areas are submerged lag deposits produced from the Harbor Hill-Orient Point-Fishers Island moraine segment and are found adjacent to the shorelines and just north of Plum Island, where high backscatter is present in the sidescan-sonar imagery.

  7. Sea-floor geology and character offshore of Rocky Point, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Lewit, P.G.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working cooperatively to interpret surficial sea-floor geology along the coast of the Northeastern United States. NOAA survey H11445 in eastern Long Island Sound, offshore of Plum Island, New York, covers an area of about 12 square kilometers. Multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery from the survey, as well as sediment and photographic data from 13 stations occupied during a USGS verification cruise are used to delineate sea-floor features and characterize the environment. Bathymetry gradually deepens offshore to over 100 meters in a depression in the northwest part of the study area and reaches 60 meters in Plum Gut, a channel between Plum Island and Orient Point. Sand waves are present on a shoal north of Plum Island and in several smaller areas around the basin. Sand-wave asymmetry indicates that counter-clockwise net sediment transport maintains the shoal. Sand is prevalent where there is low backscatter in the sidescan-sonar imagery. Gravel and boulder areas are submerged lag deposits produced from the Harbor Hill-Orient Point-Fishers Island moraine segment and are found adjacent to the shorelines and just north of Plum Island, where high backscatter is present in the sidescan-sonar imagery.

  8. Widespread methane leakage from the sea floor on the northern US Atlantic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarke, A.; Ruppel, C.; Kodis, M.; Brothers, D.; Lobecker, E.

    2014-09-01

    Methane emissions from the sea floor affect methane inputs into the atmosphere, ocean acidification and de-oxygenation, the distribution of chemosynthetic communities and energy resources. Global methane flux from seabed cold seeps has only been estimated for continental shelves, at 8 to 65 Tg CH4 yr-1, yet other parts of marine continental margins are also emitting methane. The US Atlantic margin has not been considered an area of widespread seepage, with only three methane seeps recognized seaward of the shelf break. However, massive upper-slope seepage related to gas hydrate degradation has been predicted for the southern part of this margin, even though this process has previously only been recognized in the Arctic. Here we use multibeam water-column backscatter data that cover 94,000 km2 of sea floor to identify about 570 gas plumes at water depths between 50 and 1,700 m between Cape Hatteras and Georges Bank on the northern US Atlantic passive margin. About 440 seeps originate at water depths that bracket the updip limit for methane hydrate stability. Contemporary upper-slope seepage there may be triggered by ongoing warming of intermediate waters, but authigenic carbonates observed imply that emissions have continued for more than 1,000 years at some seeps. Extrapolating the upper-slope seep density on this margin to the global passive margin system, we suggest that tens of thousands of seeps could be discoverable.

  9. Geological Interpretation of Bathymetric and Backscatter Imagery of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Larry J.; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Butman, Bradford; Ackerman, Seth D.; Danforth, William W.; Foster, Dave S.; Blackwood, Dann S.

    2006-01-01

    The imagery, interpretive data layers, and data presented herein were derived from multibeam echo-sounder data collected off Eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and from the stations occupied to verify these acoustic data. The basic data layers show sea-floor topography, sun-illuminated shaded relief, and backscatter intensity; interpretive layers show the distributions of surficial sediment and sedimentary environments. Presented verification data include new and historical sediment grain-size analyses and a gallery of still photographs of the seabed. The multibeam data, which cover a narrow band of the sea floor extending from Provincetown around the northern tip of Cape Cod and south southeastward to off Monomoy Island, were collected during transits between concurrent mapping projects in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (Valentine and others, 2001; Butman and others, 2004; and Valentine, 2005) and Great South Channel (Valentine and others, 2003a, b, c, d). Although originally collected to maximize the use of time aboard ship, these data provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities in this part of the Gulf of Maine (Noji and others, 2004), show the composition and terrain of the seabed, and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. These data and interpretations also support ongoing modeling studies of the lower Cape's aquifer system (Masterson, 2004) and of erosional hotspots along the Cape Cod National Seashore (List and others, 2006).

  10. Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the grant was to design, build, and test two autonomous instruments to measure vertical profiles of electrical potential in sea floor sediments. The objectives were fully met when the instruments were successfully deployed in 1,800 feet of water at known petroleum seepage sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The instruments were proven to be able to measure and record signals known to be appropriate to sediments altered by seepage. Two known seepage sites were visited on September 18th and 20th, 1996. At the first, a small-scale instrument capable of measuring 60 cm into the sediment was repeatedly emplaced by the manipulator arm of a research submarine, along a sea floor traverse. Further, the large-scale instrument, having a probe 3.3 m in length, was deployed by steel cable from the ship and emplaced in the sediment under gravity. Both successfully recorded data from multiple electrodes, revealing the expected negative potentials (Eh values at low at {minus}230 mV) at, and close to, the sediment-water interface, instead of at the normal depths of 3 to 4 m.

  11. Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.F.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of the grant was to design, build, and test two autonomous instruments to measure vertical profiles of electrical potential in sea floor sediments. The objectives were fully met when the instruments were successfully deployed in 1,800 feet of water at known petroleum seepage sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The instruments were proven to be able to measure and record signals known to be appropriate to sediments altered by seepage. Two known seepage sites were visited on September 18th and 20th, 1996. At the first, a small-scale instrument capable of measuring 60 cm into the sediment was repeatedly emplaced by the manipulator arm of a research submarine, along a sea floor traverse. Further, the large-scale instrument, having a probe 3.3 m in length, was deployed by steel cable from the ship and emplaced in the sediment under gravity. Both successfully recorded data from multiple electrodes, revealing the expected negative potentials (Eh values as low as {minus}230 mV) at, and close to, the sediment-water interface, instead of at the normal depths of 3 to 4 m.

  12. Widespread methane leakage from the sea floor on the northern US Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skarke, Adam; Ruppel, Carolyn; Kodis, Mali'o; Brothers, Daniel S.; Lobecker, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from the sea floor affect methane inputs into the atmosphere, ocean acidification and de-oxygenation, the distribution of chemosynthetic communities and energy resources. Global methane flux from seabed cold seeps has only been estimated for continental shelves, at 8 to 65 Tg CH4 yr−1, yet other parts of marine continental margins are also emitting methane. The US Atlantic margin has not been considered an area of widespread seepage, with only three methane seeps recognized seaward of the shelf break. However, massive upper-slope seepage related to gas hydrate degradation has been predicted for the southern part of this margin, even though this process has previously only been recognized in the Arctic. Here we use multibeam water-column backscatter data that cover 94,000 km2 of sea floor to identify about 570 gas plumes at water depths between 50 and 1,700 m between Cape Hatteras and Georges Bank on the northern US Atlantic passive margin. About 440 seeps originate at water depths that bracket the updip limit for methane hydrate stability. Contemporary upper-slope seepage there may be triggered by ongoing warming of intermediate waters, but authigenic carbonates observed imply that emissions have continued for more than 1,000 years at some seeps. Extrapolating the upper-slope seep density on this margin to the global passive margin system, we suggest that tens of thousands of seeps could be discoverable.

  13. Calibration of the Cenozoic Polarity Time Scale Based on Intervals of Constant Sea Floor Spreading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    Astronomical calibration of the polarity time scale is now nearly complete for 0-12 Ma and recent work is making rapid progress on calibrating 12-40 Ma. Integration of radiometric dating and sea floor spreading histories allows calibration of the Middle and Early Miocene to an accuracy arguably 0.1 Myr, supporting an Oligocene-Miocene boundary near 23.0 Ma. Spreading rate histories for the Neogene show that all plate pairs have sudden rate changes, that sudden (<0.5 Myr) rate changes are more common than gradual (>2 Myr) rate changes, and that rate changes usually correlate with recognizable changes in fracture zone trends and location of the pole of relative motion. These relations suggest a calibration strategy of identifying intervals of stable relative plate motion and assuming constant, rather than smoothly changing, spreading rates in these intervals. For Oligocene and Late Eocene (C6C-C17), Australia-Antarctica and Pacific-Nazca (Farallon) spreading distances provide excellent constraints when calibrated against Southwest U.S. ignimbrite polarity stratigraphy [McIntosh et al, 1992] with revisions for the FC 40/39 monitor at 28.21 Ma [Kuiper et al 2004]. Calibration of this interval differs subtly from published alternatives, with the Late-Early Oligocene boundary in C10N at about 28.2 Ma, the Eocene-Oligocene boundary in C13R at about 33.7 Ma, and the Middle-Late Eocene boundary in C17N at about 36.9 Ma, all with accuracy arguably 0.2 Myr or better. Calibration of Paleocene through Middle Eocene is much more speculative due to lack of ideal spreading records, lack of consensus calibration points, and apparently global plate-motion reorganization at or near C21. A strategy assuming constant rate for Pacific-Juan de Fuca (Vancouver) for C13-C21 and minimizing rate changes for Pacific-Farallon for C21-C32 appears to be at least as viable as other, published time scales. This alternative strategy brings ages for much of the Middle Eocene younger than on all

  14. Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope, northeast Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Kenyon, Neil H.

    1989-01-01

    Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope include canyons, primary fan valleys, deep-sea valleys, and remnant valley segments. Long-range sidescan sonographs and associated seismic-reflection profiles indicate that the canyons may originate along a mid-slope escarpment and grow upslope by mass wasting and downslope by valley erosion or aggradation. Most canyons are partly filled with sediment, and Quillayute Canyon is almost completely filled. Under normal growth conditions, the larger canyons connect with primary fan valleys or deep-sea valleys in Cascadia Basin, but development of accretionary ridges blocks or re-routes most canyons, forcing abandonment of the associated valleys in the basin. Astoria Fan has a primary fan valley that connects with Astoria Canyon at the fan apex. The fan valley is bordered by parallel levees on the upper fan but becomes obscure on the lower fan, where a few valley segments appear on the sonographs. Apparently, Nitinat Fan does not presently have a primary fan valley; none of the numerous valleys on the fan connect with a canyon. The Willapa-Cascadia-Vancouver-Juan de Fuca deep-sea valley system bypasses the submarine fans and includes deeply incised valleys to broad shallow swales, as well as within-valley terraces and hanging-valley confluences. ?? 1989.

  15. Bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site in 1996, 1998, and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Danforth, William W.; Clarke, John E. Hughes; Signell, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Surveys of the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS), offshore of New York and New Jersey, were carried out in 1996, 1998, and 2000 using a Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder mounted on the Canadian Coast Guard ship Frederick G. Creed. The objective of the multiple echosounder surveys was to map the bathymetry and surficial sediments over time as dredged material was placed in the HARS to remediate contaminated sediments. Maps derived from the multibeam surveys show sea-floor bathymetry, shaded-relief bathymetry, and backscatter intensity (a measure of sea-floor texture and roughness) at a spatial resolution of three meters. The area was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and with support from the Canadian Hydrographic Service and the University of New Brunswick.

  16. The Sea-Floor Mapping Facility at the U.S. Geological Survey Woods Hole Field Center, Woods Hole, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deusser, Rebecca E.; Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers of the sea-floor mapping facility at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Woods Hole Field Center in Woods Hole, Mass., use state-of-the-art technology to produce accurate geologic maps of the sea floor. In addition to basic bathymetry and morphology, sea-floor maps may contain information about the distribution of sand resources, patterns of coastal erosion, pathways of pollutant transport, and geologic controls on marine biological habitats. The maps may also show areas of human impacts, such as disturbance by bottom fishing and pollution caused by offshore waste disposal. The maps provide a framework for scientific research and provide critical information to decisionmakers who oversee resources in the coastal ocean.

  17. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  18. Invertebrate population genetics across Earth's largest habitat: The deep-sea floor.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M L; Roterman, C N

    2017-08-22

    Despite the deep sea being the largest habitat on Earth, there are just 77 population genetic studies of invertebrates (115 species) inhabiting non-chemosynthetic ecosystems on the deep-sea floor (below 200 m depth). We review and synthesize the results of these papers. Studies reveal levels of genetic diversity comparable to shallow-water species. Generally, populations at similar depths were well connected over 100s-1,000s km, but studies that sampled across depth ranges reveal population structure at much smaller scales (100s-1,000s m) consistent with isolation by adaptation across environmental gradients, or the existence of physical barriers to connectivity with depth. Few studies were ocean-wide (under 4%), and 48% were Atlantic-focused. There is strong emphasis on megafauna and commercial species with research into meiofauna, "ecosystem engineers" and other ecologically important species lacking. Only nine papers account for ~50% of the planet's surface (depths below 3,500 m). Just two species were studied below 5,000 m, a quarter of Earth's seafloor. Most studies used single-locus mitochondrial genes revealing a common pattern of non-neutrality, consistent with demographic instability or selective sweeps; similar to deep-sea hydrothermal vent fauna. The absence of a clear difference between vent and non-vent could signify that demographic instability is common in the deep sea, or that selective sweeps render single-locus mitochondrial studies demographically uninformative. The number of population genetics studies to date is miniscule in relation to the size of the deep sea. The paucity of studies constrains meta-analyses where broad inferences about deep-sea ecology could be made. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Time-Series Photographs of the Sea Floor in Western Massachusetts Bay, 1996 - 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Dalyander, P. Soupy; Bothner, Michael H.; Lange, William N.

    2008-01-01

    Time-series photographs of the sea floor were obtained from an instrumented tripod deployed in western Massachusetts Bay at LT-A (42? 22.6' N, 70? 47.0' W; 32 m water depth; fig. 1) from December 1989 through September 2005. The photographs provide time-series observations of physical changes of the sea floor, near-bottom water turbidity, and life on the sea floor. Two reports present these photographs in digital form (table 1) and chronological order. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 265 (Butman and others, 2008a) contains the photographs obtained from December 1989 to October 1996. This report, U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 266 (Butman and others, 2008b), contains photographs obtained from October 1996 through September 2005. The photographs are published in separate reports because the data files are too large for distribution on a single DVD. This report also contains photographs that were published previously in an uncompressed format (Butman and others 2004a, b, and c; table 1); they have been compressed and included in this publication so that all of the photographs are available in the same format. The photographs, obtained every 4 or every 6 hours, are presented as individual photographs (in .png format, each accessible through a page of thumbnails) and as a movie (in .avi format). The time-series photographs taken at LT-A were collected as part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study to understand the transport and fate of sediments and associated contaminants in Massachusetts Bay and Cape Cod Bay (Bothner and Butman, 2007). This long-term study was carried out by the USGS in partnership with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) (http://www.mwra.state.ma.us/) and with logistical support from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). Long-term oceanographic observations help to identify the processes causing bottom sediment resuspension and transport and provide data for developing and testing numerical models. The observations document seasonal

  20. Modelling of sea floor spreading initiation and rifted continental margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymms, V. J.; Isimm Team

    2003-04-01

    Recent observations of depth dependent (heterogeneous) stretching where upper crustal extension is much less than that of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle at both non-volcanic and volcanic margins plus the discovery of broad domains of exhumed continental mantle at non-volcanic rifted margins are not predicted by existing quantitative models of rifted margin formation which are usually based on intra-continental rift models subjected to very large stretching factors. New conceptual and quantitative models of rifted margin formation are required. Observations and continuum mechanics suggest that the dominant process responsible for rifted continental margin formation is sea-floor spreading of the young ocean ridge, rather than pre-breakup intra-continental rifting. Simple fluid flow models of ocean ridge processes using analytical iso-viscous corner-flow demonstrate that the divergent motion of the upwelling mantle beneath the ocean ridge, when viewed in the reference frame of the young continental margin, shows oceanward flow of the lower continental crust and lithospheric mantle of the young rifted margin giving rise to depth dependent stretching as observed. Single-phase fluid-models have been developed to model the initiation of sea-floor spreading and the thermal, stretching and thinning evolution of the young rifted continental margin. Finite element fluid-flow modelling incorporating the evolving temperature dependent viscosity field on the fluid flow also show depth dependent stretching of the young continental margin. Two-phase flow models of ocean ridges incorporating the transport of both solid matrix and melt fluid (Spiegelman &Reynolds 1999) predict the divergent motion of the asthenosphere and lithosphere matrix, and the focusing of basaltic melt into the narrow axial zone spreading centre at ocean ridges. We are adapting two-phase flow models for application to the initiation of sea-floor spreading and rifted continental margin formation. i

  1. Under the Golden Gate bridge: views of the sea floor near the entrance to San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Chin, John L.; Hanes, Daniel; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.; Gardner, James V.

    2006-01-01

    San Francisco Bay in Northern California is one of the largest and most altered estuaries within the United States. The sea floor within the bay as well as at its entrance is constantly changing due to strong tidal currents, aggregate mining, dredge disposal, and the creation of new land using artificial fill. Understanding this dynamic sea floor is critical for addressing local environmental issues, which include defining pollution transport pathways, deciphering tectonics, and identifying benthic habitats. Mapping commercial interests such as safe ship navigation and dredge disposal is also significantly aided by such understanding. Over the past decade, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE) and the Center for Integrative Coastal Observation, Research and Education (CICORE) have partnered to map central San Francisco Bay and its entrance under the Golden Gate Bridge using multibeam echosounders. These sonar systems can continuously map to produce 100 percent coverage of the sea floor at meter-scale resolution and thus produce an unprecedented view of the floor of the bay. This poster shows views of the sea floor in west-central San Francisco Bay around Alcatraz and Angel Islands, underneath the Golden Gate Bridge, and through its entrance from the Pacific Ocean. The sea floor is portrayed as a shaded relief surface generated from the multibeam data color-coded for depth from light blues for the shallowest values to purples for the deepest. The land regions are portrayed by USGS digital orthophotographs (DOQs) overlaid on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). The water depths have a 4x vertical exaggeration while the land areas have a 2x vertical exaggeration.

  2. Large-scale patterns in biodiversity of microbial eukaryotes from the abyssal sea floor.

    PubMed

    Scheckenbach, Frank; Hausmann, Klaus; Wylezich, Claudia; Weitere, Markus; Arndt, Hartmut

    2010-01-05

    Eukaryotic microbial life at abyssal depths remains "uncharted territory" in eukaryotic microbiology. No phylogenetic surveys have focused on the largest benthic environment on this planet, the abyssal plains. Moreover, knowledge of the spatial patterns of deep-sea community structure is scanty, and what little is known originates primarily from morphology-based studies of foraminiferans. Here we report on the great phylogenetic diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities of all 3 abyssal plains of the southeastern Atlantic Ocean--the Angola, Cape, and Guinea Abyssal Plains--from depths of 5,000 m. A high percentage of retrieved clones had no close representatives in genetic databases. Many clones were affiliated with parasitic species. Furthermore, differences between the communities of the Cape Abyssal Plain and the other 2 abyssal plains point to environmental gradients apparently shaping community structure at the landscape level. On a regional scale, local species diversity showed much less variation. Our study provides insight into the community composition of microbial eukaryotes on larger scales from the wide abyssal sea floor realm and marks a direction for more detailed future studies aimed at improving our understanding of deep-sea microbes at the community and ecosystem levels, as well as the ecological principles at play.

  3. Ice erosion of a sea-floor knickpoint at the inner edge of the stamukhi zone, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, P.W.; Asbury, J.L.; Rearic, D.M.; Ross, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1981 and 1982, detailed bathymetric and side-scan sonar surveys were made of an area of the sea floor north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, to study the changing characteristics of the seabed at the inner boundary of the stamukhi zone, the coast-parallel zone of grounded ice ridges that occurs in water depths between 15 and 50 m in the arctic. The fathograms and sonographs resolved 10-cm features and electronic navigation gave relocations accurate to about 10 m. Year after year an ice boundary develops at the inner edge of the stamukhi zone where major shear and pressure deformation occur in about the same location. Associated with this ice boundary, the bathymetry shows a pronounced break in slope - the knickpoint - on the shelf profile at about 20 m depth. The 2-3 m-high knickpoint is cut in a consolidated gravelly mud of pre-Holocene age. A well-defined gravel and cobble shoal a few meters high usually occurs at the inshore edge of the knickpoint. The sonograph mosaic shows that seaward of the knickpoint, ice gouges saturate the sea floor and are well defined; inshore the gouges are fewer in number and are poorly defined on the records. Few gouges can be traced from the seaward side of the knickpoint across the shoals to the inshore side of the knickpoint. Studies of ice gouging rates in two seabed corridors that cross the stamukhi zone reveal the highest rates of gouging seaward of the knickpoint. We believe that the knickpoint results from ice erosion at the inner boundary of the stamukhi zone. Intensified currents associated with this boundary winnow away fine sediments. Ice bulldozing and currents shape the shoals, which perch atop the knickpoint. The knickpoint helps to limit ice forces on the seabed inshore of the stamukhi zone. ?? 1987.

  4. ESR dating of barite in sulphide deposits formed by the sea-floor hydrothermal activities.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Shin; Fujiwara, Taisei; Uchida, Ai; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Takamasa, Asako

    2014-06-01

    Barite is a mineral newly found to be practically useful for electron spin resonance (ESR) dating of sulphide deposits formed by the sea-floor hydrothermal activities. The recent studies for the properties of the ESR dating signal in barite are summarised in the present paper as well as the formulas for corrections for accurate dose-rate estimation are developed including the dose-rate conversion factors, shape correction for gamma-ray dose and decay of (226)Ra. Although development of the techniques for ESR dating of barite has been completed, further comparative studies with other dating techniques such as U-Th and (226)Ra-(210)Pb dating are necessary for the technique to be widely used.

  5. Description, Analysis, and Prediction of Sea-Floor Roughness Using Spectral Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    release; distribution unlimited. Prepared under the authority of Commander, Naval Oceanography Command FOREWORD Knowledge of sea-floor characteristics...4X.F10.4)) C C ZERO OUT MATRIX TERMS C 150 A1=0.0 B1 =0.0 01=0.0 E1=0.0 G1=0.0 C C COMPUTE TERMS FOR LEAST SQUARES MATRIX CONSTRUCTION C DO 200...1=1,N PARTA=F1(X(I),A0,B0) PARTB=F2(X(I),A0,B0) P0WF=F3(X(I),A0,B0) A1=A1+(PARTA**2) B1 = B1 +(PARTA*PARTB) D1=D1+(PARTB**2) E1=E1+(PARTA*(Y(I

  6. USGS advances in integrated, high-resolution sea-floor mapping: inner continental shelf to estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, J.F.; Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; O'Brien, T.F.; Danforth, W.W.; Foster, D.S.; Bergeron, E.; Worley, C.W.; Irwin, B.J.; Butman, B.; Valentine, P.C.; Baldwin, W.E.; Morton, R.A.; Thieler, E.R.; Nichols, D.R.; Andrews, B.D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been involved in geological mapping of the sea floor for the past thirty years. Early geophysical and acoustic mapping efforts using GLORIA (Geologic LOng Range Inclined ASDIC) a long-range sidescan-sonar system, provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments to address pertinent coastal research and resource management issues. Use of shallow-water, high-resolution geophysical systems has enhanced our understanding of the processes shaping shallow marine environments. However, research within these shallow-water environments continues to present technological challenges.

  7. Sea-floor geology of a part of Mamala Bay, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, Monty A.; Torresan, Michael E.; Barber, John H.

    1997-01-01

    We surveyed the sea-floor geology within a 200-km2 area of Mamala Bay, off Honolulu, Hawaii by collecting and analyzing sidescan sonar images, 3.5-kHz profiles, video and still visual images, and box-core samples. The study area extends from 20-m water depth on the insular shelf to 600-m water depth in a southeast-trending trough. The sidescan images depict three principal types of sea-floor material: low-backscatter natural sediment, high-backscatter drowned carbonate reef, and intermediate-backscatter dredged-material deposits. Cores indicate that the natural sediment is muddy sand, composed of carbonate reef and microfauna debris with some volcanic grains. Vague areal trends in composition are evident. The dredged material comprises poorly sorted, cobble- to clay-size mixtures of reef, volcanic, and man-made debris, up to 35 cm thick. Dredged-material deposits are not evident in the 3.5-kHz profiles. In the sidescan images they appear as isolated, circular to subcircular imprints, apparently formed by individual drops, around the periphery of their occurrence, but they overlap and coalesce to a nearly continuous, intermediate-backscatter blanket toward the center of three disposal sites investigated. We did not observe significant currents during our camera surveys, but there is abundant evidence of sediment reworking: symmetrical and asymmetrical ripples in the visual images, sand waves in the 3.5-kHz profiles and side-scan images, moats around the reefs in 3.5-kHz profiles, winnowed dredged material in the visual images, and burial of dredged material by natural sediment in cores. Most current indicators imply a westerly to northwesterly transport direction, along contours or up-slope, although there are a few areas of easterly indicators. Internal waves probably drive the transport; their possible existence is implied by measured water-column density gradients.

  8. Surface amplitude data: 3D-seismic for interpretation of sea floor geology (Louisiana Slope)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H.

    1996-09-01

    Proliferation of 3D-seismic in support of hydrocarbon exploration/production has created new data for improved interpretation of sea floor and shallow subsurface geology. Processing of digital seismic data to enhance amplitude anomalies produces information for improved assessment of geohazards and identification of sensitive benthic communities protected by environmental regulations. Coupled with high resolution acoustic data and direct observation/sampling using a manned research submersible, surface amplitude maps add critical interpretive information for identification of sea floor features. Non-reflective zones (acoustic wipeouts) are associated with many slope features. Mud diapirs, mud mounds, mud volcanoes, gas-changed sediments, gas hydrates, slump deposits, carbonate hardgrounds, and various types of carbonate mounds are all features that exhibit this common response on high resolution seismic profiles. Amplitude data help make specific identifications. Since 1988, submersible data from mid-to-upper slope features (Garden Banks, Green Canyon, and Mississippi Canyon lease block areas) have been analyzed with conventional high resolution acoustic data and 313-amplitude extraction maps. Areas of rapid venting of sediment and hydrocarbon-charged formation fluids are clearly distinguishable from mud diapirs and areas of carbonate mounds (slow seepage). Gas hydrates occur as mounds and mounded zones along faults; products of moderate flux rates below (approx.) 500 in water depths. Gas hydrates function as stored trophic resources that support sensitive chemosynthetic communities. Amplitude extraction maps clearly identify these features by a strong low impedance amplitude anomaly. Refinement and {open_quotes}field calibration{close_quotes} of the surface amplitude extraction method may eventually lead to a new standard for evaluating geohazards and sensitive benthic communities.

  9. Recent heat flow survey and sea-floor spreading in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, D.; Al Amri, Z. M.

    2013-12-01

    Saudi Aramco obtained 225 new heat flow measurements along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, using an 11 m long Lister-type probe. To allow for geological control, most of the measurements were made along 2D seismic lines. In shallow areas, measurements were performed in bathymetric deeps to improve data coverage. It was observed that water bottom temperatures show an undisturbed linear gradient from ~ 21.2 °C at ~500 m water depth, to ~ 21.8 °C at ~2500 m. Consequently, high quality measurements were made from water depths as shallow as 400 m. Hard grounds on top of Pleistocene sediments prevented penetration of the probe near the toes of Upper Miocene salt glaciers terminating at the axial ridge. Based on this survey and previous data, the heat flow values range from ~80 -100 mWm-2 along the shoreline to over 350 mWm-2 at the axial ridge. However, anomalously low values between 8 and 20 mWm-2 were measured on the spreading axis where seismic data indicate Pleistocene sediments overlie volcanic rocks, probably due to groundwater circulation. One anomalously high heat flow value of 1136 mWm-2 was measured near the axial ridge, at a place where Pleistocene sediments overlie mobile salt, probably due to hydrothermal activity. In general, the regional distribution of heat flow in the eastern Red Sea shows exponential decay away from the inferred spreading axis. This is consistent with the inference that seafloor spreading in the northern Red Sea started around 15 Ma.

  10. Ophiolites in ocean-continent transitions: From the Steinmann Trinity to sea-floor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernoulli, Daniel; Jenkyns, Hugh C.

    2009-05-01

    ophiolites as ocean crust is apparent. Between 1920 and 1930, the stage was thus potentially set for modern mobilist concepts that were, however, to prove attractive to only a small circle of Alpine and peri-Gondwanian geologists. After the Second World War, the 1950s saw the rapid progress of the geophysical and geological exploration of oceans and continental margins that provided the data for a reevaluation of the geosynclinal concept. Actualistic models now equated the former preorogenic miogeosyncline of Stille (1940) and Kay (1951) with passive continental margins [C.L. Drake, M. Ewing, G.H. Sutton, Continental margin and geosynclines: the east coast of North America, north of Cape Hatteras, in: L. Ahrens, et al. (Eds.), Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 3, Pergamon Press, London, 1959, pp. 110-189], the (American version of the) eugeosyncline and its igneous rocks with "collapsing continental rises" [R.S. Dietz, J. Geol. 71 (1963) 314-333] and the ophiolites, the Steinmann Trinity, of the (European) eugeosyncline with fragments of oceanic lithosphere [H.H. Hess, History of ocean basins, in: Petrologic Studies: a Volume to Honor A.F. Buddington, Geol. Soc. Am., New York. 1962, pp. 599-620]. The concept of sea-floor spreading [H.H. Hess, History of ocean basins, in: Petrologic Studies: a Volume to Honor A.F. Buddington, Geol. Soc. Am., New York. 1962, pp. 599-620; H.H. Hess, Mid-oceanic ridges and tectonics of the sea-floor, in: W.F. Whittard, R. Bradshaw (Eds), Submarine Geology and Geophysics, Colston Papers 17, Butterworths, London, 1965, pp. 317-333] finally eliminated the weaknesses in Wegener's hypothesis and, with the coming of the "annus mirabilis" of 1968, the concept of the geosyncline could be laid to rest. Ocean-continent transitions of modern oceans, as revealed by seismology and deep-sea drilling, could now be compared with the remnants of their ancient counterparts preserved in the Alps and elsewhere.

  11. Temporal variability of vertical migration of zooplankton at deep-sea floor in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul La, Hyoung; Ha, Ho Kyung; Kang, Chan Young; Wåhlin, Anna; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Shin, Hyoung Chul

    2014-05-01

    Vertical migration of zooplankton is ubiquitous behavior in marine plankton community. Observations on diel, seasonal, and interannual variation of zooplankton behavior can support the knowledge for understanding of marine ecosystems. However, daily and seasonal rhythms are little observed in the deep-sea with seasonally ice-covered water. We described the pattern of diel vertical distribution (DVM) above deep-sea floor in a seasonally ice-covered Amundsen Sea. Times series of acoustic backscatter was observed using a bottom-moored, upward-looking Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) in the depth of 250-550 m. Multi-frequency acoustic backscatter data (38 and 120 kHz, EK60) were collected to identify the composition of DVM between fish and zooplankton using a dB differencing technique. The seasonal vertical distribution of zooplankton was clearly governed by the seasonal phase of surface solar radiation (SSR) and sea ice condition (SIC), while water temperature did not affect on the DVM variation. The main depths of zooplankton were primarily distributed near 250 m with high SSR and low SIC period and found near bottom in the lowermost layers (>400 m) with low SSR and high SIC between mid-April and mid-November. The temporal variation of main depths of zooplankton was significantly correlated with both SSR and SIC (r = 0.87 and -0.70, respectively, p<0.01, n=300). Furthermore, the acoustic backscatter strengths, which can be considered as a relative zooplankton biomass, were enhanced during high SIC period. Mean daily cycles of acoustic backscatter showed distinctive DVM pattern dependence on the SIC. During the low SIC in austral summer, DVM initiate to descent at sunrise, reach a maximum depth at around the highest levels of SSR, and ascend at sunset. However, DVM was not associated with sun's periodicity and remained above the bottom with high acoustic backscatter strength with high SIC in austral winter. It is shown that light is the proximate cue for diel

  12. Salton Sea ecosystem monitoring and assessment plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case(compiler), H. L.; Boles, Jerry; Delgado, Arturo; Nguyen, Thang; Osugi, Doug; Barnum, Douglas A.; Decker, Drew; Steinberg, Steven; Steinberg, Sheila; Keene, Charles; White, Kristina; Lupo, Tom; Gen, Sheldon; Baerenklau, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    The Salton Sea, California’s largest lake, provides essential habitat for several fish and wildlife species and is an important cultural and recreational resource. It has no outlet, and dissolved salts contained in the inflows concentrate in the Salton Sea through evaporation. The salinity of the Salton Sea, which is currently nearly one and a half times the salinity of ocean water, has been increasing as a result of evaporative processes and low freshwater inputs. Further reductions in inflows from water conservation, recycling, and transfers will lower the level of the Salton Sea and accelerate the rate of salinity increases, reduce the suitability of fish and wildlife habitat, and affect air quality by exposing lakebed playa that could generate dust. Legislation enacted in 2003 to implement the Quantification Settlement Agreement (QSA) stated the Legislature’s intent for the State of California to undertake the restoration of the Salton Sea ecosystem. As required by the legislation, the California Resources Agency (now California Natural Resources Agency) produced the Salton Sea Ecosystem Restoration Study and final Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR; California Resources Agency, 2007) with the stated purpose to “develop a preferred alternative by exploring alternative ways to restore important ecological functions of the Salton Sea that have existed for about 100 years.” A decision regarding a preferred alternative currently resides with the California State Legislature (Legislature), which has yet to take action. As part of efforts to identify an ecosystem restoration program for the Salton Sea, and in anticipation of direction from the Legislature, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a team to develop a monitoring and assessment plan (MAP). This plan is the product of that effort. The

  13. Microbial control of silver mineralization at a sea-floor hydrothermal site on the northern Gorda Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Schiffman, P.

    1990-01-01

    THE Sea Cliff hydrothermal field, on the northern Gorda Ridge, contains mounds and chimneys of hydrothermally precipitated sulphide and sulphate minerals typical of sea-floor hydrothermal vent sites1. In addition, large areas of the sea floor are covered by subhorizontal hydrothermal crusts. Samples of the crust recovered by submersible are composed of intensely altered fragments of basalt and basaltic hyaloclastite cemented by amorphous silica and chalcedony with less abundant barite, and minor amounts of base-metal sulphide minerals2. Some surfaces of the crust were formerly colonized by bacterial mats, which are locally preserved by replacement and overgrowth of the bacterial filaments by metal sulphide minerals and amorphous silica. The bacterial filaments are selectively replaced by prousite (Ag3AsS3), pearceite3 (Ag14.7-XCu1.3+xAs2S11), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and rarely by galena (PbS). Our observations suggest that bacterially mediated processes selectively precipitate silver, arsenic and copper, and that biological processes may contribute to precious-metal enrichment in some sea-floor hydrothermal base-metal sulphide deposits.

  14. Sea-Floor Character and Sedimentary Processes in the Vicinity of Woods Hole, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Ackerman, Seth D.; Barnum, Steven R.; Brennan, Rick T.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous-coverage multibeam bathymetric models and sidescan-sonar imagery have been verified with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, sediment sampling, and bottom photography. Together these data layers provide detailed base maps that yield topographic, compositional, and environmental perspectives of the sea floor in the vicinity of Woods Hole, an important harbor and major passage between the Elizabeth Islands and Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Tidally dominated high-energy environments within Woods Hole have prevented deposition of Holocene marine sediments, exposed underlying glacial drift of the Buzzards Bay moraine, and winnowed finer grained sediments, leaving lag deposits of boulders and gravel. These conditions have also enlarged and preserved depressions in the moraine surface that were originally kettle holes and formed ebb-tidal deltas at the entrances to passages. Fields of transverse and barchanoid sand waves dominate across the southern part of the study area in Vineyard Sound, where benthic environments are characterized by processes associated with coarse-bedload transport. Transverse sand waves dominate near shoals where sediment supply is greater and have asymmetries that indicate that the shoals are shaped and maintained by clockwise gyres of net sediment transport. Barchanoid sand waves, which are most common where Holocene sediments are thinner, commonly align into elongate fields that have smaller isolated waves concentrated at the eastern ends and that progressively widen and have waveforms that increase in amplitude, wavelength, and complexity westward. The northern, protected parts of the Little and Inner Harbors are characterized by muddy sediment and processes associated with deposition. A pockmark field in Little Harbor and the muddy, organic-rich sediments that form a scarp along the edge of Parker Flat are evidence for the presence of submerged marsh deposits formed during the Holocene rise in sea level.

  15. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea-floor

  16. Upper crustal densities derived from sea floor gravity measurements: Northern Juan De Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Mark L.; Johnson, H. Paul

    1993-01-01

    A transect of sea floor gravity stations has been analyzed to determine upper crustal densities on the Endeavour segment of the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Data were obtained using ALVIN along a corridor perpendicular to the axis of spreading, over crustal ages from 0 to 800,000 years. Calculated elevation factors from the gravity data show an abrupt increase in density with age (distance) for the upper 200 m of crust. This density change is interpreted as a systematic reduction in bulk porosity of the upper crustal section, from 23% for the axial ridge to 10% for the off-axis flanking ridges. The porosity decrease is attributed to the collapse and filling of large-scale voids as the abyssal hills move out of the crustal formation zone. Forward modeling of a plausible density structure for the near-axis region agrees with the observed anomaly data only if the model includes narrow, along-strike, low-density regions adjacent to both inner and outer flanks of the abyssal hills. The required low density zones could be regions of systematic upper crustal fracturing and faulting that were mapped by submersible observers and side-scan sonar images, and whose presence was suggested by the distribution of heat flow data in the same area.

  17. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  18. Sea-floor geology in central Rhode Island Sound south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Worley, C.R.; Nadeau, M.A.; Van Hoy, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. NOAA collected multibeam-echosounder data during hydrographic survey H11995 in a 63-square-kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island. The USGS collected sediment samples, bottom video, and still photographs from 27 stations in this study area to verify an interpretation of the bathymetric data. Collected data are used to map areas of scour depressions and erosional outliers, megaripples, boulders, and relatively undisturbed modern marine sediments. In general, much of the eastern part of the study area, a submerged segment of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, is bouldery. Bottom photography shows boulders are generally encrusted with hydrozoans, algae, and anemone. Scour depressions, presumably formed by long-period storm waves, and erosional outliers of Holocene sediments dominate the western part of the study area and several large areas in the east. The scour depressions tend to have coarser grained sediment than intervening erosional outliers. The coarseness likely creates turbulence in the water over these areas, which prevents fine-grained sediment deposition. Several small areas of megaripples are visible in the bathymetry data in the west. Other sandy areas are typically rippled, with burrows, worm tubes, and starfish present.

  19. Burrowing hard corals occurring on the sea floor since 80 million years ago.

    PubMed

    Sentoku, Asuka; Tokuda, Yuki; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2016-04-14

    We describe a previously unknown niche for hard corals in the small, bowl-shaped, solitary scleractinian, Deltocyathoides orientalis (Family Turbinoliidae), on soft-bottom substrates. Observational experiments were used to clarify how the sea floor niche is exploited by turbinoliids. Deltocyathoides orientalis is adapted to an infaunal mode of life and exhibits behaviours associated with automobility that include burrowing into sediments, vertical movement through sediments to escape burial, and recovery of an upright position after being overturned. These behaviours were achieved through repeated expansion and contraction of their peripheral soft tissues, which constitute a unique muscle-membrane system. Histological analysis showed that these muscle arrangements were associated with deeply incised inter-costal spaces characteristic of turbinoliid corals. The oldest known turbinoliid, Bothrophoria ornata, which occurred in the Cretaceous (Campanian), also possessed a small, conical skeleton with highly developed costae. An infaunal mode of life became available to turbinoliids due to the acquisition of automobility through the muscle-membrane system at least 80 million years ago. The newly discovered active burrowing strategies described herein provide new insights into the use of an unattached mode of life by corals inhabiting soft-bottom substrates throughout the Phanerozoic.

  20. Burrowing hard corals occurring on the sea floor since 80 million years ago

    PubMed Central

    Sentoku, Asuka; Tokuda, Yuki; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    We describe a previously unknown niche for hard corals in the small, bowl-shaped, solitary scleractinian, Deltocyathoides orientalis (Family Turbinoliidae), on soft-bottom substrates. Observational experiments were used to clarify how the sea floor niche is exploited by turbinoliids. Deltocyathoides orientalis is adapted to an infaunal mode of life and exhibits behaviours associated with automobility that include burrowing into sediments, vertical movement through sediments to escape burial, and recovery of an upright position after being overturned. These behaviours were achieved through repeated expansion and contraction of their peripheral soft tissues, which constitute a unique muscle-membrane system. Histological analysis showed that these muscle arrangements were associated with deeply incised inter-costal spaces characteristic of turbinoliid corals. The oldest known turbinoliid, Bothrophoria ornata, which occurred in the Cretaceous (Campanian), also possessed a small, conical skeleton with highly developed costae. An infaunal mode of life became available to turbinoliids due to the acquisition of automobility through the muscle-membrane system at least 80 million years ago. The newly discovered active burrowing strategies described herein provide new insights into the use of an unattached mode of life by corals inhabiting soft-bottom substrates throughout the Phanerozoic. PMID:27074813

  1. Burrowing hard corals occurring on the sea floor since 80 million years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Asuka; Tokuda, Yuki; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2016-04-01

    We describe a previously unknown niche for hard corals in the small, bowl-shaped, solitary scleractinian, Deltocyathoides orientalis (Family Turbinoliidae), on soft-bottom substrates. Observational experiments were used to clarify how the sea floor niche is exploited by turbinoliids. Deltocyathoides orientalis is adapted to an infaunal mode of life and exhibits behaviours associated with automobility that include burrowing into sediments, vertical movement through sediments to escape burial, and recovery of an upright position after being overturned. These behaviours were achieved through repeated expansion and contraction of their peripheral soft tissues, which constitute a unique muscle-membrane system. Histological analysis showed that these muscle arrangements were associated with deeply incised inter-costal spaces characteristic of turbinoliid corals. The oldest known turbinoliid, Bothrophoria ornata, which occurred in the Cretaceous (Campanian), also possessed a small, conical skeleton with highly developed costae. An infaunal mode of life became available to turbinoliids due to the acquisition of automobility through the muscle-membrane system at least 80 million years ago. The newly discovered active burrowing strategies described herein provide new insights into the use of an unattached mode of life by corals inhabiting soft-bottom substrates throughout the Phanerozoic.

  2. Monitoring of Bio-signal of People on Flooring, Tatami and in Bathtub, Toilet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Kawanishi, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    In the graying Japanese society, monitoring health-related human data with sensors embedded in the living environment is quite meaningful in terms of emergency response and of long-term health management. In using the body data monitoring system daily at home, the lack of invasiveness during the monitoring and the maintenance of the system are of great importance. We have proposed the method to surmise the sleep stages of sleeping subjects by measuring the heartbeats and the respirations without invasiveness using the pneumatic method with an air mattress. This method, however, has a problem in the maintenance, since it requires periodic refilling of the air into the mattress. In this paper, another pneumatic method, which applies silicon tubes instead of the air mattress, is proposed. The change of S/N ratio in heartbeat and respiration signals, while having the environmental noises increased, are compared among a room with wooden flooring, another with tatami mats, a bath tub, and a toilet room. The result shows that both the pulse waves and the breaths can be measured with the accuracy of around 30dB, and the identification of each pulse from among the pulse waves is also feasible, under the condition that the environmental noises in the room with wooden flooring, that with tatami mats, the bath tub, and the rest room are 0.01G, 0.09G, 100ml, and 0.01G respectively.

  3. Sea-floor geology and sedimentary processes in the vicinity of Cross Rip Channel, Nantucket Sound, offshore southeastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Schaer, J.D.; Wright, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 10.4 square kilometers of sea floor in the vicinity of Cross Rip Channel in Nantucket Sound, offshore southeastern Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12007, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor sediment sampling and bottom photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them, show the composition and terrain of the seabed and provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat. This report is part of an expanding series of cooperative studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource-management activities (for example, windfarms, pipelines, and dredging) along the inner continental shelf offshore of Massachusetts.

  4. Sea-floor character and geology off the entrance to the Connecticut River, northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Guberski, Megan R.; Wood, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar backscatter, together covering approximately 29.1 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor off the entrance to the Connecticut River in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12013, these acoustic data, sidescan-sonar imagery, and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  5. Sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments of western Block Island Sound, northeast of Gardiners Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Danforth, William W.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Clos, Andrew R.; Parker, Castle E.

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder data, collected during survey H12299 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 162-square-kilometer area of Block Island Sound, northeast of Gardiners Island, New York, are used along with sediment samples and bottom photography, collected at 37 stations in this area by the U.S. Geological Survey during cruise 2013-005-FA, to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. These data and interpretations provide important base maps for future studies of the sea floor, focused, for example, on benthic ecology and resource management. The features and sedimentary environments on the sea floor are products of the glacial history and modern tidal regime. Features include bedforms such as sand waves and megaripples, boulders, a large current-scoured depression, exposed glaciolacustrine sediments, and areas of modern marine sediment. Sand covers much of the study area and is often in the form of sand waves and megaripples, which indicate environments characterized by coarse-grained bedload transport. Boulders and gravelly lag deposits, which indicate environments of erosion or nondeposition, are found off the coast of Gardiners Island and on bathymetric highs, probably marking areas where deposits associated with recessional ice-front positions, the northern flank of the terminal moraine, or coastal-plain sediments covered with basal till are exposed. Bottom photographs and video of boulders show that they are commonly covered with sessile fauna. Strong tidal currents have produced the deep scour depression along the northwestern edge of the study area. The eastern side of this depression is armored with a gravel lag. Sea-floor areas characterized by modern marine sediments appear featureless at the 2-meter resolution of the bathymetry and flat to current rippled in the photography. These modern environments are indicative of sediment sorting and reworking.

  6. Use of Anthropogenic Sea Floor Structures by Australian Fur Seals: Potential Positive Ecological Impacts of Marine Industrial Development?

    PubMed

    Arnould, John P Y; Monk, Jacquomo; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Hindell, Mark A; Semmens, Jayson; Hoskins, Andrew J; Costa, Daniel P; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg J

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced changes to habitats can have deleterious effects on many species that occupy them. However, some species can adapt and even benefit from such modifications. Artificial reefs have long been used to provide habitat for invertebrate communities and promote local fish populations. With the increasing demand for energy resources within ocean systems, there has been an expansion of infrastructure in near-shore benthic environments which function as de facto artificial reefs. Little is known of their use by marine mammals. In this study, the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures (pipelines, cable routes, wells and shipwrecks) on the foraging locations of 36 adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) was investigated. For 9 (25%) of the individuals, distance to anthropogenic sea floor structures was the most important factor in determining the location of intensive foraging activity. Whereas the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures on foraging locations was not related to age and mass, it was positively related to flipper length/standard length (a factor which can affect manoeuvrability). A total of 26 (72%) individuals tracked with GPS were recorded spending time in the vicinity of structures (from <1% to >75% of the foraging trip duration) with pipelines and cable routes being the most frequented. No relationships were found between the amount of time spent frequenting anthropogenic structures and individual characteristics. More than a third (35%) of animals foraging near anthropogenic sea floor structures visited more than one type of structure. These results further highlight potentially beneficial ecological outcomes of marine industrial development.

  7. Use of Anthropogenic Sea Floor Structures by Australian Fur Seals: Potential Positive Ecological Impacts of Marine Industrial Development?

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, John P. Y.; Monk, Jacquomo; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Hindell, Mark A.; Semmens, Jayson; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Costa, Daniel P.; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced changes to habitats can have deleterious effects on many species that occupy them. However, some species can adapt and even benefit from such modifications. Artificial reefs have long been used to provide habitat for invertebrate communities and promote local fish populations. With the increasing demand for energy resources within ocean systems, there has been an expansion of infrastructure in near-shore benthic environments which function as de facto artificial reefs. Little is known of their use by marine mammals. In this study, the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures (pipelines, cable routes, wells and shipwrecks) on the foraging locations of 36 adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) was investigated. For 9 (25%) of the individuals, distance to anthropogenic sea floor structures was the most important factor in determining the location of intensive foraging activity. Whereas the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures on foraging locations was not related to age and mass, it was positively related to flipper length/standard length (a factor which can affect manoeuvrability). A total of 26 (72%) individuals tracked with GPS were recorded spending time in the vicinity of structures (from <1% to >75% of the foraging trip duration) with pipelines and cable routes being the most frequented. No relationships were found between the amount of time spent frequenting anthropogenic structures and individual characteristics. More than a third (35%) of animals foraging near anthropogenic sea floor structures visited more than one type of structure. These results further highlight potentially beneficial ecological outcomes of marine industrial development. PMID:26132329

  8. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) Predictions for a Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software founded on Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) and Energy Boundary Element Analysis (EBEA). Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) was validated on a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and experimental results. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions were made using the commercial software program VA One 2009 from ESI Group. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 100 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  9. Relationships among sea-floor structure and benthic communities in Long Island Sound at regional and benthoscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajac, Roman N.; Lewis, Ralph S.; Poppe, Larry J.; Twichell, David C.; Vozarik, Joseph; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.

    2000-01-01

    Long Island Sound is comprised of a rich and spatially heterogeneous mix of sea-floor environments which provide habitat for an equally diverse set of assemblages of soft-sediment communities. Information from recent research on the geomorphological and chemical attributes of these environments, as well as from studies of the hydrodynamics of the Sound, provide the opportunity to develop a landscape, or "benthoscape" framework for understanding the soft-sediment ecology of this estuary and for guiding future research focusing on structure and function at multiple spatial scales. This contribution reviews past research on benthic communities in Long Island Sound and addresses how they may be shaped by sea-floor characteristics at regional and benthoscape scales. At the regional scale (i.e. the entire Sound), differences in benthic community composition correspond to the distribution of general sedimentary environments. However, significant variation in community structure also occurs at the benthoscape scale (within regions) related to local variations in sediment properties, and physical and biogenic topographic features. Several topical areas in particular need further research in Long Island Sound, including temporal dynamics of benthic communities relative to sea-floor structure and the interaction between the dynamics of benthoscapes and hydrologic seascapes.

  10. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

  11. Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Western Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Haupt, T.A.; Crocker, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working together to interpret sea-floor geology along the northeastern coast of the United States. In 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE completed survey H11322, a sidescan-sonar and bathymetric survey that covers about 60 square kilometers of the sea floor in western Rhode Island Sound. This report interprets sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA survey H11322 to delineate sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in the study area. Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous Coastal Plain sediments in Rhode Island Sound underlie Pleistocene glacial drift that affects the distribution of surficial Holocene marine and transgressional sediments. The study area has three bathymetric highs separated by a channel system. Features and patterns in the sidescan-sonar imagery include low, moderate, and high backscatter; sand waves; scarps; erosional outliers; boulders; trawl marks; and dredge spoils. Four sedimentary environments in the study area, based on backscatter and bathymetric features, include those characterized by erosion or nondeposition, coarse-grained bedload transport, sorting and reworking, and deposition. Environments characterized by erosion or nondeposition and coarse-grained bedload transport are located in shallower areas and environments characterized by deposition are located in deeper areas; environments characterized by sorting and reworking processes are generally located at moderate depths.

  12. Sea floor topography and backscatter intensity of the Hudson Canyon region offshore of New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Twichell, David C.; Rona, Peter A.; Tucholke, Brian E.; Middleton, Tammie J.; Robb, James M.

    2006-01-01

    These maps show the sea floor topography and backscatter intensity of the Hudson Canyon region on the continental slope and rise offshore of New Jersey and New York (fig. 1 and fig. 2). Sheet 1 shows sea floor topography as shaded relief. Sheet 2 shows sea floor topography as shaded relief with backscatter intensity superimposed in color. Both sheets are at a scale of 1:300,000 and also show smoothed topographic contours at selected intervals. The maps are based on new multibeam echo-sounder data collected on an 18-day cruise carried out aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ship Ronald H. Brown during August and September 2002. Additional multibeam data of the Hudson Canyon collected by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), on the continental shelf collected by the STRATAFORM project (Goff and others, 1999), and a survey of the Hudson Shelf Valley (Butman and others, 2003), and a compilation of bathymetric data from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) Coastal Relief Model provide coverage of areas surrounding Hudson Canyon (fig. 2). Interpretations of the surficial geology also utilize widely spaced 3.5- and 10-kiloHertz (kHz) high-resolution seismic profiles collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (fig.2).

  13. Sea-floor environments within Long Island Sound: a regional overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, Harley J.; Poppe, Lawrence J.

    2000-01-01

    Modern sea-floor sedimentary environments within the glaciated, topographically complex Long Island Sound estuary have been interpreted and mapped from an extensive collection of sidescan sonographs, bottom samples, and video-camera observations together with supplemental bathymetric, marine-geologic, and bottom-current data. Four categories of environments are present that reflect the dominant long-term processes of erosion or nondeposition; coarsegrained bedload transport; sediment sorting and reworking; and fine-grained deposition. (1) Environments of erosion or nondeposition contain exposures of glacial drift, coarse lag deposits, and possibly bedrock and include sediments which range from boulder fields to gravelly coarse-to-medium sands. (2) Environments of coarse-grained bedload transport are mantled by sand ribbons and sand waves and contain mostly coarse-to-fine sands with only small amounts of mud. (3) Environments of sediment sorting and reworking comprise both uniform and heterogeneous sediment types and contain variable amounts of fine sand and mud. (4) Environments of fine-grained deposition are blanketed by muds and sandy muds. The patchy distribution of sedimentary environments within Long Island Sound reflects both regional and local changes in bottom processes. Regional changes are primarily the result of a strong, east-to-west decreasing gradient of bottom tidal-current speeds, coupled with the net (westward) estuarine bottom drift. The regional current regime has produced a westward succession of environments along the basin floor beginning with erosion or nondeposition at the narrow eastern entrance to the Sound, changing to an extensive area of coarse-grained bedload transport, passing into a contiguous band of sediment sorting, and ending with broad areas of fine-grained deposition in the central and western Sound. However, local changes in processes are superimposed on the regional conditions within the central and western parts of the basin

  14. Magnetic studies of magma-supply and sea-floor metamorphism: Troodos ophiolite dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Gauthier, D.

    2006-05-01

    Dikes of the eastern Troodos ophiolite of Cyprus intruded at slow ocean-spreading axes with dips ranging up to 15° from vertical and with bimodal strikes (now NE-SW and N-S due to post-88 Ma sinistral microplate rotation). Varied dike orientations may represent local stress fields during dike-crack propagation but do not influence the spatial-distributions or orientation-distributions of dikes' magnetic fabrics, nor of their palaeomagnetic signals. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) integrates mineral orientation-distributions from each of 1289 specimens sampled from dikes at 356 sites over ˜400 km 2 in the eastern Troodos ophiolite of Cyprus. In 90% of dikes, AMS fabrics define a foliation ( kMAX- kINT) parallel to dike walls and a lineation ( kMAX) that varies regionally and systematically. Magma-flow alignment of accessory magnetite controls the AMS with a subordinate contribution from the mafic silicate matrix that is reduced in anisotropy by sea-floor metamorphism. Titanomagnetite has less influence on anisotropy. Occasionally, intermediate and minimum susceptibility axes are switched so as to be incompatible with the kinematically reasonable flow plane but maximum susceptibility ( kMAX) still defines the magmatic flow axis. Such blended subfabrics of kinematically compatible mafic-silicate and misaligned multidomain magnetite subfabrics; are rare. Areas of steep magma flow ( kMAX plunge ≥ 70°) and of shallow magma-flow alternate in a systematic and gradual spatial pattern. Foci of steep flow were spaced ˜4 km parallel to the spreading axes and ˜6 km perpendicular to the spreading axes. Ridge-parallel separation of steep flow suggest the spacing of magma-feeders to the dikes whereas ridge-perpendicular spacing of 6 km at a spreading rate of 50 mm/a implies the magma sources may have been active for ˜240 Ka. The magma feeders feeding dikes may have been ≤ 2 km in diameter. Stable paleomagnetic vectors, in some cases verified by reversal tests

  15. Sea-floor geology of a part of Mamala Bay, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Torresan, M.E.; Barber, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    We surveyed the sea-floor geology within a 200-km2 area of Mamala Bay, off Honolulu, Hawai'i, by collecting and analyzing sidescan sonar images, 3.5kHz profiles, video and still visual images, and box-core samples. The study area extends from 20-m water depth on the insular shelf to 600-m water depth in a southeast-trending trough. The sidescan images depict three principal types of seafloor material: low-backscatter natural sediment, high-backscatter drowned carbonate reef, and intermediate-backscatter dredged-material deposits. Cores indicate that the natural sediment is muddy sand, composed of carbonate reef and microfauna debris with some volcanic grains. Vague areal trends in composition are evident. The dredged material comprises poorly sorted, cobble- to clay-size mixtures of reef, volcanic, and man-made debris, up to 35 cm thick. Dredged-material deposits are not evident in the 3.5-kHz profiles. In the sidescan images they appear as isolated, circular to subcircular imprints, apparently formed by individual drops, around the periphery of their occurrence, but they overlap and coalesce to a nearly continuous, intermediate-backscatter blanket toward the center of three disposal sites investigated. We did not observe noticeable currents during our camera surveys, but there is abundant evidence of sediment reworking: symmetrical and asymmetrical ripples in the visual images, sand waves in the 3.5-kHz profiles and side-scan images, moats around the reefs in 3.5-kHz profiles, winnowed dredged material in the visual images, and burial of dredged material by natural sediment in cores. Most current indicators imply a westerly to northwesterly transport direction, along contours or upslope, although there are a few areas of easterly indicators. Internal waves probably drive the transport; their possible existence is implied by measured water-column density gradients.

  16. Morphology of sea-floor landslides on Horizon Guyot: application of steady-state geotechnical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.E.; Schwab, W.C.; Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; Hein, J.R.; Quinterno, P.J.; Levin, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mass movement and erosion have been identified on the pelagic sediment cap of Horizon Guyot, a seamount in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Trends in the size, shape and preservation of bedforms and sediment textural trends on the pelagic cap indicate that bottom-current-generated sediment transport direction is upslope. Slumping of the sediment cap occurred on and that the net bedload transport direction is upslope. Slumping of the sediment cap occurred on the northwest side of the guyot on a 1.6?? to 2.0?? slope in the zone of enhanced bottom-current activity. Submersible investigations of these slump blocks show them to be discrete and to have a relief of 6-15 m, with nodular chert beds cropping out along the headwall of individual rotated blocks. An evaluation of the stability of the sediment cap suggests that the combination of the current-induced beveling of the sea floor and infrequent earthquake loading accompanied by cyclic strength reduction is responsible for the initiation of slumps. The sediment in the area of slumping moved short distances in relatively coherent masses, whereas sediment that has moved beyond the summit cap perimeter has fully mobilized into sediment gravity flows and traveled large distances. A steady-state geotechnical analysis of Horizon Guyot sediment indicates the predisposition of deeply buried sediment towards disintegrative flow failure on appropriately steep slopes. Thus, slope failure in this deeper zone would include large amounts of internal deformation. However, gravitational stress in the near-surface sediment of the summit cap (sub-bottom depth < 14 m) is insufficient to maintain downslope movement after initial failure occurs. The predicted morphology of coherent slump blocks displaced and rafted upon a weakened zone at depth corresponds well with seismic-reflection data and submersible observations. ?? 1990.

  17. Physiologic monitoring alarm load on medical/surgical floors of a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Gross, Brian; Dahl, Deborah; Nielsen, Larry

    2011-01-01

    It has been known to the public that high frequency of false and/or unnecessary alarms from patient monitoring devices causes "alarm fatigue" in critical care. But little is known about the impact to care on the less acute patients located outside the critical care areas, such as the traditional medical/surgical (med/surg) floor. As part of a larger population management study, we initiated continuous physiological monitoring to 79 beds of floor patients in a community hospital. In order to qualify the patient monitoring alarm load for subacute medical and surgical floor patients, we assessed alarm data from April 2009 to January 2010. A standard critical care monitoring system (Philips IntelliVue MP-5 and Telemetry) was installed and set to the default alarm limits. All waveform data available for the patient (typically ECG, RESP, PPG at 125hz 8 bit), all alarm conditions declared by the monitoring system, and 1 minute parameter trend data were saved to disk every 8 hours for all patients. A monitoring care protocol was created to determine whether the patient was monitored via the hardwired bedside or wirelessly via telemetry. Alarms were not announced on the care unit but instead notifications were the responsibility of remote telehealth center personnel. We retrospectively evaluated the frequency of alarms over specific physiologic thresholds (n= 4104 patients) and conducted adjudication of all alarms based on a smaller sampling (n=30 patients). For all patients, the average hours of monitoring per patient were 16.5 hours with a standard deviation (s) of 8.3 hours and a median of 22 hours. The average number of alarms (all severities) per patient was 69.7 (s =90.3, median =28) alarms. When this is adjusted to the duration of monitoring, the average per patient, per day rate was 95.6 (s =124.2, median =34.2) alarms. The adjudicated sample (n=30 patients) resulted in 34% of critical alarms (lethal arrhythmias, extreme high or low heart rate [HR], extreme

  18. On the optimal siting of cubic kilometre scale neutrino telescope infrastructure on the deep-sea floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Priede, Imants G.; Holford, Anne

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose an approach for optimal siting of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope on the sea floor. The method is based on Geographic Information System (GIS) spatial analyses and cost assessment. GIS techniques initially aim to derive depth and slope characteristics of the sea floor, and estimate the distance from shore. Subsequently, GIS methods are used to pre-select sites meeting the KM3NeT infrastructure criteria. Finally, the candidate locations are evaluated in terms of cost estimation. A convex combination of instantaneous cost functions (ICFs) is applied and different weighting factors are allowed to account for dissimilar importance of the considered variables. The ICFs are indexed by a parameter β to assign different cost characteristics to different variables. The overall assessment is based on the comparison of costs computed for the candidate sites assuming many configurations of weights and β values. Our exercise uses a simulated numerical bathymetry to avoid a site-specific evaluation at the initial stage of the KM3NeT project. Hence, no recommendations as to the real locations of the neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea are addressed. Our approach is found to serve well in the process of comparing costs between different candidate sites.

  19. Sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments in western Block Island Sound, offshore of Fishers Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Danforth, William W.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Winner, William G.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam-bathymetric and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 114-square-kilometer area of Block Island Sound, southeast of Fishers Island, New York, are combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 36 stations in this area in order to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. These interpretations and datasets provide base maps for studies on benthic ecology and resource management. The geologic features and sedimentary environments on the sea floor are products of the area’s glacial history and modern processes. These features include bedrock, drumlins, boulders, cobbles, large current-scoured bathymetric depressions, obstacle marks, and glaciolacustrine sediments found in high-energy sedimentary environments of erosion or nondeposition; and sand waves and megaripples in sedimentary environments characterized by coarse-grained bedload transport. Trawl marks are preserved in lower energy environments of sorting and reworking. This report releases the multibeam-bathymetric, sidescan-sonar, sediment, and photographic data and interpretations of the features and sedimentary environments in Block Island Sound, offshore Fishers Island.

  20. Time-Series Photographs of the Sea Floor in Western Massachusetts Bay: June 1998 to May 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Alexander, P. Soupy; Bothner, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents time-series photographs of the sea floor obtained from an instrumented tripod deployed at Site A in western Massachusetts Bay (42? 22.6' N., 70? 47.0' W., 30 m water depth, figure 1) from June 1998 through May 1999. Site A is approximately 1 km south of an ocean outfall that began discharging treated sewage effluent from the Boston metropolitan area into Massachusetts Bay in September 2000. Time-series photographs and oceanographic observations were initiated at Site A in December 1989 and are anticipated to continue to September 2005. This one of a series of reports that present these images in digital form. The objective of these reports is to enable easy and rapid viewing of the photographs and to provide a medium-resolution digital archive. The images, obtained every 4 hours, are presented as a movie (in .avi format, which may be viewed using an image viewer such as QuickTime or Windows Media Player) and as individual images (.tif format). The images provide time-series observations of changes of the sea floor and near-bottom water properties.

  1. Time-Series Photographs of the Sea Floor in Western Massachusetts Bay: June 1997 to June 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Alexander, P. Soupy; Bothner, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents time-series photographs of the sea floor obtained from an instrumented tripod deployed at Site A in western Massachusetts Bay (42? 22.6' N., 70? 47.0' W., 30 m water depth, figure 1) from June 1997 through June 1998. Site A is approximately 1 km south of an ocean outfall that began discharging treated sewage effluent from the Boston metropolitan area into Massachusetts Bay in September 2000. Time-series photographs and oceanographic observations were initiated at Site A in December 1989 and are anticipated to continue to September 2005. This is the first in a series of reports planned to summarize and distribute these images in digital form. The objective of these reports is to enable easy and rapid viewing of the photographs and to provide a medium-resolution digital archive. The images, obtained every 4 hours, are presented as a movie (in .avi format, which may be viewed using an image viewer such as QuickTime or Windows Media Player) and as individual images (.tif format). The images provide time-series observations of changes of the sea floor and near-bottom water properties.

  2. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  3. Maps Showing Sea Floor Topography, Sun-Illuminated Sea Floor Topography, and Backscatter Intensity of Quadrangles 1 and 2 in the Great South Channel Region, Western Georges Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.; Middleton, Tammie J.; Malczyk, Jeremy T.; Fuller, Sarah J.

    2002-01-01

    The Great South Channel separates the western part of Georges Bank from Nantucket Shoals and is a major conduit for the exchange of water between the Gulf of Maine to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the south. Water depths range mostly between 65 and 80 m in the region. A minimum depth of 45 m occurs in the east-central part of the mapped area, and a maximum depth of 100 m occurs in the northwest corner. The channel region is characterized by strong tidal and storm currents that flow dominantly north and south. Major topographic features of the seabed were formed by glacial and postglacial processes. Ice containing rock debris moved from north to south, sculpting the region into a broad shallow depression and depositing sediment to form the irregular depressions and low gravelly mounds and ridges that are visible in parts of the mapped area. Many other smaller glacial featuresprobably have been eroded by waves and currents at worksince the time when the region, formerly exposed bylowered sea level or occupied by ice, was invaded by the sea. The low, irregular and somewhat lumpy fabric formed by the glacial deposits is obscured in places by drifting sand and by the linear, sharp fabric formed by modern sand features. Today, sand transported by the strong north-south-flowing tidal and storm currents has formed large, east-west-trending dunes. These bedforms (ranging between 5 and 20 m in height) contrast strongly with, and partly mask, the subdued topography of the older glacial features.

  4. Classification of sea-floor features associated with methane seeps along the Gulf of Cádiz continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Ricardo; Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; Maestro, Adolfo; Díaz-del-Río, Victor; Fernández-Puga, María del Carmen

    2006-06-01

    Based on recently gathered swath-bathymetry, high- to ultra-high-resolution seismic, and underwater camera data, along with dredging and coring samples, this paper examines the relationship between sea-floor features and the nature of hydrocarbon-enriched fluid and gas leaks from degassing of deeply buried sediments along the continental margin of the Gulf of Cádiz (eastern Central Atlantic). A classification into three main groups is proposed on the basis of the morphology and nature of deposits: (1) mud volcanoes, (2) methane-derived authigenic carbonates (MDAC) mounds, and (3) crater-like pockmarks. Mud volcanoes are, topographically, cone-shaped sea-floor edifices, built up from catastrophic mud and fluid degassing, intercalated with periods of inactivity. So far more than 25 mud volcanoes have been discovered in the Gulf of Cádiz, named in memory of deceased colleagues (e.g., Ginsburg and Baraza), or researchers' birth places (e.g. Faro, Cibeles, Almazán, San Petersburgh, Yuma, Rabat, Bonjardim, Coruña, Gades). These structures range from 800 to 2500 m in diameter and tower 150-300 m above the seabed. The volcanoes consistently feature a well-defined outer ring or circular terrace and an inner dome. All mud volcanoes are built up of episodes of mud-breccia flows, intercalated with deep-current deposits, with evident indications of gas saturation: degassing structures, a strong H 2S smell, and chemosynthetic fauna (such as Pogonophora sp. tube worms and Calyptogena sp.). Commonly observed carbonate crusts and slabs overlying some mud volcanoes are thought to have been formed by slow, diffuse venting during periods of inactivity or slower rates of fluid venting following the ejection of mud. A "fermentation" process, the result of microbial-mediated oxidation of hydrocarbon-enriched fluids, seems to play an important role in the growth of large deep-water carbonate mounds and chimneys during periods of low methane-seep fluid pressure. More than 400 crater

  5. The influence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles on wave-driven sea-floor sediment mobility along the central California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Reid, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are the dominant temporally and spatially variable process influencing sea floor sediment resuspension along most continental shelves. Wave-induced sediment mobility on the continental shelf and upper continental slope off central California for different phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events was modeled using monthly statistics derived from more than 14 years of concurrent hourly oceanographic and meteorologic data as boundary input for the Delft SWAN wave model, gridded sea floor grain-size data from the usSEABED database, and regional bathymetry. Differences as small as 0.5 m in wave height, 1 s in wave period, and 10° in wave direction, in conjunction with the spatially heterogeneous unconsolidated sea-floor sedimentary cover, result in significant changes in the predicted mobility of continental shelf surficial sediment in the study area. El Niño events result in more frequent mobilization on the inner shelf in the summer and winter than during La Niña events and on the outer shelf and upper slope in the winter months, while La Niña events result in more frequent mobilization on the mid-shelf during spring and summer months than during El Niño events. The timing and patterns of seabed mobility are addressed in context of geologic and biologic processes. By understanding the spatial and temporal variability in the disturbance of the sea floor, scientists can better interpret sedimentary patterns and ecosystem structure, while providing managers and planners an understanding of natural impacts when considering the permitting of offshore activities that disturb the sea floor such as trawling, dredging, and the emplacement of sea-floor engineering structures.

  6. Crustal Structure in the Southern Rockall Trough from Satellite Gravity Data: Evidence for Sea-floor Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, A.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    The southern Rockall Trough south of 57 N has previously been interpreted as either an intra-continental rift floored with highly extended continental crust, or a failed oceanic rift formed by Cretaceous sea floor spreading. Satellite gravity, bathymetry data and seismic estimates of sediment thickness are used to derive crustal basement thickness for the southern Rockall Trough and adjacent regions using a gravity inversion method incorporating a correction for the large negative thermal gravity component present in oceanic and stretched continental lithosphere. The marine Bouguer anomaly, derived from satellite free air gravity (Sandwell & Smith 1997) and Gebco 2003 bathymetry data, is inverted using the method of Oldenberg (1974), incorporating an iteratively applied thermal anomaly correction, to give Moho depth. For oceanic crust the thermal anomaly correction is calculated using isochron ages (Muller et al. 1997) and for continental crust from the beta stretching factors resulting from gravity derived crustal basement thickness and an assumed rift age. When sediment thickness and volcanic addition are assumed to be zero, the resulting upper bound of crustal thickness from the gravity inversion is as little as 10 km in the southern Rockall Trough. A segmented axial thickening of the crust at the centre of the Rockall Trough is predicted, between the Barra volcanic ridge and the Anton Dohrn seamount and is interpreted as having a volcanic origin. Inclusion of a sediment thickness correction in the gravity inversion further reduces predicted crustal thickness. A pseudo-sediment-thickness map has been constructed from the available wide-angle data and incorporated in the gravity inversion. The addition of up to 5.5 km of sediment in the gravity inversion reduces the upper bound of crustal thickness to less than 3 km in some locations. The segmented axial thickening and thin crust shown by the gravity inversion, the lack of intra-basinal faulting, and the volcanic

  7. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution. [North and Irish Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Hall, T. S. (Principal Investigator); Telfer, D. J.; Wilson, L.; Fryer, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal IR data from NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission were used in a study of the feasibility of detecting oil spills in the seas around the UK. The period of observation covered the years 1978/9, in which there were no major spills in the area. A video processor capable of generating false color renderings of any satellite image from eight density levels was used in the synoptic search for spills. Other laboratory equipment, and associated analyses, were used to study the thermal behavior of oil spills on water. Oil spills may appear to be warmer or cooler that the surrounding sea, depending on numerous factors.

  8. A comparison of the South China Sea and Canada Basin: two small marginal ocean basins with hyper-extended margins and central zones of sea-floor spreading.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    Both the South China Sea and Canada Basin preserve oceanic spreading centres and adjacent passive continental margins characterized by broad COT zones with hyper-extended continental crust. We have investigated the nature of strain accommodation in the regions immediately adjacent to the oceanic spreading centres in these two basins using 2-D backstripping subsidence reconstructions, coupled with forward modelling constrained by estimates of upper crustal extensional faulting. Modelling is better constrained in the South China Sea but our results for the Beaufort Sea are analogous. Depth-dependent extension is required to explain the great depth of both basins because only modest upper crustal faulting is observed. A weak lower crust in the presence of high heat flow is suggested for both basins. Extension in the COT may continue even after sea-floor spreading has ceased. The analogous results for the two basins considered are discussed in terms of (1) constraining the timing and distribution of crustal thinning along the respective continental margins, (2) defining the processes leading to hyper-extension of continental crust in the respective tectonic settings and (3) illuminating the processes that control hyper-extension in these basins and more generally.

  9. Boron-rich mud volcanoes of the Black Sea region: modern analogues to ancient sea-floor tourmalinites associated with Sullivan-type Pb-Zn deposits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Turner, R.J.W.; Ware, P.L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Large submarine mud volcanoes in the abyssal part of the Black Sea south of the Crimean Peninsula are similar in many respects to synsedimentary mud volcanoes in the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell basin. One of the Belt-Purcell mud volcanoes directly underlies the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia. Footwall rocks to the Sullivan deposit comprise variably tourmalinized siltstone, conglomerate, and related fragmental rock; local thin pyrrhotite-rich and spessartine-quartz beds are interpreted as Fe and Fe-Mn exhalites, respectively. Analogous Fe- and Mn-rich sediments occur near the abyssal Black Sea mud volcanoes. Massive pyrite crusts and associated carbonate chimneys discovered in relatively shallow waters (~200 m depth) west of the Crimean Peninsula indicate an active sea-floor-hydrothermal system. Subaerial mud volcanoes on the Kerch and Taman Peninsulas (~100 km north of the abyssal mud volcanoes) contain saline thermal waters that locally have very high B contents (to 915 mg/L). These data suggest that tourmalinites might be forming in or near submarine Black Sea mud volcanoes, where potential may also exist for Sullivan-type Pb-Zn mineralization.

  10. Time-series photographs of the sea floor in western Massachusetts Bay, version 2, 1989-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Dalyander, P. Soupy; Bothner, Michael H.; Lange, William N.

    2008-01-01

    Time-series photographs of the sea floor were obtained from an instrumented tripod deployed in western Massachusetts Bay at LT-A (42° 22.6' N, 70° 47.0' W; nominal water depth of 32 m; fig. 1) from December 1989 through September 2005. The photographs provide time-series observations of physical changes of the sea floor, near-bottom water turbidity, and life on the sea floor. Several reports present these photographs in digital form (table 1). This report, U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 265, Version 2.0, contains the photographs obtained from December 1989 to October 1996, adding to (and replacing) Version 1 of Data Series 265 (Butman and others, 2007a) that contained photographs from 1989 through 1993. Data Series 266 (Butman and others, 2008b) contains photographs obtained from October 1996 through September 2005. The photographs are published in separate reports because the data files are too large for distribution on a single DVD. These reports present the photographs, originally collected on 35-mm film, in digital form to enable easy viewing and to provide a medium-resolution digital archive. The photographs, obtained every 4 or every 6 hours, are presented as individual photographs (in .png format) and as a movie (in .avi format). The time-series photographs taken at LT-A were collected as part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study to understand the transport and fate of sediments and associated contaminants in Massachusetts Bay and Cape Cod Bay (Bothner and Butman, 2007). This long-term study was carried out by the USGS in partnership with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) (http://www.mwra.state.ma.us/) and with logistical support from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). Long-term oceanographic observations help to identify the processes causing bottom sediment resuspension and transport and provide data for developing and testing numerical models. The observations document seasonal and interannual changes in currents, hydrography

  11. Star-shaped feeding traces produced by echiuran worms on the deep-sea floor of the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Suguru

    1984-12-01

    Many star-shaped foraging traces were observed in bottom photographs of the deep-sea floor taken in the Bay of Bengal between the depths of 5025 and 2635 m. They were classified into 10 types according to their dimensions, aspect ratios (length/width) of their spokes, features of the central structure, and possible production mechanisms. The proboscis of a deep-sea bonellid echiuran worm was photographed at a depth of 2635 m in the act of producing one of the star-shaped foraging traces. On the basis of photographic observations and observations of shallow-water forms, several types of the feeding traces can be ascribed to the foraging of deep-sea echiuran worms on surface detritus. At least four types of the star-shaped trace are probably produced by deep-sea bonellid worms, and a linear correlation could be found between the aspect ratios of the spokes and maximum number of spokes around the central hole. A geometrical model experiment stimulating the feeding behavior of a bonellid worm suggested simple behavioral principles which afford maximum utilization of the surface area around a central hole with least expenditure of energy. The prediction of the maximum number of spokes for a given aspect of spokes by the model experiment agreed well with those observed, both utilizing about 76% of the fresh sediment surface within the span of the probiscis around a central hole. This efficient feeding pattern may have adaptive value in deep-sea environments such as the central part of the Bay of Bengal, where energy input is limited.

  12. Fish, crustaceans, and the sea floor under the ross ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, P M; Raymond, J A; Jacobs, S S; Devries, A L; Thorndike, E M; Dewitt, H H

    1979-02-02

    Baited traps and a camera lowered through the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, at a point 475 kilometers from the open Ross Sea and to 597 meters below sea level revealed the presence of fish, many amphipods, and one isopod. Biological or current markings were not evident on a soft bottom littered with subangular lumps. A fish was caught through a crevasse 80 kilometers from the shelf edge.

  13. Food for the deep sea: utilization, dispersal, and flux of nekton falls at the Santa catalina basin floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Craig R.

    1985-04-01

    The role of large food falls in the ecology of deep-sea benthos has been the topic of much speculation and little direct study. The submersible Alvin and free vehicles were used to assess experimentally the fate and flux of nekton falls at a depth of 1310 m in the Santa Catalina Basin. Parcels of dead fish (1 to 40 kg) placed on the basin floor rapidly attracted large aggregations of fish and invertebrate scavengers, which consumed the bulk of the carrion within hours to days. The most strongly attracted megafaunal scavenger was the ophiuroid Ophiophthalmus normani, the dominant megabenthic species in the background epifaunal assemblage. O. normani attained densities of 700 m -2 in aggregations containing thousands of individuals, and remained at elevated abundance around baitfalls for weeks. Six other megafaunal species also appeared to feed directly on carrion, including two of the next ten most abundant megabenthic organisms. Several of these species exhibited roosting behavior near baitfalls; this is probably an adaptation for exploiting rich but unpredictable food resources. Scavengers consumed bait parcels so rapidly and then dispersed so broadly that energy from nekton falls apparently reaches infaunal benthos only in very attenuated form, yielding at most minor community enhancement. Necrophagy was not the sole cause of megafaunal attraction to bait parcels; there is evidence that three predacious species were drawn to high concentrations of their ophiuroid prey. Benthic standing-crop and turnover-rate estimates for nekton falls suggest that perhaps 11% of benthic community respiratory requirements are met by nekton carcasses reaching the basin floor; the flux of energy to the deep sea through such fall events thus merits further study. These energy bonanzas occur frequently enough that O. normani, and other common necrophages, are likely to encounter at least one nekton fall per year. Such windfalls thus could influence the life histories of several

  14. Mercury isotopic composition of hydrothermal systems in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, L.S.; Blum, J.D.; Nordstrom, D.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Barkay, T.; Vetriani, C.

    2009-01-01

    To characterize mercury (Hg) isotopes and isotopic fractionation in hydrothermal systems we analyzed fluid and precipitate samples from hot springs in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and vent chimney samples from the Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift. These samples provide an initial indication of the variability in Hg isotopic composition among marine and continental hydrothermal systems that are controlled predominantly by mantle-derived magmas. Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente hot spring in Yellowstone range in δ202Hg from - 1.02‰ to 0.58‰ (± 0.11‰, 2SD) and solid precipitate samples from Guaymas Basin range in δ202Hg from - 0.37‰ to - 0.01‰ (± 0.14‰, 2SD). Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of Hg from the vent (δ202Hg = 0.10‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) to the end of the outflow channel (&delta202Hg = 0.58‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) in conjunction with a decrease in Hg concentration from 46.6pg/g to 20.0pg/g. Although a small amount of Hg is lost from the fluids due to co-precipitation with siliceous sinter, we infer that the majority of the observed MDF and Hg loss from waters in Ojo Caliente is due to volatilization of Hg0(aq) to Hg0(g) and the preferential loss of Hg with a lower δ202Hg value to the atmosphere. A small amount of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) was observed in all samples from Ojo Caliente (Δ199Hg = 0.13‰ ±1 0.06‰, 2SD) but no significant MIF was measured in the sea-floor rift samples from Guaymas Basin. This study demonstrates that several different hydrothermal processes fractionate Hg isotopes and that Hg isotopes may be used to better understand these processes.

  15. Surficial Geologic Interpretation and Sidescan Sonar Imageryof the Sea Floor in West-Central Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Paskevich, V.F.; Doran, E.F.; Moser, M.S.; Christman, E.B.; Beaver, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT-DEP) to conduct detailed studies of the surficial geology in Long Island Sound (LIS). The study goals are to interpret sedimentary environments within the Sound, to further understand processes controlling sediment distribution, and to provide a framework for future studies. Sidescan-sonar mosaics produced by USGS and NOAA show detailed acoustic images of the sea floor with 1-m resolution. These images, along with data obtained from sediment samples, seismic-reflection profiles, and seafloor video, are used to interpret the surficial geology. As part of this cooperative program, since 1995, 12 sidescan-sonar surveys of the LIS sea floor have been completed (Poppe and others, 1997; Twichell and others, 1997; Poppe and others, 1998a; Poppe and others, 1998b; Twichell and others, 1998; Poppe and others, 1999a; Poppe and others, 1999b; Poppe and others, 2001; Poppe and others, 2004; Zajac and others, 2003). The purpose of this report is to release digital versions of the imagery and interpretations from NOAA survey H11044 originally published in McMullen and others (2005). Survey H11044, which covers an area of 293 km2 in west-central LIS, includes the area of the previously published Milford Survey (Twichell and others, 1998) and the westernmost part of the New Haven Harbor Survey (Poppe and others, 2001). These two surveys detailed surficial geology and mapped sediment distributions. In this study, we map the sediment distribution across a broader, previously unstudied area and the sedimentary environments.

  16. Ice-gouged microrelief on the floor of the eastern Chukchi Sea, Alaska: a reconnaissance survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toimil, Lawrence J.

    1978-01-01

    Side-scan sonar and bathymetric records obtained from 1,800 km of trackline from the eastern Chukchi Sea continental shelf, between water depths of 20 and 70 m show the ubiquitous presence of furrow-like linear depressions produced by gouging of the sea bed by ice keels. These sea bed micro-features are regionally widespread but are not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, the microrelief, texture, and lithologic structure of sea bed sediments have been significantly modified by the disruptive processes associated with ice gouge formation. An analysis of some 10,.200 individual gouges shows that the density of ice gouges increases with increasing latitude, increasing slope gradients, and decreasing water depth. Across the northern half of the shelf few trackline segments are free of ice gouges; in the southern portion numerous segments contain no ice gouges. However, ice gouges extend at least as far south as Cape Prince of Wales Shoal. Densities of over 200 gouges per km of trackline are not uncommon in water depths less than 30 m ,but no values higher than 50 km are encountered in water deeper than 50 m. No ice gouges have been observed in water depths exceeding 58 m. Saturation ice gouge densities (greater than 300/Pan) occur along the eastern side 6f Barrow Sea Valley and the northeast flank of Hanna Shoal. Maximum gouge incision depths per km of trackline are greatest in water 36 to 50 m deep . A maximum incision depth of 4.5 m occurs in the 35-40 m water depth interval. Individual ice gouge events wider than 100 m, most produced by multi-keeled ice fragments, are found between 31 and 45 m depths. The dominant azimuth of gouge furrows shows no preferred orientation on the Chukchi Sea shelf; only locally does bathmetric control of the trend of gouges appear. The occurrence of current-produced bedforms within individual ice gouges suggests an interaction between slow-moving grounded or gouging ice keels and swift currents. In other cases, current

  17. Dispersal Patterns of Pleistocene Sands on the North Atlantic Deep-Sea Floor.

    PubMed

    Hubert, J F

    1962-05-04

    Glauconitic, quartzose sands previously modified on the continental shelf from feldspathic glacial detritus were transported through submarine canyons onto the Hudson deep-sea fan, the Hatteras abyssal plain, and the western and central Sohm abyssal plain. These feldspar-poor, quartzose sands contrast with highly feldspathic sands derived directly from a glacial source and probably transported through the Newfoundland abyssal gap onto the eastern and southern Sohm abyssal plain.

  18. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  19. The monitoring system of the Kazakhstan sector of Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanova, Luydmila; Khachaturov, Vladimir; Zlotov, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    The monitoring system of the Kazakhstan sector of Caspian Sea The Caspian Sea is the largest closed reservoir in the world, which washes the western part of Kazakhstan. The area of water territory is 371,000 sq km; the sea level is lower than the level of the ocean on 28.5 m (1971). Maximum depth is 1,025m (in the southern part); the Kazakhstan part is not deep, and the depth of the North Caspian sea is about 15-20 m. The Caspian Sea is divided according to physical and geographical conditions to 3 parts - North Caspian, Middle Caspian and South Caspian Sea. Fauna is represented by 1809 species, 415 of which belong to the vertebrates, 101 species of fish, it also has the majority of the world's sturgeon, freshwater fish - roach, carp, pike, saltwater fish - carp, mullet, sprats, Kutum, bream, salmon, perch, pike, mammal - caspian seal. The plant world is represented by 728 species, of which algae are dominated - blue-green, diatoms, red, brown, Stoneworts and others, from flowering - eelgrass and seagrass. Development of sea oil-and-gas deposits of the Kazakhstan sector of Caspian sea entails increase of anthropogenous pressure on the environment. According to preliminary estimates, the volume of recoverable hydrocarbon resources in the Kazakhstan sector of Caspian Sea is about 8.0 billion tons per year. The impact of terrestrial and marine infrastructure, oil and gas facilities on natural systems is reflected in discharges and emissions into the environment of gaseous, solid and liquid pollutants, consumption of natural resources for industrial, farm and household needs, and violation of coastal landscapes. Dangerous influence on the environment is burning natural oil gas on torches. In this regard, there is a need for a system of state monitoring. In a basis of environmental monitoring system of the Kazakhstan sector of Caspian Sea has been put an ecosystem approach, creation of an automated system on the basis of GIS technologies and modeling of forecasts of

  20. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  1. Sea-floor-mounted rotating side-scan sonar for making time-lapse sonographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; McCulloch, David S.; Hill, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Records that are collected with this system offer several advantages over records that are collected with towed systems. Bottom features are presented in nearly true plan geometry, and transducer yaw, pitch, and roll are eliminated. Most importantly, repeated observations can be made from a single point, and bedform movements of <50 cm can be measured. In quiet seas the maximum useful range of the system varies from 30 m (for mapping ripples) to 200 m (for mapping 10-m wavelength sand waves) to 450 m or more (for mapping gravel patches).

  2. Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Central Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Denny, J.F.; Haupt, T.A.; Crocker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology of areas along the northeastern coast of the United States. During 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE conducted Hydrographic Survey H11321 in Rhode Island Sound. This sidescan-sonar and bathymetry survey covers an area of 93 km? located 12 km southeast of Brenton Point, RI in water depths of 28-39 m (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to delineate sea floor features and sedimentary environments of this area in central Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11321 and seismic-reflection data from a previous USGS field study (Needell and others, 1983a). This is important for the study of benthic habitats and provides a framework for future research. Prior work in this area includes the mapping of surface sediments and surficial geology. McMaster (1960) collected sediment samples from Rhode Island Sound and Narragansett Bay and mapped our study area as having a sandy sea floor. In addition, one sample of sand from the National Ocean Service (NOS) Hydrographic Database came from a location in the northeast part of our study area in 1939 (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). McMaster and others (1968) used seismic-reflection profiles to map the locations of a cuesta of Cretaceous sediments crossing Rhode Island Sound and post-Cretaceous drainage channels. Knebel and others (1982) identified sedimentary environments in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan sonographs. Needell and others (1983b) studied the Quaternary geology and mapped the structure, sedimentary environments, and geologic hazards in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection data. Sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11320, which overlaps the far eastern edge of our study area, was interpreted to consist of basins surrounded by a moraine and bathymetric highs composed of till with areas of rocks

  3. Slip reactivation model for the 2011 Mw9 Tohoku earthquake: Dynamic rupture, sea floor displacements and tsunami simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Rahnema, K.; Bader, M.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Mw9 Tohoku earthquake has been recorded with a vast GPS and seismic network given unprecedented chance to seismologists to unveil complex rupture processes in a mega-thrust event. In fact more than one thousand near field strong-motion stations across Japan (K-Net and Kik-Net) revealed complex ground motion patterns attributed to the source effects, allowing to capture detailed information of the rupture process. The seismic stations surrounding the Miyagi regions (MYGH013) show two clear distinct waveforms separated by 40 seconds. This observation is consistent with the kinematic source model obtained from the inversion of strong motion data performed by Lee's et al (2011). In this model two rupture fronts separated by 40 seconds emanate close to the hypocenter and propagate towards the trench. This feature is clearly observed by stacking the slip-rate snapshots on fault points aligned in the EW direction passing through the hypocenter (Gabriel et al, 2012), suggesting slip reactivation during the main event. A repeating slip on large earthquakes may occur due to frictional melting and thermal fluid pressurization effects. Kanamori & Heaton (2002) argued that during faulting of large earthquakes the temperature rises high enough creating melting and further reduction of friction coefficient. We created a 3D dynamic rupture model to reproduce this slip reactivation pattern using SPECFEM3D (Galvez et al, 2014) based on a slip-weakening friction with sudden two sequential stress drops . Our model starts like a M7-8 earthquake breaking dimly the trench, then after 40 seconds a second rupture emerges close to the trench producing additional slip capable to fully break the trench and transforming the earthquake into a megathrust event. The resulting sea floor displacements are in agreement with 1Hz GPS displacements (GEONET). The seismograms agree roughly with seismic records along the coast of Japan.The simulated sea floor displacement reaches 8-10 meters of

  4. High-resolution geophysical data from the sea floor surrounding the Western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Twichell, David C.; Foster, David S.; Worley, Charles R.; Irwin, Barry J.; Danforth, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in the nearshore area surrounding the western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael during September 2010 in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts, Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes the results of the short-term goals of this collaborative effort, which were to map the geology of the inner shelf zone of the western Elizabeth Islands and study the geologic processes that have contributed to its evolution. Data collected during the survey include: Bathymetric and sidescan-sonar data, chirp seismic-reflection data , sound velocity profiles, and navigation data. The long-term goals of this project are to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and inventory subtidal marine habitat type and distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  5. Gold distribution on the sea floor off the Klamath Mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, George William; Silver, Eli A.

    1968-01-01

    Analyses of 82 samples collected from the surface of the continental shelf between the Oregon-California border and Eureka, Calif., indicate that the background gold content on this shelf is about 0.1 ppb (part per billion). Four anomalous tracts, which range in extent from 10 to 30 square kilometers, have gold values above 10 ppb, and the richest sample contains 300 ppb. The anomalous areas seem to lack a close correlation with water depth, but they are related to areas underlain by soft Cenozoic strata that contain small quantities of dispersed gold originally derived from lodes in the Klarnath Mountains. This relationship suggests that the offshore gold accumulations are lag concentrates produced from the Cenozoic deposits by wave erosion during the postglacial rise in sea level. Gold contents at the surface are too low for economic recovery, and drilling will be required to determine whether the anomalous areas are underlain by higher grade material.

  6. Sea-Floor Topography of Quadrangle 1 in the Great South Channel, Western Georges Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.; Middleton, Tammie J.; Malczyk, Jeremy T.

    2002-01-01

    The Great South Channel separates the western part of Georges Bank from Nantucket Shoals and is a major conduit for the exchange of water between the Gulf of Maine to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the south. Water depths range mostly between 65 and 80 m in the region. A minimum depth of 45 m occurs in the east-central part of the mapped area, and a maximum depth of 100 m occurs in the northwest corner. The channel region is characterized by strong tidal and storm currents that flow dominantly north and south. Major topographic features of the seabed were formed by glacial and postglacial processes. Ice containing rock debris moved from north to south, sculpting the region into a broad shallow depression and depositing sediment to form the irregular depressions and low gravelly mounds and ridges that are visible in parts of the mapped area. Many other smaller glacial featuresprobably have been eroded by waves and currents at worksince the time when the region, formerly exposed bylowered sea level or occupied by ice, was invaded by the sea. The low, irregular and somewhat lumpy fabric formed by the glacial deposits is obscured in places by drifting sand and by the linear, sharp fabric formed by modern sand features. Today, sand transported by the strong north-south-flowing tidal and storm currents has formed large, east-west-trending dunes. These bedforms (ranging between 5 and 20 m in height) contrast strongly with, and partly mask, the subdued topography of the older glacial features.

  7. Surficial geology of the sea floor in west-central Long Island Sound as shown by sidescan-sonar imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.; Moser, M.S.; Christman, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We used sidescan-sonar imagery detailing almost 300 km2 of the sea floor in west-central Long Island Sound in conjunction with bathymetry, sediment samples, bottom video, and seismic data to interpret the area's surficial geology. The distribution of sediments and sedimentary environments interpreted from these data sets represents the Quaternary geology, regional bathymetry, and effects of modern tidal- and wave-driven currents. Four distinct sedimentary environments consisting of 1) fine-grained deposition, 2) sorting and reworking, 3) coarse-grained bedload transport, and 4) erosion or nondeposition, were identified and mapped. Relatively low-energy environments prevail where deposition of clayey silts occurs in deeper water throughout the central part of the study area, and in the protected areas of the far northeastern corner. As low-energy environments transition to relatively high-energy environments, sorting and reworking of sand, silty sand, and sand-silt-clay takes place on the flanks of the shoals and over smaller bathymetric highs. Environments of coarse-grained bedload transport, distinguished by sandy sediments with current-derived bedforms, are located on an unnamed shoal in the northwestern part of the study area and directly to the south of this on Stratford Shoal. High-energy conditions are reflected by environments of erosion or nondeposition, which occur on bathymetric highs where gravel and gravelly sediments are present.

  8. Modelling Sea-floor Spreading Initiation and Rifted Continental Margin Formation: Does Depth Dependent Stretching Occur Pre- or Syn-breakup?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.; Karner, G. D.

    2004-05-01

    Depth dependent stretching, in which upper continental crustal extension is much less than that of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle, is a characteristic of both non-volcanic and volcanic rifted margins. A key question is whether depth dependent stretching of rifted margin lithosphere occurs during the initiation of sea-floor spreading or during pre-breakup rifting. A kinematic fluid-flow model of sea-floor spreading initiation has been developed to determine the concomitant distribution and amplitude of rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and thermal evolution. The ocean-ridge initiation model uses an iso-viscous corner-flow stream-function solution (Batchelor 1967) to predict the divergent lithospheric and asthenospheric fluid-flow field of the extending continental margin lithosphere. The thinning of the continental margin lithosphere is calculated by material advection in the newly initiated ocean ridge fluid-flow field. The ocean-ridge initiation model predicts depth dependent stretching of continental lithosphere. Rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and thermal evolution are dependent on ocean-ridge spreading rate (Vx), the mantle upwelling velocity beneath the ridge axis (Vz), and the pre-breakup lithosphere beta stretching factor. The sea-floor spreading initiation model predicts that the distribution and magnitude of depth dependent stretching of continental margin lithosphere is highly sensitive to the ratio of Vz/Vx. For volcanic margins Vz/Vx may be > 5 during sea-floor spreading initiation, reducing to Vz/Vx ~ 1 after a few Myr (Nielsen & Hopper 2002), while for non-volcanic margins, lower values of Vz/Vx (~ 1) are expected during sea-floor spreading initiation. For Vz/Vx ~ 1 the sea-floor spreading initiation model predicts that lower continental crust and continental lithospheric mantle adjacent to the margin are advected oceanward and result in rifted margin depth dependent stretching and continental mantle exhumation

  9. Sea floor maps showing topography, sun-illuminated topography, and backscatter intensity of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, P.C.; Middleton, T.J.; Fuller, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains the sea floor topographic contours, sun-illuminated topographic imagery, and backscatter intensity generated from a multibeam sonar survey of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts, an area of approximately 1100 square nautical miles. The Stellwagen Bank NMS Mapping Project is designed to provide detailed maps of the Stellwagen Bank region's environments and habitats and the first complete multibeam topographic and sea floor characterization maps of a significant region of the shallow EEZ. Data were collected on four cruises over a two year period from the fall of 1994 to the fall of 1996. The surveys were conducted aboard the Candian Hydrographic Service vessel Frederick G. Creed, a SWATH (Small Waterplane Twin Hull) ship that surveys at speeds of 16 knots. The multibeam data were collected utilizing a Simrad Subsea EM 1000 Multibeam Echo Sounder (95 kHz) that is permanently installed in the hull of the Creed.

  10. Shallow sea-floor reflectance and water depth derived by unmixing multispectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwirth, P.N.; Lee, T.J.; Burne, R.V. Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor )

    1993-03-01

    A major problem for mapping shallow water zones by the analysis of remotely sensed data is that contrast effects due to water depth obscure and distort the special nature of the substrate. This paper outlines a new method which unmixes the exponential influence of depth in each pixel by employing a mathematical constraint. This leaves a multispectral residual which represents relative substrate reflectance. Input to the process are the raw multispectral data and water attenuation coefficients derived by the co-analysis of known bathymetry and remotely sensed data. Outputs are substrate-reflectance images corresponding to the input bands and a greyscale depth image. The method has been applied in the analysis of Landsat TM data at Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Algorithm derived substrate reflectance images for Landsat TM bands 1, 2, and 3 combined in color represent the optimum enhancement for mapping or classifying substrate types. As a result, this color image successfully delineated features, which were obscured in the raw data, such as the distributions of sea-grasses, microbial mats, and sandy area. 19 refs.

  11. Spectrum Gamma Ray bore hole logging while tripping with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Tim; Steinke, Stephan; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wefer, Gerold

    2013-04-01

    The robotic Sea Floor Drill Rig MARUM-MeBo developed at the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen was used to retrieve long sediment cores at two sites in the northern South China Sea. Both sites are located in about 1000 m water depth in southeasterly and southwesterly direction of the Pearl River mouth, respectively. South East Asian Monsoon variability controls terrigenous material transport by rivers into the South China Sea. The Pearl River is one of the largest rivers of the region that discharges into the northern South China Sea. The terrigenous fraction of marine sediments of the northern South China Sea therefore provides an excellent archive for reconstructing past variability of the South East Asian Monsoon system. In analogy to the drilling strategy within the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program IODP multiple holes were drilled in order to generate continuous spliced records at both sites. Overall the MARUM-MeBo drilled 374 m during 5 deployments with a maximum drilling depth of 80.85 m and an average core recovery of 94 %. Here we present first results of bore hole logging conducted during 4 of the 5 deployments with a spectrum gamma ray (SGR) probe adapted for the use with MARUM-MeBo. This probe is an autonomous slim hole probe that is used in the logging while tripping mode. This method is especially favorable for remote controlled drilling and logging operation. The probe is equipped with its own energy source and data storage. The probe is lowered into the drill string after the target wire-line coring depth is reached and after the last inner core barrel has been retrieved. When the probe has landed on the shoulder ring at the bottom of the hole, the drill string is pulled out and disassembled. The probe, while being raised with the drill string, continuously measures the geophysical properties of the in situ sediments and rocks. Since the bore hole is stabilized during the tripping process by the drill string

  12. Sidescan-sonar imagery, multibeam bathymetry, and surficial geologic interpretations of the sea floor in Rhode Island Sound, off Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Twomey, Erin R.; Danforth, William W.; Haupt, Todd A.; Crocker, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology in estuaries and sounds along the northeastern coast of the United States. This report interprets the area covered by NOAA Survey H11320, about 72 km² of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound (RIS), located about 8 km south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island (fig. 1). Previous work in RIS includes studies of both sea-floor processes and subsurface geologic framework. McMaster (1960) mapped surficial sediment samples in Narragansett Bay and RIS and McMaster and others (1968) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in Block Island Sound and RIS. O'Hara and Oldale (1980) collected seismic-reflection profiles, sidescan-sonar data, and vibracores in eastern RIS (fig. 2). They interpreted the geologic history, assessed sand and gravel resources, and evaluated the mining impact of these resources. McMaster's (1960) interpretation of the surficial sediment within this study area consisted of sand with several isolated areas of gravel. Several other sediment samples were previously obtained within the study area: three National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) dredge samples from 1942 consisted of sand and one National Ocean Service (NOS) sample from 1939 was rocky (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). The purpose of this report is to define the sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments and interpret processes occurring on the sea floor using sidescan-sonar imagery, multibeam bathymetry, and historic seismic-reflection profiles.

  13. Tsunamis hazard assessment and monitoring for the Back Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partheniu, Raluca; Ionescu, Constantin; Constantin, Angela; Moldovan, Iren; Diaconescu, Mihail; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Radulian, Mircea; Toader, Victorin

    2016-04-01

    NIEP has improved lately its researches regarding tsunamis in the Black Sea. As part of the routine earthquake and tsunami monitoring activity, the first tsunami early-warning system in the Black Sea has been implemented in 2013 and is active during these last years. In order to monitor the seismic activity of the Black Sea, NIEP is using a total number of 114 real time stations and 2 seismic arrays, 18 of the stations being located in Dobrogea area, area situated in the vicinity of the Romanian Black Sea shore line. Moreover, there is a data exchange with the Black Sea surrounding countries involving the acquisition of real-time data for 17 stations from Bulgaria, Turkey, Georgia and Ukraine. This improves the capability of the Romanian Seismic Network to monitor and more accurately locate the earthquakes occurred in the Black Sea area. For tsunamis monitoring and warning, a number of 6 sea level monitoring stations, 1 infrasound barometer, 3 offshore marine buoys and 7 GPS/GNSS stations are installed in different locations along and near the Romanian shore line. In the framework of ASTARTE project, few objectives regarding the seismic hazard and tsunami waves height assessment for the Black Sea were accomplished. The seismic hazard estimation was based on statistical studies of the seismic sources and their characteristics, compiled using different seismic catalogues. Two probabilistic methods were used for the evaluation of the seismic hazard, the Cornell method, based on the Gutenberg Richter distribution parameters, and Gumbel method, based on extremes statistic. The results show maximum values of possible magnitudes and their recurrence periods, for each seismic source. Using the Tsunami Analysis Tool (TAT) software, a set of tsunami modelling scenarios have been generated for Shabla area, the seismic source that could mostly affect the Romanian shore. These simulations are structured in a database, in order to set maximum possible tsunami waves that could be

  14. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  15. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  16. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  17. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  18. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  19. Linking benthic biodiversity and environmental conditions at the sea floor combining statistical and mechanistic modeling. Case study on the Black Sea's northwestern shelf.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drion, Roxanne; Capet, Arthur; Gregoire, Marilaure

    2014-05-01

    The preservation of the health and biodiversity of benthic ecosystems is a crucial priority in order to achieve the Good Environmental Status (GES) of marine waters. The multiple pressures acting on the ocean, and in particular, on the coastal zone may prevent the maintenance of biodiversity either directly (e.g. trawling, dredging) or indirectly by modifying environmental conditions at the sea floor (e.g. eutrophication, pollution, acidification, warming). The management of the GES of the benthos in a changing environment and the definition of management strategies (e.g. nutrient reduction) that would preserve GES require tools able to predict the modifications of environmental conditions and to link these modifications to the status of the benthic system. Coupled biogeochemical-circulation models provide a large amount of information on physical (e.g. currents, salinity, temperature, shear stress) and biochemical conditions (e.g. oxygen, inorganic nutrients, sinking detritus) but cannot provide an information on species richness. We propose to link these aspects by applying canonical ordination techniques (e.g. Redundancy Analysis, CoInertia Analysis) on a large data set on macrobenthos collected on the Black Sea's north-western shelf with in-situ sediment data (e.g. granulometry, carbon and nitrogen content, C/N ratio, CaCO3 content) and bottom conditions (e.g. shear stress, level of oxygen stress, flux of organic matter to the sediments) provided by a three dimensional model. Beyond taxonomic description, the analysis is performed on the functional composition of the macrobenthos: A trait-based approach is used to assess the functional composition of the macrobenthos by associating the considered species to a list of biological, ecological and behavioral traits. This approach allows to appraise how local conditions determine the functional and taxonomical diversity and provides a mean to evaluate the impact of habitat alteration on the ecological role of

  20. Australian sea-floor survey data, with images and expert annotations.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Michael; Friedman, Ariell; Ferrari, Renata; Hill, Nicole; Hovey, Renae; Barrett, Neville; Pizarro, Oscar; Figueira, Will; Meyer, Lisa; Babcock, Russ; Bellchambers, Lynda; Byrne, Maria; Williams, Stefan B

    2015-01-01

    This Australian benthic data set (BENTHOZ-2015) consists of an expert-annotated set of georeferenced benthic images and associated sensor data, captured by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) around Australia. This type of data is of interest to marine scientists studying benthic habitats and organisms. AUVs collect georeferenced images over an area with consistent illumination and altitude, and make it possible to generate broad scale, photo-realistic 3D maps. Marine scientists then typically spend several minutes on each of thousands of images, labeling substratum type and biota at a subset of points. Labels from four Australian research groups were combined using the CATAMI classification scheme, a hierarchical classification scheme based on taxonomy and morphology for scoring marine imagery. This data set consists of 407,968 expert labeled points from around the Australian coast, with associated images, geolocation and other sensor data. The robotic surveys that collected this data form part of Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) ongoing benthic monitoring program. There is reuse potential in marine science, robotics, and computer vision research.

  1. Australian sea-floor survey data, with images and expert annotations

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Michael; Friedman, Ariell; Ferrari, Renata; Hill, Nicole; Hovey, Renae; Barrett, Neville; Pizarro, Oscar; Figueira, Will; Meyer, Lisa; Babcock, Russ; Bellchambers, Lynda; Byrne, Maria; Williams, Stefan B.

    2015-01-01

    This Australian benthic data set (BENTHOZ-2015) consists of an expert-annotated set of georeferenced benthic images and associated sensor data, captured by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) around Australia. This type of data is of interest to marine scientists studying benthic habitats and organisms. AUVs collect georeferenced images over an area with consistent illumination and altitude, and make it possible to generate broad scale, photo-realistic 3D maps. Marine scientists then typically spend several minutes on each of thousands of images, labeling substratum type and biota at a subset of points. Labels from four Australian research groups were combined using the CATAMI classification scheme, a hierarchical classification scheme based on taxonomy and morphology for scoring marine imagery. This data set consists of 407,968 expert labeled points from around the Australian coast, with associated images, geolocation and other sensor data. The robotic surveys that collected this data form part of Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) ongoing benthic monitoring program. There is reuse potential in marine science, robotics, and computer vision research. PMID:26528396

  2. Evidence for Methyl-Compound-Activated Life in Coal Bed System 2 km Below Sea Floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembath-reichert, E.; Morono, Y.; Dawson, K.; Wanger, G.; Bowles, M.; Heuer, V.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Inagaki, F.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    IODP Expedition 337 set the record for deepest marine scientific drilling down to 2.4 kmbsf. This cruise also had the unique opportunity to retrieve deep cores from the Shimokita coal bed system in Japan with the aseptic and anaerobic conditions necessary to look for deep life. Onboard scientists prepared nearly 1,700 microbiology samples shared among five different countries to study life in the deep biosphere. Samples spanned over 1 km in sampling depths and include representatives of shale, sandstone, and coal lithologies. Findings from previous IODP and deep mine expeditions suggest the genetic potential for methylotrophy in the deep subsurface, but it has yet to be observed in incubations. A subset of Expedition 337 anoxic incubations were prepared with a range of 13C-methyl substrates (methane, methylamine, and methanol) and maintained near in situ temperatures. To observe 13C methyl compound metabolism over time, we monitored the δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon (by-product of methyl compound metabolism) over a period of 1.5 years. Elemental analysis (EA), ion chromatograph (IC), 13C volatile fatty acid (VFA), and mineral-associated microscopy data were also collected to constrain initial and endpoint conditions in these incubations. Our geochemical evidence suggests that the coal horizon incubated with 13C-methane showed the highest activity of all methyl incubations. This provides the first known observation of methane-activated metabolism in the deep biosphere, and suggests there are not only active cells in the deeply buried terrigenous coal bed at Shimokita, but the presence of a microbial community activated by methylotrophic compounds.

  3. Disappearance of Sea Floor of the Paleo-asian Ocean: Geological Evidence from the Dong Ujimqin, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhang, T.; Wang, B.; Yu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    -collisional characteristics. The discovery of the Cathaysia flora fossils, the NW to SE thrust faults, the syn-collisional magmatic rocks plus the shift of magmatic activities from NW to SE all indicate that the sea floor of the Paleo-Asian Ocean must located somewhere to the north of our research area, which could be the proposed Main Mongolian Lineament area.

  4. Burial and exhumation of temperate bedrock reefs as elucidated by repetitive high-resolution sea floor sonar surveys: Spatial patterns and impacts to species' richness and diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Fregoso, Theresa A.; Figurski, Jared D.; Freiwald, Jan; Lonhart, Steve I.; Finlayson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    To understand how chronic sediment burial and scour contribute to variation in the structure of algal and invertebrate communities on temperate bedrock reefs, the dynamics of the substrate and communities were monitored at locations that experience sand inundation and adjacent areas that do not. Co-located benthic scuba-transect surveys and high-resolution swath-sonar surveys were completed on bedrock reefs on the inner shelf of northern Monterey Bay, CA, in early winter 2009, spring 2010, and summer 2010. Analysis of the sonar surveys demonstrates that during the 8 months over which the surveys were conducted, 19.6% of the study area was buried by sand while erosion resulted in the exposure of bedrock over 13.8% of the study area; the remainder underwent no change between the surveys. Substrate classifications from the benthic transect surveys correlated with classifications generated from the sonar surveys, demonstrating the capacity of high-resolution sonar surveys to detect burial of bedrock reefs by sediment. On bedrock habitat that underwent burial and exhumation, species' diversity and richness of rock-associated sessile and mobile organisms were 50–66% lower as compared to adjacent stable bedrock habitat. While intermediate levels of disturbance can increase the diversity and richness of communities, these findings demonstrate that burial and exhumation of bedrock habitat are sources of severe disturbance. We suggest that substrate dynamics must be considered when developing predictions of benthic community distributions based on sea floor imagery. These results highlight the need for predictive models of substrate dynamics and for a better understanding of how burial and exhumation shape benthic communities.

  5. Sea level and coastal erosion require large-scale monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leatherman, Stephen P.; Douglas, Bruce C.; LaBrecque, John L.

    There is a coastward migration of the world's population, which is occurring at the same time as rising sea level and shoreline recession; this is the definition of a collision course. Rates of beach erosion along the U.S. east coast average slightly less than a meter per year, putting expensive beachfront development at risk to storm impact. Global sea levels have risen about 20 cm in the last century; relative rates of rise have more than doubled this amount in some areas due to land subsidence. Future sea levels are projected to rise significantly faster than occurred in the 20th century, resulting in acceleration of the present rate of shore recession. There is much debate about future rates of sea level rise, and even some disagreement about the historical rate based on analysis of tide gauge records [IPCC, 2001; Douglas etal, 2001]. An array of satellites are providing the requisite measurements to determine global sea level changes in concert with tide gauges and terrestrial references. At the same time, new technologies such as airborne and spaceborne laser mapping are beginning to provide the data sets necessary for three-dimensional monitoring of shoreline changes.

  6. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  7. The application of ERTS imagery to monitoring Arctic sea ice. [mapping ice in Bering Sea, Beaufort Sea, Canadian Archipelago, and Greenland Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bowley, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Because of the effect of sea ice on the heat balance of the Arctic and because of the expanding economic interest in arctic oil and minerals, extensive monitoring and further study of sea ice is required. The application of ERTS data for mapping ice is evaluated for several arctic areas, including the Bering Sea, the eastern Beaufort Sea, parts of the Canadian Archipelago, and the Greenland Sea. Interpretive techniques are discussed, and the scales and types of ice features that can be detected are described. For the Bering Sea, a sample of ERTS-1 imagery is compared with visual ice reports and aerial photography from the NASA CV-990 aircraft. The results of the investigation demonstrate that ERTS-1 imagery has substantial practical application for monitoring arctic sea ice. Ice features as small as 80-100 m in width can be detected, and the combined use of the visible and near-IR imagery is a powerful tool for identifying ice types. Sequential ERTS-1 observations at high latitudes enable ice deformations and movements to be mapped. Ice conditions in the Bering Sea during early March depicted in ERTS-1 images are in close agreement with aerial ice observations and photographs.

  8. Monitoring the Dead Sea Region by Multi-Parameter Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen, A.; Weber, M. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Asch, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea Region is an exceptional ecosystem whose seismic activity has influenced all facets of the development, from ground water availability to human evolution. Israelis, Palestinians and Jordanians living in the Dead Sea region are exposed to severe earthquake hazard. Repeatedly large earthquakes (e.g. 1927, magnitude 6.0; (Ambraseys, 2009)) shook the whole Dead Sea region proving that earthquake hazard knows no borders and damaging seismic events can strike anytime. Combined with the high vulnerability of cities in the region and with the enormous concentration of historical values this natural hazard results in an extreme earthquake risk. Thus, an integration of earthquake parameters at all scales (size and time) and their combination with data of infrastructure are needed with the specific aim of providing a state-of-the-art seismic hazard assessment for the Dead Sea region as well as a first quantitative estimate of vulnerability and risk. A strong motivation for our research is the lack of reliable multi-parameter ground-based geophysical information on earthquakes in the Dead Sea region. The proposed set up of a number of observatories with on-line data access will enable to derive the present-day seismicity and deformation pattern in the Dead Sea region. The first multi-parameter stations were installed in Jordan, Israel and Palestine for long-time monitoring. All partners will jointly use these locations. All stations will have an open data policy, with the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany) providing the hard and software for real-time data transmission via satellite to Germany, where all partners can access the data via standard data protocols.

  9. Geodetic infrastructure at the Barcelona harbour for sea level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, Juan Jose; Gili, Josep; Lopez, Rogelio; Tapia, Ana; Pros, Francesc; Palau, Vicenc; Perez, Begona

    2015-04-01

    The presentation is directed to the description of the actual geodetic infrastructure of Barcelona harbour with three tide gauges of different technologies for sea level determination and contribution to regional sea level rise and understanding past and present sea level rise in the Barcelona harbour. It is intended that the overall system will constitute a CGPS Station of the ESEAS (European Sea Level) and TIGA (GPS Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring) networks. At Barcelona harbour there is a MIROS radar tide gauge belonging to Puertos del Estado (Spanish Harbours).The radar sensor is over the water surface, on a L-shaped structure which elevates it a few meters above the quay shelf. 1-min data are transmitted to the ENAGAS Control Center by cable and then sent each 1 min to Puertos del Estado by e-mail. The information includes wave forescast (mean period, significant wave height, sea level, etc.This sensor also measures agitation and sends wave parameters each 20 min. There is a GPS station Leica Geosystems GRX1200 GG Pro and antenna AX 1202 GG. The Control Tower of the Port of Barcelona is situated in the North dike of the so-called Energy Pier in the Barcelona harbor (Spain). This tower has different kind of antennas for navigation monitoring and a GNSS permanent station. As the tower is founded in reclaimed land, and because its metallic structure, the 50 m building is subjected to diverse movements, including periodic fluctuations due to temperature changes. In this contribution the 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 the necessary monitoring campaigns are described. In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 2000C from Geonica S.L. in June 2014 near an acoustic tide gauge from the Barcelona Harbour installed in 2013. Precision levelling has been made several times in the last two years because the tower is founded in reclaimed land and

  10. Improvement of Environmental Monitoring for the SeaQuest Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, Elizabeth; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    SeaQuest (E906), is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that uses the Drell-Yan process to measure the anti-down to anti-up quark asymmetry in the nucleon sea. Recording environmental conditions is important for a particle physics detector, since detector performance and response can vary depending on conditions such as temperature and pressure. SeaQuest uses many drift chambers, and monitoring their performance can be aided by having these environmental measurements. Due to the size of the detector hall, there are vertical temperature gradients, so temperature must be measured at varying heights. Another important need is to monitor temperature in electronics racks to know when they are overheating. The requirements of the equipment to be used were that it had to be ethernet based and rely only on non-proprietary software. Also, in order to be used during a data run, it had to be fast enough to be recorded between beam spills. This poster will focus on our solution for measuring environmental conditions, such as decreasing the sensor readout from 17.5 seconds to 6.9 seconds. Supported in part by the U.S. DOE under Grant #DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  11. Monitoring Sea Level At L'Estartit, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, J.; Ortiz Castellon, M.; Martinez-Garcia, M.; Talaya, J.; Rodriguez Velasco, G.; Perez, B.

    2007-12-01

    Sea level is an environmental variable which is widely recognised as being important in many scientific disciplines as a control parameter for coastal dynamical processes or climate processes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean systems, as well as engineering applications. A major source of sea-level data are the national networks of coastal tide gauges, in Spain belonging to different institutions as the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), Puertos del Estado (PE), Instituto Hidrográfico de la Marina (IHM), Ports de la Generalitat, etc. Three Begur Cape experiences on radar altimeter calibration and marine geoid mapping made on 1999, 2000 and 2002 are overviewed. The marine geoid has been used to relate the coastal tide gauge data from l'Estartit harbour to off-shore altimetric data. The necessity to validate and calibrate the satellite's altimeter due to increasing needs in accuracy and long term integrity implies establishing calibration sites with enhanced ground based methods for sea level monitoring. A technical Spanish contribution to the calibration experience has been the design of GPS buoys and GPS catamaran taking in account the University of Colorado at Boulder and Senetosa/Capraia designs. Altimeter calibration is essential to obtain an absolute measure of sea level, as are knowing the instrument's drifts and bias. Specially designed tidegauges are necessary to improve the quality of altimetric data, preferably near the satellite track. Further, due to systematic differences a month instruments onboard different satellites, several in-situ calibrations are essentials to tie their systematic differences. L'Estartit tide gauge is a classical floating tide gauge set up in l'Estartit harbour (NE Spain) in 1990. It provides good quality information about the changes in the sea heights at centimetre level, that is the magnitude of the common tides in theMediterranean. In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, ref:ESP2001- 4534-PE, the instrumentation of sea

  12. Burial, remineralization and utilization of organic matter at the sea floor under a strong western boundary current. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1995-08-24

    The overall goals of this project were to quantify the rates of organic carbon export from the southern mid-Atlantic Bight and to quantify the rates at which carbon is exchanged between the inorganic and organic pools within the bottom sediments. This information is necessary to constrain the role of the oceans in the control of carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere in association with energy production. During this project, in situ benthic flux chamber incubations have been performed at six sites on the continental slope and rise adjacent to Cape Hatteras. Based on the analysis of the time-series samples recovered during each experiment, the sea floor exchange rates of the major biogenic elements, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon were calculated. From the estimated benthic flux rates and the ancillary pore water and sediment analyses, the deposition, remineralization and burial rates of organic carbon to the sea floor in this area was evaluated. This information has been incorporated into regional and global assessments of organic carbon fluxes to the deep sea.

  13. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter from Deep-sea Floor Hydrothermal Vents in South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, F.; Yamanaka, T.

    2004-12-01

    In South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center, a few active hydrothermal fields are located. We investigated a characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from hydrothermal vents in this area, in order to clarify the biosphere beneath deep-sea floor. Hot water sample was collected from a drilled hole (APM01 located in Fryer site, 12o 55.22fN, 143o 37.16fE, depth 2850m) during the ROPOS/TN167A cruise in March 2004. The hole had been drilled during Hakurei-Maru 2 cruise in January 2004. Another hot water sample was collected from a natural black smoker located in Pika site (12o 55.15fN, 143o 36.96fE, depth 2773m) during YK03-09 cruise. In this investigation, we developed a standalone filtration system in order to collect and enrich dissolved organic matter of quite low concentration. This system was designed to be put near hydrothermal vents for at least 24h. This system has an ODS disk (EmporeTM High Performance Extraction Disk C18 90mmφ) with a pre-filter (Whatman GMF 1 μ)m filter paper) to adsorb dilute organics. We collected DOM from the APM01 casing pipe for about 30h (Tmax = 25-30 o C, the estimated volume of filtrated water is max. 300L) using this filtration system. Adsorbed organics were eluted with methanol for 12h twice and toluene once using soxhlet extractor. Recovered amounts of methanol eluents are 72.8mg for APM01, and 89.7mg for the black smoker. Prior to GCMS analysis, we carried out high resolution 1 H-NMR measurement (400MHz), together with the DOM samples collected from the Suiyo Seamount in July-August 2001 and August 2002. Most of the samples show signals in the region of 3-4 ppm, and the samples from the vents of relatively low temperatures (APM01 and AP04: the natural vent at the Suiyo Seamount, temperature 8-48o C ) show signals also in the region of 0.8-1.6 ppm.

  14. Sustainable Seas Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K. S.; Dean, A.; Gusman, V.; McCracken, K.; Solli, S.; Storm, E.; Placeholder, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students conduct two baseline-monitoring surveys three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring) to identify and count key invertebrate and algae species. Seasonal abundance of the algae species Mastocarpus and Fucus revealed lower populations in the spring monitoring events. Turban snails, Tegula funebralis, also showed dramatic population variation with respect to tidal zone. One of our project goals is to monitor this area long enough to obtain trends and to begin to connect these patterns to contributing factors (specific weather events, anthropogenic impacts, etc). Replicate counts of all species are regularly performed. Replicate counts for invertebrate and algae species within the same quadrat along the permanent transects revealed a very small amount of variability, giving us confidence that our monitoring program is providing

  15. Monitoring short-period internal waves in the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimin, A. V.; Kozlov, I. E.; Atadzhanova, O. A.; Chapron, B.

    2016-12-01

    Widespread short-period internal wave (SPIW) activity in the White Sea has been revealed for the first time based on long-term (2009-2013) monitoring performed using satellite and in situ observations, and the statistical characteristics of these waves have been obtained. Two main regions where short-period waves constantly exist have been identified: the shelf area near the frontal zone at the boundary between the Basin and the Gorlo Strait and the shallow shelf area where the depths are about 30-50 m near Solovetskie Islands. Intense internal waves (IIWs), which are substantially nonlinear and are related to specific phases of a barotropic tide, are regularly observed near frontal zones. The wave height can reach half the sea depth and the wave periods vary from 7 to 18 min.

  16. Large-scale scour of the sea floor and the effect of natural armouring processes, land reclamation Maasvlakte 2, port of Rotterdam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boer, S.; Elias, E.; Aarninkhof, S.; Roelvink, D.; Vellinga, T.

    2007-01-01

    Morphological model computations based on uniform (non-graded) sediment revealed an unrealistically strong scour of the sea floor in the immediate vicinity to the west of Maasvlakte 2. By means of a state-of-the-art graded sediment transport model the effect of natural armouring and sorting of bed material on the scour process has been examined. Sensitivity computations confirm that the development of the scour hole is strongly reduced due to the incorporation of armouring processes, suggesting an approximately 30% decrease in terms of erosion area below the -20m depth contour. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  17. Changes in seasonality of organic matter supply to the sea floor in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific over the last 260 kyr based on benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Elena; Vidal, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    At present, short- and long-term variations of sea-surface biological productivity in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific have been extensively studied in order to evaluate changes in efficiency of biological carbon dioxide pump in the past. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are investigated from the IMAGES giant Core MD02-2529 (8°12.5' N, 84° 07.5'W, w.d. 1619 m) off Costa Rica recovered the last 262 kyr according to oxygen isotope stratigraphy confirmed by 15 AMS14C dates in the upper part of the core. A predominance of high productivity species (e.g. hispid Uvigerina, U. peregrina, M. barleeanus, B. mexicana, C. carinata, T. delicata, C. wuellerstorfi, P. bulloides, Chilostomella spp., Globobulimina spp.) in benthic foraminiferal assemblages indicates intensive organic matter supply to the sea floor throughout the interval studied. CABFAC factor analysis applied for the species percentages matrix reveals that changes in taxonomic composition are described by three factors. Factor 1 is loaded mainly to U. hispida and in a less degree to U. peregrina. According to the modern ecological notion (e.g. Loubere, Fariduddin, 1999), U. hispida is associated with high and fairly constant organic matter flux to the seabed. Hence, high values of factor 1 reflect high productivity and low seasonality conditions. Factor 2 is loaded positively to U. peregrina and negatively to U. hispida. U. peregrina prefers slightly degraded organic matter, whereas U. hispida is abundant within the regions where organic matter is fresh and dominated by diatoms. Thus, we suppose that maxima of factor 2 mirror high productivity conditions with non-regular flux of organic matter to the sea floor with several events of phytoplankton blooms over the year (moderate seasonality). We believe that fresh organic matter derived from the photic layer underwent bacterial decomposition between multiple flux pulses and thereby contributed to thrift U. peregrina assemblages. Factor 3 is loaded positively to M

  18. Cobalt in ferromanganese crusts as a monitor of hydrothermal discharge on the Pacific sea floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Lane-Bostwick, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxide crusts, which accumulate on unsedimented surfaces in the open ocean1-6, derive most of their metal content from dissolved and particulate matter in ambient bottom water7,8, in proportions modified by the variable scavenging efficiency of the oxide phase for susceptible ions9. They differ in this respect from abyssal nodules, much of whose metals are remobilized from host sediments. Here we present maps of cobalt concentration and inferred accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts from the Pacific Ocean. We propose that depletion of cobalt in Pacific crusts measures the location and intensity of submarine hydrothermal discharge. Use of the 'cobalt chronometer', an algorithm inversely relating cobalt content and crust growth rate, permits mapping of the accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts with only indirect recourse to radioactivity-based dating methods. These maps show that crusts in hydrothermal areas grow from two to more than four orders of magnitude faster than in the Central Pacific Ocean. Cobalt-enriched crusts are found where water masses are most isolated from continental-coastal and hydrothermal sources of metals, now and in the past. This relationship can resolve the problem of cobalt enrichment in crusts without recourse to hypotheses invoking special cobalt sources or enrichment mechanisms. ?? 1988 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Optimization of phytoplankton monitoring in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaanus, Andres; Kuprijanov, Ivan; Kaljurand, Kaire; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Enke, Annely

    2017-07-01

    Since water quality monitoring can be rather costly, it is important to properly design the monitoring network so that maximum information can be received with moderate effort. One component of monitoring is measuring the phytoplankton community composition and detecting whether that has changed. From April to October 2012, by using ships-of-opportunity (SOOP), we collected simultaneous samples from 15 stations in the Gulf of Finland and the Baltic Proper to study the spatial variability in the phytoplankton species composition and biomass throughout the growing season. The analysis was performed with 10 dominant taxa constituting 83-97% of the total phytoplankton biomass. We set the criterion of the statistically significant (p < 0.05) Bray-Curtis similarity for the station pairs to be mutually representative according to the species composition and biomass. Our results indicated that in areas of similar hydrological conditions, it is sufficient to have sampling stations in 50-65 km distance between one another, but in the areas with varying hydrographical conditions, i.e. coastal areas, higher spatial coverage may be needed. Whenever possible, it is recommended to combine monitoring efforts between the Baltic Sea countries in the offshore areas, including SOOP. The need for further harmonization of phytoplankton analysis between countries is addressed in order to have comparable data sets by different countries.

  20. Geology of the northern Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Recent lava flows, sea-floor spreading, and the formation of megaplumes

    SciTech Connect

    Embley, R.W. ); Chadwick, W. ); Perfit, M.R. ); Baker, E.T. )

    1991-08-01

    Geologic mapping and lava sampling were carried out after the discovery of large bursts of hydrothermal fluids (megaplumes) over the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge in 1986 and 1987. These investigations of the northernmost section of the Cleft segment have discovered: (1) semicontinuous low-temperature venting and one major high-temperature vent site along 17 km of the neovolcanic zone and (2) very glassy, lightly sedimented sheet flows and pillow mounds superimposed on older terrain over about 24 km along the northern-most part. The pillow mounds are documented to have erupted between 1981 and 1987. The occurrence of the megaplumes during this same time period strengthens the hypothesis that megaplumes are caused by sea-floor extension events. Although the basalts from the entire length of the neovolcanic zone of the Cleft segment appear to have been derived from the same mantle source, a systematic northward increase in Mg number along the segment within the neovolcanic zone indicates less shallow-level differentiation to the north, possibly related to the development of new magma chambers during the recent phase of sea-floor spreading that has occurred there.

  1. Wave-driven spatial and temporal variability in sea-floor sediment mobility in the Monterey Bay, Cordell Bank, and Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Reid, Jane A.; Golden, Nadine E.

    2007-01-01

    Wind and wave patterns affect many aspects of continental shelves and shorelines geomorphic evolution. Although our understanding of the processes controlling sediment suspension on continental shelves has improved over the past decade, our ability to predict sediment mobility over large spatial and temporal scales remains limited. The deployment of robust operational buoys along the U.S. West Coast in the early 1980s provides large quantities of high-resolution oceanographic and meteorologic data. By 2006, these data sets were long enough to clearly identify long-term trends and compute statistically significant probability estimates of wave and wind behavior during annual and interannual climatic cycles (that is, El Niño and La Niña). Wave-induced sediment mobility on the shelf and upper slope off central California was modeled using synthesized oceanographic and meteorologic data as boundary input for the Delft SWAN model, sea-floor grain-size data provided by the usSEABED database, and regional bathymetry. Differences in waves (heights, periods, and directions) and winds (speeds and directions) between El Niño and La Niña months cause temporal and spatial variations in peak wave-induced bed shear stresses. These variations, in conjunction with spatially heterogeneous unconsolidated sea-floor sedimentary cover, result in predicted sediment mobility widely varying in both time and space. These findings indicate that these factors have significant consequences for both geological and biological processes.

  2. Time-Series Photographs of the Sea Floor in Western Massachusetts Bay: May to September 1999; May to September 2000; and October 2001 to February 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Alexander, P. Soupy; Bothner, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents time-series photographs of the sea floor obtained from an instrumented tripod deployed at Site A in western Massachusetts Bay (42? 22.6' N., 70? 47.0' W., 30 m water depth, figure 1) from May 1999 to September 1999; May 2000 to September 2000; and October 2001 to February 2002. Site A is approximately 1 km south of an ocean outfall that began discharging treated sewage effluent from the Boston metropolitan area into Massachusetts Bay in September 2000. Time-series photographs and oceanographic observations were initiated at Site A in December 1989 and are anticipated to continue to September 2005. This one of a series of reports that present these images in digital form. The objective of these reports is to enable easy and rapid viewing of the photographs and to provide a medium-resolution digital archive. The images, obtained every 4 hours, are presented as a movie (in .avi format, which may be viewed using an image viewer such as QuickTime or Windows Media Player) and as individual images (.tif format). The images provide time-series observations of changes of the sea floor and near-bottom water properties.

  3. A sea floor observatory for studying the hydrocarbon system within the gas hydrate stability zone of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, J.; McGee, T.; Lutken, C.; Geresi, E.

    2003-04-01

    A presentation at the Oceans 98 Conference in Nice described a then newly initiated program to install a net of acoustic vertical line arrays (VLAs) on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Since then, the project has evolved into the development of a multi-sensor sea floor observatory that incorporates geochemical as well as geophysical systems. Some of these systems, including a prototype VLA, have been successfully tested and others are in final stages of development. Initial deployment is expected in 2004 with full operations to begin in 2005. The observatory is designed to provide long term, more-or-less continuous monitoring of conditions in the lower water column and sub-bottom sediments proximal to and within the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). The primary purpose is to promote a better understanding of the complex interactions which take place therein with the near-seabed hydrocarbon system. The manifestations of this complex system are the hydrate bodies, massive and surficial; mud, sand and brine seeps and flows; gas vents, quiescent to vigorous and chemosynthetic biological communities. The complexity of the HSZ, its various features and phenomena, relates to the instability of the zone itself; superimposed over an irregular, unstable salt sheet, permeated by migrating hydrocarbon and other fluids, subjected to ubiquitous seismicity, active fault zones, and the effects of transiting warm loop currents. Under these various conditions hydrates form and dissociate with relative rapidity and gas is expelled into the water column in variable amounts at irregular intervals. The particular instability of hydrates and proximal fault zones with venting gas represent significant geohazards to bottom-founded installations typical of deep conventional oil and gas production. The latter also contributes substantial quantities of hydrocarbon gases to the water column and eventually to the atmosphere as green house gases. These real concerns provide

  4. Funky Floors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-11-08

    The material covering the floors of these two craters looks very different from the surrounds. The unusual markings of the floor material indicates that a volatile, such as ice, has affected the appearance of the surface

  5. A Fiber-Optic Interferometric Tri-Component Geophone for Ocean Floor Seismic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Fu, Qunjian; Lang, Jinpeng; Gao, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhongmin; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Yanbo; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2016-12-28

    For the implementation of an all fiber observation network for submarine seismic monitoring, a tri-component geophone based on Michelson interferometry is proposed and tested. A compliant cylinder-based sensor head is analyzed with finite element method and tested. The operation frequency ranges from 2 Hz to 150 Hz for acceleration detection, employing a phase generated carrier demodulation scheme, with a responsivity above 50 dB re rad/g for the whole frequency range. The transverse suppression ratio is about 30 dB. The system noise at low frequency originated mainly from the 1/f fluctuation, with an average system noise level -123.55 dB re rad / Hz ranging from 0 Hz to 500 Hz. The minimum detectable acceleration is about 2 ng / Hz , and the dynamic range is above 116 dB.

  6. A Fiber-Optic Interferometric Tri-Component Geophone for Ocean Floor Seismic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Fu, Qunjian; Lang, Jinpeng; Gao, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhongmin; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Yanbo; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    For the implementation of an all fiber observation network for submarine seismic monitoring, a tri-component geophone based on Michelson interferometry is proposed and tested. A compliant cylinder-based sensor head is analyzed with finite element method and tested. The operation frequency ranges from 2 Hz to 150 Hz for acceleration detection, employing a phase generated carrier demodulation scheme, with a responsivity above 50 dB re rad/g for the whole frequency range. The transverse suppression ratio is about 30 dB. The system noise at low frequency originated mainly from the 1/f fluctuation, with an average system noise level −123.55 dB re rad/Hz ranging from 0 Hz to 500 Hz. The minimum detectable acceleration is about 2 ng/Hz, and the dynamic range is above 116 dB. PMID:28036011

  7. Passive monitoring of temporal, coseismic, velocity variations at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouedard, P.; Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    Passive techniques are now widely used for seismic imaging, for example ambient noise tomography. A recent development of passive techniques, namely the Passive Image Interferometry, allows the monitoring of temporal variations of seismic velocities from the continuous recording of ambient noise. The sensitivity of the method is as high as 0.01% in relative velocity changes. Such a high sensitivity is reached by using the (multiply-) scattered waves reconstructed in the noise cross-correlation functions in the surface-wave coda. In our study we utilized passive image interferometry to detect changes in velocity before/after a Mw 6.0 earthquake at the Gofar transform fault at the East Pacific Rise. The data set consists of a year of continuous recording at 15 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) located in the vicinity of the fault. A velocity drop of 0.1% is measured at the time of the earthquake. Preliminary results suggest that the temporal variation is localized within the fault zone. Coseismic variations are usually interpreted as a consequence of the stress release on the fault. Multi-component analysis (3 components seismometers plus accelerometers) allows to make independent measurements of the velocity variations, and further improve the resolution. We note that the method is insensitive to clock errors, which is of particular interest when working with OBS, and can also be used to measure and correct for clock errors, if any. The sensitivity of the method, along with its low cost and its continuous and real time nature, make it a promising tool for monitoring geological structures at different scales.

  8. SEA monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure plans - Improvement opportunities identified in practical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, K.; Balfors, B.; Folkeson, L.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-11-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) requires monitoring in order to identify unforeseen adverse effects and to enable appropriate remedial action to be taken. Guidelines on how to monitor significant environmental impacts have been developed but experience from practice is limited. This paper presents a study of environmental monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure planning. The result shows that essentially no environmental monitoring is currently performed. Monitoring of the plans merely involves checking the implementation of projects and performing an economic account. At present, a new planning period has commenced for the regional transport infrastructure plans. To obtain an iterative SEA process for the new plan with integrated SEA monitoring, the following means are suggested: reinforcement of practitioners' incentives to plan and perform monitoring; integration of monitoring in the SEA process; pre-determined impact thresholds that prompt remedial action; and more efficient use of monitoring results.

  9. Palinspastic reconstruction of the opening of the NE Atlantic: differential sea-floor spreading and resulting deformation of the NW European Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, E.; Cobbold, P. R.; Dauteuil, O.

    2012-04-01

    The NE Atlantic Ocean opened progressively between Greenland and NW Europe during the Cenozoic. Sea-floor spreading occurred along three ridge systems: the Reykjanes Ridge south of Iceland, the Mohns Ridge north of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (JMFZ), and the Aegir and Kolbeinsey ridges between Iceland and the JMFZ. At the same time, compressional structures developed along the continental margin of NW Europe, but apparently not on the East Greenland Margin. We therefore investigate how compressional deformation of the NW European Margin may have resulted from variations in the amount and direction of sea-floor spreading along the various ridges. One of the main assumptions of the theory of plate tectonics is that all lithospheric plates are rigid. However, reconstructions of the opening of the NE Atlantic Ocean, on the basis of two rigid plates (Eurasia and Greenland), lead to gaps and overlaps between the plates. Furthermore, the oceanic Jan Mayen Segment, between Iceland and the JMFZ, had a complex spreading history, including progressive separation of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMMC) and a ridge jump from the Aegir Ridge to the Kolbeinsey Ridge. A subdivision of the NE Atlantic Ocean into micro-plates improves the fits, yet it remains difficult to reconstruct a simple spreading history for the Jan Mayen Segment using Euler rotation poles alone. In order to reconstruct the complex spreading history of the NE Atlantic and to study the evolution of the European Margin during sea-floor spreading, we have developed a method for palinspastic reconstruction of the opening of an ocean, using magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. We first subdivide the oceanic domain into a finite number of blocks, lying between magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. Our iterative least-squares method then minimizes the gaps and overlaps between the blocks. This yields the rigid translations and rotations of the blocks. Thus the method provides a full pattern of displacement for all

  10. VIEW OF WIDE STAIR TO SECOND FLOOR FROM GROUND FLOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WIDE STAIR TO SECOND FLOOR FROM GROUND FLOOR. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. The Potentials Of Gnss-R For Sea Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarizia, Maria Paola; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry represents a new and innovative approach for ocean remote sensing. This technique exploits signals of opportunity from GNSS constellations (i.e. GPS, Glonass, Galileo etc.), reflected off the surface of the ocean, and uses these reflections to retrieve useful geophysical parameters of the ocean surface. GNSS-R is generating an increasing attention from the Remote Sensing community, especially in recent years, due to its numerous advantages compared to other classical remote sensing techniques. The exploitation of long-term, ubiquitous signals of opportunity freely available, the high space-time sampling capabilities and the ability of its L-band signals to penetrate well through rain all contribute to make this technique very attractive. An additional and very important strength of GNSS-R is the need for simple, low-cost/low-power GNSS receivers, that could be easily piggybacked on other satellites to form a constellation of receivers. These recognized potentials of GNSS-R have been recently led to the approval of the NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), a spaceborne mission focused on tropical cyclone (TC) inner core process studies. GNSS-R can be used for both scatterometric applications (i.e. wind and wave monitoring) and altimetric applications (i.e. measurements of sea surface height). In particular, its ability to collect multiple GPS reflections anywhere on the globe and at any time (due to the ubiquity of GPS signals) using a large constellation of simple GNSS receivers, makes is very suitable for Real-Time (RT) and Near-Real Time (NRT) applications. These are particularly crucial for monitoring sea hazards related to ship operations and operational oceanography in general. For scatterometric purposes, GNSS-R can potentially detect high wind and waves in RT and NRT, as well as oil spills on the surface of the ocean, through its measurements of the sea surface roughness. In addition to that, GNSS-R could provide

  12. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  13. Operational Monitoring and Forecasting in Regional Seas: the Aegean Sea example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittis, K.; Perivoliotis, L.; Zervakis, V.; Papadopoulos, A.; Tziavos, C.

    2003-04-01

    The increasing economic activities in the coastal zone and the associated pressure on the marine environment have raised the interest on monitoring systems able to provide supporting information for its effective management and protection. Such an integrated monitoring, forecasting and information system is being developed during the past years in the Aegean Sea. Its main component is the POSEIDON network that provides real-time data for meteorological and surface oceanographic parameters (waves, currents, hydrological and biochemical data) from 11 fixed oceanographic buoys. The numerical forecasting system is composed by an ETA atmospheric model, a WAM wave model and a POM hydrodynamic model that provide every day 72 hours forecasts. The system is operational since May 2000 and its products are published through Internet while a sub-set is also available through cellular telephony. New type of observing platforms will be available in the near future through a number of EU funded research projects. The Mediterranean Moored Multi-sensor Array (M3A) that was developed for the needs of the Mediterranean Forecasting System and was tested during 2000-2001 will be operational in 2004 during the MFSTEP project. The M3A system incorporates sensors for optical and chemical measurements (Oxygen, Turbidity, Chlorophyll-a, Nutrients and PAR) in the euphotic zone (0-100m) together with sensors for physical parameters (Temperature, Salinity, Current speed and direction) at the 0-500m layer. A Ferry-Box system will also operate during 2004 in the southern Aegean Sea, providing surface data for physical and bio-chemical properties. The ongoing modeling efforts include coupling with larger scale circulation models of the Mediterranean, high-resolution downscaling to coastal areas of the Aegean Sea and development of multi-variate data assimilation methods.

  14. Spatial and temporal variability and monitoring of hydrophysical fields of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Russian-Ukrainian program "The Black Sea as a Simulation Model of the Ocean," the monitoring of the marine environment is considered using modern measuring systems. On the basis of historical and contemporary observation data, we estimate the spatial and temporal scales of dominant processes in the Black Sea. We describe the main measuring systems used to monitor the structure and variability of the hydrophysical fields. Examples characterizing the specific features of the Black Sea processes are presented.

  15. Sea-Floor Images and Data from Multibeam Surveys in San Francisco Bay, Southern California, Hawaii, the Gulf of Mexico, and Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardiner, James V.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate base maps are a prerequisite for any geologic study, regardless of the objectives. Land-based studies commonly utilize aerial photographs, USGS 7.5-minute quadrangle maps, and satellite images as base maps. Until now, studies that involve the ocean floor have been at a disadvantage due to an almost complete lack of accurate marine base maps. Many base maps of the sea floor have been constructed over the past century but with a wide range in navigational and depth accuracies. Only in the past few years has marine surveying technology advanced far enough to produce navigational accuracy of 1 meter and depth resolutions of 50 centimeters. The Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project of the U.S. Geological Survey's, Western Coastal and Marine Geology Program, Menlo Park, California, U.S.A., in cooperation with the Ocean Mapping Group, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada, is using this new technology to systematically map the ocean floor and lakes. This type of marine surveying, called multibeam surveying, collects high-resolution bathymetric and backscatter data that can be used for various base maps, GIS coverages, and scientific visualization methods. This is an interactive CD-ROM that contains images, movies, and data of all the surveys the Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project has completed up to January 1999. The images and movies on this CD-ROM, such as shaded relief of the bathymetry, backscatter, oblique views, 3-D views, and QuickTime movies help the viewer to visualize the multibeam data. This CD-ROM also contains ARC/INFO export (.e00) files and full-resolution TIFF images of all the survey sites that can be downloaded and used in many GIS packages.

  16. Sea floor cycling of organic matter in the continental margin of the mid-Atlantic Bight. Final report, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project was to examine quantitatively the cycling of organic matter at the sea floor of the mid-Atlantic Bight continental margin. This information would be used to better understand sedimentary geochemical processes and, when used in conjunction with other measurements made within the DOE Ocean Margins Program, would be used to constrain the offshore and surface-to-deep water transport of organic carbon in this region. The latter information is critical in assessing the role of continental margins in the sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide, the dominant greenhouse gas, in the deep ocean. Because the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may cause significant changes in climate, this project had major societal importance.

  17. Sea-floor texture and physiographic zones of the inner continental shelf from Salisbury to Nahant, Massachusetts, including the Merrimack Embayment and Western Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Foster, David S.; Schwab, William C.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.

    2015-10-26

    A series of maps that describe the distribution and texture of sea-floor sediments and physiographic zones of Massachusetts State waters from Nahant to Salisbury, Massachusetts, including western Massachusetts Bay, have been produced by using high-resolution geophysical data (interferometric and multibeam swath bathymetry, lidar bathymetry, backscatter intensity, and seismic reflection profiles), sediment samples, and bottom photographs. These interpretations are intended to aid statewide efforts to inventory and manage coastal and marine resources, link with existing data interpretations, and provide information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change. Marine geologic mapping of the inner continental shelf of Massachusetts is a statewide cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management.

  18. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project, Duxbury Reef, Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Prescutti, K.; Ball, O.; Chang, E.; Darakananda, K.; Jessup, K.; Poutian, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Storm, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B), and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities of aggregating anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima, for seasonal abundance variations as well as long-term population trends. We will also follow the seasonal and long-term population fluctuations of red algal turf, Endocladia muricata and Gelidium coulteri, and black turban snails, Tegula funebralis. Comparing populations of turf algae and the herbivorous black turban snails gathered before and after the November 7, 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill shows very little impact on the Duxbury Reef intertidal inhabitants. Future analyses will

  19. Monitoring Beaufort Sea waterfowl and marine birds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.R.

    1990-11-15

    The purpose of the project was to design and implement a monitoring protocol for marine waterbirds in the Jones-Return Islands area of the central Alaska Beaufort Sea. Because of its overwhelming and widespread abundance, relatively sedentary behavior, ease in counting, and the extensive historical database, the oldsquaw duck (Clangula hyemalis) was selected as the focal species for the study. Two null hypotheses were formulated concerning potential changes in the numbers and distribution of oldsquaws in relation to OCS development in the industrial area, compared to a control area (Stockton-Maguire-Flaxman Islands area) located about 50 km to the east. A 9-year historical database (1977 through 1984, and 1989) was analyzed using multivariate techniques to determine which of several predictor variables recorded during past aerial surveys significantly influenced oldsquaw density in the central Alaska Beaufort Sea. Separate analyses were conducted for the complete open-water period, and for the molt period of oldsquaws, when they are flightless and relatively sedentary in the study areas. The results of the two multiple regression analyses indicated that only about 57% and 68%, respectively, of the total amount of variation in oldsquaw density during the two periods could be explained by predictor variables recorded during aerial surveys. Candidate predictor variables were year of study, day of year, time of day, wind speed and direction, habitat, east-west position (study area) of the transect, distance of the transect from a barrier island, water depth beneath the transect, wave height and amount of ice recorded on the transect. Predictor variables associated with habitat, day of the year, time of day of the survey, amount of ice, and wave height recorded on transect during the survey had the most significant effect on oldsquaw density.

  20. Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

    2005-01-01

    Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to

  1. Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground Floor Plan, West Bunkhouse - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  2. Aquarius: A Mission to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Pellerano, F.; Yueh, S.; Colomb, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument for measuring salinity is the radiometer. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the largest potential sources of error in the retrieval. Unique features of the sensor are the large reflector (2.5 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds), polarimetric operation, and the tight thermal control. The three feeds produce three beams arranged to image in pushbroom fashion looking to the side of the orbit away from the sun to avoid sunglint. Polarimetric operation is included to assist in correcting for Faraday rotation which can be important at L-band. The tight thermal control is necessary to meet stability requirements (less than 0.12K drift over 7 days) which have been imposed to assist in meeting the science requirements for the retrieval of surface salinity (0.2 psu). The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6ad6pm (ascending at 6 pm). The objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. To accomplish this, the measurement goals are a spatial resolution of 100 km and retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis. Aquarius is being developed by NASA and is a partnership between JPL and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The SAC-D mission is being developed by CONAE and will include the spacecraft and several additional instruments, including visible and infrared cameras and a microwave radiometer to monitor rain and wind velocity over the oceans, and sea ice.

  3. Aquarius: A Mission to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Pellerano, F.; Yueh, S.; Colomb, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument for measuring salinity is the radiometer. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the largest potential sources of error in the retrieval. Unique features of the sensor are the large reflector (2.5 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds), polarimetric operation, and the tight thermal control. The three feeds produce three beams arranged to image in pushbroom fashion looking to the side of the orbit away from the sun to avoid sunglint. Polarimetric operation is included to assist in correcting for Faraday rotation which can be important at L-band. The tight thermal control is necessary to meet stability requirements (less than 0.12K drift over 7 days) which have been imposed to assist in meeting the science requirements for the retrieval of surface salinity (0.2 psu). The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6ad6pm (ascending at 6 pm). The objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. To accomplish this, the measurement goals are a spatial resolution of 100 km and retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis. Aquarius is being developed by NASA and is a partnership between JPL and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The SAC-D mission is being developed by CONAE and will include the spacecraft and several additional instruments, including visible and infrared cameras and a microwave radiometer to monitor rain and wind velocity over the oceans, and sea ice.

  4. Aerial monitoring of marine waterfowl in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen R; Noel, Lynn E; Gazey, William J; Hawkes, Virgil C

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and test a monitoring protocol for marine waterfowl in the central Alaskan Beaufort Sea. The study provides an important case-study of how a long-term monitoring program may be affected by unanticipated human disturbances. Because of its overwhelming and widespread abundance, relatively sedentary behavior, ease in counting, and the extensive historical database, the long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) was selected as the focal species. Two null hypotheses were formulated concerning potential changes in the numbers and distribution of long-tailed ducks in relation to disturbance in an industrial study area, compared to a reference study area located about 50 km to the east. A 9-year historical database (1977-1984, 1989) of long-tailed duck densities and other important data recorded during systematic aerial surveys was analyzed retrospectively using multiple regression techniques. The retrospective analyses determined which of several predictor variables recorded were significantly related to long-tailed duck density. Separate analyses were conducted for two periods: (1) the overall period when long-tailed ducks were present in the lagoon study areas, and (2) the shorter adult male molt period. The results of the two analyses indicated that 57% and 68%, respectively, of the total variation in long-tailed duck density during the two periods could be explained by variables recorded during the surveys. Predictor variables representing habitat, day of the year, time of day, amount of ice, and wave height recorded on-transect during surveys were most closely associated with long-tailed duck density. Measurement error during the surveys, and influences outside the study area such as nesting success in tundra habitats and mortality during migration and in over-wintering areas likely also had strong influences on the results, but these factors were not measurable in our study. Based on results of the retrospective analyses, a long

  5. First and Second Floor Window Sills; First Floor, Second Floor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First and Second Floor Window Sills; First Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor Door Jambs; Stair and Second Floor Baseboards; First Floor Window Jamb - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Treasurer's Quarters, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  6. Oil Spill Monitoring in North Sea and Bohai Sea Using High Resolution X-Band SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velotto, Domenico; Lehner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Offshore crude oil production has grown regularly since its beginning in the early 1940s, it accounts today for almost one-third of the world’s production. This growth goes along with the production plateau reached in the last decades by onshore installations. As a direct consequence also the sea oil pollution caused by operational offshore activities has increased. In this paper results of oil spill monitoring using X-band SAR imagery are shown. North Sea and Bohai Sea are two hot spots because they are reach of oil fields.

  7. Monitoring of sea currents and waves in Spitsbergen fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Nataliya; Brazhnikov, Dmitry; Marchenko, Aleksey; Finseth, Jomar

    2014-05-01

    Investigation of sea currents and waves in Spitsbergen fjords has both pure scientific and practical value. It allows to understand the processes in the fjords and to get idea about functioning of World Ocean. From practical point of view such measurements can give information about sediment transport, coastal erosion processes and sea ice behavior in winter, which is important for port construction and industry in shore zone. It has special meaning for Adventfjorden, because of Longyearbyen, a town with 2,500 citizens, with large tourist, scientific and economic activities and growing importance as base for rescue and pollution preparedness for significant part of Arctic. UNIS researchers and colleagues have performed studies of sea currents in fjords over several years. Field investigations in Adventfjorden (ADCP, drift trackers) in 2012-2013 are in the center of the presentation. Adventfjorden is a rather small (7x4 km) side-fjord on the south of Isfjorden, directed 135° (NW-SE). Isfjorden is second longest (107 km) fjord of Spitsbergen, influenced by West Spitsbergen current. The ADCP AWAC (producer Nordtek) was installed and collecting data 10.09.2012-25.10.2013 in a point of Adventfjorden and Isfjorden connection; 563 m from shore line, 16 m depth. One year of data collection for waves and currents parameters, pressure, temperature and salinity and comparison with meteodata has allowed to compose the picture of water movement. Data had been processed in AWAC, Storm and Origin software. Studying surface water flow in Adventfjorden was performed by using GPS transmitters "Garmin DC40" and receiver "Garmin AstroDog 320". To avoid effect of wind and wave motions, GPS transmitters had been mounted on PVC frames with 4 textiles sails (1mx0.5m). Floating rings was used for buoyancy. 3 such devices freely moved/sailed following the currents during 3 days in October 2013. It allowed covering all tidal variations and some weather changings. To analyze resulted tracks

  8. Monitoring mercury in the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Day, Rusty D; Christopher, Steven J; Becker, Paul R; Whitaker, David W

    2005-01-15

    The validity of using blood samples and keratinized scutes for nonlethal routine monitoring of mercury (Hg) in loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, is evaluated in the context of how effectively these matrixes predict internal tissue Hg burdens and the different temporal scales of exposure they represent. Total Hg (THg) was measured in blood and scutes collected from live captures (n = 34) and liver, kidney, muscle, spinal cord, blood, and scutes collected from freshly stranded loggerhead turtles (n = 6) along the coast of the southeastern United States. Linear regressions between monitoring compartments and internal tissues from stranded animals were all statistically significant (r2 > 0.805, p < 0.015) but varied in their utility as a predictive tool depending on which tissues were paired. Blood was an effective predictor of THg in muscle (r2 = 0.988, p < 0.0001) and spinal cord (r2 = 0.988, p < 0.0001), while scute was the most accurate predictor of THg in liver (r2 = 0.948, p = 0.0010). The strength of the relationship between tissues types is believed to reflect the similarity in the temporal scales they represent and the variability in the fraction of methylmercury present. The stability of Hg in the scute matrix makes this tissue preferable for approximating long-term exposure, while blood Hg levels can be affected by recent changes in Hg intake. THg levels in blood and scutes from live captures were highly correlated (linear regression r2 = 0.926, p < 0.0001) and increased significantly with body mass (r2 = 0.173, p = 0.016 and r2 = 0.187, p = 0.012 respectively), further supporting thatthere is a component reflecting long-term accumulation of Hg in these matrixes. We also present a novel technique using the residuals from the blood-scute regression as an index of recent exposure (IRE). The interpretation of this value is derived from the comparison between the most recent Hg intake (which contributes to the Hg measured in the blood) relative to the

  9. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provides a platform which solves a variety of accessibility problems associated with controlling process flow streams in remote, hard to reach locations in harsh environments. Installation of the equipment described has shown to allow access to flow streams that otherwise would require exceptional means to access and control. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to both control and monitor process fluid flow through shielding, walls or floors when direct connection is advantageous. (authors)

  10. Sea-floor features related to hydrocarbon seeps in deepwater carbonate-mud mounds of the Gulf of Cádiz: from mud flows to carbonate precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, R.; Somoza, L.; Medialdea, T.; González, F. J.; Díaz-Del-Río, V.; Fernández-Puga, M. C.; Maestro, A.; Mata, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    Underwater images taken from deepwater carbonate-mud mounds located along the continental margin of the Gulf of Cádiz (eastern Central Atlantic) have identified a great variety of hydrocarbon seep-related geomorphic features that exist on the sea floor. An extensive photographic survey was made along the Guadalquivir Diapiric Ridge, after detailed examination of the main mounds identified on previous swath bathymetry coverage, high-resolution seismic imagery, dredge and gravity core data. Recognised fluid-induced geomorphic features include seep precipitates, named here generically as hydrocarbon-derived authigenic carbonates (HDACs), mud-breccia flows and piping/rills, at scales ranging from metres to centimetres. Based on the viscosity, texture, morphology, and the nature of observed features, we have categorized the geomorphic seeps into the following types: mud-breccia flows and liquid seepages, which can be grouped as highly viscous and viscous mud-breccia flows, gassy mud-breccia flows, and small-scale piping/rills; HDACs types, including massive crusts, “honeycombed” carbonate crusts, nodular aggregated crusts, steeply dipping to vertical slabs, and pipe-like formations (chimneys). These widespread geomorphic features observed along the carbonate-mud mounds reveal alternate periods of (1) active mud-flow extrusion (mud-volcano formation), (2) reduced seepage activity, with the formation of extensive carbonate features by chemosynthetic organisms, and (3) formation of hardgrounds and colonisation by non-chemosynthetic organisms such as deepwater corals (e.g. Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata). The formation of large amounts of HDACs is related to the microbially mediated oxidation of hydrocarbon fluids (biogenic and thermogenic) during periods of slower fluid venting. This has led to the hypothesis that these carbonate-mud mounds could be built up by alternating episodes of varying fluid-venting rates, with peaks that may have been triggered by

  11. A major upgrade of the sediment echosounder ATLAS PARASOUND and the digital acquisition software ParaDigMA for high-resolution sea floor studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerriets, A.; von Lom-Keil, H.; Spiess, V.; Zwanzig, C.; Bruns, R.

    2003-04-01

    The combination of the ATLAS PARASOUND sediment echosounder, designed by ATLAS Hydrographic, and the digital recording software package ParaDigMA (commercially available as ATLAS PARASTORE-3) for online digitisation, preprocessing and visualisation of recorded seismograms has proven to be a reliable system for high-resolution acoustic sea floor studies. During 10 years of successful operation aboard several research vessels, including R/V Meteor, R/V Sonne and R/V Polarstern, the system has been only slightly modified. Based on this experience, today's PARASOUND/ParaDigMA system has accomplished the step from DOS towards Windows platform and network capability. In cooperation of ATLAS Hydrographic and the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bremen a major upgrade of the PARASOUND/ParaDigMA system has been developed that adds significant functionality for surveys of sediment structures and sea floor morphology. The innovations primarily concern the control section of the ATLAS PARASOUND echosounder and the ParaDigMA user front end. The previous analogue PARASOUND control terminal has been replaced by a small real time control PC responsible for the control of the echosounder as well as for the continuous digitisation of the data. The control PC communicates via standard network protocols metadata and data with client applications that can display and store the acquired data on different computers on the network. The new network capabilities of the system overcome former limitations and admit a high flexibility with respect to numbers and locations of operator and recording/display PCs. The system now offers a simultaneous parallel registration of the 2.5-5.5kHz parametric signal and the 18kHz NBS signal. This feature in combination with the recording of complete soundings including the entire water column provides the basis for evolving scientific research topics e. g. gas venting. The ParaDigMA recording software now operates on Windows platforms which

  12. An Inverse Method to Derive the Kinematic History of Rifted Margin Formation Using a New Model of Sea Floor Spreading Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D.; Kusznir, N.

    2004-05-01

    Recent discoveries of depth-dependent stretching and mantle exhumation at rifted continental margins require new models of margin formation. A two-dimensional coupled fluid mechanics/thermal kinematic model of sea-floor spreading initiation has been developed to predict the deformational and thermal evolution of rifted continental margins through time. The model can also include the effects of pre-breakup pure-shear stretching of continental lithosphere. Rifted margin lithosphere thinning and thermal evolution is dependent on ocean-ridge spreading rate (Vx), the mantle upwelling velocity beneath the ridge axis (Vz), and the pre-breakup lithosphere stretching factor (a). The model predicts the thinning of the upper crust, lower crust and lithospheric mantle of the continental margin, and the history of rifted margin subsidence, water depths and top basement heat-flow. We apply inverse methods to this new forward model of rifted margin formation to explore how successfully model input parameters may be extracted from observational data at rifted margins. The ability of the inverse method to find a unique solution has been established using synthetic data from forward modelling. Output parameters from the inversion are the horizontal and vertical velocities of sea-floor spreading, their variation with time, and the initial pre-breakup lithosphere stretching factor. Initial inversion tests used forward model predictions of the stretching of the upper crust, the whole crust and the whole lithosphere. These model predictions control the variation of crustal thickness and lithosphere temperature beneath the thinned continental margin and adjacent ocean, which in turn control margin subsidence and gravity anomaly. For application of the inversion procedure to observed data on rifted margins, the input data used are measured bathymetry, sediment thickness, gravity anomaly and upper crustal stretching. The forward problem is characterised by a non-linear relationship between

  13. A seismic-reflection investigation of gas hydrates and sea-floor features of the upper continental slope of the Garden Banks and Green Canyon regions, northern Gulf of Mexico: report for cruise G1-99-GM (99002)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Alan; Twichell, David; Hart, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    During April 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a 13-day cruise in the Garden Banks and Green Canyon regions of the Gulf of Mexico. The R/V Gyre, owned by Texas A&M University, was chartered for the cruise. The general objectives were (1) to acquire very high resolution seismic-reflection data and side-scan sonar images of the upper and middle continental slope (200-1200-m water depths), (2) to study the acoustic character and features of the sea floor for evidence of sea-floor hazards, and (3) to look for evidence of subsurface gas hydrates and their effects. The Gulf of Mexico is well known for hydrocarbon resources, with emphasis now on frontier deep-water areas. For water depths greater than about 250 m, the pressure-termperature conditions are correct for the development of shallow-subsurface gas hydrate formation (Anderson et al., 1992). Gas hydrates are ice-like mixtures of gas and water (Kvenvolden, 1993). They are known to be present from extensive previous sampling in sea-floor cores and from mound-like features observed on the sea floor in many parts of the northern Gulf, including the Green Canyon and Garden Banks areas (e.g., Roberts, 1995). Seismic-reflection data are extensive in the Gulf of Mexico, but few very-high-resolution data like those needed for gas-hydrate studies exist in the public domain. The occurrence and mechanisms of gas hydrate formation and dissociation are important to understand, because of their perceived economic potential for methane gas, their potential controls on local and regional sea-floor stability, and their possible effects on earth climates due to massive release of methane greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Three high-resolution seismic-reflection systems and one side-scan sonar system were used on the cruise to map the surface reflectance and features of the sea floor and the acoustic geometries and character of the shallow sub-surface. The cruise was designed to acquire regional and detailed local

  14. Real Time Control of CO2 Enrichment Experiments on the Sea Floor Enabled by the MARS Cabled Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. G.; Mbari Foce Team

    2010-12-01

    We report on progress on FOCE (Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment) techniques designed to accomplish realistic (that is not contained within land-based aquaria) experiments on the response of deep-sea animals and biogeochemical cycles to ocean acidification. Such experiments have long been carried out on ecosystems on land, and the outcome has differed significantly from CO2 enrichment in enclosed greenhouse systems, thereby undoing much of the hope for an increase in the large-scale biosphere draw down of atmospheric CO2. It is a far bigger step if deep-sea animals and systems are removed from their cold, dark, high pressure and low oxygen native habitat. The equivalent problem in the ocean is far more difficult because of (1) the very different physical forcing; (2) the complex reaction rates between CO2 and water require delay times between addition and entry to the experimental space; (3) the lack of supporting infrastructure and of adequate sensors; and (4) the need for sophisticated and robust control techniques in both hardware and software. We have overcome almost all of these challenges, and related working systems have already been successfully deployed on the Great Barrier Reef coralline flats with Australian colleagues. We have used the MBARI MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cabled observatory to carry out deep-ocean (880m depth) experiments. The basic experimental unit is a 1m x 1m x 50cm chamber with side arms of ~ 3m length to provide the required chemical delay times for the reaction between admixed CO2 enriched sea water and emergence of the flow into the main chamber. Controllable thrusters, operated by user commands, help maintain a steady flow of seawater through the experiment. The site is slightly below the depth of the O2 minimum where small changes in either O2 from ocean warming, or CO2 from ocean acidification can lead to the formation of dead zones. Shallow (near shore) experiments are now also in the late planning stages. We have

  15. Monitoring mercury in green sea turtles using keratinized carapace fragments (scutes).

    PubMed

    Bezerra, M F; Lacerda, L D; Lima, E H S M; Melo, M T D

    2013-12-15

    The green sea turtles are facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and the impacts of heavy metals contamination contributes with the decline of their populations. It is very important to assess noninvasive and nonlethal methods for monitoring Hg contamination in sea turtles. Thus, Hg concentrations were measured in keratinized fragments (scutes) and internal tissues of green sea turtles from the Ceará coast to test the usefulness of scutes as a monitoring subject for sea turtles. A significantly positive correlation was found between Hg concentrations in muscle and scutes, which demonstrate that scutes can be used as a predictive matrix of Hg concentration in muscle tissue of green sea turtles.

  16. Rhodotorula pacifica sp. nov., a novel yeast species from sediment collected on the deep-sea floor of the north-west Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Takahiko; Hamamoto, Makiko; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    A novel species of the genus Rhodotorula was isolated from sediments collected on the deep-sea floor in the north-west Pacific Ocean. Strains SY-96T, isolated from the Yap Trench, and SY-246, isolated from the Iheya Ridge, had almost identical nucleotide sequences for their internal transcribed spacers and their 5.8S rDNA. Their physiological characteristics were also almost identical. The strains were assumed to be related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Rhodotorula dairenensis based on sequence similarities in the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA. The low DNA-DNA relatedness and sequence similarity between strain SY-96T and related species revealed that strains SY-96T and SY-246 represent a hitherto unknown species. As ballistoconidia and sexual reproduction were not observed in strains SY-96T and SY-246, these strains are described as Rhodotorula pacifica sp. nov. The type strain is SY-96T (= JCM 10908T = CBS 10070T).

  17. Petrography and Mineral Content of Sea-floor Sediments of the Tigris-Euphrates Delta, North-west Arabian Gulf, Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqrawi, A. A. M.

    1994-06-01

    Sea-floor sediments of the Iraqi territory of the Arabian Gulf have been studied in detail petrographically and mineralogically. The carbonate fraction of these sediments comprises various allochems in order of abundance: skeletal remains, ooids, peloids, and composite grains. On the other hand, the insoluble residues of the sediments studied consist of quartz, feldspars and mica. The matrix is carbonate micrite, containing various percentages of clays. Mineralogically the carbonate fraction consists of calcite, Mg-calcite, aragonite and dolomite. Mg-calcite, forming the radial cortex of the ooids, is the most unexpected and significant of such components. In addition, the Mg-calcite micritic cement is the most commonly observed diagenetic product resulting in the formation of hardgrounds in some areas. The clay minerals of the (<2 μm) grade are: illite, smectite, chlorite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and palygorskite. They are mainly detrital in origin. The fluvial loads of the Shatt Al-Arab (i.e. Tigris and Euphrates rivers) and Karun rivers, sand and dust from north-westerly storm winds (Shamal) are the main potential sources for the detrital sediments accumulating in the area of study. The indigenous marine organisms and some inorganic precipitation (as Mg-calcite), are additional sources of the sediments and increase in percentage toward the open waters.

  18. Valley Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-529, 30 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the floor of an ancient valley located near the Pyrrhae Chaos region of Mars. This valley might have been carved by liquid water, but today no evidence remains that a fluid ever flowed through it. Long after the valley formed, its floor was covered by large, windblown, ripple-like dunes. This picture is located near 13.0oS, 31.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  19. Formaldehyde emission monitoring from a variety of solid wood, plywood, blockboard and flooring products manufactured for building and furnishing materials.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Martin; Salem, Mohamed Z M; Srba, Jaromír

    2012-06-30

    The measurements of formaldehyde emission (FE) from solid wood, plywood, flooring and blockboard used for building and furnishing materials were obtained using the European small-scale chamber (EN 717-1) and gas analysis (EN 717-2) methods to identify the major sources of formaldehyde among construction and wood products in the Czech Republic. The differences in the FE values reported for various wood products were a function of their structural differences. These results showed that the wood species, plywood type and thickness significantly affected the FE measured by EN 717-2 (P<0.001). The FE values from solid wood ranged between 0.0068 and 0.0036ppm and 0.084-0.014mg/m(2)h. The initial FE ranged from 0.006mg/m(3) for engineered flooring with polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) to 0.048mg/m(3) for painted birch blockboard. Furthermore, the FE dropped noticeably by the end of the measuring period, ranging between 0.006mg/m(3) for engineered flooring with PVAc and 0.037mg/m(3) for painted beech blockboard. Additionally, the initial FE was higher for the painted blockboard (0.035-0.048mg/m(3)) than for the uncoated boards (0.022-0.032mg/m(3)). In the first week after manufacturing, the FE was high, but the decrease in FE was noticeable at the two-week measurement for all of the materials, especially for the painted blockboards.

  20. The mineralogy of Fe/Mg-clays formed in low-temperature hydrothermal sea floor environments and possible formation mechanisms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Cuadros, J.; Glotch, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    Infrared remote sensing results from the OMEGA and CRISM experiments have revealed 1000s of exposures of Fe/Mg-rich phyllosilicates on Mars, including many smectite compositions intermediate between nontronite (Fe3+ endmember) and saponite (Mg2+ endmember). In addition, many of the deposits contain spectral evidence for putative higher temperature phases such as chlorite, chlorite-smectite, and other interlayered clays. In this work, we are exploring the mineralogy of the saponite-nontronite crystal chemical series, as well the interlayered smectite-talc, and smectite-chlorite systems. Previously collected sea-floor samples originate from the East Pacific Rise, Gulf of California, and Red Sea Southwest Basin. Bulk sample mineralogy revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) of randomly oriented powder-mounts shows that the Fe/Mg-clay minerals occur with various proportions of poorly crystalline Fe/MnOOH and NaCl, and minor sulfates and sulfides, which can be removed through washing or various treatments. XRD of oriented, air-dried and glycolated mounts reveals the presence of di- and trioctohedral smectites, talc with varied Fe content, interlayered talc-smectite, chlorite, chlorite-smectite, and poorly crystalline clays that could be considered proto-smectites. Mid-infrared and visible/near infrared reflectance spectra of the samples display clear evidence for chemical and structural variation among the samples, and subtle differences related to interlayering and crystallinity relevant to understanding infrared observations of Martian clays. The sea-floor clays likely formed in low-temperature hydrothermal settings, in some cases as direct precipitates close to hydrothermal vents, and in other cases as proximal sediments. Hydrated talc with low crystalline order and frequent Fe substitution is commonly found interlayered with smectites. The chemical and structural variation in these samples produces a range of spectral features in the 2.27-2.33 micron (wavelength) range

  1. Remote Oil Spill Detection and Monitoring Beneath Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Adam; Marshall, Stephen; Ren, Jinchang; Hwang, Byongjun (Phil); Hagan, Bernard; Stothard, David J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The spillage of oil in Polar Regions is particularly serious due to the threat to the environment and the difficulties in detecting and tracking the full extent of the oil seepage beneath the sea ice. Development of fast and reliable sensing techniques is highly desirable. In this paper hyperspectral imaging combined with signal processing and classification techniques are proposed as a potential tool to detect the presence of oil beneath the sea ice. A small sample, lab based experiment, serving as a proof of concept, resulted in the successful identification of oil presence beneath the thin ice layer as opposed to the other sample with ice only. The paper demonstrates the results of this experiment that granted a financial support to execute full feasibility study of this technology for oil spill detection beneath the sea ice.

  2. Review of Deep-Sea Ecology and Monitoring as They Relate to Deep-Sea Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2004-01-30

    This review summarizes available information concerning deep-sea benthic ecology and how that information might be used to monitor and eventually reduce the potential impacts resulting from oil and gas production activities. The paper provides a brief overview of deep-sea ecology and benthic faunal groups and summarizes some of the physical and biological features that may be important in evaluating potential impacts. In addition, presented is a synopsis of issues related to the design of a sampling program and a discussion of analytical considerations related to the uncertain knowledge of deep faunas. Also included is an overview of some of the variety of sampling techniques and equipment available to study the deep sea. The review concludes with management considerations and recommendations.

  3. 15 CFR 971.603 - At-sea monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... parameters must be proposed for examination in the applicant's monitoring plan: (1) Discharges— (i) Salinity...) Nutrients. (ii) Endangered species (observations). (iii) Salinity, temperature, density. (iv) Currents...

  4. 15 CFR 971.603 - At-sea monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... parameters must be proposed for examination in the applicant's monitoring plan: (1) Discharges— (i) Salinity...) Nutrients. (ii) Endangered species (observations). (iii) Salinity, temperature, density. (iv) Currents...

  5. Sea floor topography and backscatter intensity of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS), offshore of New York, based on multibeam surveys conducted in 1996, 1998, and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Danforth, W.W.; Knowles, S.C.; May, Brian; Serrett, Laurie

    2000-01-01

    An area offshore of Sandy Hook, New Jersey, has been used extensively for disposal of dredged and other materials, derived from the New York/New Jersey Harbor and surrounding areas, since the late 1800's (Figure 1). Between 1976 and 1995, the New York Bight Dredged Material Disposal Site, also known as the Mud Dump Site (Figure 2), received on average about 6 million cubic yards of material each year from federal and private maintenance dredging and from harbor deepening activities (Massa and others, 1996). In September 1997 the Mud Dump Site (MDS) was closed as an official ocean disposal site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (http://www.epa.gov/), and the MDS and surrounding areas were designated as the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS). The HARS is subdivided into a Primary Remediation Area (PRA, subdivided into 9 cells), a Buffer Zone, and a No-Discharge Zone (Figure 2). The sea floor of the HARS, approximately 9 square nautical miles in area, is being remediated by placing at least a one-meter cap of Category I (clean) dredged material on top of the existing surface sediments that exhibit varying degrees of degradation. (See http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/business/prjlinks/dmmp/benefic/hars.htm)(Category I sediments have no potential short or long-term impacts and are acceptable for unrestricted ocean disposal (EPA, 1996)). About 1.1 million cubic yards of dredged material for remediation was placed in the HARS in 1999, and 2.5 million cubic yards in 2000. Three multibeam echosounder surveys were carried out to map the topography and surficial geology of the HARS. The surveys were conducted November 23 - December 3, 1996, October 26 - November 11, 1998, and April 6 - 30, 2000. The surveys were carried out as part of a larger survey of the Hudson Shelf Valley and adjacent shelf (Butman and others, 1998, (http://pubs.usgs.gov/openfile/of98-616/). This report presents maps showing topography, shaded relief, and backscatter intensity (a measure of sea

  6. Variability of the Black Sea from My Ocean Black Sea Monitoring and Forecasting Center Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, G.; Ratner, Yu.; Kholod, A.; Martynov, M.; Ivanchik, M.; Denmyshev, S.; Dorofeev, V.; Knysh, V.; Moiseenko, V.; Kybryakov, A.; Churilova, T.; Suslin, V.

    2012-04-01

    My Ocean project has started provision of the full set of services from 10 January 2012. Regional products in the Black Sea are provided by the Black Sea Marine Forecasting Center (BS MFC). The BS MFC products include operational three-dimensional fields of temperature, salinity, current velocity hindcast, analysis and forecast up to five years (snapshots every three hours or daily averaged fields), reanalysis of the Black Sea dynamics from 1971 to 2002 years, nitrate and phytoplankton daily averaged fields in the upper 200 meter layer and attenuation coefficient analysis. Operational products are simulated by means of assimilation of the sea level anomalies, sea surface temperature and surface chlorophyll concentration, which are products of the Thematic Assembly Centers of My Ocean project, in the models of marine dynamics and ecosystem. Atmospheric forcing for the dynamical model operation is downloaded fro the SKIRON web site. All products are free available in the real-time on the My Ocean project site www.myocean.eu from the My Ocean interactive catalogue in the form of maps on different levels, animations or in digital form. An accuracy of the Black Sea MFC product is estinmated by means fof the comparison of simulations with space remote sensing data or independent in situ measurements by profiling floats or surface drifting buoys. The Black Sea MFC products provide a new insight to the broad range variability of the Black sea dynamics and ecosystem This study is carried out with partial support of the FP6 Sesame project (contract 036949) and FP7 MyOcean project (grant agreement n°218812).

  7. 15 CFR 971.603 - At-sea monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involve the study of two types of areas, each selected by the permittee in consultation with NOAA, which... strategy for using the result to monitor more effectively commercial-scale recovery. This monitoring shall... sampling strategy that assures: that it is based on sound statistical methods, that equipment and methods...

  8. SONARC: A Sea Ice Monitoring and Forecasting System to Support Safe Operations and Navigation in Arctic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, S. R.; Babiker, M.; Sandven, S.; Muckenhuber, S.; Korosov, A.; Bobylev, L.; Vesman, A.; Mushta, A.; Demchev, D.; Volkov, V.; Smirnov, K.; Hamre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice monitoring and forecasting systems are important tools for minimizing accident risk and environmental impacts of Arctic maritime operations. Satellite data such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), combined with atmosphere-ice-ocean forecasting models, navigation models and automatic identification system (AIS) transponder data from ships are essential components of such systems. Here we present first results from the SONARC project (project term: 2015-2017), an international multidisciplinary effort to develop novel and complementary ice monitoring and forecasting systems for vessels and offshore platforms in the Arctic. Automated classification methods (Zakhvatkina et al., 2012) are applied to Sentinel-1 dual-polarization SAR images from the Barents and Kara Sea region to identify ice types (e.g. multi-year ice, level first-year ice, deformed first-year ice, new/young ice, open water) and ridges. Short-term (1-3 days) ice drift forecasts are computed from SAR images using feature tracking and pattern tracking methods (Berg & Eriksson, 2014). Ice classification and drift forecast products are combined with ship positions based on AIS data from a selected period of 3-4 weeks to determine optimal vessel speed and routing in ice. Results illustrate the potential of high-resolution SAR data for near-real-time monitoring and forecasting of Arctic ice conditions. Over the next 3 years, SONARC findings will contribute new knowledge about sea ice in the Arctic while promoting safe and cost-effective shipping, domain awareness, resource management, and environmental protection.

  9. Monitoring Sea Surface Processes Using the High Frequency Ambient Sound Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    raindrops ( Medwin et al.,1992; Nystuen, 1996). This allows rainfall to be detected and quantified using passive acoustic monitoring (Nystuen, 2001; Ma and...2005: Passive acoustic detection and measurement of rainfall at sea. J.Atmos. and Oceanic Tech. 22, 1225-1248. Medwin , H., JA Nystuen, PW Jacobus...Determine Drop Size Distribution. Sounds in the Seas: Introduction to Acoustical Oceanography, editor, H. Medwin , Cambridge Unversity Press. Ma, B.B

  10. Seabed photographs, sediment texture analyses, and sun-illuminated sea floor topography in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region off Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Page C.; Gallea, Leslie B.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Twomey, Erin R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Sanctuary Program, conducted seabed mapping and related research in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary region from 1993 to 2004. The mapped area is approximately 3,700 km (1,100 nmi) in size and was subdivided into 18 quadrangles. An extensive series of sea-floor maps of the region based on multibeam sonar surveys has been published as paper maps and online in digital format (PDF, EPS, PS). In addition, 2,628 seabed-sediment samples were collected and analyzed and are in the usSEABED: Atlantic Coast Offshore Surficial Sediment Data Release. This report presents for viewing and downloading the more than 10,600 still seabed photographs that were acquired during the project. The digital images are provided in thumbnail, medium (1536 x 1024 pixels), and high (3071 x 2048) resolution. The images can be viewed by quadrangle on the U.S. Geological Survey Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's photograph database. Photograph metadata are embedded in each image in Exchangeable Image File Format and also provided in spreadsheet format. Published digital topographic maps and descriptive text for seabed features are included here for downloading and serve as context for the photographs. An interactive topographic map for each quadrangle shows locations of photograph stations, and each location is linked to the photograph database. This map also shows stations where seabed sediment was collected for texture analysis; the results of grain-size analysis and associated metadata are presented in spreadsheet format.

  11. Manganese mineralization in andesites of Brestovačka Banja, Serbia: evidence of sea-floor exhalations in the Timok Magmatic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pačevski, Aleksandar; Cvetković, Vladica; Šarić, Kristina; Banješević, Miodrag; Hoefer, Heidi Eva; Kremenović, Aleksandar

    2016-08-01

    Andesites near Brestovačka Banja belong to the Late Cretaceous Timok Magmatic Complex (TMC), which hosts the world-class Bor metallogenic zone including numerous porphyry-copper and epithermal deposits. Two main volcanic phases are recognized in the TMC. The newly discovered Mn mineralization reported here is associated with the second volcanic phase of Turonian-Campanian age. Manganese mineralization containing 58 % MnO on average, occurs as black veins, lumps and nests filling cracks and cavities within an autoclastic andesite, which was deposited in a subaqueous environment. This rock also contains minor Fe mineralization, which is contemporaneous with the manganese mineralization. Manganese mineralization predominantly consists of Mn-Ca silicates (macfallite, pumpellyite-Mn, orientite, bustamite) and Mn oxides (pyrolusite, manganite). Micrometer-scale mineral intergrowths and locally preserved botryoidal and colloform textures are characteristic features of this uncommon mineral assemblage. The features could indicate that the mineralization was formed by deposition from a primary colloidal assemblage and is of sub-marine hydrothermal origin. Orientite is the only Mn mineral with grain size reaching several tenths of micrometers and showing prismatic crystal habit. Scarce to rare associated minerals are hollandite, crednerite, an unknown REE mineral, powellite, pyrite, barite and galena, in decreasing abundance. Trace element analyses of the Mn mineralization show different element contents and REE patterns compared to those of the volcanic host-rock. Manganese mineralization shows relatively high contents of Cu - 1784 ppm, Mo - 20 ppm and As - 268 ppm. These elements are commonly enriched in the Cu deposits of the Bor zone and their relatively high contents in the studied Mn crusts indicate sea-floor hydrothermal vents as a source of the metals.

  12. SeaDataNet network services monitoring: Definition and Implementation of Service availability index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykiardopoulos, Angelos; Mpalopoulou, Stavroula; Vavilis, Panagiotis; Pantazi, Maria; Iona, Sissy

    2014-05-01

    SeaDataNet (SDN) is a standardized system for managing large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet network is constituted of national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. SeaDataNetII project's objective is to upgrade the present SeaDataNet infrastructure into an operationally robust and state-of-the-art infrastructure; therefore Network Monitoring is a step to this direction. The term Network Monitoring describes the use of system that constantly monitors a computer network for slow or failing components and that notifies the network administrator in case of outages. Network monitoring is crucial when implementing widely distributed systems over the Internet and in real-time systems as it detects malfunctions that may occur and notifies the system administrator who can immediately respond and correct the problem. In the framework of SeaDataNet II project a monitoring system was developed in order to monitor the SeaDataNet components. The core system is based on Nagios software. Some plug-ins were developed to support SeaDataNet modules. On the top of Nagios Engine a web portal was developed in order to give access to local administrators of SeaDataNet components, to view detailed logs of their own service(s). Currently the system monitors 35 SeaDataNet Download Managers, 9 SeaDataNet Services, 25 GeoSeas Download Managers and 23 UBSS Download Managers . Taking advantage of the continuous monitoring of SeaDataNet system components a total availability index will be implemented. The term availability can be defined as the ability of a functional unit to be in a state to perform a required function under given conditions at a given instant of time or over a given time interval, assuming that the required external resources are provided. Availability measures can be considered as a are very important benefit becauseT - The availability trends that can be

  13. Valuation of perspective application of lidar methods for sea monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, Igor V.; Goncharov, Vadim K.; Lyskov, Vladimir G.; Tsvetkov, Evgeny A.

    1997-02-01

    The materials of settlement valuations and experimental data about structures oil products discharging and depth its finding can be used for valuation of opportunity and conditions of application of air laser methods to detection and classification of oil pollution at operations of deposits of oil in shelf zone the theoretical estimations of opportunity realization of air LIDAR systems in view of oil distribution features in sea are adduced. It is shown that in processes of decomposition its' space structure changes, and the floating drops can be formed the optical contrast layers in waters near to the 'sea-atmosphere' interface. The estimations of optical systems permits to generalize about reality of development two-frequent LIDAR system, containing two channels, one of which measures the fluorescence of organic substances located in thicker water, and second- combinational scattering of light by molecules of water.

  14. Floors: Selection and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Bernard

    Flooring for institutional, commercial, and industrial use is described with regard to its selection, care, and maintenance. The following flooring and subflooring material categories are discussed--(1) resilient floor coverings, (2) carpeting, (3) masonry floors, (4) wood floors, and (5) "formed-in-place floors". The properties, problems,…

  15. Floors: Selection and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Bernard

    Flooring for institutional, commercial, and industrial use is described with regard to its selection, care, and maintenance. The following flooring and subflooring material categories are discussed--(1) resilient floor coverings, (2) carpeting, (3) masonry floors, (4) wood floors, and (5) "formed-in-place floors". The properties, problems,…

  16. Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta): A target species for monitoring litter ingested by marine organisms in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Matiddi, Marco; Hochsheid, Sandra; Camedda, Andrea; Baini, Matteo; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Serena, Fabrizio; Tomassetti, Paolo; Travaglini, Andrea; Marra, Stefano; Campani, Tommaso; Scholl, Francesco; Mancusi, Cecilia; Amato, Ezio; Briguglio, Paolo; Maffucci, Fulvio; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Bentivegna, Flegra; de Lucia, Giuseppe Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of or abandoned in the marine and coastal environment. Ingestion of marine litter can have lethal and sub-lethal effects on wildlife that accidentally ingests it, and sea turtles are particularly susceptible to this threat. The European Commission drafted the 2008/56/EC Marine Strategy Framework Directive with the aim to achieve a Good Environmental Status (GES), and the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta, Linnaeus 1758) was selected for monitoring the amount and composition of litter ingested by marine animals. An analogous decision has been made under the UNEP/MAP Barcelona Convention for the protection of the Mediterranean Sea, following the Ecosystem Approach. This work provides for the first time, two possible scenarios for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive GES, both related to "Trends in the amount and composition of litter ingested by marine animals" in the Mediterranean Sea. The study validates the use of the loggerhead turtle as target indicator for monitoring the impact of litter on marine biota and calls for immediate use of this protocol throughout the Mediterranean basin and European Region. Both GES scenarios are relevant worldwide, where sea turtles and marine litter are present, for measuring the impact of ingested plastics and developing policy strategies to reduce it. In the period between 2011 and 2014, 150 loggerhead sea turtles, found dead, were collected from the Italian Coast, West Mediterranean Sea Sub-Region. The presence of marine litter was investigated using a standardized protocol for necropsies and lab analysis. The collected items were subdivided into 4 main categories, namely, IND-Industrial plastic, USE-User plastic, RUB-Non plastic rubbish, POL-Pollutants and 14 sub-categories, to detect local diversity. Eighty-five percent of the individuals considered (n = 120) were found to have ingested an average of 1.3 ± 0.2 g of

  17. Sea state monitoring over Socotra Rock (Ieodo) by dual polarization SAR image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, J.; Yun, H.; yun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The application SAR in sea state monitoring have been conducted in the large number of fields such as the vessel tracing using the wake in SAR amplitude, the measurement of sea wave height and the oil spill detection. The true merit of SAR application in sea state monitoring is the full independence from the climate conditions. Hence, it is highly useful to secure safety of the anthropogenic activities in ocean and the understanding of the marine environment. Especially the dual and full polarization modes of new L band and X band SAR such as Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR)'s Fine Beam double Polarization (FDB) and Polarimetry mode (PLR) and terraSAR-X polarization mode provided innovative means to extract sea state information exploiting the different amplitude and phase angle responses by electromagnetic and sea wave interactions. Thus a sample projects for mining the maximum possible sea state information from the ALOS PLASAR FDB SAR/InSAR pairs compared with the in-suit observation of sea state is being conducted. Test site was established over Socotra Rock (Ieodo in Korean), which is located at the Western Sea of Korea. At first, it aimed the measurement of sea waves using ALOS PLASAR multi-polarization images and its doppler-shift analysis. Together with sea state monitoring, auxiliary data analyses to combine the sea state outputs with the other in-orbital sensing image and non image information to trace the influence of sea states in the marine environment are actively undergoing. For instance, MERIS chlorophyll-a products are under investigation to identify the correlation with sea state. However, an significant obstacles to apply SAR interpretation scheme for mining sea state is the temporal gap between SAR image acquisitions in spite of the improved revising time of contemporary in-orbital SAR sensors. To tackle this problem, we are also introducing the multi view angle optical sensor

  18. Monitoring the impact of litter in large vertebrates in the Mediterranean Sea within the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD): constraints, specificities and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Galgani, F; Claro, F; Depledge, M; Fossi, C

    2014-09-01

    In its decision (2010/477/EU) relating to the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD, 2008/56/EC), the European Commission identified the following points as focuses for monitoring: (i) 10.1.1: Trends in the amount, source and composition of litter washed ashore and/or deposited on coastlines, (ii) 10.1.2: Trends in the amount and composition of litter in the water column and accumulation on the sea floor, (iii) 10.1.3: Trends in the amount, distribution and composition of micro-particles (mainly microplastics), and (iv) 10.2.1: Trends in the amount and composition of litter ingested by marine animals. Monitoring the impacts of litter will be considered further in 2014. At that time, the strategy will be discussed in the context of the Mediterranean Sea, providing information on constraints, protocols, existing harm and research needed to support monitoring efforts. The definition of targets and acceptable levels of harm must take all factors into account, whether entanglement, ingestion, the transport and release of pollutants, the transport of alien species and socio-economic impacts. It must also reflect on the practical deployment of "ingestion" measures (10.2.1). The analysis of existing data will reveal the potential and suitability of some higher trophic level organisms (fish, turtles, birds and mammals) for monitoring the adverse effects of litter. Sea turtles appear to be useful indicator species, but the definition of an ecological quality objective is still needed, as well as research on alternative potential indicator species.

  19. Sea-Ice Thickness Monitoring from Sensor Equipped Inuit Sleds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodwell, Shane; Jones, Bryn; Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    A novel instrumentation package capable of measuring sea-ice thickness autonomously has been designed for long-term deployment upon the dog drawn sleds of the indigenous peoples of the Arctic. The device features a range of sensors that have been integrated with an electromagnetic induction device. These include a global positioning system, temperature sensor, tilt meter and accelerometer. Taken together, this system is able to provide accurate (+/-5cm) measurements of ice thickness with spatio-temporal resolution ranging from 1m to 5m every second. Autonomous data transmission capability is provided via GSM, inspired by the fact that many of the coastal communities in Greenland possess modern cell-phone infrastructure, enabling an inexpensive means of data-retrieval. Such data is essential in quantifying the sea-ice mass balance; given that existing satellite based systems are unable to measure ice-thickness directly. Field-campaign results from a prototype device, deployed in the North West of Greenland during three consecutive seasons, have demonstrated successful proof-of-concept when compared to data provided by ice mass balance (IMB) stations provided at fixed positions along the route of the sled. This project highlights not only the use of novel polar technology, but how opportunistic deployment using an existing roving platform (Inuit sledges) can provide economical, yet highly valuable, data for instrumentation development.

  20. Scalloped Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    13 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows erosional remnants of layered rock and large windblown ripples on the floor of a crater in the Tyrrhena Terra region of Mars. The layered rocks are most likely sedimentary.

    Location near: 15.5oS, 270.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  1. Much ado about SEA/SA monitoring: The performance of English Regional Spatial Strategies, and some German comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, Marie Glasson, John

    2008-11-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) seeks to better integrate environmental considerations into the preparation and decision-making process of plans and programmes with a view to promoting sustainable development. Further to application of the European Directive 2001/42/EC (SEA Directive) in 2004, the body of practical SEA experience, and parallel research, has increased steadily. Yet there is a crucial element of SEA which cannot build on much experience but whose importance will grow over time - namely that of SEA monitoring. The paper explores the application of SEA monitoring for English Regional Spatial Strategies (RSSs). It briefly introduces the role of SEA monitoring and its legal requirements, the English approach of integrating SEA into Sustainability Appraisal (SA) and the nature of the current English Regional Planning context. The main part presents the research findings and discusses how practitioners cope with the challenges of SEA/SA monitoring - with guiding questions: why, what, who, how, when, and with what outcomes? Reflecting that monitoring is just about to start, the paper draws on measures envisaged for monitoring in the SA reports prepared for RSS, and on expert interviews. It identifies monitoring trends and highlights workable approaches as well as shortcomings. For a critical reflection the findings are mirrored briefly with SEA monitoring approaches of German Regional Plans. Although it is still early days for such monitoring, the findings indicate that there is a danger that some of the specific requirements and objectives of SEA/SA monitoring are not fully met, mainly due to insufficient databases, inappropriate institutional conditions and limited personnel and financial resources. Some recommendations are offered in conclusion.

  2. 15 CFR 971.603 - At-sea monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... discharge. (c) The monitoring plan shall include determination of (1) the spatial and temporal characteristics of the mining ship discharges; (2) the spatial extent and severity of the benthic impact... sampling strategy that assures: that it is based on sound statistical methods, that equipment and methods...

  3. Remote sea-water quality monitoring by means of a lidar fluorosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S.

    1995-12-31

    The lidar fluorosensor, built at ENEA Frascati to remotely monitor the sea-water quality by collecting the water Raman backscattering and induced fluorescence from dispersed oils, suspended matter and chlorophyll, has been employed in a marine campaign in the lower Adriatic sea. Extensive calibration measurements have been undertaken by analyzing with the lidar, both in the laboratory and during the campaigns, sea water samples taken at several places along the Italian coasts. Absolute values of organic matter chlorophyll concentrations have been obtained by calibrating the lidar data with standard physical-chemical methods. This system has been recently upgraded for detecting the photoplankton photosynthetic activity, by means of the pump-and-probe technique, which has been assessed to monitor the process in microalgae during laboratory experiments.

  4. Monitoring of marine debris in the Sea of Japan using multi-spectral satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    The flow of marine debris in the ocean causes extensive damage to coastal environments. In addition to local rivers, a large proportion of the marine debris that washes up along the coastline of the Sea of Japan originates in neighboring countries. It is considered important to understand the flow of marine debris in the Sea of Japan for environmental research purposes and for international relations. This study describes the results of monitoring marine debris flows using multi-spectral satellite images. The small size of most marine debris means that it cannot be confirmed directly, even when using high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Thus, to extract candidate pixels containing possible marine debris, pixels with spectra that differ from those of the surrounding ocean and the wave crests were identified. As a first step towards monitoring marine debris, a method for identifying marine debris floating on the Sea of Japan has been proposed using two-dimensional scatter diagrams of satellite spectral bands.

  5. Monitoring glucocorticoid response to rehabilitation and research procedures in California and Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Petrauskas, Lisa; Atkinson, Shannon; Gulland, Frances; Mellish, Jo-Ann; Horning, Markus

    2008-03-01

    We used serum and fecal corticosteroid analysis to study the physiological response to a range of invasive and non-invasive procedures in sea lions. Four experimental groups of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus; Group A: restraint only [n=9], Group B: gas anesthesia without surgery [n=10], Group C: minimally invasive surgery [n=10], and Group D: invasive surgery [n=5]) were monitored for adrenal response. Feces were collected opportunistically from 72 hr before 72 hr post procedure for corticosterone analysis. All experimental groups showed substantial individual variation and no significant change in corticosterone levels after the procedures. Additional fecal and serum corticoid samples were collected from six free-ranging Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in temporary captivity undergoing abdominal implantation of long-term telemetry devices. Only one sea lion exhibited a significant fecal corticosterone increase in response to the surgery. Capture and restraint appear to elicit a greater glucocorticoid response than invasive or non-invasive procedures.

  6. CP monitoring of wellhead jacket in the North Sea and evaluation of polarization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Osvoll, H.; Bjornaas, F.; Duesso, F.; Tobiassen, P.

    1999-07-01

    The collection and storage of data from the CP monitoring of a North Sea Jacket. CP data was continuously measured during installation. The jacket is essentially uncoated, and very short polarization time was experienced. Computer modeling is used to predict CP conditions.

  7. US Navy Submarine Sea Trial of NASA developed Multi-Gas Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Manney, Joshua A.; Smith, Matthew J.; O'Connor, Sara Jane; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    During a successful 2 year technology demonstration of the tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) on the International Space Station (ISS), we began discussing with the US Navy the possibility of conducting a sea trial of an MGM on a submarine. The sea trial would also include a gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometer based Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is used operationally on ISS for volatile organic compound analysis. AQM preparation and results will be the subject of a separate paper. The Navy's interest in testing NASA equipment in general relates to their ongoing search for better air monitoring technology. NASA's goal is studying submarines as closed environment analogs to spacecraft. MGM's core technology was developed by Vista Photonics Inc. using Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants and expanded for various applications using NASA program funding. The MGM measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient air, displays concentrations with temperature and pressure, and stores 30 second moving averages. The sea trial involves collocating the instrument with the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System (CAMS Mk II) of the submarine, connecting it to rack power prior to departure, and letting it run during the entire 90 day patrol. All data is stored within MGM, with no connection to the vessel data bus. Crew intervention is limited to checking MGM periodically to see that it is working and power cycling if necessary. After the trial is over, the unit with its data will be retrieved. Post sea trial calibration check and data analysis are planned and results will be compared with both CAMS Mk II data and results from MGM's ISS technology demonstration. Since the sea trial itself has been delayed, this paper describes the preparation of MGM for the sea trial and also provides a summary of the latest data from the ISS MGM technology demonstration.

  8. Emerging technology monitors ice-sea interface at outlet glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Voytenko, Denis; Lembke, Chad; de la Peña, Santiago; Howat, Ian; Gourmelen, Noel; Werner, Charles; Oddsson, Björn

    2012-11-01

    Recent melting in Greenland and Antarctica has led to concerns about the long-term stability of these ice sheets and their potential contributions to future sea level rise. Marine-terminating outlet glaciers play a key role in the dynamics of these ice sheets; recent mass losses are likely related to increased influx of warmer water to the base of outlet glaciers, as evidenced by the fact that changes in ocean currents, calving front retreats, glacial thinning, mass redistribution based on satellite gravity data, and accelerating coastal uplift are roughly concurrent [e.g., Holland et al., 2008; Wouters et al., 2008; Jiang et al., 2010; Straneo et al., 2012; Bevis et al., 2012]. However, collecting quantitative measurements within the dynamic environment of marine outlet glaciers is challenging. Oceanographic measurements are limited in iceberg-laden fjords. Measuring ice flow speeds near the calving front is similarly challenging; satellite methods lack temporal resolution (satellite revisit times are several days or longer), while GPS gives limited spatial resolution, a problem for assessing changes near the highly variable calving front.

  9. Monitoring the sea surface with a short pulse radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A solution is presented for the scattering of short pulses from a stochastic, corrugated surface relative to the sea for the case of a narrow-beam transmitting antenna pointing near nadir. The spectrum of the received power and its time history are calculated and this solution is used to show that a measure of the variance of the surface ordinant can be obtained from the backscattered power. Included explicitly in the analysis is the finite nature of the source and the role of the small-scale wave structure (capillary wave range). It is shown that when sufficiently short pulses are transmitted, one can obtain a measure of the variance of the large scale surface ordinant from either the temporal spacing of the peaks in the returned power or from the envelope of the spectrum of the received power. Assuming an appropriate model for the statistics and spectrum of the surface ordinate, the variance can be used to compute the wind speed and the significant wave height of the surface.

  10. CALYPSO: a new HF RADAR network to monitor sea surface currents in the Malta-Sicily channel (Mediterranean sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosoli, S.; Ciraolo, G.; Drago, A.; Capodici, F.; Maltese, A.; Gauci, A.; Galea, A.; Azzopardi, J.; Buscaino, G.; Raffa, F.; Mazzola, S.; Sinatra, R.

    2016-12-01

    Located in one of the main shipping lanes in the Mediterranean Sea, and in a strategic region for oil extraction platforms, the Malta-Sicily channel is exposed to significant oil spill risks. Shipping and extraction activities constitute a major threat for marine areas of relevant ecological value in the area, and impacts of oil spills on the local ecosystems and the economic activities, including tourism and fisheries, can be dramatic. Damages would be even more devastating for the Maltese archipelago, where marine resources represent important economic assets. Additionally, North Africa coastal areas are also under threat, due to their proximity to the Malta-Sicily Channel. Prevention and mitigation measures, together with rapid-response and decision-making in case of emergency situations, are fundamental steps that help accomplishing the tasks of minimizing risks and reducing impacts to the various compartments. Thanks to state-of-art technology for the monitoring of sea-surface currents in real-time under all sea-state conditions, the CALYPSO network of High-Frequency Radars represents an essential and invaluable tool for the specific purpose. HF radars technology provide a unique tool to track surface currents in near-real time, and as such the dispersion of pollutants can be monitored and forecasted and their origin backtracked, for instance through data assimilation into ocean circulation models or through short-term data-driven statistical forecasts of ocean currents. The network is constituted of four SeaSonde systems that work in the 13.5MHz frequency band. The network is operative since August 2012 and has been extensively validated using a variety of independent platforms and devices, including current meter data and drifting buoys. The latter provided clear evidences of the reliability of the collected data as for tracking the drifting objects. Additionally, data have provided a new insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the region

  11. Preparation of the NASA Air Quality Monitor for a U.S. Navy Submarine Sea Trial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Wallace, William T.; Manney, Joshua A.; Smith, Matthew J.; O'Connor, Sara Jane; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    For the past 4 years, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) has been the operational instrument for measuring trace volatile organic compounds on the International Space Station (ISS). The key components of the AQM are the inlet preconcentrator, the gas chromatograph (GC), and the differential mobility spectrometer. Onboard the ISS are two AQMs with different GC columns that detect and quantify 22 compounds. The AQM data contributes valuable information to the assessment of air quality aboard ISS for each crew increment. The US Navy is looking to update its submarine air monitoring suite of instruments and the success of the AQM on ISS has led to a jointly planned submarine sea trial of a NASA AQM. In addition to the AQM, the Navy is also interested in the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), which measures major constituent gases (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ammonia). A separate paper will present the MGM sea trial preparation and the analysis of most recent ISS data. A prototype AQM, which is virtually identical to the operational AQM, has been readied for the sea trial. Only one AQM will be deployed during the sea trial, but this is sufficient for NASA purposes and to detect the compounds of interest to the US Navy for this trial. The data from the sea trial will be compared to data from archival samples collected before, during, and after the trial period. This paper will start with a brief history of past collaborations between NASA and the U.S. and U.K. navies for trials of air monitoring equipment. An overview of the AQM technology and protocols for the submarine trial will be presented. The majority of the presentation will focus on the AQM preparation and a summary of available data from the trial.

  12. US Navy Submarine Sea Trial of NASA developed Multi-Gas Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Manney, Joshua A.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    During a successful 2 year technology demonstration of the tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) on the International Space Station (ISS), we began discussing with the US Navy the possibility of conducting a sea trial of an MGM on a submarine. The sea trial would also include a gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometer based Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is used operationally on ISS for select volatile organic compounds. AQM results will be the subject of a separate paper. The Navy’s interest in testing NASA equipment is in a planned update to the environmental monitoring equipment used aboard submarines. NASA’s goal is studying submarines as closed environment analogs to spacecraft. MGM’s core technology was developed by Vista Photonics Inc using Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants and expanded for various applications using NASA program funding. The MGM measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient air, displays concentrations with temperature and pressure, and stores 30 second moving averages. The sea trial involves colocating the instrument with the Central Air Monitor (CAM) and connecting it to rack power prior to departure, and letting it run during the entire sea trial of a few months duration. All data stored is inside MGM, with no connection to the vessel data bus. Crew intervention is limited to checking MGM periodically to see that it is working and power cycling if the display is OFF. After the trial is over, the unit with its data will be retrieved. Post sea trial calibration check and data analysis are planned and results will be compared with both CAM data and results from MGM’s ISS technology demonstration.

  13. Aquarius: An Instrument to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S .E.; Colomb, R.; Yueh, S.; Pellerano, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument that is being developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, global water cycle, and climate. Aquarius is part of the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, which is a partnership between the U.S. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and Argentina (CONAE). The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large-scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 km and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis.

  14. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a “click”, almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale’s head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  15. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent.

  16. New Approach to Sea Level Monitoring Tested at Shemya, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, G. W.; Medbery, A. H.; Burgy, M. C.

    2003-12-01

    Due to the prohibitive installation cost to replace a storm damaged stilling well type tide gauge at Earickson Air Force Station on Shemya Island, Alaska, an alternative sea-level gauge was sought by the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC). An Omart-Vega radar system was chosen as the alternative, since it had low power needs, did not require a stilling well and its design included observation of rough surface liquids. The Omart-Vega radar system works by emitting a 5 gHz radar wave which reflects off the water surface and then back to the unit at a specified rate. This information is then telemetered directly to a computer which records the sample. Although the cost of the Vega system (3500USD) was similar to that of the stilling well unit (2500USD), the comparison of the installation costs of the two different units was an issue. To install the stilling well system, two certified under-water welding divers were required at a cost of 40K-USD or more. In comparison, the installation of the Vega system simply required an arm constructed so as to hang and support the Vega unit off the pier at Shemya. This arm assembly would also house the unit to protect it from surf and weather. The arm was designed in-house and built by a local metal contractor for less than 500USD. This portable unit was sent to Shemya via C-130 aircraft. The arm assembly and housed radar tide gauge was installed by one person. The circuitry to run the Vega was developed and tested at the WCATWC. Software was designed and tested there as well, although the software was written by Omart at no cost to the Warning Center. The circuitry allows for direct remote reconfiguration from Palmer to the radar system. The Vega is accessed by software directly from the WCATWC computer to sample the water level at numerous settable sample rates, which include one second, five second, fifteen second, and thirty second. After nearly one year of operation at Earickson, which included many major

  17. Multi-sensor monitoring of Ulva prolifera blooms in the Yellow Sea using different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing; Zhang, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yongcun

    2016-06-01

    The massive Ulva (U.) prolifera bloom in the Yellow Sea was first observed and reported in summer of 2008. After that, the green tide event occurred every year and influenced coastal areas of Jiangsu and Shandong provinces of China. Satellite remote sensing plays an important role in monitoring the floating macroalgae. In this paper, U. prolifera patches are detected from quasisynchronous satellite images with different spatial resolution, i.e., Aqua MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), HJ-1A/B (China Small Satellite Constellation for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Forecasting), CCD (Charge-Coupled Device), Landsat 8 OLI (Operational Land Imager), and ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite) ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) images. Two comparative experiments are performed to explore the U. prolifera monitoring abilities by different data using detection methods such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) with different thresholds. Results demonstrate that spatial resolution is an important factor affecting the extracted area of the floating macroalgae. Due to the complexity of Case II sea water characteristics in the Yellow Sea, a fixed threshold NDVI method is not suitable for U. prolifera monitoring. A method with adaptive ability in time and space, e.g., the threshold selection method proposed by Otsu (1979), is needed here to obtain accurate information on the floating macroalgae.

  18. Monitoring Subsurface Ice-Ocean Processes Using Underwater Acoustics in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Lee, W. S.; Yun, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Ross Sea is a dynamic area of ice-ocean interaction, where a large component of the Southern Ocean's sea ice formation occurs within regional polynyas in addition to the destructive processes happening at the seaward boundary of the Ross Ice Shelf. Recent studies show the sea-ice season has been lengthening and the sea ice extent has been growing with more persistent and larger regional polynyas. These trends have important implications for the Ross Sea ecosystem with polynyas supporting high rates of primary productivity in the area. Monitoring trends in sea ice and ice shelf dynamics in the Southern Ocean has relied heavily on satellite imagery and remote sensing methods despite a significant portion of these physical processes occurring beneath the ocean surface. In January 2014, an ocean bottom hydrophone (OBH) was moored on the seafloor in the polynya area of Terra Nova Bay in the northwest region of the Ross Sea, north of the Drygalski Ice Tongue. The OBH recorded a year long record of the underwater low frequency acoustic spectrum up to 500 Hz from January 29 until it was recovered the following December 17, 2014. The acoustic records reveal a complex annual history of ice generated signals with over 50,000 detected events. These ice generated events related to collisions and cracking provide important insight for the timing and intensity of the ice-ocean dynamics happening below the sea surface as the polynya grows and expands and the nearby Drygalski ice tongue flows into Terra Nova Bay. Additionally, high concentrations of baleen whale vocalizations in frequencies ranging from 200-400 Hz from September - December suggest a strong seasonal presence of whales in this ecologically important polynya region.

  19. Pelvic Floor Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is the pelvic floor? The term "pelvic floor" refers to the group ...

  20. Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks into Cyberinfrastructure for Monitoring Hawaiian ``Mountain-to-Sea'' Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Michael H.; Mundt, Carsten W.; Montgomery, Kevin N.; Asquith, Adam; Goodale, David W.; Kaneshiro, Kenneth Y.

    2008-10-01

    Monitoring the complex environmental relationships and feedbacks of ecosystems on catchment (or mountain)-to-sea scales is essential for social systems to effectively deal with the escalating impacts of expanding human populations globally on watersheds. However, synthesis of emerging technologies into a robust observing platform for the monitoring of coupled human-natural environments on extended spatial scales has been slow to develop. For this purpose, the authors produced a new cyberinfrastructure for environmental monitoring which successfully merged the use of wireless sensor technologies, grid computing with three-dimensional (3D) geospatial data visualization/exploration, and a secured internet portal user interface, into a working prototype for monitoring mountain-to-sea environments in the high Hawaiian Islands. A use-case example is described in which native Hawaiian residents of Waipa Valley (Kauai) utilized the technology to monitor the effects of regional weather variation on surface water quality/quantity response, to better understand their local hydrologic cycle, monitor agricultural water use, and mitigate the effects of lowland flooding.

  1. Integration of wireless sensor networks into cyberinfrastructure for monitoring Hawaiian "mountain-to-sea" environments.

    PubMed

    Kido, Michael H; Mundt, Carsten W; Montgomery, Kevin N; Asquith, Adam; Goodale, David W; Kaneshiro, Kenneth Y

    2008-10-01

    Monitoring the complex environmental relationships and feedbacks of ecosystems on catchment (or mountain)-to-sea scales is essential for social systems to effectively deal with the escalating impacts of expanding human populations globally on watersheds. However, synthesis of emerging technologies into a robust observing platform for the monitoring of coupled human-natural environments on extended spatial scales has been slow to develop. For this purpose, the authors produced a new cyberinfrastructure for environmental monitoring which successfully merged the use of wireless sensor technologies, grid computing with three-dimensional (3D) geospatial data visualization/exploration, and a secured internet portal user interface, into a working prototype for monitoring mountain-to-sea environments in the high Hawaiian Islands. A use-case example is described in which native Hawaiian residents of Waipa Valley (Kauai) utilized the technology to monitor the effects of regional weather variation on surface water quality/quantity response, to better understand their local hydrologic cycle, monitor agricultural water use, and mitigate the effects of lowland flooding.

  2. State of the Salton Sea—A science and monitoring meeting of scientists for the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnum, Douglas A.; Bradley, Timothy; Cohen, Michael; Wilcox, Bruce; Yanega, Gregor

    2017-01-19

    IntroductionThe Salton Sea (Sea) is an ecosystem facing large systemic changes in the near future. Managers and stakeholders are seeking solutions to the decline of the Sea and have turned to the scientific community for answers. In response, scientists gathered in Irvine, California, to review existing science and propose scientific studies and monitoring needs required for understanding how to retain the Sea as a functional ecosystem. This document summarizes the proceedings of this gathering of approximately 50 scientists at a September 8–10, 2014, workshop on the State of the Salton Sea.

  3. Aeromagnetic anomalies and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta: Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor spreading directions in the meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.O.; Gipson, M. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    An aeromagnetic contour map compiled over shallow water and onshore portions of the Nigerian continental margin, shows several elongate, long-wavelength anomaly closures with some alternating polarity, separated by steep gradient, NE lineations. The lineations are interpreted as new fracture zones or extensions of previously mapped ones. The NE trend in the western delta region is concordant with the fracture zone trends of the deeper Gulf of Guinea. Aeromagnetic lineations of the SE Niger Delta Basin however, discordantly trend ENE. Their termination against the former, is interpreted as evidence of early sea-floor spreading in a ENE-WSW direction in addition to the well documented NE-SW spreading of the Gulf of Guinea and the rest of the meso-Atlantic sea-floor; The geophysical crustal structure indicate the existence of two Early Cretaceous triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin. The two triple-junctions further support the hypothesis that the African continent was a multi-plate system (in the Niger Delta region) during the early opening of the Atlantic.

  4. Postrelease monitoring of radio-instrumented sea otters in Prince William Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monnett, C.; Rotterman, L.M.; Stack, C.; Monson, Daniel H.; Bayha, Keith; Kormendy, Jennifer

    1990-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) that were captured in western Prince William Sound (PWS) or the Gulf of Alaska, treated, and held in captivity at the temporary rehabilitation centers established in response to the T/V Exxon Valdez oil spill were instrumented with radio transmitters, released into eastern PWS, and monitored by radiotelemetry. We undertook the present study to gain information for guiding the release of the remaining captive otters and evaluating the efficacy of sea otter rehabilitation after exposure to crude oil. Radio transmitters were attached to the flippers of seven sea otters released in May 1989 and monitored for periods of a few hours to more than 60 days. However, little was learned about the fate of these animals because the radio transmitters used proved unreliable. Forty-five additional sea otters from the rehabilitation centers were implanted with radio transmitters, released into northeastern PWS and monitored for 8 months. During the first 20 days after the first release of these implanted otters (n = 21), they were more mobile than wild-caught and released sea otters studied in PWS, from 1984 through 1990. All were alive and vigorous at the end of the 20-day period. Tracking of all 45 implanted sea otters during the 8-month period showed that the otters remained highly mobile. Many (46.6%) crossed into western PWS. However, by the end of the 8 months, 12 of the instrumented otters were dead and 9 were missing. One radio failed. These mortality and missing rates are much higher than those normally observed for adult sea otters in PWS. The death rate was highest in winter. These data suggest that, despite the tremendous amount of money and energy directed toward the treatment and care of these animals, the sea otters released from the centers were not completely rehabilitated, that is, not returned to a normal state. We recommend that future policies focus on preventing otters from becoming oiled, rather than attempting to treat them

  5. Using raptors as environmental sentinels: monitoring the white-tailed sea eagle Haliaeetus albicilla in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Helander, Björn; Bignert, Anders; Asplund, Lillemor

    2008-09-01

    This paper summarizes results from the monitoring of reproduction of white-tailed sea eagle in Sweden 1965-2006. Since 1989 the eagle population on the Swedish Baltic coast has been included in the National Environment Monitoring Program as an indicator species for potentially harmful chemicals. The percentage of successfully reproducing pairs and nestling brood size decreased in synchrony with rising concentrations of contaminants in the 1950s on into the 1970s. Mean productivity was 1.3 young per pair prior to 1950 and decreased to 0.3 in 1965-1985. Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE) in eagle eggs decreased from a range of annual means in 1965-1974 of 600-1200 microg g(-1) (lipid weight) to 60-140 microg g(-1) in 1996-2005. Total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations averaged above 1000 microg g(-1) into the early 1980s and remained in the range of 250-500 microg g(-1) in 1996-2005. Productivity began to improve when concentrations of DDE and PCBs dropped below approximately 300 and 800 microg g(-1), respectively. Brood size remains below the pre-1950 level in one coastal region, indicating a possible impact from other contaminants. The power to detect significant trends under the program is presented and discussed: if white-tailed sea eagle reproduction had been monitored earlier during the 20th century, the negative impact of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, source of DDE) would have been signaled as early as the 1950s in the Baltic Sea. The dramatic fall of white-tailed sea eagle reproduction under the influence of DDT and PCBs, and the subsequent rise following their ban, illustrates the usefulness of raptors like sea eagles as sentinels for environmental pollutants.

  6. Acoustic monitoring in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, using hydrophone of the Ocean Bottom Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sukyoung; Lee, Won Sang; Kuk Hong, Jong; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Park, Yongcheol; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita; Geissler, Wolfram H.

    2016-04-01

    Although a number of active source seismic experiments have been conducted over the last few decades to investigate the crustal structure in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, long-term observation to monitor underwater tectonic activities and changes in the cryospheric environment still remains challenging due to existence of sea ice in the study region. Korea Polar Research Institute has accomplished successful deployment of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in the Ross Sea collaborating with Alfred Wegener Institute during the period of 2011-2012 and 2014 by Korean icebreaker RV Araon. The OBS system manufactured by K.U.M. contains a hydrophone sensor that allow us to monitor underwater acoustics generated by tectonic and ice-related events. We present spectrograms of the continuous hydroacoustic data and various types of signals, e.g. seismic T-waves, iceequakes, and tremors. There are periodic and harmonic tremors that might be related with tidal modulation, and the seasonal variation of the background noise seems to be related with sea ice concentration.

  7. Monitoring and long-term assessment of the Mediterranean Sea physical state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoncelli, Simona; Fratianni, Claudia; Clementi, Emanuela; Drudi, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Jenny; Grandi, Alessandro; Del Rosso, Damiano

    2017-04-01

    The near real time monitoring and long-term assessment of the physical state of the ocean are crucial for the wide CMEMS user community providing a continuous and up to date overview of key indicators computed from operational analysis and reanalysis datasets. This constitutes an operational warning system on particular events, stimulating the research towards a deeper understanding of them and consequently increasing CMEMS products uptake. Ocean Monitoring Indicators (OMIs) of some Essential Ocean Variables have been identified and developed by the Mediterranean Monitoring and Forecasting Centre (MED-MFC) under the umbrella of the CMEMS MYP WG (Multi Year Products Working Group). These OMIs have been operationally implemented starting from the physical reanalysis products and then they have been applied to the operational analyses product. Sea surface temperature, salinity, height as well as heat, water and momentum fluxes at the air-sea interface have been operationally implemented since the reanalysis system development as a real time monitoring of the data production. Their consistency analysis against available observational products or budget values recognized in literature guarantees the high quality of the numerical dataset. The results of the reanalysis validation procedures are yearly published in the QUality Information Document since 2014 available through the CMEMS catalogue (http://marine.copernicus.eu), together with the yearly dataset extension. New OMIs of the winter mixed layer depth, the eddy kinetic energy and the heat content will be presented, in particular we will analyze their time evolution and trends starting from 1987, then we will focus on the recent time period 2013-2016 when reanalysis and analyses datasets overlap to show their consistency beside their different system implementation (i.e. atmospheric forcing, wave coupling, nesting). At the end the focus will be on 2016 sea state and circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its

  8. Practical application of a sea-water battery in deep-sea basin and its performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Masanao; Araki, Eiichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    Stable power supply is essential for various long-term sea floor geophysical observations. Due to a simple structure and a large energy capacity, sea-water batteries have been developed and used for such observations. However, the characteristics of sea-water batteries have not been well known in the case of installations at depths more than 5000 m in deep-sea basin. In 2000, a sea floor borehole broadband seismic observatory was installed in the northwestern Pacific basin where the water depth is 5577 m. For electric power supply, a Sea-Water Battery (SWB) system with monitoring and control was developed and used. The SWB system consists of four sea-water battery cells, a DC/DC converter, the Power Control System, the Data Logger, and an accumulator. The conditions of the SWB system were recorded more than 1 year, and the monitoring data was recovered. The SWB system generated enough power for the observation system consuming power of 6 W in average and continued to supply power for at least 5 years. From the monitoring data, the SWB can supply up to the long-term average of at least 13 W. The energy density is estimated to be 318 Wh kg -1. The sea-water battery is useful for application of long-term power consumption even in the deep-sea basin.

  9. Norwegian monitoring programme on the inorganic and organic contaminants in fish caught in the Barents Sea, Norwegian Sea and North Sea, 1994-2001.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, K; Lundebye, A-K; Heggstad, K; Berntssen, M H G; Boe, B

    2004-04-01

    The results from part of a monitoring programme of contaminant levels in fish and other seafood products initiated by the Directorate of Fisheries in Norway in 1994 are presented. Concentrations of 22 elements (four are presented here: As, Cd, Hg and Pb) and HCB, HCH, PCB 28, 52, 101, 105, 118, 138, 153, 156, 180, pp-DDD, p-DDE, p-DDT, sum DDT and (137)Cs were determined in 17 species of fish caught in three sampling locations: the Barents Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the North Sea. The fish species analysed in the survey were limited to species of commercial importance for Norway with catching volumes of at least 10,000 metric tons year(-1). The survey started in 1994 and is expected to continue beyond 2010. The analyses were carried out on 25 individual fish from each species and each sampling location, and the locations were representative of commercial fishing grounds for the species in question. The concentrations of contaminants found were considerably lower than the maximum levels permissible in fish set by CODEX and the European Union for contaminants in seafood products.

  10. The support of multidimensional approaches in integrate monitoring for SEA: a case of study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, C. M.; Selicato, M.

    2012-10-01

    During centuries, seaside has represented a crucial pole for future human development and civilization. The use of the sea for transport and trade and the overwhelming availability of food derived from coastal waters have encouraged and strengthened the growth of urban settlements. In the same time, the human pressure menaces to destroy coastal habitats, and consequently their carrying capacity that permits to guest many essential functions. Low-impact activities are often replaced on the surface by new intensive others that are attractive in the short term, but that in the long term undermine of reducing the resilience of the coast. It is clear that, in a perspective of sustainable development, economically efficient and socially equitable use of coastal areas need to be supported inside strategies to correct these weaknesses. The definition of such strategies and their implementation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is an essential tool of decision support and of monitoring. The issues of monitoring, more in particular, have been subject of study and modeling by the use of Dynamic Spatial Data Analisys (DSDA), in the case of the SEA of the Coastal Plan of the Italian Apulia Region, as an information instrument for regulating the anthropogenic changes; a possibility to implement the analysis of environmental sensitivity and propensity to Coastal erosion has been explored, in order to control the level of human pressure on land. The monitoring system should provide an automatic "alert" when the dimension and the velocity of change of land use overpass some threshold of environmental pressure.

  11. Ocean floor boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, H D

    1979-04-13

    The base of the continental slope, combined with the concepts of a boudary zone, a technical advisory boundary commission, and special treatment for restricted seas, offers a readily attainable, natural, practicable, and equitable boundary between national and international jurisdiction over the ocean floor. There is no point in bringing into the boundary formula the unnecessary added complication of thickness of sediments, as recently proposed. Review of the U.S. offshore brings out the critical importance with respect to energy resources of proper choice of boundary principles and proper determination of the base-of-continent line about our shores. The advice of the pertinent science and technology community should urgently be sought and contributed to decisions on offshore boundaries.

  12. Monitoring population status of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska: options and considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esslinger, George; Esler, Daniel N.; Howlin, S.; Starcevich, L.A.

    2015-06-25

    After many decades of absence from southeast Alaska, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are recolonizing parts of their former range, including Glacier Bay, Alaska. Sea otters are well known for structuring nearshore ecosystems and causing community-level changes such as increases in kelp abundance and changes in the size and number of other consumers. Monitoring population status of sea otters in Glacier Bay will help park researchers and managers understand and interpret sea otter-induced ecosystem changes relative to other sources of variation, including potential human-induced impacts such as ocean acidification, vessel disturbance, and oil spills. This report was prepared for the National Park Service (NPS), Southeast Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network following a request for evaluation of options for monitoring sea otter population status in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. To meet this request, we provide a detailed consideration of the primary method of assessment of abundance and distribution, aerial surveys, including analyses of power to detect interannual trends and designs to reduce variation around annual abundance estimates. We also describe two alternate techniques for evaluating sea otter population status—(1) quantifying sea otter diets and energy intake rates, and (2) detecting change in ages at death. In addition, we provide a brief section on directed research to identify studies that would further our understanding of sea otter population dynamics and effects on the Glacier Bay ecosystem, and provide context for interpreting results of monitoring activities.

  13. NRL’s Deep Sea Floor Search ERA: A Brief History of the NRL/MIZAR Search System and Its Major Achievements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-29

    Edgerton, H. E., SPIE Journal 2, 3 (1963). 10. Patterson, R. B. and Brundage. W. L.. Trans.Ocean Sci. Figure 13. Comparison of Processing Techniques and Engr...PSA journal . Sept.. 48 (1963). satisfactory results, but there is always room for improve- S. s Cruickshank.M. J., Trans.Ocean Sci. and Engr. Conf... csea - floor transooncer that serves a bench mar, 37 or "bench mark." for local navigation in the area. mure sophisticated signal-processing techniques

  14. Realtime Monitoring of the Extreme Oceanic Conditions in the Kangjin Bay, South Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Y.; Jung, K.

    2006-05-01

    Realtime(RT) monitoring system for the oceanic state variables was developed and has been operating since April, 2004 in the Kangjin Bay, South Sea, Korea shown. The RT production of data stream and display on the Internet web page are made possible in continuous functions of various system elements. Detailed technical information for the RT monitoring system can be referred to Ro et al. (2004). The water quality parameters, current and meteorological conditions are continuously monitored with very high sampling resolution (10 min.) throughout the year and are being published on the Internet web pages (http://oceaninfo.co.kr/kangjin). The research project encompass several important subjects focusing on the extreme oceanic conditions such as very cold water mass formation during the wintertime cold outbreak, highly diluted sea water during the dam water discharge in the summertime monsoon and the subsequent formation of the hypoxia in the shallow Kangjin Bay. These are the typical extreme events captured possibly by the RT monitoring system, without which could never have been observed and understood. These extreme conditions would exert dramatic ecological impact to the local aqua-culture ecology. This study would elucidate the series of physico-chemical processes and its implication of the local eco-system. To understand the complicated processes, various research tools have been employed such as numerical modeling of tidal circulation, density-driven current, water-quality and formation of hypoxia, time series analyses of various water quality properties including multi-variate correlation.

  15. Chemical monitoring in the Dutch Wadden Sea by means of benthic invertebrates and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essink, Karel

    1989-09-01

    In monitoring, it is of utmost importance to carefully define the purpose, the sampling strategy, as well as the analytical chemical and statistical requirements. Surveys are appropriate for describing the geographical variation in environmental contaminant levels. Repeated surveys and recurrentdata collection at permanent locations provide means of detecting temporal trends. Results are presented here of surveys on pollution by trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in the Ems Estuary and Dutch Wadden Sea using Mytilus edulis, Mya arenaria, Arenicoia marina, Nereis diversicolor and Crangon crangon as test organisms. Trends towards decreasing pollution by mercury are illustrated by monitoring data on Mytilus edulis and Zoarces viviparus. It is stressed that the results of chemical monitoring in organisms may be interpreted only in termser the biological effects on the basis of relevant toxicological knowledge and/or additional bio-assays.

  16. Implementation of CGPS at Estartit, Ibiza and Barcelona harbours for sea level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, J. J.; Ortiz Castellon, M.; Martinez-Garcia, M.; Perez, B.; Bosch, E.; Termens, A.; Martinez de Oses, X.

    2009-12-01

    The determination of global and regional mean sea level variations with accura-cies better than 1 mm/yr is a critical problem, the resolution of which is central to the current debate on climate change and its impact on the environment. Highly accurate time series from both satellite altimetry and tide gauges are needed. Measuring the sea surface height with in-situ tide gauges and GPS receivers pro-vides an efficient way to control the long term stability of the radar altimeters and other applications as the vertical land motion and studies of sea level change. L’Estartit tide gauge is a classical floating tide gauge set up in l’Estartit harbour (NE Spain) in 1990. Data are taken in graphics registers from which each two hours the mean value is recorded in an electronic support and delivered to the Permanent Service for Mean Sea level (PSMSL). Periodic surveying campaigns along the year are carried out for monitoring possible vertical movement of the geodetic benchmark adjacent to the tide gauge. Puertos del Estado (Spanish Harbours) installed the tide gauge station at Ibiza har-bour in January 2003 and a near GPS reference station. The station belongs to the REDMAR network, composed at this moment by 21 stations distributed along the whole Spanish waters, including also the Canary islands (http://www.puertos.es). The tide gauge also belongs to the ESEAS (European Sea Level) network. A description of the actual infrastructure at Ibiza, Barcelona and l’Estartit har-bours is presented.The main objective is the implementation of these harbours as a precise geodetic areas for sea level monitoring and altimeter calibration. Actually is a CGPS with a radar tide gauge from Puertos del Estado and a GPS belonging to Puerto de Barcelona. A precise levelling has been made by the Cartographic Insti-tute of Catalonia, ICC. The instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 3000C device and a

  17. Improving environmental and biodiversity monitoring in the Baltic Sea using DNA barcoding of Chironomidae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Brodin, Y; Ejdung, G; Strandberg, J; Lyrholm, T

    2013-11-01

    As for many other regions, environmental and biodiversity monitoring of the brackish Baltic Sea suffers from low species resolution for several taxa. One such case is the benthic larvae of midges Chironomidae (Diptera), which are estimated to constitute about 30% of the macrozoobenthos species of the Baltic Sea and are important indicators of environmental quality. We assessed the usefulness of COI (cytochrome oxidase I) gene barcoding to improve species resolution and its potential for implementation in monitoring programmes. Neighbour-Joining, Maximum parsimony and Bayesian-inference analyses all provided high congruency with morphological analyses of adult males for almost all 42 species studied. Barcoding was helpful to elucidate some cases of taxonomical difficulties, such as synonyms. In contrast to the high identification accuracy when using our local database, there were a number of cases where matching with GenBank and BOLD provided puzzling results. For reliable species identification at least 15-30 specimens from 5-10 well-distributed sites within the geographical range of the species might be needed in a database to adequately cover the intraspecific variability of chironomids. Implementation of DNA barcoding, as applied here, in monitoring would result in an increase from at present less than 10% to more than 90% successful chironomid species identification of Baltic Sea benthic samples, as it also would for many nearby lakes. Routine monitoring of benthic environmental samples based on Next-Generation sequencing techniques would provide a cost effective way to obtain a taxonomically much more complete assessment of environmental quality and biodiversity, as required by EU directives and national legislation.

  18. Microbial metagenomics in the Baltic Sea: Recent advancements and prospects for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ininbergs, Karolina; Bergman, Birgitta; Larsson, John; Ekman, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomics refers to the analysis of DNA from a whole community. Metagenomic sequencing of environmental DNA has greatly improved our knowledge of the identity and function of microorganisms in aquatic, terrestrial, and human biomes. Although open oceans have been the primary focus of studies on aquatic microbes, coastal and brackish ecosystems are now being surveyed. Here, we review so far published studies on microbes in the Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish water bodies, using high throughput sequencing of environmental DNA and RNA. Collectively the data illustrate that Baltic Sea microbes are unique and highly diverse, and well adapted to this brackish-water ecosystem, findings that represent a novel base-line knowledge necessary for monitoring purposes and a sustainable management. More specifically, the data relate to environmental drivers for microbial community composition and function, assessments of the microbial biodiversity, adaptations and role of microbes in the nitrogen cycle, and microbial genome assembly from metagenomic sequences. With these discoveries as background, prospects of using metagenomics for Baltic Sea environmental monitoring are discussed.

  19. The Baltic Sea - from environmental monitoring data to paleoenvironmental reconstructions in a marine/brackish system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arz, Helge W.; Dellwig, Olaf; Häusler, Katharina; Kaiser, Jérôme; Leipe, Thomas; Moros, Matthias; Pollehne, Falk

    2017-04-01

    Instrumental observations in the Baltic Sea are reaching back into the 19th century, but a comprehensive ecosystem monitoring by means of coastal stations, research vessels, moorings, permanent stations, and satellites was developed stepwise after WWII and significantly intensified after founding of the HELCOM (Helsinki Commission) in 1975 for protecting the Baltic marine environment against anthropogenic influences. Such influences are well recorded in surface sediments of the different Baltic Sea sub-basins, where i.a. heavy metal and organic pollutants accumulated in the course of the last century with characteristic rates. However, despite of the vast amount of instrumental data, calibration of paleoenvironmental proxies is often complicated due to weakly constraint chronologies of these young sediments. In many cases sedimentation is not continuous and sediments are subject to erosion, re-suspension, lateral transport, and focusing due to intense wind driven waves and current activity. Therefore, a direct link of sedimentary proxies with instrumental water column observations is not always straightforward and generally not well established. Recently developed event stratigraphic and radionuclide based chronologies in some restricted Baltic Sea areas like the central Baltic deeps form now a solid base for the in depth proxy development and validation with instrumental time series. Promising results come from e.g. the solid-phase Mn and trace element signatures and organic biomarkers in recent/sub-recent sediments from the central Baltic Sea enhancing the potential of reconstructing the Littorina-Stage environmental development.

  20. Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainsford, A.; Soave, K.; Costolo, R.; Kudler, J.; Emunah, M.; Hatfield, J.; Kiyasu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Alina Rainsford, Kathy Soave, Julia Kudler, Jane Hatfield, Melea Emunah, Rose Costelo, Jenna Kiyasu, Amy Dean and Sustainable Seas Monitoring Project, Branson School, Ross, CA, United States, Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association, San Francisco, CA, United StatesAbstract:The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima, Cladophora sp. and Fucus sp.. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high

  1. A global standard for monitoring coastal wetland vulnerability to accelerated sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Edward L.; Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Phelps, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise threatens coastal salt-marshes and mangrove forests around the world, and a key determinant of coastal wetland vulnerability is whether its surface elevation can keep pace with rising sea level. Globally, a large data gap exists because wetland surface and shallow subsurface processes remain unaccounted for by traditional vulnerability assessments using tide gauges. Moreover, those processes vary substantially across wetlands, so modelling platforms require relevant local data. The low-cost, simple, high-precision rod surface-elevation table–marker horizon (RSET-MH) method fills this critical data gap, can be paired with spatial data sets and modelling and is financially and technically accessible to every country with coastal wetlands. Yet, RSET deployment has been limited to a few regions and purposes. A coordinated expansion of monitoring efforts, including development of regional networks that could support data sharing and collaboration, is crucial to adequately inform coastal climate change adaptation policy at several scales.

  2. A global standard for monitoring coastal wetland vulnerability to accelerated sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Edward L.; Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Phelps, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Sea-level rise threatens coastal salt-marshes and mangrove forests around the world, and a key determinant of coastal wetland vulnerability is whether its surface elevation can keep pace with rising sea level. Globally, a large data gap exists because wetland surface and shallow subsurface processes remain unaccounted for by traditional vulnerability assessments using tide gauges. Moreover, those processes vary substantially across wetlands, so modelling platforms require relevant local data. The low-cost, simple, high-precision rod surface-elevation table-marker horizon (RSET-MH) method fills this critical data gap, can be paired with spatial data sets and modelling and is financially and technically accessible to every country with coastal wetlands. Yet, RSET deployment has been limited to a few regions and purposes. A coordinated expansion of monitoring efforts, including development of regional networks that could support data sharing and collaboration, is crucial to adequately inform coastal climate change adaptation policy at several scales.

  3. Monitoring and change detection of Wadden Sea areas using Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Soergel, U.

    2013-10-01

    In coastal areas morphological changes of various kinds are caused by tidal flows, storms, climate change, and human activities. For these reasons a recurrent monitoring becomes necessary in order to detect undesired changes at early stages enabling rapid countermeasures to mitigate or minimize potential harm or hazard. The morphology of the terrain can be represented by highly precise digital terrain models (DTM). Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) has become a standard method for DTM generation in coastal zones like Wadden Sea areas. In comparison to echo sounding systems, lidar is feasible for data acquisition of large areas. However, only the eulittoral zone can be covered by standard laser because the near-infrared laser pulses are not able to penetrate water which remains, for example, in some tidal channels even during low tide. In the framework of a German research project, we analyse the spatial and temporal variability of Wadden Sea areas in the North Sea. For a systematic monitoring and the detection of morphological changes we compare terrain models of two different epochs in order to determine height differences which can be caused by natural influences or human activities. We focus especially on the analysis of morphological changes near to tidal channels. In order to detect changes we compare the location of edges derived from each DTM based on the gray values' gradients. Our results for a test site in the German Wadden Sea show height differences up to 1 m due to the shifting of tidal channels and relocations of the channels up to 55 m within a period of two years.

  4. Rhodotorula benthica sp. nov. and Rhodotorula calyptogenae sp. nov., novel yeast species from animals collected from the deep-sea floor, and Rhodotorula lysiniphila sp. nov., which is related phylogenetically.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Takahiko; Hamamoto, Makiko; Nakase, Takashi; Horikoshi, Koki

    2003-05-01

    Three novel species of the genus Rhodotorula are described. Rhodotorula benthica sp. nov. (type strain JCM 10901(T) = SY-91(T)) and Rhodotorula calyptogenae sp. nov. (type strain JCM 10899(T) = SY-86(T)) were respectively isolated from the tubeworm Lamellibrachia sp. and the giant white clam Calyptogena sp., collected from the deep-sea floor of the Pacific Ocean off Japan. Rhodotorula lysiniphila sp. nov. (type strain JCM 5951(T)) is proposed for strains isolated previously in Japan and Pakistan. The three species were placed phylogenetically into a species complex comprising Rhodotorula laryngis, Rhodotorula minuta, Rhodotorula pallida and Rhodotorula slooffiae. R. minuta and R. slooffiae are closely related in both the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer and 5.8S rDNA regions. R. benthica and R. laryngis were closer to R. pallida based on the D1/D2 region. Other relationships were not clear.

  5. US Navy Submarine Sea Trial of the NASA Air Quality Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Wallace, William T.; Manney, Joshua A.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    For the past four years, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) has been the operational instrument for measuring trace volatile organic compounds on the International Space Station (ISS). The key components of the AQM are the inlet preconcentrator, the gas chromatograph (GC), and the differential mobility spectrometer. Most importantly, the AQM operates at atmospheric pressure and uses air as the GC carrier gas, which translates into a small reliable instrument. Onboard ISS there are two AQMs, with different GC columns that detect and quantify 22 compounds. The AQM data contributes valuable information to the assessment of air quality aboard ISS for each crew increment. The U.S. Navy is looking to update its submarine air monitoring suite of instruments, and the success of the AQM on ISS has led to a jointly planned submarine sea trial of a NASA AQM. In addition to the AQM, the Navy is also interested in the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), which was successfully flown on ISS as a technology demonstration to measure major constituent gases (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ammonia). A separate paper will present the MGM sea trial results. A prototype AQM, which is virtually identical to the operational AQM, has been readied for the sea trial. Only one AQM will be deployed during the sea trial, but it is sufficient to detect the compounds of interest to the Navy for the purposes of this trial. A significant benefit of the AQM is that runs can be scripted for pre-determined intervals and no crew intervention is required. The data from the sea trial will be compared to archival samples collected prior to and during the trial period. This paper will give a brief overview of the AQM technology and protocols for the submarine trial. After a quick review of the AQM preparation, the main focus of the paper will be on the results of the submarine trial. Of particular interest will be the comparison of the contaminants found in the ISS and submarine atmospheres, as both represent

  6. Monitoring Sea Water Turbidity by means of the Robust Satellite Technique (RST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, T.; Di Polito, C.; Ciancia, E.; Coviello, I.; Faruolo, M.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.; Satriano, V.; Tramutoli, V.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring Suspended Solid Material (SSM) concentration in coastal areas is important because of its impact on water quality, especially in terms of phytoplankton and benthic algae productivity that decrease as a consequence of the reduction in the photic depth associated to increases of SSM concentrations. Remote sensing techniques have already demonstrated their potential in supporting, at least, traditional in situ methodologies for SSM measurements. Data acquired in the Visible - Near Infrared spectral region (VNIR) of the electromagnetic spectrum have been generally used for this application, exploiting the spectral behaviour of clear/turbid water. One still open challenge is the low sensitivity of these methodologies in shallow waters where discriminating the SSM contribution from the sea bottom one is not trivial. Another problem of EO-based techniques is that, being often calibrated at local scale, their exportability at global scale is generally difficult. In this paper, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) has been applied for monitoring SSM concentration variations in different Mediterranean coastal areas by using VNIR MODIS data. Thanks to the natural RST independence on the investigated signal as well as on the analyzed area, such a technique can be more easily exported at a global scale than other traditional EO methods. In addition, being a differential approach, RST automatically allows us to discriminate just the contribution of reflectance due to the sea bottom, previously characterized through the multi-temporal analysis, providing a reliable detection of SSM variation. In this paper, some RST-based SSM products developed in the framework of the projects IOSMOS (IOnian Sea water quality MOnitoring by Satellite data, OP ERDF Basilicata), MOMEDAS (MOnitoraggio delle acque del mar MEditerraneo mediante DAti Satellitari, OP Basilicata SRF) and RITMARE (La Ricerca Italiana per il Mare, CNR-MIUR), will be described.

  7. The support of multidimensional approaches in integrate monitoring for SEA: a case of study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, C. M.; Selicato, M.

    2013-01-01

    During the centuries, the seaside has represented a crucial pole for future human development and civilization. The use of the sea for transport and trade and the overwhelming availability of food derived from coastal waters have encouraged and strengthened the growth of urban settlements. In the same time, the human pressure menaces to destroy coastal habitats and consequently their carrying capacity that allows for many essential functions. Low-impact activities are often replaced, on the surface, by new intensive ones that are attractive in the short term, but that in the long term undermine by reducing the resilience of the coast. It is clear that, in a perspective of sustainable development, economically efficient and socially equitable use of coastal areas need to be supported inside strategies to correct these weaknesses. The definition of such strategies and their implementation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is an essential tool for supporting decisions and of monitoring. The issues of monitoring, more in particular, have been the subject of study and modelling by the use of Dynamic Spatial Data Analysis (DSDA), in the case of the SEA of the Coastal Plan of the Italian Apulia Region, as an information instrument for regulating the anthropogenic changes; a possibility to implement the analysis of environmental sensitivity and propensity to Coastal erosion has been explored, in order to control the level of human pressure on land. The monitoring system should provide an automatic "alert" when the dimension and the velocity of the change of land use overpass some threshold of environmental pressure.

  8. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Saltzman, J.; Scott, J.; Harris, S.; Miles, E.; Neill, M.; Bergmann, S.; Storm, E.; Verkozen, A.; Steiger, R.; Lefebvre, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; and 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students conduct two baseline monitoring surveys three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring) to identify and count key invertebrate and algae species. During four seasons of monitoring (2000-2004), the density of black turban snails, Tegula funebralis, showed very low density in the high intertidal zone the winter of 2000-2001 with very little seasonal variability in the remainder of its range and throughout the period monitored. Most algae species had consistently higher densities in the northern (A) transects than the more accessible southern (B) transects. To test the reliability of the student counts, replicate counts of all species were performed. Replicate counts for invertebrate species within the same quadrat along the permanent transects revealed a very small amount of variability, giving us confidence that our monitoring program can provide reliable data. Student volunteers helped to design and install a rocky intertidal information kiosk to greet visitors at the entrance of Duxbury Reef. The kiosk includes pictures and natural history information on key

  9. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Weigel, S.; Redman, K.; Darakananda, D.; Fuller, C.; Gusman, V.; Hirschfeld, Z.; Kornfeld, H.; Picchi, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students conduct two baseline-monitoring surveys three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring) to identify and count key invertebrate and algae species. During six seasons of monitoring (2000-2006), the density of black turban snails, Tegula funebralis, showed seasonal abundance variation with respect to tidal zonation. Most algae species had consistently lower densities in the more accessible northern (A) transects than the southern (B) transects. To test the reliability of the student counts, replicate counts of all species are always performed. Replicate counts for invertebrate and algae species within the same quadrat along the permanent transects revealed a very small amount of variability, giving us confidence that our monitoring program is providing reliable data.

  10. Seismic intensity monitoring: from mature basins in the North Sea to sample-scale porosity measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Sketsiou, Panayiota

    2017-04-01

    We plan the application of a joint velocity, attenuation, and scattering tomography to the North Sea basins. By using seismic phases and intensities from previous passive and active surveys our aim is to image and monitor fluids under the subsurface. Seismic intensities provide unique solutions to the problem of locating/tracking gas/fluid movements in the volcanoes and depicting sub-basalt and sub-intrusives in volcanic reservoirs. The proposed techniques have been tested in volcanic Islands (Deception Island), continental calderas (Campi Flegrei) and Quaternary Volcanoes (Mount. St. Helens) and have been proved effective at monitoring fracture opening, imaging buried fluid-filled bodies, and tracking water/gas interfaces. These novel seismic attributes are modelled in space and time and connected with the lithology of the sampled medium, specifically density and permeability, with as key output a novel computational code with strong commercial potential. Data are readily available in the framework of the NERC CDT Oil & Gas project.

  11. Monitoring the burst-out of Enteromorpha prolifera in the Yellow Sea of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiying; Peng, Hongchun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Chunlin

    2012-10-01

    In the eve of the Beijing Olympics Games, Qingdao in China, as the host city of OSC of Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, was surrounded by Enteromorpha prolifera, which was followed with interest by whole China and the world. The Enteromorpha often comes from other ocean, monitoring the drifting path of the Enteromorpha will become very important.The Study area is mainly the Yellow Sea. And the data sources are Terra MODIS 1B images from 2000-2010 years. The data preprocessing include BOW-TIE processing, image registration, clip, merge, and masking. And the NDVI was selected as the index of derived Enteromorpha prolifera information, to get the range of Enteromorpha prolifera, and get that of dynamic change with time, and monitor the drifting path of the Enteromorpha.

  12. Mixed-Up Floors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Examines the maintenance management problems inherent in cleaning multiple flooring materials revealing the need for school officials to keep it simple when choosing flooring types. Also highlighted is a carpet recycling program used by Wright State University (Ohio). (GR)

  13. Cleaning up Floor Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard; McLean, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how educational-facility maintenance departments can cut costs in floor cleaning through careful evaluation of floor equipment and products. Tips for choosing carpet detergents are highlighted. (GR)

  14. Mixed-Up Floors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Examines the maintenance management problems inherent in cleaning multiple flooring materials revealing the need for school officials to keep it simple when choosing flooring types. Also highlighted is a carpet recycling program used by Wright State University (Ohio). (GR)

  15. Cleaning up Floor Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard; McLean, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how educational-facility maintenance departments can cut costs in floor cleaning through careful evaluation of floor equipment and products. Tips for choosing carpet detergents are highlighted. (GR)

  16. A multi-disciplinary approach for sea water quality monitoring: the IOSMOS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, Teodosio; Ciancia, Emanuele; Coviello, Irina; Daraio, Maria; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico; Tramutoli, Valerio; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2013-04-01

    Coastal zones are complex and dynamic ecosystems which represent one of the most productive areas of the marine environment. They are an important economic resource for human populations: they provide food, energy as well as a lot of commerce and recreation activities. The strong anthropization, the irrational exploitation of resources and the climate changes are causing a strong modification of the coastal areas, representing a continuous threat to the biodiversity of these areas. This is why coastal zones deserve the developing and implementing of a monitoring system able to guarantee their consistent and reliable control as well as to timely identify any sign of degradation. Water quality is an important indicator of the health of coastal ecosystem. Remote sensing data can give relevant information in this framework, offering the capability to provide the spatial distribution of water constituents over large spatial areas with high temporal rates and relatively low costs. In particular Ocean Color (OC) satellite instruments furnish information both on sea surface optical variables (e.g. upwelling normalized water-leaving radiances) and on bio-optical parameters such as chlorophyll-a (as a proxy of phytoplankton), suspended materials and dissolved organic matter. A study of these parameters and of their evolution in the space-time domain may provide useful information on the overall quality of the sea water for a specific area, offering, in addition the reference behaviors necessary for identifying significant changes (possibly induced by anthropogenic pressure) in the coastal environment. In this context main aim of IOSMOS (IOnian Sea water quality MOnitoring by Satellite data) - a Project for European Transnational Cooperation co financed by the Operational Programme ERDF Basilicata 2007-2013 - is the development of advanced and exportable satellite products for measuring the above mentioned coastal water parameters as well as to timely identify short

  17. FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS (THE LATTER FLOOR WAS REMOVED MANY YEARS AGO), See also PA-1436 B-12 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Design of self-contained sensor for monitoring of deep-sea offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Yu, Yan; Zhang, Chunwei; Dong, Weijie; Ou, Jinping

    2013-04-01

    Offshore platform, which is the base of the production and living in the sea, is the most important infrastructure for developing oil and gas resources. At present, there are almost 6500 offshore platforms servicing in the 53 countries' sea areas around the world, creating great wealth for the world. In general, offshore platforms may work for 20 years, however, offshore platforms are expensive, complex, bulky, and so many of them are on extended active duty. Because of offshore platforms servicing in the harsh marine environment for a long time, the marine environment have a great impact on the offshore platforms. Besides, with the impact and erosion of seawater, and material aging, the offshore platform is possible to be in unexpected situations when a badly sudden situation happens. Therefore, it is of great significance to monitor the marine environment and offshore platforms. The self-contained sensor for deep-sea offshore platform with its unique design, can not only effectively extend the working time of the sensor with the capability of converting vibration energy to electrical energy, but also simultaneously collect the data of acceleration, inclination, temperature and humidity of the deep sea, so that we can achieve the purpose of monitoring offshore platforms through analyzing the collected data. The self-contained sensor for monitoring of deep-sea offshore platform includes sensing unit, data collecting and storage unit, the energy supply unit. The sensing unit with multi-variables, consists of an accelerometer LIS344ALH, an inclinometer SCA103T and a temperature and humidity sensor SHT11; the data collecting and storage unit includes the MSP430 low-power MCU, large capacity memory, clock circuit and the communication interface, the communication interface includes USB interface, serial ports and wireless interface; in addition, the energy supply unit, converting vibration to electrical energy to power the overall system, includes the electromagnetic

  19. Statistical analysis of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and sea-floor seismicity in the eastern tropical Pacific.

    PubMed

    Guillas, Serge; Day, Simon J; McGuire, B

    2010-05-28

    We present statistical evidence for a temporal link between variations in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the occurrence of earthquakes on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We adopt a zero-inflated Poisson regression model to represent the relationship between the number of earthquakes in the Easter microplate on the EPR and ENSO (expressed using the southern oscillation index (SOI) for east Pacific sea-level pressure anomalies) from February 1973 to February 2009. We also examine the relationship between the numbers of earthquakes and sea levels, as retrieved by Topex/Poseidon from October 1992 to July 2002. We observe a significant (95% confidence level) positive influence of SOI on seismicity: positive SOI values trigger more earthquakes over the following 2 to 6 months than negative SOI values. There is a significant negative influence of absolute sea levels on seismicity (at 6 months lag). We propose that increased seismicity is associated with ENSO-driven sea-surface gradients (rising from east to west) in the equatorial Pacific, leading to a reduction in ocean-bottom pressure over the EPR by a few kilopascal. This relationship is opposite to reservoir-triggered seismicity and suggests that EPR fault activity may be triggered by plate flexure associated with the reduced pressure.

  20. Improving marine disease surveillance through sea temperature monitoring, outlooks and projections

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Jeffrey; van Hooidonk, Ruben; Harvell, C. Drew; Eakin, C. Mark; Liu, Gang; Willis, Bette L.; Williams, Gareth J.; Dobson, Andrew; Heron, Scott F.; Glenn, Robert; Reardon, Kathleen; Shields, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    To forecast marine disease outbreaks as oceans warm requires new environmental surveillance tools. We describe an iterative process for developing these tools that combines research, development and deployment for suitable systems. The first step is to identify candidate host–pathogen systems. The 24 candidate systems we identified include sponges, corals, oysters, crustaceans, sea stars, fishes and sea grasses (among others). To illustrate the other steps, we present a case study of epizootic shell disease (ESD) in the American lobster. Increasing prevalence of ESD is a contributing factor to lobster fishery collapse in southern New England (SNE), raising concerns that disease prevalence will increase in the northern Gulf of Maine under climate change. The lowest maximum bottom temperature associated with ESD prevalence in SNE is 12°C. Our seasonal outlook for 2015 and long-term projections show bottom temperatures greater than or equal to 12°C may occur in this and coming years in the coastal bays of Maine. The tools presented will allow managers to target efforts to monitor the effects of ESD on fishery sustainability and will be iteratively refined. The approach and case example highlight that temperature-based surveillance tools can inform research, monitoring and management of emerging and continuing marine disease threats. PMID:26880840

  1. Fiber optic well monitoring for Shell`s North Sea field

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    After eight years of development work, Alcatel Kabel Norge has reached an agreement with Shell U.K. Exploration and Production to install Alcatel`s first commercial Sub-Sea Fiber Optic Well Monitoring (FOWM) system in Shell`s Guillemot A-OP2 well on its completion in August 1996. The FOWM project was started in 1988 by Norske Shell and Alcatel. BP Norway joined the project in 1991, and additional support has been contributed by Norsk Hydro and the Norwegian Research Council. The first Alcatel FOWM system was installed in onshore gas Well 7 in NAM`s Sleen field in the Netherlands in October 1993. The final offshore test took place in late 1994, in BP Norway`s Well 2/1 A-32 in Gyda field, in the Norwegian North Sea. FOWM is a new type of permanently installed downhole monitoring system based on an optical sensor system integrating simple passive silicon resonator sensors with optical communication. The system tolerates high pressure and high temperatures (HPHT). Main elements that contribute to its high reliability are discussed.

  2. Monitoring Sea Ice Conditions and Use in Arctic Alaska to Enhance Community Adaptation to Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druckenmiller, M. L.; Eicken, H.

    2010-12-01

    Sea ice changes in the coastal zone, while less conspicuous in relation to the dramatic thinning and retreat of perennial Arctic sea ice, can be more readily linked to local impacts. Shorefast ice is a unique area for interdisciplinary research aimed at improving community adaptation to climate through local-scale environmental observations. Here, geophysical monitoring, local Iñupiat knowledge, and the documented use of ice by the Native hunting community of Barrow, Alaska are combined to relate coastal ice processes and morphologies in the Chukchi Sea to ice stability and community adaption strategies for travel, hunting, and risk assessment. A multi-year effort to map and survey the community’s seasonal ice trails, alongside a detailed record of shorefast ice conditions, provides insight into how hunters evaluate the evolution of ice throughout winter and spring. Various data sets are integrated to relate the annual accretion history of the local ice cover to both measurements of ice thickness and topography and hunter observations of ice types and hazards. By relating changes in the timing of shorefast ice stabilization, offshore ice conditions, and winter wind patterns to ice characteristics in locations where spring bowhead whaling occurs, we are working toward an integrated scientific product compatible with the perspective of local ice experts. A baseline for assessing future change and community climate-related vulnerabilities may not be characterized by single variables, such as ice thickness, but rather by how changes in observable variables manifest in impacts to human activities. This research matches geophysical data to ice-use to establish such a baseline. Documenting human-environment interactions will allow future monitoring to illustrate how strategies for continued community ice-use are indicative of or responsive to change, and potentially capable of incorporating science products as additional sources of useable information.

  3. SeaHawk: an advanced CubeSat mission for sustained ocean colour monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, John M.; Jeffrey, Hazel; Gorter, Hessel; Anderson, Pamela; Clark, Craig; Holmes, Alan; Feldman, Gene C.; Patt, Frederick S.

    2016-10-01

    Sustained ocean color monitoring is vital to understanding the marine ecosystem. It has been identified as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) and is a vital parameter in understanding long-term climate change. Furthermore, observations can be beneficial in observing oil spills, harmful algal blooms and the health of fisheries. Space-based remote sensing, through MERIS, SeaWiFS and MODIS instruments, have provided a means of observing the vast area covered by the ocean which would otherwise be impossible using ships alone. However, the large pixel size makes measurements of lakes, rivers, estuaries and coastal zones difficult. Furthermore, retirement of a number of widely used and relied upon ocean observation instruments, particularly MERIS and SeaWiFS, leaves a significant gap in ocean color observation opportunities This paper presents an overview of the SeaHawk mission, a collaborative effort between Clyde Space Ltd., the University of North Carolina Wilmington, Cloudland Instruments, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. The goal of the project is to enhance the ability to observe ocean color in high temporal and spatial resolution through use of a low-cost, next-generation ocean color sensor flown aboard a CubeSat. The final product will be 530 times smaller (0.0034 vs 1.81m3) and 115 time less massive (3.4 vs 390.0kg) but with a ground resolution 10 times better whilst maintaining a signal/noise ratio 50% that of SeaWiFs. This paper will describe the objectives of the mission, outline the payload specification and the spacecraft platform to support it.

  4. Monitors cross the Red Sea: the biogeographic history of Varanus yemenensis.

    PubMed

    Portik, Daniel M; Papenfuss, Theodore J

    2012-01-01

    The Red Sea has had a profound biogeographic effect on organisms with Afro-Asian distributions, resulting in complex patterns of admixture on the Arabian Peninsula. We investigate the phylogenetic affinities of a monitor lizard (Varanus yemenensis) restricted to the southwestern Arabian Peninsula by sequencing all African monitor species and several Asian monitor species for the mitochondrial gene ND2 and the nuclear marker RAG-1. We find evidence that V. yemenensis is of African origin, being most closely related to the white-throat monitor, V. albigularis, an African species complex distributed from the Horn of Africa to southern Africa. Using divergence-dating analyses, we investigate several biogeographic hypotheses to infer the likely mechanism of colonization of the Arabian Peninsula by this species. Our results reveal that both dispersal across a southern land bridge and overwater dispersal are potential explanations. The patterns observed in V. yemenensis are contrasted with other taxa having similar Afro-Arabian disjunct distributions to better understand the complex biogeographic history of this region. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Saltzman, J.; Begley, H.; Bassett, H.; Hester, M.; Mann, L.; Scott, J.; Ulrich, T.

    2003-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999. In cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association, goals include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; and 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Student volunteers complete an intensive 22 hour training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal ecology, interpretation and monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students conduct four baseline monitoring surveys three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring) to identify and count key invertebrate and algae species. During 2000-2002, the density of black turban snails, Tegula funebralis, is lowest in the high intertidal zones in winter yet has little seasonal variability in the mid intertidal zones. Most algae species had consistently higher percent cover in the northern transects than the more accessible southern transects. To test the reliability of the student counts, replicate counts of all species were performed. Replicate counts for invertebrate species within the same quadrat along the permanent transects revealed a very small amount of variability, giving us confidence that our monitoring program can provide reliable data. Student volunteers helped to design and install a rocky intertidal information kiosk to greet visitors at the entrance of Duxbury Reef. The kiosk includes pictures and natural history information on key intertidal species as well as tidepooling etiquette. Students lead an annual celebration at Duxbury Reef and lead intertidal walks for

  6. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broad, C.; Soave, K.; Ericson, W.; Raabe, B.; Glazer, R.; Ahuatzi, A.; Pereira, M.; Rainsford, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 100 m2 areas, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima and Fucus spp. We will continue to closely monitor algal population densities in within our site in light of the November 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill that leaked heavy bunker fuel into intertidal habitats around the SF Bay. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef

  7. Marine habitat mapping, classification and monitoring in the coastal North Sea: Scientific vs. stakeholder interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Papenmeier, Svenja; Fiorentino, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Producing detailed maps of the seafloor that include both, water depth and simple textural characteristics has always been a challenge to scientists. In this context, marine habitat maps are an essential tool to comprehend the complexity, the spatial distribution and the ecological status of different seafloor types. The increasing need for more detail demands additional information on the texture of the sediment, bedforms and information on benthic sessile life. For long time, taking samples and videos/photographs followed by interpolation over larger distances was the only feasible way to gain information about sedimentary features such as grain-size distribution and bedforms. While ground truthing is still necessary, swath systems such as multibeam echo sounders (MBES) and sidescan sonars (SSS), as well as single beam acoustic ground discrimination systems (AGDS) became available to map the seafloor area-wide (MBES, SSS), fast and in great detail. Where area-wide measurements are impossible or unavailable point measurements are interpolated, classified and modeled. To keep pace with environmental change in the highly dynamic coastal areas of the North Sea (here: German Bight) monitoring that utilizes all of the mentioned techniques is a necessity. Since monitoring of larger areas is quite expensive, concepts for monitoring strategies were developed in scientific projects such as "WIMO" ("Scientific monitoring concepts for the German Bight, SE North Sea"). While instrumentation becomes better and better and interdisciplinary methods are being developed, the gap between basic scientific interests and stakeholder needs often seem to move in opposite directions. There are two main tendencies: the need to better understand nature systems (for theoretical purposes) and the one to simplify nature (for applied purposes). Science trends to resolve the most detail in highest precision employing soft gradients and/or fuzzy borders instead of crisp demarcations and

  8. Deformation offshore Northern Chile monitored by a seafloor geodetic network (GeoSEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Lange, Dietrich; Kopp, Heidrun; Petersen, Florian; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    The Nazca-South American plate boundary around 21°S has last ruptured in an earthquake in 1877 and was identified as a seismic gap prior to the 2014 Iquique earthquake (Mw=8.1). The southern portion of this segment is still unbroken. The geodetic monitoring of the Chilean subduction zone is crucial to understand the deformation processes in this area. Most geodetic measurements rely on GPS and are therefore limited to onshore campaigns. In December 2015, we installed the GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) array around 21°S of the Nazca-South American plate boundary with RV SONNE to extend the geodetic observations to the offshore areas. The GeoSEA array consists of autonomous acoustic seafloor transponders mounted on 4 m high tripods. These transponders are able to continuously measure the two-way travel time of acoustic signals between station pairs (baselines) and the properties of the sea water (sound speed, temperature and pressure) at each transponder. These measurements are used to retrieve the distances between the transponders and give insights into the deformation of the seafloor. At the Chilean subduction zone, we installed in total 23 transponders in 3 subarrays with interstation distances of up to 2500 m. On the middle continental slope in 2300 m water depth, an array consisting of 8 transponders measures across crustal faults seen in AUV mapping. A second array of 5 stations located on the outer rise monitors extension across normal plate-bending faults. The deepest deployment in 5000 m water depth located on the lower continental slope with 10 stations is designed to measure diffuse strain build-up. The transponders are intended to monitor the seafloor deformation for 3.5 years. In November 2016 during a cruise of RV Langseth, the first 11 months of data were successfully uploaded via an acoustic modem. Furthermore, an additional component of the network, GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous vehicle (wave glider), was

  9. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Darakananda, K.; Ball, O.; Butti, C.; Yang, G.; Vetter, M.; Grimaldi, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Olivia Ball, Karin Darakananda, Matt Vetter, Grant Yang, Charlotte Butti, Zoe Grimaldi The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B) and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high intertidal zone which experiences the greatest amount of human

  10. Scenario simulations of future salinity and ecological consequences in the Baltic Sea and adjacent North Sea areas-implications for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Ilppo; Hänninen, Jari; Rajasilta, Marjut; Laine, Päivi; Eklund, Jan; Montesino-Pouzols, Federico; Corona, Francesco; Junker, Karin; Meier, H E Markus; Dippner, Joachim W

    2015-03-01

    Substantial ecological changes occurred in the 1970s in the Northern Baltic during a temporary period of low salinity (S). This period was preceded by an episodic increase in the rainfall over the Baltic Sea watershed area. Several climate models, both global and regional, project an increase in the runoff of the Northern latitudes due to proceeding climate change. The aim of this study is to model, firstly, the effects on Baltic Sea salinity of increased runoff due to projected global change and, secondly, the effects of salinity change on the distribution of marine species. The results suggest a critical shift in the S range 5-7, which is a threshold for both freshwater and marine species distributions and diversity. We discuss several topics emphasizing future monitoring, modelling, and fisheries research. Environmental monitoring and modelling are investigated because the developing alternative ecosystems do not necessarily show the same relations to environment quality factors as the retiring ones. An important corollary is that the observed and modelled S changes considered together with species' ranges indicate what may appear under a future climate. Consequences could include a shift in distribution areas of marine benthic foundation species and some 40-50 other species, affiliated to these. This change would extend over hundreds of kilometres, in the Baltic Sea and the adjacent North Sea areas. Potential cascading effects, in coastal ecology, fish ecology and fisheries would be extensive, and point out the necessity to develop further the "ecosystem approach in the environmental monitoring".

  11. Diversity and seasonality of Pseudo- nitzschia (Peragallo) at two North Sea time-series monitoring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresnan, Eileen; Kraberg, Alexandra; Fraser, Sheila; Brown, Lyndsay; Hughes, Sarah; Wiltshire, Karen H.

    2015-06-01

    Species within the diatom genus Pseudo- nitzschia (Peragallo) have been identified as producers of domoic acid, the toxin responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning. Toxin- and non-toxin-producing species of Pseudo- nitzschia have been reported globally; however, as Pseudo- nitzschia species cannot be routinely identified to species level using light microscopy, cells are rarely recorded to species level during long-term monitoring studies. Here, we report the results of a comparative survey of Pseudo- nitzschia species at two monitoring sites in the North Sea: Stonehaven on the east coast of Scotland and Helgoland Roads in the German Bight. A difference in the seasonality of this genus was observed between the sites with Pseudo- nitzschia cells playing a major role in the spring bloom as well at the summer and autumn diatom community at Stonehaven. In contrast, Pseudo- nitzschia was abundant only during the summer months at Helgoland. Pseudo- nitzschia cells constitute a higher proportion of the diatom community at Stonehaven than at Helgoland, particularly during the late summer, autumn and winter and thus may be considered more `ecologically important' at this site. A total of eight different species were recorded during this survey with five Pseudo- nitzschia species observed at the Helgoland site: P. pungens, P. fraudulenta, P. americana, P. cf. delicatissima and the potentially toxic species P. multiseries. Six species were also recorded at Stonehaven; P. australis, P cf. delicatissima, P. pungens, P. cf. pseudodelicatissima, P. subpacifica and P. seriata. This study represents the first examination of the seasonality of Pseudo-nitzschia species around Helgoland and the first comparison between two long-term monitoring sites in the North Sea. P. americana and P. multiseries are also recorded at the Helgoland Roads time-series site for the first time.

  12. Monitoring the Radiometric Stability of the SeaWiFS Transfer Radiometer II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, G.; Fargion, G.; McClain, C.

    2002-05-01

    The SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) Project Office conducts calibration round-robin intercomparison experiments on a yearly basis. The core instrument is the SeaWiFS Transfer Radiometer II (SXR-II) designed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This filter radiometer measures the radiances produced in the participating laboratories in six wavelength channels from 411 nm to 777 nm. These measured radiances are compared to the radiances expected by the laboratories. The SXR-II is calibrated once a year at the SIRCUS (Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Calibration with Uniform Sources) facility at the NIST. The radiometric stability of the SXR-II is one of the largest contributions to the combined standard uncertainty of the SXR-II. The later is estimated to be about 0.8 %. The calibration coefficients of the six SXR-II channels between the NIST calibrations from December 2000 and December 2001 changed between 0.3 % and 1.6 %. The SIMBIOS Project monitors the radiometric stability of the SXR-II with commercially available portable light sources called SeaWiFS Quality Monitors (SQM) on a monthly basis. This contribution discusses the monitoring results from 2001, which were done with an SQM-II from Satlantic Inc. These results showed that a linear interpolation between the two NIST calibrations describes the evolution of the SXR-II calibration coefficients to within +/- 0.5 %, except for channel 1. We also present preliminary results from 2002 with an SQM (OCS-5002) from Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc.

  13. Monitoring hydrocarbons and trace metals in Beaufort Sea sediments and organisms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, P.; LeBlanc, L.; Trefry, J.; Marajh-Whittemore, P.; Brown, J.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Minerals Management Service's environmental studies of oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, a study was conducted in 1989 to monitor the marine environment for inputs of chemicals related to drilling and exploration. The 1989 Beaufort Sea Monitoring Program (BSMP) was designed to monitor sediments and selected benthic organisms for trace metals and hydrocarbons so as to infer any changes that might have resulted from drilling and production activities. A series of 49 stations were sampled during the program. The study area extended from Cape Halkett on the western end of Harrison Bay to Griffin Point, east of Barter Island. The sampling design combined an area-wide approach in which stations were treated as replicates of 8 specific geographic regions, with an activity-specific approach, which focused on the potential establishment of metal or hydrocarbon concentration gradients with distance from the Endicott Production Field in Prudhoe Bay. The analytical program focused on the analysis of the fine-fraction of the sediment for a series of trace metals and elements and the analysis of a suite of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the bulk sediment. The total organic carbon (TOB) content and the grain size distribution in the sediments were determined as well. Benthic bivalve molluscs, representative of several feeding types were collected from those stations for which data previously existed from the 1984-1986 BSMP, and were analyzed for metals and saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. The benthic amphipods were collected, pooled by station or region, and analyzed as well.

  14. Ocean Monitoring Indicators for the Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry derived from a high-resolution reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero; Bolzon, Giorgio; Salon, Stefano; Teruzzi, Anna; Lazzari, Paolo; Crise, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    In recent years the interest in multi-decadal reanalyses of the status of the Mediterranean marine ecosystem has been rising constantly, also in light of the need of information for a proper implementation of European directives (e.g. MSFD). State-of-art reanalyses of the Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry - being an optimal integration of multi-platforms data and numerical models - constitute an extremely relevant source of information in evaluating the ecosystem status at basin and sub-basin scale. Furthermore, they provide highly valuable data to be used as boundary conditions for local studies. The objective of this work is to produce sensible environmental indicators useful to characterize the environmental status of the Mediterranean starting from an upgraded high-resolution reanalysis of Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry delivered in the frame of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Services (CMEMS). The reanalysis was qualified by a comparison against several available data sets, in terms of the main surface and sub-surface biogeochemical essential climate variables (chlorophyll, carbon dioxide partial pressure, ocean acidity, nutrients, oxygen). The reanalysis outputs reproduced spatial patterns, seasonal cycle and inter-annual variability of the assessed variables, allowing for a proper description of recent trends and present status of the Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry. Our results confirm the vision of the Mediterranean as a mainly oligotrophic ecosystem with the presence of significant biogeochemical gradients from the eastern to the western sub-basins (e.g. in chlorophyll, nutrients, primary production). Our reanalysis can be used to contribute estimating eutrophication MFSD descriptors, atmospheric carbon sequestration fluxes, first assessment of potential resources available for the higher trophic levels and more. Indeed, the reanalysis data set provides a suitable basis for the estimation of the so-called Ocean Monitoring Indicators

  15. TIDE TOOL: Open-Source Sea-Level Monitoring Software for Tsunami Warning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Kong, L. S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    A tsunami warning center (TWC) typically decides to issue a tsunami warning bulletin when initial estimates of earthquake source parameters suggest it may be capable of generating a tsunami. A TWC, however, relies on sea-level data to provide prima facie evidence for the existence or non-existence of destructive tsunami waves and to constrain tsunami wave height forecast models. In the aftermath of the 2004 Sumatra disaster, the International Tsunami Information Center asked the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) to develop a platform-independent, easy-to-use software package to give nascent TWCs the ability to process WMO Global Telecommunications System (GTS) sea-level messages and to analyze the resulting sea-level curves (marigrams). In response PTWC developed TIDE TOOL that has since steadily grown in sophistication to become PTWC's operational sea-level processing system. TIDE TOOL has two main parts: a decoder that reads GTS sea-level message logs, and a graphical user interface (GUI) written in the open-source platform-independent graphical toolkit scripting language Tcl/Tk. This GUI consists of dynamic map-based clients that allow the user to select and analyze a single station or groups of stations by displaying their marigams in strip-chart or screen-tiled forms. TIDE TOOL also includes detail maps of each station to show each station's geographical context and reverse tsunami travel time contours to each station. TIDE TOOL can also be coupled to the GEOWARE™ TTT program to plot tsunami travel times and to indicate the expected tsunami arrival time on the marigrams. Because sea-level messages are structured in a rich variety of formats TIDE TOOL includes a metadata file, COMP_META, that contains all of the information needed by TIDE TOOL to decode sea-level data as well as basic information such as the geographical coordinates of each station. TIDE TOOL can therefore continuously decode theses sea-level messages in real-time and display the time

  16. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Yang, G.; Solli, E.; Dattels, C.; Wallace, K.; Boesel, A.; Steiger, C.; Buie, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B) and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high intertidal zone which experiences the greatest amount of human impacts.

  17. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainsford, A.; Soave, K.; Gerraty, F.; Jung, G.; Quirke-Shattuck, M.; Kudler, J.; Hatfield, J.; Emunah, M.; Dean, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima, Cladophora sp. and Fucus sp.. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the greatest amount of human impacts.

  18. Geodetic Infrastructure in the Ibiza and Barcelona Harbours for Sea Level Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, J. J.; Gili, J.; Lopez, R.; Tapia, A.; Perez, B.; Pros, F.

    2013-12-01

    The presentation is directed to the description of the actual situation and relevant information of the geodetic infrastructure of Ibiza and Barcelona sites for sea level determination and contribution to regional sea level rise. Time series are being analysed for mean sea level variations www.puertos.es. .In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 2000C from Geonica s.l. near an acoustic tide gauge. Puertos del Estado installed in 2007 a MIROS radar tide gauge and the Barcelona Harbour Authority a GPS referente station in the roof of the new Control Tower situated in the Energy Pier. The radar sensor is over the water surface, on a L-shaped structure which elevates it a few meters above the quay shelf. 1-min data are transmitted to the ENAGAS Control Center by cable and then sent each 1 min to Puertos del Estado by e-mail. There is a GPS station Leica Geosystems GRX1200 GG Pro and antenna 1202. Precision levelling has been made several times in the last two years because the tower is founded in reclaimed land. The measured settlement rate is about 1cm/year that may be could mask the values registered by the tide gauge. A description of the actual infrastructure at Ibiza harbour at Marina de Botafoch, is presented and its applications to sea level monitoring and altimeter calibration in support of the main CGPS at Ibiza harbour. It is described the geometrical precision levelling made in June 2013 between the radar tide gauge and the GPS station. In particular, the CGPS located at Ibiza harbour is essential for its application to the marine campaign Baleares 2013, near Ibiza island. The main objective is to determine the altimeter bias for Jason-2, about 9:09 UTC September 15, 2013, and Saral/AltiKa, about 05:30 UTC September 16, UTC. These activities has been received funding of the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion under Spanish

  19. BIO ARGO floats: tools for operational monitoring of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazov, Atanas; Slabakova, Violeta; Peneva, Elisaveta; Stanev, Emil

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of ecological status in the context of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requires comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the physical and biogeochemical processes that determine the functioning of marine ecosystems. One of the main challenges however is the need of data with frequency relevant to the spatial and temporal scales of the ecological processes. The majority of in situ observations that are commonly used for ecological monitoring of the Black Sea are generally based on near-shore monitoring programs or irregular oceanographic cruises that provide either non-synoptic, coarse resolution realizations of large scale processes or detailed, but time and site specific snapshots of local features. These gaps can be filled by two independent sources: satellite observation and profiling floats. In fact satellite ocean color sensors allows for determination at synoptic scale of water quality parameters through its absorption properties. However the satellite ocean color methods have a number of limitations such as: measurements can only be made during daylight hours; require cloud-free conditions and are sensitive to atmospheric aerosols; provide information only for the upper layer of the ocean (approximately the depth of 10% incident light); algorithms developed for global applications are a source of large uncertainties in the marginal seas and costal areas. These constrains of the optical remote sensing observations can be avoided by using miniature biogeochemical sensors and autonomous platforms that offer remarkable perspectives for observing the "biological" ocean, notably at critical spatiotemporal scales which have been out of reach until recently (Claustre et al., 2010). In the frame of "E-AIMS: Euro-Argo Improvements for the GMES marine Service" 7 EC FP project two Bio Argo floats were deployed in the Black Sea. Beside the traditionally CTD the floats were equipped with biogeochemical

  20. On the mesoscale monitoring capability of Argo floats in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Román, Antonio; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Mourre, Baptiste; Guinehut, Stéphanie

    2017-03-01

    In this work a simplified observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) approach is used to investigate which Argo design sampling in the Mediterranean Sea would be necessary to properly capture the mesoscale dynamics in this basin. The monitoring of the mesoscale features is not an initial objective of the Argo network. However, it is an interesting question from the perspective of future network extensions in order to improve the ocean state estimates. The true field used to conduct the OSSEs is provided by a specific altimetry-gridded merged product for the Mediterranean Sea. Synthetic observations were obtained by sub-sampling this Nature Run according to different configurations of the ARGO network. The observation errors required to perform the OSSEs were obtained through the comparison of sea level anomalies (SLAs) from altimetry and dynamic height anomalies (DHAs) computed from the real in situ Argo network. This analysis also contributes to validate satellite SLAs with an increased confidence. The simulation experiments show that a configuration similar to the current Argo array in the Mediterranean (with a spatial resolution of 2° × 2°) is only able to recover the large-scale signals of the basin. Increasing the spatial resolution to nearly 75 km × 75 km, allows the capture of most of the mesoscale signal in the basin and to retrieve the SLA field with a RMSE of 3 cm for spatial scales larger than 150 km, similar to those presently captured by the altimetry. This would represent a theoretical reduction of 40 % of the actual RMSE. Such a high-resolution Argo array composed of around 450 floats, cycling every 10 days, is expected to increase the actual network cost by approximately a factor of 6.

  1. Monitoring Coastal Embankment Subsidence and Relative Sea Level Rise in Coastal Bangladesh Using Satellite Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Shum, C. K.; Jia, Y.; Yi, Y.; Zhu, K.; Kuo, C. Y.; Liibusk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bangladesh Delta is located at the confluence of the mega Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghan Rivers in the Bay of Bengal. It is home to over 160 million people and is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. It is prone to seasonal transboundary monsoonal flooding, potentially aggravated by more frequent and intensified cyclones resulting from anthropogenic climate change. Sea level rise, along with tectonic, sediment compaction/load and groundwater extraction induced land uplift/subsidence, have significantly exacerbated these risks and Bangladesh's coastal vulnerability. Bangladesh has built 123 coastal embankments or polders since the 1960's, to protect the coastal regions from cyclone/tidal flooding and to reduce salinity incursions. Since then, many coastal polders have suffered severe erosion and anthropogenic damage, and require repairs or rebuilding. However, the physical and anthropogenic processes governing the historic relative sea level rise and its future projection towards its quantification remain poorly understood or known, and at present not accurate enough or with an adequately fine local spatial scale for practical mitigation of coastal vulnerability or coastal resilience studies. This study reports on our work in progress to use satellite geodetic and remote sensing observations, including satellite radar altimetry/backscatter measurements over land and in coastal oceans, optical/infrared imageries, and SAR backscatter/InSAR data, to study the feasibility of coastal embankment/polder erosion monitoring, quantify seasonal polder water intrusions, observing polder subsidence, and finally, towards the goal of improving the relative sea level rise hazards assessment at the local scale in coastal Bangladesh.

  2. Developments in Earth observation for the assessment and monitoring of inland, transitional, coastal and shelf-sea waters.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew N; Hunter, Peter D; Spyrakos, Evangelos; Groom, Steve; Constantinescu, Adriana Maria; Kitchen, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's surface waters are a fundamental resource and encompass a broad range of ecosystems that are core to global biogeochemical cycling and food and energy production. Despite this, the Earth's surface waters are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic pressures and drivers of environmental change. The complex interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes in surface waters poses significant challenges for in situ monitoring and assessment and often limits our ability to adequately capture the dynamics of aquatic systems and our understanding of their status, functioning and response to pressures. Here we explore the opportunities that Earth observation (EO) has to offer to basin-scale monitoring of water quality over the surface water continuum comprising inland, transition and coastal water bodies, with a particular focus on the Danube and Black Sea region. This review summarises the technological advances in EO and the opportunities that the next generation satellites offer for water quality monitoring. We provide an overview of algorithms for the retrieval of water quality parameters and demonstrate how such models have been used for the assessment and monitoring of inland, transitional, coastal and shelf-sea systems. Further, we argue that very few studies have investigated the connectivity between these systems especially in large river-sea systems such as the Danube-Black Sea. Subsequently, we describe current capability in operational processing of archive and near real-time satellite data. We conclude that while the operational use of satellites for the assessment and monitoring of surface waters is still developing for inland and coastal waters and more work is required on the development and validation of remote sensing algorithms for these optically complex waters, the potential that these data streams offer for developing an improved, potentially paradigm-shifting understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes

  3. Corsica: An Experiment for Long-Term Altimeter Calibration and Sea Level Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefond, P.; Exetier, P.; Laurain, O.; Lyard, F.; Bijac, S.; Cancet, M.; Chimot, J.; Femenias, P.

    2010-12-01

    In collaboration with the CNES and NASA oceanographic projects (TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1), the OCA (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur) developed a verification site in Corsica since 1996. CALibration/VALidation embraces a wide variety of activities, ranging from the interpretation of information from internal-calibration modes of the sensors to validation of the fully corrected estimates of the Sea Surface Heights using in situ data. Now, Corsica is, like the Harvest platform (NASA side, [11]), an operating calibration site able to support a continuous monitoring with a high level of accuracy: thanks to the recent extension of the site to Ajaccio, we are able now to perform the absolute calibration for EnviSat with a standard deviation of 27 mm and a standard error of 5 mm.

  4. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Long-Term Monitoring of Dolphin Biosonar Activity in Deep Pelagic Waters of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Alonge, Giuseppe; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Grammauta, Rosario; Larosa, Giuseppina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Riccobene, Giorgio; Pavan, Gianni; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Sciacca, Virginia; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa

    2017-06-28

    Dolphins emit short ultrasonic pulses (clicks) to acquire information about the surrounding environment, prey and habitat features. We investigated Delphinidae activity over multiple temporal scales through the detection of their echolocation clicks, using long-term Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM). The Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare operates multidisciplinary seafloor observatories in a deep area of the Central Mediterranean Sea. The Ocean noise Detection Experiment collected data offshore the Gulf of Catania from January 2005 to November 2006, allowing the study of temporal patterns of dolphin activity in this deep pelagic zone for the first time. Nearly 5,500 five-minute recordings acquired over two years were examined using spectrogram analysis and through development and testing of an automatic detection algorithm. Echolocation activity of dolphins was mostly confined to nighttime and crepuscular hours, in contrast with communicative signals (whistles). Seasonal variation, with a peak number of clicks in August, was also evident, but no effect of lunar cycle was observed. Temporal trends in echolocation corresponded to environmental and trophic variability known in the deep pelagic waters of the Ionian Sea. Long-term PAM and the continued development of automatic analysis techniques are essential to advancing the study of pelagic marine mammal distribution and behaviour patterns.

  6. Erosional history of Cape Halkett and contemporary monitoring of bluff retreat, Beaufort Sea coast, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Arp, Christopher D.; Beck, Richard A.; Grosse, Guido; Webster, James M.; Urban, Frank E.

    2009-01-01

    Cape Halkett is located along the Beaufort Sea at the end of a low-lying tundra landscape. The area has been subject to major modifications over the last century as a result of erosion and migration of the coastline inland. Long-term mean annual erosion rates (1955-2009) for the entire cape are 7.6 m/yr, with a gradual increase in rates over the first five time periods of remotely sensed imagery analyzed and a large increase during the most recent time period. Division of the cape into three distinct coastal zones shows very different erosional patterns: the northeast-facing segment (Zone 1) showing a consistent and large increase; the southeast-facing segment (Zone 3) showing a gradual increase with recent, heightened erosion rates; and the east-facing segment (Zone 2) showing decreased rates due to the reformation of a sand and gravel spit. Monitoring of bluff erosion with time-lapse photography, differential GPS surveys, terrestrial and bathymetric surveys, and water level, sea and permafrost temperature data provide insights into the processes driving contemporary patterns of erosion and will provide valuable information for the prediction of future shoreline positions.

  7. Long-Term Marine Traffic Monitoring for Environmental Safety in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, T.; Gyftakis, S.; Charou, E.; Perantonis, S.; Nivolianitou, Z.; Koromila, I.; Makrygiorgos, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is characterized by an extremely high marine safety risk, mainly due to the significant increase of the traffic of tankers from and to the Black Sea that pass through narrow straits formed by the 1600 Greek islands. Reducing the risk of a ship accident is therefore vital to all socio-economic and environmental sectors. This paper presents an online long-term marine traffic monitoring work-flow that focuses on extracting aggregated vessel risks using spatiotemporal analysis of multilayer information: vessel trajectories, vessel data, meteorological data, bathymetric / hydrographic data as well as information regarding environmentally important areas (e.g. protected high-risk areas, etc.). A web interface that enables user-friendly spatiotemporal queries is implemented at the frontend, while a series of data mining functionalities extracts aggregated statistics regarding: (a) marine risks and accident probabilities for particular areas (b) trajectories clustering information (c) general marine statistics (cargo types, etc.) and (d) correlation between spatial environmental importance and marine traffic risk. Towards this end, a set of data clustering and probabilistic graphical modelling techniques has been adopted.

  8. Scenario simulations of future salinity and ecological consequences in the Baltic Sea and adjacent North Sea areas–implications for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vuorinen, Ilppo; Hänninen, Jari; Rajasilta, Marjut; Laine, Päivi; Eklund, Jan; Montesino-Pouzols, Federico; Corona, Francesco; Junker, Karin; Meier, H.E.Markus; Dippner, Joachim W.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial ecological changes occurred in the 1970s in the Northern Baltic during a temporary period of low salinity (S). This period was preceded by an episodic increase in the rainfall over the Baltic Sea watershed area. Several climate models, both global and regional, project an increase in the runoff of the Northern latitudes due to proceeding climate change. The aim of this study is to model, firstly, the effects on Baltic Sea salinity of increased runoff due to projected global change and, secondly, the effects of salinity change on the distribution of marine species. The results suggest a critical shift in the S range 5–7, which is a threshold for both freshwater and marine species distributions and diversity. We discuss several topics emphasizing future monitoring, modelling, and fisheries research. Environmental monitoring and modelling are investigated because the developing alternative ecosystems do not necessarily show the same relations to environment quality factors as the retiring ones. An important corollary is that the observed and modelled S changes considered together with species’ ranges indicate what may appear under a future climate. Consequences could include a shift in distribution areas of marine benthic foundation species and some 40–50 other species, affiliated to these. This change would extend over hundreds of kilometres, in the Baltic Sea and the adjacent North Sea areas. Potential cascading effects, in coastal ecology, fish ecology and fisheries would be extensive, and point out the necessity to develop further the “ecosystem approach in the environmental monitoring”. PMID:25737660

  9. Monitoring Deformation Offshore Northern Chile Using a Seafloor Geodetic Network (GeoSEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, K.; Lange, D.; Kopp, H.; Petersen, F.; Contreras-Reyes, E.

    2016-12-01

    The seafloor stores crucial information on sub-seafloor processes, including stress, elastic strain, and earthquake and tsunami generation. This information may be extracted through the emerging scientific field of seafloor geodesy. The target of the GeoSEA array (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) is to measure deformation in mm-scale between instruments located in three target areas on the marine forearc and outer rise of the North Chilean subduction zone around 21°S. This segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary has last ruptured in an earthquake in 1877 and was identified as a seismic gap prior to the 2014 Iquique/Pisagua earthquake (Mw=8.1). The southern portion of this segment is still unbroken. The GeoSEA network consists of autonomous seafloor transponders installed on 4 m high tripods. In December 2015, they were lowered to the seabed on the deep-sea cable of RV SONNE. The transponders measure acoustic distance, tilt, temperature and pressure for a period of 3.5 years. As additional component of the network, GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous vehicle (wave glider), monitors system health and is able to upload data from the seafloor stations and to transfer it via satellite. We set up 3 subarrays with interstation distances of up to 2000 m. On the middle continental slope in 2300 m water depth, an array consisting of 8 transponders measures across crustal faults seen in AUV mapping. A second array of 5 stations located on the outer rise monitors extension across normal plate-bending faults. The deepest deployment in 5000 m water depth located on the lower continental slope with 10 stations is designed to measure diffuse strain build-up. We expect a precision of ± 4mm for each station pair. The data of 11 months will be downloaded in November 2015 during a cruise of RV Langseth and will reveal the deformation between the transponders located on the seafloor.

  10. Development of tools for integrated monitoring and assessment of hazardous substances and their biological effects in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Kari K; Sundelin, Brita; Lang, Thomas; Strand, Jakob

    2014-02-01

    The need to develop biological effects monitoring to facilitate a reliable assessment of hazardous substances has been emphasized in the Baltic Sea Action Plan of the Helsinki Commission. An integrated chemical-biological approach is vitally important for the understanding and proper assessment of anthropogenic pressures and their effects on the Baltic Sea. Such an approach is also necessary for prudent management aiming at safeguarding the sustainable use of ecosystem goods and Services. The BEAST project (Biological Effects of Anthropogenic Chemical Stress: Tools for the Assessment of Ecosystem Health) set out to address this topic within the BONUS Programme. BEAST generated a large amount of quality-assured data on several biological effects parameters (biomarkers) in various marine species in different sub-regions of the Baltic Sea. New indicators (biological response measurement methods) and management tools (integrated indices) with regard to the integrated monitoring approach were suggested.

  11. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Change on Sea Surface Temperature in Monitoring Coral Reef Health in the Florida Keys Using Sea Surface Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jason; Burbank, Renane; Billiot, Amanda; Schultz, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses use of 4 kilometer satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) data to monitor and assess coral reef areas of the Florida Keys. There are growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on coral reef systems throughout the world. Satellite remote sensing technology is being used for monitoring coral reef areas with the goal of understanding the climatic and oceanic changes that can lead to coral bleaching events. Elevated SST is a well-documented cause of coral bleaching events. Some coral monitoring studies have used 50 km data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to study the relationships of sea surface temperature anomalies to bleaching events. In partnership with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the University of South Florida's Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, this project utilized higher resolution SST data from the Terra's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AVHRR. SST data for 2000-2010 was employed to compute sea surface temperature anomalies within the study area. The 4 km SST anomaly products enabled visualization of SST levels for known coral bleaching events from 2000-2010.

  12. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, A.; Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Salmi, I.; Tillapaugh, J.; Broad, C.; Raabe, B.; Ericson, W.

    2012-12-01

    Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Andrew Buie, Isabella Salmi, Joey Tillapaugh, Cory Broad, Brooke Raabe, Whitney Ericson The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 100 m2 areas, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima and Fucus spp.. We will continue to closely monitor algal population densities in within our site in light of the November 2007 San Francisco Bay oil spill that leaked heavy bunker fuel into intertidal habitats around the SF Bay. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic

  13. Perspectives of methods of laser monitoring of the atmosphere and sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayev, Arif; Tunaboylu, Bahadir; Usta, Metin; Sadixov, Ilham; Allahverdiyev, Kerim

    2016-01-01

    Laser monitoring (remote sensing) may be considered as the science of collecting and interpreting information about the atmosphere, earth and sea using sensors on earth, on platforms in our atmosphere (airplanes, balloons) or in space (satellites) without being in direct physical contact with them. Remote sensing by LIDARs (Light Identification Detection and Ranging) has wide applications as technique to probe the Earth's atmosphere, ocean and land surfaces. LIDARs are widely used to get knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in meteorological quantities (e.g. temperature, humidity, clouds and aerosol properties) and to monitor the changes in these quantities on different timescales. Subject of the present work is quite wide. It is rather difficult to perform analysis and to provide full knowledge about existing information. In the present work, in addition to the literature data, the information will be provided also about KA-09 aerosol LIDAR developed at the Marmara Research Centre of TÜBITAK (Turkish Scientific and technological Research Council) and also about KA-14 LIDAR developed at the National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan for remote sensing of contaminations on water surfaces taking place during oil-gas production. The main goal of this paper is to give students insight in different remote sensing instruments and techniques (including their perspectives) that are used for the derivation of meteorological quantities and obtaining the information about water surface.

  14. Future earthquake source faults on deep sea-floor around the Boso triple plate junction revealed by tectonic geomorphology using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Nakata, T.; Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Izumi, N.; Nishizawa, A.; Horiuchi, D.; Kido, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    that is tilted to the west, indicating up-growing of Taito spur. Northeastern part of Izu bar on Philippine Sea plate is characterized by rather smooth extensive convex slope between 1500m-7500m for over 200km long along the trench. On the lower part of the slope below 6000m, several gullies such as Mikura canyon and Kita-Hachijo canyon dissecting the slope forms rapids, probably due to continuous up-warping by subsurface thrusting dipping to the west under the slope. It is noteworthy that we can identify prominent active tectonic features on even very deep sea-floor along the plate boundaries, by using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM.

  15. Sea Level, Tectonics, Environmental Monitoring and Altimeter Calibration in Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Mertikas, S. P.; Evans, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean area is one of great interest for its intense tectonic activity as well as for its regional oceanography. Recent observations convincingly demonstrated the importance of the area for regional meteorological and climatologic changes. Monitoring tide-gauge locations with continuous GPS on the other hand removes the uncertainties introduced by local tectonics that contaminate the observed sea level variations. Such a global tide-gauge network with long historical records is already used to calibrate satellite altimeters (e.g. on TOPEX/POSEIDON, GFO, JASON-1, ENVISAT, etc.), at present, a common IOC-GLOSS-IGS effort --TIGA. Crete hosts two of the oldest tide-gauges in the regional network, at Souda Bay and Heraklion. We recently completed the instrumentation of a third, state-of-the-art mean sea level (MSL) monitoring facility in southwestern Crete, on the isle of Gavdos, the southernmost European parcel of land. Our project (GAVDOS) further expands the regional tide gauge network to the south, and contributes to TIGA and MedGLOSS. The presentation will focus on the altimeter calibration aspect of the facility, in particular, its application to the JASON-1 mission. Another component of the "GAVDOS" project is the repeated occupation of the older tide-gauges at Souda Bay and Heraklion, and their tie to the new facility. We will present results from positioning of these sites and some of the available tidal records. The Gavdos facility is situated under a ground-track crossing point of the original T/P and present JASON-1 orbits, allowing two calibration observations per cycle. It is an ideal site if the tectonic motions are monitored precisely and continuously. The facility hosts in addition to two tide gauges, multiple GPS receivers, a DORIS beacon for positioning and orbit control, a transponder for direct calibration, and is visited periodically by water vapor radiometers and solar spectrometers, GPS-laden buoys, and airborne surveys with

  16. Improving Sea Water Quality Monitoring by Integrating Satellite, Aerial and Ground based Multispectral Observations in the optical band: the case of Ionian Sea along Basilicata (Italy) coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, T.; Ciancia, E.; Coviello, I.; Daraio, M.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.; Pignatti, S.; Santini, F.; Tramutoli, V.; Vallianatos, F.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean color satellite instruments provide information both on sea surface optical variables (e.g. upwelling normalized water-leaving radiances) and on bio-optical parameters, such as chlorophyll-a concentration, Cromophormic Dissolved Organic Matter (C-DOM) concentration, etc. A study of these parameters and of their evolution in the space-time domain may provide useful information on the overall quality of the sea water for a specific area offering, in addition, the reference behaviors necessary for identifying significant (possibly induced by anthropic pressure) changes in the coastal environment. In this context main aim of IOSMOS (IOnian Sea water quality MOnitoring by Satellite data) - a Project for European Transnational Cooperation co financed by the Operational Programme ERDF Basilicata 2007-2013 - is the development of advanced satellite products and techniques for the study and monitoring of Ionian sea water quality in terms of bio-optical properties along Basilicata (Italy) coasts. Specific goals of the project are: i) identification, tuning and assessment of advanced satellite products useful for the estimation of parameters relevant for the bio-optical characterization of the coastal waters quality; ii) identification, tuning and assessment of advanced satellite products useful for the study of sediment transport mechanisms into the sea; iii) analysis of long-term trends (up to 15 years) to identify the most exposed areas, those at highest degradation and/or greatest potential risk. On the base of airborne and in situ calibration campaigns different literature (single-image) algorithms will be validated and their results compared with original techniques based on multi-temporal satellite data analyses. In this paper main starting points and preliminary results of the IOSMOS project will be presented.

  17. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesel, A.; Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Grimaldi, Z.; Buie, A.; Dattels, C.; Steiger, C.; Wallace, K.; Salmi, I.; Tillapaugh, J.

    2011-12-01

    Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Alexa Boesel, Andrew Buie, Celia Dattels, Zoe Grimaldi, Isabella Salmi, Cameryn Steiger, Joey Tillapaugh, Kathleen Wallace The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis and Anthopluera elegantissima. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the

  18. Gas hydrate environmental monitoring program in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Chun, Jong-Hwa; McLean, Scott

    2013-04-01

    As a part of the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) has been planned and conducted the environmental monitoring program for the gas hydrate production test in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea in 2014. This program includes a baseline survey using a KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) and R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM, development of a KIGAM Seafloor Monitoring System (KIMOS), and seafloor monitoring on various potential hazards associated with the dissociated gas from gas hydrates during the production test. The KIGAM also plans to conduct the geophysical survey for determining the change of gas hydrate reservoirs and production-efficiency around the production well before and after the production test. During production test, release of gas dissociated from the gas hydrate to the water column, seafloor deformation, changes in chemical characteristics of bottom water, changes in seafloor turbidity, etc. will be monitored by using the various monitoring instruments. The KIMOS consists of a near-field observation array and a far-field array. The near-field array is constructed with four remote sensor platforms each, and cabled to the primary node. The far-field sensor array will consists of four autonomous instrument pods. A scientific Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) will be used to deploy the sensor arrays, and to connect the cables to each field instrument package and a primary node. A ROV will also be tasked to collect the water and/or gas samples, and to identify any gas (bubble) plumes from the seafloor using a high-frequency sector scanning sonar. Power to the near-field instrument packages will be supplied by battery units located on the seafloor near the primary node. Data obtained from the instruments on the near-field array will be logged and downloaded in-situ at the primary node, and transmitted real-time to the support vessel using a ROV. These data will also be transmitted real-time to

  19. The Lance Insertion Retardation meter (LIRmeter): an instrument for in situ determination of sea floor properties—technical description and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sebastian; Kaul, Norbert; Villinger, Heinrich

    2012-09-01

    Within this paper we present the Lance Insertion Retardation meter (LIRmeter) as an instrument to determine the strength of marine sediments by a measurement of the deceleration of a probe during penetration into the seafloor. The instrument has been designed for the penetration of the upper 4 m of marine sediments and is therefore suitable for site investigation applications such as cable route surveys. The LIRmeter can be easily deployed from a floating platform in water depths of up to 4,500 m. The system is suitable for long lasting missions (more than 12 h) with pogo-style measurements due to a rugged design and a special selection of sensors and electronics. The LIRmeter provides a custom data acquisition software and a web interface for acquisition setup, data download and system administration. An adaptation of the instrument to specific problems (i.e. extremely soft sediments) is possible due to interchangeable tips and adjustable weights of the lance. The specifically developed user interface and the rugged design make the instrument very easy to handle and to maintain. The sensors and the data acquisition were tested in the laboratory as well as in the field. Field measurements took place in the North Sea, where numerous measurements were performed. This paper gives an extensive description of the design of the LIRmeter (mechanics, electronics and data acquisition) supplemented by a description of data analysis and results of field- and laboratory-tests.

  20. School Flooring Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    With all of the hype that green building is receiving throughout the school facility-management industry, it's easy to overlook some elements that may not be right in front of a building manager's nose. It is helpful to examine the role floor covering plays in a green building project. Flooring is one of the most significant and important systems…

  1. School Flooring Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    With all of the hype that green building is receiving throughout the school facility-management industry, it's easy to overlook some elements that may not be right in front of a building manager's nose. It is helpful to examine the role floor covering plays in a green building project. Flooring is one of the most significant and important systems…

  2. Floors: Care and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post Office Dept., Washington, DC.

    Guidelines, methods and policies regarding the care and maintenance of post office building floors are overviewed in this handbook. Procedures outlined are concerned with maintaining a required level of appearance without wasting manpower. Flooring types and characteristics and the particular cleaning requirements of each type are given along with…

  3. Maximizing Hard Floor Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steger, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Explains the maintenance options available for hardwood flooring that can help ensure long life cycles and provide inviting spaces. Developing a maintenance system, knowing the type of traffic that the floor must endure, using entrance matting, and adhering to manufacturers guidelines are discussed. Daily, monthly or quarterly, and long-term…

  4. FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS AT LEFT. See also PA-1436 B-6 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS AT LEFT. See also PA-1436 B-13 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Monitoring Endeavour vent field deep-sea ecosystem dynamics through NEPTUNE Canada seafloor observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matabos, M.; NC Endeavour Science Team

    2010-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are dynamic systems where the complex linkages between geological, biological, chemical, and physical processes are not yet well understood. Indeed, the poor accessibility to the marine environment has greatly limited our understanding of deep-sea ecosystems. Undersea cabled observatories offer the power and bandwidth required to conduct long-term and high-resolution time-series observations of the seafloor. Investigations of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal ecosystem require interdisciplinary studies to better understand the dynamics of vent communities and the physico-chemical forces that influence them. NEPTUNE Canada (NC) regional observatory is located in the Northeast Pacific, off Vancouver Island (BC, Canada), and spans ecological environments from the beach to the abyss. In September-October 2010, NC will be instrumenting its 5th node, including deployment of a multi-disciplinary suite of instruments in two vent fields on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These include a digital camera, an imaging sonar for vent plumes and flow characteristics (i.e. COVIS), temperature resistivity probes, a water sampler and seismometers. In 2011, the TEMPO-mini, a new custom-designed camera and sensor package created by IFREMER for real-time monitoring of hydrothermal faunal assemblages and their ecosystems (Sarrazin et al. 2007), and a microbial incubator, will added to the network in the Main Endeavour and Mothra vent fields. This multidisciplinary approach will involve a scientific community from different institutions and countries. Significant experience aids in this installation. For example, video systems connected to VENUS and NC have led to the development of new experimental protocols for time-series observations using seafloor cameras, including sampling design, camera calibration and image analysis methodologies (see communication by Aron et al. and Robert et al.). Similarly, autonomous deployment of many of the planned instruments

  7. Sea Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.

    Forty-foot, storm-swept seas, Spitzbergen polar bears roaming vast expanses of Arctic ice, furtive exchanges of forbidden manuscripts in Cold War Moscow, the New York city fashion scene, diving in mini-subs to the sea floor hot srings, life with the astronauts, romance and heartbreak, and invading the last bastions of male exclusivity: all are present in this fast-moving, non-fiction account of one woman' fascinating adventures in the world of marine geology and oceanography.

  8. 6. Photocopy of measured drawing dated December, 1947 FIRST FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of measured drawing dated December, 1947 FIRST FLOOR PLAN An addendum to Hanson-Cramer House, Sea Street, south end, Rockport, Knox County, Maine - Hanson-Cramer House, End of Sea Street (moved from Pascal's Avenue), Rockport, Knox County, ME

  9. 7. Photocopy of measured drawing dated December, 1947 SECOND FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of measured drawing dated December, 1947 SECOND FLOOR PLAN An addendum to Hanson-Cramer House, Sea Street, south end, Rockport, Knox County, Maine - Hanson-Cramer House, End of Sea Street (moved from Pascal's Avenue), Rockport, Knox County, ME

  10. Web application Syntool as a tool to perform sea surface monitoring in the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkhovsky, I.

    2015-12-01

    Syntool is a web-application for environmental monitoring in the Arctic region. Its functionality makes comprehensive analysis on volumes of satellite, in situ and model data. The result of such analysis can be used to reveal different natural and artificial phenomena on a sea surface such as polar lows or oil slicks. Continuous data source renewal allows user to trace a development of a phenomenon in time up to the near real time monitoring. The application allows to select a set of products for a given date which should be displayed on a basemap. In this way each product is presented by a separate layer and can be combined with others to get a complete picture of what is happening in the region. It is possible to change visibility and opacity for each particular layer. Along with various satellite products the application's catalog offers such data sources as meteorological model data, in situ measurements, ship and polar station tracks. Any combination of layers including their order and opacity can be shared or saved by user for later investigation. Zoom capability is activated when user wants to explore some particular region in detail. Being a simple and intuitive action on a client-side it is supported by a huge set of server-side technologies: on-demand data subsetting, tiling and caching. For vector data, such as wind speed and direction or air pressure, we developed a web feature service (WFS) by contributing to an open-source project and adopting it to serve meteorological model data. All of the above allows to cut off unnecessary detalization on low zoom levels and to provide high resolution data on high zoom levels without losing in user interface responsivity.

  11. Morphodynamics video monitoring and modelling of storm events at Jesolo, Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archetti, Renata; Bonaldo, Davide; Carniel, Sandro; Parlagreco, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Near-shore zone morphodynamic assessment is crucial for beach management and hinterland protection against flooding. To this aim, high resolution coastal models are a useful tool, as they allow to couple waves, currents and sediment transport processes for simulating short term morphodynamics and coastal flooding due to extreme storm events. Calibration and validation of high resolution modelling needs coastal in-situ observations. The collection of data representative of the state of the coastal environment, essential for proper set up and calibration of the numerical models, is nonetheless a challenging and expensive task. In the framework of the Italian Flagship Project RITMARE—the Italian Research for the Sea, Subproject 3 (Coastal Waters), Workpackage 4 (Coastal Oceanographic Modeling), the North Adriatic littoral zone has been identified as one Strategic Test Area for the study of coastal dynamics and for the collection of a time series of integrated of integrated measurements to support comprehensive, detailed insight on coastal circulation, wave dynamics, sediment transport and coastal erosion. More specifically, this activity proposes and validates a system for the monitoring and modelling of hydrodynamics and morphodynamics at the beach of Jesolo, about 30 km NE Venice. The system combines a video installation and a 2DH numerical model to simultaneously provide shoreline changes and maps of nearshore waves and currents and sediment transport. In this way the system can cope with issues such as beach flooding, shoreline evolution and morphodynamic nearshore changes. The proposed poster will present first results of wave - currents - sediment simulations with the software Mike21, during selected storm events, and validation of results with in situ observation (shoreline, bar position) collected by the new video monitoring station.

  12. Newly Formed Sea Ice in Arctic Leads Monitored by C- and L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A. Malin; Brekke, Camilla; Spreen, Gunnar; King, Jennifer A.; Gerland, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the scattering entropy and co-polarization ratio for Arctic lead ice using C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite scenes. During the Norwegian Young sea ICE (N-ICE2015) cruise campaign overlapping SAR scenes, helicopter borne sea ice thickness measurements and photographs were collected. We can therefore relate the SAR signal to sea ice thickness measurements as well as photographs taken of the sea ice. We show that a combination of scattering and co-polarization ratio values can be used to distinguish young ice from open water and surrounding sea ice.

  13. Mud volcano monitoring and seismic events along the North Anatolian Fault (Sea of Marmara)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Fallahi, Mohammad; Lupi, Matteo; Mazzini, Adriano; Polonia, Alina; D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe; Gasperini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara, a pull-apart basin formed along the northern strand of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system, is considered a seismic gap, that will be filled in the next decades by a large magnitude (M>7) earthquake, close to the Istanbul Metropolitan area (12 million inhabitants). For this reason, several marine geological and geophysical studies have been carried out in this region, starting from the destructive 1999 Mw 7.4 Izmit earthquake, to gather information relative to seismogenic potential of major fault strands. Together with these studies, in the frame of EC projects (i.e., MarmESONET and Marsite, among others), an intensive program of long-term monitoring of seismogenic faults was carried out using seafloor observatories deployed during several expeditions led by Italian, French and Turkish groups. These expeditions included MARM2013, on board of the R/V Urania, of the Italian CNR, when four ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed in the central part of the Sea of Marmara, at depths between 550 and 1000 m. One of the main aims of the experiment was to assess the long-term seismic activity along an active segment of the NAF, which connects the central and the western basins (depocenters), where the principal deformation zone appears relatively narrow and almost purely strike-slip. The present study shows the results of processing and analysis of continuous data records from these OBS stations during 50 days. We were able to detect seismic signal produced by an active mud volcano located close to the NAF trace, from about 3 to 6 km of distance from the OBS stations. Additionally, we captured the May 24, 2014, Mw 6.9 strike-slip earthquake occurred in the northern Aegean Sea between Greece and Turkey, which caused serious damage on the Turkish island of Imbros and the cities of Edirne and Çanakkale, as well as on the Greek island of Lemnos. The earthquake nucleated on the westward continuation of the NAF system in the NE Aegean Sea, and was

  14. Environmental monitoring in the Mar Grande basin (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    De Serio, Francesca; Mossa, Michele

    2016-07-01

    Hydrodynamic and water quality data has been recorded since February 2014 by a meteo-oceanographic station installed in the inner part of the Gulf of Taranto, in the northeastern part of the Ionian Sea (Southern Italy). This monitoring action, managed by the research unit of the Technical University of Bari, DICATECh Department, could play a pivotal role in a vulnerable and sensitive area, affected by massive chemical and biological pollutant discharges due to the presence of heavy industry and intense maritime traffic. Monthly trends of winds, waves, currents, and biochemical parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and turbidity, are analyzed and discussed. The analysis exhibits that the wave regime is slightly controlled by wind forcing; rather, topography strongly affects the wave propagation direction. Surface currents appear wind induced in the measuring station, while near the bottom a quasi-steady current directed towards southwest is formed. The selected water quality indicators show monthly trends consistent with the typical seasonal convective fluxes and mixing.

  15. Are Sea State Measurements Required for Fatigue Load Monitoring of Offshore Wind Turbines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, U.; Kaufer, D.; Cheng, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Neural network algorithms have shown the capability to infer the actual wind turbine loading from standard signals commonly used for operational control purposes. Fatigue load monitoring done with this readily available data, can offer a robust and cost effective alternative to conventional maintenance-intensive mechanical stress measurement devices. The concept needs to be adopted to offshore wind turbines, where the exposure to the harsh environment with rather difficult accessibility makes the use particularly attractive. At such a site the impact of hydro-dynamically dominated loads might result in poor fatigue estimates, which is due to the lack of information on the surrounding sea state. In order to avoid the need of measuring-buoys, this work studies the employment of additional accelerometers mounted directly at the structure. Various potential placements and three sub-structure types are considered to account for the characteristic structural response caused by wave induced loading. The feasibility is demonstrated on generic data, gained from simulations. Recommended practices are deduced and applied to data from the AREVA M5000 turbine at "alpha ventus".

  16. Monitoring Secchi depth of the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea using a semi-analytical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dingfeng; Zhou, Bin; Xing, Qianguo; Fan, Yanguo; Li, Tantan; Sun, Xiaoling

    2014-11-01

    Secchi depth, an important optical characteristic of water, is a useful index of water quality and is widely used in many environmental studies. The Yellow Sea and the East China Sea are typical case 2 waters, where concentrations of suspended matter, phytoplankton pigments, and colored dissolved organic matter are higher than those in other open oceans. Two cruises were conducted to investigate the water optical characteristics in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea in May and June, 2009. 62 water sampling stations of Secchi disk depth were measured in situ in day time, and their values were in the range of 0.0112 to 15.6 m with the mean of 6.72 m and a standard deviation of 3.18 m. In this paper, we adapted a quasi-analytical algorithm to estimate the Secchi depth from satellite ocean data in both coastal and oceanic waters. The development of the algorithm is based on the use of in situ measurements and 8-day MODIS-Aqua remote sensing reflectance data with 4 km spatial resolution. More than 39 matchups were compiled for the MODIS sensor by spatial-temporal matching. The comparison between water transparency retrievals from remote sensing data and in situ measurements yields showed that the determination coefficient was 0.60 and a root mean square error of 8.4 m. This study suggests that the quasi-analytical algorithm provide a promising result on in situ data. In the future, maps of ocean transparency for this area will be derived using this algorithm.

  17. Development of benthic biological monitoring criteria for disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the abyssal deep sea. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.R.; Present, T.M.C.; Jumars, P.A.

    1988-09-01

    In order to develop recommendations for monitoring low-level radioactive waste dumpsites in the abyss, the report attempts a synthesis of information from three overlapping topical areas. First, U.S. Regulations governing the dumping and monitoring of wastes in the ocean are interpreted in a deep-sea context. Second, significant attention is given to experiences obtained from past dumping of low-level radioactive wastes in marine environments, both shallow-water and deep-sea. Third, the report attempts to apply the monitoring Requirements and conceptual approaches selected to the abyssal seafloor, based on present understandings of the deep-sea ecosystem.

  18. Development and validation of hydroacoustic monitoring concepts for the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander; Neumann, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reimers, Hans-Christian; Capperucci, Ruggero

    2016-04-01

    The joint research project WIMO (Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht/Scientific Monitoring Concepts for the German Bight, NE North Sea) aims at providing methods for detection and analysis of seabed habitats using modern remote sensing techniques. Our subproject focuses on hydroacoustic techniques in order to gain information about seafloor environments and sediment dynamics. In a timeframe of four years, several key areas in the German Bight were repeatedly observed using different hydroacoustic gear (i. e. sidescan sonars, single/multibeam echo sounders and sub-bottom profilers). In order to ground-truth the acoustic data, hundreds of grab samples and underwater videos were taken. With these techniques it is possible to distinguish between different seafloor habitats, which range from muddy to sandy seafloors (esp. near the barrier islands) to rugged or vegetated/populated reefs around Helgoland. The conducted monitoring program revealed seasonal changes regarding the abundance of the sand mason worm (Lanice conchilega) and the brittle star (Amphiora filiformis) as well as ongoing sedimentary processes driven by tidal currents and wind/storms. It was also possible to determine relationships between sediment characteristics and benthos in some key areas. An essential part of our project included a comparison between the datasets obtained with different hydroacoustic devices, configurations, and evaluation methods in the same study areas. The investigation reveals that there could be distinct differences in interpreting the data and hence in the determination of prevailing seafloor habitats, especially in very heterogeneous areas and at transition zones between the habitats. Therefore, it is recommended to employ more than one hydroacoustic system (preferably a singlebeam device combined with a wide-swath sonar system) synchronously during a survey in order to gain more reliable and detailed information about the seafloor environments. The

  19. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-18

    The impact crater observed in this NASA Mars Odyssey image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations.

  20. Remote sensing monitoring of green tide in the Yellow Sea in 2015 based on GF-1 WFV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiangyu; Gao, Zhiqiang; Ning, Jicai; Xu, Fuxiang; Liu, Chaoshun; Sun, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the green tide (Large green algae-Ulva prolifera) in the Yellow Sea in 2015 is monitored which is based on remote sensing and geographic information system technology, using GF-1 WFV data, combined with the virtual baseline floating algae height index (VB-FAH) and manual assisted interpretation method. The results show that GF-1 data with high spatial resolution can accurately monitoring the Yellow Sea Ulva prolifera disaster, the Ulva prolifera was first discovered in the eastern waters of Yancheng in May 12th, afterwards drifted from the south to the north and affected the neighboring waters of Shandong Peninsula. In early July, the Ulva prolifera began to enter into a recession, the coverage area began to decrease, by the end of August 6th, the Ulva prolifera all died.

  1. Near real time monitoring of platform sourced pollution using TerraSAR-X over the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Singha, Suman; Velotto, Domenico; Lehner, Susanne

    2014-09-15

    Continuous operational monitoring by means of remote sensing contributes significantly towards less occurrence of oil spills over European waters however, operational activities show regular occurrence of accidental and deliberate oil spills over the North Sea, particularly from offshore platform installations. Since the areas covered by oil spills are usually large and scattered over the North Sea, satellite remote sensing particularly Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) represents an effective tool for operational oil spill detection. This paper describes the development of a semi-automated approach for oil spill detection, optimized for near real time offshore platform sourced pollution monitoring context. Eight feature parameters are extracted from each segmented dark spot. The classification algorithm is based on artificial neural network. An initial evaluation of this methodology has been carried out on 156 TerraSAR-X images. Wind and current history information also have been analyzed for particular cases in order to evaluate their influences on spill trajectory.

  2. Compact autonomous voltammetric sensor for sulfide monitoring in deep sea vent habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreira-Pereira, Leonardo; Yücel, Mustafa; Omanovic, Dario; Brulport, Jean-Pierre; Le Bris, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    In situ chemical monitoring at deep-sea hydrothermal vents remains a challenge. Particularly, tools are still scarce for assessing the ranges and temporal variability of sulfide in these harsh environmental conditions. There is a particular need for compact and relatively simple devices to enlarge the capacity of in situ measurements of this major energy source in chemosynthetic ecosystems. With this objective, a voltammetric sensor based on a bare-silver working electrode was developed and tested in real conditions. In the laboratory, the sensor presented a linear response from 10 to 1000 μM sulfide, together with a low pH sensitivity and moderate temperature dependence. The device was operated at 850 and 2500 m depth during 3 cruises over two different vent fields. The autonomous potentiostat (290 mm length, ∅ 35 mm) equipped with laboratory-made electrodes was mounted on a wand, for manipulation from a submersible, or on a holder for unattended deployments. The system was applied in mussel, tubeworm and annelid worm habitats, characterized by different ranges of sulfide concentration, pH and temperature. Calibrations performed before and after each deployment confirmed the stability of the sensor response over a few hours to 11 days, with a maximum drift of 11.4% during this period. Short-term measurements in the vicinity of Riftia pachyptila and Alvinella pompejana were consistent with previous results on these habitats, with concentrations ranging from 20 to 140 μM and 100 to 450 μM and sulfide versus temperature ratio of 14 μM °C-1 and 20 μM °C-1, respectively. A continuous 4-day record on a bed of Bathymodiolus Thermophilus mussels furthermore illustrated the capacity of the sensor to capture fluctuating sulfide concentration between 0 and 70 μM, in combination to temperature, and to investigate the changes in the sulfide versus temperature ratio over time. The method has a higher detection limit (<10 μM) than previous in situ sulfide measurement

  3. Contribution of remote sensing data to oil spills monitoring. A pilot study in the Black and Azov Seas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchma, T.

    Oil pollution belongs to the most widespread man-caused emergency situations considerably harming natural ecosystems and different types of economic activity fishing tourism and other About 50 of oil pollution of the World Ocean is on transportation where 75 is on the ordinary process of transportation related to the illicit vessel discharges such as ballasts water tank washings flowing of engine-room and other But this type of pollution can be considerably decreased due to the effective monitoring and penalty system For monitoring of marine pollution the state inspections as a rule use marine or aviation facilities which are quite expensive limited by a day light and weather conditions and cover only a territorial waters The satellites SAR Synthetic Aperture Radar images instead can be used for studding the large equatorials and does not depend on cloud coverage season and daytime Oil discharged in the water damps gravity-capillary waves and changes the slope angle Thus oil spills could be viewed on the SAR images as black spots on an unpolluted sea surface However one of the problems in odder to create an operational integrated space-based monitoring system is an absence of various pilot researches to develop methodological principles for the unified algorithm of monitoring on international level To contribute to this need a pilot research on Oil Spills Monitoring in the Black and Azov Seas was conducted by SSPC Pryroda with a support of European Space Agency under the ERUNET project within the framework of

  4. A global observing system for monitoring and prediction of sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    The rise of global sea level is a direct consequence of climate change. A one-meter rise by the end of the century is estimated to have global economic impacts by trillions of US dollars and displacement of 10% of the world’s population if no adaptation is applied. Before the advent of satellite observations of sea surface height with radar altimetry, it was not possible to make direct determination of the global mean sea level. The sparsely located tide gauges were not able to sample the uneven spatial distribution of sea level change, leading to biased measurement. The 20-year record from satellite altimetry is the first directly measured time series of the global mean sea level. The satellite’s uniform global sampling also reveals the complex geographic pattern of sea level change over the past 20 years, underscoring the uncertainty from sparse tide gauge measurement. The contributions to recent sea level rise have roughly equal partitions among the steric effect from ocean warming, the melting of mountain glaciers, and the melting of polar ice sheets. The measurement of the change of Earth’s gravity field from the GRACE Mission has for the first time provided direct observation of the mass added to the ocean from ice melting. The difference between altimetry and gravity measurements is attributed to the steric sea level change, which has been observed by an in-situ network of float measurement (Argo). The intercomparison of satellite and in-situ observations has provided cross-calibration and mutual validation of the measurement system, demonstrating a calibrated measurement system for global sea level. The ability to diagnose sea level change in terms of its various components represents a key step towards understanding the physical processes. In order to assess the societal impact of sea level rise, one must be able to predict its regional pattern, which involves a host of other factors. The prediction of sea level change thus requires an Earth system

  5. Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Weekly-Polar-Gridded Products to Monitor Ice Sheets, Sea Ice, and Frozen Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Koenig, Lora

    2014-01-01

    Space-based microwave sensors have been available for several decades, and with time more frequencies have been offered. Observations made at frequencies between 7 and 183 GHz were often used for monitoring cryospheric properties (e.g. sea ice concentration, snow accumulation, snow melt extent and duration). Since 2009, satellite observations are available at the low frequency of 1.4 GHz. Such observations are collected by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, and the AquariusSAC-D mission. Even though these missions have been designed for the monitoring of soil moisture and sea surface salinity, new applications are being developed to study the cryosphere. For instance, L-band observations can be used to monitor soil freezethaw (e.g. Rautiainen et al., 2012), and thin sea ice thickness (e.g. Kaleschke et al., 2010, Huntemann et al., 2013). Moreover, with the development of satellite missions comes the need for calibration and validation sites. These sites must have stable characteristics, such as the Antarctic Plateau (Drinkwater et al., 2004, Macelloni et al., 2013). Therefore, studying the cryosphere with 1.4 GHz observations is relevant for both science applications, and remote sensing applications.

  6. Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Weekly Polar-Gridded Products to Monitor Ice Sheets, Sea Ice, and Frozen Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Koenig, Lora

    2014-01-01

    Space-based microwave sensors have been available for several decades, and with time more frequencies have been offered. Observations made at frequencies between 7 and 183 GHz were often used for monitoring cryospheric properties (e.g. sea ice concentration, snow accumulation, snow melt extent and duration). Since 2009, satellite observations are available at the low frequency of 1.4 GHz. Such observations are collected by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, and the Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Even though these missions have been designed for the monitoring of soil moisture and sea surface salinity, new applications are being developed to study the cryosphere. For instance, L-band observations can be used to monitor soil freeze/thaw (e.g. Rautiainen et al., 2012), and thin sea ice thickness (e.g. Kaleschke et al., 2010, Huntemann et al., 2013). Moreover, with the development of satellite missions comes the need for calibration and validation sites. These sites must have stable characteristics, such as the Antarctic Plateau (Drinkwater et al., 2004, Macelloni et al., 2013). Therefore, studying the cryosphere with 1.4 GHz observations is relevant for both science applications, and remote sensing applications.

  7. Sensing the sea bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    William Wilcock and a team of scientists and engineers drilled holes in the sea floor, and inadvertently provided a breeding ground for octopuses, in their attempt to understand deep-ocean hydrothermal venting.

  8. Environmental monitoring survey in Gemsa development lease of the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazaly, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    An offshore oil field is located in the Gemsa development lease near the west coast of the Red Sea, 50 km north of Hurgada. The wells are accommodated at a 3 leg tripod jacket in 20m meter depth. The oil produced is exported untreated to treatment facilities onshore. Production commenced end 1991. The region of extensive coral reef formation is of considerable value in view of nature conservation, scientific studies, recreation and tourist industry and has a vulnerable ecology. The area is largely influenced by strong tidal currents and a prevailing NW wind. Bottom sediments are almost completely composed of carbonate material. Bapetco requested the National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries to carry out an environmental monitoring programme, which started early 1992. Sediment samples were collected from 13 locations according to the recommendation of the Group of Experts on oil pollution of the Paris commission up to 2 km from the wells. This was repeated early collected by a grab sampler from a survey vessel with occasional help of divers. For positioning a single GFS receiver was used. The samples were analyzed in MM ways covering both the chemical composition (hydrocarbons, metals, organic carbon) and the bioactivity. Particulars of the analysis can be summarized as follows: Concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in all samples were of the same order of magnitude except one location in the immediate vicinity of the platform, still being within the margins of accuracy of the analysis methodology. Bottom flora and fauna in all samples were consistently rich as far as the variety of species and of the number of individuals within the various species is concerned. The observed change of flora and fauna of metals should be characterized as an improvement rather than as a decline. The concentrations of heavy metals declined. Organic carbon content did not show any significant change.

  9. Brown algae (Phaeophyta) for monitoring heavy metals at the Sudanese Red Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Abuagla Y. A.; Idris, Abubakr M.; Ebrahim, Ammar M.; Eltayeb, Mohmaed A. H.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at monitoring some heavy metals at the Sudanese Red Sea coast using Brown algae (Phaeophyta) as biomonitor. The total contents of heavy metals in four species (Turbinaria sp., Sargassum sp., Cystoseira sp. and Padina sp.) as well as seawater were examined. Twenty-six algae samples were collected from seven locations. The ranges of concentrations (µg/g, dry wt.) of heavy metals in algae were 4.95-16.95 for Cr, 2.93-257.32 for Mn, 1.35-7.43 for Ni, 0.83-14.10 for Cu, 4.13-19.13 for Zn, 0.03-0.15 for Cd and 0.45-2.18 for Pb. The ranges of the pH and the salinity of seawater from the same locations were 8.11-8.82 and 38.00-41.00 PSU, respectively. The ranges of concentrations (µg/L) of heavy metals in seawater were 7.00-11.00 for Cr, 2.90-10.20 for Mn, 6.70-10.10 for Ni, 1.70-5.00 for Cu, 0.94-5.70 for Zn, 0.09-0.14 for Cd and 0.93-1.80 for Pb. No significant correlations between metal concentrations in algae and seawater were observed. Some locations in the study area recorded relatively high levels of heavy metals in algae indicating possible contribution from manmade activities. Cr recorded higher levels in the study area than those in other coastal areas in the word. Padina sp. and Cystoseira sp. were better bioindicator than Turbinaria sp., Sargassum sp. for their high metal uptake.

  10. Monitoring Arctic sea ice phenology change using hypertemporal remotely sensed data: 1989-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wenxia; LeDrew, Ellsworth

    2016-07-01

    Arctic sea ice has undergone a significant decline in recent years. Previous studies have demonstrated that the annual sea ice cycle has experienced earlier melt and later freeze up, leading to a significant reduction in minimum sea ice extents and the lengthening of the melting season. The Arctic is being transformed into a regime of widespread seasonal ice with a large loss of old and thick multiyear ice in recent years. However, the sea ice change exhibits considerable interannual and regional variability at different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we present a new method for hypertemporal sea ice data change detection based on the annual sea ice concentration (SIC) profile for the melt months of each year. A decision tree-based classification is adopted to group pixels with similar annual SIC profiles, and a phenology map of each year is generated for visualization. The phenoregion map visualizes the spatial and temporal configurations of ice melt process for a year. The change detection objective is achieved by comparing the phenoregion number of the same pixel in different years. The algorithm further leads to interpretation of anomalies to obtain change maps at the pixel level. Compared to previous sea ice studies that mainly focused on a particular spatial region and commonly use time period averages, the proposed pixel-based approach has the potential to map sea ice data change both temporally and spatially.

  11. [Pelvic floor and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fritel, X

    2010-05-01

    Congenital factor, obesity, aging, pregnancy and childbirth are the main risk factors for female pelvic floor disorders (urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, dyspareunia). Vaginal delivery may cause injury to the pudendal nerve, the anal sphincter, or the anal sphincter. However the link between these injuries and pelvic floor symptoms is not always determined and we still ignore what might be the ways of prevention. Of the many obstetrical methods proposed to prevent postpartum symptoms, episiotomy, delivery in vertical position, delayed pushing, perineal massage, warm pack, pelvic floor rehabilitation, results are disappointing or limited. Caesarean section is followed by less postnatal urinary incontinence than vaginal childbirth. However this difference tends to disappear with time and following childbirth. Limit the number of instrumental extractions and prefer the vacuum to forceps could reduce pelvic floor disorders after childbirth. Ultrasound examination of the anal sphincter after a second-degree perineal tear is useful to detect and repair infra-clinic anal sphincter lesions. Scientific data is insufficient to justify an elective cesarean section in order to avoid pelvic floor symptoms in a woman without previous disorders.

  12. An Advanced Sea-Floor Spreading Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Describes models which (1) illustrate spreading that varies in rate from place to place; (2) clearly show transform faults as arcs of small circles; and (3) illustrate what happens near a pole of rotation. The models are easy to construct and have been well received by students. (JN)

  13. Possible Floor of an Ancient Martian Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-06

    This view of a portion of the Eridania region of southern Mars shows fractured, dismembered blocks of deep-basin deposits that have been surrounded and partially buried by younger volcanic deposits. The image was taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The area covered by this view spans about 12 miles (20 kilometers) across. The shape and texture of the thick bedrock layers in the Eridania basin, together with the mix of minerals identified from orbit, led researchers to identify this as the site of possible seafloor hydrothermal deposits. A schematic cross section (PIA22059 of this terrain shows an interpretation of its origin. The mineral identifications were made from observations by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars. This is a portion of Context Camera image B08_012563_1445. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22058

  14. 27. Jet Lowe, Photographer, 1979. THIRD FLOOR, INTERIOR, SOUTHEAST CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Jet Lowe, Photographer, 1979. THIRD FLOOR, INTERIOR, SOUTHEAST CORNER. FOREGROUND: 'MONITOR' ADJUSTABLE SCOURING AND POLISHING SEPARATOR BY HUNTLEY MANUFACTURING CO., BRAN DUSTER IN REAR. - Womack's Mill, Yanceyville, Caswell County, NC

  15. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 19061910 ONESTORY SHED ADDITION, FIRST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 1906-1910 ONE-STORY SHED ADDITION, FIRST FLOOR, SHOWING ROOF MONITOR, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Massachusetts Mills, Cloth Room-Section 15, 95 Bridge Street, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  16. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  17. Temporal monitoring of vessels activity using day/night band in Suomi NPP on South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Asanuma, Ichio; Park, Jong Geol; Mackin, Kenneth J.; Mittleman, John

    2017-05-01

    In this research, we focus on vessel detection using the satellite imagery of day/night band (DNB) on Suomi NPP in order to monitor the change of vessel activity on the region of South China Sea. In this paper, we consider the relation between the temporal change of vessel activities and the events on maritime environment based on the vessel traffic density estimation using DNB. DNB is a moderate resolution (350-700m) satellite imagery but can detect the fishing light of fishery boats in night time for every day. The advantage of DNB is the continuous monitoring on wide area compared to another vessel detection and locating system. However, DNB gave strong influence of cloud and lunar refection. Therefore, we additionally used Brightness Temperature at 3.7μm(BT3.7) for cloud information. In our previous research, we construct an empirical vessel detection model that based on the DNB contrast and the estimation of cloud condition using BT3.7. Moreover, we proposed a vessel traffic density estimation method based on empirical model. In this paper, we construct the time temporal density estimation map on South China Sea and East China Sea in order to extract the knowledge from vessel activities change.

  18. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  19. Five Years of Coastal Sea Level Monitoring in the bay of Bengal with CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccioni, Gaia; Dinardo, Salvatore; Benveniste, Jerome; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2016-08-01

    A continuous monitoring of sea level is particularly necessary along the coastal zones as these areas are the most exposed to flooding and storm surges that dramatically affect local economy and society. The aim of this project is to study the annual sea level variability in the Bay of Bengal exploiting five years of CryoSat-2 data. The work is focused on the analysis of CryoSats performances over coastal areas with using 20Hz SAR data from SARvatore online processing toolbox. This research is also an opportunity for comparing SIRALs LRM and SAR modes, which have covered the same area for different time frames: LRM from 2010 to October 2012 and SAR from October 2012 to present. Finally, SARvatore is compared with independent datasets like the ESA CCI products, AVISO and RADS.

  20. Offshore petroleum installations in the North Sea used as fish aggregating devices - potential and suggestions for preparation, management and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Aabel, J.P.; Cripps, S.J.; Kjeilen, G.

    1996-12-31

    There are approximately 70 working and planned structures in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The majority are steel-legged installations (oil and gas jackets) placed in depths ranging from 70 to 200 m. oil fields and structures are soon to be abandoned. Production from the North-east Frigg and Odin fields, was stopped in 1993 and 1994 respectively. From a technical and safety viewpoint, most of the structures are probably removable. Economically, concern has been expressed as to whether it is necessary to remove to shore all the installations. A positive environmental impact may be achieved by using some of the structures as fish aggregating devices. The implications of creating an artificial reef from a steel jacket by toppling in-place are discussed. A typical steel in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea weighs 5,000 - 10,000 tonnes (excluding piles) and has a volume of 100,000 - 150,000 m{sup 3}. It may also be possible to utilize some of the deck modules. Technical and biological aspects relating to artificial reef establishment are reviewed, including the identification of the chemicals and materials that need to be removed prior to toppling. Suggestions for further management and monitoring for documentation purposes, are reviewed. A 5 year monitoring programme protocol is proposed. The creation of a test reef from a steel jacket would present an ideal opportunity to obtain essential data, hitherto lacking in the North Sea, on the usefulness of high profile steel reefs as fisheries management tools. Data obtained would also be used to propose effective North Sea reef management and exploitation strategies. The suitability of using material arising from the petroleum industry, as components for artificial reefs, seeks to be determined.

  1. Monitoring environmental controls on salt-marsh foraminifera in Tuckerton, NJ: implications for sea-level research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jennifer; Khan, Nicole; Shaw, Timothy; Garcia-Artola, Ane; Dura, Tina; Horton, Ben

    2016-04-01

    Salt-marsh foraminifera have been widely used as proxies to reconstruct sea-level trends because their modern distribution is strongly linked with tidal elevation, and they are relatively abundant and have a high preservation potential in intertidal sediments. To determine former sea levels, the relation between contemporary foraminifera and their controlling environmental variables must be determined and the influence of post-depositional changes elucidated. Duration and frequency of tidal exposure, while the dominant control, is not the only environmental variable controlling the distribution of foraminifera. Complex interactions between organisms and their environment factor into foraminifera species distributions and these factors will vary over space and time. Here we present preliminary results of a spatial and temporal ecological study to monitor short-term, seasonal, and interannual variations in salt-marsh foraminifera assemblages along a salinity gradient of an intertidal zone of New Jersey, USA. The temporal nature is beneficial in recording potential lags in response to changes in environmental conditions compared with one-time sampling. Live foraminifera assemblage samples are compared with measured environmental parameters (porewater chemistry, porewater nutrients, tidal inundation, grain size) and experiments (bioturbation, overwash deposit, and infaunal) to determine the controlling environmental variables on foraminifera and how these variables and the foraminifera assemblages change through time. Ultimately, this multi-year monitoring experiment provides a more comprehensive understanding of environmental controls on salt-marsh foraminifera and will provide a background data set of salt-marsh foraminifera to compare with future studies and with sampling after large events such as storms. A greater understanding of salt-marsh foraminifera in their environment will contribute to sea-level reconstructions. Since sea-level records use the distribution

  2. 16. STATIC TEST TOWER REMOVABLE FLOOR LEVEL VIEW OF FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STATIC TEST TOWER REMOVABLE FLOOR LEVEL VIEW OF FLOOR THAT FOLDS BACK TO ALLOW ROCKET PLACEMENT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Two and Three Bedroom Units: First Floor Plan, Second Floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Two and Three Bedroom Units: First Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, South Elevation (As Built), North Elevation (As Built), East Elevation (As Built), East Elevation (Existing), North Elevation (Existing) - Aluminum City Terrace, East Hill Drive, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. 45. SECOND FLOOR WAREHOUSE, WITH CRANE AND WOODEN BLOCK FLOORING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. SECOND FLOOR WAREHOUSE, WITH CRANE AND WOODEN BLOCK FLOORING. VIEW TO NORTH. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 16. SANDSORTING BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, MEZZANINE ON LEFT (BELOW FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, MEZZANINE ON LEFT (BELOW FLOOR ARE CONCRETE AND STORAGE BINS), LOOKING NORTH - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  6. Pockmarks in the floor of Penobscot Bay, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, K.M.; Knebel, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    Hundreds of depressions (pockmarks) were found within a 40 square kilometer area of the sea floor near the head of Penobscot Bay, Maine. These roughly circular depressions range in diameter from 10 to 300 meters and extend as much as 30 meters below the surrounding sea floor. The pockmarks have formed in marine mud of Holocene age, which unconformably overlies glaciomarine deposits. The presence of shallow interstitial gas in the mud suggests that the pockmarks are related to the excipe of gas from the sediments, although other factors must be involved. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Floor of Juventae Chasma

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-17

    Juventae Chasma is an enormous box canyon which opens to the north and forms the outflow channel Maja Vallis. This image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft captures a portion of the western floor of Juventae Chasma and shows a wide variety of landforms.

  8. Using Seismic Noise Generated by Ocean Waves to Monitor Seasonal and Secular Changes in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Thompson, D. W. J.; Reusch, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's background seismic noise between ~1-30 seconds period is commonly dominated by microseisms that arise when oceanic wave energy and swell are converted to ground displacement as the waves crash and interact with the continental shelf. Peak power in the microseism bands at high-latitude stations typically coincides with large-scale extratropical cyclonic winter storm activity. However, due to the seasonal formation of sea ice around the continental shelves of polar regions, oceanic waves are impeded from efficiently exciting seismic energy, and annual peak microseism power thus occurs prior to the midwinter storm peak. We utilize recently collected seismic data from across the continent to show that power in three distinct microseism bands is found to be strongly anti-correlated with sea ice extent, with the shorter period signals being exceptionally sensitive to local conditions. Particular focus is given to the Antarctic Peninsula, the strongest source of microseism energy on the continent, where we note a significant increase in primary microseism power attributable to near coastal sources from 1993-2012. This increase correlates with regional sea ice loss driven by large-scale wind changes associated with strengthening of the Southern Annular Mode. Additionally, we use microseism analysis to explore changes in sea ice strength and extent relative to wave state and storminess in the Southern Oceans. Investigation of microseism seasonality, power, and decadal-scale trends in the Antarctic shows promise as a spatially integrated tool for monitoring and interpreting such sea ice strength and extent metrics through time.

  9. Primary carbonates and Ca-chloride brines as monitors of a paleo-hydrological regime in the Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Nicolas; Starinsky, Abraham; Stein, Mordechai

    2007-09-01

    Lakes Samra, Lisan and the Dead Sea occupied the Dead Sea basin during the Last Interglacial (˜140-75 ka BP), last glacial (˜70-14 ka BP) and Holocene periods, respectively. The age of Lake Lisan and Samra was determined by U-Th dating of primary aragonites comprising parts of the lacustrine sedimentary sequences. The lakes have periodically deposited sequences of layered calcitic marls (Lake Samra) or laminated primary aragonite (Lake Lisan). The deposition of aragonite as the primary carbonate phase reflects the contribution of the incoming freshwater (loaded with bi-carbonate) and high Mg-, Ca-chloride brine that originated from the subsurface vicinity of the Dead Sea basin. Deposition of calcitic marls suggests a minor effect of the brines. The Ca-chloride subsurface brine has been migrating in and out of the wall rocks of the Dead Sea basin, reflecting the regional hydrological conditions. During most of the last glacial period and during the late Holocene, sufficient precipitation above the Judea Mountains pushed the subsurface Ca-chloride brines into the lakes causing the deposition of aragonite. During the Last Interglacial period the rain that precipitated above the Judea Mountains was insufficient to induce brine flow toward Lake Samra. It appears that sporadic floods provided calcium, bicarbonate and detritus to produce the Samra calcitic marls. Travertines deposited at the Samra-Lisan boundary indicate the early stage in the resumption of groundwater (springs) activity that led to the resurgence of Ca-chloride brine and rise of Lake Lisan. Similar variations in the regional rain precipitation and hydrological activity probably characterized the long-term geochemical evolution of Pleistocene lacustrine water-bodies in the Dead Sea basin, enabling the use of the carbonates as paleo-hydrological monitors.

  10. The sea surface currents as a potential factor in the estimation and monitoring of wave energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianoy, Stavros; Liakatas, Aristotelis

    2015-04-01

    The use of wave energy as an alternative renewable is receiving attention the last years under the shadow of the economic crisis in Europe and in the light of the promising corresponding potential especially for countries with extended coastline. Monitoring and studying the corresponding resources is further supported by a number of critical advantages of wave energy compared to other renewable forms, like the reduced variability and the easier adaptation to the general grid, especially when is jointly approached with wind power. Within the framework, a number of countries worldwide have launched research and development projects and a significant number of corresponding studies have been presented the last decades. However, in most of them the impact of wave-sea surface currents interaction on the wave energy potential has not been taken into account neglecting in this way a factor of potential importance. The present work aims at filling this gap for a sea area with increased scientific and economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Based on a combination of high resolution numerical modeling approach with advanced statistical tools, a detailed analysis is proposed for the quantification of the impact of sea surface currents, which produced from downscaling the MyOcean-FO regional data, to wave energy potential. The results although spatially sensitive, as expected, prove beyond any doubt that the wave- sea surface currents interaction should be taken into account for similar resource analysis and site selection approaches since the percentage of impact to the available wave power may reach or even exceed 20% at selected areas.

  11. THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER TECHNOLOGY: A PROVEN AND COST EFFECTIVE METHOD TO VERIFY INTEGRITY AND MONITOR LONG TERM PERFORMANCE OF WALLS, FLOORS, CAPS, AND COVER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER, J.; SULLIVAN, T.

    2002-03-11

    Currently, containment system failures are detected by monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. Clearly this approach is inefficient, as the contaminants will have migrated from the disposal area before they are detected. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict impending cover failure are needed. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) technology can measure performance changes and integrity losses as the cover ages. This allows early detection of cover failure or pending failure so that repair or replacement can be made before contaminants leave the disposal cell. The PFT technology has been successfully applied to four subsurface barrier problems, one leak detection problem from underground ducts, and one surface cover problem. Testing has demonstrated that the PFTs are capable of accurately detecting and locating leaks down to fractions of an inch. The PFT technology has several advantages over competing approaches. The ability to simultaneously use multiple PFTs separates it from other gas tracer technologies. Using multiple tracers provides independent confirmation of flaw location, helps to clearly define transport pathways, and can be used for confirmatory testing (e.g., repeat the test using a new tracer). The PFT tests provide a direct measure of flaws in a barrier, whereas other measurements (pressure, moisture content, temperature, subsidence) provide indirect measures that need interpretation. The focus of the six PFT demonstrations has been on engineering aspects of the technology with the intent of finding if a flaw existed in the barrier. Work remains to be done on the scientific basis for this technology. This includes determining PFT diffusion rates through various materials (soils and barrier) as a function of moisture content, determining the effects of barometric pumping on PFT flow for cover systems, and determining wind effects on side slopes of cover systems and

  12. Accidental spills at sea--risk, impact, mitigation and the need for co-ordinated post-incident monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Mark F; Law, Robin J

    2010-06-01

    A fully integrated and effective response to an oil or chemical spill at sea must include a well planned and executed post-incident assessment of environmental contamination and damage. While salvage, rescue and clean-up operations are generally well considered, including reviews and exercises, the expertise, resources, networks and logistical planning required to achieve prompt and effective post-spill impact assessment and monitoring are not generally well established. The arrangement and co-ordination of post-incident monitoring and impact assessment need to consider sampling design, biological effects, chemical analysis and collection/interpretation of expert local knowledge. This paper discusses the risks, impacts and mitigation options associated with accidental spills and considers the importance of pre-considered impact assessment and monitoring programmes in the wider response cycle. The PREMIAM (Pollution Response in Emergencies: Marine Impact Assessment and Monitoring; www.premiam.org) project is considered as an example of an improved approach to the planning, co-ordination and conduct of post-incident monitoring.

  13. Eastern Floor of Holden Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 15 April 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS image covers territory on the eastern floor of Holden Crater, which is located in region of the southern hemisphere called Noachis Terra. Holden Crater is 154 km in diameter and named after American Astronomer Edward Holden (1846-1914). This image shows a mottled surface with channels, hills, ridges and impact craters. The largest crater seen in this image is 5 km in diameter. This crater has gullies and what appears to be horizontal layers in its walls. The Story With its beautiful symmetry and gullies radially streaming down to the floor, the dominant crater in this image is an impressive focal point. Yet, it is really just a small crater within a much larger one named Holden Crater. Take a look at the context image to the right to see just how much bigger Holden Crater is. Then come back to the image strip that shows the mottled surface of Holden Crater's eastern floor in greater detail, and count how many hills, ridges, channels, and small impact craters can be seen. No perfectly smooth terrain abounds there, that's for sure. The textured terrain of Holden Crater has been particularly intriguing ever since the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft found evidence of sedimentary rock layers there that might have formed in lakes or shallow seas in Mars' ancient past. This finding suggests that Mars may have been more like Earth long ago, with water on its surface. Holden Crater might even have held a lake long ago. No one knows for sure, but it's an exciting possibility. Why? If water was once on the surface of Mars long enough to form sedimentary materials, maybe it was there long enough for microbial life to have developed too. (Life as we know it just isn't possible without the long-term presence of liquid water.) The question of life on the red planet is certainly tantalizing, but scientists will need to engage in a huge amount of further investigation to begin to know the answer. That

  14. Monitoring Sea Level in the Coastal Zone with Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Calafat, Francisco M.; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Melet, Angelique; Prandi, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We examine the issue of sustained measurements of sea level in the coastal zone, first by summarizing the long-term observations from tide gauges, then showing how those are now complemented by improved satellite altimetry products in the coastal ocean. We present some of the progresses in coastal altimetry, both from dedicated reprocessing of the radar waveforms and from the development of improved corrections for the atmospheric effects. This trend towards better altimetric data at the coast comes also from technological innovations such as Ka-band altimetry and SAR altimetry, and we discuss the advantages deriving from the AltiKa Ka-band altimeter and the SIRAL altimeter on CryoSat-2 that can be operated in SAR mode. A case study along the UK coast demonstrates the good agreement between coastal altimetry and tide gauge observations, with root mean square differences as low as 4 cm at many stations, allowing the characterization of the annual cycle of sea level along the UK coasts. Finally, we examine the evolution of the sea level trend from the open to the coastal ocean along the western coast of Africa, comparing standard and coastally improved products. Different products give different sea level trend profiles, so the recommendation is that additional efforts are needed to study sea level trends in the coastal zone from past and present satellite altimeters. Further improvements are expected from more refined processing and screening of data, but in particular from the constant improvements in the geophysical corrections.

  15. The Floor of Saha E

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    Diverse textures on the floor of Saha E which could be the result of impact melt coating boulders and other deposits on the floor of the crater on the lunar farside in this image taken by NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  16. Macroalgal mass development in the Wadden Sea: First experiences with a monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, K.; Kaminski, E.; Michaelis, H.; Obert, B.; Rahmel, J.

    1995-03-01

    The distribution and cover density of macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Ulvaceae) were estimated by means of aerial surveys in 1990 1992 in the Wadden Sea of Niedersachsen, an intertidal area of some 1200 km2 situated at the German North Sea coast. Each year, up to a maximum of 15% of the total area was covered by algae. The spatial distribution was heterogeneous. In some subregions the macroalgal carpets covered from 30% up to 60% of the tidal flats. The cover density was at its peak in 1990. Additionally, tentative ground truth investigations were carried out on species composition. Reviewing other reports of macroalgal mass development at various sites in Europe, it is assumed that in the German Wadden Sea the recent macroalgal blooms have to be regarded as a response to eutrophication, and will presumably remain a chronic problem for many years to come.

  17. Monitoring the mesoscale circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea using SSS derived from SMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The circulation in the Mediterranean Sea is characterized by the inflow of fresh waters from the Atlantic Ocean through the Strait of Gibraltar. These waters, characterized by their lower salinity, create baroclinic instabilities that spawn eddies with sizes of the order of 100 km. These eddies have been widely analyzed using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations. Recent improvements in the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) retrieval and bias correction methodologies applied to the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite data have led, for the first time, to the generation of SSS maps that capture the signature of these structures. This opens the door for the generation of high spatial and temporal density maps in the Mediterranean, which can be used in a wide variety of oceanographic applications. In particular, the signature of the Alboran gyre and the eddy propagation across the Algerian coast are well reproduced, allowing for the first time to characterize the baroclinicity of the flow. The SMOS data are strongly affected by Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and land-sea contamination in the Mediterranean Sea. Two important SSS retrieval algorithm improvements are proposed in this study. First, with more than six years of SMOS data acquisitions, there is enough data to empirically characterize and correct systematic biases. Second, the filtering criterion has been modified to account for the statistical distributions of SSS at each ocean grid point. This allows retrieving a value of SSS which is less affected by outliers originated from RFI and other effects. In this study, high level (spatio-temporally consistent) SSS maps are obtained by averaging the SMOS SSS retrievals using a classical objective analysis scheme and then combining the resulting maps with Sea Surface Temperature (SST) maps by means of multifractal fusion. The SSS fused maps contain well-defined spatial structures, suitable for studying the mesoscale activity in the Western

  18. Integration of an Emerging Highly Sensitive Optical CO2 Sensor for Ocean Monitoring on an Existing Data Acquisition System SeaKeeper 1000 (trademark)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    be deployed in geat numbers to autonomously monitor the overall patterns of CO2 emissions and ocean acidification . OBJECTIVES  Meet the...Integration of an Emerging Highly Sensitive Optical CO2 Sensor for Ocean Monitoring on an Existing Data Acquisition System SeaKeeper 1000TM Annual...challenging requirements for ocean pCO2 monitoring using an innovative sensor design based on high sensitivity fluorescence detection.  Assemble the system

  19. Integration of an Emerging Highly Sensitive Optical CO2 Sensor for Ocean Monitoring on an Existing Data Acquisition System SeaKeeper 1000(TM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    be deployed in geat numbers to autonomously monitor the overall patterns of CO2 emissions and ocean acidification . OBJECTIVES  Meet the...Integration of an Emerging Highly Sensitive Optical CO2 Sensor for Ocean Monitoring on an Existing Data Acquisition System SeaKeeper 1000TM Annual...challenging requirements for ocean pCO2 monitoring using an innovative sensor design based on high sensitivity fluorescence detection.  Assemble the system

  20. Developing hydrological monitoring system based on HF radar for islands and reefs in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shi, P.; Chen, J.; Zhu, Y.; Li, B.

    2016-12-01

    There are many islands (or reefs) in the South China Sea. The hydrological properties (currents and waves) around the islands are highly spatially variable compared to those of coastal region of mainland, because the shorelines are more complex with much smaller scale, and the topographies are step-shape with a much sharper slope. The currents and waves with high spatial variations may destroy the buildings or engineering on shorelines, or even influence the structural stability of reefs. Therefore, it is necessary to establish monitoring systems to obtain the high-resolution hydrological information. This study propose a plan for developing a hydrological monitoring system based on HF radar on the shoreline of a typical island in the southern South China Sea: firstly, the HF radar are integrated with auxiliary equipment (such as dynamo, fuel tank, air conditioner, communication facilities) in a container to build a whole monitoring platform; synchronously, several buoys are set within the radar visibility for data calibration and validation; and finally, the current and wave observations collected by the HF radar are assimilated with numerical models to obtain long-term and high-precision reanalysis products. To test the feasibility of this plan, our research group has built two HF radar sites at the western coastal region of Guangdong Province. The collected data were used to extract surface current information and assimilated with an ocean model. The results show that the data assimilation can highly improve the surface current simulation, especially for typhoon periods. Continuous data with intervals between 6 and 12 hour are the most suitable for ideal assimilations. On the other hand, the test also reveal that developing similar monitoring system on island environments need advanced radars that have higher resolutions and a better performance for persistent work.

  1. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  2. Marine environmental monitoring in the shelf zone of the Black Sea: Assessment of the current state of the pelagic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arashkevich, E. G.; Louppova, N. E.; Nikishina, A. B.; Pautova, L. A.; Chasovnikov, V. K.; Drits, A. V.; Podymov, O. I.; Romanova, N. D.; Stanichnaya, R. R.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Kuklev, S. B.; Flint, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The state of the shelf pelagic ecosystem has been assessed based on multidisciplinary monitoring performed in the northeastern Black Sea in 2005-2014. Seasonal and interannual variations in sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentration have been analyzed along with the concentration of nutrients (silicate, nitrogen, and phosphate), biomass, and taxonomic compositions of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and gelatinous macroplankton. The linear trend shows an increase in the annual average SST by 0.9°C over the last decade. An increase in the winter SST is accompanied by a decrease in the concentration of silicates in spring ( p < 0.05) and an increase in summer SST, by a decrease in Chl-a concentration and biomass of diatoms in the period of summer to fall ( p < 0.05). A decrease in the phosphate concentration also has a negative effect on the development of diatoms ( p < 0.01). The decrease in diatom biomass caused a decrease in herbivorous zooplankton biomass in the second half of the year ( p = 0.05). Correlation analysis shows no significant dependence between the biomass of gelatinous top predators and mesozooplankton biomass. The assessed current state of the shelf pelagic ecosystem is regarded as stable; however, trends of a decrease in biomass and a change in the taxonomic composition of phytoplankton and zooplankton are observed during the last 2 years; the latter is likely to result from both direct and indirect effects of temperature increase in the upper sea layer.

  3. Development of state-of-the-art optical sensors for the monitoring of deep sea umbilicals and flexible pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, P.; Bertoli, S.; Sala, G.; Gaspari, R.; Pozzati, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the search for new deposits petrochemical extraction Companies are searching in challenging environments as deep sea-beds. At the same time, especially following the Gulf of Mexico disaster, there is a justified concern about the assessment of the installed asset condition. The Aerospace Engineering Department of the Politecnico di Milano and Prysmian Group R&D Department are currently carrying over a joint research project aiming to the development of new methods for the testing and evaluation of health status and conditions to be applied in the field of deep sub-sea umbilical normally employed for the petrochemical hydrocarbon extraction. The monitoring methods and the measurement system under joint development will enable Prysmian to validate vs. full scale measurement the design analytical tools currently utilized to analyze the developed elements versus the operational scenarios for which any particular umbilical is currently designed. Additionally, together with the Politecnico di Milano, Prysmian will develop a real-time measurement system to be utilized, during operational lifetime, for the asset management of the produced sub-sea umbilicals.

  4. Monitoring the variability of sea level and surface circulation with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L. "Jr"

    2004-10-01

    Variability in the ocean plays an important role in determining global weather and climate conditions. The advent of satellite altimetry has significantly facilitated the study of the variability of sea level and surface circulation. Satellites provide high-quality regular and nearly global measurements enabling us to study the oceanic variability on the spatial scales from the size of an eddy to global, and on the temporal scales from weeks to interannual and longer. This thesis demonstrates how satellite altimetry measurements can be used to study the mesoscale, seasonal and interannual variability of sea level and surface circulation. Oceanic variability at these time scales is mainly induced by the variations of heat and fresh water fluxes (buoyancy fluxes) at air-sea interface, the variations of heat and salt budget due to the advection of water masses with different properties, eddy generation mechanisms due to the instability of oceanic currents, Rossby waves, etc. It is shown how the sea level in the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean was changing during the investigated time interval from 1993 to 2003. The mesoscale, seasonal and inter-annual modes of the variability are revealed, and the magnitude and relative contribution of each mode to the total variance is assessed. The inter-annual change of the sea surface height in the northern North Atlantic, measured with altimetry, is coupled with in situ observations along the transatlantic section AR7E, repeated almost every year from 1990 to 2003 in the framework of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) and CLIVAR (CLImate VARiability) hydrographic programs. This allowed interpreting the observed inter-annual change of sea level in terms of changes in the sea water properties and the distribution of water masses. A comparative analysis of changes observed in the extratropical North Atlantic and in the extratropical North Pacific is performed. The magnitudes, spatial patterns, and also trends of the

  5. CGPS Implementation and Lidar/Laser Altimeter Experiences at l'Estartit, Ibiza and Barcelona Harbours for Sea Level Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, J.; Schutz, B.; Urban, T.; Ortiz Castellon, M.; Martinez-Garcia, M.; Ruiz, A.; Perez, B.; Rodriguez-Velasco, G.

    2008-12-01

    In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge and with a continuous GPS station nearby. The radar tide gauge is a Datamar 3000C device and a Thales Navigation Internet-Enabled GPS Continuous Geodetic Reference Station (iCGRS) with a choke ring antenna. It is intended that the overall system will constitute a CGPS Station of the ESEAS (European Sea Level) and TIGA (GPS Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring) networks. Puertos del Estado (Spanish Harbours) installed the tide gauge station at Ibiza harbour in January 2003. The station belongs to the REDMAR network, composed at this moment by 21 stations distributed along the whole Spanish waters, including also the Canary islands. The tide gauge also belongs to the ESEAS (European Sea Level) network. At the Barcelona harbour they have installed a radar tide gauge near a GPS station belonging to Puerto de Barcelona. L'Estartit floating tide gauge was set up in 1990. Data are taken in graphics registers from each two hours the mean value is recorded in an electronic support. L'Estartit tide gauge series provides good quality information about the changes in the sea heights at centimeter level, that is the magnitude of the common tides in the Mediterranean. Two airborne calibration campaigns carrying an Optech Lidar ALTM-3025 (ICC) were made on June 16, 2007 with a Partenavia P-68 and October 12, 2007, with a Cessna Caravan 208B flying along two ICESat target tracks including crossover near l'Estartit. The validation of this new technology LIDAR may be useful to fill coastal areas where satellite radar altimeters are not measuring due to the large footprint and the resulting gaps of about 15-30 km within the coastline. Measurements with a GPS Buoy at l'Estartit harbour were made during the June experience and a GPS reference station was installed in Aiguablava. On October 12, 2007, another LIDAR campaign was

  6. Submarine Sand Dunes on the Continental Slope in the South China Sea and Their Impact on Internal Wave Transformation and Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    South China Sea and Their Impact on Internal Wave Transformation and Acoustic Propagation Steven R. Ramp Soliton Ocean Services, Inc. 691 Country...sea floor to form and maintain the large (>16 m) sand dunes over the Chinese continental slope NE of Dongsha Island • Study how enhanced bottom...ES) Soliton Ocean Services, Inc,691 Country Club Drive,Monterey,CA,93924 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY

  7. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Waterline Detection and Monitoring in the German Wadden Sea Using High Resolution Satellite-Based Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehle, S.; Lehner, S.; Pleskachevsky, A.

    2015-04-01

    High resolution TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X as well as Sentinel-1 remote sensing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used to determine and monitor the waterline in the Wadden Sea. In this very unique and dynamic coastal region in the southeastern North Sea, tidal flats extend several kilometers away from the coast during low tide with features like tidal inlets and sand banks. Under the influence of tidal water currents transporting large amounts of eroded material, inlets and sand banks move over time; heavy storms can even cause large variations in their extensions in merely a few hours. Observation of these obstacles is crucial for maritime security as high ship traffic is caused by the ports of Hamburg, Bremerhaven, Wilhelmshaven and others. Conventional monitoring campaigns with ships or airplanes are economically expensive and can only provide limited coverage. We present an automatic algorithm with Near Real-Time capability for extracting the waterline at the time of recording from SAR images, which allows for a fast and large scale determination of changes in coastal outlines. The comparison of recent acquisitions of TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1 to bathymetry data of the Elbe estuary obtained in 2010 reveals significant changes in tidal flat structures.

  9. Floor of Hellas Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With a diameter of roughly 2000 km and a depth of over 7 km, the Hellas Basin is the largest impact feature on Mars. Because of its great depth, there is significantly more atmosphere to peer through in order to see its floor, reducing the quality of the images taken from orbit. This THEMIS image straddles a scarp between the Hellas floor and an accumulation of material at least a half kilometer thick that covers much of the floor. The southern half of the image contains some of this material. Strange ovoid landforms are present here that give the appearance of flow. It is possible that water ice or even liquid water was present in the deposits and somehow responsible for the observed landscape. The floor of Hellas remains a poorly understood portion of the planet that should benefit from the analysis of new THEMIS data.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in

  10. Aircraft Monitoring of Sea-Spray and Changes in Hurricane Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Sea spray above the ocean surface in hurricanes enhances the transfer of sensible heat to the atmospheric boundary layer. Sea spray becomes of greater significance as the intensity and thereby the wind speed of the hurricane increases. A fuller knowledge of the distribution of sea spray over the ocean may help in understanding changes in intensity of the most dangerous hurricanes. An instrument to measure the salt content of rain has been developed and installed on one of NOAA’s P3 hurricane research aircraft. The instrument detects changes in the conductivity of a thin film of water on the surface of the instrument. Calibration of the instrument has been completed at the University of Texas A&M wind tunnel facility. An earlier version of the sensor was flown into Hurricane Paloma (2008) at an elevation of 4 km. Changes in salt concentration were detected. A sturdier version of the instrument was flown into winter storms off the coast of Newfoundland in February of 2010. For the most part, the instrument did not function because the precipitation was a solid. But the one time the on-board meteorologist noted there was liquid precipitation, the instrument did function. Rain samples collected at ground level from eleven land falling hurricanes ranged from 5 ppm to 50 ppm (Lawrence et al, 2006 Fall AGU abstract, session A33). Hurricane Katrina showed the highest concentration of salt at 50 ppm. Sea salt measurements in rain from Hurricane Earl were underway starting on August 28 with continued plans through September 3. Salinity measurements by the instrument will be compared to wind velocities measured by the on-board radar. Because sea spray increases heat-transfer from the ocean to the hurricane atmosphere, especially in category 3 to 5 hurricanes, these studies may help improve models that predict changes in hurricane intensity.

  11. Eastern Mediterranean sea level, tectonics, environmental monitoring and altimeter calibration from the GAVDOS EU/NASA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E.; Evans, K.; Beckley, B.; Mertikas, S.

    Eastern Mediterranean is an area of great interest for its intense tectonic activity as well as for its regional oceanography. Recent observations convincingly demonstrated the importance of the area for regional climate changes. Space systems can be complemented by ground-based systems providing valuable observations: GPS monitoring tectonics, tide gauges recording the variations in Mean Sea Level (MSL). Monitoring tide gauge locations with continuous GPS removes the uncertainties introduced by local tectonics that contaminate the observed sea level variations. Such a global tide gauge network with long historical records is already used to calibrate satellite altimeters (e.g. on TOPEX/POSEIDON, GFO, JASON-1, ENVISAT, etc.). Crete hosts two of the oldest tide gauges in the regional network, at Souda Bay and Heraklion. We have now completed the instrumentation of a third, state-of-the-art MSL monitoring facility in southwestern Crete, on the isle of Gavdos, the southernmost European parcel of land. Our project -GAVDOS, further expands the regional tide gauge network to the south, and contributes to TIGA and MedGLOSS. This presentation focuses on the altimeter calibration aspect of the facility for the JASON-1 mission. The Gavdos facility is situated under a ground-track crossing point of JASON-1, allowing two calibration observations per 10-day cycle. It is an ideal site if the tectonic motions are monitored precisely and continuously. The facility hosts in addition to two tide gauges, multiple GPS receivers, a DORIS beacon for positioning and orbit control, a transponder for direct calibration and it is visited periodically by Water Vapor Radiometers and solar spectrometers. At frequent intervals we also deploy GPS-laden buoys and conduct airborne surveys with gravimeters and laser profiling lidars for a high resolution and increased accuracy geoid and an independent observation of the local Sea Surface Topography (SST). In 2003, the French Transportable Laser

  12. Modular Flooring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thate, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The modular flooring system (MFS) was developed to provide a portable, modular, durable carpeting solution for NASA fs Robotics Alliance Project fs (RAP) outreach efforts. It was also designed to improve and replace a modular flooring system that was too heavy for safe use and transportation. The MFS was developed for use as the flooring for various robotics competitions that RAP utilizes to meet its mission goals. One of these competitions, the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC), currently uses two massive rolls of broadloom carpet for the foundation of the arena in which the robots are contained during the competition. The area of the arena is approximately 30 by 72 ft (approximately 9 by 22 m). This carpet is very cumbersome and requires large-capacity vehicles, and handling equipment and personnel to transport and deploy. The broadloom carpet sustains severe abuse from the robots during a regular three-day competition, and as a result, the carpet is not used again for competition. Similarly, broadloom carpets used for trade shows at convention centers around the world are typically discarded after only one use. This innovation provides a green solution to this wasteful practice. Each of the flooring modules in the previous system weighed 44 lb (.20 kg). The improvements in the overall design of the system reduce the weight of each module by approximately 22 lb (.10 kg) (50 %), and utilize an improved "module-to-module" connection method that is superior to the previous system. The MFS comprises 4-by-4-ft (.1.2-by- 1.2-m) carpet module assemblies that utilize commercially available carpet tiles that are bonded to a lightweight substrate. The substrate surface opposite from the carpeted surface has a module-to-module connecting interface that allows for the modules to be connected, one to the other, as the modules are constructed. This connection is hidden underneath the modules, creating a smooth, co-planar flooring surface. The modules are stacked and strapped

  13. Active EM Monitoring of Sea-Bottom Geoelectrical Structures in the Areas with the Rough Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    During the recent years, the marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic (MCSEM) method has become widely used for active geophysical surveying of the sea-bottom geological structures in hydrocarbon exploration. A typical MCSEM survey consists of a set of sea-bottom receivers and a moving electrical bipole transmitter. The interpretation of the MCSEM data over the complex 3-D geoelectrical structures is a very challenging problem. This problem becomes even more complicated in the areas with the rough sea-bottom bathymetry, because the relief of a sea bottom makes a profound effect on the EM data observed by the receivers located in the close proximity to the bottom. In this paper I introduce a new approach to interpretation of the MCSEM data in the areas with the rough bathymetry. This approach is based on a new formulation of the integral equation (IE) EM modeling method in the models with inhomogeneous background conductivity. The method is based on the separation of the effects due to excess electric current induced in the inhomogeneous background domain, and those due to the anomalous electric current in the location of the anomalous conductivity, respectively. As a result, we arrive at a system of integral equations which uses the same simple Green's functions for the layered model, as in the original IE formulation. However, the new equations take into account the effect of the variable background conductivity distribution. The developed technique allows us to incorporate the known geological structures and bathymetry effects in the method of iterative EM migration/holographic imaging and inversion. This approach provides us with the ability to pre-compute only once the effect of the known geoelectrical structure (e.g., the bathymetry effect) and keep it unchanged during the entire modeling and migration process. Taking into account that precomputing the bathymetry effect constitutes the most time-consuming part of the EM modeling, this approach allows us to

  14. The entrance of the Izmit Gulf : a key site for monitoring gas emissions and seismicity in the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Luca; Polonia, Alina; Favali, Paolo; Marinaro, Giuditta; Etiope, Giuseppe; Namık Ćaǧatay, M.; Henry, Pierre; Geli, Louis

    2010-05-01

    The Sea of Marmara has been widely recognized as a seismic gap that will be probably filled in the next decades by a large (M >=7) earthquake along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system. Accordingly, new research activities started in the last years, and the possibility of installing seafloor observatories, considered. Only long-term observatories allow continuous observation of large numbers of parameters. This capability is crucial for observing natural processes that are either very episodic, or statistically require long time series to be detected. Among these phenomena, gas seepage at the seabed, occurring in various locations in the Sea of Marmara (Geli et al., 2008) may be sensitive to seismicity, providing possible precursor signals. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Gulf of Izmit, in the eastern Sea of Marmara, is a key area for monitoring the activity of the NAF through seismometers and gas sensors, because: 1) it is an area characterized by a "focusing" of the NAF principal deformation zone into a single strike-slip fault, along which the dextral strike-slip rate averaged over geological times (10 mm/y) has been measured (Polonia et al., 2004); 2) it is close to the western end of the surface rupture associated with the 1999 Izmit earthquake; thus, it is a probable area where the next earthquake will nucleate; 3) it is characterized by gas and fluids emission related to the fault activity, as documented by acoustic images of the water-column and direct observations carried out using ROVs (Gasperini et al., 2009). The methane and hydrogen sulphide escape is also confirmed by the presence of "black patches" at the seafloor observed during MarNaut cruise. Seafloor multi-parameters monitoring in this area is therefore essential to unravel relationships between geochemical, physical and geophysical parameters and the mechanical behaviour of faults; the information could then be used for seismic risk assessments and to define early-warning strategies

  15. INTERIOR VIEW OF EAST CORNER OF SECOND FLOOR SHOWING CLERESTORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF EAST CORNER OF SECOND FLOOR SHOWING CLERESTORY WINDOWS. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OVERVIEW OF SECOND FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF SECOND FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. INTERIOR VIEW OF SOUTHWEST WALL OF SECOND FLOOR SHOWING WINDOWS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF SOUTHWEST WALL OF SECOND FLOOR SHOWING WINDOWS, SLIDING DOORS AND METAL ROOF FRAMING. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. VIEW OF EQUIPMENT AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EQUIPMENT AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL OF THE MISSILE TUBE ROOM. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING CONTROL CENTER CAB. VIEW FACING WEST/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL (RIGHT) AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL (RIGHT) AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL AND SIDE OF THE MISSILE TUBE (FOREGROUND). VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SUPPORTS AND FOUNDATION BLOCKS. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING AIR COMPRESSOR TANKS AND CURVING STEEL PIECE. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Operational monitoring and forecasting in the Aegean Sea: system limitations and forecasting skill evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nittis, K; Zervakis, V; Perivoliotis, L; Papadopoulos, A; Chronis, G

    2001-01-01

    The POSEIDON system, based on a network of 11 oceanographic buoys and a system of atmospheric/oceanic models, provides real-time observations and forecasts of the marine environmental conditions in the Aegean Sea. The buoy network collects meteorological, sea state and upper-ocean physical and biochemical data. The efficiency and functionality of the various system components are being evaluated during the present pre-operational phase and discussed in this paper. The problem of bio-fouling on optical and chemical sensors is found to be a main limitation factor on the quality of data. Possible solutions to this problem as well as quality control methods that are being developed are also described. Finally, an evaluation of the numerical models is presented through the estimation of their forecasting skill for selected periods.

  7. Monitoring natural and artificial radioactivity enhancement in the Aegean Sea using floating measuring systems.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C

    2008-11-01

    In the present work, the enhancement of radioactivity due to rainfall in the Aegean Sea using floating measuring systems was observed and quantified. The data were acquired with a NaI underwater detection system, which was installed on a floating measuring system at a depth of 3m. The results of natural and artificial radioactivity are discussed taking into account the rainfall intensity and wind direction. The activity concentration of (214)Bi increased up to (991+/-102)Bq/m(3) after strong rainfall in the North Aegean Sea in winter (humid period) with east wind direction. On other hand, the maximum activity concentration reached the level of (110+/-10)Bq/m(3) in summer (dry period) during south winds.

  8. Monitoring Sea Surface Processes Using the High Frequency Ambient Sound Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    raindrops) produces a loud peak in the sound field from 13-25 kHz. This is due to unique bubble formation mechanism for small raindrops ( Medwin et... Medwin , H., JA Nystuen, PW Jacobus, LH Ostwald and DE Synder. 1992: The anatomy of underwater rain noise. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 92, 1613-1623. Mellinger...Using Underwater Sound to Determine Drop Size Distribution. Sounds in the Seas: Introduction to Acoustical Oceanography, editor, H. Medwin

  9. Environmental monitoring of heavy metals in Bulgarian Black Sea green algae.

    PubMed

    Strezov, Alexander; Nonova, Tzvetana

    2005-06-01

    Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb and Cd concentration distribution in six green macroalgae species from the Bulgarian Black Sea coast were determined. The measurement of these metals was carried out during six seasons from 1996 to 2002 using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Samples were collected from eight different sites-Shabla, Kaliakra, Tuzlata, Ravda, Ahtopol and Sinemoretz. The obtained heavy metal (HM) data (mean values microg/g) for all algae are: 650 +/- 100 for Fe, 184 +/- 15 for Mn, 5.6 +/- 0.5 for Cu, 3.3 +/- 0.3 for Pb and 1.1 +/- 0.2 for Cd. The obtained HM contents indicate that different species demonstrate various degree of metal accumulation and the obtained higher values in the northern sector of the studied zone can be attributed to the discharge influence of the big rivers, entering the Black Sea-Danube, Dnyepr, Dnester and local pollutant emissions. All data show that there is no serious contamination in green macroalgae with heavy and toxic metals along the whole Bulgarian Black Sea coast.

  10. mCSEM inversion for CO2 sequestration monitoring at a deep brine aquifer in a shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seogi; Noh, Kyubo; Seol, Soon Jee; Byun, Joongmoo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dioxide injection monitoring in offshore environments is a promising future application of the marine controlled-source electromagnetic (mCSEM) method. To investigate wheth