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Sample records for sea northeastern indian

  1. The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies. Volume 2, Northeastern Indian Catalog and Southeastern Indian Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Judith A., Ed.; And Others

    Two catalogs inventory field-recorded wax cylinders which document the music and language of Indian tribes in northeastern and southeastern United States from 1890-1930. The Northeastern Indian Catalog contains entries for 738 cylinders comprising 16 music and spoken word collections from the Chippewa, Fox, Iroquois, Kickapoo, Menominee,…

  2. Epibenthic community variability in the northeastern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Alexandra M.; Konar, Brenda; Trefry, John H.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.

    2014-04-01

    Epibenthic organisms can occur in large numbers and high biomass on the continental shelf of the northeastern Chukchi Sea. From an ecosystem perspective, epibenthic organisms are important in recycling and redistributing organic matter deposited from the pelagic zone, and they also are key members of the local food web. Data for biological (epibenthic species composition, abundance, and biomass) and environmental (bottom water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, sediment grain size, sediment organic matter and sediment chlorophyll content, latitude, longitude, and water depth) variables were collected at 53 stations in the northeastern Chukchi Sea during the summers of 2009-2010 to characterize the epibenthos and provide a benchmark for potential future changes due to possible anthropogenic disturbances. Community biomass, abundance, species composition and taxa richness varied in patches throughout the study area, but were generally dominated by crustaceans and echinoderms. These two groups had an inverse relationship in the distribution of their dominance. Communities dominated by crustaceans had significantly higher Simpson's dominance and Pielou's evenness values compared to echinoderm-dominated communities. Correlation coefficients for six environmental variables (longitude, bottom water temperature, water depth, bottom water dissolved oxygen, sediment grain size 2 phi and total organic carbon) with epifaunal abundance and biomass were moderate (0.42 for abundance and 0.51 for biomass at a significance level of 0.1%). However, assemblages within the study area followed a distinct spatial distribution pattern that matched the path of important water masses in the region.

  3. 75 FR 38935 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass Specifications; Emergency Rule... emergency action to increase the 2010 black sea bass specifications (i.e., commercial fishing quota... year. Extending the increase to the 2010 black sea bass total allowable landings (TAL) will...

  4. 77 FR 65136 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; Recreational Quota Harvested

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; Recreational Quota Harvested AGENCY: National Marine...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the 2012 black sea bass recreational harvest limit has been exceeded. No one may fish for or possess black sea bass in Federal waters for the remainder...

  5. Demersal fish assemblages of the northeastern Chukchi Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, W.E.; Smith, R.L.; Vallarino, M.; Meyer, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    We documented the distribution and abundance of demersal fishes in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, Alaska, in 1990 and 1991, and described 1990 demersal fish assemblages and their relationship to general oceanographic features in the area. We collected samples using an otter trawl at 48 stations in 1990 and 16 in 1991, and we identified a total of 66 species in 14 families. Gadids made up 83% and 69% of the abundance in 1990 and 1991, respectively. Cottids, pleuronectids, and zoarcids together made up 15% of the species in 1990, 28% in 1991. The number of species, species diversity (H), and evenness (V') generally were greater inshore than offshore and greater in the south than in the north. There were significant differences in ranks of species, species diversity, and evenness at 3 of 8 stations sampled beth years. From data collected in 1990, 3 nearshore and 3 offshore station groupings were defined. The northern offshore assemblages had the fewest species, lowest diversity and evenness, and least abundance, whereas two southern assemblages had the most species, highest diversity and evenness, and greatest abundance. We determined that bottom salinity and percent gravel were probably the primary factors influencing assemblage arrangement.

  6. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the Southern Indian Ocean (18° S-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1) are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), over estimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by a lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but over estimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by Ocean BioGeochemical Models (OBGM) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predict an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric inversions

  7. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R. M.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet it remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 PgC yr-1 is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 PgC yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the southern Indian Ocean (18-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), overestimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but overestimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by ocean biogeochemical models (OBGMs) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predicted an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than that found by atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric

  8. Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Johnson, K.R.; Barber, John H.

    1983-01-01

    A dense ampeliscid amphipod community in Chirikov Basin and around St. Lawrence Island in the northeastern Bering Sea has been outlined by summarizing biological studies, analyzing bioturbation in sediment samples, and examining sea floor photos and videotapes. The amphipod population is associated with a homogeneous, relict fine-grained sand body 0.10-1.5 m thick that is deposited during the marine transgression over the Bering land bridge 8,000-10,000 yr B.P. Modern current and water mass movements and perhaps whale feeding activity prevent modern deposition in this area. The distribution of the transgressive sand sheet, associated amphipod community and feeding gray whales mapped by aerial survey correlate closely with three types of sea-floor pits observed on high (500 kHz) and low (105 kHz) resolution side-scan sonar; they are attributed to gray whale feeding traces and their subsequent current scour modification. The fresh and modified feeding pits are present in 22,000 km2 of the basin and they cover a total of 2 to 18% of the sea floor in different areas of the feeding region. The smallest size class of pits approximates whale mouth gape size and is assumed to represent fresh whale feeding pits. Fresh feeding disturbance of the sea floor is estimated to average about 5.7% for a full feeding season. Combined with information that 34% of the measured benthic biomass is amphipod prey species, and calculating the number of gray whale feeding days in the Alaskan waters plus amount consumed per day, it can be estimated that Chirikov Basin, 2% of the feeding area, supplies a minimum of 5.3 to 7.1% of the gray whale's food resource in the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean. If a maximum of 50% of the fresh feeding features are assumed to be missed because they parallel side-scan beam paths, then a maximum whale food resource of 14.2% is possible in northeastern Bering Sea. Because of side-scan techniques and possible higher amphipod biomass estimates, a reasonable minimum

  9. Ethnobotany in Intermedical Spaces: The Case of the Fulni-ô Indians (Northeastern Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Soldati, Gustavo Taboada; Paulino de Albuquerque, Ulysses

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the Fulni-ô medical system and introduced its intermedical character based on secondary data published in the literature. Then we focused on the medicinal plants known to the ethnic group, describing the most important species, their therapeutic uses and the body systems attributed to them. We based this analysis on the field experience of the authors in the project Studies for the Environmental and Cultural Sustainability of the Fulni-ô Medical System: Office of Medicinal Plant Care. This traditional botanical knowledge was used to corroborate the hybrid nature of local practices for access to health. We show that intermedicality is a result not only of the meeting of the Fulni-ô medical system with Biomedicine but also of its meeting with other traditional systems. Finally, we discuss how traditional botanical knowledge may be directly related to the ethnogenesis process led by the Fulni-ô Indians in northeastern Brazil. PMID:21961025

  10. Bajocian-Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) sea-level changes in northeastern Egypt: Synthesis and further implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, Dmitry A.; Sallam, Emad S.

    2016-08-01

    The global eustatic developments can benefit significantly from properly acquired regional information. Summarizing the available interpretations of the relative sea-level changes from two areas in northeastern Egypt, namely Gebel Maghara and Khashm El-Galala, allows better understanding of the Middle Jurassic sea-level changes. It is established that the Bajocian-Bathonian relative sea-level changes in these areas were coherent. The magnitude of changes was lower in the Bajocian than in the Bathonian. Significant sea-level rises occurred at the Bajocian-Bathonian and middle-late Bathonian transitions, and there was a clear tendency toward sea-level rise throughout the studied time interval. This evidence favors one of the two alternative global eustatic reconstructions that implies "stable" position of the shoreline in the Bajocian and general tendency to eustatic rise throughout the Jurassic. The tectonic regime of northeastern Egypt in the Middle Jurassic provided for strong eustatic control of the relative sea-level changes. The possible influence of hotspot activity is questionable. Filling the accommodation space with materials derived from the eroded continent may explain some sea-level falls that are regionally documented.

  11. Sea surface temperature associations with the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, P.; Delecluse, P.; Labattu, S.; Terray, L.

    2003-04-01

    This paper uses recent gridded data and Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations in order to assess the relationships between interannual variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomaly patterns over the Indian and Pacific oceans. Interannual variability of ISM rainfall and dynamical indices for the traditional summer monsoon season (June-September) are strongly influenced by rainfall and circulation anomalies observed during August and September, or the Late Indian Summer Monsoon (LISM). Southern Indian Ocean SST acts as a major boundary forcing for the LISM system. Strong (weak) LISMs are preceded by significant positive (negative) SST anomalies in the southeastern subtropical Indian Ocean, off Australia. These SST anomalies are highly persistent and affect the northwestward translation of the Mascarene high from austral to boreal summer. The southeastward (northwestward) shift of this subtropical high associated with cold (warm) SST anomalies off Australia causes a weakening (strengthening) of the whole monsoon circulation through a modulation of the local Hadley cell during the LISM. Furthermore, it is suggested that the Mascarene high interacts with the underlying SST anomalies through a positive dynamical feedback mechanism, maintaining its anomalous position during the LISM. Southeastern Indian Ocean SST anomalies during boreal winter are mainly linked to subtropical Indian Ocean dipole events, studied by Behera and Yamagata (2001), and to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. An El Niño event and the associated warm SST anomalies over the southeastern Indian Ocean during boreal winter may play a key role in the development of a strong ISM by strengthening the local Hadley circulation during the LISM. On the other hand, a developing La Niña event in boreal summer may also enhance the east-west Walker circulation and the monsoon.

  12. Hydrologic data for the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, J.N.; Craigg, S.D.; Mendes, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents selected hydrologic data for the East Poplar oil field, located in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in northeastern Montana. Data about the occurrence, quantity, and quality of ground and surface water are presented in tabular form. The tables contain records of privately owned wells (active and abandoned), monitoring wells installed by the U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, oil wells, and brine-injection wells; lithologic descriptions of drill cuttings and well-completion data from monitoring wells; data from two aquifer tests conducted in Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits; chemical quality of ground water; and information on the quantity and chemical quality of surface water. Records of electromagnetic geophysical measurements collected throughout an area of about 20 square miles of the study area are compiled and included on a floppy disk. Illustrations in this report contain information about study area location, site- numbering system, general physical and cultural features, and construction of monitoring wells installed by the U.S. Geological Survey. plate-sized map presents additional information about privately owned wells, monitoring wells, oil wells, brine-injections wells, surface-water data-collection sites, and area of electromagnetic data collection. The data presented in this report provide a base with which to better define and interpret the occurrence, quantity, and quality of ground and surface water in the vicinity of the Poplar River Valley in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The data can be used to help delineate the occurrence of brine and saline water in Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits in the East Poplar oil field.

  13. Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, D. K.; Robinson, M. M.; Dowsett, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mid-Pliocene (~3.3 to 3.0 Ma) climate is being reconstructed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project. The Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) dataset is an integral piece of PRISM’s climate reconstruction and continually evolves over time as additional data are added and refined. The Indian Ocean has in the past been a region lacking PRISM SST data coverage, while it is also a region marked with interesting climate phenomena (e.g., the Indian Ocean Dipole). Questions over the existence of these modern oceanographic elements during the mid-Piacenzian have led to increased interest in the Indian Ocean. New data analyzed by PRISM provides insight on what Indian Ocean circulation and SST may have been like ~3 million years ago. Using planktic foraminifera sampled and analyzed from Indian Ocean ODP Sites 709, 716, 754, 758, and 763, PRISM is developing new mid-Pliocene SST estimates to better understand this region’s paleoceanography.

  14. Sea Surface Temperature Forcing of the Late Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, P.; Delecluse, P.; Labattu, S.; Terray, L.; Cassou, C.

    2002-12-01

    This paper uses recent historical data and Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations in order to assess the relationships between interannual variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomaly patterns over the Indian and Pacific oceans. The focus is on the predictability of ISM rainfall and circulation, and its links to local (Indian Ocean) and remote (Pacific Ocean) SST forcing. Interannual variability of ISM rainfall and dynamical indices for the traditional summer monsoon season (June-September) are strongly influenced by rainfall and circulation anomalies observed during August and September, or the Late Indian Summer Monsoon (LISM). Anomalous monsoons are linked to well-defined LISM rainfall and large-scale circulation anomalies. The whole three-dimensional monsoon circulation, i.e., the east-west Walker and local Hadley circulations, fluctuates during the LISM of anomalous ISM years. LISM circulation is weakened and shifted eastward during weak ISM years. Therefore, we focus on the predictability of the LISM in this study. It is found that southern Indian Ocean SST acts as a major boundary forcing for the LISM system. Strong (weak) LISMs are preceded by significant positive (negative) SST anomalies in the southeastern subtropical Indian Ocean, off Australia. These SST anomalies are highly persistent and affect the northwestward translation of the Mascarene high from austral to boreal summer. The southeastward (northwestward) shift of this subtropical high associated with cold (warm) SST anomalies off Australia causes a weakening (strengthening) of the whole monsoon circulation through a modulation of the local Hadley cell during the LISM. Furthermore, it is suggested that the Mascarene high interacts with the underlying SST anomalies through a positive dynamical feedback mechanism, maintaining its anomalous position during the LISM. Southeastern Indian Ocean SST anomalies during boreal winter are mainly

  15. Salt tectonics in the northeastern Nordkapp Basin, southwestern Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Koyi, H.; Talbot, C.J.; Torudbakken, B.O.

    1996-12-31

    Salt structures in the northeastern Nordkapp subbasin are interpreted on reflection seismic profiles. Thickness variations indicate localized accumulation of the mother salt in Late Carboniferous-Early Permian time. Rapid sedimentation in the Early Triassic accompanied rise of salt into asymmetric salt pillows during regional extension. These pillows domed the prekinematic Permian sediments and became diapiric during the late Early-Middle Triassic, perhaps as a result of thin-skinned normal faulting decoupled by the salt from old basements faults reactivated by thick-skinned regional (northwest-southeast) extension. Variations in size, maturity, and evolution history of individual salt structures can be attributed to local differences in thickness of the initial salt layer and its burial history. Salt structures form three rows concentric to the basin margins and cover {approximately}20% of the basin area. Some salt stocks appear to overlie basement faults. Asymmetric primary, secondary, and in places tertiary, peripheral sinks indicate that salt was withdrawn mainly from the basin side of most diapirs throughout Triassic downbuilding.

  16. 77 FR 68723 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Northeastern United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries; 2013-2014 Summer Flounder... summer flounder, scup, and black sea bass fisheries, and the 2014 summer flounder and scup fisheries, and... Fishery Management Council's Research Set-Aside Program. The implementing regulations for the...

  17. Mercury distribution in ancient and modern sediments of northeastern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C. Hans; Pierce, D.E.; Leong, K.W.; Wang, F.F.

    1972-01-01

    A reconnaissance of surface and subsurface sediments to a maximum depth of 244 feet below the sea floor shows that natural mercury anomalies from 0.2 to 1.3 ppm have been present in northeastern Bering Sea since early Pliocene. The anomalies and mean values are highest in modern beach (maximum 1.3 and mean 0.22 ppm Hg) and nearshore subsurface gravels (maximum 0.6 and mean .06 ppm Hg) along the highly mineralized Seward Peninsula and in organic rich silt (maximum 0.16 and mean 0.10 ppm Hg) throughout the region; the mean values are lowest in offshore sands (0.03 ppm Hg) . Although gold mining may be partially responsible for high mercury levels in the beaches near Nome, Alaska, equally high or greater concentrations of mercury occur in ancient glacial sediments immediately offshore (0.6 ppm) and in modern unpolluted beach sediments at Bluff (0.45 - 1.3 ppm); this indicates that the contamination effects of mining may be no greater than natural concentration processes in the Seward Peninsula region. The background content of mercury (0.03) throughout the central area of northeastern Bering Sea is similar to that elsewhere in the world. The low mean values (0.04 ppm) even immediately offshore from mercury-rich beaches, suggests that in the surface sediments of northeastern Bering Sea, the highest concentrations are limited to the beaches near mercury sources; occasionally, however, low mercury anomalies occur offshore in glacial drift derived from mercury source regions of Chukotka and Seward Peninsula and reworked by Pleistocene shoreline processes. The minimal values offshore may be attributable to beach entrapment of heavy minerals containing mercury and/or dilution effects of modern sedimentation.

  18. Geochemical peculiarities of sediments in the northeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, A. G.; Gursky, Yu. N.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of chemical determinations of Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Pb, Sb, and As in Black Sea sediments over a profile from the Kerch Strait to the eastern part of a deep depression (2210 m). The lithological and geochemical variations were studied in the horizontal and vertical profiles of sediments up to 3 m thick. The tendencies in the distributions of the studied metals during Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentation were analyzed beginning from Neoeuxinian freshwater deposits via the overlaying Drevnechernomorian beds with elevated contents of sapropel to modern clayey carbonate deposits with coccolithophorids. Statistical factor analysis isolated five factors: two main factors (75% of the total dispersion) and three subordinate factors. The first leading biogenic factor (47% of dispersion) reflects the correlation between Corg, Cu, and Ni; the second terrigenous factor (28% of dispersion) combimes Fe, Al, Cr, and Sb. The chemical composition of the sediments reflects the manifestation of diagenesis of landslide processes and mud volcanism along with sedimentation regularities.

  19. The relationship between Arabian Sea upwelling and Indian Monsoon revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xing; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is important to marine ecosystems and human activities. It transports nutrient-rich deep water mass that supports marine biological productivity. In this study, we aim to characterize the large-scale climate forcings that drive upwelling along the western Arabian Sea coast. Studies based on ocean sediments suggest that there is a link between this coastal upwelling system and the Indian summer monsoon. However, a more direct method is needed to examine the influence of various forcings on upwelling. For this purpose, we analyse a high-resolution (about 10 km) global ocean simulation (denoted STORM), which is based on the MPI-OM model developed by the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg driven by the global meteorological reanalysis NCEP over the period 1950-2010. This very high spatial resolution allows us to identify characteristics of the coastal upwelling system. We compare the simulated upwelling velocity of STORM with two traditional upwelling indices: along-shore wind speed and sea surface temperature. The analysis reveals good consistency between these variables, with high correlations between coastal upwelling and along-shore wind speed (r=0.85) as well as coastal sea surface temperature (r=-0.77). To study the impact of the monsoon on the upwelling we analyse both temporal and spatial co-variability between upwelling velocity and the Indian summer monsoon index. The spatial analysis shows that the impact of the monsoon on the upwelling is concentrated along the coast, as expected. However, somewhat unexpectedly, the temporal correlation between the coastal upwelling and the monsoon index is rather weak (r=0.26). Also, the spatial structure of upwelling in the Arabian Sea as revealed by a Principal Component Analysis is rather rich, indicating that factors other than the Monsoon are also important drivers of upwelling. In addition, no detectable trend in our coastal upwelling is found in the simulation that would match the

  20. Does the Maritime Continent region affect sea level change of the eastern Indian Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Lee, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Maritime Continent region, in particular, the Indonesian Sea, regulates the oceanic communication between the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Previous studies suggest that the freshwater transported from the South China Sea to the Indonesian Sea affects the magnitude and structure of the Indonesian throughflow, and the strong tidal mixing in the Indonesian Sea alters the time mean vertical structure of the water mass carried from the Pacific to the Indian Oceans. Sea level changes in the eastern Indian Ocean is known to be affected by those in the northwestern Pacific via coastal Kelvin wave propagation through the Indonesian Sea. However, whether the Maritime Continent region influences sea level changes in the eastern Indian Ocean has not been investigated. In this study, we used Argo floats and satellite altimeter data to study the near decadal change of sea level during the 2005-2013 period. We found that the steric sea level change in eastern Indian Ocean cannot be fully explained by either local forcing or the transmission of steric signal from the western Pacific. This implicates the potential role of the Maritime Continent region in regulating sea level changes in the eastern Indian Ocean.

  1. Sea-floor geology and topography offshore in northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Glomb, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry, covering approximately 52.9 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12012, these acoustic data and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data are interpreted (1) to define the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) as part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  2. Modes of sedimentary basin formation in the north-eastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Randell; Starostenko, Vitaly; Sydorenko, Grygoriy; Yegorova, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    The Greater Caucasus and Black Sea sedimentary basins developed in a Mesozoic back-arc setting, the former older than the latter (Jurassic v. Cretaceous). Compressional shortening of the former and accompanying ongoing development of marginal basin depocentres in the north-eastern Black Sea - which is closely tied to the formation of the Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogen - is a Cenozoic phenomenon, starting in the Eocene and proceeding until the present day. Recently, the sedimentary basin/crust/lithosphere geometry of the study area has been characterised across a range of scales using regional seismic reflection profiling, long-offset refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling and local earthquake tomography. These provide a new integrated image of the present-day crustal structure and sedimentary basin architecture of the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea, north across the Azov Sea and provide evidence of the deeper expression of sedimentary basins and the processes controlling the geometry of their inversion during the Cenozoic. It is inferred that the Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, lying stratigraphically below the Black Sea and younger sedimentary successions, extends further to the west than previously known. This basin has significant thickness in the area between the Azov and Black seas and probably forms the deeper core of the Crimea-Caucasus inversion zone. The Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogenic belt is the expression of "basin inversion" of the Jurassic Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, the degree of inversion of which varies along strike. The Greater Caucasus foredeep basins - Indolo-Kuban and Sorokin-Tuapse troughs -represent syn-inversional marginal troughs to the main inversion zone. The Shatsky Ridge - the northern flank of the main East Black Sea Basin - may also be mainly a syn-inversional structure, underlain by a blind thrust zone expressed as a northward dipping zone of seismicity on the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea.

  3. Oysters, estuaries, and Late Pleistocene-Holocene sea level, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W.W. . Marine Science Program); Shultz, A.W. )

    1993-03-01

    The timing and magnitude of global sea level fluctuations over the past 35 kyr remain nondum ostenduntur after three decades of study. The construction of local relative sea level histories is often complicated by the need to assess regional tectonic and climatic components together. The authors attempt to contribute to an understanding of sea level fluctuations in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico through the application of faunal tracking, using fossil oyster shells as indicators of paleoestuarine environments. They assume that sites on the continental shelf where oysters have been collected were coastal and therefore are reasonable approximations of past shoreline locations and sea-level elevations. They acknowledge that this assumption is a leap of faith for some observers, but is justified as a provisional step toward an independent determination. Insights into Quaternary coastal paleogeography are gathered from locations and radiocarbon ages of American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) shells collected from the Alabama continental shelf. Prior to the onset of the last Wisconsinan glaciation (35 to 26 kyr BP), estuaries occupied a zone 20 to 25 km seaward of today's coastline. As glaciation increased and sea level was lowered (23 to 21 kyr BP), open coastal estuarine conditions developed southward. Oysters dating from the lowstand period (20 to 16 kyr BP) have not been collected. As sea level rose over the next 10 kyr (16 to 6 kyr BP), estuaries were displaced northward in steps. This data on depths and ages can be viewed as supporting an interpretation of fluctuating Holocene sea level, rather than a steady sea-level rise.

  4. Marine mammal acoustic detections in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, September 2007-July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, David E.; Delarue, Julien; Mouy, Xavier; Martin, Bruce S.; Leary, Del; Oswald, Julie N.; Vallarta, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    Several cetacean and pinniped species use the northeastern Chukchi Sea as seasonal or year-round habitat. This area has experienced pronounced reduction in the extent of summer sea ice over the last decade, as well as increased anthropogenic activity, particularly in the form of oil and gas exploration. The effects of these changes on marine mammal species are presently unknown. Autonomous passive acoustic recorders were deployed over a wide area of the northeastern Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska from Cape Lisburne to Barrow, at distances from 8 km to 200 km from shore: up to 44 each summer and up to 8 each winter. Acoustic data were acquired at 16 kHz continuously during summer and on a duty cycle of 40 or 48 min within each 4-h period during winter. Recordings were analyzed manually and using automated detection and classification systems to identify calls. Bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) and beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) whale calls were detected primarily from April through June and from September to December during their migrations between the Bering and Beaufort seas. Summer detections were rare and usually concentrated off Wainwright and Barrow, Alaska. Gray (Eschrichtius robustus) whale calls were detected between July and October, their occurrence decreasing with increasing distance from shore. Fin (Balaenoptera physalus), killer (Orcinus orca), minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), and humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) whales were detected sporadically in summer and early fall. Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) was the most commonly detected species between June and October, primarily occupying the southern edge of Hanna Shoal and haul-outs near coastal recording stations off Wainwright and Point Lay. Ringed (Pusa hispida) and bearded (Erignathus barbatus) seals occur year-round in the Chukchi Sea. Ringed seal acoustic detections occurred throughout the year but detection numbers were low, likely due to low vocalization rates. Bearded seal acoustic detections

  5. Effects of produced waters at oilfield production sites on the Osage Indian Reservation, northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Asher-Bolinder, Sigrid; Owen, Douglass E.; Hall, Laurel

    1997-01-01

    The authors conducted limited site surveys in the Wildhorse and Burbank oilfields on the Osage Indian Reservation, northeastern Oklahoma. The purpose was to document salt scarring, erosion, and soil and water salinization, to survey for radioactivity in oilfield equipment, and to determine if trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) were present in soils affected by oilfield solid waste and produced waters. These surveys were also designed to see if field gamma spectrometry and field soil conductivity measurements were useful in screening for NORM contamination and soil salinity at these sites. Visits to oilfield production sites in the Wildhorse field in June of 1995 and 1996 confirmed the presence of substantial salt scarring, soil salinization, and slight to locally severe erosion. Levels of radioactivity on some oil field equipment, soils, and road surfaces exceed proposed state standards. Radium activities in soils affected by tank sludge and produced waters also locally exceed proposed state standards. Laboratory analyses of samples from two sites show moderate levels of copper, lead, and zinc in brine-affected soils and pipe scale. Several sites showed detectable levels of bromine and iodine, suggesting that these trace elements may be present in sufficient quantity to inhibit plant growth. Surface waters in streams at two sampled sites exceed total dissolved solid limits for drinking waters. At one site in the Wildhorse field, an EM survey showed that saline soils in the upper 6m extend from a surface salt scar downvalley about 150 m. (Photo [95k]: Dead oak trees and partly revegetated salt scar at Site OS95-2 in the Wildhorse field, Osage County, Oklahoma.) In the Burbank field, limited salt scarring and slight erosion occurs in soils at some sites and low to moderate levels of radioactivity were observed in oil field equipment at some sites. The levels of radioactivity and radium observed in some soils and equipment at these

  6. Effect of surface mesoscale eddies on deep-sea currents and mixing in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Liu, Zhifei; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Jianru; Liang, Xinfeng

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that deep-reaching surface-generated eddies result in anomalous current velocities in the deep sea, and ultimately lead to energy transfer from mesoscale to small-scale motions. Here we examine the influence of mesoscale eddies on deep-sea subinertial and near-inertial currents, and on possible enhanced oceanic mixing in the deep South China Sea (SCS). We analyzed current velocity data for nearly a full water column. Data were obtained using acoustic Doppler current profilers and recording current meters on a deep-sea mooring system at a depth of 2100 m in the northeastern SCS from October 2012 to May 2013. A highly nonlinear southwestward-propagating anticyclonic eddy was detected via a resolved sea-surface-level anomaly. This eddy induced pronounced subinertial currents with a characteristic time scale of 1-2 months and a maximum velocity of up to 0.2 m s-1 at the subsurface and 0.1 m s-1 at great depth. Near-inertial energy co-occurring with subinertial flows showed a distinctive vertical propagation trend during strong subinertial oscillations in the deep sea. During periods of strong subinertial and near-inertial kinetic energy, estimates of diapycnal diffusivity in the deep ocean showed approximately 10-fold enhancement, with a mean value of 1.2×10-3 m2 s-1 compared to the background value of 1.4×10-4 m2 s-1. The results provide observational evidence of the effect of surface-observed mesoscale motions on benthic currents and ocean mixing in the deep SCS.

  7. Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P.G.; Parker, Castle E.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

  8. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of bacteria isolated from diseased cultured sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in Northeastern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the winter–spring from 2004 to 2006 in northeastern China cultured Japanese sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus suffered from a serious disease. Clinical signs included swollen mouth, skin ulceration and massive mortality. Clinical samples taken during this period were studied. Thirty-one bac...

  9. Interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon associated with the air-sea feedback in the northern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ravi P.; Huang, Bohua

    2016-03-01

    Using observation-based analyses, this study identifies the leading interannual pattern of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) independent of ENSO and examines the potential mechanisms of its formation. For this purpose, an objective procedure is used to isolate the variability of the summer precipitation associated with the contemporary ENSO state and in previous winter-spring, which influence the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region in opposite ways. It is shown that the leading pattern of these ENSO-related monsoon rainfall anomalies reproduces some major ISMR features and well represents its connections to the global-scale ENSO features in both lower and upper troposphere. On the other hand, the leading pattern derived from the precipitation anomalies with the ENSO component removed in the ISM and surrounding region also accounts for a substantial amount of the monsoon precipitation centered at the eastern coast of the subtropical Arabian Sea, extending into both the western Indian Ocean and the Indian subcontinent. The associated atmospheric circulation change is regional in nature, mostly confined in the lower to mid troposphere centered in the Arabian Sea, with a mild connection to an opposite tendency centered at the South China Sea. Further analyses show that this regional pattern is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea feedback during early to mid summer season. Specifically, before the monsoon onset, an anomalous atmospheric high pressure over the Arabian Sea causes excessive shortwave radiation to the sea surface and increases SST in May. The warm SST anomalies peak in June and reduce the sea level pressure. The anomalous cyclonic circulation generates regional convection and precipitation, which also induces subsidence and anticyclonic circulation over the South China Sea. The combined cyclonic-anticyclonic circulation further transport moisture from the western Pacific into the Indian Ocean and causes its convergence into the Arabian Sea. As a

  10. Characteristics and possible origin of native aluminum in cold seep sediments from the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Huang, Chi-Yue; Zhao, Meixun; Yan, Wen; Chien, Chih-Wei; Chen, Muhong; Yang, Huaping; Machiyama, Hideaki; Lin, Saulwood

    2011-01-01

    Although native aluminum (Al°) has been reported to occur in various geological settings for more than 20 locations but its mechanism of formation still remains to be elucidated. We report the occurrence and characterization of Al° particles recovered from the surface sediment (CF4) and a short core sediment (ROV-G, 37 cm length) obtained at cold seeps in the northeastern continental slope (NCS) of the South China Sea (SCS). X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the collected particles are metallic aluminum with the unit cell edge a of 4.059 ± 0.005 Å (CF4#2) and 4.029 ± 0.004 Å (T26-28#2, ROV-G). The Al° particles occur as spherules, irregular plates and elongated forms with typical lamellar structures. Their chemical compositions are 95.07-99.84% Al (the average values is 98.42%) with very small amounts of Si, Fe, Ti, S, Zn, Mg, Ca, K, Na, Cu, Co and P, and are similar to Al° particles from the East Pacific Rise and the Central Indian Basin but differ markedly to those from other locations. After ruling out several possibilities of Al° sources and mechanism of formation, an alternative cold seep mechanism is proposed for the origin of Al° in the SCS. During the processes of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and pyrite formation, high H 2S and H 2 partial pressures result in strong reducing micro-environments, under which Al(OH)4- is reduced to its metallic state by the microbial-bacterial processes.

  11. Ecological consequences of biological invasions: three invertebrate case studies in the north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotta, Jonne; Kotta, Ilmar; Simm, Mart; Lankov, Ain; Lauringson, Velda; Põllumäe, Arno; Ojaveer, Henn

    2006-05-01

    Population dynamics and ecological impacts of the cirriped Balanus improvisus, the polychaete Marenzelleria neglecta and the cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi were investigated in the north-eastern Baltic Sea. After an increase during the first decade of invasion, the density of M. neglecta and C. pengoi declined afterwards. The studied abiotic environmental variables did not explain the interannual variability in the seasonal cycles of M. neglecta and C. pengoi indicating that the species are at their initial phase of invasion. The population dynamics of B. improvisus was best described by water temperature. B. improvisus promoted the growth of the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis. M. neglecta enhanced the content of sediment chlorophyll a and reduced growth and survival of the polychaete Hediste diversicolor and growth of the amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Concurrent with the invasion of C. pengoi the abundance of small-sized cladocerans declined, especially above the thermocline. C. pengoi had become an important food for nine-spined stickleback, bleak, herring and smelt.

  12. Temporal record of Pu isotopes in inter-tidal sediments from the northeastern Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda; Andersen, Morten B; Kershaw, Peter; Leonard, Kins; Choi, Min-Seok; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    A depth profile of (239)Pu and (240)Pu specific activities and isotope ratios was determined in an inter-tidal sediment core from the Esk Estuary in the northeastern Irish Sea. The study site has been impacted with plutonium through routine radionuclide discharges from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria, NW England. A pronounced sub-surface maximum of ~10 k Bq kg(-1) was observed for (239+240)Pu, corresponding to the peak in Pu discharge from Sellafield in 1973, with a decreasing trend with depth down to ~0.04 k Bq kg(-1) in the deeper layers. The depth profile of (239+240)Pu specific activities together with results from gamma-ray spectrometry for (137)Cs and (241)Am was compared with reported releases from the Sellafield plant in order to estimate a reliable sediment chronology. The upper layers (1992 onwards) showed higher (239+240)Pu specific activities than would be expected from the direct input of annual Sellafield discharges, indicating that the main input of Pu is from the time-integrated contaminated mud patch of the northeastern Irish Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from ~0.03 in the deepest layers to >0.20 in the sub-surface layers with an activity-weighted average of 0.181. The decreasing (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio with depth reflects the changing nature of operations at the Sellafield plant from weapons-grade Pu production to reprocessing spent nuclear fuel with higher burn-up times in the late 1950s. In addition, recent annual (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in winkles collected during 2003-2008 from three stations along the Cumbrian coastline showed no significant spatial or temporal differences with an overall average of 0.204, which supports the hypothesis of diluted Pu input from the contaminated mud patch.

  13. Air-Sea Interaction Studies of the Indian and Pacific Oceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    tasks: Task 1: Air- Sea Interactions Impacting the North Arabian Sea Circulation Task 2: Satellite Observations of Flow Encountering Abrupt...resolution SAR data will allow monitoring of ocean processes in the North Arabian Sea circulation region due to current and/or meteorological forcing at a...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Air- Sea Interaction Studies of the Indian and Pacific

  14. Pollen evidence for late pleistocene bering land bridge environments from Norton Sound, Northeastern Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, T.A.; Phillips, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    After more than half a century of paleoenvironmental investigations, disagreements persist as to the nature of vegetation type and climate of the Bering land bridge (BLB) during the late Wisconsin (Sartan) glacial interval. Few data exist from sites on the former land bridge, now submerged under the Bering and Chukchi Seas. Two hypotheses have emerged during the past decade. The first, based on pollen data from Bering Sea islands and adjacent mainlands of western Alaska and Northeast Siberia, represents the likely predominant vegetation on the Bering land bridge during full-glacial conditions: graminoid-herb-willow tundra vegetation associated with cold, dry winters and cool, dry summer climate. The second hypothesis suggests that dwarf birch-shrub-herb tundra formed a broad belt across the BLB, and that mesic vegetation was associated with cold, snowier winters and moist, cool summers. As a step towards resolving this controversy, a sediment core from Norton Sound, northeastern Bering Sea was radiocarbon dated and analyzed for pollen content. Two pollen zones were identified. The older, bracketed by radiocarbon ages of 29,500 and 11,515 14C yr BP, contains pollen assemblages composed of grass, sedge, wormwood, willow, and a variety of herb (forb) taxa. These assemblages are interpreted to represent graminoid-herb-willow tundra vegetation that developed under an arid, cool climate regime. The younger pollen zone sediments were deposited about 11,515 14C yr BP, when rising sea level had begun to flood the BLB. This younger pollen zone contains pollen of birch, willow, heaths, aquatic plants, and spores of sphagnum moss. This is interpreted to represent a Lateglacial dwarf birch-heath-willow-herb tundra vegetation, likely associated with a wetter climate with deeper winter snows, and moist, cool summers. This record supports the first hypothesis, that graminoid-herb-willow tundra vegetation extended into the lowlands of the BLB during full glacial conditions of the

  15. Growth and condition of juvenile chum and pink salmon in the northeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechter, Melissa E.; Beckman, Brian R.; Andrews, Alexander G., III; Beaudreau, Anne H.; McPhee, Megan V.

    2017-01-01

    As the Arctic continues to warm, abundances of juvenile Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the northern Bering Sea are expected to increase. However, information regarding the growth and condition of juvenile salmon in these waters is limited. The first objective of this study was to describe relationships between size, growth, and condition of juvenile chum (O. keta) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon and environmental conditions using data collected in the northeastern Bering Sea (NEBS) from 2003-2007 and 2009-2012. Salmon collected at stations with greater bottom depths and cooler sea-surface temperature (SST) were longer, reflecting their movement further offshore out of the warmer Alaska Coastal Water mass, as the season progressed. Energy density, after accounting for fish length, followed similar relationships with SST and bottom depth while greater condition (weight-length residuals) was associated with warm SST and shallower stations. We used insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations as an indicator of relative growth rate for fishes sampled in 2009-2012 and that found fish exhibited higher IGF-1 concentrations in 2010-2012 than in 2009, although these differences were not clearly attributable to environmental conditions. Our second objective was to compare size and condition of juvenile chum and pink salmon in the NEBS between warm and cool spring thermal regimes of the southeastern Bering Sea (SEBS). This comparison was based on a hypothesis informed by the strong role of sea-ice retreat in the spring for production dynamics in the SEBS and prevailing northward currents, suggesting that feeding conditions in the NEBS may be influenced by production in the SEBS. We found greater length (both species) and condition (pink salmon) in years with warm thermal regimes; however, both of these responses changed more rapidly with day of year in years with cool springs. Finally, we compared indicators of energy allocation between even and odd brood

  16. Northeastern Chukchi Sea demersal fishes and associated environmental characteristics, 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcross, Brenda L.; Raborn, Scott W.; Holladay, Brenda A.; Gallaway, Benny J.; Crawford, Stephen T.; Priest, Justin T.; Edenfield, Lorena E.; Meyer, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Three closely-spaced study areas in the northeastern Chukchi Sea off of Alaska provided a opportunity to examine demersal fish communities over a small spatial scale as part of a multidisciplinary program. During 2009 and 2010, fishes in the three study areas (Klondike, Burger, and Statoil) were sampled at 37 stations with a plumb staff beam trawl and a 3 m beam trawl; 70% of stations were sampled during all three cruises. Fish catches were dominated by small fishes (<150 mm TL), which cannot be wholly attributed to the small mesh size of the net. Output from generalized linear modeling of the data suggested that overall fish density, species richness, and density of Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and Bering flounder (Hippoglossoides robustus) were higher in the more southerly Klondike study area than in the more northerly Burger and Statoil study areas. Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) was abundant throughout the study region. Richness and density could be explained by the environmental variables that defined the overall study area. The Klondike study area was warmer and erosional in nature with higher proportions of gravel sediment. Other study areas were colder and more depositional in nature with muddier sediment and were characterized by high densities of megafaunal invertebrates such as brittle stars. There appeared to be a lack of ecological homogeneity across these three closely-spaced study areas of the Chukchi Sea.

  17. Tetrodotoxin levels in pufferfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus) caught in the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Kosker, Ali Rıza; Özogul, Fatih; Durmus, Mustafa; Ucar, Yılmaz; Ayas, Deniz; Regenstein, Joe M; Özogul, Yesim

    2016-11-01

    The toxicity of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in pufferfish (Lagocephalus sceleratus) from Mersin Bay in the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea was measured using a mouse bioassay (MBA) and LC-MS-MS. Pufferfish were caught by trawl fishing, longlining and fishing line from December 2012 to October 2013. Changes in the levels of TTX in the gonads, livers, intestines, skins and muscles as a function of season and sex were determined. The gonads of female fish were toxic in all seasons (>2μg/g), whereas the gonads of male fish were only toxic in the spring and autumn. The highest TTX levels in gonads, livers, intestines and skins of female fish were 52.1, 46.2, 7.64 and 3.43μg/g, respectively, using LC-MS-MS. The TTX level in the muscle of female fish in winter was 2.83μg/g but was otherwise below the toxic limit. Consequently, it can be dangerous to consume pufferfish, including the edible muscle, from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Late Holocene SST and primary productivity variations in the northeastern Arabian Sea as a recorder for winter monsoon variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böll, Anna; Gaye, Birgit; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Variability in the oceanic environment of the Arabian Sea region is strongly influenced by the seasonal monsoon cycle of alternating wind directions. Strong south-westerly winds during the summer monsoon induce upwelling of nutrient rich waters along the coast off Somalia, Oman and southwest India, which result in high rates of primary production. In the northeastern Arabian Sea off Pakistan on the other hand, primary production and sea surface temperatures are linked to northeast monsoonal winds that cool the sea surface and drive convective mixing and high surface ocean productivity during the winter season. In this study, we analyzed alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) variations and proxies of primary productivity (organic carbon and δ15N) in a well-laminated sediment core from the Pakistan continental margin to establish the first high-resolution record of winter monsoon variability for the late Holocene. Over the last 2400 years reconstructed SST in the northeastern Arabian Sea decreased whereas productivity increased, imaging a long-term trend of northeast monsoon strengthening in response to insolation-induced southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The comparison of our winter monsoon record with records of summer monsoon intensity suggests that summer and winter monsoon strength was essentially anti-correlated over the late Holocene throughout the Asian monsoon system. In addition, SST variations recorded off Pakistan match very well with Northern Hemisphere temperature records supporting the growing body of evidence that Asian climate is linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change. It reveals a consistent pattern of increased summer monsoon activity in the northeastern Arabian Sea during northern hemispheric warm periods (Medieval Warm Period, Roman Warm Period) and strengthened winter monsoon activity during hemispheric colder periods (Little Ice Age).

  19. Rates of nitrification and ammonium dynamics in northeastern Chukchi Sea shelf waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Afonso C.; Gardner, Wayne S.; Dunton, Kenneth H.

    2014-04-01

    Nutrient concentrations are often depleted in surface waters during the late summer open-water period in the northern Chukchi Sea. Yet the rate of re-supply of nutrients to the pelagic environment controls phytoplankton community abundance and productivity, which in turn influences the benthic components of this relatively shallow ecosystem. We measured nitrogen cycling rates at four experimental stations on the northeastern Chukchi Sea shelf in the western arctic. At each station, rates for net NH4+ regeneration, actual NH4+ uptake, and nitrification were measured using 15N isotope enrichment methods with 24-h bottle incubations under both light and dark conditions. Net NH4+ regeneration rates throughout the water column ranged between -0.25 and 0.23 μmol N L-1 h-1, with highest net positive regeneration occurring under light exposure in surface waters. Actual uptake rates ranged between -0.41 and -0.01 μmol N L-1 h-1. Nitrification rates (measured at two stations) were generally highest in the sediment overlying waters, ranging between 0.14 and 0.67 μmol N L-1 h-1, and appear to account for most NH4+ uptake. Calculations of turnover time indicate that N is recycled within one day throughout the water column under natural conditions in the northern Chukchi Sea. Our findings confirm the results of previous studies that suggest a significant portion of surface nutrients on the Chukchi Shelf are products of horizontal advection through the Anadyr Current but also highlight the role of sediment regenerated N in supporting water-column primary production.

  20. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  1. Comparative study of the hydrochemical regime in the Gelendzhik and Golubaya Bays, northeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyleva, A.; Chasovnikov, V.; Chjoo, V.; Menshikova, N.; Kuprikova, N.

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this work was to study the hydrochemical regime in the coastal waters of the northeastern Black Sea. The observations were performed in influenced by significant anthropogenic stress Gelendzhik Bay and at the open coast region (Golubaya Bay). A sampling program has been initiated by the Southern Branch of Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, (SB SIO RAS) on a weekly basis at the shore line area of «Chernomorets» beach (Gelendzhik Bay) and from the head of pier in the Golubaya Bay. Studies were carried out during a period from January 2001 to December 2008. List of measured parameters includes following: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD), pH, alkalinity, phosphate, organic phosphorus, silicates, nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, urea, organic nitrogen, oil products. The Gelendzhik bay in its different parts is characterized with strong variability of concentrations of hydrochemical parameters. Above all, it relates to complex structure caused by wind impact. Parts of the bay filled with nearshore and sea waters are legibly differ from each other. The bay itself is rather isolated from the open sea, and its liability to man's impact leads to forming of next features of its seasonal variability of physical-chemical state: • On the base of Si/P and Si/N ratios analysis it was shown that the Gelendzhik Bay waters are significantly enriched with nitrogen and phosphorus compounds. • Unlike the Golubaya bay, phosphates are always present in the water of the Gelendzhik Bay and development of photosynthesis is not limited with nutrients. It may lead to processes of intensive eutrophication. • The oxygen saturation in the Gelendzhik Bay periodically descend lower than 80% during the summer period. That means, that even the Bay's surface layer formally corresponds to the hypoxic conditions that testify to the degradation of the ecosystem there. The conclusions obtained during our studies testify that the pollution from

  2. Water resources on and near Indian lands in northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska; hydrologic data through 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, L.D.; Trombley, T.J.; Pomes, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Four Kansas Indian Tribes, the Iowa, Kickapoo, Potawatomi, and Sac & Fox are interested in developing the water resources on and near their respective tribe lands. This report presents climatic and geohydrologic data that are useful in describing the available water resources in the 4,005-square-mile area in northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska. Climatological data for 1961- 90 include monthly summaries of average temperature, heating degree days, precipitation for the climato- logical stations in Horton and Topeka, Kansas, and average temperature and precipitation for the north- east Climatological Region in Kansas. Geohydrologic data include site descriptions for 18 continuous- record streamflow-gaging stations with 10 or more years of daily discharge records, site descriptions for about 1,900 wells, and water-quality data for surface- and ground-water sampling sites in the study area. Water-quality data for surface- and ground-water sites include specific conductance, pH, bacteria concentrations, hardness, dissolved solids, nutrients, dissolved and total metals, and concen- trations for selected pesticides and other organic substances.

  3. Acoustic and visual surveys for bowhead whales in the western Beaufort and far northeastern Chukchi seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Sue E.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Munger, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Two types of passive-acoustic survey were conducted to investigate the seasonal occurrence of bowhead whales ( Balaena mysticetus) in the western Beaufort and far northeastern Chukchi seas: (1) an over-winter (2003-04) survey using autonomous recorders deployed northeast of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) a summertime dipping-hydrophone survey along the 2005 NOAA Ocean Exploration (OE) cruise track northwest of Barrow. The longest continuous sampling period from the over-winter survey was 3 October 2003 to 12 May 2004. During that period, bowhead whale calls were recorded from 3 to 23 October, intermittently on 6-7 and 22-23 November, then not again until 25 March 2004. Bowhead calls were recorded almost every hour from 19 April to 12 May 2004, with a call rate peak on 30 April ( ca. 9400 calls) and a few instances of patterned calling (or, "song") detected in early May. Bowhead whale calls were never detected during the NOAA OE cruise, but calls of beluga whales ( Delphinapterus leucas) were recorded at 3 of 16 acoustic stations. Opportunistic visual surveys for marine mammals were also conducted during the NOAA OE cruise from the ship (65 h) and helicopter (7.8 h), resulting in single sightings of bowhead whales (3-5 whales), beluga (16-20 whales), walrus (1), polar bear (2=sow/cub), and 17 sightings of 87 ringed seals from the ship and 15 sightings of 67 ringed seals from the helicopter.

  4. Sea breeze Initiated Rainfall over the east Coast of India during the Indian Southwest Monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M; Warrior, H; Raman, S; Aswathanarayana, P A; Mohanty, U C; Suresh, R

    2006-09-05

    Sea breeze initiated convection and precipitation is investigated along the east coast of India during the Indian southwest monsoon season. The sea breeze circulations are observed approximately 70 to 80% of the days during the summer months (June to August) along the Chennai coast. Observations of average sea breeze wind speeds are stronger at a rural location as compared to the wind speeds observed inside the urban region of Chennai. The sea breeze circulation is shown to be the dominant mechanism for initiating rainfall during the Indian southwest monsoon season. Roughly 80% of the total rainfall observed during the southwest monsoon over Chennai is directly related to the convection initiated by sea breeze circulation.

  5. Causes for the reversal of North Indian Ocean decadal sea level trend in recent two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasu, U.; Ravichandran, M.; Han, Weiqing; Sivareddy, S.; Rahman, H.; Li, Yuanlong; Nayak, Shailesh

    2017-03-01

    Using satellite and in-situ observations, ocean reanalysis products and model simulations, we show a distinct reversal of the North Indian Ocean (NIO, north of 5°S) sea level decadal trend between 1993-2003 and 2004-3013, after the global mean sea level rise is removed. Sea level falls from 1993 to 2003 (Period I) but rises sharply from 2004 to 2013 (Period II). Steric height, which is dominated by thermosteric sea level of the upper 700 m, explains most of the observed reversal, including the spatial patterns of sea level change. The decadal change of surface turbulent heat flux acts in concert with the change of meridional heat transport at 5°S, with both being driven by decadal change of surface winds over the Indian Ocean, to cause sea level fall during Period I and rise during Period II. While the effect of surface net heat flux is consistent among various data sets, the uncertainty is larger for meridional heat transport, which shows both qualitative and quantitative differences amongst different reanalyses. The effect of the Indonesian Throughflow on heat content and thus thermosteric sea level is limited to the South Indian Ocean, and has little influence on the NIO. Our new results point to the importance of surface winds in causing decadal sea level change of the NIO.

  6. Inhibition of mixed-layer deepening during winter in the northeastern Arabian Sea by the West India Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Behera, Ambica

    2016-08-01

    Though the deep mixed layers (MLs) that form in the northeastern Arabian Sea (NEAS) during the winter monsoon (November-February) have been attributed to convective mixing driven by dry, cool northeasterly winds from the Indian subcontinent, data show that the deepest MLs occur in the northern NEAS and the maxima of latent-heat and net heat fluxes in the southern NEAS. We use an oceanic general circulation model to show that the deep MLs in the NEAS extend up to ~20°N till the end of December, but are restricted poleward of ~22°N (~23°N) in January (February). This progressive restriction of the deep mixed layers within the NEAS is due to poleward advection of water of lower salinity by the West India Coastal Current (WICC). The deep MLs are sustained till February in the northern NEAS because convective mixing deepens the ML before the waters of lower salinity reach this region and the wind stirring and convective overturning generate sufficient turbulent energy for the ML to maintain the depth attained in January. Though the atmospheric fluxes tend to cool the ML in the southern NEAS, this cooling is countered by the warming due to horizontal advection. Likewise, the cooling due to entrainment, which continues in the southern NEAS even as the ML shallows during January-February, is almost cancelled by the warming caused by a downwelling vertical velocity field. Therefore, the SST changes very little during December-February even as the ML shallows dramatically in the southern NEAS. These deep MLs of the NEAS also preclude a strong intraseasonal response to the intraseasonal variability in the fluxes. This role of horizontal advection implies that the ML depth in the NEAS is determined by an interplay of physical processes that are forced differently. The convective mixing depends on processes that are local to the region, but the advection is due to the WICC, whose seasonal cycle is primarily forced by remote winds. By inhibiting the formation of deep MLs in

  7. Sedimentary regime of deep submarine canyons around Fylla Banke, northeastern Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Dorthe; Kuijpers, Antoon; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Nielsen, Tove

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentary regime of deep submarine canyons around the Fylla Banke, northeastern Labrador Sea Dorthe Paulsen (1), Antoon Kuijpers (2), Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz (3) and Tove Nielsen (2) 1) Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K 2) Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgde 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. 3) Centre for Past Climate Studies, Department of Geoscience, Aarhus University. Hoegh-Guldbergs Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C The southern end of the Davis Strait, the comparatively shallow-water area separating the Labrador Sea from the Baffin Bay, is cut by two deep submarine canyons of west Greenland, on the western and eastern side of the Fylla Banke, respectively. The purpose of this study is to investigate Late Pleistocene sedimentary processes governing the area of the two canyons in order to test if gravity flows or ocean currents are the most important factors governing canyon sedimentary processes in this region. Furthermore, an account is given on the formation of the two canyons in order to explain the significant difference between them. The study was carried out based on seismic profiles combined with bathymetric information, and a single sidescan sonar profile from one of the canyons (western canyon). Sedimentary information and an age model are derived from of a 5-m long gravity core (TTR13-AT-479G) collected from the mouth of the western canyon (southern end). The data indicates that the sedimentary regime is today highly affected by northward transport of the ocean currents and that gravity flows (southward from shallower to deep waters) are only of limited significance today. The deep southern end of the canyons are influenced by the upper parts of the deep North Atlantic Deep Water, but the majority of the sediment transport is linked to the strong northward flow of the lower parts of the West Greenland Current. For comparison the sediment

  8. Mercury distribution in ancient and modern sediment of northeastern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Pierce, D.E.; Leong, K.W.; Wang, F.F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Reconnaissance sampling of surface and subsurface sediment to a maximum depth of 80 m below the sea floor shows that typical values of 0.03 p.p.m. and anomalies of 0.2-1.3 p.p.m. mercury have been present in northeastern Bering Sea since Early Pliocene time. Values are highest in modern beach (maximum 1.3 and mean 0.22 p.p.m. Hg) and nearshore subsurface gravels (maximum 0.6 and mean 0.06 p.p.m. Hg) along the highly mineralized Seward Peninsula and in clayey silt rich in organic matter (maximum 0.16 and mean 0.10 p.p.m. Hg) throughout the region. Although gold mining may be partly responsible for high mercury levels in the modern beach near Nome, Alaska (maximum 0.45 p.p.m.), equally high or greater concentrations of mercury occur in buried Pleistocene sediments immediately offshore (maximum 0.6 p.p.m.) and in modern unpolluted beach sediments at Bluff (maximum 1.3 p.p.m.); this suggests that the contamination effects of mining may be no greater than natural concentration processes in the Seward Peninsula region. The mercury content of offshore surface sediment, even adjacent to mercury-rich beaches, corresponds to that of unpolluted marine and fresh-water sediment elsewhere. The normal values that prevail offshore may be attributable to entrapment of mercury-bearing heavy minerals on beaches near sources and/or dilution effects of offshore sedimentation. The few minor anomalies offshore occur in glacial drift derived from mercury source regions of Chukotka (Siberia) and Seward Peninsula; Pleistocene shoreline processes have reworked the drift to concentrate the heavy metals. The distribution pattern of mercury indicates that particulate mercury-bearing minerals have not been widely dispersed from onland deposits in quantities sufficient to increase mercury levels above normal in offshore sediments of Bering Sea; however, it shows that natural sedimentary processes can concentrate this mercury in beaches of the coastal zone where there already is concern because of

  9. Late Holocene intermediate water variability in the northeastern Atlantic as recorded by deep-sea corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, K.; Colin, C.; Henderson, G. M.; Scholten, J.; Douville, E.; Sicre, M.-A.; Frank, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Nd isotopic composition of the aragonite skeleton of fossil deep-sea corals ( Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and Desmophyllum dianthus) located in the northeastern Atlantic at water depths between 635 and 1300 m was investigated to reconstruct changes in the Atlantic mid-depth gyre circulation during the past millennium. The coral ɛNd values varied systematically from - 11.8 to - 14.4 during the past 1500 years, reflecting variations in seawater ɛNd and thus water mass provenance. Low ɛNd values (ɛNd = - 14) occurred during the warm Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA) (between 1000 AD and 1250 AD) and during the most recent period (1950 AD to 2000 AD), interrupted by a period of significantly higher ɛNd values (~-12.5) during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (between 1350 AD and 1850 AD). One long-lived branching coral even recorded an abrupt systematic rise from low to high ɛNd values around 1250 AD over the course of its 10-year growth period. These variations are interpreted to result from variable contributions of the subpolar and subtropical Atlantic intermediate water masses, which today are characterized by ɛNd values of - 15 and ~-11, respectively. The low ɛNd values observed during the warm MCA and during recent times imply a strong eastward extension of the mid-depth subpolar gyre (SPG) induced by a dominant positive phase of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO). During the LIA, water from the subtropical gyre (STG) and potentially from the Mediterranean Sea Water (MSW) propagated further northward, as indicated by the higher coral ɛNd values. This pattern suggests a negative mean state of the NAO during the LIA, with weaker and more southerly located Westerlies and a westward contraction of the SPG. Variations in the contributions of the two gyres imply changes in the heat and salt budgets at intermediate depths during the past millennia that may have contributed to changes in the properties of North Atlantic inflow into the Nordic Seas and thus

  10. Black carbon in deep-sea sediments from the northeastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Lee, Y.; Hyeong, K.; Yoo, C.

    2011-12-01

    Deep-sea sediment core is a good archive for understanding the land-ocean interactions via atmosphere, due to it is little influenced by fluvial and continental shelf processes. This study dealt with black carbon(BC) in a 328 cm-long piston core collected from the northeastern equatorial Pacific Ocean (16°12'N, 125°59'W), covering the last 15 Ma (Hyeong at al., 2004). BC is a common name of carbon continuum formed by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and plant materials. Though it may react with ozone and produce water-soluble organic carbon, BC has commonly refractory nature. Thus BC in preindustrial sediment can be a tracer of forest-fire events. BC is purely terrestrial in origin, and is transported to marine environments by atmospheric and fluvial processes. Therefore, distribution of BC in deep-sea sediments could be used to understand atmospheric circulation. Chemical oxidation was used to determine BC in this study following Lim and Cachier (1996). Concentration of BC varies from 0.010% to 0.233% of total sediments. Mass accumulation rate (MAR) of BC ranged between 0.077 mg/cm^2/1000 yrs and 47.49 mg/cm^21000 yrs. It is noted that MAR in sediments younger than 8 Ma (av. 9.0 mg/cm^2/1000 yrs) is higher than that in sediments older than 8 Ma (av. 3.2 mg/cm^2/1000 yrs). Stable carbon isotope value of BC increases with time from the low δ13C value near 13 Ma until it reaches the highest value near 4 Ma. Change of MAR seems to be related to the meridional migration of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) at around 8 Ma in the study area (cf., Hyeong at al., 2004). Accordingly, higher BC content in sediment younger than 8 Ma seems to be accounted for by its derivation from the Northern Hemisphere compared to that from the Southern Hemisphere in older sediment. Increase of carbon isotope value with time seems to be related to expansion of C4 grassland. C4 grassland expansion might have been caused by change of atmosphreic cycle, which moved dry subtropical

  11. Results of many-year subsatellite measurements of current fine structure in northeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Krayushkin, Evgeny; Kalashnikova, Nina

    Results of subsatellite measurements of coastal currents in the shelf zone of northeastern Black Sea are presented. The measurements have been performed every year since 2006 in June and September-October months near the Gelendzhik Bay. The main instruments used are Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) and CTD probes. Ground and ship measurements were conducted simultaneously with satellite imaging in microwave (ASAR Envisat, ERS-2, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X), visible and infrared (OLI Landsat-8, ETM+ Landsat-7, TM Landsat-5, MODIS Terra/Aqua, AVHRR NOAA) ranges. The investigations performed revealed spatial, depth and temporal variability of current direction and velocity in the shelf zone. Multiple instances of counter-currents opposing to the Ring Current were registered. In our view, they are associated with a passage of small-scale anticyclonic eddies across the region of interest. The 3D structure of the eddies in the upper quasi-uniform layer was analyzed based on ADCP data. The use of high resolution (3 m) SAR data in combination with ADCP measurements at the resolution of 0.5 m allowed us to detect a number of internal wave trains. Form ADCP and thermistors records, their amplitudes were estimated to reach 5-8 m. Joint analysis of satellite SAR and subsatellite data gave an assessment of their typical wavelength at 90-100 m. Generation mechanisms of these internal waves are suggested. Another phenomenon of interest observed in the region of the measurements is surface manifestations of ring waves near localized natural and anthropogenic generation sources. Such ring waves are most frequently found in the anchor area for ships, whose oscillations can be the source of their generation. The work was in part supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects #14-05-00520-а, and 13-07-12017-ofi_m). SAR data from RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X were obtained under SOAR RADARSAT-2/TerraSAR-X Project #5074.

  12. Bacterial community structure and functional potential in the northeastern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlin, Kelly M.; Questel, Jennifer M.; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2017-03-01

    We performed a molecular microbial ecological analysis in the northeastern Chukchi Sea in order to characterize bacterial community structure and genetic potential for biogeochemical cycling and oil biodegradation in a region targeted for oil and gas exploration (Burger lease area). Samples were collected from the surface, middle (20 m), and bottom (2-3 m above seafloor) of the water column during the open-water season of August and September 2012 at 17 different locations. We determined bacterial community structure with 16S rRNA genes sequencing and detected functional genes, including an array of oil biodegradation and biogeochemical cycling (carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling) genes, using the GeoChip 5.0 microarray, and then correlated molecular data to contextual physical and biogeochemical factors. Bacterial community structure differed significantly by depth (surface water vs. bottom water) and between sampling dates (August vs. September). While the relative abundance of major functional gene categories did not differ with depth, the abundance of individual functional genes for carbon cycling, nitrogen cycling, organic contaminant remediation, phosphorus cycling, sulfur cycling, virulence, and viruses differed between surface and bottom seawater samples. Aerobic oil degradation genes and taxa known to include oil-degrading bacteria were found at all three depths. These findings support previous observations that two different water masses contribute to a stratified water column in the summer open-water season of the Burger lease area, but indicate that potential function is fairly similar with depth despite differences in temperature, water chemistry, bacterial community structure, and individual functional gene alleles.

  13. Drifter Studies of the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Arabian Sea Principal Investigator: Dr. Luca Centurioni The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 0213 La Jolla, CA 92093-0213 Email...in the Indian Ocean and in the Arabian Sea to improve the dynamical knowledge and predictability of the near-surface circulation in these regions and...have an impact on the boundary current observed on the east side of Palau? 3) Can the island rule provide a plausible explanation for observations of

  14. 250 years of SW Indian Monsoon Variability from Red Sea Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S.; Hughen, K. A.; Karnauskas, K. B.; Farrar, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    During the northern hemisphere summer, strong dust storms develop in the Tokar Delta region of Sudan. These massive dust storms are funneled through a gap in the coastal mountains and blow out across the Red Sea. The generation and transport of these dust storms is driven by the large-scale atmospheric pressure gradient across the Red Sea, which is a component of the Southwest Indian Monsoon. Dust deposited on the Red Sea is recorded in skeletal geochemistry of corals that live on the Saudi Arabian coast, and provides an opportunity to reconstruct variability in the monsoon system prior to instrumental records. We have generated annually-resolved records of coral Ba/Ca, which display strong correlations to the zonal pressure gradient across the Red Sea during the instrumental period. Our coral-based monsoon records show an increasing trend in the strength of SW Indian Monsoon circulation since the Little Ice Age, in agreement with lower-resolution Arabian Sea upwelling based records. Our records also show strong decadal-scale variability, which was strongest during the late 19th century and has declined during the past century. In this presentation, we will discuss the decadal-scale variability in the SW Indian Monsoon circulation over the past 250 years as revealed by Red Sea Corals and the implications of the relationships and trends observed in this study for projections of future monsoon variability.

  15. Consequences of inhibition of mixed-layer deepening by the West India Coastal Current for winter phytoplankton bloom in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijith, V.; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Thushara, V.; Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Anil, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The intense winter phytoplankton bloom during November-February in the northeastern Arabian Sea (NEAS) was thought, until recently, to be controlled only by a convective deepening of the mixed layer (ML) owing to cool and dry northeasterlies. But a recent study has shown that the deepening of the ML in the southern NEAS is inhibited by the poleward advection of low-salinity water from the south by the West India Coastal Current (WICC). Using an Ocean General Circulation Model coupled with an ecosystem model, we investigate the consequences of the inhibition of mixed-layer deepening for winter phytoplankton bloom in the NEAS. We show that, during the winter monsoon, the shallow ML inhibits the entrainment of nutrients in the southern NEAS. Strong (weak) positive nitrate tendency in the northern (southern) NEAS seen in the model during the winter monsoon is maintained by strong (weak) entrainment. As a result, the chlorophyll integrated to 200 m depth from the surface is lower in the southern NEAS than in the northern NEAS. The inhibition of mixed-layer deepening in the south affects the size-based distribution of small and large phytoplankton, nutrient limitation terms and growth rate, and their elemental composition. The WICC, which inhibits the deepening of the ML and affects the winter bloom in the NEAS, is driven by coastal Kelvin waves generated by remote winds. This paper demonstrates a mechanism by which remotely forced coastal Kelvin waves impact the biology in the north Indian Ocean.

  16. Overview of water resources in and near Indian lands in northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombley, T.J.; Wolf, R.J.; Jordan, P.R.; Brewer, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of water resources is provided for a 4,005-square-mile area of northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska that includes the treatylands for the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, the Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas, the Prairie Band of Potawatomi, and the Sac and Fox Tribe ofMissouri. The only plentiful supplies of surface water are available from the Missouri and Kansas Rivers. The smallest mean streamflows for 4 consecutive months occur in November through February for most streams in the area. The smallest flows for 7 consecutive days in a year occur most often in August, September, or October. The typical seasonal distribution of streamflows indicates a pattern favorable for the same-year use of small surface-water impoundments for low-flow augmentation; large flows that could be impounded typically occur in the month shortly before augmentation is most needed. However, droughts of 2 or more consecutive years are common and would largely negate the advantage of using small impoundments except for very small water-supply needs. Alluvial deposits along the Kansas and Missouri Rivers provide the largest well yields in the study area, but these deposits are limited in areal extent. The Kansas River alluvium reaches a maximum saturated thickness of about 70 feet, and the Missouri River alluvium reaches a maximum thickness of 120 feet. Well yields in the Kansas River generally range from 300 to 1,000 gallons per minute (gal/min) but may be as large as 2,500 gal/min. Well yields in the Missouri River alluvium generally range from 150 to 2,500 gal/min but may be as large as 3,000 gal/min. Although generally capable only of small sustained yields to wells, minor aquifers are important because they are available throughout most of the study area. Within the thick, mostly fine-grained glacial deposits, isolated sand and gravel layers may yield adequate supplies for stock- watering or domestic use. Sodium concentrations exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection

  17. Drying of Indian subcontinent by rapid Indian Ocean warming and a weakening land-sea thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Roxy, Mathew Koll; Ritika, Kapoor; Terray, Pascal; Murtugudde, Raghu; Ashok, Karumuri; Goswami, B N

    2015-06-16

    There are large uncertainties looming over the status and fate of the South Asian summer monsoon, with several studies debating whether the monsoon is weakening or strengthening in a changing climate. Our analysis using multiple observed datasets demonstrates a significant weakening trend in summer rainfall during 1901-2012 over the central-east and northern regions of India, along the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna basins and the Himalayan foothills, where agriculture is still largely rain-fed. Earlier studies have suggested an increase in moisture availability and land-sea thermal gradient in the tropics due to anthropogenic warming, favouring an increase in tropical rainfall. Here we show that the land-sea thermal gradient over South Asia has been decreasing, due to rapid warming in the Indian Ocean and a relatively subdued warming over the subcontinent. Using long-term observations and coupled model experiments, we provide compelling evidence that the enhanced Indian Ocean warming potentially weakens the land-sea thermal contrast, dampens the summer monsoon Hadley circulation, and thereby reduces the rainfall over parts of South Asia.

  18. Galatheid and chirostylid crustaceans (Decapoda: Anomura) from a cold seep environment in the northeastern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dong; Li, Xinzheng

    2015-12-09

    Six species of squat lobsters from a cold seep field in the northeastern South China Sea are studied. Two new species, Uroptychus jiaolongae n. sp. and U. spinulosus n. sp., are described, and their distinctions from the related species are detailed. Two species, Munidopsis tuberosa Osawa, Lin & Chan, 2008 and M. verrilli Benedict, 1902, are herein reported for the first time from a cold seep/hydrothermal vent environment. The number of squat lobsters species associated with those chemosynthetic environments now stands at forty-one.

  19. Phytoplankton dynamics driven by vertical nutrient fluxes during the spring inter-monsoon period in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. P.; Dong, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    A field survey from the coastal upwelling zones to the offshore pelagic zones of the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) was conducted during the inter-monsoon period of May 2014 when the region was characterized by prevailing low-nutrient conditions. Comprehensive field measurements were made for not only hydrographic and biogeochemical properties but also phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. We also performed estimations of the vertical turbulent diffusivity and diffusive nutrient fluxes using a Thorpe-scale method and the upwelling nutrient fluxes by Ekman pumping using satellite-derived wind stress curl. Our results suggest that phytoplankton patchiness in the northeastern SCS during the study period could be largely controlled by vertical nutrient fluxes with combined contributions from both turbulent diffusion and curl-driven upwelling. Our results also reveal the generally increasing role of turbulent diffusion but decreasing role of curl-driven upwelling on vertical transport of nutrients from the coastal upwelling zones to the offshore pelagic zones in the northeastern SCS. Elevated nutrient fluxes observed near Dongsha Island were found to support high new production leading to net growth of a diatom-rich phytoplankton community, whereas the low nutrient fluxes near southwest Taiwan resulted in a negative net community growth leading to a decline of a picoplankton-dominant phytoplankton bloom.

  20. Underwater Acoustic Localization and Tracking of Pacific Walruses in the Northeastern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, Brendan Pearce

    This thesis develops and demonstrates an approach for estimating the three-dimensional (3D) location of a vocalizing underwater marine mammal using acoustic arrival time measurements at three spatially separated receivers while providing rigorous location uncertainties. To properly account for uncertainty in the measurements of receiver parameters (e.g., 3D receiver locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained with prior estimates and prior uncertainties. While previous localization algorithms have solved for an unknown scaling factor on the prior uncertainties as part of the inversion, in this work unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival time uncertainties are estimated. Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns are calculated and incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Simulation results demonstrated that, for the case considered here, linearization errors are generally small and that the lack of an accurate sound speed profile does not necessarily cause large uncertainties or biases in the estimated positions. The primary motivation for this work was to develop an algorithm for locating underwater Pacific walruses in the coastal waters around Alaska. In 2009, an array of approximately 40 underwater acoustic receivers was deployed in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (northwest of Alaska) from August to October to record the vocalizations of marine mammals including Pacific walruses and bowhead whales. Three of these receivers were placed in a triangular arrangement approximately 400 m apart near the Hanna Shoal (northwest of Wainwright, Alaska). A sequence of walrus knock vocalizations from this data set was processed using the localization algorithm developed in this thesis

  1. Sea-floor character and geology off the entrance to the Connecticut River, northeastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Guberski, Megan R.; Wood, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Datasets of gridded multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar backscatter, together covering approximately 29.1 square kilometers, were used to interpret character and geology of the sea floor off the entrance to the Connecticut River in northeastern Long Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H12013, these acoustic data, sidescan-sonar imagery, and the sea-floor sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify the acoustic data (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and resource management (for example, cables, pipelines, and dredging) activities in this major east coast estuary.

  2. Connection of sea level height between Western Pacific and South Indian Ocean in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DU, Y.; Wang, T.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Based on merged altimetry data and in site observations from tide gauges, we analyzed the fast increasing trend of sea surface height (SSH) in the recent two decades in the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean. The results of analysis indicated a dynamic connection of SSH between the tropical western Pacific and the southeastern Indian Ocean. The low-frequency variations of SSH propagate westward in the tropical Pacific, enter the Indonesian Seas through the waveguide, and influence the southeastern India Ocean with the Kelvin-Rossby wave transformation. The thermal structure of upper ocean reveals the above adjustment mainly occur in the thermocline. However, the impacts from the Pacific are limited in the southeast Indian Ocean. In the central and west of the south Indian Ocean, local wind dominates the SSH changes in the last two decades. By lead-lag statistic analyses, we identified the cause of interdecadal from the interannual SSH variations. The interannual SSH variations is dominated by ENSO, forced by the anomalous wind along the equatorial Pacific. Whereas, the interdecadal SSH variations results from the off-equatorial wind stress curl, which is closely related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The dynamic connections between the western Pacific and the south Indian Ocean were tested in the baroclinic Rossby wave solution and the numerical experiments based on the nonlinear reduced-gravity dynamics model.

  3. Molecular phylogenetic and chemical analyses of the microbial mats in deep-sea cold seep sediments at the northeastern Japan Sea.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Shizuka; Sato, Takako; Sato, Rumi; Zhang, Jing; Gamo, Toshitaka; Tsunogai, Urumu; Hirota, Akinari; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Usami, Ron; Inagaki, Fumio; Kato, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting deep-sea cold seep sediments at the northeastern Japan Sea were characterized by molecular phylogenetic and chemical analyses. White patchy microbial mats were observed along the fault offshore the Hokkaido Island and sediment samples were collected from two stations at the southern foot of the Shiribeshi seamount (M1 site at a depth of 2,961 m on the active fault) and off the Motta Cape site (M2 site at a depth of 3,064 m off the active fault). The phylogenetic and terminal-restriction fragment polymorphism analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes revealed that microbial community structures were different between two sampling stations. The members of ANME-2 archaea and diverse bacterial components including sulfate reducers within Deltaproteobacteria were detected from M1 site, indicating the occurrence of biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane, while microbial community at M2 site was predominantly composed of members of Marine Crenarchaeota group I, sulfate reducers of Deltaproteobacteria, and sulfur oxidizers of Epsilonproteobacteria. Chemical analyses of seawater above microbial mats suggested that concentrations of sulfate and methane at M1 site were largely decreased relative to those at M2 site and carbon isotopic composition of methane at M1 site shifted heavier ((13)C-enriched), the results of which are consistent with molecular analyses. These results suggest that the mat microbial communities in deep-sea cold seep sediments at the northeastern Japan Sea are significantly responsible for sulfur and carbon circulations and the geological activity associated with plate movements serves unique microbial habitats in deep-sea environments.

  4. The morphology of saccular otoliths as a tool to identify different mugilid species from the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callicó Fortunato, Roberta; Benedito Durà, Vicent; Volpedo, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    In the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea there are 8 species of the Mugilidae family: Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, Oedalechilus labeo, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza carinata and Liza haematocheila. The identification of mugilids is very important for local fisheries management and regulations, but it is difficult using gross morphological characters. This work aims to contribute to the identification of mullets present in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea using saccular otolith features of each species. Specimens of C. labrosus, L. aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens and M. cephalus were obtained from Delta del Ebro (40°38'N-0°44'E) in artisanal catches. For L. carinata and O. labeo photographs extracted from AFORO online database were used. L. haematocheila was not studied for lack of otolith samples. A general pattern of the saccular otoliths for this family was identified: the shape of the otoliths are rectangular to oblong with irregular margins; they present a heterosulcoid, ostial sulcus acusticus, with an open funnel-like ostium to the anterior margin and a closed, tubular cauda, ending towards the posterior ventral corner, always larger than the ostium. In the present study, the mugilid species could be recognized using their saccular otolith morphology. Here we give the first key to identify Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean mullets. The distinctive features between the species were the position and centrality of the sulcus, the curvature of the cauda, the presence of areal depositions and plateaus, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. These features could be used not only to reinforce the identification keys through morphological and meristic characters of the species, but also to identify the species consumed by piscivores, being the otoliths the only identifiable remains of the individuals.

  5. Forced and Unforced Changes of Indian Ocean Temperature and Land-Sea Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achutarao, K. M.; Thanigachalam, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) over the Indian Ocean is directly connected with circulation, winds, precipitation, humidity, etc. over India. Increased SSTs are a major consequence of climate change driven largely by anthropogenic factors. Recent literature points to weakening of the Indian Summer Monsoon possibly because of decreased land-sea temperature gradient due to faster rate of warming of the oceans compared to land regions. We examine changes in the SST over the Indian Ocean using two observational datasets; HadISST (v1.1) and ERSST (v3b). Based on trend differences between two time periods (1979-2009 and 1948-1978) we identify four regions in the Indian Ocean with different signatures of change - Bay of Bengal (BOB), Arabian Sea (AS), Southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO), and Southeast Indian Ocean (SEIO). We first quantify the extent to which the SST trends over multiple time-scales (20, 30, 50 and 100-years) are outside of the range expected from internal variability of the climate system. We make use of output data from long control run simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase-5 (CMIP5) database in order to estimate the contribution of external forcings to the observed trends. Using optimal fingerprint Detection and Attribution methods we quantify the contributions of various natural and anthropogenic forcings by making use of the suite of experiments (piControl, historical, historicalNat, historicalAnt, historicalGHG, and historicalAA) from CMIP5 are used in this study. We will also address the question of what drives the observed weakening of land-ocean temperature gradients.

  6. 75 FR 59154 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... United States; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass Specifications; Emergency Rule Extension... Federal Register a temporary rule to extend the emergency action to increase the 2010 black sea bass... recreational harvest limit (RHL) based on the increased 2010 black sea bass total allowable landings...

  7. 75 FR 22073 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 21

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Proposed rule... scallop fishery: Total allowable catch (TAC); open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area... minimize impacts of incidental take of sea turtles as required by the March 14, 2008, Atlantic Sea...

  8. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of bacteria isolated from diseased cultured sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Qiao, Guo; Gu, Jie-Quan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Qiang; Woo, Sung-Ho; Xu, De-Hai; Park, Soo-Il

    2010-09-17

    During the winter-spring from 2004 to 2006 in northeastern China cultured Japanese sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus suffered from a serious disease. Clinical signs included swollen mouth, skin ulceration and massive mortality. Clinical samples taken during this period were studied. Thirty-one bacterial samples were isolated from diseased sea cucumbers and identified through biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and PCR amplification, followed by pathogenicity determination. The results showed that the 31 isolates belonged to the genera Vibrio (64.5%), Shewanella (12.9%), Serratia (12.9%), Pseudoalteromonas (6.4%) and Flavobacterium (3.2 %). The 3 prominent strains were Vibrio splendidus (41.9%), Shewanella (12.9%) and Serratia odorifera biogroup I (12.9%). Pathogenicity tests demonstrated that 13 out of 31 isolates were pathogenic, including 8 strains of V splendidus, 3 strains of Shewanella sp. and 2 strains of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis. The pathogenic V splendidus showed the highest frequency of appearance. Median lethal dose (LD50) values (14 d) of V splendidus, Shewanella sp. and P. tetraodonis were 1.74 x 10(7), 7.76 x 10(6), 7.24 x 10(7) CFU g(-1) body weight of sea cucumber, respectively. The virulences differed by species: Shewanella sp. > V splendidus> P. tetraodonis. This is the first report of Shewanella sp. virulence in sea cucumber.

  9. New deep-sea Paratanaoidea (Crustacea: Peracarida: Tanaidacea) from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Drumm, David T; Bird, Graham J

    2016-08-23

    One new genus is erected and four new species of paratanaoidean tanaidaceans are described from deep waters in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: one in each of the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and Pseudomacrinella, and one as a new genus in the family Anarthruridae. Keys to species in the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and the genera of the Anarthruridae are provided.

  10. Growth of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount and its relationship with the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. S.; Bull, J. M.; Ishizuka, O.; Scrutton, R. A.; Jaishankar, S.; Banakar, V. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Afanasy Nikitin seamount (ANS) is a major structural feature (400 km-long and 150 km-wide) in the Central Indian Basin, situated at the southern end of the so-called 85°E Ridge. Combined analyses of new multibeam bathymetric, seismic reflection and geochronological data together with previously described magnetic data provide new insights into the growth of the ANS through time, and its relationship with the 85°E Ridge. The ANS comprises a main plateau, rising 1200 m above the surrounding ocean floor (4800 m), and secondary elevated seamount highs, two of which (lie at 1600 and 2050 m water depths) have the morphology of a guyot, suggesting that they were formed above or close to sea-level. An unbroken sequence of spreading anomalies 34 through 32n.1 identified over the ANS reveal that the main plateau of the ANS was formed at 80-73 Ma, at around the same time as that of the underlying oceanic crust. The 40Ar/39Ar dates for two basalt samples dredged from the seamount highs are consistent, within error, at 67 Ma. These results, together with published results of late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic Indian Ocean plate reconstructions, indicate that the Conrad Rise hotspot emplaced both the main plateau of the ANS and Conrad Rise (including the Marion Dufresne, Ob and Lena seamounts) at 80-73 Ma, close to the India-Antarctica Ridge system. Subsequently, the seamount highs were formed by late-stage volcanism c. 6-13 Myr after the main constructional phase of the seamount plateau. Flexural analysis indicates that the main plateau and seamount highs of the ANS are consistent with Airy-type isostatic compensation, which suggest emplacement of the entire seamount in a near spreading-center setting. This is contrary to the flexural compensation of the 85°E Ridge further north, which is interpreted as being emplaced in an intraplate setting, i.e., 25-35 Myr later than the underlying oceanic crust. Therefore, we suggest that the ANS and the 85°E Ridge appear to be

  11. Navy Tactical Applications Guide. Volume 5. Part 1. Indian Ocean (Red Sea/Persian Gulf) Weather Analysis and Forecast Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    NO. Navy Tactical Applications Guide. Volume 5. Part 1 Indian Ocean (Red Sea/Persian Gulf) Weather Analysis and Forecast Applications 7...tldt It ntctf try mid Idtnlltr by block numOtr) Meteorological Satellite Systems Analysis and Forecast Applications Indian Ocean Northeast Monsoon...by block numbtr) Case studies describing regional environmental analysis and forecast applications based on satellite data and conventional

  12. Buried paleo-sedimentary basins in the north-eastern Black Sea-Azov Sea area and tectonic implications (DOBRE-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenko, Vitaly; Stephenson, Randell; Janik, Tomasz; Tolkunov, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    A number of independent but inter-related projects carried out under the auspices of various national and international programmes in Ukraine including DARIUS were aimed at imaging the upper lithosphere, crustal and sedimentary basin architecture in the north-eastern Black Sea, southern Crimea and Kerch peninsulas and the Azov Sea. This region marks the transition from relatively undisturbed Precambrian European cratonic crust and lithosphere north of the Azov Sea to areas of significant Phanerozoic tectonics and basin development, in both extensional as well as compressional environments, to the south, including the eastern Black Sea rift, which is the main sedimentary basin of the study area. The wide-angle reflection and refraction (WARR) profile DOBRE-2, a Ukrainian national project with international participation (see below), overlapping some 115 km of the southern end of the DOBREfraction'99 profile (that crosses the intracratonic Donbas Foldbelt) in the north and running to the eastern Black Sea basin in the south, utilised on- and offshore recording and energy sources. It maps crustal velocity structure across the craton margin and documents, among other things, that the Moho deepens from 40 km to ~47 km to the southwest below the Azov Sea and Crimean-Caucasus deformed zone. A regional CDP seismic profile coincident with DOBRE-2, crossing the Azov Sea, Kerch Peninsula and the north-eastern Black Sea southwest to the Ukraine-Turkey border, acquired by Ukrgeofisika (the Ukrainian national geophysical company) reveals in its inferred structural relationships the ages of Cretaceous and younger extensional and subsequent basin inversion tectonic events as well as the 2D geometry of basement displacement associated with post mid-Eocene inversion. A direct comparison of the results of the WARR velocity model and the near-vertical reflection structural image has been made by converting the former into the time domain. The results dramatically demonstrate that

  13. Provenance change of sediment input in the northeastern foreland of Pamir related to collision of the Indian Plate with the Kohistan-Ladakh arc at around 47 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Ji, Weiqiang; Fu, Bihong; Wang, Jiangang; Jin, Chunsheng

    2016-02-01

    The Pamir plateau forms a prominent tectonic salient that marks the western end of the Himalayan orogen containing several terranes that were accreted to Eurasia from the Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic. A detailed knowledge of the tectonic evolution of the Pamir salient during the Cenozoic is important for our understanding of the intracontinental deformation in the western Himalaya. Although the tectonic evolution of the Pamir salient has long been studied, the timing of collision between the Indian Plate and the Kohistan-Ladakh arc is still a matter of debate. We present new U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes of detrital zircons, magnetic fabrics, and stable isotopes from the foreland basin on the northeastern margin of the Pamir that indicate a change in sediment provenance started at about 47 Ma. Sediments in the southwest Tarim Basin were partially derived from the uplifted and eroded Karakoram and Kohistan terranes created by the collision between the Indian Plate and the Kohistan-Ladakh arc at circa 47 Ma, as a result of northward thrusting and propagation of the Indian Plate under Eurasia.

  14. 76 FR 23940 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 22

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Proposed rule... (LAGC) fleets; open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area (access area) trip allocations... to minimize impacts of incidental take of sea turtles as required by the March 14, 2008, Atlantic...

  15. 77 FR 28311 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Closure of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... management unit of the Atlantic sea scallop fishery ranges from the shorelines of Maine through North Carolina to the outer boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone. The Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management... United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Closure of the Delmarva Access Area AGENCY: National...

  16. 77 FR 52 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 23

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 23 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Adjustment 23 to the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management Plan, which was developed and adopted by the New... measures to: Minimize impacts on sea turtles through the requirement of a turtle deflector dredge;...

  17. 75 FR 63721 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... specified in Sec. 648.52(d), outside the boundaries of a Sea Scallop Access Area by a vessel that is... United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 21; Correction AGENCY: National Marine... implement Framework Adjustment 21 (Framework 21) to the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management...

  18. 75 FR 17618 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Recreational Fishery; Emergency Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... United States; Black Sea Bass Recreational Fishery; Emergency Rule Correction and Extension AGENCY... recreational black sea bass fishery in the Federal waters of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) from 3 to 200... implemented with no end date, and to extend the prohibition on recreational fishing for black sea bass in...

  19. Deep-water sediment transport processes in the northeastern South China Sea: Mooring and shipboard-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Li, X.; Wang, W.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Six moorings equipped with acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP), recording current meter (RCM), and sediment trap have been deployed in the northeastern South China Sea at water depths ranging from 1700-3900 m to collect time-series data that can hopefully help better characterize the bottom current system and transport process in the region. Shipboard-based measurements including CTD, transmissometer, optical backscatter (OBS), and in-situ layered suspended particle sampling using large volume pump (LVP) were undertaken along three deep-water transects in the region during two cruises in the spring of 2012 and 2013. Preliminary results show for the first time the presence of continuous and relative stable contour currents and widespread deep-water nepheloid layers in the deep South China Sea. The contour currents flow southwestwards with average speeds of 2-4 cm/s (occasionally up to 11 cm/s) along lower slope of the northern South China Sea at depths of 1700-2500 m. The large-scale sediment waves recorded by high-resolution multibeam bathymetry appear to be related to activities of the contour currents. Intermediate and bottom nepheloid layers with an average suspended particle concentration of 0.6 mg/l are extended from the lower slope to the deep basin of the South China Sea. The intermediate nepheloid layers in depths ranging from 900 to 1100 m are thought to be controlled mainly by the interaction between the North Pacific Intermediate Water and the Pacific Deep Water masses. A sedimentary core (MD01-2905) previously collected on the sediment drift of ODP Site 1144, where three of the mooring systems are located, indicates that 60% of total fine-grained terrigenous sediment budget since the last glacial time have sourced from Taiwan. Our data suggest that the observed contour currents are the major carrier for transporting Taiwan-derived sediments to the northern slope of the South China Sea.

  20. Sea surface height anomaly and upper ocean temperature over the Indian Ocean during contrasting monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Anitha; Mitra, A. K.; Mahapatra, D. K.; Momin, I. M.; Rajagopal, E. N.; Basu, Swati

    2016-09-01

    Recent research emphasizes the importance of the oceanic feedback to monsoon rainfall over the Asian landmass. In this study, we investigate the differences in the sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and upper ocean temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean during multiple strong and weak monsoons. Analysis of satellite derived SSHA, sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean reanalysis data reveals that patterns of SSHA, SST, ocean temperature, upper ocean heat content (UOHC) and propagations of Kelvin and Rossby waves differ during strong and weak monsoon years. During strong monsoons positive SSH, SST and UOHC anomalies develop over large parts of north Indian Ocean whereas during weak monsoons much of the north Indian Ocean is covered with negative anomalies. These patterns can be used as a standard tool for evaluating the performance of coupled and ocean models in simulating & forecasting strong and weak monsoons. The rainfall over central India is found to be significantly correlated with SSHA over the regions (Arabian Sea and West central Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal) where SSHA is positively large during strong monsoons. The SST-SSHA correlation is also very strong over the same area. The study reveals that much convection takes place over these regions during strong monsoons. In contrast during weak monsoons, convection takes place over eastern equatorial region. These changes in SST are largely influenced by oceanic Kelvin and Rossby waves. The Rossby waves initiated in spring at the eastern boundary propagate sub-surface heat content in the ocean influencing SST in summer. The SST anomalies modulate the Hadley circulation and the moisture transport thereby contributing to rainfall over central India. Therefore oceanic Kelvin and Rossby waves influence the rainfall over central India.

  1. Relative sea-level change in northeastern Florida (USA) during the last ∼8.0 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Andrea D.; Kemp, Andrew C.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Peltier, W. Richard; Cahill, Niamh; Hill, David F.; Ashe, Erica; Alexander, Clark R.

    2016-06-01

    An existing database of relative sea-level (RSL) reconstructions from the U.S. Atlantic coast lacked valid sea-level index points from Georgia and Florida. This region lies on the edge of the collapsing forebulge of the former Laurentide Ice Sheet making it an important location for understanding glacio-isostatic adjustment and the history of ice-sheet melt. To address the paucity of data, we reconstruct RSL in northeastern Florida (St. Marys) over the last ∼8.0 ka from samples of basal salt-marsh sediment that minimize the influence of compaction. The analogy between modern salt-marsh foraminifera and their fossil counterparts preserved in the sedimentary record was used to estimate paleomarsh surface elevation. Sample ages were determined by radiocarbon dating of identifiable and in-situ plant macrofossils. This approach yielded 25 new sea-level index points that constrain a ∼5.7 m rise in RSL during the last ∼8.0 ka. The record shows that no highstand in sea level occurred in this region over the period of the reconstruction. We compared the new reconstruction to Earth-ice models ICE 6G-C VM5a and ICE 6G-C VM6. There is good fit in the later part of the Holocene with VM5a and for a brief time in the earlier Holocene with VM6. However, there are discrepancies in model-reconstruction fit in the early to mid Holocene in northeastern Florida and elsewhere along the Atlantic coast at locations with early Holocene RSL reconstructions. The most pronounced feature of the new reconstruction is a slow down in the rate of RSL rise from approximately 5.0 to 3.0 ka. This trend may reflect a significant contribution from local-scale processes such as tidal-range change and/or change in base flow of the St. Marys River in response to paleoclimate changes. However, the spatial expression (local vs. regional) of this slow down is undetermined and corroborative records are needed to establish its geographical extent.

  2. Evaluation of CMIP5 models on sea surface salinity in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathrio, Ibnu; Manda, Atsuyoshi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Kodama, Yasu-Masa; Ishida, Sachinobu

    2017-01-01

    Prior to future climate assessment of the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) experiments, how well CMIP5 models simulates present climate should be examined. Sea surface salinity (sss) play important role in ocean stratification and indirectly affects air sea interaction. However, few studies have been carried out to evaluate sss in CMIP5 models. In this study, performance of CMIP5 models in simulating sss in Indian Ocean was examined with respect to the observation. Our results showed that multi model ensemble (MME) mean of CMIP5 models displayed annual and seasonal salinity bias in three regions i.e. Western Indian Ocean (WIO), Bay of Bengal (BOB) and Southeastern Indian Ocean (SEIO). CMIP5 models overestimate sss in BOB about 1.5 psu and underestimated sss in WIO and SEIO about 0.4 psu. Biases in WIO and BOB were mainly attributed to bias in precipitation. CMIP5 models overestimated (underestimated) precipitation in WIO (BOB) with greater bias found during Boreal summer to winter. Meanwhile, advection process was responsible for negative SSS bias in SEIO.

  3. 76 FR 43773 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 22

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Adjustment 22; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 140 / Thursday, July 21, 2011 / Rules and... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: NMFS is implementing measures specified in... access general category (LAGC) fleets; open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area...

  4. 75 FR 36559 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 21

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... rule for Framework 21 published in the Federal Register on April 27, 2010, with a 15-day public comment... Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule...: Total allowable catch (TAC); open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area (access area)...

  5. 75 FR 6586 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United; Black Sea Bass Fishery; 2010 Black Sea Bass Specifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... fax to the attention of the Sustainable Fisheries Division. Include ``Comments on 2010 Black Sea Bass... remaining 3,589,000 lb (1,628 mt) is divided 49 percent for the revised commercial fishery quota and...

  6. Seasonal and interannual changes in zooplankton community in the coastal zone of the North-Eastern Black Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishina, A. B.; Arashkevich, E. G.; Louppova, N. E.; Soloviev, K. A.

    2009-04-01

    The phenological response of zooplankton community is a result of simultaneous effect of several factors: feeding conditions, predation abundance, periods of reproduction of common species and hydrodynamic regime. The Black sea ecosystem is one of the best studied in the world, otherwise there is still some illegibility about ecosystem functioning and especially about environmental factors influence on zooplankton dynamics. For the last twenty years pelagic system of the Black Sea has changed dramatically. The invasion of ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the middle of eighties caused significant decrease in zooplankton biomass. It also altered plankton structure and shifted periods of mass reproduction of the abundant species and biomass maximums. For instance, before the invasion of Mnemiopsis the maximum of zooplankton biomass was observed in autumn (data by A. Pasternak, 1983), and after that the maximum moved to the spring (data by V.S. Khoroshilov, 1999). The incursion of ctenophore Beroe ovata feeding on Mnemiopsis in the nineties has led to the enhancement of zooplankton community. Although the detailed analysis of seasonal zooplankton dynamics wasn't performed in the recent years. The object of our research was to study seasonal and interannual changes in zooplankton community in the coastal area of the North-Eastern Black Sea. Analysis of interannual, seasonal and spatial changes in zooplankton distribution, abundance and species composition along with age structure of dominant populations were performed based on investigations during 2005-2008 years in the North-Eastern Black Sea. Plankton samples were obtained monthly since June 2005 till December 2008. Plankton was collected at three stations at depths 25m, 50m and 500-1000m along the transect from the Blue Bay to the open sea. Sampling of gelatinous animals was conducted in parallel to the zooplankton sampling. Simultaneously with plankton sampling CTD data were obtained. The feeding conditions were

  7. Sea level and coral atolls: Late holocene emergence in the Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Woodroffe, C. ); McLean, R. ); Polach, H.; Wallensky, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cocos (keeling) Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean were visited by Charles Darwin, who described geomorphological evidence that he considered supported his subsidence theory of coral-reef development. However, several other accounts of the reef islands have questioned Darwin's interpretation, and have suggested that a conglomerate platform that underlies most of the reef islands may indicate recent emergence of the atoll. Radiocarbon ages on corals from this conglomerate platform, reported here, indicate that it formed in the late Holocene. Fossil in situ microatolls above present upper coral growth limits, the elevation of associated beachrock, and the morphological similarity of the conglomerate platform to the present reef-flat deposits indicate a late Holocene sea level above the present relative to the atoll. The atoll has undergone at least 0.5 m of emergence since about 3000 yr B.P. This represents the first radiometrically dated evidence of Holocene emergence from islands in the eastern or central Indian Ocean.

  8. The effect of zonal gradients of sea surface temperature on the Indian Ocean winter monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C.

    1981-01-01

    Several global climate simulations by the 7-layer, 8 x 10 GISS climate model were designed to test the contributions of various surface boundary conditions to the global climate. The model was run with the sun fixed at a perpetual January. In a comparison of run #5, in which realistic January surface boundary conditions were used, with run #4, which was the same except that a zonally symmetric climatological January sea surface temperature (SST) field was used, one of the results was that run #5 provided a better simulation of the Indian Ocean monsoon. A further comparison of the wind fields over the Indian Ocean that were generated by these two model runs is presented.

  9. 78 FR 42890 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery and Northeast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery and Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Framework Adjustment 24 and Framework Adjustment 49; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... action contains corrections and clarifications to the final rule implemented through Joint...

  10. The relationship between Arabian Sea upwelling and Indian Monsoon revisited in a high resolution ocean simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xing; Hünicke, Birgit; Tim, Nele; Zorita, Eduardo

    2017-03-01

    Studies based on sediment records, sea-surface temperature and wind suggest that upwelling along the western coast of Arabian Sea is strongly affected by the Indian summer Monsoon. We examine this relationship directly in an eddy-resolving global ocean simulation STORM driven by atmospheric reanalysis over the last 61 years. With its very high spatial resolution (10 km), STORM allows us to identify characteristics of the upwelling system. We analyse the co-variability between upwelling and meteorological and oceanic variables from 1950 to 2010. The analysis reveals high interannual correlations between coastal upwelling and along-shore wind-stress (r = 0.73) as well as with sea-surface temperature (r = -0.83). However, the correlation between the upwelling and the Monsoon is small. We find an atmospheric circulation pattern different from the one that drives the Monsoon as the main modulator of the upwelling variability. In spite of this, the patterns of temperature anomalies that are either linked to Arabian Sea upwelling or to the Monsoon are spatially quite similar, although the physical mechanisms of these links are different. In addition, no long-term trend is detected in our modelled upwelling in the Arabian Sea.

  11. The benthic ecosystem of the northeastern Chukchi Sea: An overview of its unique biogeochemical and biological characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunton, Kenneth H.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Trefry, John H.

    2014-04-01

    In February 2008, Lease Sale 193 generated renewed interest for oil and gas exploration in the northeastern Chukchi Sea and prompted a series of studies designed to increase our scientific knowledge of this biologically rich area. We present in this special issue the results from major field expeditions during open-water periods in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Our work focused on the biological and chemical characteristics of the benthos with the goal of establishing a strong baseline for assessing future changes that may occur in response to (1) impacts from oil and gas activities, and (2) variations in hydrography, circulation or ice retreat associated with climatic change. We found concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 17 trace metals in sediments at natural background levels throughout the study area except at two previous (1989) drilling sites; there was no evidence that showed bioaccumulation of these substances above natural concentrations. Inorganic-N was recycled within one day throughout the water column, with evidence of substantial remineralization of organic matter in the sediments. Active efflux of sediment NO3- supports water column primary production that, in turn, sustains a rich benthos dominated by crustaceans and echinoderms that also receive, based on isotopic evidence, a benthic carbon subsidy. Benthic food webs are complex, with high trophic redundancy based on the diversity of both infaunal and epifaunal populations. The highest trophic levels in the benthos were dominated by predatory gastropods. Comparisons of gray whale and walrus distributions from aerial sightings showed a large difference between the two study years relative to the more stable benthic prey base for these animals over that period. A nearly ice-free shelf by early summer 2009 compared to 2010 revealed that walrus distributions were more closely linked to sea ice rather than to benthic prey items, indicating that rapid

  12. Archaeal tetraether membrane lipid fluxes in the northeastern Pacific and the Arabian Sea: Implications for TEX86 paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Schouten, Stefan; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2006-12-01

    The newly introduced temperature proxy, the tetraether index of archaeal lipids with 86 carbon atoms (TEX86), is based on the number of cyclopentane moieties in the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids of marine Crenarchaeota. The composition of sedimentary GDGTs used for TEX86 paleothermometry is thought to reflect sea surface temperature (SST). However, marine Crenarchaeota occur ubiquitously in the world oceans over the entire depth range and not just in surface waters. We analyzed the GDGT distribution in settling particulate organic matter collected in sediment traps from the northeastern Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea to investigate the seasonal and spatial distribution of the fluxes of crenarchaeotal GDGTs and the origin of the TEX86 signal transported to the sediment. In both settings the TEX86 measured at all trap deployment depths reflects SST. In the Arabian Sea, analysis of an annual time series showed that the SST estimate based on TEX86 in the shallowest trap at 500 m followed the in situ SST with a 1 to 3 week time delay, likely caused by the relatively low settling speed of sinking particles. This revealed that the GDGT signal that reaches deeper water is derived from the upper water column rather than in situ production of GDGTs. The GDGT temperature signal in deeper traps at 1500 m and 3000 m did not show a seasonal cyclicity observed in the 500 m trap but rather reflected the annual mean SST. This is probably due to a homogenization of the TEX86 SST signal carried by particles as they ultimately reach the interior of the ocean. Our data confirm the use of TEX86 as a temperature proxy of surface ocean waters.

  13. Seasonal and interannual variation in the planktonic communities of the northeastern Chukchi Sea during the summer and early fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Questel, Jennifer M.; Clarke, Cheryl; Hopcroft, Russell R.

    2013-09-01

    We analyzed the seasonal and interannual variability of the planktonic communities in a densely sampled region of the northeastern Chukchi Sea as part of a multidisciplinary ecosystem study from 2008 to 2010. Observations of chlorophyll-a, inorganic macronutrients, and zooplankton (using both 150-μm and 505-μm mesh nets) were made within two 900-NM 2 grids (Klondike and Burger) at high spatial resolution three times each in 2008 and 2009, with a third grid (Statoil) sampled twice in 2010. Sea-ice conditions prior to sampling varied notably during the study: seasonal sea ice retreat was earlier and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) were warmer in 2009 than in 2008, whereas SSTs for 2010 were intermediate between the 2008 and 2009 values. Eighty taxonomic categories of zooplankton, including 11 meroplanktonic categories, were recorded, with the greatest diversity found within the copepods (25 species), followed by the cnidarians (11 species). All species are typical for the region and most are seeded from the Bering Sea. A seasonal progression of the community structure was apparent over each survey area and was likely influenced by temperature. Cold oceanographic conditions in 2008 likely slowed growth and development of the zooplankton, such that holozooplankton abundance averaged 2389 and 106 individuals m-3 and biomass averaged 10.5 and 8.3 mg DW m-3 in the 150- and 505-μm nets, respectively. An early phytoplankton bloom in 2009 apparently supported a zooplankton community of greater abundance, but moderate biomass, averaging 6842 and 189 individuals m-3, and 16.3 and 7.0 mg DW m-3 in the 150- and 505-μm nets, respectively. Highest zooplankton abundance and biomass values among the three years occurred in 2010: 7396 and 198 individuals m-3 and 102.9 and 33.5 mg DW m-3 in the 150- and 505-μm nets, respectively. Holozooplankton biomass changes were driven by increases in large-bodied, lipid-rich copepods. The contribution of meroplankton was substantial in this

  14. Deglacial temperature patterns in the Arabian Sea and mechanisms for Indian monsoon failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J. E.; Pausata, F. S. R.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Both paleoclimate data and climate model simulations demonstrate that the Indian monsoon system responds to remote coolings in the North Atlantic. The textbook examples are the stadial events associated with the last deglaciation — the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Stadial 1 — when the monsoon weakened dramatically and caused drying throughout the Indian Ocean rim. The mechanism by which the North Atlantic influences the monsoon system is not completely clear: locally cool SSTs, increases in continental albedo, and southward migration of the intertropical convergence zone have all been raised as possibilities. Here we synthesize biomarker and foraminiferal estimates of temperature to study the evolution of the Arabian Sea water column during the deglaciation and test hypotheses of monsoon failure during stadials. Alkenone and Mg/Ca data clearly indicate that the Arabian Sea cools during the YD and H1, although H1 cooling is partly obscured by the overall warming trend associated with orbital forcing and rising greenhouse gases. In contrast, TEX86 data record warmings during the YD and H1. The stark difference between the TEX86 response and the alkenone and foraminiferal data, as well as comparison with climate model simulations, indicates that TEX86 is most likely acting as a subsurface temperature proxy in the Arabian Sea over these timescales. Taken together, the paleoclimate data describe a pattern of surface cooling and subsurface warming in response to North Atlantic cooling. This oceanographic response is in excellent agreement with both timeslice and transient model simulations spanning the last deglaciation, and strongly supports the hypothesis that locally cool SSTs are a requisite for monsoon failure. Furthermore, subsurface warming causes a destratification of the Arabian Sea water column and provides a mechanism for previously observed reductions in productivity during stadial events.

  15. Navy Tactical Applications Guide. Volume 5. Part 1. Indian Ocean (Red Sea/Persian Gulf) Weather Analysis and Forecast Applications. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Tactical Applications Guide. Volume 5. Part I Indian Ocean (Red Sea/Persian Gulf) Weather Analysis and Forecast Applications . . PERFORMING ORD. REPORT...and ideaittp by hiocA nb..) Meteorological Satellite Systems Southwest Monsoon Analysis and Forecast Applications Coastal Zone Phenomena Indian Ocean...describing regional environmental analysis and forecast applications based on satellite data and conventional meteorological observations for the Indian Ocean

  16. Changes in Cancer Incidence Patterns among a Northeastern American Indian Population: 1955-1969 versus 1990-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Martin C.; Va, Puthiery; Stevens, Adrian; Kahn, Amy R.; Michalek, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This manuscript examines shifts in patterns of cancer incidence among the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) for the interval 1955-1969 compared to 1990-2004. Methods: A retrospective cohort design was used to examine cancer incidence among the SNI during 2 time intervals: 1955-1969 and 1990-2004. Person-years at risk were multiplied by…

  17. Indian Ocean sea surface temperature variability and change since 1960s: forcing and process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Meehl, G. A.; Hu, A.

    2005-12-01

    Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) variability and change since 1960s are investigated using global coupled models,the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and parallel climate model (PCM). Results from the CCSM3 and a series of PCM experiments are analyzed in order to understand the roles played by internal variability, human-induced warming, and external forcing in causing the SST variations. To consolidate the model results, the simple Ocean model Data Assimilation (SODA) products are also analyzed. The results suggest that the SST in both the south and north Indian Ocean (IO) has an increasing trend. Overlying on this trend is decadal variability. Consistent with previous studies, the warming trend results mainly from the human-induced increased green house gases, which increase downward longwave fluxes. Interestingly, warming of the upper tropical and subtropical basins is accomanied by cooling in higher-latitudes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) region, which results from the reduced southward heat transports by weakened the subtropical cells (STCs). This colder, ACC water can enter the IO via deep layers in the south and then shoals upward to the thermocline layer in the tropical Indian Ocean, causing a distinct vertical structrure: with warming in the near surface and below the thermocline and cooling in the thermocline. The SST decadal variability, however, is caused primarily by external forcing, due to a combined effect of surface heat flux and lateral heat transport. Internal variability of the coupled system also plays a role.

  18. The genus Litophyton Forskål, 1775 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nephtheidae) in the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    van Ofwegen, Leen P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Litophyton species of the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean are revised, which includes species previously belonging to the genus Nephthea, which is synonymized with Litophyton. A neotype for both Litophyton arboreum, the type species of Litophyton, and Nephthea chabrolii, the type species of Nephthea, are designated. The new species Litophyton curvum sp. n. is described and depicted, and a key to all Litophyton species is provided. Of the 26 species previously described from the western Indian Ocean and Red Sea, 13 species are considered valid and 13 have been synonymized or placed in other genera. PMID:27103869

  19. The Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Echinometra (Camarodonta: Echinometridae) from the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, Omri; Loya, Yossi

    2013-01-01

    The number of valid species in the genus Echinometra (Echinodermata, Echinoidea) and their associated identification keys have been debated in the scientific literature for more than 180 years. As the phylogeny and dispersal patterns of these species have been widely used as a prominent model for marine speciation, new insights into their taxonomy have the potential to deepen our understanding of marine speciation processes. In this study we examine Echinometra taxonomy, combining morphology and molecular tools. We present the taxonomy and phylogeny of Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean Echinometra. The currently available morphological keys were found to be limited in their ability to delineate all species within this genus. Nonetheless, morphological similarities between the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean populations were high, and delimited them from the other species. These latter populations together formed a monophyletic clade, genetically distant from any of the other Echinometra species by more than 3%. Combining both traditional taxonomy and molecular evidence, we found that these populations were neither Echinometra mathaei nor E. oblonga, as previously considered. The morphological discrepancies of these populations, and their genetic divergence from the other Echinometra species, suggest that they should be considered as a new Echinometra species. PMID:24116225

  20. 77 FR 20728 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 23

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Management Council and includes measures to: Minimize impacts on sea turtles through the requirement of a turtle deflector dredge; improve the effectiveness of the scallop fishery's accountability measures... to use a turtle deflector dredge (TDD), including where, when, and to which vessels this...

  1. Diversity and Characteristics of Benthic Foraminifera in Cold Seep Areas in the Active Margin of the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Meng-Ting; Thomas, Ellen; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Lin, Saulwood; Tien-Shun Lin, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The active continental margin in northeastern South China Sea (SCS) has been considered to have high potential to be a reservoir of gas hydrate, based on geographic features, geophysical evidences, as well as geochemical analyses of samples from the water column, pore water and sediments. Compared to a typical sea floor area, cold seep areas have more food for benthos and more diverse habitats. As a result, we can expect a higher species diversity of benthic organisms in cold seep areas of the SCS. Based on preliminary results of species identification of benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the upper most sediments (0-5 cm) of box cores collected around cold seeps at water depth ~1300m, the species diversity is significantly higher at seep sites (Shannon-Wiener index = 274) than at background sites (Shannon-Wiener index = 3). The faunal assemblages consist of ~68% calcareous benthic foraminifera (CBF) and ~32% agglutinated benthic foraminifera (ABF) at seep sites. On the other hand, faunal assemblages are composed of only ~24% CBF and ~76% ABF at background sites. By staining the sample with rose Bengal-ethanol solution, we were able to recognize in-situ individuals which were alive at the time of collection, and separate them from dead specimens. Among the living individuals, the most abundant CBF species in seep sites is Bulimina aculeata (~51% in the living CBF fauna), followed by the typical 'shelf-species,' Lenticulina inornata, (~10%) and the common 'brackish-species,' Miliolinella subrotunda, (~9%), while the most abundant ABF species is Cribrostomoides subglobosus (~19% in the living ABF fauna). The most common species thus are typical for shallower, more food rich environments.

  2. The circulation of Levantine intermediate water in the northeastern Ionian sea (late winter/early spring 1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorou, Athanasios J.

    1991-05-01

    CTD data, collected in the northeastern Ionian Sea during late winter/early spring 1986, are used to examine the spreading of the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) on selected isopycnal surfaces. The distribution of salinity on these surfaces provides the qualitative aspects of the flow field. Charts of the spreading of LIW, based on θ-S analysis, emphasize the diffusive nature of the LIW spreading over a major part of the study area. However, more than half of the overall decrease in its concentration, indicative of vertical mixing, occurs at the Strait of Otranto. Geostrophic calculations, with a reference level selected on the basis of heuristic criteria, are used to derive (preserving continuity) the quantitative flow pattern. The circulation of the "upper" water (above the reference level), in the part of the study area south of 37° 30'N was found to be dominated by a mesoscale though distorted anticyclonic gyre; with the latter a total of 2.0 Sv (1 Sv = 1 × 10 6 m 3/s) of "upper" water, including 1.0 Sv of LIW, was found to be associated, presumably re-circulating in the area of the anticyclonic gyre. North of 37°30'N the flow is northward and mildly cyclonic, transporting 0.5 Sv. A major portion of the latter (= 0.4 Sv), including 0.2 Sv of LIW is directed toward the eastern side of the Otranto Strait.

  3. Phytoplankton dynamics driven by vertical nutrient fluxes during the spring inter-monsoon period in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. P.; Dong, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    A field survey from the coastal ocean zones to the offshore pelagic zones of the northeastern South China Sea (nSCS) was conducted during the inter-monsoon period of May 2014 when the region was characterized by prevailing low-nutrient conditions. Comprehensive field measurements were made for not only hydrographic and biogeochemical properties but also phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. We also performed estimations of the vertical turbulent diffusivity and diffusive nutrient fluxes using a Thorpe-scale method and the upwelling nutrient fluxes by Ekman pumping using satellite-derived wind stress curl. Our results indicated a positive correlation between the integrated phytoplankton chlorophyll a and vertical nutrient fluxes in the offshore region of the nSCS during the study period. We generally found an increasing role of turbulent diffusion but a decreasing role of curl-driven upwelling in vertical transport of nutrients from the coastal ocean zones to the offshore pelagic zones. Elevated nutrient fluxes near Dongsha Islands supported high new production leading to net growth of the phytoplankton community, whereas the low fluxes near the southwest of Taiwan had resulted in a negative net community growth leading to decline of a surface phytoplankton bloom. Overall, phytoplankton dynamics in the large part of the nSCS could be largely driven by vertical nutrient fluxes including turbulent diffusion and curl-driven upwelling during the spring inter-monsoon period.

  4. Nd isotopes in deep-sea corals in the North-eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Kevin; Colin, Christophe; Douville, Eric; Freiwald, Andre; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur; De Mol, Ben; Frank, Norbert

    2010-09-01

    Neodymium (Nd) concentrations and isotopic signatures of living and fossil deep-sea coral species Lophelia pertusa, Desmophyllum dianthus and Madrepora oculata from the northeast Atlantic Ocean have been investigated in order to test the ability of deep-sea corals to reconstruct the seawater Nd isotopic signature and past changes of ocean circulation in the eastern North Atlantic. Small quantities of Nd—less than 45 ng/g—are incorporated into the aragonite skeleton of living deep-sea corals that dwell at upper intermediate depths throughout the Northeast Atlantic. Rigorous cleaning techniques are needed in order to avoid Nd contamination from manganese-oxide and iron hydroxide coatings. Moreover, Nd isotopic compositions have been measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) by Nd-oxide method. Our data indicate that the isotopic signatures of modern corals are similar to those of adjacent water masses, implying that deep-sea corals can serve as an archive of the seawater Nd isotopic compositions in the past. The first results from few fully-cleaned fossils corals collected within the Porcupine Seabight and the southwest Rockall Bank reveal significantly higher ɛNd for corals dated between 150 ± 40 and 3060 ± 90 yrs than those of the living corals located in similar areas. This suggests rapid hydrological variations along the eastern margin of the North Atlantic Ocean at intermediate water depth with higher contribution of the Mediterranean Overflow Waters (MOW) or other temperate Atlantic mid-depth water masses (ENACW or NAC) in the past.

  5. Influence of interannual rainfall anomalies on sea level variations in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perigaud, Claire; McCreary, Julian P.

    2003-10-01

    A halo-thermal, reduced-gravity model with four active layers is used to investigate how interannual rainfall anomalies affect sea surface height (SSH) variability in the Indian Ocean. The model is forced by monthly varying winds observed over the period 1980-2000 in two experiments that differ by their rainfall forcing, Run FSU and Run Arkin, forced by climatological and interannually varying rainfall, respectively. Compared to the large impact of wind on SSH (about 30 cm), the impact of rain is much smaller. Its maximum (found in the southeastern Indian Ocean during the rainfall deficits of 1994 and 1997) is only 2 cm. Because rainfall significantly affects model salinity and temperature, the deficits make the layers of Run Arkin colder and saltier than in Run FSU, causing a -5 cm change in sea level. Baroclinic adjustments also occur such that the top (bottom) two layers are thicker (thinner), increasing sea level by 3 cm and hence significantly reducing the SSH change due to steric effects alone. SSH variability in either Run Arkin or Run FSU compares very well with TOPEX data. Although the impact of rainfall on SSH is negligible, salinity variations significantly affect dynamic-height calculations of SSH. In the model, the neglect of salinity variations leads to an error of 5 to 10 cm along the eastern boundary, in the Bay of Bengal, and in the interior ocean south of 8°S. This error is validated by the difference between TOPEX data and SSH derived from observed temperature profiles.

  6. Composition and geochemistry of clay sediments offshore the northeastern Sicilian coast (Southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccà, Carmelo; Saccà, Domenica; Nucera, Preziosa; De Fazio, Anna

    2011-05-01

    Grain-size, mineralogical and chemical analyses were carried out on fine fraction of sediments collected in the Gulfs of Patti and Milazzo, two borderland basins in the Southern Tyrrhenian extending offshore the northeastern Sicilian coast. Results of granulometric analyses on size fractions smaller than 63 μm showed that the investigated samples can be classified mainly as clayey silts. The coarse fractions (>63 μm), examined by optical microscopy, consist of a terrigenous component, representing in some samples about 98-99% of the total sediment, and by a biogenic component. This latter is mainly made up of benthic Foraminifera. The mineralogical composition of the fine fraction, determined by X-Ray diffractometry, is represented by muscovite, quartz, clay minerals, carbonates (calcite) and, in some samples, by calcium and sodium-rich plagioclases. The method of saturation with K and Mg, followed by ethylene glycol solvation and heating, are used for a qualitative determination of the clay minerals. Clay mineralogical composition is characterized by the dominance of clinochlore and illite, with minor amounts of smectite (especially montmorillonite) and vermiculite. The chemical data reflect the main mineralogical composition showing a uniform quantitative composition, with high Al 2O 3 and SiO 2 values and very few variations in the relative abundance of the other components. The Cr/Th, Th/Sc, Th/Co and La/Sc ratios suggest a felsic nature of the source rocks. Finally the geochemical parameters such as V/Cr, U/Th, Ni/Co and Cu/Zn ratios indicate that examined sediments were deposited under oxic environments.

  7. Environmental policy in the north-eastern sector of the Black sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyan, Ruben; Godin, Evgenii; Kosyan, Alisa

    2015-04-01

    Active economic development of the Black Sea East coastal zone has started in the beginning of 20-th century. Those days the pebble taken from beaches was used for construction of buildings, rail and motor roads. Active consumption of pebble from the beaches and river banks had caused a sharp increase of sea shores abrasion and washout rate, number of landslides had also increased. Contemporary Caucasian shores of Black Sea are being developed under increasing man-caused load. Favorable natural conditions, their variety and uniqueness determine the exceptional role of these shores as very important recreational zone of Russian South. Waste urbanized areas, agricultural territories and National Parks are located in immediate neighborhood with the sea. Important industrial facilities and federal and international communi- cations, including major seaports are located in the shore zone. At present time major gas and oil transportation facilities are commissioned and being constructed in the area. Due to the change of geopolitical situation the Russian shoreline had significantly reduced in comparison with Soviet period, especially in most developed regions. Large resort complexes in Georgia, Crimea and Baltic area were lost. Russia had also lost many major seaports that, under conditions of structural change of economy and export growth, had caused the necessity of building new industrial facilities in the Black Sea coastal zone, and, consequently, had stimulated active human invasion into natural coastal processes. At the time being, a major part (three hundred nine kilometers) of Black Sea coast within Russian sector is subject to abrasion and landslide processes. Abrasion process and beaches wash-out, landslides cause destruction of industrial and transport facilities, living and public buildings, resort complexes and valuable agricultural areas. In this light, the challenge of estimation of effective methods of shores protection against wave-induced erosion

  8. Interannual Sea Level Variations in the Tropical Indian Ocean from Geosat and Shallow Water Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perigaud, Claire; Delecluse, Pascale

    1993-01-01

    Sea level variations of the Indian Ocean north of 20 deg S are analyzed from Geosat satellite altimeter data over April 1985-September 1989. These variations are compared and interpreted with numerical simulations derived from a reduced gravity model forced by FSU observed winds over the same period. After decomposition into complex empirical orthogonal functions, the low-frequency anomalies are described by the first two modes for observations as well as for simulations. The sums of the two modes contain 34% and 40% of the observed and simulated variances, respectively. Averaged over the basin, the observed and simulated sea level changes are correlated by 0.92 over 1985-1988. The strongest change happens during the El Ninio 1986-1987: between winter 1986 and summer 1987 the basin-averaged sea level rises by approx. 1 cm. These low-frequency variations can partly be explained by changes in the Sverdrup circulation. The southern tropical Indian Ocean between 1O deg and 20 deg S is the domain where those changes are strongest: the averaged sea level rises by approx. 4.5 cm between winter 1986 and winter 1987. There, the signal propagates southwestward across the basin at a speed similar to free Rossby waves. Sensitivity of observed anomalies is examined over 1987-1988, with different orbit ephemeris, tropospheric corrections, and error reduction processes. The uncertainty of the basin-averaged sea level estimates is mostly due to the way the orbit error is reduced and reaches approx. 1 cm. Nonetheless, spatial correlation is good between the various observations and better than between observations and simulations. Sensitivity of simulated anomalies to the wind uncertainty, examined with Former Soviet Union (FSU) and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) forcings over 1985-1988, shows that the variance of the simulations driven by ECMWF is 52% smaller, as FSU winds are stronger than ECMWF. Results show that the wind strength also affects the

  9. A sea breeze induced thunderstorm over an inland station over Indian South Peninsula - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhate, Jyoti; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Karipot, Anandakumar; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.; Rajasekhar, M.; Sathiyamoorthy, V.; Kishtawal, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic interaction of sea breeze with the prevailing synoptic flows can give rise to meteorological conditions conducive for the occurrence to the thunderstorms over coastal and adjoining regions. Here, we present a rare case study of the genesis of the thunderstorm that occurred on 4th May 2011 at 1500Z over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), one of the tropical inland stations (100 km) near to the east coast of the Indian peninsula. The objective of present work is to understand the underlying physical mechanism of initiation of such convection over this region. A set of meteorological observations obtained from microwave radiometer profiler, eddy covariance flux tower system, and Doppler weather radar, are used for investigating the convection genesis characteristics. In conjunction with observations, to bridge the gap of lack of high resolutional spatial observations, the high-resolution (2 km) model analysis is developed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and four-dimensional data assimilation technique. The analysis of thermodynamical and dynamical indices carried out from the model analysis as well as observations. Results obtained from this study indicated the presence of a wind discontinuity line and a warm air advection from the north Indian region towards Gadanki caused this area hot dry and convectively active. The sea breeze front propagated over hot and dry area few hours before the genesis of the thunderstorm. The moisture flux convergence increased with the inland propagation of sea breeze front. We found that the inland penetration of sea-breeze front caused advection of moist and cold air over warm and dry region; reduction in dew point depression causing bulging of dry line and lowering of lifting condensation level; development of shear in wind direction and speed; increase in low level convergence and vertical velocity, upward transport of moist air and finally increase in helicity of the environment. The wind shear instability

  10. Depositional and erosional features of the inner shelf, northeastern Bering Sea.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.E.; Thor, D.R.; Swisher, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Sonographs and bathymetric profiles from water depths less than 15m in the Nome-Solomon, Port Clarence, and Yukon Delta areas of the Alaskan Bering Sea coast show features generated by waves, currents, and drifting ice. The surficial sediments in the Nome-Solomon and Port Clarence areas range in grain size from sand to boulder gravel and have many surface features visible on sonographs, whereas the sediments off the Yukon Delta are fine sands and silts that have few such features. Materials in the Nome-Solomon and Port Clarence areas have been seggregated by grain size into ribbons and irregular, elongate, and lobate patches. Coarse sand and fine gravel patches and ribbons are characterized by symmetrical ripples generated by storm waves. Ice-gouged furrows occur in all the nearshore areas studied.-from Authors

  11. Features of hydrocarbon distribution in the coastal zone of the northeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Onegina, V. D.; Konovalov, B. V.

    2015-09-01

    Data on the content and composition of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface water and bottom sediments are reported as compared to the distribution of total organic carbon, suspended particulate matter, lipids, and chlorophyll for the Greater Sochi area and the Gelendzhik and Blue bays. It is established that an influx of oil products leads to the increase of hydrocarbon concentrations in the water and bottom sediments, thus providing the present-day hydrocarbon background. Active transformation of organic matter in the water succession and on the water-bottom interface results in the prevalence of natural components in alkanes in spite of the high hydrocarbon concentrations (119-262 μg/g). The river-seawater mixing zone serves as a geochemical barrier preventing the influx of most pollutants delivered by rivers into open sea.

  12. Air-sea interactions during tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi, R.; Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V. M.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of air-sea momentum flux during tropical cyclone is one of the most important fields of study in wind - wave modeling and prediction. A number of studies suggested that the Charnock coefficient depends on the sea state. The Charnock coefficient (α) is firstly considered as a constant 0.0144 (Charnock, 1955). Toba et al. (1990) suggested that α increases with the wave age (β) based on the observations of mostly young waves in a wave flume, while Donelan (1990), Johnson et al. (1998), Lange et al. (2004), showed that α decreases with the wave age β. Moon et al. (2004) studied the effect of surface waves on Charnock coefficient under tropical cyclones and pointed out that the Charnock coefficient is mainly determined by two parameters: the wave age and the wind speed. Also there is a strong correlation between drag coefficient (Cd) and wave age (β) for each wind speed. When the wind speed is higher than 30 m/s, Cd will increase with β, otherwise Cd will decrease with increasing β. Amorocho et al. (1980) showed that three regions exist in the development of the wind stress: (i) a lower region in which the wind waves have not begun to break, for which drag coefficient (Cd) is approximately constant; (ii) a transitional region after the onset of breakers, for which Cd varies non-linearly with U10; (iii) a limiting region for which Cd tends again toward a constant value, and corresponds to a condition of breaker saturation. The three regions described above can be classified as 'low roughness', 'transitional', and 'high roughness', respectively. Wavewatch III model was used to study the air sea interaction during tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean. ECMWF winds (2.5° x 2.5°) have been used for forcing the wave model. Air-sea momentum data was obtained by simulating wave fields of tropical cyclones during 1996 in the Indian Ocean. The wave parameters from the model results have been compared with measured buoy data and with merged altimeter data. The

  13. A ~25 ka Indian Ocean monsoon variability record from the Andaman Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rashid, H.; Flower, B.P.; Poore, R.Z.; Quinn, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent paleoclimatic work on terrestrial and marine deposits from Asia and the Indian Ocean has indicated abrupt changes in the strength of the Asian monsoon during the last deglaciation. Comparison of marine paleoclimate records that track salinity changes from Asian rivers can help evaluate the coherence of the Indian Ocean monsoon (IOM) with the larger Asian monsoon. Here we present paired Mg/Ca and δ18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white) from Andaman Sea core RC12-344 that provide records of sea-surface temperature (SST) and δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw) over the past 25,000 years (ka) before present (BP). Age control is based on nine accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dates on mixed planktic foraminifera. Mg/Ca-SST data indicate that SST was ∼3 °C cooler during the last glacial maximum (LGM) than the late Holocene. Andaman Sea δ18Osw exhibited higher than present values during the Lateglacial interval ca 19–15 ka BP and briefly during the Younger Dryas ca 12 ka BP. Lower than present δ18Osw values during the BØlling/AllerØd ca 14.5–12.6 ka BP and during the early Holocene ca 10.8–5.5 ka BP are interpreted to indicate lower salinity, reflect some combination of decreased evaporation–precipitation (E–P) over the Andaman Sea and increased Irrawaddy River outflow. Our results are consistent with the suggestion that IOM intensity was stronger than present during the BØlling/AllerØd and early Holocene, and weaker during the late glaciation, Younger Dryas, and the late Holocene. These findings support the hypothesis that rapid climate change during the last deglaciation and Holocene included substantial hydrologic changes in the IOM system that were coherent with the larger Asian monsoon.

  14. Intraseasonal Variability of the Equatorial Indian Ocean Observed from Sea Surface Height, Wind, and Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2007-01-01

    The forcing of the equatorial Indian Ocean by the highly periodic monsoon wind cycle creates many interesting intraseasonal variabilities. The frequency spectrum of the wind stress observations from the European Remote Sensing Satellite scatterometers reveals peaks at the seasonal cycle and its higher harmonics at 180, 120, 90, and 75 days. The observations of sea surface height (SSH) from the Jason and Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon radar altimeters are analyzed to study the ocean's response. The focus of the study is on the intraseasonal periods shorter than the annual period. The semiannual SSH variability is characterized by a basin mode involving Rossby waves and Kelvin waves traveling back and forth in the equatorial Indian Ocean between 10(deg)S and 10(deg)N. However, the interference of these waves with each other masks the appearance of individual Kelvin and Rossby waves, leading to a nodal point (amphidrome) of phase propagation on the equator at the center of the basin. The characteristics of the mode correspond to a resonance of the basin according to theoretical models. The theory also calls for similar modes at 90 and 60 days.

  15. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Hoell, A.; Shukla, S.; Bladé, I.; Liebmann, B.; Roberts, J. B.; Robertson, F. R.; Husak, G.

    2014-12-01

    In eastern East Africa (the southern Ethiopia, eastern Kenya and southern Somalia region), poor boreal spring (long wet season) rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers implement disaster risk reduction measures while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent East African droughts to a stronger Walker circulation, resulting from warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool and an increased east-to-west sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the western Pacific, we show that the two dominant modes of East African boreal spring rainfall variability are tied to SST fluctuations in the western central Pacific and central Indian Ocean, respectively. Variations in these two rainfall modes can thus be predicted using two SST indices - the western Pacific gradient (WPG) and central Indian Ocean index (CIO), with our statistical forecasts exhibiting reasonable cross-validated skill (rcv ≈ 0.6). In contrast, the current generation of coupled forecast models show no skill during the long rains. Our SST indices also appear to capture most of the major recent drought events such as 2000, 2009 and 2011. Predictions based on these simple indices can be used to support regional forecasting efforts and land surface data assimilations to help inform early warning and guide climate outlooks.

  16. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Hoell, A.; Shukla, S.; Bladé, I.; Liebmann, B.; Roberts, J. B.; Robertson, F. R.; Husak, G.

    2014-03-01

    In southern Ethiopia, Eastern Kenya, and southern Somalia, poor boreal spring rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers implement disaster risk reduction measures while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent droughts in that region to a stronger Walker Circulation, warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, and an increased western Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, we show that the two dominant modes of East African boreal spring rainfall variability are tied, respectively, to western-central Pacific and central Indian Ocean SST. Variations in these rainfall modes can be predicted using two previously defined SST indices - the West Pacific Gradient (WPG) and Central Indian Ocean index (CIO), with the WPG and CIO being used, respectively, to predict the first and second rainfall modes. These simple indices can be used in concert with more sophisticated coupled modeling systems and land surface data assimilations to help inform early warning and guide climate outlooks.

  17. Monsoon variability in the northeastern Arabian Sea on orbital- and millennial scale during the past 200,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lückge, Andreas; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Steinke, Stephan; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Westerhold, Thomas; Schulz, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations and Heinrich events described in the Greenland ice cores and in North Atlantic and Western Mediterranean sediments are also expressed in the climate of the tropics, for example, as documented in Arabian Sea sediments. However, little is known about these fluctuations beyond the reach of the Greenland ice cores. Here, we present high-resolution geochemical, sedimentological as well as micropaleontological data from two cores (SO130-283KL, 987m water depth and SO130-289KL, 571m) off the coast of Pakistan, extending the monsoon record on orbital and millennial scales to the past 200,000 years. The stable oxygen isotope record of the surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer G. ruber shows a strong correspondence to Greenland ice core δ18O, whereas the deepwater δ18O signal of benthic foraminifera (U. peregrina and G. affinis) reflects patterns recorded in ice cores from Antarctica. Strong shifts in benthic δ18O during stadials/Heinrich events are interpreted to show frequent advances of oxygen-rich intermediate water masses into the Arabian Sea originating from the southern ocean. Alkenone-derived SSTs varied between 23 and 28° C. Highest temperatures were encountered during interglacial MIS 5. Rapid SST changes of 2° C magnitude on millennial scale are overlain by long-term SST fluctuations. Interstadials (of glacial phases) and the cold phases of interglacials are characterized by sediments enriched in organic carbon (up to 4 % TOC) whereas sediments with low TOC contents (< 1 % TOC) appear during stadials and Heinrich events. Shifts at climate transitions, such as onsets of interstadials, were coeval with changes in productivity-related and anoxia-indicating proxies. Interstadial inorganic elemental data consistently show that enhanced fluxes of terrestrial-derived sediments are paralleled by productivity maxima, and are characterized by an increased fluvial contribution from the Indus River. In contrast, stadials are

  18. Estimates of upwelling rates in the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean based on bomb radiocarbon.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, R; Dutta, K; Somayajulu, B L K

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements were made in the water column of the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean during 1994, 1995 and 1997 to assess the temporal variations in bomb 14C distribution and its inventory in the region with respect to GEOSECS measurements made during 1977-1978. Four GEOSECS stations were reoccupied (three in the Arabian Sea and one in the equatorial Indian Ocean) during this study, with all of them showing increased penetration of bomb 14C along with decrease in its surface water activity. The upwelling rates derived by model simulation of bomb 14C depth profile using the calculated exchange rates ranged from 3 to 9 m a(-1). The western region of the Arabian Sea experiencing high wind-induced upwelling has higher estimated upwelling rates. However, lower upwelling rates obtained for the stations occupied during this study could be due to reduced 14C gradient compared to that during GEOSECS.

  19. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Sander, Sylvia G; Jayachandran, Saranya; Nath, B Nagender; Nagaraju, G; Chennuri, Kartheek; Vudamala, Krushna; Lathika, N; Mascarenhas-Pereira, Maria Brenda L

    2014-11-01

    The current study aims to understand the speciation and fate of Cu complexes in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin and assess the probable impacts of deep-sea mining on speciation of Cu complexes and assess the Cu flux from this sediment to the water column in this area. This study suggests that most of the Cu was strongly associated with different binding sites in Fe-oxide phases of the hydrothermally altered sediments with stabilities higher than that of Cu-EDTA complexes. The speciation of Cu indicates that hydrothermally influenced deep-sea sediments from Central Indian Ocean Basin may not significantly contribute to the global Cu flux. However, increasing lability of Cu-sediment complexes with increasing depth of sediment may increase bioavailability and Cu flux to the global ocean during deep-sea mining.

  20. Biological response to intensified upwelling and to a river plume in the northeastern South China Sea: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jianping; Lu, Zhongming; Dai, Minhan; Cheung, Anson Y. Y.; Liu, Hongbin; Harrison, Paul

    2010-09-01

    A coupled three-dimensional physical model and a nitrogen-based dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model was used to study the ecosystem responses to the wind-driven summer upwelling and to the Pearl River plume over a distinctly widened shelf in the northeastern South China Sea (NSCS). Forced with an idealized, but representative, upwelling-favorable wind and the river discharge for the purpose of process-oriented study, we identified two high chlorophyll centers that are typically observed over the NSCS shelf and stimulated by nutrient enrichment from intensified upwelling over the widened shelf and from the river plume. The nutrient enrichment has strong along-shore variability involving the variable cross-isobath nutrient transport between the middle and the inner widened shelf during the upwelling and an eastward expansion of the nutrient-rich plume. About 20% of the upwelled nutrient-rich deep water from the outer shelf reaches the inner shelf where algal blooms occur. Nutrient enrichment in the plume stretches over a broad extent of the shelf and produces significant biomass on the NSCS shelf. The plume is physically governed by intensified surface Ekman dynamics that leads to a strong offshore nutrient transport and eventually offsets the shoreward transport caused by the upwelling in the NSCS. Biological forcing and circulation dynamics of the surface Ekman layer jointly form the spatial dislocation and temporal variation of NO3, phytoplankton, and zooplankton biomasses in the upwelled and plume waters. The simulated results qualitatively resemble field and satellite measurements and demonstrate the physically modulated biological responses to the intensified upwelling and plume-influenced NSCS shelf.

  1. Written records of historical tsunamis in the northeastern South China Sea - challenges associated with developing a new integrated database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, A. Y. A.; Switzer, A. D.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Aitchison, J. C.; Zong, Y.

    2010-09-01

    Comprehensive analysis of 15 previously published regional databases incorporating more than 100 sources leads to a newly revised historical tsunami database for the northeastern (NE) region of the South China Sea (SCS) including Taiwan. The validity of each reported historical tsunami event listed in our database is assessed by comparing and contrasting the information and descriptions provided in the other databases. All earlier databases suffer from errors associated with inaccuracies in translation between different languages, calendars and location names. The new database contains 205 records of "events" reported to have occurred between AD 1076 and 2009. We identify and investigate 58 recorded tsunami events in the region. The validity of each event is based on the consistency and accuracy of the reports along with the relative number of individual records for that event. Of the 58 events, 23 are regarded as "valid" (confirmed) events, three are "probable" events and six are "possible". Eighteen events are considered "doubtful" and eight events "invalid". The most destructive tsunami of the 23 valid events occurred in 1867 and affected Keelung, northern Taiwan, killing at least 100 people. Inaccuracies in the historical record aside, this new database highlights the occurrence and geographical extent of several large tsunamis in the NE SCS region and allows an elementary statistical analysis of annual recurrence intervals. Based on historical records from 1951-2009 the probability of a tsunami (from any source) affecting the region in any given year is relatively high (33.4%). However, the likelihood of a tsunami that has a wave height >1 m, and/or causes fatalities and damage to infrastructure occurring in the region in any given year is low (1-2%). This work indicates the need for further research using coastal stratigraphy and inundation modeling to help validate some of the historical accounts of tsunamis as well as adequately evaluate the recurrence

  2. Underwater passive acoustic localization of Pacific walruses in the northeastern Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Brendan P; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops and applies a linearized Bayesian localization algorithm based on acoustic arrival times of marine mammal vocalizations at spatially-separated receivers which provides three-dimensional (3D) location estimates with rigorous uncertainty analysis. To properly account for uncertainty in receiver parameters (3D hydrophone locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound-speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained by prior estimates and prior uncertainties. Unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival-time uncertainties are estimated by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (a maximum entropy condition). Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously using measurements of arrival times for direct and interface-reflected acoustic paths. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that, for the cases considered here, linearization errors are small and the lack of an accurate sound-speed profile does not cause significant biases in the estimated locations. A sequence of Pacific walrus vocalizations, recorded in the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska, is localized using this technique, yielding a track estimate and uncertainties with an estimated speed comparable to normal walrus swim speeds.

  3. NEAMWave12: The First Tsunami Exercise in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmioglu, Ocal; Matias Matias, Luis; Schindelé, François; Behrens, Jörn; Tinti, Stefano; Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Melis, Nicos; Carrilho, Fernando; Santoro, Francesca; Rudloff, Alexander; Crochet, Emilie; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2013-04-01

    The first tsunami exercise of the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAMTWS) has been conducted on 27-28 November 2012 involving 19 of the 39 member countries of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) for NEAMTWS. NEAMWave12 involved the simulation of the assessment of a tsunami, based on an earthquake-driven scenario followed by alert message dissemination by Candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (CTWP) (Phase A) and continued with the simulation of the National Tsunami Warning Center's/Tsunami Warning Focal Point's (NTWC/TWFP) and Civil Protection Authoritie's (CPA) actions (Phase B), as soon as the message produced in Phase A has been received. There were four earthquake triggered tsunami scenarios in NEAMWave12 in different parts of the NEAM Region, where each CTWP (CENALT-France, NOA-Greece, IPMA-Portugal and KOERI-Turkey) was responsible for a single scenario. The CENALT Scenario was based on a plausible worst-case scenario of magnitude 7.5 along the Western Mediterranean Algerian margin at a fault located close to 21-22 August 1856 Jijel earthquakes. The NOA scenario was based on an earthquake similar to the well-known Amorgos earthquake, which was followed by a tsunami that devastated the Aegean Sea on 9 July 1956. The IPMA scenario was based on the 1 November 1755 Lisbon event with the assumption that the event represents the worst-case tsunami scenario impacting the NE Atlantic region. Finally, the KOERI scenario was based on a Mw=8.4 worst-case interpretation of the 8 August 1303 Crete and Dodecanese Islands earthquake resulting in destructive inundation in the Eastern Mediterranean. Initial evaluation of the exercise indicates that all CTWPs successfully participated in the exercise, where existing operational and some future prototype systems were utilized. System end-users (NTWC/TWFP/CPA) benefited from the exercise considerably, demonstrating the first successful test

  4. Regal phylogeography: Range-wide survey of the marine angelfish Pygoplites diacanthus reveals evolutionary partitions between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Richard R; Eble, Jeffrey A; DiBattista, Joseph D; Rocha, Luiz A; Randall, John E; Berumen, Michael L; Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The regal angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus; family Pomacanthidae) occurs on reefs from the Red Sea to the central Pacific, with an Indian Ocean/Rea Sea color morph distinct from a Pacific Ocean morph. To assess population differentiation and evaluate the possibility of cryptic evolutionary partitions in this monotypic genus, we surveyed mtDNA cytochrome b and two nuclear introns (S7 and RAG2) in 547 individuals from 15 locations. Phylogeographic analyses revealed four mtDNA lineages (d=0.006-0.015) corresponding to the Pacific Ocean, the Red Sea, and two admixed lineages in the Indian Ocean, a pattern consistent with known biogeographic barriers. Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean had both Indian and Pacific lineages. Both S7 and RAG2 showed strong population-level differentiation between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean (ΦST=0.066-0.512). The only consistent population sub-structure within these three regions was at the Society Islands (French Polynesia), where surrounding oceanographic conditions may reinforce isolation. Coalescence analyses indicate the Pacific (1.7Ma) as the oldest extant lineage followed by the Red Sea lineage (1.4Ma). Results from a median-joining network suggest radiations of two lineages from the Red Sea that currently occupy the Indian Ocean (0.7-0.9Ma). Persistence of a Red Sea lineage through Pleistocene glacial cycles suggests a long-term refuge in this region. The affiliation of Pacific and Red Sea populations, apparent in cytochrome b and S7 (but equivocal in RAG2) raises the hypothesis that the Indian Ocean was recolonized from the Red Sea, possibly more than once. Assessing the genetic architecture of this widespread monotypic genus reveals cryptic evolutionary diversity that merits subspecific recognition. We recommend P.d. diacanthus and P.d. flavescens for the Pacific and Indian Ocean/Red Sea forms.

  5. The Footprint of the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation in Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lu; Zhou, Tianjun; Dai, Aiguo; Song, Fengfei; Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also show considerable decadal variations that can cause regional climate oscillations around the IO. However, the mechanisms of the IO decadal variability remain unclear. Here we perform numerical experiments using a state-of-the-art, fully coupled climate model in which the external forcings with or without the observed SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean (TEP) are applied for 1871–2012. Both the observed timing and magnitude of the IO decadal variations are well reproduced in those experiments with the TEP SSTs prescribed to observations. Although the external forcings account for most of the warming trend, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is dominated by internal variability that is induced by the TEP SSTs, especially the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The IPO weakens (enhances) the warming of the external forcings by about 50% over the IO during IPO’s cold (warm) phase, which contributes about 10% to the recent global warming hiatus since 1999. The decadal variability in IO SSTs is modulated by the IPO-induced atmospheric adjustment through changing surface heat fluxes, sea surface height and thermocline depth.

  6. The sea-floor spreading history of the eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Thomas S.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.

    1982-09-01

    The geologic history of the eastern Indian Ocean between northwest Australia and the Java Trench is known to involve two separate events of rifting and sea-floor spreading. Late Jurassic spreading in the Argo Abyssal Plain off northwest Australia was followed by Early Cretaceous spreading in the Cuvier and Perth Abyssal Plains off west Australia. However, the evolution and interaction of these events has not been clear. Mesozoic sea-floor spreading anomalies have been identified throughout the Argo Abyssal Plain that define a rifting event and subsequent northward spreading on the northwestern Australian margin at 155 m.y.b.p. Magnetic anomalies northwest of the Argo Abyssal Plain indicate a ridge jump to the south at about 130 m.y.b.p. that is approximately synchronous with east-west rifting along the southwestern Australian margin. The Joey Rise in the Argo Plain was probably formed by volcanism at the intersection of this new rift and the spreading ridge to the north. The southern and northern spreading systems were connected through the Exmouth Plateau which was stretched and faulted as spreading progressed. The RRR triple junction was formed at the intersection of the two spreading systems and appears to have migrated west along the northern edge of the Gascoyne Abyssal Plain. Spreading off northwest Australia cannot be easily related to simultaneous spreading in the west central Pacific via any simple tectonic scheme.

  7. The footprint of the inter-decadal Pacific oscillation in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Lu; Zhou, Tianjun; Dai, Aiguo; ...

    2016-02-17

    Superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also show considerable decadal variations that can cause regional climate oscillations around the IO. However, the mechanisms of the IO decadal variability remain unclear. Here we perform numerical experiments using a state-of-the-art, fully coupled climate model in which the external forcings with or without the observed SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean (TEP) are applied for 1871–2012. Both the observed timing and magnitude of the IO decadal variations are well reproduced in those experiments with the TEP SSTs prescribed to observations. Although the external forcingsmore » account for most of the warming trend, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is dominated by internal variability that is induced by the TEP SSTs, especially the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The IPO weakens (enhances) the warming of the external forcings by about 50% over the IO during IPO’s cold (warm) phase, which contributes about 10% to the recent global warming hiatus since 1999. As a result, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is modulated by the IPO-induced atmospheric adjustment through changing surface heat fluxes, sea surface height and thermocline depth.« less

  8. The Footprint of the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation in Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lu; Zhou, Tianjun; Dai, Aiguo; Song, Fengfei; Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-17

    Superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also show considerable decadal variations that can cause regional climate oscillations around the IO. However, the mechanisms of the IO decadal variability remain unclear. Here we perform numerical experiments using a state-of-the-art, fully coupled climate model in which the external forcings with or without the observed SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean (TEP) are applied for 1871-2012. Both the observed timing and magnitude of the IO decadal variations are well reproduced in those experiments with the TEP SSTs prescribed to observations. Although the external forcings account for most of the warming trend, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is dominated by internal variability that is induced by the TEP SSTs, especially the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The IPO weakens (enhances) the warming of the external forcings by about 50% over the IO during IPO's cold (warm) phase, which contributes about 10% to the recent global warming hiatus since 1999. The decadal variability in IO SSTs is modulated by the IPO-induced atmospheric adjustment through changing surface heat fluxes, sea surface height and thermocline depth.

  9. The footprint of the inter-decadal Pacific oscillation in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lu; Zhou, Tianjun; Dai, Aiguo; Song, Fengfei; Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-17

    Superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also show considerable decadal variations that can cause regional climate oscillations around the IO. However, the mechanisms of the IO decadal variability remain unclear. Here we perform numerical experiments using a state-of-the-art, fully coupled climate model in which the external forcings with or without the observed SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean (TEP) are applied for 1871–2012. Both the observed timing and magnitude of the IO decadal variations are well reproduced in those experiments with the TEP SSTs prescribed to observations. Although the external forcings account for most of the warming trend, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is dominated by internal variability that is induced by the TEP SSTs, especially the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The IPO weakens (enhances) the warming of the external forcings by about 50% over the IO during IPO’s cold (warm) phase, which contributes about 10% to the recent global warming hiatus since 1999. As a result, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is modulated by the IPO-induced atmospheric adjustment through changing surface heat fluxes, sea surface height and thermocline depth.

  10. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Subhajit; Matondkar, S. G. Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS). This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca of NAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E), during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise of Sagar Sampada 253, in March 2007. Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts, revealed `variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaCl), pH levels (5-8.5), and organic nutrient strengths, in comparison to non-bloom waters. MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB, corresponded to (3.08-4.41)×103 cells/mL at 3.5% NaCl (w/v), and (2.82-9.49)×102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaCl in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE). Plate counts were (1.12-4)×106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl, (1.28-3.9)×106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaCl, and (0.4-7)×104 CFU/mL at 25% NaCl (w/v) on TYE. One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)×105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)×105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5. These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Staphylococcus, Planococcus, Dietzia, Virgibacillus, Micrococcus, Sporosarcinae, Leucobacter, and Halomonas. The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2, GUFBSS253N30, and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus cereus. The ˜2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu. The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  11. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean - A process oriented modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Majumdar, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    The 85°E Ridge extends from the Mahanadi Basin, off northeastern margin of India to the Afanasy Nikitin Seamount in the Central Indian Basin. The ridge is associated with two contrasting gravity anomalies: negative anomaly over the north part (up to 5°N latitude), where the ridge structure is buried under thick Bengal Fan sediments and positive anomaly over the south part, where the structure is intermittently exposed above the seafloor. Ship-borne gravity and seismic reflection data are modelled using process oriented method and this suggest that the 85°E Ridge was emplaced on approximately 10-15 km thick elastic plate ( Te) and in an off-ridge tectonic setting. We simulated gravity anomalies for different crust-sediment structural configurations of the ridge that were existing at three geological ages, such as Late Cretaceous, Early Miocene and Present. The study shows that the gravity anomaly of the ridge in the north has changed through time from its inception to present. During the Late Cretaceous the ridge was associated with a significant positive anomaly with a compensation generated by a broad flexure of the Moho boundary. By Early Miocene the ridge was approximately covered by the post-collision sediments and led to alteration of the initial gravity anomaly to a small positive anomaly. At present, the ridge is buried by approximately 3 km thick Bengal Fan sediments on its crestal region and about 8 km thick pre- and post-collision sediments on the flanks. This geological setting had changed physical properties of the sediments and led to alter the minor positive gravity anomaly of Early Miocene to the distinct negative gravity anomaly.

  12. 75 FR 49420 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications In... (TAC) and corresponding fleet days-at-sea (DAS) allocation for the Atlantic deep- sea red crab fishery... the implementing regulations for the Atlantic Deep- Sea Red Crab Fishery Management Plan...

  13. Last Glacial to Holocene history of the Indian Monsoon recorded in Andaman Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathorne, E. C.; Yirgaw, D. G.; Ali, S.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Nath, B.; Frank, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over 3 billion people live in the area influenced by the Asian monsoon, the rains of which provide vital water resources while posing a risk to human life through flooding. Despite the importance to so many the monsoon is difficult to predict and model, making its future development in a changing global climate uncertain. To help improve models and predictions, histories of monsoon variability beyond the instrumental record are required. The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of monsoon wind strength over the Arabian Sea. This study uses a unique long sediment core obtained by the drill ship JOIDES Resolution in the Andaman Sea to examine the past variability of Indian Monsoon precipitation on the Indian sub-continent and directly over the ocean. Here we present multi-proxy data examining variations during the last glacial and deglaciation. The radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic composition of the clay fraction (<2 microns) indicates that the Irrawaddy river has been the dominant source of fine detrital material to the site for the last 60 kyrs. The Nd and Pb isotope results show negligible variability indicating little change of the eroded source rocks supplying material and suggest a spatial stability of the monsoon in the Irrawaddy catchment. The clay minerology is dominated by smectite reflecting overall intense chemical weathering. Decreases of smectite/(illite + chlorite) are associated with the Heinrich events suggesting less intense weathering. An increase of the smectite/(illite + chlorite) and the radiogenic Sr isotope composition of the clays during the deglaciation indicates an increase in weathering intensity. The monsoon related influx of freshwater to the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea leads to a low salinity surface layer and a strong stratification of the upper 200 meters. Ocean atlas data (Antonov et al., 2010) indicate that this stratification is remarkably stable throughout the year while the salinity of the

  14. Trace oxyanions and their behaviour in the rivers Porong and Solo, the Java Sea and the adjacent Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Sloot, H. A.; Hoede, D.; Wijkstra, J.

    During the Snellius-II Expedition (theme 5) dissolved and particulate concentrations of As(III), As(V), Sb(III), Sb(V), Se(IV), Mo, U, V, Au and W were measured in the Kali Porong and Bengawan Solo, Strait Madura, the Java Sea and the adjacent Indian Ocean. The estuarine mixing behaviour of Mo, U and V was found to be conservative. Arsenic behaved in a conservative manner during the wet period, while removal was observed in the high salinity region of the Solo and Porong during the dry season. The exceptionally high vanadium concentration in the rivers Porong and Solo, which is more than 10 times higher than that in the world rivers, is connected with leaching of volcanic rock; dissolved concentrations of Au, W and Mo are also higher. Apart from V and Au, the dissolved concentrations in the Java Sea and in the Indian Ocean compare well with average ocean values.

  15. The contribution of inertial oscillations in water dynamics in terms of the 2013/03/24 storm situation in the northeastern part of the Black and Azov Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diansky, Nikolay; Gusev, Anatoly; Vladimir, Fomin; Kabatchenko, Ilya; Evgeny, Borisov

    2015-04-01

    The results of sea dynamics numerical simulation for the northeastern part of the Black Sea and Azov (BAS) are manifested for period of strong storm occured on 22 - 28 March 2013. The INMOM (Institute Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) was used, implemented for the whole BAS domain with a spatial resolution about 4 km. This INMOM version is the main component of the system for operational diagnosis and prognosis of hydrometeorological characteristics in the BAS implemented in the State Oceanography Institute (SOI). This system also includes Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for computation of atmospheric forcing and Russian wind wave model (RWWM) for computation of the wind wave characteristics. During the storm, the extensive cyclone appeared with the center located northward to the Sea of Azov. Its southern periphery, covering almost the whole BS, formed airflow, which lead to the domination of the southeast wind in the eastern part of the BS with speed more than 20 m/s over the open sea. At the same time, the strong wind intensification occurred on the night of 2013/03/23. It lead to the excitement of inertial oscillations in the wind influence zone with sea velocities up to 100-120 cm/s. The simulations of the wind wave height, performed for this period using RWWM, revealed strong wind wave intensification with heights over 6 m. This was the main factor that led to the destruction of coast-protecting structures in the area Imeretinsky coast. At the same time, the sea level was not greater than 20 cm, which is nevertheless also led to the destruction of coast-protecting structures. The oscillation period of sea velocity in the active layer corresponds to the Coriolis frequency. The field of velocity inertial oscillation covered the whole open eastern part of the BS. Following the physical nature of inertial oscillations, a few hours after the storm beginning, the sea velocity field in the 0-30m layer stopped corresponding to the storm wind, and

  16. Foraminiferal record of anthropogenic environmental changes in the northeastern Adriatic Sea (Panzano Bay, Gulf of Trieste, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovic, Jelena; Cosovic, Vlasta; Kern, Vieana; Gallmetzer, Ivo; Haselmair, Alexandra; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The northern Adriatic Sea is one of the world's largest modern epicontinental seas and a young marine ecosystem that has been subject to various natural and anthropogenic processes during the Holocene: marine transgression, regional climate fluctuations, urbanisation and pollution. The Gulf of Trieste, located in the northeastern part, presents the area of particular interest, as it is a shallow and sheltered embayment, prone to the accumulation of pollutants, populated for at least the last 2000 years and with recent anthropogenic pressure coming from several rivers, ports and industrial zones. The aim of this multidisciplinary study is to provide a high-resolution record of these processes using benthic foraminiferal assemblages, geochemical proxies (trace metals, nutrients and pollutants), sedimentological (sedimentation rates) and time-averaging data (from dated mollusc shells). One core of 1.5 m length was taken at the sampling station Panzano Bay, northernmost part of the Gulf of Trieste, at the water depth of 12.5 m. The sedimentation rate is estimated to be 2.5 mm/year, based on 210Pb sediment dating, while dating of the molluscs shells revealed the age at the bottom of the core to be approximately 500 years. The core was sliced into smaller subsamples, and four sediment fractions of each subsample (63, 125, 250 and 500 μm) were analysed for standard properties of the foraminiferal community (faunal composition, absolute and relative abundances of species, biodiversity indices), in order to make comparison with relevant physical and geochemical properties of the sediment. The results concerning changes in foraminiferal species composition, their abundance and biodiversity, supported by statistical analyses (cluster analysis, NMDS, PCA), allow identification of three major foraminiferal associations: 1) 80-150 cm - the oldest association is dominated by opportunistic genera ans species, characteristic for unstable environments: Valvulineria sp. (25

  17. Iron bacterial phylogeny and their execution towards iron availability in Equatorial Indian Ocean and coastal Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Rajasabapathy, Raju; Mohandass, Chellandi; Vijayaraj, Ajakkalamoole Srinivas; Madival, Varsha Vinayak; Meena, Ram Murti

    2013-01-01

    Based on distinct colony morphology, color, size, shape and certain other traits, 92 bacterial isolates were investigated to understand their managerial ability on iron from the Arabian Sea and Equatorial Indian Ocean samples. The ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) applied to eliminate the duplication of the bacterial strains, resulted 39 different banding patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing data indicate the dominancy of three phylogenetic groups, alpha-Proteobacteria (10.25%), gamma-Proteobacteria (35.89%) and Bacilli (53.84%) in these waters. Marinobacter and Bacillus were the only common genera from both of the regions. Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Rheinheimera, Staphylococcus and Idiomarina were some of the other genera obtained from the Arabian Sea. Erythrobacter, Roseovarius, Sagittula and Nitratireductor were found mostly in Equatorial Indian Ocean. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequence data of some of our iron bacterial strains belong to novel species and one isolate ASS2A could form a new genus. Close to 23% of the isolates were able to produce high affinity sets of ligands like siderophores to mediate iron transport into the cell. The current study indicated that the Equatorial Indian Ocean species were well adapted to oxidize iron as an electron acceptor and the Arabian Sea species preferably go through siderophore production.

  18. An assessment of Indian monsoon seasonal forecasts and mechanisms underlying monsoon interannual variability in the Met Office GloSea5-GC2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephanie J.; Turner, Andrew; Woolnough, Steven; Martin, Gill; MacLachlan, Craig

    2017-03-01

    We assess Indian summer monsoon seasonal forecasts in GloSea5-GC2, the Met Office fully coupled subseasonal to seasonal ensemble forecasting system. Using several metrics, GloSea5-GC2 shows similar skill to other state-of-the-art seasonal forecast systems. The prediction skill of the large-scale South Asian monsoon circulation is higher than that of Indian monsoon rainfall. Using multiple linear regression analysis we evaluate relationships between Indian monsoon rainfall and five possible drivers of monsoon interannual variability. Over the time period studied (1992-2011), the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) are the most important of these drivers in both observations and GloSea5-GC2. Our analysis indicates that ENSO and its teleconnection with Indian rainfall are well represented in GloSea5-GC2. However, the relationship between the IOD and Indian rainfall anomalies is too weak in GloSea5-GC2, which may be limiting the prediction skill of the local monsoon circulation and Indian rainfall. We show that this weak relationship likely results from a coupled mean state bias that limits the impact of anomalous wind forcing on SST variability, resulting in erroneous IOD SST anomalies. Known difficulties in representing convective precipitation over India may also play a role. Since Indian rainfall responds weakly to the IOD, it responds more consistently to ENSO than in observations. Our assessment identifies specific coupled biases that are likely limiting GloSea5-GC2 Indian summer monsoon seasonal prediction skill, providing targets for model improvement.

  19. Sea-surface temperatures around the Australian margin and Indian Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Juggins, Steve

    2005-04-01

    We present new last glacial maximum (LGM) sea-surface temperature (SST) maps for the oceans around Australia based on planktonic foraminifera assemblages. To provide the most reliable SST estimates we use the modern analog technique, the revised analog method, and artificial neural networks in conjunction with an expanded modern core top database. All three methods produce similar quality predictions and the root mean squared error of the consensus prediction (the average of the three) under cross-validation is only ±0.77 °C. We determine LGM SST using data from 165 cores, most of which have good age control from oxygen isotope stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates. The coldest SST occurred at 20,500±1400 cal yr BP, predating the maximum in oxygen isotope records at 18,200±1500 cal yr BP. During the LGM interval we observe cooling within the tropics of up to 4 °C in the eastern Indian Ocean, and mostly between 0 and 3 °C elsewhere along the equator. The high latitudes cooled by the greatest degree, a maximum of 7-9 °C in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Our maps improve substantially on previous attempts by making higher quality temperature estimates, using more cores, and improving age control.

  20. Chelidoperca stella, a new species of perchlet (Perciformes: Serranidae) from the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Matsunuma, Mizuki; Motomura, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-16

    A new species of serranid fish, Chelidoperca stella, is described on the basis of five specimens from the Andaman Sea in the eastern Indian Ocean. The species can be readily distinguished from all valid congeners by having fewer pored lateral-line scales (34 or 35 vs. 40-45 in the latter) and the pelvic fin white with several small yellow spots (vs. spots absent). The species is also characterized by having relatively high counts of small serrae on the posterior margins of the preopercle (33-43 serrae), interopercle (7-10) and subopercle (18-28), despite the small body size (51.7-61.8 mm SL). Although Chelidoperca stella resembles C. margaritifera in having 2.5 scale rows between lateral line and the sixth dorsal-fin spine base, a relatively wider interorbital region, and the interorbital scales not reaching a vertical through the orbit anterior margin, but differs by having the above-mentioned diagnostic characters plus a slightly shorter longest anal-fin soft ray [17.4-18.7 (mean 18.1) % SL vs. 22.6-26.4 (24.4) % SL in C. margaritifera].

  1. Brevibacterium oceani sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea sediment of the Chagos Trench, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Bhaskar; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2008-01-01

    Two bacterial strains, designated BBH5 and BBH7(T), were isolated from a deep-sea sediment sample collected from the Chagos Trench of the Indian Ocean (1 degrees 06' S 7 degrees 31' E). Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (99.9%), level of DNA-DNA relatedness (93%) and a number of similar phenotypic characteristics, the two strains are identified as representing the same species. Their phylogenetically nearest neighbours, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values (97.9-98.4%), were identified as Brevibacterium iodinum, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Brevibacterium linens and Brevibacterium permense. However, strains BBH5 and BBH7(T) could be distinguished from the above four species by a number of phenotypic characteristics, and levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between the two new isolates and these Brevibacterium species were 35-42%. Therefore, strains BBH5 and BBH7(T) are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium, for which the name Brevibacterium oceani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BBH7(T) (=LMG 23457(T) =IAM 15353(T)).

  2. Heavy metals in fish from the Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean: effect of origin, fish species and size and correlation among the metals.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Al-Athamneh, Ahmad M; Jaradat, Qasem M

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the levels of As, Cu, Pb, and Cd in fish from Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Metal levels were compared with international standards. The levels among fish types and origin, the relationship among metals, and the correlation between the levels and fish size were statistically tested. Fish type and origin significantly affected the levels. None of the fish contained As, Cu, and Pb above the FAO and EU codes. However, Cd exceeded the Jordanian, FAO, and EC codes from the three origins. As and Cd positively correlated with each other in Arabian Sea fish. As and Pb correlated negatively, but Cu and Cd did not correlate with fish size. This study indicates that Cd is common in fish from the three origins regardless the fish size. This warrants continuous monitoring for heavy metals, especially Cd, in internationally traded fish.

  3. Uptake of phytodetritus by benthic foraminifera under oxygen depletion at the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enge, A. J.; Witte, U.; Kucera, M.; Heinz, P.

    2014-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera in sediments on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea, where the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) impinges on the continental slope, are exposed to particularly severe levels of oxygen depletion. Food supply for the benthic community is high but delivered in distinct pulses during upwelling and water mixing events associated with summer and winter monsoon periods. In order to investigate the response by benthic foraminifera to such pulsed food delivery under oxygen concentrations of less than 0.1 mL L-1 (4.5 μmol L-1), an in situ isotope labeling experiment (13C, 15N) was performed on the western continental slope of India at 540 m water depth (OMZ core region). The assemblage of living foraminifera (>125 μm) in the uppermost centimeter at this depth is characterized by an unexpectedly high population density of 3982 individuals 10 cm-2 and a strong dominance by few calcareous species. For the experiment, we concentrated on the nine most abundant taxa, which constitute 93% of the entire foraminiferal population at 0-1 cm sediment depth. Increased concentrations of 13C and 15N in the cytoplasm indicate that all investigated taxa took up labeled phytodetritus during the 4 day experimental phase. In total, these nine species had assimilated 113.8 mg C m-2 (17.5% of the total added carbon). Uptake of nitrogen by the three most abundant taxa (Bolivina aff. B. dilatata, Cassidulina sp., Bulimina gibba) was 2.7 mg N m-2 (2% of the total added nitrogen). The response to the offered phytodetritus varied largely among foraminiferal species with Uvigerina schwageri being by far the most important species in short-term processing, whereas the most abundant taxa Bolivina aff. B. dilatata and Cassidulina sp. showed comparably low uptake of the offered food. We suggest the observed species-specific differences are related to species biomass and specific feeding preferences. In summary, the experiment in the OMZ core region shows rapid processing of fresh

  4. Holocene tropical western Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures in covariation with climatic changes in the Indonesian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Henning; Kuhlmann, Holger; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Meggers, Helge; Baumann, Karl-Heinz; Pätzold, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Indian Ocean is a major component of global climate teleconnections. While the Holocene SST history is documented for regions affected by the Indian and Arabian monsoons, data from the near-equatorial western Indian Ocean are sparse. Reconstructing past zonal and meridional SST gradients requires additional information on past temperatures from the western boundary current region. We present a unique record of Holocene SST and thermocline depth variations in the tropical western Indian Ocean as documented in foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios and δ18O from a sediment core off northern Tanzania. For Mg/Ca and thermocline δ18O, most variance is concentrated in the centennial to bicentennial periodicity band. On the millennial time scale, an early to mid-Holocene (~7.8-5.6 ka) warm phase is followed by a temperature drop by up to 2°C, leading to a mid-Holocene cool interval (5.6-4.2 ka). The shift is accompanied by an initial reduction in the difference between surface and thermocline foraminiferal δ18O, consistent with the thickening of the mixed layer and suggestions of a strengthened Walker circulation. However, we cannot confirm the expected enhanced zonal SST gradient, as the cooling of similar magnitude had previously been found in SSTs from the upwelling region off Sumatra and in Flores air temperatures. The SST pattern probably reflects the tropical Indian Ocean expression of a large-scale climate anomaly rather than a positive Indian Ocean Dipole-like mean state.

  5. Satellite estimate of freshwater exchange between the Indonesian Seas and the Indian Ocean via the Sunda Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, James T.; Hacker, Peter W.; Melnichenko, Oleg; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    The straits in Indonesia allow for low-latitude exchange of water between the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Collectively known as the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), this exchange is thought to occur primarily via the Makassar Strait and downstream via Lombok Strait, Ombai Strait, and Timor Passage. The Sunda Strait, between the islands of Sumatra and Java, is a very narrow (≈10 km) and shallow (≈20 m) gap, but it connects the Java Sea directly to the Indian Ocean. Flow through this strait is presumed to be small, given the size of the passage; however, recent observations from the Aquarius satellite indicate periods of significant freshwater transport, suggesting the Sunda Strait may play a more important role in Pacific to Indian Ocean exchange. The nature of this exchange is short-duration (several days) bursts of freshwater injected into the eastern Indian Ocean superimposed on a mean seasonal cycle. The mean volume transport is small averaging about 0.1 Sv toward the Indian Ocean, but the freshwater transport is nonnegligible (estimated at 5.8 mSv). Transport through the strait is hydraulically controlled and directly correlates to the along-strait pressure difference. The episodic low-salinity plumes observed by Aquarius do not, however, appear to be forced by this same mechanism but are instead controlled by convergence of flow at the exit of the Strait in the Indian Ocean. Numerical model results show the fate of this freshwater plume varies with season and is either advected to the northwest along the coast of Sumatra or southerly into the ITF pathway.

  6. Food habits of Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) in the northeastern Chukchi and western Beaufort Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Benjamin P.; Norcross, Brenda L.; Beaudreau, Anne H.; Blanchard, Arny L.; Seitz, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) belong to Cottidae, the second most abundant fish family in the western Arctic. Although considered important in food webs, little is known about their food habits throughout this region. To address this knowledge gap, we examined and compared the diets of 515 Arctic staghorn sculpin and 422 shorthorn sculpin using stomachs collected over three summers in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (2010-2012) and one summer in the western Beaufort Sea (2011). We used permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) to compare sculpin diets between regions and selected size classes. Differences in mouth morphologies and predator size versus prey size relationships were examined using regression techniques. Arctic staghorn sculpin and shorthorn sculpin diet compositions differed greatly throughout the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Regardless of body size, the smaller-mouthed Arctic staghorn sculpin consumed mostly benthic amphipods and polychaetes, whereas the larger-mouthed shorthorn sculpin shifted from a diet composed of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates as smaller individuals to shrimps and fish prey as larger individuals. Within shared habitats, the sculpins appear to partition prey, either by taxa or size, in a manner that suggests no substantial overlap occurs between species. This study increases knowledge of sculpin feeding ecology in the western Arctic and offers regional, quantitative diet information that could support current and future food web modeling efforts.

  7. Laboratory analysis of the habitat occupancy of the crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (Gould) in an invaded ecosystem: The north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurkse, Kristiina; Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Pärnoja, Merli; Kuprijanov, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    The Harris mud crab (Rhithropanopeus harrisii) arrived to the Baltic Sea in 1936. It was not until the late 2000es when the species considerably expanded its distribution area towards the northern Baltic Sea and formed a viable and expanding population. This introduction represents an appearance of a completely new function, as such larger epibenthic predators were previously missing from north-eastern Baltic Sea. In order to assess potential impacts of the crab to the invaded ecosystem, knowledge of the crab habitat preferences is required. This study experimentally evaluated the habitat occupancy of the Harris mud crab. The crab stayed more in vegetated boulders compared to unvegetated boulders or sandy habitats. There was an interactive effect between the presence of prey and crab population density with prey availability increasing the crab's affinity towards less favored habitats when population densities were low. Increased aggression between crab individuals increased their affinity towards otherwise less occupied habitats. Less favored habitats were typically inhabited by smaller individuals and presence of prey increased occupancy of some habitats for larger crabs. The experiment demonstrated that the crab may inhabit a large variety of habitats with stronger affinity towards boulder fields covered with the brown macroalga Fucus vesiculosus. This implies stronger impact of crab in such habitats in the invaded ecosystem.

  8. Distribution of radionuclides in a marine sediment core off the waterspout of the nuclear power plants in Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Dongmei; Li, Haitao; Fang, Hongda; Huang, Chuguang; Zhang, Yusheng; Zhang, Hongbiao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Junjie; Wang, Hua; Yang, Jie

    2015-07-01

    A sediment core was collected and dated using (210)Pbex dating method off the waterspout of nuclear power base of Daya Bay, northeastern South China Sea. The γ-emitting radionuclides were analyzed using HPGe γ spectrometry, gross alpha and beta radioactivity as well as other geochemical indicators were deliberated to assess the impact of nuclear power plants (NPP) operation and to study the past environment changes. It suggested that NPP provided no new radioactivity source to sediment based on the low specific activity of (137)Cs. Two broad peaks of TOC, TC and LOI accorded well with the commercial operations of Daya Bay NPP (1994.2 and 1994.5) and LNPP Phase I (2002.5 and 2003.3), implying that the mass input of cooling water from NPP may result into a substantial change in the ecological environment and Daya Bay has been severely impacted by human activities.

  9. Sea Level Rise, Rainfall and Coastal Flooding in Northeastern U.S. Cities Vivien Gornitz, Radley Horton, Philip Orton, Nickitas Georgas, Alan Blumberg, and Cynthia Rosenzweig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornitz, V.; Horton, R. M.; Orton, P. M.; Georgas, N.; Blumberg, A. F.; Rosenzweig, C.

    2012-12-01

    Populations and infrastructure along much of the northeastern coast of the United States will become increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of rising sea level and storm surges over the coming century. This vulnerability is amplified by regional land subsidence and likely also by shifts in ocean circulation. Building upon recent studies for the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), New York State ClimAid assessment, and the latest U.S. National Climate Assessment, we report new regional sea level rise projections based on the latest CMIP-5 global climate models (GCMs) and RCP emission scenarios, adjusted for revised glacial ice melt contributions, and other factors such as gravitational effects, land water storage, and changes in the Atlantic Meriodional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Over the coming two years, GCM-derived sea level outputs for future decades will be utilized in risk assessments for coastal flooding in New York City, Boston, and Philadelphia, as part of the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast-RISA project. The Stevens Institute Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (sECOM) will be used to produce best estimates (including uncertainty ranges) of sea level rise impacts for a wide range of tropical and extra-tropical cyclones for the 2010s, 2050s, and 2080s. Major improvements over prior studies include (a) the use of a detailed, extensively validated ocean model, and (b) inclusion of rainfall and river flow influences on coastal flooding, which affect flood levels in enclosed tidal waterways (e.g., the Hudson and Delaware Rivers), and which are also likely important in coastal confluence zones of impermeable urbanized watersheds. In addition to the sea level rise results, we present initial model validation results for historical storms.

  10. Redescription of the rare and endangered Broadfin Shark Lamiopsis temminckii (Müller & Henle, 1839) (Carcharhiniformes:Carcharhinidae) from the northeastern Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Akhilesh, K V; White, W T; Bineesh, K K; Purushottama, G B; Singh, V V; Singh, V V; Zacharia, P U

    2016-10-12

    The genus Lamiopsis (Carcharhinidae) was previously considered to be monotypic, containing only the Broadfin Shark Lamiopsis temminckii (Müller & Henle, 1839) widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific. However, a recent taxonomic study revealed that the Western Central Pacific populations were a separate species and that L. temminckii was restricted to the northern Indian Ocean. In this study, the paucity of data available for the true L. temminckii was highlighted. Recently collected specimens of L. temminckii has allowed for a detailed redescription of this species from the northern Arabian Sea to complement the previous taxonomic work on this genus.

  11. Interdecadal component variation characteristics in heavy winter snow intensity in North-Eastern China and its response to sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chun-Yu; Fang, Yi-He; Luo, Yong; Wang, Ji

    2016-11-01

    Based on daily precipitation data from 208 weather stations, monthly NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, and sea surface temperature data reconstructed by NOAA between 1961 and 2012, the heavy winter snow intensity in North-Eastern China was defined; its spatiotemporal variation characteristics were analyzed; the physical mechanisms of the relations between key sea surface temperature (SST) regions and heavy winter snow intensity were studied. Results showed that, in terms of temporal variation characteristics: heavy winter snow intensity in North-Eastern China has been rising, with obvious interdecadal variations during the study interval. In terms of spatial variation characteristics: the first empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of the interdecadal component in heavy winter snow intensity showed consistent anomaly characteristics throughout the region; the second mode exhibited opposite variation characteristics between the south and north; and the third mode exhibited opposite variation characteristics between the northwest and southeast. In terms of physical mechanisms underlying the effects of SST on heavy winter snow intensity, the key SST region of the first EOF mode was the Oyashio, the interdecadal component of the autumn Oyashio SST was abnormally high, which corresponded to a higher winter 500 hPa height field in the northern section of the North Pacific. This condition led to a blocking situation and was associated with a weaker East Asian winter monsoon (EAMW), which resulted in a stronger interdecadal component of heavy winter snow intensity and vice versa. The second mode was closely related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO): the interdecadal component of the autumn PDO was abnormal, which induced the teleconnection pattern of the winter Pacific-North America (PNA) pattern. The PNA pattern may have been related to the second EOF mode through its association with the Mongolian high.

  12. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during two cruises in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of various other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of DIC in the interior ocean, and also assist in determining the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37‰, relative to the Vienna Peedee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during both cruises, the precision for the 552 results is 0.07‰, which is similar to other published studies of this kind. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (Northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  13. Basin-scale estimates of pelagic and coral reef calcification in the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Zvi; Erez, Jonathan; Shemesh, Aldo; Yam, Ruth; Katz, Amitai; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Basin-scale calcification rates are highly important in assessments of the global oceanic carbon cycle. Traditionally, such estimates were based on rates of sedimentation measured with sediment traps or in deep sea cores. Here we estimated CaCO3 precipitation rates in the surface water of the Red Sea from total alkalinity depletion along their axial flow using the water flux in the straits of Bab el Mandeb. The relative contribution of coral reefs and open sea plankton were calculated by fitting a Rayleigh distillation model to the increase in the strontium to calcium ratio. We estimate the net amount of CaCO3 precipitated in the Red Sea to be 7.3 ± 0.4·1010 kg·y−1 of which 80 ± 5% is by pelagic calcareous plankton and 20 ± 5% is by the flourishing coastal coral reefs. This estimate for pelagic calcification rate is up to 40% higher than published sedimentary CaCO3 accumulation rates for the region. The calcification rate of the Gulf of Aden was estimated by the Rayleigh model to be ∼1/2 of the Red Sea, and in the northwestern Indian Ocean, it was smaller than our detection limit. The results of this study suggest that variations of major ions on a basin scale may potentially help in assessing long-term effects of ocean acidification on carbonate deposition by marine organisms. PMID:25368148

  14. Basin-scale estimates of pelagic and coral reef calcification in the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Zvi; Erez, Jonathan; Shemesh, Aldo; Yam, Ruth; Katz, Amitai; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-11-18

    Basin-scale calcification rates are highly important in assessments of the global oceanic carbon cycle. Traditionally, such estimates were based on rates of sedimentation measured with sediment traps or in deep sea cores. Here we estimated CaCO3 precipitation rates in the surface water of the Red Sea from total alkalinity depletion along their axial flow using the water flux in the straits of Bab el Mandeb. The relative contribution of coral reefs and open sea plankton were calculated by fitting a Rayleigh distillation model to the increase in the strontium to calcium ratio. We estimate the net amount of CaCO3 precipitated in the Red Sea to be 7.3 ± 0.4·10(10) kg·y(-1) of which 80 ± 5% is by pelagic calcareous plankton and 20 ± 5% is by the flourishing coastal coral reefs. This estimate for pelagic calcification rate is up to 40% higher than published sedimentary CaCO3 accumulation rates for the region. The calcification rate of the Gulf of Aden was estimated by the Rayleigh model to be ∼1/2 of the Red Sea, and in the northwestern Indian Ocean, it was smaller than our detection limit. The results of this study suggest that variations of major ions on a basin scale may potentially help in assessing long-term effects of ocean acidification on carbonate deposition by marine organisms.

  15. Early Pliocene closing of the Indonesian Seaway: evidence from north-east Indian Ocean and Tropical Pacific deep sea cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M. S.; Sinha, D. K.

    1998-04-01

    Deep sea cores from sites 214 and 758 A (Ninetyeast Ridge, north-east Indian Ocean), 761 B (Wombat Plateau, north-east Indian Ocean) and 586 B (Ontong Java Plateau, Tropical Pacific) are ideally located for comparison of late Neogene planktic foraminiferal biogeography and paleoceanographic records of tropical Indian and Pacific oceans to infer the timing of closing of the Indonesian Seaway. A consistent stratigraphy was developed between sites 214 and 586 B using graphic correlation and was integrated with the paleomagnetic time scale of Berggren et al. (1985) to provide an accurate chronology to compare interocean stratigraphic ranges of late Neogene planktic foraminifera. Tropical planktic foraminifera occur throughout each sequence at all sites. At each site the Miocene-Pliocene boundary is defined by the first appearance of Globorotalia tumida (5.2 Ma), the early/late Pliocene boundary by the first appearance of Globigerinoides fistulosus (3.2 Ma) and the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary by the last appearance of G. fistulosus (1.6 Ma). Neogene planktic foraminiferal assemblages at sites 214, 758A, 761 B and 586B are generally similar until the beginning of the Pliocene (5.2 Ma) when the faunal record indicates divergence. A notable difference is complete absence of early Pliocene taxon Pulleniatina spectabilis from all the Indian Ocean sites. This difference suggests that the Indonesian Seaway became an effective biogeographic barrier to planktic foraminifera at the beginning of the Pliocene. However, there is still exchange of surface waters through this Seaway. Earlier studies suggested a Middle to Late Miocene occurrence for this biogeographic barrier. P. spectabilis evolved from P. primalis in the equatorial Pacific at about 5.2 Ma. It is a short-ranging early Pliocene species spanning about 1.3 my and occurred only in Pacific, unlike earlier suggestions of a broader distribution into the Indian Ocean.

  16. Evaluation of Backscatter in the northeastern Red Sea using a Lowered Acoustic Doppler Profiler, Simrad EK60 Echosounder and in situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. J.; Klevjer, T. A.; Solberg, I.; Bower, A. S.; Kaartvedt, S.

    2010-12-01

    An oceanographic research cruise aboard the R/V Aegaeo was conducted in the Red Sea from 16-29 March 2010. The primary objective of the cruise was to undertake the first large-scale physical oceanographic survey of the northeastern quadrant of the Red Sea, including observations of top-to-bottom ocean currents and water properties such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and fluorescence. Additional objectives were to take seawater samples throughout the water column for carbonate chemistry and microbial studies, and to survey the distribution of pelagic fishes using acoustic methods. A total of 111 casts were made during the cruise which covered nine transects ranging from 22°-28°N. A modified SeaBird 9/11+ rosette/CTD system equipped with a pair of upward and downward facing 300 kHz Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (LADCP) from Teledyne RD Instruments was used for station sampling. The LADCP system is primarily used for measuring full water column absolute velocity profiles. However, this study focuses on using the LADCP echo intensity data to measure ocean backscatter. Complex methods are usually required for calibration of acoustic instruments to measure backscatter due to attenuation and absorption of sound in water. Here we present a method for data processing which eliminates the need for calibration by using a single bin at a fixed distance from the ADCP transducers. We also present data from a Simrad EK60 echosounder which collected underway acoustic data throughout the cruise. Diurnal migration patterns of mesopelagic fish (an abundant and important part of the Red Sea ecosystem) are clearly evident in both data sets. Although the LADCP (due to bin size settings optimized for water velocity measurements) cannot resolve the thinner layers of acoustic scatterers compared to the 38 kHz EK60 data, it can be a very useful tool for measuring fish and zooplankton distribution from ships not equipped with high end acoustic

  17. 76 FR 36511 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Fishery Management Council (Council) has submitted Amendment 3 to the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery... proposed to modify the existing trap limit regulations. The current trap limit regulations state that...

  18. 75 FR 70192 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries; 2011 Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black... specifications; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS proposes specifications for the 2011 summer flounder, scup...-Aside (RSA) program. The implementing regulations for the Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea...

  19. 76 FR 53831 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... United States; Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fisheries; 2011 Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black... December 28, 2010, NMFS published in the Federal Register the final rule to implement the 2011 summer flounder, scup, and black sea bass specifications, which established commercial summer flounder...

  20. Roseovarius indicus sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea water of the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiliang; Zhong, Huanzi; Wang, Jianning; Yuan, Jun; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2011-09-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on a novel bacterial strain, designated B108(T), which was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading consortium, enriched from deep-sea water of the Indian Ocean. The isolate was Gram-reaction-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile. Growth of strain B108(T) was observed in 1-15 % (w/v) NaCl and at 10-39 °C and it was unable to degrade Tween 80 or gelatin. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that strain B108(T) was most closely related to Roseovarius halotolerans HJ50(T) (97.1 % sequence similarity), followed by Roseovarius pacificus 81-2(T) (96.6 %) and Roseovarius aestuarii SMK-122(T) (95.2 %); other species shared <95.0 % sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization tests showed that strain B108(T) had a low DNA-DNA relatedness to R. halotolerans HJ50(T) and R. pacificus 81-2(T) (48±4 % and 44±5 %, respectively). The predominant fatty acids were C₁₆:₀, C₁₆:₀ 2-OH, summed feature 8 (C₁₈:₁ω7c/ω6c) and C₁₉:₀ω8c cyclo, which accounted for 84.2 % of the total cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 63.6 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q10). Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and some unidentified compounds were detected. These characteristics were in good agreement with those of members of the genus Roseovarius. The pufLM gene was also detected. According to its morphology, physiology, fatty acid composition and phylogenetic position based on 16S rRNA sequence data, the novel strain most appropriately belongs to the genus Roseovarius but can be readily distinguished from known species of this genus. Therefore, strain B108(T) represents a novel species, of the genus Roseovarius, for which the name Roseovarius indicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B108(T) ( = 2PR52-14(T)  = CCTCC AB 208233(T)  = LMG 24622(T)  = MCCC 1A01227(T)).

  1. Uptake of phytodetritus by benthic foraminifera under oxygen depletion at the Indian Margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enge, A. J.; Witte, U.; Kucera, M.; Heinz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Benthic foraminifera in sediments on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea where the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) impinges on the continental slope are exposed to particularly severe levels of oxygen depletion. Food supply for the benthic community is high but delivered in distinct pulses during upwelling and water mixing events associated with summer and winter monsoon periods. In order to investigate the response by benthic foraminifera to such pulsed food delivery under oxygen concentrations of less than 0.1 mL L-1 (4.5 μmol L-1), an in situ isotope labeling experiment (13C, 15N) was performed at the western continental slope of India at 540 m water depth (OMZ core region). The assemblage of living foraminifera (>125 μm) in the uppermost centimeter at this depth is characterized by an unexpectedly high population density of 3982 ind. 10 cm-2 and a strong dominance by few calcareous species. For the experiment, we concentrated on the nine most abundant taxa, which constitute 93% of the entire foraminifera population at 0-1 cm sediment depth. Increased concentrations of 13C and 15N in the cytoplasm indicate that all investigated taxa took up the labeled phytodetritus during the 4 day experimental phase. In total, these nine species had assimilated 113.8 mg C m-2 (17.5% of the total added carbon). The uptake of nitrogen by the three most abundant taxa (Bolivina aff. B. dilatata, Cassidulina sp., Bulimina gibba) was 2.7 mg N m-2 (2% of the total added nitrogen) and showed the successful application of 15N as tracer in foraminiferal studies. The short-term response to the offered phytodetritus varied largely among foraminiferal species with Uvigerina schwageri being by far the most important species in short-term processing whereas the most abundant taxa Bolivina aff. B. dilatata and Cassidulina sp. showed comparably low uptake of the offered food. We suggest that the observed species-specific differences are related to individual biomass of species and to specific

  2. Evaluation of ecosystem status in the shelf-slope zone of the northeastern Black Sea based on the trophic index (TRIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, N. D.; Chasovnikov, V. K.; Arashkevich, E. G.; Mosharov, S. A.; Nikishina, A. B.; Kostyleva, A. V.; Louppova, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    The water conditions and trophic status in the shelf-slope zone and bays of the northeastern Black Sea were evaluated on the basis of monitoring data from 2007-2014. It has been shown that the concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll "a" in the studied area are at the level of the pristine period (of the late 1970s). The concentration of mineral nitrogen in the surface water layer varied from 0.19 to 5.64 μM. The concentration of phosphates differed from analytical zero to 0.56 μM. The concentration of chlorophyll "a" in different seasons ranged from 0.24 to 0.89 μg/L. The trophic index characterizes the status of the marine shelf ecosystem near Gelendzhik city as "excellent" even in the bays. Significant year-to-year differences in the index were not detected. The range between the values of the trophic index in the bays and open sea was low (3.7 and 3.2, respectively).

  3. AMS-dated mollusks in beach ridges and berms document Holocene sea-level and coastal changes in northeastern Kuwait Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinink-Smith, Linda M.

    2015-09-01

    In northeastern Kuwait, ancient beach ridges and associated berms are separated from the present shoreline by a 4-6 km-wide sabkha. A diverse mollusk fauna in the beach ridges attests to a former open marine environment. A total of 21 AMS dates were obtained in this study. Thirteen mollusk samples from beach ridges yielded AMS dates ranging from ~ 6990 cal yr BP in the southeast to ~ 3370 cal yr BP in the northwest, suggesting a southeast to northwest age progression during the Holocene transgression. In contrast, four samples from berms throughout the study area yielded AMS dates of 5195-3350 cal yr BP showing no age progression; these berms consist largely of Conomurex persicus gastropods that aggregated by storms during a highstand at ~ 5000-3500 cal yr BP. The berms are presently at ~ + 6 m above sea level, 2-3 m above the beach ridges. Human settlements were common on the ridge crests before and after the highstand. Regression to present-day sea level commenced after the highstand, which is when the sabkha began forming. A landward, marine-built terrace, which yielded AMS dates > 43,500 14C yr BP, probably formed during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 5e and hence is not genetically related to the beach ridges.

  4. Quantification of the early small-scale fishery in the north-eastern Baltic Sea in the late 17th century.

    PubMed

    Verliin, Aare; Ojaveer, Henn; Kaju, Katre; Tammiksaar, Erki

    2013-01-01

    Historical perspectives on fisheries and related human behaviour provide valuable information on fishery resources and their exploitation, helping to more appropriately set management targets and determine relevant reference levels. In this study we analyse historical fisheries and fish trade at the north-eastern Baltic Sea coast in the late 17th century. Local consumption and export together amounted to the annual removal of about 200 tonnes of fish from the nearby sea and freshwater bodies. The fishery was very diverse and exploited altogether one cyclostome and 17 fish species with over 90% of the catch being consumed locally. The exported fish consisted almost entirely of high-valued species with Stockholm (Sweden) being the most important export destination. Due to rich political history and natural features of the region, we suggest that the documented evidence of this small-scale fishery should be considered as the first quantitative summary of exploitation of aquatic living resources in the region and can provide a background for future analyses.

  5. The effects of natural iron fertilisation on deep-sea ecology: the Crozet Plateau, Southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Wolff, George A; Billett, David S M; Bett, Brian J; Holtvoeth, Jens; FitzGeorge-Balfour, Tania; Fisher, Elizabeth H; Cross, Ian; Shannon, Roger; Salter, Ian; Boorman, Ben; King, Nicola J; Jamieson, Alan; Chaillan, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The addition of iron to high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic waters stimulates phytoplankton, leading to greater primary production. Large-scale artificial ocean iron fertilization (OIF) has been proposed as a means of mitigating anthropogenic atmospheric CO(2), but its impacts on ocean ecosystems below the photic zone are unknown. Natural OIF, through the addition of iron leached from volcanic islands, has been shown to enhance primary productivity and carbon export and so can be used to study the effects of OIF on life in the ocean. We compared two closely-located deep-sea sites (∼400 km apart and both at ∼4200 m water depth) to the East (naturally iron fertilized; +Fe) and South (HNLC) of the Crozet Islands in the southern Indian Ocean. Our results suggest that long-term geo-engineering of surface oceanic waters via artificial OIF would lead to significant changes in deep-sea ecosystems. We found that the +Fe area had greater supplies of organic matter inputs to the seafloor, including polyunsaturated fatty acid and carotenoid nutrients. The +Fe site also had greater densities and biomasses of large deep-sea animals with lower levels of evenness in community structuring. The species composition was also very different, with the +Fe site showing similarities to eutrophic sites in other ocean basins. Moreover, major differences occurred in the taxa at the +Fe and HNLC sites revealing the crucial role that surface oceanic conditions play in changing and structuring deep-sea benthic communities.

  6. Sedimentary record on the Indian Summer Monsoon since the Last Glacial Maximum: Evidence from the southeastern Andaman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Shengfa; Cao, Peng; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Kornkanitnan, Narumol

    2016-04-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) generated by across-equatorial pressure gradient between the Asian continent and the southern Indian Ocean is a major component of the Asian monsoon system and establishes interactions among the ocean, land and atmosphere. Provenance and paleoclimate changes in the Andaman Sea during the last 26 ka were reconstructed from high-resolution records of grain-size, major elements and Sr-Nd isotopes in core ADM-9. The values of ɛNd(0) and 87Sr/86Sr were in good agreement with those of Irrawaddy River sediments, indicating a common source of origin. Two sensitive grain-size intervals (3.4-7.5 and 16.8-21.2 μm) were identified; the former was controlled primarily by sea-level change, whereas the latter was related to Irrawaddy River discharge and South-west Current transport driven by the ISM. Proxies of chemical weathering (K/Al) and terrigenous input (Ti/Ca) coupled with sensitive grain-size interval (16.8-21.2 μm population) revealed that the ISM was weak during ~15-26 ka BP and then strengthened gradually to a maximum during ~7-9 ka BP; subsequently, the ISM exhibited a generally declining trend to ~2 ka BP. The variation of the ISM recorded in this work is consistent with ISM variations observed in an open area in the northern Indian Ocean and in adjacent continents, implying the evolution of the Asia summer monsoon since 26 ka.

  7. Distribution of picoplankton in the northeastern South China Sea with special reference to the effects of the Kuroshio intrusion and the associated mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajun; Jiang, Xin; Li, Gang; Jing, Zhiyou; Zhou, Linbin; Ke, Zhixin; Tan, Yehui

    2017-07-01

    We investigated picoplankton distribution patterns and environmental variables along an east-to-west transect in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) during late winter 2016, giving us the opportunity to examine the impacts of the Kuroshio intrusion and the associated eddies. The results indicated that the subsurface (50-75m) phytoplankton biomass chlorophyll (Chl a) maximum (SCM) disappeared and was replaced by higher Chl a in the middle part of the transect due to the impacts of the Kuroshio intrusion and mesoscale eddies. Both flow cytometry and pyrosequencing data revealed that picoplankton abundance and community structure were significantly influenced by perturbations in complex physical processes. Picoeukaryotes represented most of the total phytoplankton biomass, and their maximum abundance (>10(4)cellsmL(-1)) occurred within cyclonic eddy-affected regions (Stations 11 and 12), whereas the abundance of Prochlorococcus was the lowest in these regions. Prochlorococcus showed a higher abundance in the Kuroshio-affected area, while Synechococcus was mostly distributed at the upper well-lit depths, with its maximum abundance observed in surface waters (0-30m) adjacent to the cyclonic eddy center. Heterotrophic bacteria (HBA) displayed high abundance along the transect, consistent with the total phytoplankton biomass. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 26 bacterial phyla, with major components belonging to Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, as well as SAR406. Notably, relatively more Rhodobacterales, Flavobacteriales, Alteromonadales, and Vibrionales that were distributed in surface waters of the cyclonic eddy center were specifically associated with the phytoplankton (mainly picoeukaryotes) bloom. Our study highlights the impacts of the Kuroshio intrusion in regulating the microbial ecology of the northeastern SCS and the potential coupling between phytoplankton and bacteria.

  8. Ectoenzymatic activity in surface waters: A transect from the Mediterranean Sea across the Indian Ocean to Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misic, C.; Castellano, M.; Fabiano, M.; Ruggieri, N.; Saggiomo, V.; Povero, P.

    2006-09-01

    The activities of two hydrolytic enzymes (leucine aminopeptidase and β glucosidase), belonging to the particle-bound enzymatic fraction, were measured in open-sea surface waters. Samples were collected along a transect crossing the Indian Ocean during the early NW monsoon period (November and December 2001). The latitudinal pattern of the ectoenzymatic activities highlighted a generally increasing trend of glycolysis approaching the equator, with significantly higher β glucosidase activity (0.79-3.00 nmol l -1 h -1) within the latitudinal range from 12°N to 16°S. In this area, the surface waters coming from the Indonesian Throughflow and the Bay of Bengal carry a considerable quantity of carbohydrates (38.9-41.9 μg l -1), which stimulated glycolytic activity and its cell-specific rates scaled to bacterial abundance. On the other hand, in the Central Indian Ocean, the proteolytic activity was considerable (0.91-2.03 nmol l -1 h -1), although the particulate proteins did not show significant increases and the dissolved proteinlike signal was one of the lowest of the entire transect (0.7 mg l -1 on average compared to the 1.4-1.6 mg l -1 of the adjacent areas). Therefore, in this area, the two ectoenzymes studied did not respond to the same stimulatory effect (namely the specific substrate concentrations). The time needed for the hydrolysis of macromolecules within the particulate and dissolved organic substrate fractions, although these measures are affected by a number of assumptions starting with the potential nature of the ectoenzymatic determinations, confirms these observations. The Central Indian Ocean displayed the lowest values, from 8 to 26 days for particulate and dissolved organic carbon, respectively. As observed in the equatorial areas of the Atlantic Ocean, the relevant degradation activity of the central area of the Indian Ocean Basin suggests a notable heterotrophy based on a faster turnover of organic substrates.

  9. Centennial-scale teleconnection between North Atlantic sea surface temperatures and the Indian summer monsoon during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Jin, Liya; Jia, Wanna

    2016-05-01

    Proxy records have shown that abrupt changes in the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) are closely linked to cold events in the North Atlantic at centennial timescales during the Holocene. However, mechanisms for these co-occurring phenomena are not fully understood. This study uses simulation results from a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice general circulation model forced by astronomical variations to investigate how summer (June, July, August and September) North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) may have influenced the ISM at centennial timescales during the Holocene (9.5-0 ka BP). Our analyses identified an intimate relationship between the North Atlantic tripole SST (NATS) mode and the ISM. The NATS mode can affect the ISM in several ways. First, air-sea interactions over the tropical Atlantic can induce negative tropospheric temperature (TT) anomalies over the Indian Ocean, resulting in a strengthened meridional TT gradient favorable to a prolonged monsoonal rainy season. Second, a positive NATS mode tends to induce closed zonal vertical circulation over the tropical Atlantic, North Africa and the tropical Indian Ocean, creating anomalous convergence over India, and hence an enhanced ISM. Third, westerly surface wind anomalies, related to the NATS mode and coursing over the Arabian Sea, can increase moisture delivery to the monsoon region, causing enhanced rainfall in India. This mechanism resembles a decadal-scale mechanism that operates in the present-day climate. We also compared the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO), an alternative North Atlantic SST mode, with the NATS mode to determine their relationships to the ISM. A Holocene transient simulation indicates that the AMO's trend has diverged from that of the ISM since 5.5 ka BP, due to inverse SST trends over the tropical and extratropical North Atlantic. This latter trend leads to a much weaker relationship between the AMO and the ISM, relative to that observed between the NATS mode and the ISM

  10. Palynology of the northeastern Fram Strait since the Last Glacial Maximum : evidence for large amplitude changes in sea-surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falardeau, Jade; de Vernal, Anne; Spielhagen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Palynological analyses were performed in core PS2863 (80°33.47'N, 10°17.93'E) and MSM5/5-712-2 (78°54.94'N, 6°46.04'E) in order to document changes of sea-surface conditions of the northeastern Fram Strait since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The study area is ideally located to record the northernmost influence of the North Atlantic waters prior they enter into the Arctic Ocean, at the surface or through subduction. Core PS2863 contains a 183 cm long sequence characterized by sedimentation rates of 8.6 cm/kyrs and abundant dinocysts (up to 22 000/g) except during the LGM. Core MSM5/5-712-2 shows a much higher time resolution with a mean sedimentation rate of 27.7 cm/kyrs. It also contains generally abundant dinocysts (up to 48 000/g). The preliminary results from these cores permit some inference in terms of regional paleoceanography. The assemblages of the LGM (23-19 ka) are characterized by the lowest dinocyst concentrations (< 200/g), which suggests low productivity. However, the assemblages dominated by Bitectatodinium tepikiense (up to 40%) suggest cold condition in winter with sea ice cover development but relatively high sea-surface temperature (SST) in summer, possibly due to low salinity (< 32.5 psu) and low thermal inertia at the surface thus owing to summer warming. The high abundance of Bitectatodinium tepikiense (up to 40%) is a feature observed at the scale of the Nordic Seas (see de Vernal et al., 2005) during the LGM, reflect a situation with modern analogues in cool estuarine environments marked by strong seasonality. The assemblages from 19 to 16 ka BP are marked by an almost monospecific assemblage of Brigantedinium spp., which reflect very cold conditions and extensive sea ice cover for up to 8 months/yr. It is synchronous with a peak of reworked palynomorphs that indicates erosion of surrounding lands and outwash deposition, likely related to important meltwater discharges. From 16 ka BP to 12.5 ka BP, the dominance of the Spiniferites

  11. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in a batch process for 552 samples collected during two cruises in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the interior ocean, and to help to determine the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. The mean of the absolute differences between samples collected in duplicate in the same container type during both cruises and measured consecutively is 0.10 ‰, which corresponds to a 1σ uncertainty of 0.09 ‰, and which is within the range reported by other published studies of this kind. A crossover analysis was performed with nearby historical δ13CDIC data, indicating that any systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results are negligible. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  12. Evaluating coastal landscape response to sea-level rise in the northeastern United States: approach and methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lentz, Erika E.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gesch, Dean B.; Horton, Radley M.

    2014-02-13

    The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data. Sea-level-rise scenarios used as model inputs are generated by using multiple sources of information, including Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models following representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5 in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A Bayesian network is used to develop a predictive coastal response model that integrates the sea-level, elevation, and land-cover data with assigned probabilities that account for interactions with coastal geomorphology as well as the corresponding ecological and societal systems it supports. The effects of sea-level rise are presented as (1) level of landscape submergence and (2) coastal response type characterized as either static (that is, inundation) or dynamic (that is, landform or landscape change). Results are produced at a spatial scale of 30 meters for four decades (the 2020s, 2030s, 2050s, and 2080s). The probabilistic predictions can be applied to landscape management decisions based on sea-level-rise effects as well as on assessments of the prediction uncertainty and need for improved data or fundamental understanding. This report describes the methods used to produce predictions, including information on input datasets; the modeling approach; model outputs; data-quality-control procedures; and information on how to access the data and metadata online.

  13. Evaluating Coastal Landscape Response to Sea-Level Rise in the Northeastern United States - Approach and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gesch, Dean B.; Horton, Radley M.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is examining effects of future sea-level rise on the coastal landscape from Maine to Virginia by producing spatially explicit, probabilistic predictions using sea-level projections, vertical land movement rates (due to isostacy), elevation data, and land-cover data. Sea-level-rise scenarios used as model inputs are generated by using multiple sources of information, including Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models following representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5 in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A Bayesian network is used to develop a predictive coastal response model that integrates the sea-level, elevation, and land-cover data with assigned probabilities that account for interactions with coastal geomorphology as well as the corresponding ecological and societal systems it supports. The effects of sea-level rise are presented as (1) level of landscape submergence and (2) coastal response type characterized as either static (that is, inundation) or dynamic (that is, landform or landscape change). Results are produced at a spatial scale of 30 meters for four decades (the 2020s, 2030s, 2050s, and 2080s). The probabilistic predictions can be applied to landscape management decisions based on sea-level-rise effects as well as on assessments of the prediction uncertainty and need for improved data or fundamental understanding. This report describes the methods used to produce predictions, including information on input datasets; the modeling approach; model outputs; data-quality-control procedures; and information on how to access the data and metadata online.

  14. Effect of Pacific warm and cold events on the sea ice behavior in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Pranab; Dash, Mihir Kumar; Pandey, Prem Chand

    2014-02-01

    The teleconnections between sea ice area (SIA) in the Indian Ocean Sector (IOS) of the Southern Ocean (20-90°E) and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) for the period 1982-2009 are studied. The ENSO years are divided into La Niña, El Niño and El Niño Modoki years. The sea surface temperature anomalies averaged over the Niño 3.4 (SST3.4A) region (120-170°W, 5°N-5°S) are used as proxy for ENSO. A significantly stronger negative correlation between SST3.4A and SIA anomalies is found at a positive lag of 6-12 months in 50-80°E region than elsewhere in the IOS. Variations in sea level pressure anomalies over the Antarctic continent and the subpolar regions play an important role in shaping the surface wind. Variation in the surface wind along with the changes in sea surface temperature (SST), sea ice drift and surface air temperature (SAT) shape the sea ice cover over the region. Composites show that the winters following La Niña years are associated with more SIA compared to that of ENSO-neutral years. This is attributed to the increase in sea level pressure gradient between the Antarctic land mass and the subpolar region, which enhances the southerly wind and results in a reduction in SAT. Also, anomalous northward advection of sea ice increases the SIC over the outer margin of the sea ice cover. The in-phase relation among SAT, SST and sea ice advection results in an increase in SIA. Also, a weaker Regional Ferrel Cell (RFC) during this period results in the reduction of poleward heat transport and contributes to the increase in SIA. During the winters following El Niño years, interaction among anomalous easterlies, wind-induced sea ice motion, SAT anomalies and heat transport by the RFC increases (decreases) the SIA in the western (eastern) part of the high correlation region. During El Niño Modoki years, an increase in SST and presence of warmer surface air over the high correlation region reduce SIA during summer as well as the winter following it

  15. 75 FR 35435 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... catch (TAC) and a fleet-wide days-at-sea (DAS) allocation. However, the implementing regulations for the... rulemaking is to adjust the target TAC and corresponding fleet DAS allocation equivalent to the revised... crab emergency action implemented by NMFS (74 FR 9770, March 6, 2009), i.e., a target TAC of...

  16. 75 FR 7435 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Atlantic deep-sea red crab fishery, including a target total allowable catch (TAC) and a fleet-wide days-at... opportunity for public comment. The intent of this rulemaking is to specify the target TAC and other... New England Fishery Management Council (Council) to recommend, on a triennial basis, a target TAC...

  17. 75 FR 27219 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... crab fishery, including a target total allowable catch (TAC) and a fleet-wide days-at-sea (DAS) allocation. The intent of this rulemaking is to specify the target TAC and other management measures in order... England Fishery Management Council (Council) to recommend, on a triennial basis, a target TAC and a...

  18. Indian Surface Combatants: Sea Power for the 1990’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Force Development ........................................................................ 17 5. Logstic Support...prior to the weapons release point of ingressing aircraft. If the Indian Navy’s aircraft are unable to successfully interdict inbound air raids, the...engagement ranges allow for fewer engagements of inbound missiles 73 on aircraft and greatly decrease the probability of eliminating large numbers of

  19. Decadal- to biennial scale variability of planktic foraminifera in the northeastern Arabian Sea during the last two millennia: evidence for winter monsoon forcing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Philipp; Lückge, Andreas; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; Schulz, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    The Asian monsoon system is controlling the hydrologic cycle, and thus the agricultural and economic prosperity of the worlds most densely populated region. Strong and moisture-laden winds from the southwest induce upwelling and significant productivity in the western Arabian Sea during boreal summer. During boreal winter, weaker dry and cold surface winds from the northeast nourish ocean productivity mainly in the northeastern Arabian Sea. Instrumental records spanning the last century are too short to understand how the monsoon system reacts to external forcing mechanisms and to accurately determine its natural variability. Compared to the summer monsoon component, the dynamics of the winter monsoon are virtually unknown, due to the lack of adequate archives that are affected only by winter conditions. Here we present a decadal- to biennial-scale resolution record of past winter monsoon variability over the last two millennia, based on census counts of planktic foraminifera from two laminated sediment cores collected offshore Pakistan. One shorter box core (SO90-39KG) spans the last 250 years with an average ~2-year resolution, whereas the longer piston core (SO130-275KL) spans the last 2,100 years with a 10-year resolution. We use Globigerina falconensis as a faunal indicator for winter conditions, a species that is most abundant during winter in the NE Arabian Sea (Peeters and Brummer, 2002; Schulz et al., 2002). Our results show that during the past 2,100 years G. falconensis varied with significant periodicities centered on ˜ 60, ˜ 53, ˜ 40, ˜ 34 and ˜ 29 years per cycle. Some of these periods closely match cycles that are known from proxy records of solar irradiance, suggesting a solar forcing on winter monsoon variability. During the past 250 years G. falconensis varied in correlation with the (11-year) Schwabe and the (22-year) Hale solar cycles. Furthermore, a significant ˜ 7 year cyclicity could indicate a teleconnection to the El Niño Southern

  20. A sea surface temperature reconstruction for the southern Indian Ocean trade wind belt from corals in Rodrigues Island (19° S, 63° E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinke, Jens; Reuning, Lars; Pfeiffer, Miriam; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Hardman, Emily; Jhangeer-Khan, Reshad; Davies, Gareth R.; Ng, Curtise K. C.; Kroon, Dick

    2016-10-01

    The western Indian Ocean has been warming rapidly over recent decades, causing a greater number of extreme climatic events. It is therefore of paramount importance to improve our understanding of links between Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) variability, climate change and sustainability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. Here we present monthly resolved coral Sr / Ca records from two different locations from Rodrigues Island (63° E, 19° S) in the south-central Indian Ocean trade wind belt. We reconstruct SST based on a linear relationship with the Sr / Ca proxy with records starting from 1781 and 1945, respectively. We assess relationships between the observed long-term SST and climate fluctuations related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Subtropical Indian Ocean Dipole Mode (SIOD) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) between 1945 and 2006, respectively. The reproducibility of the Sr / Ca records is assessed as are the potential impacts of diagenesis and corallite orientation on Sr / Ca-SST reconstructions. We calibrate individual robust Sr / Ca records with in situ SST and various gridded SST products. The results show that the SST record from Cabri provides the first Indian Ocean coral proxy time series that records the SST signature of the PDO in the south-central Indian Ocean since 1945. We suggest that additional records from Rodrigues Island can provide excellent records of SST variations in the southern Indian Ocean trade wind belt to unravel teleconnections with the SIOD/ENSO/PDO on longer timescales.

  1. Marine mammal distribution and abundance in an offshore sub-region of the northeastern Chukchi Sea during the open-water season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Lisanne A. M.; McFarland, Alexandra E.; Watts, Bridget H.; Lomac-MacNair, Kate S.; Seiser, Pamela E.; Wisdom, Sheyna S.; Kirk, Alex V.; Schudel, Carissa A.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the distribution and abundance of marine mammals during the open-water season within and near three offshore oil and gas prospects in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, known as the Klondike, Burger, and Statoil study areas. We collected vessel-based marine mammal data during July-October 2008-2010 along line transects oriented in a north-south direction. Over this period, we surveyed ~18,600 km of on-transect effort in the three study areas. Sightings of cetaceans were rare. The bowhead whale was the primary cetacean species sighted and was mostly observed in October (33 of 35 animals). Pinnipeds were the most abundant marine mammals in the study area, with 980 seals and 367 walruses recorded on transect. Most seals were observed as solitary animals, while walruses were often observed in aggregations. We calculated seal and walrus densities using species-specific detection functions corrected for probability of detection. There was high interannual variability in the abundance of seals and walruses that for some species may be related to interannual differences in ice conditions. Notwithstanding this variation, the distribution data suggest that benthic-feeding bearded seals and walruses generally were more common in the Burger and Statoil study areas, which can be characterized as more benthic-dominated ecosystems. The distribution of ringed/spotted seals did not show any statistically significant differences among the study areas, although a slight preference for the Klondike and Statoil study areas was suggested. Both of these study areas are affected by Bering Sea Water from the Central Channel and have a stronger pelagic component than the Burger study area. Continued sampling of these areas will help establish whether the observed trends in marine mammal distribution and abundance are persistent.

  2. Dry and wet atmospheric deposition of organic carbon in coastal and water areas of the northeastern part of the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, V. V.; Soier, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports on new data focusing on organic carbon contained in aeolian material and precipitation falling on coastal and water areas of the northeastern part of the Sea of Azov. Atmospheric deposition was sampled in 2006-2014. The particulate organic carbon content varied from 4 to 27% in aeolian dust samples. The concentration of the organic carbon dissolved in rainwater was from 1.6 to 4.3 mg C/L, and from 0.9 to 16.6 mg C/L in snow. The particulate organic carbon content varied from 2 to 43% in snow. Intensity of aeolian dust settling decreased from 178 to 33 mg/m2 per day with distance from a source of dust; in contrast, the relative content of organic matter increased. In a spring-summer season the aeolian organic carbon fluxes varied from 12 to 18 mg C/m2 per day in Rostov-on-Don, from 28 to 48 mg C/m2 per day on the Gulf of Taganrog coast, and from 20 to 80 mg C/m2 per day in the water area of the Gulf of Taganrog.

  3. Assimilation of the seabird and ship drift data in the north-eastern sea of Japan into an operational ocean nowcast/forecast system

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Yasumasa; Guo, Xinyu; Varlamov, Sergey M.; Miyama, Toru; Yoda, Ken; Sato, Katsufumi; Kano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, ocean current is being operationally monitored mainly by combined use of numerical ocean nowcast/forecast models and satellite remote sensing data. Improvement in the accuracy of the ocean current nowcast/forecast requires additional measurements with higher spatial and temporal resolution as expected from the current observation network. Here we show feasibility of assimilating high-resolution seabird and ship drift data into an operational ocean forecast system. Data assimilation of geostrophic current contained in the observed drift leads to refinement in the gyre mode events of the Tsugaru warm current in the north-eastern sea of Japan represented by the model. Fitting the observed drift to the model depends on ability of the drift representing geostrophic current compared to that representing directly wind driven components. A preferable horizontal scale of 50 km indicated for the seabird drift data assimilation implies their capability of capturing eddies with smaller horizontal scale than the minimum scale of 100 km resolved by the satellite altimetry. The present study actually demonstrates that transdisciplinary approaches combining bio-/ship- logging and numerical modeling could be effective for enhancement in monitoring the ocean current. PMID:26633309

  4. Seasonal variation of speed and width from kinematic parameters of mode-1 nonlinear internal waves in the northeastern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chomgun; Nam, SungHyun; Song, Heechun

    2016-08-01

    To better understand the statistical and theoretical characteristics of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) in the broad continental shelf of the northeastern East China Sea (ECS), historical hydrographic data collected over 50 years between 1962 and 2011 are analyzed to calculate monthly climatology. Based on KdV and extended KdV models under the two-layer approximation (i.e., mode-1 NLIWs), the monthly climatology for propagating speed and characteristic width is constructed, ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 m s-1 and from O(102) to O(103) m, respectively. The result is consistent with a few previous in situ observations in the region. When NLIWs originating in the southeastern slope area approach the shallower regime (northwestward propagation), they propagate more slowly with neither break nor extinction, but with a shorter width, since both the Iribarren and Ostrovsky numbers are small (Ir ≪ 0.45 and Os ≪ 1, respectively). Limitations of the two-layered KdV-type models are discussed (e.g., an importance of mode-2 waves) in the context of occasional extension of the low-salinity Changjiang Discharged Water onto the area, which implies distinct effects on the kinematic parameters of NLIWs in the ECS.

  5. Assimilation of the seabird and ship drift data in the north-eastern sea of Japan into an operational ocean nowcast/forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yasumasa; Guo, Xinyu; Varlamov, Sergey M.; Miyama, Toru; Yoda, Ken; Sato, Katsufumi; Kano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Keiji

    2015-12-01

    At the present time, ocean current is being operationally monitored mainly by combined use of numerical ocean nowcast/forecast models and satellite remote sensing data. Improvement in the accuracy of the ocean current nowcast/forecast requires additional measurements with higher spatial and temporal resolution as expected from the current observation network. Here we show feasibility of assimilating high-resolution seabird and ship drift data into an operational ocean forecast system. Data assimilation of geostrophic current contained in the observed drift leads to refinement in the gyre mode events of the Tsugaru warm current in the north-eastern sea of Japan represented by the model. Fitting the observed drift to the model depends on ability of the drift representing geostrophic current compared to that representing directly wind driven components. A preferable horizontal scale of 50 km indicated for the seabird drift data assimilation implies their capability of capturing eddies with smaller horizontal scale than the minimum scale of 100 km resolved by the satellite altimetry. The present study actually demonstrates that transdisciplinary approaches combining bio-/ship- logging and numerical modeling could be effective for enhancement in monitoring the ocean current.

  6. Assimilation of the seabird and ship drift data in the north-eastern sea of Japan into an operational ocean nowcast/forecast system.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Yasumasa; Guo, Xinyu; Varlamov, Sergey M; Miyama, Toru; Yoda, Ken; Sato, Katsufumi; Kano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Keiji

    2015-12-03

    At the present time, ocean current is being operationally monitored mainly by combined use of numerical ocean nowcast/forecast models and satellite remote sensing data. Improvement in the accuracy of the ocean current nowcast/forecast requires additional measurements with higher spatial and temporal resolution as expected from the current observation network. Here we show feasibility of assimilating high-resolution seabird and ship drift data into an operational ocean forecast system. Data assimilation of geostrophic current contained in the observed drift leads to refinement in the gyre mode events of the Tsugaru warm current in the north-eastern sea of Japan represented by the model. Fitting the observed drift to the model depends on ability of the drift representing geostrophic current compared to that representing directly wind driven components. A preferable horizontal scale of 50 km indicated for the seabird drift data assimilation implies their capability of capturing eddies with smaller horizontal scale than the minimum scale of 100 km resolved by the satellite altimetry. The present study actually demonstrates that transdisciplinary approaches combining bio-/ship- logging and numerical modeling could be effective for enhancement in monitoring the ocean current.

  7. Relationship between historical sea-surface temperature variability and climate change-induced coral mortality in the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Ateweberhan, M; McClanahan, Tim R

    2010-07-01

    Many of the world's coral reefs suffered high coral mortality during the 1998 ENSO, with the highest mortality in the western Indian Ocean (WIO). A meta-analysis of field data on change in coral cover across the 1998 ENSO event was conducted for 36 major reef areas in the WIO, and relationship of the change with the historical sea-surface temperature (SST) variability investigated. WIO reefs were categorized into three major SST groups of differing coral cover change. Cover change was negatively associated with standard deviation (SD) SST until about SD 2.3, with increasing flatness of the SST frequency distributions. It increased with further increase in SD as the SST distributions became strongly bimodal in the Arabian/Persian Gulf area. The study indicates that environmental resistance/tolerance to extreme anomalous events could be predicted and management priorities directed accordingly for a warmer and more variable future climate.

  8. Hydrocarbons in waters and bottom sediments of coastal areas in the northeastern part of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.

    2015-09-01

    Data on the content and composition of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the surface layer of water and bottom sediments are presented. The data were compared to the distribution of the total organic carbon, particulate matter, lipids, and chlorophyll in the Gelendzhik and Golubaya bays, as well as in the Greater Sochi area. The intense transformation processes of organic compounds within the water mass and water-bottom interface have resulted in the prevalence of natural components in the alkane composition of the bottom sediments in the areas of the Black Sea considered. The riverine and marine water mixing zone acts as a geochemical barrier preventing the supply of the bulk of river-transferred pollutants to the open sea areas.

  9. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946–4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments. PMID:26379634

  10. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946-4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments.

  11. Distribution, Abundance, Behavior, and Bioacoustics of Endangered Whales in the Western Beaufort and Northeastern Chukchi Seas, 1979-87

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    water lead systems that annually develop relatively nearshore in the Chukchi Sea , but offshore and well north of oil exploration activities in...seen in September. Walrus were most often seen swimming in open water and resting in light ice (0-30%; 40%, n = 883) or hauled out in heavy ice (36...little broken floe ice was available to haul out on and the ice edge was far to the north (see figure 21). Overall,

  12. The distribution and origin of PAHs over the Asian marginal seas, the Indian, and the Pacific Oceans: Implications for outflows from Asia and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junwen; Xu, Yue; Li, Jun; Liu, Di; Tian, Chongguo; Chaemfa, Chakra; Zhang, Gan

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol samples were collected aboard the R/V Dayang Yihao from 8 January to 7 August 2007 to investigate the geographical distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) over oceans and to assess their continental origins. The highest concentrations were found over the marginal seas in Asia, especially the East and South China Seas, indicating that China is a top source of emissions into the marine atmosphere in the areas monitored on this cruise. PAH concentrations over the west oceanic region in the South Indian Ocean were noticeably higher than in other areas of the Indian Ocean, most likely because air masses from Africa, the Arabian Sea, and the Bay of Bengal exert a negative impact on those regions through long-range atmospheric transport. The PAH isomer ratio values varied over the oceans that were impacted by continental sources but remained relatively uniform over most of the remote oceans. Using diagnostic ratio analysis, we found PAHs emitted from China were mainly associated with biomass/coal burning. The measurements of levoglucosan were consistent with the results mentioned above. The western part of the South Indian Ocean atmosphere was likely affected by wildfire emissions from Africa, while the northern part was by petroleum combustion, biofuel, and wildfire burning, because the winter monsoon most likely carries aerosol from the Arabian Peninsula and India across the equator. Using the monthly images of fire activity and aerosol optical depth, it can be confirmed biomass burning from Africa can significantly influence the aerosol over the Indian Ocean.

  13. Report on two deep-water caridean shrimp species (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Alvinocarididae, Acanthephyridae) from the northeastern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzheng

    2015-01-16

    Two deep-water species of caridean shrimps collected during recent dives by the Chinese manned submersible "Jiaolong" represents new records for the South China Sea: Alvinocaris longirostris Kikuchi & Ohta, 1995 (Alvinocarididae) and Acanthephyra faxoni Calman, 1939 (Acanthephyridae). Specimens of these two species were collected from Jiaolong Cold Seep I, off Guangdong Province, China (depth 1138 m). Alvinocaris longirostris is known to be associated with chemosynthetic community, whereas Acanthephyra faxoni is a bathypelagic inhabitant, of which the occurrence in seep site is merely opportunistic. An identification key to species of Alvinocaris is provided. 

  14. Non-migratory breeding by isolated green sea turtles ( Chelonia mydas) in the Indian Ocean: biological and conservation implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Scott D.; Murray, Wendy; Macrae, Ismail; Thorn, Robert; Chongkin, Mohammad; Koch, Andrea U.

    2008-04-01

    Green sea turtles ( Chelonia mydas) are renowned for their long-distance migrations but have less fame for short-distance migrations or non-migratory behavior. We present satellite telemetric evidence from Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Indian Ocean for the first predominantly non-migratory green sea turtle ( C. mydas) population. The mean migration distance from the nesting beach to the foraging grounds was 35.5 km with a maximum mean transit time of 3.4 days. The behavior of this population has major implications for our general understanding of green turtle behavior and their life cycle and for conservation. Firstly, these results indicate a level of juvenile or adult non-breeding homing behavior from the open ocean to foraging grounds adjacent to their natal nesting beach. Secondly, a non-migratory breeding phase reduces the consumption of reproductive energy utilized, potentially resulting in higher fecundity for this population. Thirdly, the close proximity of the nesting and foraging habitats allows for uniformity in management and conservation strategies rarely possible for wide-ranging green turtle populations.

  15. Antibiotics in South Indian coastal sea and farmed prawns (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Venkatesh; Nagalingam, Arun Kumar; Ranganathan, Hari Prasad; Kandhikuppam, Krishnamoorthy Bharathi; Kothandam, Hari Prasath; Vasu, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Sulphonamides and chloramphenicol antibiotics were analysed by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in sea and farmed prawn (Penaeus monodon) samples obtained from the coastal region of southern India during 2011-2012. Average recoveries were 77-99% and precision was between 1% and 8%. The results revealed that in sea prawn samples neither of the two antibiotics was detected, but in farmed samples from coastal Andhra Pradesh some sulphonamides were detected in a concentration range greater than the maximum residual limit as set by Council Directive 2377/90 EC.

  16. Influence of Indian summer monsoon variability on the surface waves in the coastal regions of eastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanil Kumar, V.; George, Jesbin

    2016-10-01

    We assess the influence of monsoon variability on the surface waves using measured wave data covering 7 years and reanalysis data from 1979 to 2015 during the Indian summer monsoon (JJAS) in the eastern Arabian Sea. The inter-annual comparison shows that the percentage of higher wave heights ( > 2.5 m) is higher ( ˜ 26%) in 2014 than in other years due to the higher monsoon wind speed (average speed ˜ 7.3 m s-1) in 2014. Due to the delayed monsoon, monthly average significant wave height (Hm0) of June was lowest (˜ 1.5 m) in 2009. The spectral peak shifted to lower frequencies in September due to the reduction of wind seas as a result of decrease in monsoon intensity. The study shows high positive correlation (r ˜ 0.84) between average low-level jet (LLJ) for the block 0-15° N, 50-75° E and Hm0 of eastern Arabian Sea in all the months except in August (r ˜ 0.66). The time series data on wave height shows oscillations with periods 5 to 20 days. Wavelet coherence analysis indicates that the LLJ and Hm0 are in-phase related (phase angle 0°) almost all the time and LLJ leads Hm0. The monsoon seasonal anomaly of Hm0 is found to have a negative relationship with the Oceanic Niño Index indicating that the monsoon average Hm0 is relatively low during the strong El Niño years.

  17. Patterns of Indian Ocean Sea-Level Change in a Warming Climate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    and it results from wind-driven mass redistribution, with global thermal expansion and salinity effects18 increasing the basin-mean sea level...Ocean. RemoteSens. Lett. 6, 332-336 (2009). 24. Giannini, A. et al. Oceanic forcing of Sahel rainfall on interannual to interdecadal time scales

  18. Insights into Deep-Sea Sediment Fungal Communities from the East Indian Ocean Using Targeted Environmental Sequencing Combined with Traditional Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-yong; Tang, Gui-ling; Xu, Xin-ya; Nong, Xu-hua; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The fungal diversity in deep-sea environments has recently gained an increasing amount attention. Our knowledge and understanding of the true fungal diversity and the role it plays in deep-sea environments, however, is still limited. We investigated the fungal community structure in five sediments from a depth of ∼4000 m in the East India Ocean using a combination of targeted environmental sequencing and traditional cultivation. This approach resulted in the recovery of a total of 45 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 20 culturable fungal phylotypes. This finding indicates that there is a great amount of fungal diversity in the deep-sea sediments collected in the East Indian Ocean. Three fungal OTUs and one culturable phylotype demonstrated high divergence (89%–97%) from the existing sequences in the GenBank. Moreover, 44.4% fungal OTUs and 30% culturable fungal phylotypes are new reports for deep-sea sediments. These results suggest that the deep-sea sediments from the East India Ocean can serve as habitats for new fungal communities compared with other deep-sea environments. In addition, different fungal community could be detected when using targeted environmental sequencing compared with traditional cultivation in this study, which suggests that a combination of targeted environmental sequencing and traditional cultivation will generate a more diverse fungal community in deep-sea environments than using either targeted environmental sequencing or traditional cultivation alone. This study is the first to report new insights into the fungal communities in deep-sea sediments from the East Indian Ocean, which increases our knowledge and understanding of the fungal diversity in deep-sea environments. PMID:25272044

  19. Insights into deep-sea sediment fungal communities from the East Indian Ocean using targeted environmental sequencing combined with traditional cultivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-yong; Tang, Gui-ling; Xu, Xin-ya; Nong, Xu-hua; Qi, Shu-hua

    2014-01-01

    The fungal diversity in deep-sea environments has recently gained an increasing amount attention. Our knowledge and understanding of the true fungal diversity and the role it plays in deep-sea environments, however, is still limited. We investigated the fungal community structure in five sediments from a depth of ∼ 4000 m in the East India Ocean using a combination of targeted environmental sequencing and traditional cultivation. This approach resulted in the recovery of a total of 45 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 20 culturable fungal phylotypes. This finding indicates that there is a great amount of fungal diversity in the deep-sea sediments collected in the East Indian Ocean. Three fungal OTUs and one culturable phylotype demonstrated high divergence (89%-97%) from the existing sequences in the GenBank. Moreover, 44.4% fungal OTUs and 30% culturable fungal phylotypes are new reports for deep-sea sediments. These results suggest that the deep-sea sediments from the East India Ocean can serve as habitats for new fungal communities compared with other deep-sea environments. In addition, different fungal community could be detected when using targeted environmental sequencing compared with traditional cultivation in this study, which suggests that a combination of targeted environmental sequencing or traditional cultivation alone. This study is the first to report new insights into the fungal communities in deep-sea sediments environmental sequencing and traditional cultivation will generate a more diverse fungal community in deep-sea environments than using either from the East Indian Ocean, which increases our knowledge and understanding of the fungal diversity in deep-sea environments.

  20. Structural Evolution of the India-Arabia Plate Boundary from Miocene to Present-Day (NW Indian Ocean) and Comparison with the Dead Sea Fault (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arabia is bounded by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) to the west and by the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) to the east. These present-day major strike-slip fault systems activated during the Plio-Pleistocene, which contrasts with the age of inception of strike-slip motion, assumed to begin around 13-18 Ma for the DST and around 20 Ma at the edge of the Owen-Murray Ridge (OMR) for the India-Arabia plate boundary. This discrepancy between the age of the active strike-slip systems and the age of inception of strike-slip motion raises the question of the kinematic driver for the transition between successive generations of strike-slip faults. Using a recent mutibeam and seismic dataset crossing the OFZ and the OMR, we provide a new geodynamic framework for the Miocene to present-day structural evolution of the India-Arabia plate boundary, and highlight some similarities with the structural evolution of the DST. We first document a Late Miocene episode of uplift of the OMR uplift along the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. The onset of this uplift is coeval with a plate reorganization event marked by the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean. The OFZ emplaced around 3 Ma, with major pull-apart basins opening (20°N Basin, Dalrymple Trough) dated at 2.4 Ma by far-field correlation with ODP Sites. The opening of pull-apart basins is coeval with the last structural reorganization of the Makran accretionnary wedge, marked by the regional M-unconformity, and with a major intensification of the Indian monsoon. A Late Miocene episode of folding is also recognized at the Lebanon ranges prior to the onset of the present-day DST, which occurred in the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. The similarities between the geological history of the India-Arabia plate boundary and the DST in the Late Miocene and the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene suggest that both plate boundaries recorded the same kinematic changes. Late Miocene (i.e. Tortonian) deformation is widely

  1. Recent summer precipitation trends in the Greater Horn of Africa and the emerging role of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. Park; Funk, Chris; Michaelsen, Joel; Rauscher, Sara A.; Robertson, Iain; Wils, Tommy H. G.; Koprowski, Marcin; Eshetu, Zewdu; Loader, Neil J.

    2012-11-01

    We utilize a variety of climate datasets to examine impacts of two mechanisms on precipitation in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) during northern-hemisphere summer. First, surface-pressure gradients draw moist air toward the GHA from the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Congo Basin. Variability of the strength of these gradients strongly influences GHA precipitation totals and accounts for important phenomena such as the 1960s-1980s rainfall decline and devastating 1984 drought. Following the 1980s, precipitation variability became increasingly influenced by the southern tropical Indian Ocean (STIO) region. Within this region, increases in sea-surface temperature, evaporation, and precipitation are linked with increased exports of dry mid-tropospheric air from the STIO region toward the GHA. Convergence of dry air above the GHA reduces local convection and precipitation. It also produces a clockwise circulation response near the ground that reduces moisture transports from the Congo Basin. Because precipitation originating in the Congo Basin has a unique isotopic signature, records of moisture transports from the Congo Basin may be preserved in the isotopic composition of annual tree rings in the Ethiopian Highlands. A negative trend in tree-ring oxygen-18 during the past half century suggests a decline in the proportion of precipitation originating from the Congo Basin. This trend may not be part of a natural cycle that will soon rebound because climate models characterize Indian Ocean warming as a principal signature of greenhouse-gas induced climate change. We therefore expect surface warming in the STIO region to continue to negatively impact GHA precipitation during northern-hemisphere summer.

  2. Organochlorine contaminants in tissues of common bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus from the northeastern part of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Romanić, S Herceg; Holcer, D; Lazar, B; Klinčić, D; Mackelworth, P; Fortuna, C M

    2014-09-01

    Levels of 24 organochlorine compounds, including toxic mono-ortho PCB congeners, were determined in the organs and tissues (blubber, kidney, lung, muscle, liver, heart) of 13 common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) stranded between 2000 and 2005 in the northern part of the Croatian territorial waters of the Adriatic Sea. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found at higher concentrations in comparison with organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in all of the analyzed tissues. Sums of six indicator congeners (Σ6PCB) constituted around 50% of the total PCB amount, while PCB-153 and PCB-138 were found to have the highest concentrations. Among the seven investigated OCPs, p,p'-DDE was found at the highest concentrations. In blubber, mean values of 22,048 and 11,310ngg(-1) wet weight were determined for ΣPCB and ΣDDT, respectively. Much lower concentrations were found in muscle samples, followed by similar concentrations in kidneys, liver and heart, while the lowest levels of organochlorine contaminants were found in lungs. The results indicate that p,p'-DDT is still being introduced in the Mediterranean region. PCB concentrations are among the highest found in this region and toxicological assessments indicate that the health of this specie is at high risk.

  3. Can large scale surface circulation changes modulate the sea surface warming pattern in the Tropical Indian Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2016-06-01

    The increased rate of Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) surface warming has gained a lot of attention in the recent years mainly due to its regional climatic impacts. The processes associated with this increased surface warming is highly complex and none of the mechanisms in the past studies could comprehend the important features associated with this warming such as the negative trends in surface net heat fluxes and the decreasing temperature trends at thermocline level. In this work we studied a previously unexplored aspect, the changes in large scale surface circulation pattern modulating the surface warming pattern over TIO. We use ocean reanalysis datasets and a suit of Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) experiments to address this problem. Both reanalysis and OGCM reveal strengthening large scale surface circulation pattern in the recent years. The most striking feature is the intensification of cyclonic gyre circulation around the thermocline ridge in the southwestern TIO. The surface circulation change in TIO is mainly associated with the surface wind changes and the geostrophic response to sea surface height decrease in the western/southwestern TIO. The surface wind trends closely correspond to SST warming pattern. The strengthening mean westerlies over the equatorial region are conducive to convergence in the central and divergence in the western equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) resulting central warming and western cooling. The resulting east west SST gradient further enhances the equatorial westerlies. This positive feedback mechanism supports strengthening of the observed SST trends in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The cooling induced by the enhanced upwelling in the west is compensated to a large extent by warming due to reduction in mixed layer depth, thereby keeping the surface temperature trends in the west to weak positive values. The OGCM experiments showed that the wind induced circulation changes redistribute the excess heat received in the western

  4. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Hoell, Andrew; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Blade, Ileana; Liebmann, Brant; Roberts, Jason B.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    In southern Ethiopia, Eastern Kenya, and southern Somalia poor boreal spring rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers support disaster risk reduction while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent droughts to a stronger Walker Circulation, warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, and an increased western Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, we explore the dominant modes of East African rainfall variability, links between these modes and sea surface temperatures, and a simple index-based monitoring-prediction system suitable for drought early warning.

  5. Structure of the lithosphere of the northeastern part of the Indian Ocean according to results of two-dimensional structural-density modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, A. A.; Gilod, D. A.; Dubinin, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    From a gravitational field analysis, the lithosphere was regionalized and a structural schematic map of the eastern part of the Indian Ocean was compiled. The area adjacent to the western margin of Australia was studied. The region is characterized by a complex lithospheric structure. It includes heterogeneous blocks of varying age, framed by structures with different morphological and geophysical expression and varying genesis. To clarify the peculiarities of tectonic structures of various genetic types, structural-density modeling was performed. This made it possible to establish certain gravimetric indicators characteristic of structures of various genesis.

  6. Air-Sea and Lateral Exchange Processes in East Indian Coastal Current off Sri Lanka

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of which have a bearing on local air-sea fluxes. The project seeks to collect hydrographic data sets in the international waters (R/V Roger Revelle...and in Sri Lankan coastal waters (R/V Samuddrika). The measurements include thermohaline stratification, currents and the kinetic energy...conducted CTD and ADCP measurements in the southern BoB onboard R/V Roger Revelle and in Sri Lanka coastal waters using R/V Samuddrika. The data analysis

  7. Ingestion and defecation of marine debris by loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, from by-catches in the South-West Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Hoarau, Ludovic; Ainley, Lara; Jean, Claire; Ciccione, Stéphane

    2014-07-15

    Marine debris, caused by anthropogenic pollution, is a major problem impacting marine wildlife worldwide. This study documents and quantifies the ingestion and defecation of debris by 74 loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, in the South-West Indian Ocean. Debris was found in 51.4% of gut or fecal samples of loggerheads by-catch from Reunion Island long liners. Anthropogenic debris was ubiquitous in our samples with plastics accounting for 96.2% of the total debris collected. No significant relationship was detected between the characteristics of ingested debris and the biometric characteristics of loggerheads. The number, weight, volume and mean length of debris were higher in gut content of deceased loggerheads than in fecal samples of live turtles, but not significantly, except for the mean length. This is the first record of debris ingestion by sea turtles in the Indian Ocean and our results highlight the magnitude of this pollution of the marine environment.

  8. Physical and chemical properties of water and sediments, Grand Portage and Wauswaugoning Bays, Lake Superior, Grand Portage Indian Reservation, northeastern Minnesota, 1993-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a compilation of data on the physical and chemical properties of water and sediments in Grand Portage and Wauswaugoning Bays of Lake Superior along the shoreline of the Grand Portage Indian Reservation. The data were collected during 1993-96 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Grand Portage Indian Reservation. The data include: (1) temperature, pH, and specific conductance measurements and dissolved oxygen concentrations; (2) Secchi disk transparency, alkalinity, and turbidity measurements; (3) fecal Coliform and fecal Streptococcal bacteria colony counts (per 100 milliliters of sample water); (4) major and minor ion, nutrient, and trace-metal concentrations; (5) dissolved and suspended residue concentrations; (6) pesticide, phenol, and asbestos concentrations; (7) suspended sediment trace-metal concentrations; and (8) bottom sediment trace-metal concentrations. Water samples were collected from nine sites; suspended and bottom sediment samples were collected from five sites. The data in this report can be used to evaluate present water-quality conditions and as a reference to monitor potential long-term changes in these conditions.

  9. Sedimentary pigments and nature of organic matter within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (Indian margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasiq, K. T.; Kurian, S.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentary pigments, carbon and nitrogen content and their stable isotopes were studied in three short cores collected from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS). Nine pigments including chlorophyll a and their degradation products were quantified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Astaxanthin followed by canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin were the major carotenoids detected in these cores. The total pigment concentration was high in the core collected from 500 m water depth (6.5 μgg-1) followed by 800 m (1.7 μgg-1) and 1100 m (1.1 μgg-1) depths respectively. The organic carbon did not have considerable control on sedimentary pigments preservation. Pigment degradation was comparatively high in the core collected from the 800 m site which depended not only the bottom dissolved oxygen levels, but also on the faunal activity. As reported earlier, the bottom water dissolved oxygen and presence of fauna have good control on the organic carbon accumulation and preservation at Indian margin OMZ sediments. The C/N ratios and δ13C values for all the cores conclude the marine origin of organic matter and δ15N profiles revealed signature of upwelling associated denitrification within the water column.

  10. A preliminary assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in deep-sea sediments from the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhineng; Lin, Tian; Xu, Weihai; Xu, Yue; Li, Jun; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2015-05-15

    Ten surface sediments were collected from the open Indian Ocean at depths below 4000 m in 2011, for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The concentrations of Σ32 PCBs, Σ7 PBDEs, and BDE-209 were 120-514, 49-152, and 7-133 pg/g, respectively. These concentrations are close to the lowest values recorded in the global marine environment. The PCBs had a relatively uniform composition, and were dominated by low chlorinated congeners. The concentrations of di-, tri-, and tetra-PCBs were strongly correlated with the total organic carbon (TOC), suggesting the dissolved PCBs were derived from the atmosphere via diffusive air-water exchange, and absorbed by phytoplankton. A high proportion of BDE209 was only detected in the sediment of the low fan of the Ganga River. There were weak correlations between low brominated BDEs and TOC, implying the degradation of BDE209 is a possible source of lower-brominated BDEs in deep-sea sediments.

  11. Tectonic structure of Dokdo and adjacent area in the northeastern part of the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea using geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Jeong, E.; Park, C.; Kwon, B.; Park, G.; Park, J.

    2008-12-01

    The northeastern part of the Ulleung Basin in the East Sea is composed of volcanic islands (Ulleungdo and Dokdo), seamounts (the Anyongbok Seamount, the Simheungtaek and the Isabu Tablemounts), and a deep pathway (Korea Gap). To understand tectonic structure and geophysical characteristics of Dokdo and adjacent area, We analysed geophysical potential data of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute), KIGAM(Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources), and NORI(National Oceanographic Research Institute of Korea) around the Dokdo volcanic body except Ulleung Do because of empty data of its large island. Also, we eliminate the effect of water and sediments from the free-air gravity data to process 3D Moho depth inversion. 3D tectonic structure modelling of the study area was developed using Moho depth inversion result and sediment thickness data of NGDC(National Geophysical Data Center). The free-air gravity anomalies of the study area generally reflect bathymetric effects. Although the Dokdo seamounts have a similar topographic size, the decrease of free-air anomaly toward Isabu suggest that Isabu is oldest among the seaounts and have high degree of isostatic compensation. High Bouguer anomalies in the central part of the Ulleung Basin gradually decreases toward the Oki Bank. This feature suggests that the crust/mantle boundary is shallow in the central part of the Ulleung Basin. The complex magnetic pattern of Dokdo suggests that it might have erupted several times during its formation. The magnetic anomaly amplitude of Isabu is much smaller than that of Dokdo. Such low magnetic anomalies are attributed to a secondary change caused by the metamorphism or weathering of ferromagnetic minerals of the seamount during a long period of time after its formation. Analytic signals show high anomalous zones over volcanoes. Also, there are high analytic signal values in Korea Gap indicating magmatic intrusion in thick sediments. The power spectrum analysis

  12. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey maps and data, East Poplar Oil Field area, August 2004, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Cain, Michael J.; Tyrrell, Christa; Hill, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a data release for a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during August 2004 in a 275-square-kilometer area that includes the East Poplar oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic resistivity data were converted to six electrical conductivity grids, each representing different approximate depths of investigation. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. Areas of high conductivity in shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field area are being delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, in order to map areas of saline-water plumes. Ground electromagnetic methods were first used during the early 1990s to delineate more than 31 square kilometers of high conductivity saline-water plumes in a portion of the East Poplar oil field area. In the 10 years since the first delineation, the quality of water from some wells completed in the shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field changed markedly. The extent of saline-water plumes in 2004 likely differs from that delineated in the early 1990s. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies is being used by resource managers to develop ground-water resource plans for the area.

  13. Qualitative and Quantitative Saponin Contents in Five Sea Cucumbers from the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents. PMID:20161976

  14. Qualitative and quantitative saponin contents in five sea cucumbers from the Indian ocean.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Séverine; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-01-21

    To avoid predation, holothuroids produce feeding-deterrent molecules in their body wall and viscera, the so-called saponins. Five tropical sea cucumber species of the family Holothuriidae were investigated in order to study their saponin content in two different organs, the body wall and the Cuvierian tubules. Mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI- and ESI-MS) were used to detect and analyze saponins. The smallest number of saponins was observed in Holothuria atra, which contained a total of four congeners, followed by Holothuria leucospilota, Pearsonothuria graeffei and Actinopyga echinites with six, eight and ten congeners, respectively. Bohadschia subrubra revealed the highest saponin diversity (19 congeners). Saponin mixtures also varied between the two body compartments within a given animal. A semi-quantitative approach completed these results and showed that a high diversity of saponins is not particularly correlated to a high saponin concentration. Although the complexity of the saponin mixtures described makes the elucidation of their respective biological roles difficult, the comparisons between species and between body compartments give some clues about how these molecules may act as predator repellents.

  15. Inter-decadal changes in the East Asian summer monsoon and associations with sea surface temperature anomaly in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Wen, Zhiping; Wu, Renguang; Chen, Zesheng; Guo, Yuanyuan

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have revealed inter-decadal changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) that occurred around the late 1970s and early 1990s, respectively. The present study compares characteristics of these two changes and analyzes plausible influences of the South Indian Ocean (SIO) sea surface temperature (SST) change. The two changes share pronounced common features, characterized by an equivalent barotropic circulation anomaly over northern East Asia and a meridional vertical overturning circulation over the tropical region. Meanwhile, they display some distinct characteristics, especially over the tropics. The circumfluent anomalies are more robust for the first change than for the second one. Related amplitude asymmetry is partly attributed to a weakening trend in the EASM. Moreover, SST change in the SIO, featuring a decadal warming since the 1980s and a cooling after 1993, may contribute to both of these inter-decadal changes. Cold SST anomaly induces anomalous mid-tropospheric descent over the western SIO and ascent extending from the eastern SIO to western Australia and over the equatorial Indian Ocean. The accompanying upper-tropospheric divergent flows from western Australia and equatorial Indian Ocean to the Philippines lead to anomalous descent and an anomalous lower-tropospheric anticyclone over the South China Sea-Philippines. Warm SST anomaly induces opposite changes in above regions. The possible influence of SST anomaly in the SIO is further confirmed by numerical experiments.

  16. Diversity, Biogeography, and Biodegradation Potential of Actinobacteria in the Deep-Sea Sediments along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Limin; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Dai, Xin; Liu, Li; Xi, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhu, Yaxin; Huang, Li; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria has been reported to be common or even abundant in deep marine sediments, however, knowledge about the diversity, distribution, and function of actinobacteria is limited. In this study, actinobacterial diversity in the deep sea along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) was investigated using both 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and culture-based methods. The samples were collected at depths of 1662–4000 m below water surface. Actinobacterial sequences represented 1.2–9.1% of all microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences in each sample. A total of 5 actinobacterial classes, 17 orders, 28 families, and 52 genera were detected by pyrosequencing, dominated by the classes Acidimicrobiia and Actinobacteria. Differences in actinobacterial community compositions were found among the samples. The community structure showed significant correlations to geochemical factors, notably pH, calcium, total organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, rather than to spatial distance at the scale of the investigation. In addition, 176 strains of the Actinobacteria class, belonging to 9 known orders, 18 families, and 29 genera, were isolated. Among these cultivated taxa, 8 orders, 13 families, and 15 genera were also recovered by pyrosequencing. At a 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the pyrosequencing data encompassed 77.3% of the isolates but the isolates represented only 10.3% of the actinobacterial reads. Phylogenetic analysis of all the representative actinobacterial sequences and isolates indicated that at least four new orders within the phylum Actinobacteria were detected by pyrosequencing. More than half of the isolates spanning 23 genera and all samples demonstrated activity in the degradation of refractory organics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polysaccharides, suggesting their potential ecological functions and biotechnological applications for carbon recycling. PMID:27621725

  17. Diversity, Biogeography, and Biodegradation Potential of Actinobacteria in the Deep-Sea Sediments along the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Limin; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Dai, Xin; Liu, Li; Xi, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhu, Yaxin; Huang, Li; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria has been reported to be common or even abundant in deep marine sediments, however, knowledge about the diversity, distribution, and function of actinobacteria is limited. In this study, actinobacterial diversity in the deep sea along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) was investigated using both 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and culture-based methods. The samples were collected at depths of 1662-4000 m below water surface. Actinobacterial sequences represented 1.2-9.1% of all microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences in each sample. A total of 5 actinobacterial classes, 17 orders, 28 families, and 52 genera were detected by pyrosequencing, dominated by the classes Acidimicrobiia and Actinobacteria. Differences in actinobacterial community compositions were found among the samples. The community structure showed significant correlations to geochemical factors, notably pH, calcium, total organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, rather than to spatial distance at the scale of the investigation. In addition, 176 strains of the Actinobacteria class, belonging to 9 known orders, 18 families, and 29 genera, were isolated. Among these cultivated taxa, 8 orders, 13 families, and 15 genera were also recovered by pyrosequencing. At a 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the pyrosequencing data encompassed 77.3% of the isolates but the isolates represented only 10.3% of the actinobacterial reads. Phylogenetic analysis of all the representative actinobacterial sequences and isolates indicated that at least four new orders within the phylum Actinobacteria were detected by pyrosequencing. More than half of the isolates spanning 23 genera and all samples demonstrated activity in the degradation of refractory organics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polysaccharides, suggesting their potential ecological functions and biotechnological applications for carbon recycling.

  18. Role of the Indian Ocean sea surface temperature in shaping the natural variability in the flow of Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siam, Mohamed S.; Wang, Guiling; Demory, Marie-Estelle; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2014-08-01

    A significant fraction of the inter-annual variability in the Nile River flow is shaped by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Here, we investigate a similar role for the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperature (SST) in shaping the inter-annual variability of the Nile River flow. Using observations of global SST distribution and river flow in addition to atmospheric general circulation model sensitivity experiments, we show that North and Middle IO SSTs play a significant intermediate role in the teleconnection between ENSO and the Nile flow. Applying partial coherency analyses, we demonstrate that the connection between North and Middle IO SSTs and Nile flow is strongly coupled to ENSO. During El Niño events, SST in the North and Middle IO increases in response to the warming in the Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean and forces a Gill-type circulation with enhanced westerly low-level flow over East Africa and the Western IO. This anomalous low-level flow enhances the low-level flux of air and moisture away from the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) basin resulting in reduction of rainfall and river flow. SSTs in the South IO also play a significant role in shaping the variability of the Nile flow that is independent from ENSO. A warming over the South IO, generates a cyclonic flow in the boundary layer, which reduces the cross-equatorial meridional transport of air and moisture towards the UBN basin, favoring a reduction in rainfall and river flow. This independence between the roles of ENSO and South IO SSTs allows for development of new combined indices of SSTs to explain the inter-annual variability of the Nile flow. The proposed teleconnections have important implications regarding mechanisms that shape the regional impacts of climate change over the Nile basin.

  19. Brevibacterium sediminis sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea sediments from the Carlsberg and Southwest Indian Ridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Jian; Ruan, Jisheng; Han, Xiqiu; Huang, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Three actinobacterial strains, FXJ8.128, FXJ8.269T and FXJ8.309, were isolated from deep-sea sediments collected from the Carlsberg Ridge and Southwest Indian Ridge at depths of 3690, 1800 and 2461 m, respectively. The three strains had highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences (99.8-99.9 % identities) and formed a monophyletic clade within the Brevibacterium 16S rRNA gene tree, showing 98.2-98.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identities with type strains Brevibacterium epidermidis NCIMB 702286T, Brevibacterium iodinum DSM 20626T, Brevibacterium linens DSM 20425T, Brevibacterium oceani BBH7T and Brevibacterium permense VKM Ac-2280T. All three isolates showed activity towards the breakdown of pectin and fluoranthene. They contained MK-8(H2) as the most predominant menaquinone, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and a glycolipd as the main polar lipids, and anteiso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0 as the major cellular fatty acids. Moreover, the three isolates were distinguished readily from the phylogenetically related type strains by DNA-DNA hybridization values, by random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprint profiles and by a range of physiological and biochemical characteristics. On the basis of the above polyphasic taxonomic data, strains FXJ8.128, FXJ8.269T and FXJ8.309 represent a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium, for which the name Brevibacterium sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FXJ8.269T (=CGMCC 1.15472T=DSM 102229T).

  20. Living (Rose-Bengal-stained) benthic foraminiferal faunas along a strong bottom-water oxygen gradient on the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulle, C.; Mojtahid, M.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F. J.; Kitazato, H.

    2015-08-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained foraminiferal assemblages (> 150 μm) were analysed along a five-station bathymetric transect across the core and the lower part of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores were collected using the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during the RV Yokosuka cruise YK08-11 in the post-monsoon season (October 2008) at water depths ranging from 535 to 2000 m, along a gradient from almost anoxic to well-oxygenated (0.3 to 108 μM) bottom waters. Stained benthic foraminifera were investigated from two different size fractions (150-300 μm and > 300 μm). Stained foraminiferal densities were very high in the core of the OMZ (at 535 and 649 m) and decreased at deeper sites. The faunas (> 150 μm) were dominated (40-80 %) by non-calcareous taxa at all stations. These were mainly species of Reophax and Lagenammina but also included delicate monothalamous taxa (organic-walled "allogromiids", agglutinated saccamminids, psammosphaerids and tubular forms). These new data from the Indian margin are compared to previous studies from the Murray Ridge, the Pakistan margin and the Oman margin. The fact that similar species were found at sites with comparable bottom-water oxygen concentrations but with very different surface water productivity suggests that, within the strongly developed Arabian Sea OMZ, bottom-water oxygen concentration, and not the organic flux to the sea floor, is the main factor controlling the species composition of the foraminiferal communities. Several foraminiferal species (e.g. Praeglobobulimina sp. 1, Ammodiscus sp. 1, Bolivina aff. dilatata) were confined to the core of the OMZ. These species are presently known only from the Arabian Sea. Because of their association with extremely low oxygen concentrations, these species may be good markers for very low oxygen concentrations, and could be used to reconstruct past OMZ variability in the Arabian Sea.

  1. Living (Rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminiferal faunas along a strong bottom-water oxygen gradient on the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulle, C.; Mojtahid, M.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F. J.; Kitazato, H.

    2015-02-01

    Rose Bengal stained foraminiferal assemblages were analysed along a five-station bathymetric transect across the core and the lower part of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores were collected using the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during RV Yokosuka cruise YK08-11 in the post-monsoon season (October 2008) at water depths ranging from 535 to 2000 m, along a gradient from almost anoxic to well-oxygenated (0.3 to 108 μM) bottom waters. Stained foraminiferal densities were very high in the OMZ core (535 m) and decreased with depth. The faunas were dominated (40-80%) by non-calcareous taxa at all stations. These were mainly species of Reophax and Lagenammina but also included delicate monothalamous taxa (organic-walled "allogromiids", agglutinated saccamminids, psammosphaerids and tubular forms). These new data from the Indian margin are compared to previous studies from the Murray Ridge, the Pakistan margin and the Oman margin. The fact that similar species were found at sites with comparable bottom-water oxygen concentrations but with very different surface water productivity suggests that, within the strongly developed Arabian Sea OMZ, bottom-water oxygen concentration, and not the organic flux to the sea floor, is the main factor controlling the species composition of the foraminiferal communities. Several foraminiferal species (e.g. Praeglobobulimina sp. 1, Ammodiscus sp. 1, Bolivina aff. dilatata) were confined to the core of the OMZ and are presently known only from the Arabian Sea. Because of their association with extremely low-oxygen concentration, these species may prove to be good indicators of past OMZ variability in the Arabian Sea.

  2. Gradual and small decrease of glacial sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, Marie; Malaize, Bruno; Bassinot, Franck; Caillon, Nicolas; Degaridel-Thoron, Thibault; Rebaubier, Hélène; Charlier, Karine; Caley, Thibaut; Marieu, Vincent; Beaufort, Luc; Rojas, Virginia; Meynadier, Laure; Valet, Jean Pierre; Reaud, Yvan

    2015-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), between about 1.2 and 0.7 Ma, is characterized by the emergence of asymmetric, high-amplitude 100 ka cycles, which contrast with the low amplitude, 41 kyr cycles that dominate the early Pleistocene climate. Here, we study the sediment core MD12-3409, which spans the last ~ 1.75 Ma, to document hydrographic changes across the MPT in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean. Stratigraphy is based on benthic foraminifera delta18O and we reconstruct Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) using the Mg/Ca ratio of Globigerinoides ruber, a surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera. Our results reveal a progressive cooling of glacial maxima across the MPT but no long-term trend in mean SST over the last 1.75 Ma. The main periodicity of the surface temperature signal shifts from 41 kyr before the MPT, to both 100 kyr and 41 kyr for the post MPT time period. Over the last 800 ka, the strong correlation between core MD12-3409 SST fluctuations and the atmospheric CO2 record suggests a global, greenhouse forcing for the tropical Indian SST over the post-MPT time period. Within the MPT, and for earlier time interval, changes in temperature gradients between our SST record and other temperature records in, or at the edge of, the Pacific Warm Pool, could suggest reorganizations of sea surface circulation and lateral heat exchanges. Since the MPT, the amplification of sea level lowering during glacial periods might have shoaled the Indonesian Through Flow (ITF) gateway, restricting hydrographic exchanges between Pacific and Indian oceans.

  3. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkuryev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate Nubia-Somalia rotations at ~1-Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr from newly available, high-resolution reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge and reconstructions of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The former rotations are based on many more data, extend farther back in time, and have more temporal resolution than has previously been the case. Nubia-Somalia plate motion has remained remarkably steady since 5.2 Ma. For example, at the northern end of the East Africa rift, our Nubia-Somalia plate motion estimates at six different times between 0.78 Ma and 5.2 Ma agree to within 3% with the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from the recently estimated Saria et al. (2014) GPS angular velocity. Over the past 10.6 Myr, the Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42±4 km of rift-normal extension across the northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift. This agrees with approximate minimum and maximum estimates of 40 km and 53 km for post-10.6-Myr extension from seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary and is also close to 55-km and 48±3 km estimates from published and our own reconstructions of the Nubia-Arabia and Somalia-Arabia seafloorspreading histories for the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level two previously published estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion based on inversions of Chron 5n.2 along the Southwest Indian Ridge, which predict rift-normal extensions of 13±14 km and 129±16 km across the Main Ethiopian Rift since 11 Ma. Constraints on Nubia-Somalia motion before ~15 Ma are weaker due to sparse coverage of pre-15-Myr magnetic reversals along the Nubia-Antarctic plate boundary, but appear to require motion before 15 Ma. Nubia-Somalia rotations that we estimate from a probabilistic analysis of geometric and age constraints from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden are consistent with those determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data, particularly for the past 11 Myr. Nubia

  4. The stability of gas hydrate field in the northeastern continental slope of Sakhalin Island, Sea of Okhotsk, as inferred from analysis of heat flow data and its implications for slope failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Jin, Y.; Baranov, B.; Obzhirov, A.; Salomatin, A.; Shoji, H.

    2012-12-01

    The sudden release of methane in shallow water due to ocean warming and/or sea level drop, leading to extensive mass wasting at continental margins, has been suggested as a possible cause of global climate change. In the northeastern continental slope of the Sakhalin Island (Sea of Okhotsk), numerous gas hydrate-related manifestations occur, including hydroacoustic anomaly (gas flare) in the water column, pockmarks and mounds on the seafloor, seepage structures and bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). The gas hydrate found at 385 mbsl represents the shallowest occurrence ever recorded in the Okhotsk Sea. In this study, we modeled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) using methane gas composition, water temperature and geothermal gradient to see if it is consistent with the observed depth of BSR. An important distinction can be made between the seafloor containing seepage features and normal seafloor in terms of their thermal structure. The depth of BSR matches well with the base of GHSZ estimated from the background heat flow (geothermal gradient). A large slope failure feature is found in the northern Sakhalin continental slope. We explore the possibility that this failure was caused by gas hydrate dissociation, based on the past climate change history and inference from the GHSZ modeling. Prediction of the natural landslide is difficult; however, new stratigraphic evidence from subbottom profiles suggests that the landslide occurred at 20 ka which is roughly consistent with the period of sea level drop during the Last Glacial Maximum. Furthermore, this region has witnessed a rapid sea water temperature increase (~0.6°C) in the last 50 years. If such a trend continues, additional slope failure can be expected in the near future in this region.

  5. The middle Holocene climatic records from Arabia: Reassessing lacustrine environments, shift of ITCZ in Arabian Sea, and impacts of the southwest Indian and African monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzel, Yehouda; Kushnir, Yochanan; Quade, Jay

    2015-06-01

    A dramatic increase in regional summer rainfall amount has been proposed for the Arabian Peninsula during the middle Holocene (ca. 9-5 ka BP) based on lacustrine sediments, inferred lake levels, speleothems, and pollen. This rainfall increase is considered primarily the result of an intensified Indian summer monsoon as part of the insolation-driven, northward shift of the boreal summer position of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to over the deserts of North Africa, Arabia, and northwest India. We examine the basis for the proposed drastic climate change in Arabia and the shifts in the summer monsoon rains, by reviewing paleohydrologic lacustrine records from Arabia. We evaluate and reinterpret individual lake-basin status regarding their lacustrine-like deposits, physiography, shorelines, fauna and flora, and conclude that these basins were not occupied by lakes, but by shallow marsh environments. Rainfall increase required to support such restricted wetlands is much smaller than needed to form and maintain highly evaporating lakes and we suggest that rainfall changes occurred primarily at the elevated edges of southwestern, southern, and southeastern Arabian Peninsula. These relatively small changes in rainfall amounts and local are also supported by pollen and speleothems from the region. The changes do not require a northward shift of the Northern Hemisphere summer ITCZ and intensification of the Indian monsoon rainfall. We propose that (a) latitudinal and slight inland expansion of the North African summer monsoon rains across the Red Sea, and (b) uplifted moist air of this monsoon to southwestern Arabia highlands, rather than rains associated with intensification of Indian summer monsoon, as proposed before, increased rains in that region; these African monsoon rains produced the modest paleo-wetlands in downstream hyperarid basins. Furthermore, we postulate that as in present-day, the ITCZ in the Indian Ocean remained at or near the equator all

  6. The role of northern Arabian Sea surface temperature biases in CMIP5 model simulations and future projections of Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Richard C.; Turner, Andrew G.; Marathayil, Deepthi; Martin, Gill M.

    2013-07-01

    Many climate models have problems simulating Indian summer monsoon rainfall and its variability, resulting in considerable uncertainty in future projections. Problems may relate to many factors, such as local effects of the formulation of physical parametrisation schemes, while common model biases that develop elsewhere within the climate system may also be important. Here we examine the extent and impact of cold sea surface temperature (SST) biases developing in the northern Arabian Sea in the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble, where such SST biases are shown to be common. Such biases have previously been shown to reduce monsoon rainfall in the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) by weakening moisture fluxes incident upon India. The Arabian Sea SST biases in CMIP5 models consistently develop in winter, via strengthening of the winter monsoon circulation, and persist into spring and summer. A clear relationship exists between Arabian Sea cold SST bias and weak monsoon rainfall in CMIP5 models, similar to effects in the MetUM. Part of this effect may also relate to other factors, such as forcing of the early monsoon by spring-time excessive equatorial precipitation. Atmosphere-only future time-slice experiments show that Arabian Sea cold SST biases have potential to weaken future monsoon rainfall increases by limiting moisture flux acceleration through non-linearity of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Analysis of CMIP5 model future scenario simulations suggests that such effects are small compared to other sources of uncertainty, although models with large Arabian Sea cold SST biases may suppress the range of potential outcomes for changes to future early monsoon rainfall.

  7. Genetic Population Structure of the Coral Reef Sea Star Linckia laevigata in the Western Indian Ocean and Indo-West Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The coral reef sea star Linckia laevigata is common on shallow water coral reefs of the Indo-West Pacific. Its large geographic distribution and comprehensive data from previous studies makes it suitable to examine genetic differentiation and connectivity over large geographical scales. Based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene this study investigates the genetic population structure and connectivity of L. laevigata in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) and compares it to previous studies in the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago (IMPA). A total of 138 samples were collected from nine locations in the WIO. AMOVA revealed a low but significant ΦST-value of 0.024 for the WIO populations. In the hierarchical AMOVA, the following grouping rejected the hypothesis of panmixia: (1) Kenya (Watamu, Mombasa, Diani) and Tanzanian Island populations (Misali and Jambiani) and (2) the rest of the WIO sites (mainland Tanzania and Madagascar; ΦCT = 0.03). The genetic population structure was stronger and more significant (ΦST = 0.13) in the comparative analysis of WIO and IMPA populations. Three clades were identified in the haplotype network. The strong genetic differentiation (ΦCT = 0.199, P < 0.001) suggests that Indo-West Pacific populations of L. laevigata can be grouped into four biogeographic regions: (1) WIO (2) Eastern Indian Ocean (3) IMPA and (4) Western Pacific. The findings of this study support the existence of a genetic break in the Indo-West Pacific consistent with the effect of lowered sea level during the Pleistocene, which limited gene flow between the Pacific and Indian Ocean. PMID:27798700

  8. Genetic Population Structure of the Coral Reef Sea Star Linckia laevigata in the Western Indian Ocean and Indo-West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Otwoma, Levy Michael; Kochzius, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The coral reef sea star Linckia laevigata is common on shallow water coral reefs of the Indo-West Pacific. Its large geographic distribution and comprehensive data from previous studies makes it suitable to examine genetic differentiation and connectivity over large geographical scales. Based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene this study investigates the genetic population structure and connectivity of L. laevigata in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) and compares it to previous studies in the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago (IMPA). A total of 138 samples were collected from nine locations in the WIO. AMOVA revealed a low but significant ΦST-value of 0.024 for the WIO populations. In the hierarchical AMOVA, the following grouping rejected the hypothesis of panmixia: (1) Kenya (Watamu, Mombasa, Diani) and Tanzanian Island populations (Misali and Jambiani) and (2) the rest of the WIO sites (mainland Tanzania and Madagascar; ΦCT = 0.03). The genetic population structure was stronger and more significant (ΦST = 0.13) in the comparative analysis of WIO and IMPA populations. Three clades were identified in the haplotype network. The strong genetic differentiation (ΦCT = 0.199, P < 0.001) suggests that Indo-West Pacific populations of L. laevigata can be grouped into four biogeographic regions: (1) WIO (2) Eastern Indian Ocean (3) IMPA and (4) Western Pacific. The findings of this study support the existence of a genetic break in the Indo-West Pacific consistent with the effect of lowered sea level during the Pleistocene, which limited gene flow between the Pacific and Indian Ocean.

  9. Geology of northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collier, Arthur J.

    1919-01-01

    A large region in northeastern Montana has never been thoroughly explored by geologists, owing to the fact that it is a part of the Great Plains and the belief that it is too monotonous and uninteresting to tempt anyone to turn aside from the pronounced geologic features a little farther west, for which Montana is noted. This region includes parts of Sheridan, Valley, Phillips, and Blaine counties. Its investigation was begun by Smith in 1908, when he made a geologic survey of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Beekly explored a strip of land along the Montana-North Dakota line from Missouri River to the international boundary, and Bauer examined the townships in which Plentywood and Scobey are situated. Their results are here included with those of the writer, who during the field seasons of 1915 and 1916 was engaged in an investigation of the lignite resources of the remainder of this region, which extends from a line within 12 miles of the Montana-North Dakota boundary westward about 200 miles.

  10. Basin-wide modification of dynamical and biogeochemical processes by the positive phase of the Indian Ocean dipole during the SeaWiFS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggert, Jerry D.; Vialard, Jérôme; Behrenfeld, Michael J.

    Characterizing how the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) modifies typical basin-wide dynamical variability has been vigorously pursued over the past decade. Along with this dynamic response, a clear biological impact has been revealed in the ocean color data acquired by remote sensing platforms such as Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS). The signature feature illustrating IOD alteration of typical spatiotemporal chlorophyll variability is the phytoplankton bloom that first appears in September along the eastern boundary of the IO in tropical waters that are normally highly oligotrophic. Positive chlorophyll anomalies (CLa) are also apparent in the southeastern Bay of Bengal, while negative anomalies are observed over much of the Arabian Sea. Moreover, in situ measurements obtained by the R/V Suroit as part of the Cirene cruise during the 2006/2007 IOD reveal anomalous subsurface biochemical distributions in the southern tropical IO that are not reflected in SeaWiFS data. Despite the clear basin-wide influence of IOD events on biological variability, the accompanying influence on biogeochemical cycling that must occur has received little attention. Here, the dynamical signatures apparent in remote sensing fields for the two positive-phase IODs of the SeaWiFS era are used to illuminate how these events are similar or distinct. A corresponding comparison of IOD-engendered surface CLa is performed, with the dynamical fields providing the framework for interpreting the mechanisms underlying the biological response. Then, results from a newly developed net primary production algorithm are presented that provide the first characterization of how biogeochemical fluxes throughout the IO are altered by IOD occurrence

  11. High-resolution estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion since 20 Ma from reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-10-01

    Large gaps and inconsistencies remain in published estimates of Nubia-Somalia plate motion based on reconstructions of seafloor spreading data around Africa. Herein, we use newly available reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge at ˜1-Myr intervals since 20 Ma to estimate Nubia-Somalia plate motion farther back in time than previously achieved and with an unprecedented degree of temporal resolution. At the northern end of the East African rift, our new estimates of Nubia-Somalia motion for six times from 0.78 Ma to 5.2 Ma differ by only 2 per cent from the rift-normal component of motion that is extrapolated from a recently estimated GPS angular velocity. The rate of rift-normal extension thus appears to have remained steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that the two plates have moved relative to each other since at least 16 Ma and possibly longer. Motion has either been steady since at least 16 Ma or accelerated modestly between 6 and 5.2 Ma. Our Nubia-Somalia rotations predict 42.5 ± 3.8 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the well-studied, northern segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with 40-50 km estimates for extension since 10.6 Myr based on seismological surveys of this narrow part of the plate boundary. Nubia-Somalia rotations are also derived by combining newly estimated Somalia-Arabia rotations that reconstruct the post-20-Ma opening of the Gulf of Aden with Nubia-Arabia rotations estimated via a probabilistic analysis of plausible opening scenarios for the Red Sea. These rotations predict Nubia-Somalia motion since 5.2 Myr that is consistent with that determined from Southwest Indian Ridge data and also predict 40 ± 3 km of rift-normal extension since 10.6 Ma across the Main Ethiopian Rift, consistent with our 42.5 ± 3.8 km Southwest Indian Ridge estimate. Our new rotations exclude at high confidence level previous estimates of 12 ± 13 and 123 ± 14 km for rift-normal extensions across the Main

  12. Sediment transport on the inner shelf off Khao Lak (Andaman Sea, Thailand) during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and former storm events: evidence from foraminiferal transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milker, Y.; Wilken, M.; Schumann, J.; Sakuna, D.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.; Schmiedl, G.

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the benthic foraminiferal fauna from sediment event layers associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and former storms, that have been retrieved in short sediment cores from offshore environments of the Andaman Sea, off Khao Lak, western Thailand. Species composition and test preservation of the benthic foraminiferal faunas exhibit pronounced changes across the studied sections and provide information on the depositional history of the tsunami layer, particularly on the source water depth of the displaced foraminiferal tests. In order to obtain accurate bathymetric information on sediment provenance, we have mapped the distribution of modern faunas in non-tsunamigenic surface sediments and created a calibration data set for the development of a transfer function. Our quantitative reconstructions revealed that the re-suspension of sediment particles by the tsunami wave was restricted to a maximum water depth of approximately 20 m. Similar values were obtained for former storm events, thus impeding an easy distinction of different high-energy events.

  13. Sediment transport on the inner shelf off Khao Lak (Andaman Sea, Thailand) during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and former storm events: evidence from foraminiferal transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milker, Y.; Wilken, M.; Schumann, J.; Sakuna, D.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.; Schmiedl, G.

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the benthic foraminiferal fauna from sediment event layers associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and former storms that have been retrieved in short sediment cores from offshore environments of the Andaman Sea, off Khao Lak, western Thailand. Species composition and test preservation of the benthic foraminiferal faunas exhibit pronounced changes across the studied sections and provide information on the depositional history of the tsunami layer, particularly on the source water depth of the displaced foraminiferal tests. In order to obtain accurate bathymetric information on sediment provenance, we have mapped the distribution of modern faunas in non-tsunamigenic surface sediments and created a calibration data set for the development of a transfer function. Our quantitative reconstructions revealed that the resuspension of sediment particles by the tsunami wave was restricted to a maximum water depth of approximately 20 m. Similar values were obtained for former storm events, thus impeding an easy distinction of different high-energy events.

  14. High connectivity of animal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields in the Central Indian Ridge relevant to its geological setting.

    PubMed

    Beedessee, Girish; Watanabe, Hiromi; Ogura, Tomomi; Nemoto, Suguru; Yahagi, Takuya; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kentaro; Takai, Ken; Koonjul, Meera; Marie, Daniel E P

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal ability plays a key role in the maintenance of species in spatially and temporally discrete niches of deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. On the basis of population genetic analyses in the eastern Pacific vent fields, dispersal of animals in the mid-oceanic ridge systems generally appears to be constrained by geographical barriers such as trenches, transform faults, and microplates. Four hydrothermal vent fields (the Kairei and Edmond fields near the Rodriguez Triple Junction, and the Dodo and Solitaire fields in the Central Indian Ridge) have been discovered in the mid-oceanic ridge system of the Indian Ocean. In the present study, we monitored the dispersal of four representative animals, Austinograea rodriguezensis, Rimicaris kairei, Alviniconcha and the scaly-foot gastropods, among these vent fields by using indirect methods, i.e., phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. For all four investigated species, we estimated potentially high connectivity, i.e., no genetic difference among the populations present in vent fields located several thousands of kilometers apart; however, the direction of migration appeared to differ among the species, probably because of different dispersal strategies. Comparison of the intermediate-spreading Central Indian Ridge with the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed the presence of relatively high connectivity in the intermediate- and slow-spreading ridge systems. We propose that geological background, such as spreading rate which determines distance among vent fields, is related to the larval dispersal and population establishment of vent-endemic animal species, and may play an important role in controlling connectivity among populations within a biogeographical province.

  15. Variability of remote sensing reflectance and implications for optical remote sensing-A study along the eastern and northeastern waters of Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Harilal B.; Lotliker, Aneesh A.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Nayak, Shailesh R.

    2006-08-01

    Situated in the eastern and northeastern regions and subjected to similar oceanic processes, the inshore waters north of 20°N and east of 65°E are more optically complex than the offshore waters and waters south of 20°N and east of 65°E. This has been observed through the analysis of variations of the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs(λ)) in the optical spectrum of Electromagnetic radiation. The optical complexity has further been studied through the examination of optically active substances (OAS) such as chlorophyll_a, suspended sediment and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). It is found that CDOM is the significant component in making the area optically non-linear. For the first time multi-spatial/temporal band-ratio algorithms are developed to map OAS from these waters through Ocean Colour Monitor flown on IRS - P4 satellite.

  16. Factors affecting the occurrence and transport of atmospheric organochlorines in the China Sea and the northern Indian and South East Atlantic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Rosalinda; Li, Jun; Schuster, Jasmin; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong; Spiro, Baruch; Bhatia, Ravinder S; Dachs, Jordi; Jones, Kevin C

    2012-09-18

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are reported in 97 air samples collected on board the RV Polarstern in November 2007 from the equator to Cape Town, South Africa and the MV Oceanic II (The Scholar Ship) in January-March 2008 from Shanghai, China to Cape Verde in the Central Atlantic Ocean. The atmospheric concentrations were higher close to the coast and lower in remote regions of the Indian and South Atlantic Ocean. Groups of samples were selected in the South China Sea, Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean where the relative wind direction matched the trajectory of the ship, thus all the samples had the same input of sources upwind. In these three regions the concentrations of OCPs and PCBs declined during atmospheric transport following first order kinetics. These sets of measurements provided estimates of field derived residence times (FDRTs) for individual compounds. These values were compared with predicted atmospheric residence times (PARTs) computed using a model of long-range atmospheric transport potential of POPs. The FDRTs are 5-10 times longer for the more volatile PCB congeners and TC, CC, p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE than the respective PARTs, while they are similar to PARTs for the less volatile compounds. Possible causes of discrepancies between PARTs and FDRTs are discussed, and revolatilization from the ocean surface seems to be the main cause for the higher values of FDRTs of the more volatile compounds in comparison with the respective PARTs.

  17. Archaea Dominate the Ammonia-Oxidizing Community in Deep-Sea Sediments of the Eastern Indian Ocean—from the Equator to the Bay of Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Kan, Jinjun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xia, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xuecheng; Qian, Gang; Miao, Yanyi; Leng, Xiaoyun; Sun, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) oxidize ammonia to nitrite, and therefore play essential roles in nitrification and global nitrogen cycling. To better understand the population structure and the distribution of AOA and AOB in the deep Eastern Indian Ocean (EIO), nine surface sediment samples (>3,300 m depth) were collected during the inter-monsoon Spring 2013. One sediment sample from the South China Sea (SCS; 2,510 m) was also included for comparison. The community composition, species richness, and diversity were characterized by clone libraries (total 1,238 clones), and higher diversity of archaeal amoA genes than bacterial amoA genes was observed in all analyzed samples. Real time qPCR analysis also demonstrated higher abundances (gene copy numbers) of archaeal amoA genes than bacterial amoA genes, and the ratios of AOA/AOB ranged from 1.42 to 8.49 among sites. In addition, unique and distinct clades were found in both reconstructed AOA and AOB phylogeny, suggesting the presence of niche-specific ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in the EIO. The distribution pattern of both archaeal and bacterial amoA genes revealed by NMDS (non-metric multidimensional scaling) showed a distinct geographic separation of the sample from the SCS and most of the samples from the EIO following nitrogen gradients. Higher abundance and diversity of archaeal amoA genes indicated that AOA may play a more important role than AOB in the deep Indian Ocean. Environmental parameters shaping the distribution pattern of AOA were different from that of AOB, indicating distinct metabolic characteristics and/or adaptation mechanisms between AOA and AOB in the EIO, especially in deep-sea environments. PMID:28360898

  18. Checklist of Recent thecideoid brachiopods from the Indian Ocean and Red Sea, with a description of a new species of Thecidellina from Europa Island and a re-description of T. blochmanni Dall from Christmas Island.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alan; Hoffmann, Jana; Lüter, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Compilation of a checklist of Recent thecideoid brachiopods from the Indian Ocean and Red Sea indicates that members of this superfamily are represented by a small number of species. The subfamily Lacazellinae is represented by Ospreyella maldiviana from the Maldive Islands but the presence of Lacazella cannot yet be confirmed in the Indian Ocean as the holotype of Lacazella mauritiana from Mauritius is lost. The subfamily Thecidellininae is represented by Thecidellina blochmanni from Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean and the Red Sea while a new species T. europa is here described from Europa Island in the Mozambique Channel. The subfamily Minutellinae is represented by Minutella minuta from Samper Bank and Walters Bank in the south-western Indian Ocean and in the Red Sea. Since the holotype of Thecidellina blochmanni from Flying Fish Cove, Christmas Island is also lost, this species is re-described and illustrated mainly from topotypes in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, from which a suggested neotype has been selected.

  19. The spatial distribution and potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) over the Asian marginal seas and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Li, Jun; Gioia, Rosalinda; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiang-Dong; Spiro, Baruch; Bhatia, Ravinder S.; Jones, Kevin C.

    2012-04-01

    Gaseous and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in air samples taken on a voyage of the Scholar Ship from January 16th to March 14th, 2008. Samples were taken from the Asian marginal seas and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, providing an opportunity to assess spatial trends and potential sources of atmospheric PAHs over those oceans. The results show that continental sources were still responsible for some high concentrations of PAHs measured over the oceans. The Σ15PAHs in the gaseous phase were elevated on the approach to China and India, while the highest Σ15PAHs in the particulate phase were found at Chennai Harbor and close to Guinea. The high proportion of fluorene in the gas phase over the East and South China Sea could be a marker of coal and coke related combustion emission from Mainland China. The elevated high-molecular-weight PAHs in particles close to Guinea might be related to biomass burning in Africa. These results are consistent with previous PAH emission inventories and highlight the potential impact of continental PAH sources in China, India and Africa on the adjacent marine atmosphere.

  20. Nutrient enrichment and precipitation changes do not enhance resiliency of salt marshes to sea level rise in the Northeastern U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the U.S. Northeast, salt marshes are exceptionally vulnerable to the effects of accelerated sea level rise as compensatory mechanisms relying on positive feedbacks between inundation and sediment deposition are insufficient to counter inundation increases in low turbidity tida...

  1. Joint influence of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool and Northern Arabian Sea Temperatures on the Indian Summer Monsoon in a Global Climate Model Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befort, Daniel J.; Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Proxy-based studies confirmed that the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) shows large variations during the Holocene. These changes might be explained by changes in orbital conditions and solar insolation but are also thought to be associated to changes in oceanic conditions, e.g. over the Indo-Pacific-Warm-Pool region. However, due to the nature of these (proxy-based) analyses no conclusion about atmospheric circulation changes during dry and wet epochs are possible. Here, a fully-coupled global climate simulation (AOGCM) covering the past 6000 years is analysed regarding ISM variability. Several dry and wet epochs are found, the most striking around 2ka BP (dry) and 1.7ka BP (wet). As only orbital parameters change during integration, we expect these "shorter-term" changes to be associated with changes in oceanic conditions. During 1.7ka BP the sea surface temperatures (SST) over the Northern Arabian Sea (NARAB) are significantly warmer compared to 2ka BP, whereas cooler conditions are found over the western Pacific Ocean. Additionally, significant differences are found over large parts of the North Atlantic. To explain in how far these different ocean basins are responsible for anomalous conditions during 1.7ka BP, several sensitivity experiments with changed SST/SIC conditions are carried out. It is found that neither the SST's in the Pacific nor in the Indian Ocean are able to reproduce the anomalous rainfall and atmospheric circulation patterns during 1.7ka on its own. Instead, anomalous dry conditions during 2ka BP and wet conditions during 1.7ka BP are associated with a shift of the Indo-Pacific-Warm-Pool (IPWP) and simultaneous anomalous sea-surface temperatures over the NARAB region. Eventually, it is tested in how far this hypothesis holds true for other dry and wet events in the AOGCM data during the whole 6000 years. In general, a shift of the IPWP without anomalous SST conditions over the NARAB region (and vice versa) is not sufficient to cause long

  2. Iridium in sediments containing large abundances of Australasian microtektites from DSDP hole 758B in the Eastern Indian Ocean and from DSDP hole 769A in the Sulu Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gerhard; Zhou, Lei; Wasson, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Excess Ir found in sediments at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary and in other (e.g., Pliocene) sediments from deep sea drilling cores is widely interpreted as evidence of major impact events. The Australasian tektites originated in an impact event approximately 0.77 Ma ago; microtektites have been found in deep-sea sediment cores from throughout the Indian Ocean, the Philippine Sea, and western Pacific Ocean, but Ir has not been previously reported in these horizons. The deep-sea record of tektites is of particular interest, because in contrast to most continental occurrences, the stratigraphy preserves the original depositional position. Recently several cores having exceptionally high contents of Australasian microtektites have been investigated, Glass and Wu found shocked quartz associated with the microtektites. We used neutron activation to determine concentrations of Ir and other elements in two cores bearing microtektites, one from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) hole 758B in the Eastern Indian Ocean and one from DSDP hole 769A in the Sulu Sea (near Mindanao, Philippines). The sedimentation age for the microtektite layers in core 758B lies between 0.73 - 0.78 Ma and agrees well with the mean laser-fusion Ar-40/Ar-39 age of Australasian tektites of 0.77 +/- 0.02 Ma by Izett et al. We are able to resolve a small positive Ir enhancement in 758B. Core 769A shows too much scatter to allow resolution of an Ir peak.

  3. The 26-day oscillation observed in the satellite sea surface temperature measurements in the equatorial western Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Pedro T. H.; O'Brien, James J.; Luther, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    A 26-d oscillation in SST data is observed in the western Indian Ocean, from 52 to 60 deg E and in the vicinity of the equator. The SST data used in this study are obtained from the NOAA 9 satellite and are for the years 1987 and 1988. This fluctuation of SST at a period near 26-d is found to be antisymmetric about the equator and is trapped within the equatorial waveguide latitude; furthermore, the variance decreases at a faster rate toward the equator than poleward. These characteristics are consistent with the latitudinal structure for the mixed Rossby-gravity (or Yanai) waves as predicted from linear wave theory. The temporal variation of this 26-d oscillation is most energetic during the summer season (July to September), with maximum values of 0.4 C and 0.8 C found during August of 1987 and 1988, respectively. This observation agrees with temporal variation of Yanai waves inferred from drifting buoy observations and numerical studies of the Indian Ocean. Thus it is concluded that the Yanai wave is responsible for the 26-d fluctuation observed in the SST data in this region.

  4. Melioidosis, Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rolim, Dionne Bezerra; Vilar, Dina Cortez Feitosa Lima; Sousa, Anastacio Queiroz; Miralles, Iracema Sampaio; Almeida de Oliveira, Diana Carmen; Harnett, Gerry; O'Reilly, Lyn; Howard, Kay; Sampson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Melioidosis was first recognized in northeastern Brazil in 2003. Confirmation of additional cases from the 2003 cluster in Ceará, more recent cases in other districts, environmental isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei, molecular confirmation and typing results, and positive serosurveillance specimens indicate that melioidosis is more widespread in northeastern Brazil than previously thought. PMID:16229782

  5. Possible impacts of spring sea surface temperature anomalies over South Indian Ocean on summer rainfall in Guangdong-Guangxi region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dachao; Guan, Zhaoyong; Huo, Liwei; Wang, Xudong

    2017-01-01

    Based on observational and reanalysis data for 1979-2015, the possible impacts of spring sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) over the South Indian Ocean on the inter-annual variations of summer rainfall in Guangdong and Guangxi Provinces (i.e., the Guangdong-Guangxi area, GG) were analysed in this study. The physical mechanism behind these impacts was explored. Two geographic regions over [65°E-95°E, 35°S-25°S] and [90°E-110°E, 20°S-5°S] were defined as the western pole region and the eastern pole region, respectively, for the GG summer precipitation (PGG)-related South Indian Ocean dipole SSTA pattern (R-SIODP). The difference between springtime SST anomalies averaged over the western pole region and that averaged over the eastern pole region was defined as the R-SIODP index. The correlation between the spring R-SIODP index and GG summer precipitation can reach up to 0.52. In the spring of positive R-SIODP anomaly, southerly winds over the western pole of the R-SIODP weaken, whereas the southeast trade winds over the eastern pole strengthen. By means of the wind-evaporation-SST feedback mechanism, the enhanced southeast trade winds can weaken the evaporation over the western pole of the R-SIODP and enhance the evaporation over the eastern pole. This results in a sustained positive SSTA in the western pole of the R-SIODP and a sustained negative SSTA in the eastern pole, whereby the distribution of the SSTAs maintains until summer. The SST dipole abnormally enhances the cross-equatorial airflow near 105°E, which intensifies the anomalous anti-cyclonic circulation over South China Sea at 850 hPa and simultaneously results in abnormal enhancement of water vapour transport to GG. Additionally, the SST dipole promotes abnormal divergence in the lower troposphere and abnormal convergence in the upper troposphere over the maritime continent (MC) region. Moreover, the low-level convergence in GG is enhanced, which results in abnormal enhancement of ascending

  6. Pleistocene volcaniclastic units from North-Eastern Sicily (Italy): new evidence for calc-alkaline explosive volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bella, Marcella; Italiano, Francesco; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Tripodo, Alessandro; Baldanza, Angela; Casella, Sergio; Pino, Paolo; Rasa', Riccardo; Russo, Selma

    2016-08-01

    A well-preserved volcaniclastic sequence crops out in Pleistocene marine sediments along the Tyrrhenian coastline of the Calabrian-Peloritani arc (Sicily, Italy), testifying the occurrence of Lower-Middle Pleistocene volcanic activity in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The presence of dominant highly vesicular and minor blocky glassy particles indicates that the volcanic clasts were originated by explosive events related to the ascent and violent emission of volatile-rich magmas accompanied by and/or alternated with hydromagmatic fragmentation due to magma-sea water interaction. Field investigations and sedimentological features of the studied volcaniclastic units suggest a deposition from sediment-water density flows. The chemical classification of the pumice clasts indicates prevalent rhyolitic and dacitic compositions with calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline affinity. The geochemical features of immobile trace elements together with the presence of orthopyroxene are indicative of a provenance from an arc-type environment. The age (from 980-910 to 589 ka), the chemical composition and the evidence of subaerial explosive volcanic activity constrain the origin nature and temporal evolution of the arc-type volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian domain. Finally, the new information here provided contribute to a better understanding of the temporal geodynamic evolution of this sector of the Mediterranean domain.

  7. Demography of a deep-sea lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) caught in trawl fisheries of the northeastern Atlantic: Application of Leslie matrices with incorporated uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rui; Alpizar-Jara, Russell; Erzini, Karim

    2015-05-01

    The deep-sea lantern shark Etmopterus spinax occurs in the northeast Atlantic on or near the bottoms of the outer continental shelves and slopes, and is regularly captured as bycatch in deep-water commercial fisheries. Given the lack of knowledge on the impacts of fisheries on this species, a demographic analysis using age-based Leslie matrices was carried out. Given the uncertainties in the mortality estimates and in the available life history parameters, several different scenarios, some incorporating stochasticity in the life history parameters (using Monte Carlo simulation), were analyzed. If only natural mortality were considered, even after introducing uncertainties in all parameters, the estimated population growth rate (λ) suggested an increasing population. However, if fishing mortality from trawl fisheries is considered, the estimates of λ either indicated increasing or declining populations. In these latter cases, the uncertainties in the species reproductive cycle seemed to be particularly relevant, as a 2-year reproductive cycle indicated a stable population, while a longer (3-year cycle) indicated a declining population. The estimated matrix elasticities were in general higher for the survivorship parameters of the younger age classes and tended to decrease for the older ages. This highlights the susceptibility of this deep-sea squaloid to increasing fishing mortality, emphasizing that even though this is a small-sized species, it shows population dynamics patterns more typical of the larger-sized and in general more vulnerable species.

  8. Bacterial community shift is induced by dynamic environmental parameters in a changing coastal ecosystem (northern Adriatic, northeastern Mediterranean Sea)--a 2-year time-series study.

    PubMed

    Tinta, T; Vojvoda, J; Mozetič, P; Talaber, I; Vodopivec, M; Malfatti, F; Turk, V

    2015-10-01

    The potential link between the microbial dynamics and the environmental parameters was investigated in a semi-enclosed and highly dynamic coastal system (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea, NE Mediterranean Sea). Our comprehensive 2-year time-series study showed that despite the shallowness of this area, there was a significant difference between the surface and the bottom bacterial community structure. The bottom bacterial community was more diverse than the surface one and influenced by sediment re-suspension. The surface seawater temperature had a profound effect on bacterial productivity, while the bacterial community structure was more affected by freshwater-borne nutrients and phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton blooms caused an increase of Gammaproteobacteria (Alteromonadaceae, SAR86 and Vibrionaceae) and shift in dominance from SAR11 to Rhodobacteraceae taxon at the surface. Our results propose the importance of the water mass movements as drivers of freshwater-borne nutrients and of allochthonous microbial taxa. This study emphasizes the prediction power based on association networks analyses that are fed with long-term measurements of microbial and environmental parameters. These interaction maps offer valuable insights into the response of marine ecosystem to climate- and anthropogenic-driven stressors.

  9. Dissolved Fe(II) in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone and western tropical Indian Ocean during the inter-monsoon period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Moffett, James W.

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of iron(II) (Fe(II)) in seawater was investigated throughout the water column in the Arabian Sea and western tropical Indian Ocean including the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) as part of the 2009 Japanese GEOTRACES cruise using a luminol-chemiluminescence detection based flow injection analysis technique. A novel modification was the adjustment of the sample pH to 7.2 with a 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer to minimize Fe(II) oxidation during sampling. At stations in the Arabian Sea OMZ, Fe(II) had subsurface maxima in the oxygen-deficient and high nitrite layers; fully 7-29% of total dissolved Fe existed as Fe(II) in these samples. Subsurface Fe(II) maxima were not observed in stations south of the oxygen minimum zone. Within the OMZ, the distribution of Fe(II) resembled previous data obtained during the 2004 southwest monsoon, indicating that the Fe(II) maxima are seasonally and interannually persistent feature. These results confirm the close relationship between Fe(II) and the secondary nitrite maxima and suggest that the rich microbial community within this feature is closely involved with Fe redox cycling. Fe(II) concentrations near the seafloor were elevated in locations underlying the OMZ but nowhere else, possibly reflecting inputs from reducing sediments. To the south, a clear maximum in dissolved Fe from the Rodriguez Triple Junction hydrothermal system showed no evidence of Fe(II). The center location of the Rodriguez Triple Junction is 25° 35'S, 70° 00'E (Gamo et al., 2001), more than 800 km southwest of station ER10 (the closest station), so hydrothermally-derived Fe(II) was probably oxidized.

  10. Impact of air-sea coupling on the simulation of tropical cyclones in the North Indian Ocean using a simple 3-D ocean model coupled to ARW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Mohan, Greeshma M.; Naidu, C. V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the impact of air-sea coupling on tropical cyclone (TC) predictions is studied using a three-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel (3DPWP) ocean model coupled to the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting in six tropical storms in the North Indian Ocean, representing different intensities, seasonality, and varied oceanic conditions. A set of numerical experiments are conducted for each cyclone using sea surface temperature (SST) boundary conditions derived from Global Forecast System (GFS) SST, NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction SST, and ocean coupling (3DPWP). Significant differences and improvements are found in the predicted intensity and track in the simulations, in which the cyclones' impact on SST is included. It has been found that while the uncoupled model using GFS SST considerably overestimated the intensity as well as produced large track errors, the ocean coupling substantially improved the track and intensity predictions. The improvements with 3DPWP are because of simulating the ocean-atmosphere feedback in terms of deepening of ocean mixed layer, reduction in enthalpy fluxes, and storm-induced SST cooling as seen in observations. The coupled model could simulate the cold wake in SST, asymmetries in the surface winds, enthalpy fluxes, size, and structure of the storm in better agreement with observations than the uncoupled model. The coupled model reduced the track errors by roughly 0.3-39% and intensity errors by 29-47% at 24-96 h predictions by controlling the northward deviation of storms tracks by SST cooling and associated changes in the dynamics. The vorticity changes associated with horizontal advection and stretching terms affect the tracks of the storms in the three simulations.

  11. Voice Onset Time in Indian English-Accented Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Stine, Carolyn L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in voice onset time (VOT) between speakers of standard American English (AE) and Indian English (IE) in a continuous speech context. The participants were 20 AE speakers, who were native to the Northeastern Pennsylvania region, and 20 IE speakers from the Indian subcontinent who had…

  12. Understanding the life of a sandy beach polychaete of functional importance - Scolelepis squamata (Polychaeta: Spionidae) on Belgian sandy beaches (northeastern Atlantic, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speybroeck, Jeroen; Alsteens, Lotte; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2007-08-01

    The cosmopolitan sandy beach polychaete Scolelepis squamata constitutes an important food resource for juvenile flatfish and wading birds in the northeastern Atlantic, thus playing an important role in sandy beach ecosystem functioning. However, its population dynamics and life history in this part of the world have gone widely uninvestigated. Eight beach transects on Belgian sandy beaches were sampled monthly from October 2003 until October 2004, in order to investigate seasonal trends in the species' abundance, biomass, secondary production, and patterns in reproduction and zonation. Average density, modal density and modal biomass (ash-free dry weight) (mean average density = 169 ± 9 SE ind/m 2; mean modal density = 505 ± 38 SE ind/m 2; mean modal biomass = 0.25 ± 0.02 SE g/m 2) did not exhibit major seasonal changes, whereas average biomass (0.081 ± 0.005 SE g/m 2) and individuals and biomass per strip transect (IST = 16286 ± 1330 SE ind/m; BMST = 7.8 + 0.7 SE g/m) did, peaking in May 2004. Production was calculated at 1.9 g/(m 2*year) (size-frequency method, SFM) and 0.88 g/(m 2*year) (mass specific growth rate method, MSGR) and mean annual biomass was 0.797 g/m 2; resulting in a P/B ratio of 2.40/year (SFM) and 1.11/year (MSGR), which is intermediate to moderately low compared to other polychaete species. Gravid individuals were found from February until August and a single recruitment period was observed from July until September. An average sex ratio of 1.41 ± 0.08 SE was calculated, with a female predominance. Highest densities (>200 ind/m 2) were mostly found above 3 m above MLLWS and at a median grain size from 190 to 320 μm. Average modal or peak density along each transect was situated from 3.95 m up to 4.40 m above MLLWS, in contrast to some other studies where the species was restricted to mid-tidal levels. Significant differences in elevation of peak density were found between non-gravid (411 ± 4 SE cm) and gravid (402 ± 5 SE cm) animals

  13. Depositional architecture and evolution of the Late Miocene slope channel-fan-system in the northeastern shelf-margin of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Lin, Changsong; Zhang, Zhongtao; Tian, Hongxun; Tao, Ze; Liu, Hanyao

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Miocene in the Pearl River Mouth Basin of northwestern shelf-margin of South China Sea Basin contains a series of slope channel - fan systems. Their depositional architecture and evolution are documented in this investigation based on an integrated analysis of cores, logs, and seismic data. Four depositional-palaeogeomorphological elements have been identified in the slope channel-fan systems as follows: broad, shallow and unconfined or partly confined outer-shelf to shelf-break channels; deeply incised and confined unidirectionally migrating slope channels; broad or U-shaped, unconfined erosional-depositional channels; frontal splays-lobes and nonchannelized sheets. The slope channels are mostly oriented NW-SE, which migrated unidirectionally northeastwards and intensively eroded almost the whole shelf-slope zone. The channel infillings are mainly mudstones, interbedded with siltstones. They might be formed by gravity flow erosion as bypassing channels. They were filled with limited gravity flow sediments at the base and mostly filled with lateral accretionary packages of bottom current deposits. At the end of the channels, a series of small-scale slope fans developed and coalesced into fan aprons along the base of the slope. The unconfined erosional-depositional channels at the upper parts of the fan-apron-systems display compound infill patterns, and commonly have concave erosional bases and convex tops. The frontal splays-lobes representing middle to distal deposits of fan-apron-systems have flat-mounded or gull-wing geometries, and the internal architectures include bidirectional downlap, progradation, and chaotic infillings. The distal nonchannelized turbidite sheets are characterized by thin-bedded, parallel to sub-parallel sheet-like geometries. Three major unconformities or obvious erosional surfaces in the channel-fan systems of the Upper Miocene are recognized, and indicate the falling of sea-level. The depositional architecture of sequences

  14. Planktic foraminiferal assemblages from laminated sediments of the northeastern Arabian Sea: a high-resolution study over the last two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Philipp; Lückge, Andreas; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; Schulz, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Modern planktic foraminiferal assemblages in the Arabian Sea are largely controlled by seasonal shifts of surface water properties. Boreal summer (June-September) heating of the Asian landmass and Tibetan Plateau leads to northward migration of the ITCZ and develops an intense atmospheric pressure gradient. Strong monsoonal winds from the southwest lead to coastal- and open ocean upwelling, especially in the western Arabian Sea along the coast of Somalia and Oman. Opposite directed dry and cold winds lead to deep convective mixing during boreal winter (January-March) and breakup of the thermal stratification. Deepening of the mixed-layer thus enables nutrient transport into the photic zone with enhanced primary production. Here we study planktic foraminiferal assemblages from the dominantly winter monsoon controlled Pakistan Margin off Karachi. We sampled annually laminated sediments from box core SO90-39KG and ca. 2-m-long piston core SO130-275KL from the same station. High sedimentation rates and varve-like lamination provides a particular record with very precise age control. Box core 39KG offers a record of the last 100 years with 2-year-resolution and 275KL provides a ca. 10-year-resolution during the last 2100 years. We calculated foraminiferal flux rates after photometric identification and subtraction of light-colored event layers, consisting solely of terrigeneous matter to enable comparison with flux rates from sediment trap stations. We identified a total of 28 planktic foraminiferal (PF) species/morphotypes in the fraction >150μm. During the relatively short period of the past two millennia, several species showed comparatively large fluctuations on decadal time scales, not seen in bioturbated records. Globigerina bulloides, a species generally associated with high primary production rates, fluctuates between ca. 10% and 45%. Highest relative share was observed during periods 1593-1413, 1023-923, 483-393, 63- -7 years AD. Average PF accumulation rates

  15. Assessment of Climatological Trends of Sea Level over the Indian Coast Using Artificial Neural Network and Wavelet Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha Rani, N. N. V.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Bhaskaran, Prasad Kumar

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the variability of mean sea level (MSL) over east and west coast of India during 1973-2010. For this purpose, the monthly tide gauge data available over Kandla, Mumbai and Cochin along west coast and Diamond Harbour, Haldia, Visakhapatnam and Chennai along east coast obtained from PSMSL data archives has been considered. Sea level data from the tide gauge records show loss of data due to any disfunctioning of equipment or upgrade of the tide gauge resulting loss of data. It requires no gaps in the time series of MSL during the study period, and needs to be filled with better accuracy and hence artificial neural networks was implemented. To examine any periodicities of MSL variability, continuous wavelet analysis was conducted. The interrelationships between the stations in time-frequency space were examined, using cross and coherence wavelet analysis as well. The study reveals notable interannual variability of MSL. An observational analysis was done to understand the relation between inter-annual variability of MSL anomalies and ENSO. During positive (negative) SOI as associated with positive (negative) MSL anomaly was noticed significantly for the winter season over east (west) coast, where as during post-monsoon season this was observed for east coast and is less prevalent along the west coast. The observational analysis revealed that for the west (east) coast positive IOD showed significantly increased (decreased) MSL anomalies and negative IOD showed significantly decreased (increased) MSL anomalies. It is also found that the concurrent ENSO and IOD may have a different impact on MSL. The observations also reveal an increase of 1.353 mm/year on the east coast and observed a total 0.372 mm/year on the west coast.

  16. Late Holocene marine terraces along the northeastern Japan Sea: Evidence of coseismic uplift associated with large earthquakes beneath an active fold and thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Shishikura, M.; Echigo, T.; Kamataki, T.; Furusawa, A.; Takada, K.; Suda, S.

    2006-12-01

    above the active shoreline are located above the crest of the frontal fold that extends parallel to the coast. Borehole and Geoslicer transects indicate that three flights of late Holocene marine terraces are underlain by 3.3 m and 5.0 m offsets of erosion surfaces between overlying upper shoreface deposits and underlying Pliocene-Pleistocene units, suggesting that repeated relative sea level falls occurred during the late Holocene. Radiocarbon dating of boring shells and shell fragments indicate that the 3.3 m of relative sea level fall occurred very rapidly (during ca 5.0-4.5 ka), which is interpreted as coseismic uplift of the frontal fold above the underlying thrust ramp. We emphasize the importance of late Holocene marine terraces as geomorphic evidence of coseismic growth of active fold beneath coastal plains, and also suggest that integration of multi-disciplinary dataset that combine tectonic geomorphology with subsurface geology may be used to adequately define coseismic behavior and kinematic evolution of active fold and thrust belts at shorter millennial timescales.

  17. An offshore-onland transect across the north-eastern Black Sea basin (Crimean margin): Evidence of Paleocene to Pliocene two-stage compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, Yevgeniya; Sosson, Marc; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Sydorenko, Grigoriy; Voitsitskiy, Zinoviy; Yegorova, Tamara; Gintov, Oleg; Murovskaya, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Black Sea (BS) is a subject of debate, there are several unsolved questions: 1) the timing and the spatial progression of the BS basin opening and 2) the timing of Cenozoic shortening along the northern margin of the Eastern BS basin. The timing of the main compressional deformations, related to the inversion of the Greater Caucasus (GC) basin, is assumed to be Oligo-Miocene. However, Late Cretaceous/Early Paleocene shortening, linked to the final closure of the northern branch of the Neotethys, is also suggested. The Crimean Mountains (CM), to the north of the Eastern BS, is one of the key areas to investigate in order to fix the tectonic evolution of the BS. To precise the timing of the Cenozoic shortening of the Eastern BS, we focus on an integrated onshore/offshore transect from the Eastern CM to the Sorokin Trough (north of Eastern BS). We use newly collected stratigraphic and structural data from the Eastern CM, and a new interpretation of multichannel seismic lines. We define 1) the offshore seismic stratigraphy and constrain the relative chronology of deformations, 2) the age of seismic units by correlation of the seismic data with the Subbotina-403 well log, and 3) we construct an on-to-off shore transect of Eastern CM - northern Eastern BS region. Our results evidence a polyphased Cenozoic compression in the northern part of the Eastern BS: 1) Paleocene-Earliest Eocene and 2) Oligocene-Miocene (Maikopian). Normal faults appear to be related to a formation of the foreland basin, instead of evidencing the Eastern BS Cretaceous rifting. Finally, this study allows precising the shortening phases within Eastern CM and Eastern BS since the Early Paleocene, linking them to the Neotethys closure and the GC tectonic evolution.

  18. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  19. Indian Writers and Indian Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stensland, Anna Lee

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of popular Indian stereotypes and counter-stereotypes in literature, based on the thesis that the introduction of the literature of the American Indian, traditional and modern, will help to increase the Indian child's pride in his culture and add to the understanding of the non-Indian child. (EH)

  20. Volcanology and eruptive styles of Barren Island: an active mafic stratovolcano in the Andaman Sea, NE Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Kumar, Alok; Smitha, R. S.

    2009-11-01

    Barren Island (India) is a relatively little studied, little known active volcano in the Andaman Sea, and the northernmost active volcano of the great Indonesian arc. The volcano is built of prehistoric (possibly late Pleistocene) lava flows (dominantly basalt and basaltic andesite, with minor andesite) intercalated with volcaniclastic deposits (tuff breccias, and ash beds deposited by pyroclastic falls and surges), which are exposed along a roughly circular caldera wall. There are indications of a complete phreatomagmatic tephra ring around the exposed base of the volcano. A polygenetic cinder cone has existed at the centre of the caldera and produced basalt-basaltic andesite aa and blocky aa lava flows, as well as tephra, during historic eruptions (1787-1832) and three recent eruptions (1991, 1994-95, 2005-06). The recent aa flows include a toothpaste aa flow, with tilted and overturned crustal slabs carried atop an aa core, as well as locally developed tumuli-like elliptical uplifts having corrugated crusts. Based on various evidence we infer that it belongs to either the 1991 or the 1994-95 eruptions. The volcano has recently (2008) begun yet another eruption, so far only of tephra. We make significantly different interpretations of several features of the volcano than previous workers. This study of the volcanology and eruptive styles of the Barren Island volcano lays the ground for detailed geochemical-isotopic and petrogenetic work, and provides clues to what the volcano can be expected to do in the future.

  1. Comparison of hyperspectral measurements of the attenuation and scattering coefficients spectra with modeling results in the north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipelgas, Liis; Raudsepp, Urmas

    2015-11-01

    The spectral variations in the attenuation and scattering coefficients measured with a hyperspectral ac-spectra (Wetlabs) instrument were analyzed from a dataset collected in the vicinity of commercial harbors on the Estonian coast of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. In total, the measured TSM concentration varied from 0.4 to 30 mg L-1 and the concentration of Chl a varied from values below the detection limit (0.05) to 23 mg m-3. The reliability of the power law describing the particle attenuation cp (λ) and scattering bp(λ) coefficients was evaluated by means of a determination coefficient (R2). The power law described the particle attenuation spectra with high accuracy (R2 > 0.67), giving the dataset an average cp (λ) slope of 1.3. In the case of particle scattering coefficients, the power law did not represent the whole dataset. Depending on a particular spectrum, the R2 varied from 0 to 1.0 and the slope varied from 1.15 to -0.56. Decomposition of bp(λ) into dominant modes using principal component analyses resulted in the first principal mode accounting for the power law dependence of bp(λ), i.e. the "mineral-type" spectrum, and the second and third mode representing the characteristic bp(λ) of dominant algal particles, i.e. the "algae-type" spectrum. From our dataset we estimated that if Chl a concentration is above 10 mg m-3 or below 5 mg m-3 then most likely the "algae-type" or the "mineral-type" spectrum is dominant, respectively. There was strong linear relationship (R2 > 0.92) between TSM concentration and cp(555) and bp(555),irrespective of the dominant shape of the particle scattering spectra. The estimated TSM-specific attenuation and scattering coefficients at 555 nm were 0.8 m2 g-1 and 0.68 m2 g-1, respectively. Corresponding values for water samples with a dominant "mineral-type" spectrum were 0.85 m2 g-1 and 0.73 m2 g-1, respectively and for water samples with a dominant "algae-type" spectrum were 0.64 m2 g-1 and 0.52 m2 g-1, respectively.

  2. Early Triassic geologic history of northeastern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, R.K.; Paull, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    Conodont biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic studies of Lower Triassic rocks in northeastern Elko County, Nevada, and adjacent parts of Idaho and Utah provide new information about regional geologic history. A sequential summary of Early Triassic events in this area follows: (1) rapid transgression of the Griesbachian sea to limiting barriers on the south (Oquirrh-Uinta axis) and west (Humboldt highland.). (2) Although the initial Triassic transgression may have persisted farther south and west than present-day evidence indicates, a period of progradation during the Dienerian limited marine sedimentation to northeastern-most Nevada and adjacent states. (3) In Smithian time, a widespread transgression spilled south and west over the earliest Triassic basin margin. (4) The southward flood is characterized by locally spectacular basal conglomerates followed by shallow marine deposits of the Thaynes Formation. (5) The transgression to the west was facilitated by tectonic removal of the restrictive barrier during the Smithian. This resulted in a slope-basin environment that accumulated a thick sequence of shale and calcareous siltstone with interbeds of turbidite conglomerates, olistostromes, and exotic blocks derived from Permian formations in northern Nevada or adjacent Idaho. (6) During a regional progradation in early Spathian time, marine conditions persisted in northeastern Nevada. (7) A final depositional episode is documented by the progressive westward spread of carbonate rocks of the Thaynes Formation. (8) Withdrawal of Triassic seas from northeast Nevada occurred post-latest Early Triassic, since a carbonate sequence of more than 300 m overlies the youngest dated interval.

  3. Age of the floor of the eastern Indian ocean.

    PubMed

    Heirtzler, J R; Veevers, J V; Bolli, H M; Carter, A N; Cook, P J; Krasheninnikov, V A; McKnight, B K; Proto-Decima, F; Renz, G W; Robinson, P T; Rocker, K; Thayer, P A

    1973-06-01

    Deep sea drilling in the eastern Indian Ocean shows that the oceanic crust off Western Australia is approximately 140 million years old and becomes younger to the west; this dates the initial opening of the Indian Ocean.

  4. Simulation of the Indian Summer Monsoon Using Comprehensive Atmosphere-land Interactions, in the Absence of Two-way Air-sea Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Shin, D. W.; Cocke, Steven; Kang, Sung-Dae; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Community Land Model version 2 (CLM2) as a comprehensive land surface model and a simple land surface model (SLM) were coupled to an atmospheric climate model to investigate the role of land surface processes in the development and the persistence of the South Asian summer monsoon. Two-way air-sea interactions were not considered in order to identify the reproducibility of the monsoon evolution by the comprehensive land model, which includes more realistic vertical soil moisture structures, vegetation and 2-way atmosphere-land interactions at hourly intervals. In the monsoon development phase (May and June). comprehensive land-surface treatment improves the representation of atmospheric circulations and the resulting convergence/divergence through the improvements in differential heating patterns and surface energy fluxes. Coupling with CLM2 also improves the timing and spatial distribution of rainfall maxima, reducing the seasonal rainfall overestimation by approx.60 % (1.8 mm/d for SLM, 0.7 mm/dI for CLM2). As for the interannual variation of the simulated rainfall, correlation coefficients of the Indian seasonal rainfall with observation increased from 0.21 (SLM) to 0.45 (CLM2). However, in the mature monsoon phase (July to September), coupling with the CLM2 does not exhibit a clear improvement. In contrast to the development phase, latent heat flux is underestimated and sensible heat flux and surface temperature over India are markedly overestimated. In addition, the moisture fluxes do not correlate well with lower-level atmospheric convergence, yielding correlation coefficients and root mean square errors worse than those produced by coupling with the SLM. A more realistic representation of the surface temperature and energy fluxes is needed to achieve an improved simulation for the mature monsoon period.

  5. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae).

    PubMed

    Taylor, John D; Glover, Emily A

    2013-01-01

    Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400-650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200-825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar.

  6. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John D.; Glover, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae) includes the little-known Scabrilucina victorialis (Melvill, 1899) from the Arabian Sea and Scabrilucina vitrea (Deshayes, 1844) from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species Scabrilucina melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae) was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400–650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200–825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar. PMID:24039537

  7. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  8. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  9. The effect of ENSO to the variability of sea surface height in western Pacific Ocean and eastern Indian Ocean and its connectivity to the Indonesia Throughflow (ITF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejeki, H. A.; Munasik; Kunarso

    2017-02-01

    The differences of altimetry in the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean causes the Indonesia Throughflow or commonly called ITF. The altimerty will have variation when the ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscilation) occur. The altimetry data from AVISO is used to find out how much the influence of ENSO to variations of that indicator in particular the altimetry difference between the western Pacific Ocean to the eastern Indian Ocean. When El Nino occured, the altimetry in the western Pacific Ocean will be lower than the altimetry of eastern Indian Ocean while the opposite condition occurs when the La Nina happened that the differences of altimetry in western Pacific Ocean higher than the altimetry in eastern Indian Ocean. These differences will affect the transport of ITF.

  10. A prominent pattern of year-to-year variability in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vimal; Smoliak, Brian V; Lettenmaier, Dennis P; Wallace, John M

    2012-05-08

    The dominant patterns of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) and their relationships with the sea surface temperature and 850-hPa wind fields are examined using gridded datasets from 1900 on. The two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of ISMR over India are used as basis functions for elucidating these relationships. EOF1 is highly correlated with all India rainfall and El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. EOF2 involves rainfall anomalies of opposing polarity over the Gangetic Plain and peninsular India. The spatial pattern of the trends in ISMR from 1950 on shows drying over the Gangetic Plain projects onto EOF2, with an expansion coefficient that exhibits a pronounced trend during this period. EOF2 is coupled with the dominant pattern of sea surface temperature variability over the Indian Ocean sector, which involves in-phase fluctuations over the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the South China Sea, and it is correlated with the previous winter's El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. The circulation anomalies observed in association with fluctuations in the time-varying indices of EOF1 and EOF2 both involve distortions of the low-level monsoon flow. EOF1 in its positive polarity represents a southward deflection of moist, westerly monsoon flow from the Arabian Sea across India, resulting in a smaller flux of moisture to the Himalayas. EOF2 in its positive polarity represents a weakening of the monsoon trough over northeastern India and the westerly monsoon flow across southern India, reminiscent of the circulation anomalies observed during break periods within the monsoon season.

  11. ASIRI: Air-Sea Interactions in Northern Indian Ocean (And it’s Relation to Monsoonal Dynamics of the Bay of Bengal)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    February 4 , 2011. Meetings were held at the Indian Ministry of Earth Sciences , Delhi (January 31), National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa (February...administrative hurdles will be necessary. The science component of the current project includes preparation of a review ( journal ) article as well as...Mission, which is being orchestrated as a five year program by the Indian Ministry of Earth Sciences . Dr. Debasis Sengupta will lead the effort, and he

  12. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copley, J. T.; Marsh, L.; Glover, A. G.; Hühnerbach, V.; Nye, V. E.; Reid, W. D. K.; Sweeting, C. J.; Wigham, B. D.; Wiklund, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47‧S 49° 39‧E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ13C and δ15N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations.

  13. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Copley, J. T.; Marsh, L.; Glover, A. G.; Hühnerbach, V.; Nye, V. E.; Reid, W. D. K.; Sweeting, C. J.; Wigham, B. D.; Wiklund, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47′S 49° 39′E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ13C and δ15N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations. PMID:27966649

  14. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Copley, J T; Marsh, L; Glover, A G; Hühnerbach, V; Nye, V E; Reid, W D K; Sweeting, C J; Wigham, B D; Wiklund, H

    2016-12-14

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47'S 49° 39'E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ(13)C and δ(15)N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations.

  15. Impacts of the leading modes of tropical Indian Ocean sea surface temperature anomaly on sub-seasonal evolution of the circulation and rainfall over East Asia during boreal spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Senfeng; Duan, Anmin

    2017-02-01

    The two leading modes of the interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly are the Indian Ocean basin mode (IOBM) and the Indian Ocean dipole mode (IODM) from March to August. In this paper, the relationship between the TIO SST anomaly and the sub-seasonal evolution of the circulation and rainfall over East Asia during boreal spring and summer is investigated by using correlation analysis and composite analysis based on multi-source observation data from 1979 to 2013, together with numerical simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model. The results indicate that the impacts of the IOBM on the circulation and rainfall over East Asia vary remarkably from spring to summer. The anomalous anticyclone over the tropical Northwest Pacific induced by the warm IOBM is closely linked with the Pacific-Japan or East Asia-Pacific teleconnection pattern, which persists from March to August. In the upper troposphere over East Asia, the warm phase of the IOBM generates a significant anticyclonic response from March to May. In June and July, however, the circulation response is characterized by enhanced subtropical westerly flow. A distinct anomalous cyclone is found in August. Overall, the IOBM can exert significant influence on the western North Pacific subtropical high, the South Asian high, and the East Asian jet, which collectively modulate the precipitation anomaly over East Asia. In contrast, the effects of the IODM on the climate anomaly over East Asia are relatively weak in boreal spring and summer. Therefore, studying the impacts of the TIO SST anomaly on the climate anomaly in East Asia should take full account of the different sub-seasonal response during boreal spring and summer.

  16. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  17. Water resources of the Grand Portage Indian Reservation, northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Water types determined from analyses of water from nine wells completed in bedrock were sodium-chloride, calcium-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate, and calcium-bicarbonate. Water from three wells had concentrations of dissolved solids (800 to 3,110 milligrams per liter) and dissolved chloride (410 to 1,600 milligrams per liter) that were higher than their respective Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels of 500 and 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Water from two wells had concentrations of dissolved iron (1,600 and 1,300 micrograms per liter) that were higher than the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level of 300 micrograms per liter. Water from an observation well located about 200 feet downgradient from an abandoned landfill and screened from 79 to 84 feet below land surface in a gravel aquifer had a trace amount of toluene (0.2 micrograms per liter). The presence of toluene suggested possible contamination.

  18. Neotectonics in northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, Francisco Hilario Rego

    The thesis describes neotectonic deformation in the continental intraplate region of northeastern Brazil and explores its links with modern seismicity. The region, which is under E-W-oriented compression and N-S-oriented extension, shows shallow earthquake swarms which last for several years and include 5.0-5.2 mb events. Remote sensing, borehole and geophysical data, in conjunction with field structural information, indicate a continuous faulting process since the Miocene which has reactivated Cretaceous faults and Precambrian shear zones or in places generated new faults which cut across existing structures. Three main sets of faults are recognised across the area: a NE-striking set, a NW-striking set and a N-striking set. The first and the second sets are pervasive and their cross-cutting relationships show that they locally form a conjugate set and display both a strike-slip and a dip-slip component of movement. They have generated troughs filled by as much as 260 m of Cainozoic sediments. Radiocarbon dating shows that some of the faults slipped as recently as 4,041-3,689 cal. yr BP. Although the elevation of coastal deposits is consistent with the predictions of glacioisostatic models for the area, tectonic influence can be detected notably near the Carnaubais fault, where rapid emergence by at least 5 m to the east of Sao Bento occurred 4,080-2,780 cal. yr BP. Secondary ground failure, which includes hydroplastic deformation, liquefaction and landslides, can be seen in Quaternary alluvial sediments and is reported in the historical record. The present data show that the potential for large earthquakes in northeastern Brazil has been underestimated. Empirical relationships using liquefaction and surface rupture point to events of at least Ms=6.8 compared to a maximum mb = 5.2 recorded instrumentally. The finding that NE- and NW-trending faults are favourably orientated for reactivation in relation to the current stress field is of potential value for seismic

  19. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  20. Model for the Establishment of Modern Atolls during the Mid Brunhes MIS 12 to MIS 11 Sea Level Transgression in the Maldive Archipelago (Equatorial Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droxler, A. W.; Belopolsky, A. V.

    2003-12-01

    The Maldive archipelago consists of 22 main atolls characterized by a marginal rim surrounding a lagoon commonly less than 50-60 m deep, though some lagoons reach depths of more than 80 m. The overall evolution of the carbonate system in the Maldive Archipelago clearly shows that the slow subsidence of hypothetical volcanic edifices buried under the atolls cannot explain their typical ringed morphology. On the contrary, the atolls in the Maldives, as most likely the majority of the modern atolls, are probably young (less than 0.5 My old) carbonate edifices. Our research in the Maldives was developed based upon the interpretation of two Elf-Aquitaine and Royal Dutch Shell MCS grids, groundtruthed by ODP Site 716 and two deep exploration wells. Several seismic profiles across the modern atoll margins clearly illustrate a shift from middle Miocene-early Pliocene sigmoid lateral margin progradation of flat-topped carbonate banks to late Quaternary bank top vertical aggradation evolving into the modern atoll physiography. This well-marked transition is first illustrated by a regionally observed initial downward shift of the depositional system dated at 3.0-2.5 Ma. This downward shift of onlap and subsequent deposition in sedimentary wedges below the early Pliocene bank margins are explained by a late Pliocene-early Pleistocene (3.0-0.5 My) gradual sea level regression tied to the onset and successive expansions of major continental ice sheets in the northern Hemisphere. This regression is clearly defined in several Pliocene-Quaternary high resolution benthic isotope records, best proxy for ice volume variations in the past 5 My, at ODP sites such as 659, 677, 846, and 849.The early Pliocene flat-topped carbonate banks, exposed for about 2.5 My in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, were fully re-flooded for the first time at the glacial MIS 12 to interglacial MIS 11 transition. This sea level transgression is unique by its highest amplitude among the multiple sea

  1. MISR Images Northeastern Botswana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    MISR images of the Ntwetwe and Sua Pans in northeastern Botswana, acquired on August 18, 2000 (Terra orbit 3553). The left image is a color view from the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. On the right is a composite of red band imagery in which the 45-degree aft camera data are displayed in blue, 45-degree forward as green, and vertical as red. This combination causes wet areas to appear blue because of the glint-like reflection from water and damp surfaces. Clouds are visible in the upper left corner and right center of each image. The clouds look peculiar in the multi-angle view because geometric parallax resulting from their elevation above the surface causes a misregistration of the individual images making up the composite. This stereoscopic effect provides a way of distinguishing clouds from bright surfaces.

    The images are approximately 250 kilometers across. Ntwetwe and Sua pans are closed interior basins that catch rainwater and surface runoff during the wet season. Seasonal lakes form that may reach several meters in depth. During the dry season the collected waters rapidly evaporate leaving behind dissolved salts that coat the surface and turn it bright ('sua' means salt). The mining town of Sowa is located where the Sua Spit (a finger of grassland extending into the pan) attaches to the shore. Sowa represents headquarters for a JPL contingent carrying out MISR field experiments using the evaporite surface and the grasslands as targets and for Botswana scientists studying migration of groundwaters beneath the pans and surrounding areas. These efforts support the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000), which is now underway.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

    For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  2. Joint spatiotemporal variability of global sea surface temperatures and global Palmer drought severity index values

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apipattanavis, S.; McCabe, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominant modes of individual and joint variability in global sea surface temperatures (SST) and global Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) values for the twentieth century are identified through a multivariate frequency domain singular value decomposition. This analysis indicates that a secular trend and variability related to the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are the dominant modes of variance shared among the global datasets. For the SST data the secular trend corresponds to a positive trend in Indian Ocean and South Atlantic SSTs, and a negative trend in North Pacific and North Atlantic SSTs. The ENSO reconstruction shows a strong signal in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and Indian Ocean regions. For the PDSI data, the secular trend reconstruction shows high amplitudes over central Africa including the Sahel, whereas the regions with strong ENSO amplitudes in PDSI are the southwestern and northwestern United States, South Africa, northeastern Brazil, central Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Australia. An additional significant frequency, multidecadal variability, is identified for the Northern Hemisphere. This multidecadal frequency appears to be related to the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO). The multidecadal frequency is statistically significant in the Northern Hemisphere SST data, but is statistically nonsignificant in the PDSI data.

  3. Two flavors of the Indian Ocean Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Satoru; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is known as a climate mode in the tropical Indian Ocean accompanied by negative (positive) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over the eastern (western) pole during its positive phase. However, the western pole of the IOD is not always covered totally by positive SST anomalies. For this reason, the IOD is further classified into two types in this study based on SST anomalies in the western pole. The first type (hereafter "canonical IOD") is associated with negative (positive) SST anomalies in the eastern (central to western) tropical Indian Ocean. The second type (hereafter "IOD Modoki"), on the other hand, is associated with negative SST anomalies in the eastern and western tropical Indian Ocean and positive SST anomalies in the central tropical Indian Ocean. Based on composite analyses, it is found that easterly wind anomalies cover the whole equatorial Indian Ocean in the canonical IOD, and as a result, positive rainfall anomalies are observed over East Africa. Also, due to the basin-wide easterly wind anomalies, the canonical IOD is accompanied by strong sea surface height (SSH) anomalies. In contrast, zonal wind anomalies converge in the central tropical Indian Ocean in the IOD Modoki, and no significant precipitation anomalies are found over East Africa. Also, only weak SSH anomalies are seen, because equatorial downwelling anomalies induced by westerly wind anomalies in the west are counteracted by equatorial upwelling anomalies caused by easterly wind anomalies in the east.

  4. 77 FR 65498 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to the Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to the Atlantic Herring Management Area 1A Sub... fishing year sub-annual catch limit for Atlantic Herring Management Area 1A due to an under-harvest in the... processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2012...

  5. Sea surface temperatures in the central southern Indian Ocean over the period 1790 to 2007 inferred from two monthly resolved Sr/Ca and oxygen isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinke, J.; Wassenburg, J.; Hardman, E.

    2009-04-01

    We obtained two monthly resolved Sr/Ca records from Rodrigues island (Mauritius) located in the trade wind belt of the central southern Indian Ocean. The longest core was obtained at a nearshore fringing reef and covers the period 1790-2005. This coral records surface air temperatures from the local weather station available from 1950 to the present. The most remarkable signal is a slight cooling after the 1950's. The second core was obtained from the open ocean and records a long-term warming trend between 1947 to 2007. The warming accelerated after the late 1970's in agreement with instrumental data. The oxygen isotope record is affected by salinity variations and shows a strong freshening trend after the late 1970's. The freshening trend is probably related to advection of low salinity waters with the South Equatorial Current and/or increased cyclonicity. We will discuss our results in light of interannual and decadal variability and present long-term seawater monitoring data.

  6. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the…

  7. Satellite-Based Surface Heat Budgets and Sea Surface Temperature Tendency in the Tropical Eastern Indian and Western Pacific Oceans for the 1997/98 El Nino and 1998/99 La Nina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    The 1997/98 is a strong El Nino warm event, while the 1998/99 is a moderate La Nina cold event. We have investigated surface heat budgets and sea surface temperature (SST) tendency for these two events in the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans using satellite-retrieved surface radiative and turbulent fluxes. The radiative fluxes are taken from the Goddard Satellite-retrieved Surface Radiation Budget (GSSRB), derived from radiance measurements of the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The GSSRB covers the domain 40 deg S - 4 deg N, 90 deg E-17 deg W and a period from October 1997 to December 2000. The spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg lat-long and the temporal resolution is 1 day. The turbulent fluxes are taken from Version 2 of the Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF-2). The GSSTF-2 has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long over global Oceans and a temporal resolution of 1 day covering the period July 1987-December 2000. Daily turbulent fluxes are derived from the S S M (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) surface wind and surface air humidity, and the SST and 2-m air temperature of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a stability-dependent bulk flux algorithm. The changes of surface heat budgets, SST and tendency, cloudiness, wind speed, and zonal wind stress of the 1997/98 El Nino relative to the1998/99 La Nina for the northern winter and spring seasons are analyzed. The relative changes of surface heat budgets and SST tendency of the two events are quite different between the tropical eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans. For the tropical western Pacific, reduced solar heating (more clouds) is generally associated with decreased evaporative cooling (weaker winds), and vise versa. The changes in evaporative cooling over-compensate that of solar heating and dominate the spatial variability of the changes in net surface heating. Both solar heating and evaporative cooling offset each other to reduce

  8. Precessional forced evolution of the Indian Ocean Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Jian, ZhiMin; Zhao, Ping; Chen, JunMing; Xiao, Dong

    2015-05-01

    In a transient accelerated simulation of a coupled climate model, we identified a zonal dipole-like pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the tropical Indian Ocean, which is forced by precessional insolation changes since 300 ka and named as the paleo-IOD (Indian Ocean Dipole). A positive paleo-IOD mean state at 23 kyr precessional band exhibits warmer and wetter conditions over the western Indian Ocean and cooler and drier conditions over the eastern tropical Indian Ocean from August to October. This zonal thermal seesaw at the sea surface can extend downward to the subsurface ocean between 60 and 80 m and accompanies stronger oceanic upwelling in the eastern tropical Indian Ocean. The associated boreal summer-autumn tropospheric circulation anomalies are characterized by anomalous ascent over the western Indian Ocean and anomalous descent over the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean, with anomalous easterlies at the surface along the equatorial Indian Ocean. The positive paleo-IOD largely originates from local air-sea interactions that are induced by the increased summer insolation, and is also contributed by the reduced boreal winter insolation through an oceanic "heat memory effect." Our simulated dipole mode index (DMI) of SST is qualitatively consistent with the paleoceanographic reconstructed DMI based on the UK37 proxy of SST at precessional band and provides a possible explanation for the in-phase precessional variation between boreal winter insolation and the UK37 proxy of SST in the eastern tropical Indian Ocean.

  9. Changes of coastal upwelling systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans recorded from alkenone-derived sea surface temperatures and other multiproxy information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahabi, Anuar; Martrat, Belen; Lopez, Jordi F.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    2014-05-01

    Upwelling regions have received limited attention in paleoceanography, particularly for what concerns their changes at high temporal resolution. Furthermore, they have generally been considered independently. The lack of integrated studies of the evolution of the main coastal upwelling systems has limited the present degree of understanding of the links between global ocean dynamics and intensity and geographic distribution of these highly productive sites. In the present study, an integrated assessment of sea surface temperature (SST) records based on literature available alkenone-data on the upwelling regions of North-West Africa, North-West Arabian Sea, Namibia and Peru encompassing the last 25 kyr is reported. Additionally, in order to consider the complex effects of regional processes literature-available multiproxy data (marine, ice cores and speleothems records; PIG2LIG-4FUTURE database; Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-13825) has also been used to constrain upwelling features. This approach has allowed the description of high resolution temporal and spatial upwelling patterns and the interdependences between ocean dynamics and upwelling shifts. The spatio-temporal SST-upwelling patterns during the deglaciation-Holocene stage have been discussed. Suitable proxies for the upwelling and advection processes, such as CaCO3, TOC and Opal, Nd and carbon isotopes, respectively have been studied. Temporal snapshots at approximately at 22 ka, 15 ka, 12 ka, 8 ka, and 5 ka BP have been identified. These transitions illustrate flips between contrasting states. Major environmental and climatic changes have been observed before and after this type of transition, e.g. the one at 5 ka BP. These observations provide interesting clues on mechanisms, location of forcings and sustainers. The high temporal resolution records examined provide good constraints on the timing and magnitude of oceanic processes related with upwelling change and therefore an assessment

  10. Northeastern Summer Electricity Market Alert

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The National Weather Service declared an excessive-heat warning for much of the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, including major electric markets covering Philadelphia, Boston, Washington, D.C., and New York City. This report highlights the wholesale electricity market activity occurring in response to the higher-than-normal electricity demand caused by the heat wave.

  11. The main issues affecting coasts of the Indian and western Pacific Oceans: a meta-analysis from Seas at the Millennium.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, C

    2001-12-01

    A review of the world oceans in three volumes by 365 scientists, provides scope for several 'meta-analyses' of the main problems affecting over 100 areas in the year 2000. This article summarises the main issues affecting a sub-set of the reviewed areas, covering Asian, African and Arabian countries dealt with in Volume 2, which included over 50 articles. From all issues raised, assessment is made of the nature of the major ones, including evaluation of reasons why so many of them remain important issues after so much attention to them. These include long standing problems, several problems more newly flagged as becoming particularly important, the issue of global warming and no less than three related issues connected with fishing and over exploitation. One or two issues such as industrial pollution and sewage, previously considered of almost universal concern, almost traditional pollution issues even, continue to feature strongly for some countries, but while these were almost always referred to in Seas chapters, by and large these categories appear not to be the most pressing of issues today, except in localized areas (albeit areas where huge numbers of people live). Perhaps other issues have simply taken over. They are excluded from this article.

  12. Atmospheric Storm Triggered and Intensified by Geodynamics: Case Studies from Andaman Sea and Bay of Bengal Region in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akilan, A.; Azeez, K. K. Abdul; Schuh, H.

    2017-03-01

    The study analyses the possible connection between the onset of cyclone and volcano-tectonic seismicity in the Andaman region. The historical data of the major volcanic, seismic, and atmospheric events from the region show that several of the geodynamic activities were followed by severe atmospheric disturbances over the region. In this study, we consider the case of three recent cyclones (Phailin, Hudhud, and Nilam) that either originated or were intensified over the Andaman Sea and Bay of Bengal, and examine their correlation with the volcano-tectonic seismic events during the cyclone occurrence. The zenith total delay (ZTD) time series, derived from Global Positioning System data from the PBR2 station on Andaman Island, overlapping with the period of the cyclone occurrence were examined to distinguish the onset and intensification of the atmospheric events. The comparison of the sharp changes in ZTD associated with the cyclone and the seismic events during the period indicates that the atmospheric changes almost coincide or follow the geodynamic activity. Our study illustrates that volcano-tectonics of the region plays a role in the triggering of atmospheric disturbances.

  13. Indian Ocean and Indian summer monsoon: relationships without ENSO in ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétat, Julien; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien; Sooraj, K. P.; Roxy, Mathew Koll

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between the Indian Ocean and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and their respective influence over the Indo-Western North Pacific (WNP) region are examined in the absence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in two partially decoupled global experiments. ENSO is removed by nudging the tropical Pacific simulated sea surface temperature (SST) toward SST climatology from either observations or a fully coupled control run. The control reasonably captures the observed relationships between ENSO, ISM and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Despite weaker amplitude, IODs do exist in the absence of ENSO and are triggered by a boreal spring ocean-atmosphere coupled mode over the South-East Indian Ocean similar to that found in the presence of ENSO. These pure IODs significantly affect the tropical Indian Ocean throughout boreal summer, inducing a significant modulation of both the local Walker and Hadley cells. This meridional circulation is masked in the presence of ENSO. However, these pure IODs do not significantly influence the Indian subcontinent rainfall despite overestimated SST variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean compared to observations. On the other hand, they promote a late summer cross-equatorial quadrupole rainfall pattern linking the tropical Indian Ocean with the WNP, inducing important zonal shifts of the Walker circulation despite the absence of ENSO. Surprisingly, the interannual ISM rainfall variability is barely modified and the Indian Ocean does not force the monsoon circulation when ENSO is removed. On the contrary, the monsoon circulation significantly forces the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal SSTs, while its connection with the western tropical Indian Ocean is clearly driven by ENSO in our numerical framework. Convection and diabatic heating associated with above-normal ISM induce a strong response over the WNP, even in the absence of ENSO, favoring moisture convergence over India.

  14. An Indian Ocean precursor for Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, O. P.; Panickal, S.; Pai, S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) depicts large interannual variability strongly linked with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, many of the El Niño years were not accompanied by deficient ISMR. The results from the study reveal the significant role of coupled air-sea interaction over the tropical Indian Ocean (IO) in modifying the ENSO-ISMR association. The IO warm water volume (WWV), a measure of heat content variations in the equatorial IO has strong influence on ISMR. A deepening (shoaling) of thermocline in the eastern equatorial IO (EEIO) during late boreal spring (April-May) accompanied by increase (decrease) in WWV anomalies weaken (enhance) the ISMR by enhancing (suppressing) the convection over EEIO resulting in the below (above) normal ISMR. Thus, the changes in the WWV anomalies in the EEIO along with ENSO conditions during boreal spring can be considered as a precursor for the performance of subsequent ISMR.

  15. Indian Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others

    A product of the Indian Studies Curriculum Committee and the Indian Studies Staff, this manual on the Indians of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this Indian Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…

  16. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  17. American Indians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    This paper reviews American Indian demography and the political and economic conditions on Indian reservations. After collapsing during the 19th century, the American Indian population grew gradually during the early 20th century, approaching 2 million in 1990. American Indians are heavily concentrated in the West, northern Midwest, and Oklahoma;…

  18. Madden-Julian Oscillation and sea level: Local and remote forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, E. C. J.; Thompson, K. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of atmospheric variability in the tropical atmosphere on intraseasonal time scales (i.e., weeks to seasons). This study examines the connection between the MJO and global sea level measured by altimeters over the last 17 years. We first identify regions exhibiting a significant (both statistical and practical) relationship between sea level and the MJO. The first region consists of the equatorial Pacific and western coastal zones of North and South America. Consistent with previous studies, we identify wind-driven equatorially trapped Kelvin waves that propagate eastward along the equatorial Pacific and then transform into coastal trapped waves that propagate poleward along the western coasts of North and South America. The second region includes the shallow waters of the Gulf of Carpentaria (off Australia's north coast) and the adjacent Arafura and Timor seas. Setup by onshore winds is shown to be the dominant physical process. Finally, the northeastern Indian Ocean is shown to be a complex region involving a combination of equatorially trapped Kelvin waves, coastal trapped waves, and westward-propagating Rossby waves exhibiting characteristics of both local and remote forcing. The implications of the results for deep and coastal ocean forecasting are discussed.

  19. Clay Mineralogical Records in Sediments along the Shelf Break of the Eastern Andaman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunsomboonsakul, S.; Liu, Z.; Sompongchaiyakul, P.; Snidvongs, A.; Krastel, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Andaman Sea as part of the northeastern Indian Ocean is located between the Irrawaddy delta coast of Myanmar in the north and Sumatra and the Malacca Strait in the south. Distribution of sediments in the Andaman Sea is strongly influenced by two prevailing monsoon seasons: northeast (November-April) and southwest (May-October) monsoons. However, the sedimentation process is little known. In this study, clay mineralogy has been inquired to indicate sediment transportation and provenance of the Andaman Sea sediments. Two sediment cores from offshore and surface sediments from two nearshore locations in the Andaman Sea were studied. The cores of 1.58 m (MASS-III-07) and 1.50 m (MASS-III-10) long were collected from a flat-top plateau protruded along the Andaman Sea shelf break off the west coast of Thailand (604 m and 632 m water depth, respectively). The plateau has been found during the MASS project in 2007. The surface sediments were collected from off Thailand coast to represent the middle part source and off Myanmar coast to represent the northern part source, respectively. Semiquantitative analyses of clay minerals were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) to document clay mineralogical composition and distribution, and to reconstruct the chronological oceanic processes. The preliminary results reveal that the cores contain high smectite (65-79%) and kaolinite (9-18%), and low illite and chlorite contents (<10%). Although clay mineral contents of the two cores shows similar average compositions, the vertical profiles of distribution are displayed reversely particularly for smectite, kaolinite and illite. The results from core sediments suggest that the sediment transport in this area was strongly controlled by the plateau in addition to the current direction. In comparison of clay mineral compositions of the two cores with the surface sediments, it is implied that the potential terrigenous sediment input to the Andaman Sea was likewise from Myanmar than

  20. Northeastern Pennsylvania Retrospective Case Study Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA conducted a retrospective case study in northeastern Pennsylvania to investigate reported instances of contaminated drinking water resources in areas where hydraulic fracturing activities occurred

  1. The north Sulu Sea productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The Sulu Sea is a part of the western North Pacific. It is a closed sea for its deep water and a semi-closed sea for its upper layer. The Sulu Sea exchanges mainly surface waters with the South China Sea and the Celebes Sea. The Sulu Sea is more productive than the adjacent South China Sea (Jones, 2002). On the basis of MERIS satellite observations from 2002 to 2008, we focus on the high-chlorophyll area as an indicator of the abundance of primary productivity in the Sulu Sea. Strong chlorophyll concentration in the north Sulu Sea close to the Mindoro Strait mainly occurs from December to March and low chlorophyll concentration happens in April to November. The adjacent South China Sea on the other side of Mindoro Strait has shown persistent signs of low chlorophyll concentration. Based on 1/8° Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model, the intrusion of the South China Sea waters through the Mindoro Strait to the Sulu Sea from April to November is the main reason for the low chlorophyll concentration observed in the north Sulu Sea. During April to November, the South China Sea waters flow through the Mindoro Strait and stay on the surface of the north Sulu Sea because of their low density. The north Sulu Sea waters mix with fresher waters coming from the South China Sea without new nutrients supply. When the inflow from South China Sea to Sulu Sea ceases in December to March, the upwelling due to the summer monsoon wind becomes an important mechanism supplying deep nutrients to the surface water which lead to high chlorophyll concentration. Jones, I.S.F., 2002. Primary production in the Sulu Sea. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences-Earth and Planetary Sciences 111, 209-213.

  2. Modelling of the Circulation of the Western Indian Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    MODELLING OF THE CIRCULATION OF THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN Contract N00014-85-K-0019 Julian P. McCreary Pijush K. Kundu Nova University Oceanographic...described below. (i) Cooling of the Arabian Sea: McCreary and Kundu (1989) have just completed a modeling study of the variability in the Arabian Sea...entirely responsible for the observed annual heat gained by the Arabian Sea. (ii) The Gulf of Tehuantepec: McCreary , Lee and Enfield (1989) have

  3. Pasture plants of the Northeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate humid grazing lands are an important component of the landscape of the northeastern Unites States, as well as of the economy of this region, yet unlike their European counterparts, little is known about their basic ecology. During an eight-year survey of 44 farms across the northeastern Un...

  4. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  5. 78 FR 62331 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-17

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Harvested for Management...), optimum yield, domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2013 Domestic Annual Harvest is 107,800 metric tons (mt); the 2013...

  6. 77 FR 10668 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2012 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2...

  7. 78 FR 21071 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management.... at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2013 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2013 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2 is 22,146 mt, and 0 mt of the...

  8. 77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  9. 77 FR 66746 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  10. 76 FR 66654 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2011 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2011 sub-ACL allocated to...

  11. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  12. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian…

  13. Coast of the East Siberian Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sea ice is pulling away from the coastline of northeastern Siberia in the east Siberia Sea. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 26, 2002, also the thinning of ice in bays and coves, and the blue reflection of the water from beneath causes the ice to appear bright blue. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  15. Indians into Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N.

    Located at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) is a multi-faceted program providing academic, financial, and personal support for Indian students preparing for health careers. The program has the following goals: (1) increase awareness and motivation among Indian students with the potential for health…

  16. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  17. National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen Kay

    2006-01-01

    This report includes information from the National Indian Education Study of American Indian/Alaska Native students in grades 4 and 8 on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) in reading and mathematics. The national sample includes both public and private schools (i.e. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Defense Education…

  18. Indians in Minneapolis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Richard G.

    The League of Women Voters of Minneapolis decided in May of 1967 to examine public and private agencies in the city of Minneapolis to determine agency perception of Indian problems, and to assess how well the various agencies were dealing with problems related to the Indian population of the city. In addition, 100 Indians were randomly selected…

  19. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  20. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves. PMID:27079921

  1. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-04-15

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves.

  2. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves.

  3. Tropical forcing of the recent rapid Arctic warming in northeastern Canada and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qinghua; Wallace, John M; Battisti, David S; Steig, Eric J; Gallant, Ailie J E; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Geng, Lei

    2014-05-08

    Rapid Arctic warming and sea-ice reduction in the Arctic Ocean are widely attributed to anthropogenic climate change. The Arctic warming exceeds the global average warming because of feedbacks that include sea-ice reduction and other dynamical and radiative feedbacks. We find that the most prominent annual mean surface and tropospheric warming in the Arctic since 1979 has occurred in northeastern Canada and Greenland. In this region, much of the year-to-year temperature variability is associated with the leading mode of large-scale circulation variability in the North Atlantic, namely, the North Atlantic Oscillation. Here we show that the recent warming in this region is strongly associated with a negative trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is a response to anomalous Rossby wave-train activity originating in the tropical Pacific. Atmospheric model experiments forced by prescribed tropical sea surface temperatures simulate the observed circulation changes and associated tropospheric and surface warming over northeastern Canada and Greenland. Experiments from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (ref. 16) models with prescribed anthropogenic forcing show no similar circulation changes related to the North Atlantic Oscillation or associated tropospheric warming. This suggests that a substantial portion of recent warming in the northeastern Canada and Greenland sector of the Arctic arises from unforced natural variability.

  4. A Little Boy Eats Too Much. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthaus, Mary L.

    Part of the Indian Culture Series of the Montana Council for Indian Education, the book is a simple story of a young Alaskan boy who makes oil lamps and his grandmother who sews with a needle. The little boy goes to hunt by the sea because they are hungry. He catches and eats a tomcod, two seals, and a whale, then returns to the igloo having eaten…

  5. Geothermal reconnaissance of northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Urbani, F. )

    1989-01-01

    About 60% of Venezuela has been covered by a reconnaissance geothermal survey that includes geologic and water geochemical studies. The information is stored in a computerized data bank that holds data from 361 geothermal localities. The subsurface reservoir temperatures of the geothermal systems have been estimated using chemical geothermometry and mixing models and in many cases conceptual geothermal modes have been postulated. Preliminary assessments of the northeastern Venezuelan geothermal systems indicate that the most promising system is Las Minas near El Pilar in the state of Sucre, with an estimated deep reservoir temperature of 200-220{sup 0}C. Further studies are intended to evaluate its potential for electricity generation. Based on present data, other medium and low temperature systems in Venezuela appear useful for direct applications.

  6. The String of Pearls: Chinese Maritime Presence in the Indian Ocean and Its Effect on Indian Naval Doctrine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    informs budgetary, personnel and procurement decisions. In the case of a navy, doctrine can drive what types of ships, weapons systems and aircraft are...supplier of ships, weapons, aircraft and other systems to the Indian navy.57 Starting with the purchase of patrol boats in 1965, the Soviets supplied...territory, offshore assets and citizens against attack from the sea; 4) influence affairs on land; 5) safeguard Indian mercantile trade; 6) safeguard

  7. Geotechnical characteristics of bottom sediments in the northeastern Bering Sea.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, H.W.; Clukey, E.C.; Nelson, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    Sediment of Holocene age derived from the Yukon River, consisting dominantly of silty fine sand and sandy silt, covers the bottom of central and western Norton Sound, which is a high energy environment involving extensive ice loading, high waves, and strong bottom currents. The sediment characteristics indicate that it is susceptible to liquefaction during major storms. Substantially finer grained, weak and highly compressible sediment of Holocene age covers eastern Norton Sound and the Port Clarence embayment, which are low energy environments. Pleistocene peaty deposits underlie the Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits in both Norton Sound and Chirikov Basin and are somewhat overconsolidated. The presence of gas indicates high in situ pore pressure and hence low material strength.-from Authors

  8. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry.

  9. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  10. Variability of the southwest Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    de Ruijter, Wilhelmus P M; Ridderinkhof, Herman; Schouten, Mathijs W

    2005-01-15

    The variability in the southwest Indian Ocean is connected to the basin-scale and global-scale ocean circulation. Two bands of enhanced variability stretch across the Southern Indian Ocean east of Madagascar around 12 degrees S and 25 degrees S, respectively. They mark the preferred routes along which anomalies, generated by varying forcing over the central basin, near the eastern boundary or in the equatorial region, propagate westward as baroclinic Rossby waves. Sea-surface height anomalies pass along the northern tip of Madagascar and are observed by satellite altimetry to propagate into the central Mozambique Channel. There, eddies are subsequently formed that propagate southward into the Agulhas retroflection region. The anomalies along the southern band trigger the formation of large dipolar vortex pairs in the separation region of the East Madagascar Current at the southern tip of the island. South of Africa these eddies and dipoles trigger the shedding of Agulhas Rings that feed the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation with warm, salty, Indian Ocean water. Interannual variability of the forcing over the Indian Ocean, such as that associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole/El Nino climate modes, propagates along these pathways and leads to associated modulations of the eddy transports into the South Atlantic.

  11. The Indian Child Welfare Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Katy Jo

    The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (I.C.W.A.) is federal legislation which preempts state law whenever Indian children may be removed from their families. The I.C.W.A. permits Indian tribal courts to decide the future of Indian children, establishes minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children from their families, requires that…

  12. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  13. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  14. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary... section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710,...

  15. Unlocking Indian Maritime Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    installment of a maritime strategy, Indian strategy has been expanding since India’s partition from the British Empire. India appears poised to assume...After partition it did not represent a totally Indian force, as almost all of its top leadership and most of its strategic planning was conducted by the...arm of the Royal navy and after the partition of the subcontinent and the Royal Indian Naval force, India possessed four sloops, two frigates, one

  16. Recent and Late Quaternary sedimentation processes in the area of the SE Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Y.; Ehrmann, W.; Schmiedl, G.; Dulski, P.; Kuhnt, T.

    2007-12-01

    The present distribution of clay minerals in the southeastern Levantine Sea reveals a complex pattern of different source areas and dispersions of the main clay minerals smectite, illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and palygorskite. Smectite dominates the suspension load of the Nile River and rivers of the Near East. Sources of illite are dust- bearing winds blowing from the Saharan desert and the northern mainland of the Levantine Sea. Kaolinite is prevalent in the sediment yield of rivers which drain the Sinai, in sediments of wadis which discharge into the Nile River, and in dust loads of African storms. Palygorskite and chlorite are mainly derived from several dust bearing wind systems of the North and Central African continent, whereas chlorite is also provided by dust-bearing winds of the northeastern Mediterranean mainland. The clay mineral distributions and XRF element data of a sediment core from the southeastern Levantine Sea, spanning the last 27,000 years, show that the sediments are mainly affected by the discharge of the Nile River. The provenance of clay minerals provides a sensitive recorder of changes in the Nile River discharge and therefore in the climate conditions in the catchment of its tributaries. The glacial section of the core is characterized by low smectite concentrations, high K/Al ratios and low linear sedimentation rates when compared to the Holocene suggesting a low influence by the Nile outflow. Subsequently, during the early and middle Holocene, when the North African continent was influenced by more humid conditions during the African Humid Period, our record shows high proportions of smectite and low K/Al ratios which likely reflect higher discharge rates of the River Nile. In contrast to the sharp beginning and end of the African Humid Period as recorded in West African records at 15 and 5.5 kyr BP, our record in the southeastern Levantine Sea shows more transitional patterns and trend towards slightly lower Nile discharge rates at

  17. Indian Ocean heat content changes masked by multi-decadal variability: Is the Indian Ocean warming or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, Caroline; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus

    2015-04-01

    The Indian Ocean has sustained robust surface warming in recent decades, with warming rates exceeding those of other tropical ocean basins. Significant, non-uniform trends in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures - both in observations and projections for the 21st Century - have the potential to impact regional climate, through variations in the monsoon circulation, characteristics of Indian Ocean Dipole events, and the associated hydroclimate across the wider Indo-Pacific. However, it remains unclear what role decadal to multi-decadal variability in upper-ocean Indian Ocean thermal characteristics play in these trends. Using high-resolution ocean model hindcasts building on the ocean/sea-ice numerical Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) framework forced with atmospheric forcing fields of the Coordinated Ocean Reference Experiments (CORE), the characteristics of Indian Ocean temperature changes are explored. Sensitivity experiments, where interannual atmospheric forcing variability is restricted to thermal or wind-stress forcing only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for the evolution of temperature characteristics across the Indian Ocean, focusing on the top 700m. Simulated temperature changes across the Indian Ocean in the hindcasts are consistent with those recorded in observational products, as well as ocean reanalyses. Assessment of Indian Ocean heat content since the 1950s suggests extensive (subsurface) cooling for much of the tropical Indian Ocean. The presence of substantial multi-decadal variability in its heat content further implies caution in interpreting linear trends in thermal properties, as long-term trends can be masked. The sensitivity experiments reveal that cooling trends in Indian Ocean heat content since the mid-1960s to the late 1990s are largely driven by wind-stress forcing, likely due to remote Pacific wind forcing associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). As such, multi-decadal wind-forcing has

  18. Vulnerability of Northeastern U.S. Salt Marshes to Climatic and Anthropogenic Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Oczkowski, A. J.; Hanson, A.; Davey, E. W.; Crosby, S. C.; Johnson, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    In the Northeastern U.S., salt marsh area is in decline. Habitat change analysis has revealed fragmentation, displacement of high marsh by low marsh species, and ecological drowning, while development of adjacent uplands limits upslope migration. Using inundation experiments, field surveys, and LiDAR datasets, we developed an elevation-productivity relationship for Spartina alterniflora specific to the U.S. Northeast states of New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, southern Massachusetts and located current salt marsh orthometric heights on this curve. We determined that 89% of salt marshes in these Northeastern states are located at elevations where growth is limited by inundation, suggesting links between current salt marsh loss patterns and sea level rise. By manipulating water column nutrients, precipitation, and elevation, we further found that altered precipitation receipt was associated with significant reductions in biomass, and that nutrient enrichment adversely impacts organic matter accumulation and peat formation. These results provide evidence that Northeastern U.S. marshes are vulnerable to the effects of accelerated sea level rise, and that neither precipitation changes, nor cultural eutrophication, will contribute positively to long-term salt marsh survival.

  19. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  20. Yakima Indian Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Migrant and Indian Education, Toppenish, WA.

    This booklet was prepared by the Yakima Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs, to provide information to the public on the history and customs of the Yakima Indian Nation, as well as explaining life on the Reservation today. The events mentioned range from 1775 to July 1, 1971. Since this document only skims the surface of Yakima culture and history,…

  1. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  2. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  3. The American Indian Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, George

    This guide provides a basic source of historical and contemporary Indian information from an American Indian perspective and includes study questions at the end of each section. The primary function of this guide is to be a quick-study reference handbook. Basic questions essential to understanding current problems and issues of American Indians…

  4. American Indian Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  5. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  6. Suicide in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    This book reviews present knowledge about suicidal behavior in American Indians, prevention efforts in Native communities, and recommendations for understanding suicidal behavior and developing suicide prevention efforts. Data from Canadian aboriginal groups is also included. Chapter 1 explains why suicide in American Indians is of concern to…

  7. Gc types in one Indian group and one Mestizo Mexican group.

    PubMed

    Lisker, R; Pérez-Briceño, R; Ramirez, E; Aizpuru, E

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of Gc types was investigated in an Indian group residing in Cuetzalan, Puebla, and in a Mestizo group from Mexico City. Gc1 and Gc2 gene frequencies were 0.862 and 0.138 in Cuetzalan, and 0.858 and 0.142 in Mexico City. These figures are similar to those obtained by other authors in one Northeastern Mexican City. A literature review showed that there appears to be a pattern of high Gc2 frequency in most Brazilian Indians (above 0.3) in contrast to a low frequency (below 0.2) in most other Amerindian groups studied.

  8. Drought Analysis in Northeastern Argentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, N. O.

    2005-12-01

    The objetive of the present work was analyze the occurrence of droughts in the context of the climatic variability, in a wide region of the Argentinean territory that encompass the six provinces of the northeastern (Misiones, Corrientes, Entre Rios, Santa Fe, Chaco and Formosa). In order to define the droughts a decilic analysis of the monthly precipitation records was used, and the temporal and spatial variability were analyzed with Spectral Analysis of the composite dry year (From January of the year of droughts onset until December of the following year), this period contain the complete hydrologic dry-year. It was observed that the occurrence of annual droughts change along the last century, verifying an average of one drought each three years up to 1969 and one drought each five year from 1970. From the point of view of the relative amount of fallen water, it was observed that the extreme dry periods take place in autumn, winter and spring and weak dry period during the summer or to along the complete hydrologic year. The spatial and temporal behavior of the dry periods showed that the composite dry-years are more significant in amplitude and phase than composite LA NIÑA years. So much the rains of summer like the winters droughts accentuate the second harmonic amplitude, that contains information of the amount of fallen water and also represent the annual cycle of the precipitations, while the droughts of summer attenuate it. The harmonic dials in the analyzed region showed that the second spectral component is the most significant, while the first component indicates their relationship with the region EL NIÑO, in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean. The results indicate a regional homogeneous characterization regarding the first harmonic in the north, the same as the area center-eastern, while the southwest and south area has a behavior with characteristic very particular characteristics during the dry events (second harmonic not significant).

  9. First Data on Lake Level Changes in Northeastern Siberia during the Postglacial Time

    SciTech Connect

    Shilo, N A; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Lozhkin, A V; Pakhomov, A Y; Solomatkina, T B

    2005-05-18

    Moraines of the Tyellakh Group [1] (QIII{sub 2-4}) preserved in river valleys of the northeastern Kolyma River basin indicate development of cirque-valley glaciers originating in the Kilgan Mountains located at the northeastern periphery of the Kolyma Ridge that separates drainage basins of the Sea of Okhotsk and Kolyma River. Moraines host lakes with a length of up to 1-5 km and a relatively small width depending on the valley bottom dimension. The study of lacustrine sediments, their bed-by-bed palynological analysis, and radiocarbon dating provided the first information on lake levels during the final glacial stage of the Late Pleistocene, as well as the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary and Holocene, for the upper reaches of the Kolyma River.

  10. Late Ordovician-Early Silurian chitinozoans from north-eastern and western Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butcher, A.; Mikulic, Donald G.; Kluessendorf, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Samples of uppermost Ordovician and Silurian strata from two cores from north-eastern and western Illinois were processed for chitinozoans. Due to apparent sea-floor oxidation or palaeoenvironmental constraints, very few samples yielded specimens, but those that did allow tentative correlation with established biostratigraphical zonations for the Chitinozoa. Samples from the Wilhelmi Formation of core DH76-21 in north-eastern Illinois yielded Spinachitina fragilis, a typically earliest Silurian taxon. A sample from the Maquoketa Group strata of core Principia #4, western Illinois, yielded a monospecific assemblage of Conochitina elegans, which is suggestive of a late Ordovician age. Higher in this core, a sample from the upper strata of the Bowling Green Dolomite yielded an assemblage indicating a late Rhuddanian to Aeronian age, including Angochitina hansonica, previously only described from strata in Nevada, and one new species, Fungochitina illinoisensis. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation of the Jurassic through Oligocene Stratigraphic Units of Trinidad and Northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Algar, S.; Erikson, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    The Jurassic through Oligocene stratigraphies of Trinidad and the Serrenia del Interior of eastern Venezuela exhibit many similarities because of their proximity on the passive continental margins of northeastern South America. A slightly later subsidence in eastern Venezuela, and the generally deeper-water sedimentation in Trinidad, is interpreted to be the result of a serration of the original rift margin, producing an eastern Venezuela promontory and Trinidadian re-entrant. We interpret these serrations to be the result of oblique (NW-SE) spreading of North and South America during Middle and late Jurassic time. The stratigraphies of northeastern Venezuela and Trinidad contrast in the Hauterivan-Albian interval, with dynamic shallow shelf environments prevailing in the Serrenia del Interior and deeper marine submarine-fan deposition in Trinidad. Both areas develop middle to Upper Cretaceous source rocks during a time of eustatic sea level high and widespread oceanic anoxia. 15 refs., 4 fig.

  12. Indians in Indian Fiction: The Shadow of the Trickster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velie, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    Studies mythic dimension of protagonists in novels by American Indian authors Scott Momaday and James Welch. Illustrates discrepancies between White readers' beliefs about Indians and Indian myths of the trickster and how mythologies affect interpretation of the novels. Contrasts use of myth by Indian authors Leslie Silko and Gerald Vizenor. (LFL)

  13. Relationships between otolith and fish size from Mediterranean and north-eastern Atlantic species to be used in predator-prey studies.

    PubMed

    Giménez, J; Manjabacas, A; Tuset, V M; Lombarte, A

    2016-10-01

    Regressions between fish length and otolith size are provided for 40 species from the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean and 142 species from the Mediterranean Sea. Regressions were also estimated at genus level. Most of the regressions (c. 84%) explained a high percentage of the deviance (>75%).

  14. Potential Change in the Indian Monsoon Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C. C.; Williams, A. P.; Mishra, V.; Barlow, M. A.; Hoerling, M. P.; Hoell, A.

    2011-12-01

    In India and East Africa more than 350 million people face chronic undernourishment; population growth alone could bring this number to 500 million by 2030. Below normal rains have become more frequent as falling water tables, land degradation, warmer air temperatures, and rising fuel and fertilizer costs limit crop production growth. The Indian and East African boreal summer monsoons rely on large moisture transports from the southern Indian Ocean (SIO, 55-90°E, 0-15°S) and a low pressure cell over the north Indian Ocean (NIO, 55-90°E, 0-15°N). The relatively cloud free NIO warm pool receives a large excess of solar radiation, which the ocean transports south across the equator. While many factors influence this system, we present here observations and climate simulations linking preferential SIO-versus-NIO warming, evaporation and precipitation changes to weaker monsoon winds, weaker northward moisture transports, and warmer and drier weather in India and East Africa. Observations show that increasing SIO sea surface temperatures (SSTs) below rapid surface winds provide an 'evaporative window' (Fig. 1) that transfers energy and moisture to the atmosphere, increasing SIO rainfall. Climate simulations driven with i) observed SSTs and ii) mid-tropospheric SIO heating associate increased SIO rainfall with lower NIO rainfall. Given the empirical relationships between increasing SIO rainfall and reduced summer monsoon rains, continued warming in the Indian Ocean could lead to more frequent droughts in India, and perhaps, East Africa.

  15. Modeling of Air-Sea Interaction and Ocean Processes for the Northern Arabian Sea Circulation Autonomous Research Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    and space-time variability in the Northwestern Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea on time scales from days up to several seasonal cycles . OBJECTIVES...determine the mechanisms causing vertical mixing in the Arabian Sea: wind mixing, role of air- sea interaction and surface heat and fresh water ...equatorial region and the East African Coastal current, a source of low-salinity water for the Arabian Sea. APPROACH The fast-flowing Somali

  16. Federal Financing of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loon, Eric Van

    Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American Indian education under Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, Indian Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of Indian education. However, factors contributing to abuse of…

  17. Information About Indians of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toothman, Maryann; Jensen, Denise

    An intermediate or junior high level unit on Indians indigenous to Iowa focuses on history, culture, and cultural conflict between the Indians and white Americans. Many of the materials can be adapted for use in other states or for a more general unit on American Indians. Twenty lessons cover the location of Iowa; prehistoric Iowa; Indian society…

  18. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  19. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ...: 2010-16214] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC 20240, (202) 219-4066. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of...

  20. The American Indian Development Bank?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottinger, Richard

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, the Indian Finance Corporation Act died in committee for lack of Indian support. A model for an American Indian Development Bank is proposed, based on the International Finance Corporation of the World Bank. Two case studies illustrate how this model can meet Indian economic development needs. (SV)

  1. Early Spring Dust over the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) observed this large cloud of dust (brownish pixels) blowing from northern Africa across the Mediterranean Sea on March 4, 2002. The dust can be seen clearly blowing across Southern Italy, Albania, Greece, and Turkey-all along the Mediterranean's northeastern shoreline. Notice that there also appears to be human-made aerosol pollution (greyish pixels) pooling in the air just south of the Italian Alps and blowing southeastward over the Adriatic Sea. The Alps can be easily identified as the crescent-shaped, snow-capped mountain range in the top center of this true-color scene. There also appears to be a similar haze over Austria, Hungary, and Yugoslavia to the north and east of Italy. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  2. North Atlantic forcing of tropical Indian Ocean climate.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Mahyar; Prange, Matthias; Oppo, Delia W; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Merkel, Ute; Zhang, Xiao; Steinke, Stephan; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The response of the tropical climate in the Indian Ocean realm to abrupt climate change events in the North Atlantic Ocean is contentious. Repositioning of the intertropical convergence zone is thought to have been responsible for changes in tropical hydroclimate during North Atlantic cold spells, but the dearth of high-resolution records outside the monsoon realm in the Indian Ocean precludes a full understanding of this remote relationship and its underlying mechanisms. Here we show that slowdowns of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during Heinrich stadials and the Younger Dryas stadial affected the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate through changes to the Hadley circulation including a southward shift in the rising branch (the intertropical convergence zone) and an overall weakening over the southern Indian Ocean. Our results are based on new, high-resolution sea surface temperature and seawater oxygen isotope records of well-dated sedimentary archives from the tropical eastern Indian Ocean for the past 45,000 years, combined with climate model simulations of Atlantic circulation slowdown under Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 3 boundary conditions. Similar conditions in the east and west of the basin rule out a zonal dipole structure as the dominant forcing of the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate of millennial-scale events. Results from our simulations and proxy data suggest dry conditions in the northern Indian Ocean realm and wet and warm conditions in the southern realm during North Atlantic cold spells.

  3. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  4. [Indian workers in Oman].

    PubMed

    Longuenesse, E

    1985-01-01

    Until recently Oman was a country of emigration, but by 1980 an estimated 200,000 foreign workers were in the country due to the petroleum boom. Almost 1/3 of the estimated 300,000 Indian workers in the Gulf states were in Oman, a country whose colonial heritage was closely tied to that of India and many of whose inhabitants still speak Urdu. The number of work permits granted to Indians working in the private sector in Oman increased from 47,928 in 1976 to 80,787 in 1980. An estimated 110,000 Indians were working in Oman in 1982, the great majority in the construction and public works sector. A few hundred Indian women were employed by the government of Oman, as domestics, or in other capacities. No accurate data is available on the qualifications of Indian workers in Oman, but a 1979 survey suggested a relatively low illiteracy rate among them. 60-75% of Indians in Oman are from the state of Kerala, followed by workers from the Punjab and the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh and Bombay. Indian workers are recruited by specialized agencies or by friends or relatives already employed in Oman. Employers in Oman prefer to recruit through agencies because the preselection process minimizes hiring of workers unqualified for their posts. Officially, expenses of transportation, visas, and other needs are shared by the worker and the employer, but the demand for jobs is so strong that the workers are obliged to pay commissions which amount to considerable sums for stable and well paying jobs. Wages in Oman are however 2 to 5 times the level in India. Numerous abuses have been reported in recruitment practices and in failure of employers in Oman to pay the promised wages, but Indian workers have little recourse. At the same level of qualifications, Indians are paid less then non-Omani Arabs, who in turn receive less than Oman nationals. Indians who remain in Oman long enough nevertheless are able to support families at home and to accumulate considerable

  5. Crustal structure of northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, John J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Milkereit, Bernd; Mooney, Walter D.; Catchings, Rufus D.

    1986-06-01

    In 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a seismic refraction survey of northeastern California designed to characterize the structure in four geologic provinces: the Klamath Mountains, Cascade Range, Modoc Plateau, and Basin and Range provinces. The survey consisted of north-south lines in the Klamath Mountains and Modoc Plateau provinces, northwest-southeast lines centered on Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake volcano, and an east-west line linking all the profiles. All lines except the east-west line ranged in length from 125 to 140 km, contained three shot points, and were recorded by 100 instruments. The east-west line was 260 km long, contained six shot points, and was recorded by 200 instruments. The Klamath and Modoc lines yielded the simplest models. The Klamath model is finely layered from the surface to at least 14-km depth, consisting of a series of high-velocity layers (6.1-6.7 km/s), ranging in thickness from 1 to 4 km, with alternating positive and negative velocity gradients. A layer with an unreversed velocity of 7.0 km/s extends from 14 km downward to an unknown depth. The Modoc model, in contrast, is thickly layered and has lower velocity at all depths down to 25 km. The uppermost layer, 4.5 km thick, consists of low-velocity material (2-4.5 km/s). Velocity beneath this layer is much higher (6.2 km/s) and increases slowly with depth. A small velocity step (to 6.4 km/s) is seen at 11 km, and a larger step (to 7.0 km/s) is seen at 25 km depth. Moho is probably 38-45 km deep under the Modoc Plateau, but its depth is unknown under the Klamath Mountains. Models for the Shasta and Medicine Lake lines show special features including low velocity (less than 3.5 km/s) in the edifice of Mount Shasta but high velocity (5.6 km/s) at shallow depth (1-2 km) under the summit of Medicine Lake volcano. The model for the east-west line consists of a western part similar to the Klamath model, an eastern part similar to the Modoc model, and laterally changing

  6. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  7. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  8. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  9. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  10. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  11. Dengue virus serotype 4, northeastern Peru, 2008.

    PubMed

    Forshey, Brett M; Morrison, Amy C; Cruz, Cristhopher; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Guevara, Carolina; Camacho, Daria E; Alava, Araceli; Madrid, César; Beingolea, Luis; Suarez, Victor; Comach, Guillermo; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2009-11-01

    In 2008, dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) emerged in northeastern Peru, causing a large outbreak and displacing DENV-3, which had predominated for the previous 6 years. Phylogenetic analysis of 2008 and 2009 isolates support their inclusion into DENV-4 genotype II, forming a lineage distinct from strains that had previously circulated in the region.

  12. Chemical Dependency Regional Needs Assessment: Northeastern Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Marylee

    The Minnesota Model of Chemical Dependency Treatment, which evolved from a combination of the grassroots Alcoholics Anonymous movement and the State Mental Health Services in the 1960s has made Minnesota an international leader in chemical dependency treatment efforts. Northeastern Minnesota has shared this reputation with the state. In spite of…

  13. Pathogenic Hantaviruses, Northeastern Argentina and Eastern Paraguay

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Valeria P.; Bellomo, Carla; Maidana, Silvina; San Juan, Jorge; Tagliaferri, Paulina; Bargardi, Severino; Vazquez, Cynthia; Colucci, Norma; Estévez, Julio; Almiron, María

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first, to our knowledge, cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in northeastern Argentina and eastern Paraguay. Andes and Juquitiba (JUQ) viruses were characterized. JUQV was also confirmed in 5 Oligoryzomys nigripes reservoir species from Misiones. A novel Akodon-borne genetic hantavirus lineage was detected in 1 rodent from the Biologic Reserve of Limoy. PMID:17953094

  14. CHARCOAL-PRODUCING INDUSTRIES IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Charcoal workers in northeastern Brazil: Occupational risks and effects of exposure to wood smoke
    ABSTRACT
    Brazil has the largest production of charcoal in the world, which is used mostly in the iron and steel industries. In most of the production sites, the process is ba...

  15. Directly measured mid-depth circulation in the northeastern North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bower, A S; Le Cann, B; Rossby, T; Zenk, W; Gould, J; Speer, K; Richardson, P L; Prater, M D; Zhang, H-M

    2002-10-10

    The circulation of water masses in the northeastern North Atlantic Ocean has a strong influence on global climate owing to the northward transport of warm subtropical water to high latitudes. But the ocean circulation at depths below the reach of satellite observations is difficult to measure, and only recently have comprehensive, direct observations of whole ocean basins been possible. Here we present quantitative maps of the absolute velocities at two levels in the northeastern North Atlantic as obtained from acoustically tracked floats. We find that most of the mean flow transported northward by the Gulf Stream system at the thermocline level (about 600 m depth) remains within the subpolar region, and only relatively little enters the Rockall trough or the Nordic seas. Contrary to previous work, our data indicate that warm, saline water from the Mediterranean Sea reaches the high latitudes through a combination of narrow slope currents and mixing processes. At both depths under investigation, currents cross the Mid-Atlantic Ridge preferentially over deep gaps in the ridge, demonstrating that sea-floor topography can constrain even upper-ocean circulation patterns.

  16. Tourism and Indian Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    A cursory review of Federal support to the Eastern Cherokees shows that the Cherokee Historical Association and not the Cherokee Indians are the recipients and beneficiaries of many Federal grants. (JC)

  17. Indians on the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamail, Milton H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Kickapoo have actively sought to preserve their culture at Nacimiento in Coahuila, Mexico, evidence of an eroding culture is found at Eagle Pass, Texas where American Indian migrant workers reside temporarily. (JC)

  18. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  19. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  20. 25 CFR 31.3 - Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools. 31.3 Section 31.3... Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools. Indian and non-Indian children who are not eligible for... of maintenance in the school attended, when their presence will not exclude Indian pupils...

  1. Coastal Change Along the Shore of Northeastern South Carolina: The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, conducted a 7-year, multi-disciplinary study of coastal erosion in northeastern South Carolina. The main objective was to understand the geologic and oceanographic processes that control sediment movement along the region's shoreline and thereby improve projections of coastal change. The study used high-resolution remote sensing and sampling techniques to define the geologic framework and assess historic shoreline change. Based on these findings, oceanographic-process studies and numerical modeling were carried out to determine the rates and directions of sediment transport along South Carolina's Grand Strand.

  2. Distribution, Abundance, Behavior, and Bioacoustics of Endangered Whales in the Alaskan Beaufort and Eastern Chukchi Seas, 1979-86.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    hauled out on the ice (Appendix A, N780: Flight 43). Three walruses , all swimming, were seen in the western Alaskan Beaufort Sea in mid- September...develop relatively nearshore in the Chukchi Sea , but offshore and well north of oil exploration activities in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea (Braham et al., 1984...band of open water between the shorefast and heavy ice (>9596) west of Barrow in the northeastern Chukchi Sea . Ice

  3. Estimation of the Barrier Layer Thickness in the Indian Ocean Using Aquarius Salinity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-08

    derived from satellite measurements using a multilinear regression model (MRM) within the Indian Ocean. Sea surface salinity ( SSS ) from the recently...surface salinity ( SSS ), sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface height anomalies (SSHA). Three regions where the BLT variability is most...mechanisms are important for sustaining the BLT variability in each of the selected regions. Sensitivity tests show that SSS is the primary driver of

  4. Response of tropical clouds to the interannual variation of sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Rong; Liu, W.T.

    1996-03-01

    Connections between large-scale interannual variations of clouds, deep convection, atmospheric winds, vertical thermodynamic structure, and sea surface temperatures (SST) over global tropical oceans are examined. SST warming associated with El Nino significantly impacted the global tropical cloud field. Extensive variations of the total cloud field, dominated by changes of high and middle clouds, occurred in the northeastern Indian, western and central Pacific, and western Atlantic Oceans. Total cloud variation, dominated by low cloud variation, was relatively weak in the eastern Pacific and the Atlantic due to cancellation between high and low cloud changes. Destabilization of the lapse rate between 900 and 750 mb was more important in enhancing convective instability than was the change of local SST in the equatorial central Pacific during the 1987 El Nino. In the subtropical Pacific, the change of lapse rate between 900 and 750 mb associated with anomalous subsidence and the decrease of boundary-layer buoyancy due to a decrease of temperature and moisture were important in enhancing convective stability. Consequently, convection and high and middle clouds decreased in these areas. The change of low clouds in the equatoral and southeastern Atlantic correlated to local SST and SST changes in the equatorial eastern Pacific, and the increase of low clouds was consistent with the sharper inversion during the 1987 El Nino. The coherence between clouds and SST tendency shows that SST tendency leads cloud variation in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the change of clouds does not dominate the sign of SST tendency even though the cloud change was maximum during the 1987 El Nino. In some areas of the Indian, subtropical Pacific, and North Atlantic Oceans, cloud change leads SST tendency. Cloud change might affect SST tendency in these regions. 60 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  6. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  7. Southern Indian Ocean SST as a modulator for the progression of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Namendra Kumar; Rai, Shailendra; Mishra, Nishant

    2016-11-01

    This study explores the possibility of southern Indian Ocean (SIO) sea surface temperature (SST) as a modulator for the early phase of Indian summer monsoon and its possible physical mechanism. A dipole-like structure is obtained from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis which is similar to an Indian Ocean subtropical dipole (IOSD) found earlier. A subtropical dipole index (SDI) is defined based on the SST anomaly over the positive and negative poles. The regression map of rainfall over India in the month of June corresponding to the SDI during 1983-2013 shows negative patterns along the Western Ghats and Central India. However, the regression pattern is insignificant during 1952-1982. The multiple linear regression models and partial correlation analysis also indicate that the SDI acts as a dominant factor to influence the rainfall over India in the month of June during 1983-2013. The similar result is also obtained with the help of composite rainfall over the land points of India in the month of June for positive (negative) SDI events. It is also observed that the positive (negative) SDI delays (early) the onset dates of Indian monsoon over Kerala during the time domain of our study. The study is further extended to identify the physical mechanism of this impact, and it is found that the heating (cooling) in the region covering SDI changes the circulation pattern in the SIO and hence impacts the progression of monsoon in India.

  8. Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease in Northeastern Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    meningococcal meningits in Bamako, Mali: epidemiological features and analysis of vaccine efficacy, Lancet, ii, 315, 1982. 17. Kilpatrickt, MW. E., Maill. 1. A...r LIE) DTIC , . [iE LE CTE ili D PUBLICATION REPORT 1514 33/88 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE IN NORTHEASTERN AFRICA BY John E. Sippel, and...to the southern regions of the Sudan. Like the disease in the sub-Siaharan region, meningococcal meningitis in the Nile Valley is seaso- nal and most

  9. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  10. Young Once, Indian Forever: Youth Gangs in Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James; Lim, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Not unlike mainstream society of the United States, Indian Country faces new challenges regarding the values, mores, and behavior of its young people. Since their first encounters with European explorers, American Indians have fought to preserve their culture and traditions. Federal policies that addressed the "Indian problem" by…

  11. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation... Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...

  12. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the... Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada became effective upon publication of the...

  13. Deep Upwelling Beneath the Northeastern Afro-Arabian Continent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, M.; Wittlinger, G.; Debayle, E.; Sieminski, A.; Montagner, J. P.; Lepine, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    A large low shear-wave velocity anomaly is observed at upper-mantle depths beneath the northeastern Afro-Arabian continent, from the Turkana depression, South-West of Ethiopia, to the Red sea and South of Arabia. The question of connection between this anomaly and a source of material rising from the lower mantle is of major concern for understanding how a plume associated with the African superswell could interact with the upper mantle structure in the region. Thanks to the deployment of five broadband stations in Ethiopia and Yemen (INSU-RLBM), complementing several sets of broad-band stations in Arabia, Ethiopia and Djibouti (IRIS, Geoscope, PASSCAL) we address this question by using two broadband seismological tools: 1) higher-mode surface wave tomography and 2) receiver function technique. Higher-mode surface waves tomography shows a clear low shear-wave velocity anomaly down to 400 km depth beneath the Ethiopian plateau and the Afar depression. In a paper by Debayle et al. (2001), no continuity of this anomaly with a deeper low-velocity anomaly is observed beneath Ethiopia. Instead, a deeper low-velocity anomaly (down to ~500-600 km depth) was observed farther north beneath the Red Sea and South of Arabia, suggesting a possible link with lower mantle material rising there. Applying a SVD receiver function technique to a set of broad-band records from Arabia to Ethiopia, including Yemen, we discuss the above suggestion by looking at the seismic discontinuities of the upper-mantle transition zone.

  14. Glacial Refugium of Pinus pumila (Pall.) Regel in Northeastern Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Shilo, N A; Lozhkin, A V; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Pakhomov, A Y; Solomatkina, T B

    2007-02-10

    One of the most glowing representatives of the Kolyma flora [1], ''Pinus pumila'' (Pall.) Regel (Japanese stone pine), is a typical shrub in larch forests of the northern Okhotsk region, basins of the Kolyma and Indigirka rivers, and high-shrub tundra of the Chukchi Peninsula. It also forms a pine belt in mountains above the forest boundary, which gives way to the grass-underbrush mountain tundra and bald mountains. In the southern Chukchi Peninsula, ''Pinus pumila'' along with ''Duschekia fruticosa'' (Rupr.) Pouzar and ''Betula middendorffii'' Trautv. et C. A. Mey form trailing forests transitional between tundra and taiga [2]. Pinus pumila pollen, usually predominating in subfossil spore-and-pollen spectra of northeastern Siberia, is found as single grains or a subordinate component (up 2-3%, rarely 10%) in spectra of lacustrine deposits formed during the last glacial stage (isotope stage 2) in the Preboreal and Boreal times of the Holocene. Sometimes, its content increases to 15-22% in spectra of lacustrine deposits synchronous to the last glacial stage near the northern coast of the Sea of Okhotsk [3], evidently indicating the proximity of Japanese stone pine thickets.

  15. Teaching about Indians? Use the Real Stuff!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldkamp-Price, Betsy; Smith, David Lee

    1994-01-01

    Provides suggestions for teaching students about American Indians. Teachers need to learn more about Indians; confront misconceptions and stereotypes; have students make Indian crafts and foods; play Indian games; learn about contemporary Indian culture; be critical of resources; and contact local Indian or cultural groups. (MDM)

  16. Seismic anisotropy of western Mexico and northeastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Soto, Gerardo

    considered. Shear wave splitting measurements using teleseismic SKS and SKKS phases recorded by the ASCENT (A Seismic Collaborative Experiment in Northeastern Tibet) and INDEPTH-IV (International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalaya, Phase IV) experiments reveal significant anisotropy in north-eastern Tibet with a large delay time of up 2.2 sec, indicating that anisotropy exists in both the lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle. The coherence between fast polarization directions of split core phases and the left-lateral slip on eastern-striking, southeastern-striking and southern-striking faults in eastern Tibet as well as the surface velocity calculated from GPS data support the idea that left-lateral shear strain is the predominant cause of the orientation of the upper mantle petrofabrics. The left-lateral motion can be best understood as a manifestation of north-striking right-lateral simple shear exerted by the eastern edge of the underthrusting Indian plate as it penetrates into Eurasia, as well as the bending of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) by the foundering Burma-Andaman-Sumatra slab. Two plausible competing models are proposed for the flow of asthenosphere. In the first, the deforming lithosphere gliding over the passive asthenosphere induces flow of the asthenosphere. In the second, the asthenosphere beneath northeastern Tibet is flowing eastward in an asthenosphere channel that lies between the Ordos plateau and Sichuan basin, and around the EHS as it is being compressed between the advancing Indian continental lithosphere and the thick Tarim and Qaidam lithospheres to the north. Delay times from stations in the EHS have a maximum of 1.3 sec suggesting that although most anisotropy is residing in the lithosphere, some may be associated with flow of the asthenosphere. The retreating Burma slab induces flow that is toroidal and located exclusively around the northern edge of the slab. The curved fast directions of split shear waves for stations in the

  17. Halocoryza Alluaud 1919, sea-side beetles of the Indian, Atlantic (sensu lato), and Pacific Oceans: a generic synopsis and description of a remarkable new species from Baja California Sur, México (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Scaritini, Clivinina).

    PubMed

    Erwin, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Information on the three previously described species of Halocoryza Alluaud is updated and a new species for the genus from Isla Carmen, Sea of Cortés, Baja California Sur, México is described. Halocoryza whiteheadianasp. n. was found at UV light on a beach of that island. This species does not fit the profile of the other three species, i.e., living on coralline beach sands, or in the Mangrove intertidal zone. Two alternative possibilities as to why this is so are suggested and a study plan for testing these possibilities is proposed.

  18. Tectonic evaluation of the Nubian shield of Northeastern Sudan using thematic mapper imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Bechtel is nearing completion of a one-year program that uses digitally enhanced LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) data to compile the first comprehensive regional tectonic map of the Proterozoic Nubian Shield exposed in the northern Red Sea Hills of northeastern Sudan. The status of significant objectives of this study are given. Pertinent published and unpublished geologic literature and maps of the northern Red Sea Hills to establish the geologic framework of the region were reviewed. Thematic mapper imagery for optimal base-map enhancements was processed. Photo mosaics of enhanced images to serve as base maps for compilation of geologic information were completed. Interpretation of TM imagery to define and delineate structural and lithogologic provinces was completed. Geologic information (petrologic, and radiometric data) was compiled from the literature review onto base-map overlays. Evaluation of the tectonic evolution of the Nubian Shield based on the image interpretation and the compiled tectonic maps is continuing.

  19. Warm Indian Ocean, Weak Asian Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koll Roxy, Mathew; Ritika, Kapoor; Terray, Pascal; Murtugudde, Raghu; Ashok, Karumuri; Nath Goswami, Buphendra

    2015-04-01

    There are large uncertainties looming over the status and fate of the South Asian monsoon in a changing climate. Observations and climate models have suggested that anthropogenic warming in the past century has increased the moisture availability and the land-sea thermal contrast in the tropics, favoring an increase in monsoon rainfall. In contrast, we notice that South Asian subcontinent experienced a relatively subdued warming during this period. At the same time, the tropical Indian Ocean experienced a nearly monotonic warming, at a rate faster than the other tropical oceans. Using long-term observations and coupled model experiments, we suggest that the enhanced Indian Ocean warming along with the suppressed warming of the subcontinent weaken the land-sea thermal contrast throughout the troposphere, dampen the monsoon Hadley circulation, and reduce the rainfall over South Asia. As a result, the summer monsoon rainfall during 1901-2012 shows a significant weakening trend over South Asia, extending from Pakistan through central India to Bangladesh.

  20. Atlantic and Indian Oceans Pollution in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, B.

    2007-05-01

    Africa is the second largest and most populated continent after Asia. Geographically it is located between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Most of the Africa's most populated and industrialized cities are located along the coast of the continent facing the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, example of such cities include Casablanca, Dakar, Accra, Lagos, Luanda and Cape town all facing the Atlantic Ocean and cities like East London, Durban, Maputo, Dar-es-salaam and Mogadishu are all facing the Indian Ocean. As a result of the geographical locations of African Coastal Cities plus increase in their population, industries, sea port operations, petroleum exploration activities, trafficking of toxic wastes and improper waste management culture lead to the incessant increase in the pollution of the two oceans. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN i. The petroleum exploration activities going on along the coast of "Gulf of Guinea" region and Angola continuously causes oil spillages in the process of drilling, bunkering and discharging of petroleum products in the Atlantic Ocean. ii. The incessant degreasing of the Sea Ports "Quay Aprons" along the Coastal cities of Lagos, Luanda, Cape Town etc are continuously polluting the Atlantic Ocean with chemicals. iii. Local wastes generated from the houses located in the coastal cities are always finding their ways into the Atlantic Ocean. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE INDIAN OCEAN i. Unlike the Atlantic ocean where petroleum is the major pollutant, the Indian Ocean is polluted by Toxic / Radioactive waste suspected to have been coming from the developed nations as reported by the United Nations Environmental Programme after the Tsunami disaster in December 2004 especially along the coast of Somalia. ii. The degreasing of the Quay Aprons at Port Elizabeth, Maputo, Dar-es-Salaam and Mongolism Sea Ports are also another major source polluting the Indian Ocean. PROBLEMS GENERATED AS A RESULT OF THE OCEANS POLLUTION i. Recent report

  1. Indian Child Welfare in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull Knife Memorial Coll., Lame Deer, MT.

    This report is based upon a 1985-86 survey conducted by the Dull Knife Memorial College Indian Child Welfare Project. A series of workshops were conducted throughout Montana to acquaint providers of services for abused and neglected Indian children with the requirements of and issues associated with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.…

  2. The Indian Mineral Development Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Antoinette

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of the Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) and the possible effects it may have on Indian mineral development. Explains how the provisions of IMDA work to provide Indian tribes with greater flexibility for the development and sale of their mineral resources. (ML)

  3. A History of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon; Eder, Jeanne

    The goal of assimilating American Indians into an alien culture seemed inevitable as superior weaponry and foreign diseases conquered the Indians. Only in the 20th century has serious consideration been given to allowing Indians to choose their own destiny. Using many excerpts from historical accounts, this book describes educational efforts by…

  4. Literature of the Indian Subcontinent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimock, Edward C., Jr.

    Indian literature is intimately bound up with the Indian religious system. The earliest sacred writings are the Vedas. In addition to being poetry on nature, and later on, ritual formulae for controlling the universe, the Vedas have philosophical speculation. A large part of classical Indian literature consists of writing commentaries on…

  5. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  6. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  7. [Presidential Message on Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Richard

    President Nixon's message pointed out the deprivation and the injustices which the American Indians have suffered for centuries. It was noted that now is the time to break with the past and create conditions for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and decisions. The relationship between the Federal Government and the…

  8. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Deemed Approved Amended Tribal-State Class III... Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. On October 31, 2012, the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians and the State of California submitted Amendment I to the Class III compact approved on December...

  9. Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus orchard. Camera facing 118" east-southeast. - Goerlitz House, 9893 Highland Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Role of south Indian Ocean swells in modulating the north Indian Ocean wave climate through modelling and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiksha, S. V.; Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V. M.; Rashmi, R.

    2012-04-01

    Implementation and validation of a third generation wave model, Wavewatch III was used to study the characteristics of the south Indian ocean swells and their propagation in the north Indian Ocean. The NCEP reanalysis wind data (2.5° x 2.5°) has been used to generate the wind waves for the entire Indian Ocean during 2006 - 2007. The modelled wave parameters have been compared with measured buoy data and with merged altimeter data. The model results show good agreement with the buoy and altimeter data. A case study is carried out to study the propagation of the swells generated at the roaring 40°S in the Indian Ocean during May 2007. The "southern swell" occurred during May 2007 has been successfully reproduced in the wave model, which confirmed by the comparison of modelled significant wave heights with the merged altimeter significant wave heights. These swells were generated in the Atlantic ocean near the southern tip of South Africa and propagated towards the north Indian Ocean. These waves touches the Madagascar region and further hits the La Reunion islands after three days thus creating numerous damages near the islands. The magnitude of the swell is around 15m near the generation area and it reduces to around 6m near the La Reunion islands while propagating towards the north Indian Ocean. Further the swell energy is spataially distributed in the northern and southern Indian Ocean. The study reveals that the swells generated in the roaring forties and propagating in the SW/SSW direction influences more to Bay of Bengal than Arabian Sea. This occurs during pre-monsoon season primarily because large scale winds are weak in the north Indian Ocean during this period and hence swells from south Indian Ocean dominates at this time. The case of "southern swell" also happened to be at the same season. Further wave parameters were extracted at few locations in the northern Indian Ocean to study the impact of May 2007 swells on the wave climate. An average of around

  11. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J.; Campbell, John L.; Klein, Eric S.; Likens, Gene E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-03-01

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ18O and δ2H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968–2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43o56‧N, 71o45‧W). We found a significant reduction in δ18O and δ2H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ18O and δ2H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US.

  12. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US.

    PubMed

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J; Campbell, John L; Klein, Eric S; Likens, Gene E; Welker, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-14

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968-2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43(°)56'N, 71(°)45'W). We found a significant reduction in δ(18)O and δ(2)H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ(18)O and δ(2)H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US.

  13. Taxonomic guide and historical review of starfishes in northeastern Brazil (Echinodermata, Asteroidea)

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Anne Isabelley; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; Pereira Dias, Thelma Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Presently more than 1900 species of sea stars are recognized, of which 77 are recorded for the coast of Brazil. Although the first starfish record in Brazil was published 363 years ago, our knowledge of this fauna remains unsatisfactory from a systematic and ecological point of view, particularly in the north and northeastern regions of the country. This study provides the first annotated list of sea stars from northeastern Brazil. Material described herein is housed at the collections of the Federal University of Paraíba, Federal University of Sergipe, and the Federal University of Bahia, Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo and Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro. Twenty-one species were identified, belonging to 12 genera, 10 families, and 5 orders. Descriptions of species are provided. Three new occurrences were recorded for northeast Brazil: Astropecten alligator, Luidia ludwigi scotti, and Mithrodia clavigera. Highest diversities of Asteroidea were encountered for the states of Bahia (n = 14 spp), Paraíba (n = 12 spp) and Pernambuco (n = 9 spp). No species were recorded for the states of Maranhão and Sergipe. Sandy substrates and depths below 10 m were the least sampled areas over the continental shelf. Herein we provide a first panorama on the fauna of Asteroidea occurring in the northeast region of Brazil, hopefully to function as a basic reference for biodiversity studies in this poorly studied area. PMID:25408612

  14. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US

    PubMed Central

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J.; Campbell, John L.; Klein, Eric S.; Likens, Gene E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ18O and δ2H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968–2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43o56′N, 71o45′W). We found a significant reduction in δ18O and δ2H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ18O and δ2H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US. PMID:26971874

  15. Taxonomic guide and historical review of starfishes in northeastern Brazil (Echinodermata, Asteroidea).

    PubMed

    Gondim, Anne Isabelley; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; Pereira Dias, Thelma Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Presently more than 1900 species of sea stars are recognized, of which 77 are recorded for the coast of Brazil. Although the first starfish record in Brazil was published 363 years ago, our knowledge of this fauna remains unsatisfactory from a systematic and ecological point of view, particularly in the north and northeastern regions of the country. This study provides the first annotated list of sea stars from northeastern Brazil. Material described herein is housed at the collections of the Federal University of Paraíba, Federal University of Sergipe, and the Federal University of Bahia, Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo and Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro. Twenty-one species were identified, belonging to 12 genera, 10 families, and 5 orders. Descriptions of species are provided. Three new occurrences were recorded for northeast Brazil: Astropectenalligator, Luidialudwigiscotti, and Mithrodiaclavigera. Highest diversities of Asteroidea were encountered for the states of Bahia (n = 14 spp), Paraíba (n = 12 spp) and Pernambuco (n = 9 spp). No species were recorded for the states of Maranhão and Sergipe. Sandy substrates and depths below 10 m were the least sampled areas over the continental shelf. Herein we provide a first panorama on the fauna of Asteroidea occurring in the northeast region of Brazil, hopefully to function as a basic reference for biodiversity studies in this poorly studied area.

  16. Water-quality data for Navajo National Monument, northeastern Arizona--2001-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Blakemore E.

    2003-01-01

    Water-quality data are provided for six sites in Navajo National Monument in northeastern Arizona. These data describe the current water quality and provide baseline water-quality information for monitoring future trends. Water samples were collected from six sites near three ancient Indian ruins during September 2001 to August 2002. Two springs and one well near Betatakin Ruin, one spring is near Keet Seel Ruin, and one spring and one stream are near Inspection House Ruin. Water from all the sites is from the N aquifer, a regional sandstone aquifer that is the source of drinking water for most members of the Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe in northeastern Arizona. Concentrations of dissolved solids, major ions, trace elements, and uranium were low at the six sites. Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 94 to 221 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate (as nitrogen) were generally low (less than 0.05 to 0.92 milligrams per liter) and were within the range of concentrations at other N-aquifer sites within 20 miles of the study area. Water samples from Inscription House Spring, Navajo Creek Tributary (near Inscription House Ruin), and Keet Seel Ruin Spring contained indicators of human or animal wastes--fecal coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria.

  17. Continuous exhumation of mantle-derived rocks at the Southwest Indian Ridge for 11 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Daniel; Cannat, Mathilde; Rouméjon, Stéphane; Andreani, Muriel; Birot, Dominique; Bronner, Adrien; Brunelli, Daniele; Carlut, Julie; Delacour, Adélie; Guyader, Vivien; MacLeod, Christopher J.; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mendel, Véronique; Ménez, Bénédicte; Pasini, Valerio; Ruellan, Etienne; Searle, Roger

    2013-04-01

    The global mid-ocean ridge system, where tectonic plates diverge, is traditionally thought of as the largest single volcanic feature on the Earth. Yet, wide expanses of smooth sea floor in the easternmost part of the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Indian Ocean lacks the hummocky morphology that is typical for submarine volcanism. At other slow-spreading ridges, the sea floor can extend by faulting the existing lithosphere, along only one side of the ridge axis. However, the smooth sea floor in the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge also lacks the corrugated texture created by such faulting. Instead, the sea floor is smooth on both sides of the ridge axis and is thought to be composed of altered mantle-derived rocks. Here we use side-scan sonar to image the sea floor and dredge samples to analyse the composition of two sections of the Southwest Indian Ridge, between 62°05'E and 64°40'E, where the sea floor formed over the past 11 million years. We show that the smooth floor is almost entirely composed of seawater-altered mantle-derived rocks that were brought to the surface by large detachment faults on both sides of the ridge axis. Faulting accommodates almost 100% of plate divergence and the detachment faults have repeatedly flipped polarity. We suggest that this tectonic process could also explain the exhumation of mantle-derived rocks at the magma-poor margins of rifted continents.

  18. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  19. Early Indian People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doermann, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Using bits and pieces of the past such as charred bits of wood from campfires, broken pieces of clay pots, stone spearpoints and arrowheads, and shell or copper ornaments, the archaeologist tries to put together the story of early Indian people in the Minnesota region. A short story, one of eight articles, re-creates the kill of an Itasca bison…

  20. Who Is An Indian?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jeanette; Costo, Rupert

    1980-01-01

    A resolution submitted by the National Tribal Chairmen's Association declares only tribes have the right to determine tribal membership. The resolution results from an emergency meeting of the tribes to review the six federal options of defining "Indian" for eligibility to receive educational services. (ERB)

  1. Indians of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The booklet gives a general introduction to American Indians in New Mexico. Covering historical background and present status, reports are given for these tribes: the 19 Pueblos (i.e., Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, and Zuni), the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apaches, and the Navajos. Also included are 26 places of interest such as Acoma…

  2. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  3. Indians as Archaeologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badhorse, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes a cooperative program between Fort Belknap College, in northern Montana, and an archeological firm designed to provide Native American students with hands-on experience in research and excavation of Indian artifacts. Reviews benefits of the partnership with respect to student experience and knowledge of ancient cultures. (MAB)

  4. Indian School Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age…

  5. Prison Reform and Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Charles

    1976-01-01

    Briefly describing the history of prison reform and the American Indian, this article argues that the "professed" humanitarian philosophy of the reformers would not have been extended to "peoples languishing in prison or sequestered on reservations had it not been expedient for the business interests of the larger society". (JC)

  6. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  7. Great Indian Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastron, Allen

    Brief biographies and pen and ink portraits of over 40 chiefs and other distinguised American Indians comprise this book. Each page contains a full page portrait and a biography that notes tribal affiliation, important dates, geographical location, major accomplishments, and dealings with other tribes, white settlers, and the United States or…

  8. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  9. Problems of Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Marigold

    Previous approaches to the learning problems of American Indian children are viewed as inadequate. An alternative is suggested which emphasizes the problem solution strategies which these children bring to the school situation. Solutions were analyzed in terms of: (1) their probability; (2) their efficiency at permitting a present problem to be…

  10. English for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slager, William R., Ed.; Madsen, Betty M., Ed.

    The present issue of "English for American Indians" follows the format and approach of the Spring 1970 issue. (See ED 040 396.) In the lead article, Evelyn Hatch surveys some of the research in first language acquisition and points out its implications for second language teaching. Her main thesis is that with the best of intentions,…

  11. Marsden Hartley: "Indian Fantasy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Uses Marsden Hartley's "Indian Fantasy" to explore with students in grades 7-9 the variety of expressive qualities of an early twentieth-century U.S. artist working abroad. Presents lesson objectives, instructional strategies, evaluation criteria, and background information about the artist and painting. (GEA)

  12. Downriver Indians' Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Exline, Jesse

    Yurok Indian legends in Yurok Unifon text include English translations of the entire texts in order to produce fluent reading for English speakers and a continuous text for Yurok readers. Although corresponding sentences are numbered, translation is not word-for-word or sentence-for-sentence. The five stories refer to a time when animals could…

  13. Indian Wisdom Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanche, Jerry D.

    Rather than simply recreating a real or imagined event or experience for entertainment purposes, the wisdom stories of the American Indians were sophisticated teaching devices that kept alive the history and traditions of the tribe at the same time that they instructed the young tribe members in the areas of history, geography, nature study, and…

  14. Experiencing Indian Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Carol; And Others

    Intended to provide for the reader a new road to study India, the booklet encourages students to experience the languages of India as an avenue to learning something about its people. The workbook introduces the reader to the languages of India; shows through activities and research the contributions of Indian languages to English; and provides a…

  15. Northwest Coast Indian Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Thomas; Knecht, Elizabeth

    The visual art forms of the Northwest Coast Indian Tribes of Alaska (Haida, Tlingit, and Tsimshian) share common distinctive design elements (formline, ovoid, U-form, and curvilinear shapes) which are referred to as the "Northern Style." Designs represent events or characters taken from the oral tradition of song and legend.…

  16. The Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Winona DuBray

    The document presents six articles that provide a glimpse of the uniqueness of American Indian cultural conflict, focusing on aspects of the culture which warrant special attention. Since there are over 100 tribes, an effort was made to enumerate commonalities amongst the tribal cultures in looking at issues raised in the urban areas throughout…

  17. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Published by the U.S. Department of the Interior, this brief booklet on the historical development of the Cherokee Nation emphasizes the Tribe's relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its improved economy. Citing tourism as the major tribal industry, tribal enterprises are named and described (a 61 unit motor court in existence since…

  18. INDIAN EDUCATION WORKSHOPS. PART I - EDUCATION OF INDIAN ADULTS. PART II - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN INDIAN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEE, NICHOLAS, ED.; ROESSEL, ROBERT A., JR., ED.

    DURING THE SUMMER OF 1962, THE INDIAN EDUCATION CENTER OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY OFFERED TWO COURSES--EDUCATION OF THE INDIAN ADULT AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN INDIAN EDUCATION. PAPERS WRITTEN BY STUDENTS IN THE COURSES AND REPORTS OF GUEST SPEAKERS ARE PRESENTED IN THIS VOLUME. TOPICS COVERED INCLUDE ADULT EDUCATION THROUGH PARENT-TEACHER…

  19. Gray whale sightings in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahara, Yuka; Fujiwara, Amane; Ito, Keizo; Miyashita, Kazushi; Mitani, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) are distributed within the productive neritic and estuarine waters of the North Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, and adjacent waters of the Arctic Ocean. They migrate to high-latitude feeding grounds each spring. Their main feeding grounds in the Arctic include the Chirikov Basin, the northeastern Chukchi Sea from Pt. Hope to Cape Lisburne and Pt. Lay to Pt. Barrow, and the northwestern Chukchi Sea along the Chukotka coast. Although sightings are rare in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, we observed three gray whales in two groups in this area in September 2014. A mud plume was observed near one of the whales, suggesting the animal had been feeding. In the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, large-scale monitoring of the distributions of marine mammals has been continuously conducted since 1979; however, there has been less monitoring in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Therefore, it is necessary to record opportunistic sightings, such as those described here.

  20. POSSIBLE TSUNAMI ALONG THE NORTHWESTERN COAST OF THE UNITED STATES INFERRED FROM INDIAN TRADITIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heaton, Thomas H.; Snavely, Parke D.

    1985-01-01

    There is no direct geologic or historical evidence presently available to confirm that great shallow subduction earthquakes have occurred along the coast of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. However, there are reports describing Indian legends of great sea-level disturbances that may be related to large nearby earthquakes. In this letter, we briefly review the history of exploration and settlement of this region by nonnative people and then discuss legends from Indians in northern Washington and northern California. Refs.

  1. China and the United States in the Indian Ocean: An Emerging Strategic Triangle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    the expected emergence of a “strategic triangle”—the prospects of Indian sea power. While no one has rigorously defi ned this international-relations...neighborhood, notably the straits at Hormuz, Malacca, and Bab el Mandeb. Ship- ping is at its most vulnerable in such confi ned waterways. Strategists in...take the concept of an Indian Monroe Doctrine for granted. C. Raja Mohan , to name one leading pundit, routinely uses this ter- minology, matter-of

  2. Salish Sea

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Health of the Salish Sea Report is a collaboration between EPA and Environment Canada to examine the health of the Salish Sea ecosystem in Washington and British Columbia, encompassing the Puget Sound and Georgia Basin.

  3. Interbasin effects of the Indian Ocean on Pacific decadal climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kimoto, Masahide; Watanabe, Masahiro; Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu; Ishii, Masayoshi

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the significant impact of the Indian Ocean on the Pacific climate on decadal timescales by comparing two sets of data assimilation experiments (pacemaker experiments) conducted over recent decades. For the Indian Ocean of an atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate model, we assimilate ocean temperature and salinity anomalies defined as deviations from climatology or as anomalies with the area-averaged changes for the Indian Ocean subtracted. When decadal sea surface temperature (SST) trends are observed to be strong over the Indian Ocean, the equatorial thermocline uniformly deepens, and the model simulates the eastward tendencies of surface wind aloft. Surface winds strongly converge around the maritime continent, and the associated strengthening of the Walker circulation suppresses an increasing trend in the equatorial Pacific SST through ocean thermocline shoaling, similar to common changes associated with seasonal Indian Ocean warming.

  4. Indonesian throughflow nutrient fluxes and their potential impact on Indian Ocean productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, Jennifer M.; Strutton, Peter G.; Coles, Victoria J.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Matear, Richard J.

    2014-07-01

    The Indonesian throughflow (ITF) is a chokepoint in the upper ocean thermohaline circulation, carrying Pacific waters through the strongly mixed Indonesian Seas and into the Indian Ocean. Yet the influence of the ITF on biogeochemical fluxes into the Indian Ocean is largely unknown. This study determines the first depth- and time-resolved nitrate, phosphate, and silicate fluxes at the three main exit passages of the ITF: Lombok Strait, Ombai Strait, and Timor Passage. Nutrient flux as well as its variability with depth and time differs greatly between the passages. We estimate the effective flux of nutrients into the Indian Ocean by accounting for existing nutrients in the basin and find it largest in the upper 300-400 m. This suggests that the majority of ITF nutrient supply to the Indian Ocean is to thermocline waters, where it is likely to support new production and significantly impact Indian Ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  5. Three-dimensional Mechanical Modeling of the GPS Velocity Field around the Northeastern Tibet and Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Li, Y.; Teng, C.

    2004-12-01

    The northeastern Tibet and surrounding region is an intense active tectonic area with great potential of strong earthquakes. Active tectonics is featured mainly by left-lateral transpressive deformation along the Qilian Shan and right-lateral transtensional deformation between the Alashan and the Ordos blocks out of the Tibet. This region gives a good example to investigate how the strain rate is partitioning around the plateau edge and how the remainder strain rate of Tibetan deformation is propagating towards the interior of the Eurasia plate with relative to the Indian-Eurasia convergence. In this study, we use three-dimensional mechanical models incorporated the main active faults as Coulomb-type friction zones to simulate the surface velocity field as dense GPS data shown. We simplify the rheological structure of lithosphere as a frictional upper crust underlying with the viscoelastic lower crust with available heat flow. Topographic loading on the model surface and hydrostatic pressure on the model base are added. The models are solved with Adeli finite element code, and modeled velocities are checked using the chi-square merit function with dense GPS data. We test the model with fault friction ranged from 0.4 to 0.01 on different major fault systems. Results show: (1) with a relatively high fault friction ~0.4-0.2, the northeastern Tibet and surrounding region could behave like diffusive deformation, but the modeled velocities and the strain rate seem unable to fit the GPS data and the seismic data, respectively. (2) To best fit the GPS data, a relatively low fault friction ~0.05-0.02 is needed. At this condition, the deformation is localized mainly around the Qilian Shan in northeastern Tibet and between the Alashan and the Ordos blocks out of the Tibet, consistent with the active tectonics and the strong earthquake distribution. (3) Changes of the fault friction out of the Tibet seem to affect the modeled velocity quite small, suggesting that the

  6. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  7. Bering Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The skies of the Bering Sea were relatively clear again in this SeaWiFS image showing a band of aquamarine colored water. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  8. Bering Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Much of the Bering Sea is clear in this SeaWiFS image. The large expanse of bright aquamarine water is clearly visible. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  9. Recent sedimentation, northeastern Port Valdez, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Harold D.

    1981-09-01

    Sediments accumulating on the northeastern shore of Port Valdez, a fjord leading to Prince William Sound in southern Alaska, are derived from both deltaic and alluvial fan processes. The resulting thick wedge of Recent silts, sands, shells and gravels lies atop irregular ridges of local graywacke bedrock and scattered till deposits. Seismic reflection profiling augmented by soil borings indicates that rapid infilling and upbuilding has occurred at this site. Evidence of slumping suggests general instability of steep submarine slopes in an area characterized by strong earthquakes and large tidal ranges.

  10. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  11. Atlantic and indian oceans pollution in africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Babagana

    Africa is the second largest and most populated continent after Asia. Geographically it is located between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Most of the Africa's most populated and industrialized cities are located along the coast of the continent facing the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, example of such cities include Casablanca, Dakar, Accra, Lagos, Luanda and Cape town all facing the Atlantic Ocean and cities like East London, Durban, Maputo, Dar-es-salaam and Mogadishu are all facing the Indian Ocean. As a result of the geographical locations of African Coastal Cities plus increase in their population, industries, sea port operations, petroleum exploration activities, trafficking of toxic wastes and improper waste management culture lead to the incessant increase in the pollution of the two oceans. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN i. The petroleum exploration activities going on along the coast of "Gulf of Guinea" region and Angola continuously causes oil spillages in the process of drilling, bunkering and discharging of petroleum products in the Atlantic Ocean. ii. The incessant degreasing of the Sea Ports "Quay Aprons" along the Coastal cities of Lagos, Luanda, Cape Town etc are continuously polluting the Atlantic Ocean with chemicals. iii. Local wastes generated from the houses located in the coastal cities are always finding their ways into the Atlantic Ocean. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE INDIAN OCEAN i. Unlike the Atlantic ocean where petroleum is the major pollutant, the Indian Ocean is polluted by Toxic / Radioactive waste suspected to have been coming from the developed nations as reported by the United Nations Environmental Programme after the Tsunami disaster in December 2004 especially along the coast of Somalia. ii. The degreasing of the Quay Aprons at Port Elizabeth, Maputo, Dar-es-Salaam and Mongolism Sea Ports are also another major source polluting the Indian Ocean. PROBLEMS GENERATED AS A RESULT OF THE OCEANS POLLUTION i. Recent report

  12. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline

    PubMed Central

    Jurgens, Laura J.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T.; Schiebelhut, Lauren M.; Dawson, Michael N.; Grosberg, Richard K.; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species. PMID:26039349

  13. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Laura J; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T; Schiebelhut, Lauren M; Dawson, Michael N; Grosberg, Richard K; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species.

  14. Decadal and interannual variability of the Indian Ocean SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Lakshmi; Krishnamurthy, V.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of the Indian Ocean on interannual and decadal timescales is investigated in observations, coupled model simulation and model experiment. The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) mode was specifically analyzed using a data-adaptive method. This study reveals one decadal mode and two interannual modes in the sea surface temperature (SST) of the IOD. The decadal mode in the IOD is associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) of the North Pacific SST. The two interannual modes are related to the biennial and canonical components of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), consistent with previous studies. This study hypothesizes that the relation between the Indian Ocean and the North Pacific on decadal scale may be through the northerly winds from the western North Pacific. The long simulation of Community Climate System Model version 4 also indicates the presence of IOD modes associated with the decadal PDO and canonical ENSO modes. However, the model fails to simulate the biennial ENSO mode in the Indian Ocean. The relation between the Indian Ocean and North Pacific Ocean is further supported by the regionally de-coupled model experiment.

  15. The simulated Indian monsoon: A GCM sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessy, M. J.; Kinter, J. L., III; Kirtman, B.; Marx, L.; Nigam, S.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.; Straus, D.; Vernekar, A.; Xue, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A series of sensitivity experiments are conducted in an attempt to understand and correct deficiencies in the simulation of the seasonal mean Indian monsoon with a global atmospheric general circulation model. The seasonal mean precipitation is less than half that observed. This poor simulation in seasonal integrations is independent of the choice of initial conditions and global sea surface temperature data used. Experiments are performed to test the sensitivity of the Indian monsoon simulation to changes in orography, vegetation, soil, wetness, and cloudiness. The authors find that the deficiency of the model precipitation simulation may be attributed to the use of an enhanced orography in the integrations. Replacement of this orography with a mean orography results in a much more realistic simulation of Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall. Experiments with a linear primitive equation model on the sphere suggest that this striking improvement is due to modulations of the orographically forced waves in the lower troposphere. This improvement in the monsoon simulation is due to the kinematic and dynamical effects of changing the topography, rather than the thermal effects, which were minimal. The magnitude of the impact on the Indian monsoon of the other sensitivity experiments varied considerably, but was consistently less than the impact of using the mean orography. However, results from the soil moisture sensitivity experiments suggest a possibly important role for soil moisture in simulating tropical precipitation, including that associated with the Indian monsoon.

  16. Indian scales and inventories

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, S.

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  17. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  18. An ensemble weighting approach for dendroclimatology: drought reconstructions for the northeastern Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fang, Keyan; Wilmking, Martin; Davi, Nicole; Zhou, Feifei; Liu, Changzhi

    2014-01-01

    Traditional detrending methods assign equal mean value to all tree-ring series for chronology developments, despite that the mean annual growth changes in different time periods. We find that the strength of a tree-ring model can be improved by giving more weights to tree-ring series that have a stronger climate signal and less weight to series that have a weaker signal. We thus present an ensemble weighting method to mitigate these potential biases and to more accurately extract the climate signals in dendroclimatology studies. This new method has been used to develop the first annual precipitation reconstruction (previous August to current July) at the Songmingyan Mountain and to recalculate the tree-ring chronology from Shenge site in Dulan area in northeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP), a marginal area of Asian summer monsoon. The ensemble weighting method explains 31.7% of instrumental variance for the reconstructions at Songmingyan Mountain and 57.3% of the instrumental variance in the Dulan area, which are higher than those developed using traditional methods. We focus on the newly introduced reconstruction at Songmingyan Mountain, which showsextremely dry (wet) epochs from 1862-1874, 1914-1933 and 1991-1999 (1882-1905). These dry/wet epochs were also found in the marginal areas of summer monsoon and the Indian subcontinent, indicating the linkages between regional hydroclimate changes and the Indian summer monsoon.

  19. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  20. Native Indian Teachers: A Key to Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkness, Verna J.

    1986-01-01

    Indian teachers are critical to the realization of quality education for the Indian population. Indians would be effective teachers of Indian identity, traditions, language, and psychology in addition to the usual subjects. Home-school and community-school relationships would likely improve if Native Indian staff were a significant presence in the…

  1. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen to the northern Indian Ocean from the Indian monsoonal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, V. R.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.; Hemalatha, K. P. J.; Rao, Y. V.

    2015-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were measured in 27 major and medium monsoonal estuaries along the Indian coast during southwest monsoon in order to understand the spatial variability in their concentrations and fluxes to the northern Indian Ocean. A strong spatial variability (~20-fold) in DOC and DON was observed in the Indian monsoonal estuaries due to variable characteristics of the catchment area and volume of discharge. It is estimated that the Indian monsoonal estuaries transport ~2.37 ± 0.47 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g) of DOC and ~0.41 ± 0.08 Tg of DON during wet period to the northern Indian Ocean. The Bay of Bengal receives 3 times higher DOC and DON (1.82 and 0.30 Tg, respectively) than the Arabian Sea (0.55 and 0.11 Tg). Catchment area normalized fluxes of DOC and DON were found to be higher in the estuaries located in the southwestern than the estuaries from other regions of India. It was attributed to relatively higher soil organic carbon, biomass carbon, and heavy rainfall in catchment areas of the rivers from the former region. It has been noticed that neither catchment area nor discharge volume of the river controls the fluxes of DOC and DON to the northern Indian Ocean. Since the total load of DOC and DON is strongly linked to the volume of discharge, alterations in the freshwater discharge due to natural or anthropogenic activities may have significant influence on organic matter fluxes to the Indian coastal waters and its impact on microbial food web dynamics needs further evaluation.

  2. Indian Ocean analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Gary

    1992-01-01

    The background and goals of Indian Ocean thermal sampling are discussed from the perspective of a national project which has research goals relevant to variation of climate in Australia. The critical areas of SST variation are identified. The first goal of thermal sampling at this stage is to develop a climatology of thermal structure in the areas and a description of the annual variation of major currents. The sampling strategy is reviewed. Dense XBT sampling is required to achieve accurate, monthly maps of isotherm-depth because of the high level of noise in the measurements caused by aliasing of small scale variation. In the Indian Ocean ship routes dictate where adequate sampling can be achieved. An efficient sampling rate on available routes is determined based on objective analysis. The statistical structure required for objective analysis is described and compared at 95 locations in the tropical Pacific and 107 in the tropical Indian Oceans. XBT data management and quality control methods at CSIRO are reviewed. Results on the mean and annual variation of temperature and baroclinic structure in the South Equatorial Current and Pacific/Indian Ocean Throughflow are presented for the region between northwest Australia and Java-Timor. The mean relative geostrophic transport (0/400 db) of Throughflow is approximately 5 x 106 m3/sec. A nearly equal volume transport is associated with the reference velocity at 400 db. The Throughflow feeds the South Equatorial Current, which has maximum westward flow in August/September, at the end of the southeasterly Monsoon season. A strong semiannual oscillation in the South Java Current is documented. The results are in good agreement with the Semtner and Chervin (1988) ocean general circulation model. The talk concludes with comments on data inadequacies (insufficient coverage, timeliness) particular to the Indian Ocean and suggestions on the future role that can be played by Data Centers, particularly with regard to quality

  3. 76 FR 58076 - Designation of the Indian Mujahideen, Also Known as Indian Mujahedeen, Also Known as Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM), as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant... known as Indian Mujahidin, also known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM). Therefore,...

  4. Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Principal Components Analysis in T-Mode Varimax rotated was performed on Antarctic and Arctic monthly sea ice concentration anomalies (SICA) fields for the period 1979-2014, in order to investigate which are the main spatial characteristics of sea ice and its relationship with atmospheric circulation. This analysis provides 5 patterns of sea ice for inter-spring period and 3 patterns for summer-autumn for Antarctica (69,2% of the total variance) and 3 different patterns for summer-autumn and 3 for winter-spring season for the Arctic Ocean (67,8% of the total variance).Each of these patterns has a positive and negative phase. We used the Monthly Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations database derived from satellite information generated by NASA Team algorithm. To understand the links between the SICA and climate trends, we extracted the mean pressure and, temperature field patterns for the months with high loadings (positive or negative) of the sea ice patterns that gave distinct atmospheric structures associated with each one. For Antarctica, the first SICA spatial winter-spring pattern in positive phase shows a negative SICA centre over the Drake Passage and north region of Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas together with another negative SICA centre over the East Indian Ocean. Strong positive centres over the rest of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans basins and the Amundsen Sea are also presented. A strong negative pressure anomaly covers most of the Antarctic Continent centered over the Bellingshausen Sea accompanied by three positive pressure anomalies in middle-latitudes. During recent years, the Arctic showed persistent associations of sea-ice and climate patterns principally during summer. Our strongest summer-autumn pattern in negative phase showed a marked reduction on SICA over western Arctic, primarily linked to an overall increase in Arctic atmospheric temperature most pronounced over the Beaufort, Chukchi and East Siberian Seas, and a positive anomaly of

  5. 19 CFR 12.61 - Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. 12.61...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.61 Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. (a) Fur-seal or sea-otter skins taken by Indians, Aleuts, or...

  6. 19 CFR 12.61 - Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. 12.61...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.61 Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. (a) Fur-seal or sea-otter skins taken by Indians, Aleuts, or...

  7. 19 CFR 12.61 - Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. 12.61...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.61 Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. (a) Fur-seal or sea-otter skins taken by Indians, Aleuts, or...

  8. 19 CFR 12.61 - Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. 12.61...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.61 Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. (a) Fur-seal or sea-otter skins taken by Indians, Aleuts, or...

  9. 19 CFR 12.61 - Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. 12.61...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.61 Fur-seal or sea-otter skins permitted entry. (a) Fur-seal or sea-otter skins taken by Indians, Aleuts, or...

  10. Bay of Bengal Surface and Thermocline and the Arabian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    oceanographic processes that exchange low salinity surface and upper thermocline water of the Bay of Bengal with the salty Arabian Sea and tropical Indian Ocean ...e.g. where do the eddies come from? 2. Investigating advective pathways, and the role of isopycnal mixing, exchanging upper ocean water between the...the tropical Indian Ocean water , including the Indonesian Throughflow. APPROACH In situ observational data collected as part of ASIRI and

  11. Bedforms and Evolution of Tropical Estuaries: Examples from Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vital, H.; Soares, C.; Rocha, G.; Pereira, T.; Eichler, P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper intends to show the geomorphological and sedimentary responses of tropical estuaries to meteorological and oceanographic forcing. The study area is located on the coastal zone of Rio Grande do Norte State, northeastern Brazil. This coast is under natural influence of waves and tides with a semidiurnal mesotidal regime and anthropogenic influence (urbanization, oil and salt industries, shrimp farms, and tourism). An operational methodology was developed using collection and analysis of an integrated dataset (comprising remote sensing, oceanographic, hy-droacoustic, and sedimentologic data). All data were integrated through a geographical infor-mation system database. The imaging of subaqueous features allowed the identification of differ-ent bedforms as well as submerged rocky outcrops. Four main groups of bedforms were identi-fied: 2D and 3D large dunes, ripples and flat bottom, and rocky outcrops as well. Rocky outcrops were correlated to Barreiras Formation and beachrocks. The estuarine channel is filled by Holocene sandy- to silt sediments, with sandy sediments in the main channel ranging from well-selected to selected grains, and silty sediments in the river margins. The integration and analysis of currents velocity and other physical parameters with bedforms characterization and different sedimentary textures in the study area allows a better knowledge of the active sedimentary processes, which are responsible for the formation of morphologic features of these estuaries. The evolution of estuary settings, led by the postglacial sea-level rise, is recorded in the subsurface an present-day riverbed. These results contribute to a better understanding of tropical estuaries.; Location of the study area

  12. Oil-source correlation study in northeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, D.E.; Magoon, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of numerous oil-stained outcrops across the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska indicates that commercial hydrocarbons could be present in the subsurface of this region. In addition, this region is flanked by two important oil provinces-the Prudhoe Bay area to the west and the Mackenzie delta to the east. To begin to understand the petroleum resource potential of ANWR, we evaluated the source rock quality and thermal maturity of five rock units ranging in age from Triassic to early Tertiary: Shublik Formation, Kingak Shale, pebble shale unit, Hue Shale and Canning Shale. We also compared ANWR oils using stable carbon isotope ratios, tricyclic terpane ratios, and saturate/aromatic hydrocarbon ratios. The organic carbon content of the five rock units range from an average of 1.6 to 4.0 wt%. Cretaceous rocks from the coastal plain are thermally immature (vitrinite reflectance <0.5%) and in the southern mountains thermally mature to overmature (vitrinite reflectance 1.0-1.8%). In general, type III organic matter predominates in the Kingak Shale, pebble shale unit, and Canning Shale, and types II and III in the Hue Shale. ANWR oils are divided into three groups: (1) Jago oil type, includes oils from Angun Point, Katakturuk River and Jago River; (2) Manning oil type, from Manning Point near the coast of the Beaufort Sea; and (3) Kavik oil type, from Kavik west of the Canning River. None of the three oil types of ANWR compares favorably with the economically important oils from Prudhoe Bay and the National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska (NPRA). The most promising source rock for the otherd ANWR oil types could not be type II units of the Hue Shale. Possible source rocks for the other ANWR oil types could not be established. ?? 1986.

  13. Pelagic ecology of the South West Indian Ocean Ridge seamounts: Introduction and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Indian Ocean was described by Behrman (1981) as the "Forlorn Ocean", a region neglected by science up to the late-1950s. For example, the Challenger Expedition from 1872 to 1876 largely avoided the Indian Ocean, sailing from Cape Town into Antarctic waters sampling around the Prince Edward Islands, Kerguelen Island and Crozet Islands before heading to Melbourne. From 1876 to the 1950s there were expeditions on several vessels including the Valdivia, Gauss and Planet (Germany), the Snellius (Netherlands), Discovery II, MahaBiss (United Kingdom), Albatross (Sweden), Dana and Galathea (Denmark; Behrman, 1981). There was no coordination between these efforts and overall the Indian Ocean, especially the deep sea remained perhaps the most poorly explored of the world's oceans. This situation was largely behind the multilateral effort represented by the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIEO), which was coordinated by the Scientific Committee for Ocean Research (SCOR), and which ran from 1959-1965. Work during this expedition focused on the Arabian Sea, the area to the northwest of Australia and the waters over the continental shelves and slopes of coastal states in the region. Subsequently several large-scale international oceanographic programmes have included significant components in the Indian Ocean, including the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). These studies were focused on physical oceanographic measurements and biogeochemistry and whilst the Indian Ocean is still less understood than other large oceans it is now integrated into the major ocean observation systems (Talley et al., 2011). This cannot be said for many aspects of the biology of the region, despite the fact that the Indian Ocean is one of the places where exploitation of marine living resources is still growing (FAO, 2016). The biology of the deep Indian Ocean outside of the Arabian Sea is particularly poorly understood given the presence

  14. Indian/atlantic Interocean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matano, R. P.; Beier, E. J.

    In this presentation we analyze the interocean exchanges between the Indian and the South Atlantic Oceans simulated in an global, eddy-permitting simulation. The analy- sis focuses in the Cape Basin, a region of the southeastern Atlantic limited to the north- west by the Walvis Ridge and to the south by the subtropical convergence. To quantify the relative importance of the different dynamical mechanisms involved in the intero- cean exchange we separated the climatological mean circulation from the transients. The analysis indicates that Agulhas eddies not only influence the transient fluxes but also to those associated with the mean circulation (eddy fluxes, for example, supply most of the energy of the Benguela Current). A distinct characteristic of the eddy variability within the Cape Basin is the co-existence of cyclonic and anticyclonic vor- tices in dipole structures that resemble the heton model of Hogg and Stommel (Deep Sea Research,1985). Anticyclones are surface intensified vortices that, in spite of their baroclinic structure, reach to deep layers. Cyclones, are bottom-intensified vortices with dominant barotropic structure that projects into the upper layer. The propaga- tion of cyclones and anticyclones is strongly affected by the bottom topography. Our analysis shows that the Walvis Ridge and the Vema Seamount block the passage of bottom-intensified cyclones and rectifies the trajectories of the upper-intensified anti- cyclones. Although most anticyclones are able to escape the basin the deep compen- sation generated by the ridge generates an energy loss of approximately 30%, and a rectification of the eddy trajectory to a more westward direction.

  15. Saltwater in shallow aquifers in east-central and northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.; Bonck, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The chemistry of water from irrigation and monitor wells in east-central Louisiana indicates the presence of saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer and the uppermost part of the Jasper aquifer system. The salinity of this groundwater makes it unsuitable for use in irrigation of salt-sensitive crops. The geochemistry of bromide (Br) and chloride (Cl) ions and strontium (Sr) isotopes indicated that this saltwater could have originated from the mixing of freshwater with briny water originating from the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer at altitudes from 5,800 to 6,800 feet below sea level. However, in the absence of data on the concentrations of Br and Cl ions and the values of (87)Sr/(86)Sr in water from the Catahoula, Cockfield, and Sparta aquifers within the study area, no conclusive statement can be made on the origin of saltwater in the alluvial aquifer and the uppermost part of the Jasper aquifer system. Analyses of water from irrigation wells in northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas indicated the presence of saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer. Saltwater probably moves from southern Chicot County, Arkansas, into northeastern Louisiana by flowing to the southwest along a fluvial channel eroded into the Cockfield Formation. Saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas can be hazardous to salt-sensitive crops, such as rice, when used for irrigation. The geochemistry of Br and Cl ions indicated that saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer of southern Chicot County in southeastern Arkansas has two geochemically distinct sources. One source, which has Br/Cl ratios less than that of modern seawater, could be derived from saltwater present in aquifers of Tertiary age; this saltwater could enter the alluvial aquifer by upward flow from below as part of the natural regional groundwater flow pattern. The other source, which has Br/Cl ratios greater than that of modern sea

  16. Clean Water Indian Set-Aside Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Indian Set-Aside Grant Program (CWISA) provides funding to Indian tribes and Alaska Native Villages for wastewater infrastructure. The CWISA program is administered in cooperation with the Indian Health Service (IHS).

  17. Walrus areas of use in the Chukchi Sea during sparse sea ice cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jay, Chadwick V.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; Kochnev, Anatoly A.

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific walrus Odobenus rosmarus divergens feeds on benthic invertebrates on the continental shelf of the Chukchi and Bering Seas and rests on sea ice between foraging trips. With climate warming, ice-free periods in the Chukchi Sea have increased and are projected to increase further in frequency and duration. We radio-tracked walruses to estimate areas of walrus foraging and occupancy in the Chukchi Sea from June to November of 2008 to 2011, years when sea ice was sparse over the continental shelf in comparison to historical records. The earlier and more extensive sea ice retreat in June to September, and delayed freeze-up of sea ice in October to November, created conditions for walruses to arrive earlier and stay later in the Chukchi Sea than in the past. The lack of sea ice over the continental shelf from September to October caused walruses to forage in nearshore areas instead of offshore areas as in the past. Walruses did not frequent the deep waters of the Arctic Basin when sea ice retreated off the shelf. Walruses foraged in most areas they occupied, and areas of concentrated foraging generally corresponded to regions of high benthic biomass, such as in the northeastern (Hanna Shoal) and southwestern Chukchi Sea. A notable exception was the occurrence of concentrated foraging in a nearshore area of northwestern Alaska that is apparently depauperate in walrus prey. With increasing sea ice loss, it is likely that walruses will increase their use of coastal haul-outs and nearshore foraging areas, with consequences to the population that are yet to be understood.

  18. Thoughts on the Indian Dilemma: Backgrounding the "Indian Problem"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muskrat, Joseph

    1973-01-01

    Argues that the core of the Indians' problem is the inability of their community to achieve a sense of control over its own destiny, and explores ways in which the Indians can organize to gain the necessary internal cohesion, resources, and capabilities in order to create a satisfactory position within American society. (JM)

  19. American Indian Intellectualism and the New Indian Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Critically reviews modern writings about American Indians, focusing on Indian romance novels, children's stories, biographies, works by "urban mixed-bloods," and the "art for art's sake" stance. Views non-Native works as irrelevant and most Native writings as self-centered or escapist. Calls for Native intellectuals to…

  20. Indian Tales of the Northern Rockies. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Coyote, Sally; Toineeta, Joy Yellowtail

    Part of the Montana Council for Indian Education's Indian Culture Series, the book contains six folk stories recorded on reservations and by headstart teachers. The stories are: "The Owl", a Gros Ventre tale; "How the Robin Got a Red Breast", from the Flathead Tribe; "Old Man Coyote and the Wild Geese", a Crow Indian…

  1. 34 CFR 300.21 - Indian and Indian tribe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Indian and Indian tribe. 300.21 Section 300.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  2. 34 CFR 300.21 - Indian and Indian tribe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Indian and Indian tribe. 300.21 Section 300.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  3. 34 CFR 300.21 - Indian and Indian tribe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian and Indian tribe. 300.21 Section 300.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  4. Natural climate variabilities and Antarctic sea ice trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, T.; Hartmann, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The interannual Antarctic sea ice variability in Indian Ocean shares a large portion of variance with Southern Annular Mode (SAM), and that in Ross Sea with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). If we regress out the influence of these climate modes from the sectorial sea ice extent time series, the expanding sea ice trends in the satellite era become insignificant at 95 %. Because SAM has a human-induced trend, the increasing sea ice extent in Indian Ocean may be explained by superposition of anthropogenic forcing and natural variability. On the other hand, because ENSO does not have a significant trend, the sea ice trend in Ross Sea might be produced purely by natural variability. In addition to SAM and ENSO, some residual sea ice variances can be explained by other modes, which are not simultaneously-correlated with SAM or ENSO. For instance, a wave-like mode that appears to be Rossby wave trains shares large variance with interannual sea ice variability in many longitudinal sectors. The spatial trend pattern reconstructed by the Rossby mode exhibits consistent features with the ice motion trend pattern shown by Holland and Kwok (2012). These results, based on observational and reanalysis data, suggest that a large portion of expanding trend of Antarctic sea ice may be explained by natural climate variability.

  5. Development of a regional model for the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Hasibur; Ravichandran, M.; Sengupta, Debasis; Harrison, Matthew J.; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a one-way nested Indian Ocean regional model. The model combines the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) Modular Ocean Model (MOM4p1) at global climate model resolution (nominally one degree), and a regional Indian Ocean MOM4p1 configuration with 25 km horizontal resolution and 1 m vertical resolution near the surface. Inter-annual global simulations with Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II) surface forcing over years 1992-2005 provide surface boundary conditions. We show that relative to the global simulation, (i) biases in upper ocean temperature, salinity and mixed layer depth are reduced, (ii) sea surface height and upper ocean circulation are closer to observations, and (iii) improvements in model simulation can be attributed to refined resolution, more realistic topography and inclusion of seasonal river runoff. Notably, the surface salinity bias is reduced to less than 0.1 psu over the Bay of Bengal using relatively weak restoring to observations, and the model simulates the strong, shallow halocline often observed in the North Bay of Bengal. There is marked improvement in subsurface salinity and temperature, as well as mixed layer depth in the Bay of Bengal. Major seasonal signatures in observed sea surface height anomaly in the tropical Indian Ocean, including the coastal waveguide around the Indian peninsula, are simulated with great fidelity. The use of realistic topography and seasonal river runoff brings the three dimensional structure of the East India Coastal Current and West India Coastal Current much closer to observations. As a result, the incursion of low salinity Bay of Bengal water into the south-eastern Arabian Sea is more realistic.

  6. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  7. Interaction of the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge near Rodrigues Island (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Hémond, C.; Bissessur, D.; Scientific Party, Cruises Magofond 2; Gimnaut Scientific Party, Cruise; Knox11RR Scientific Party, Cruise

    2009-04-01

    Reunion hotspot is often viewed as a typical intraplate hotspot, which can be traced back along the southern Mascarene Plateau and the Chagos - Laccadive Ridge to the Deccan flood basalt, caused by the inception of a mantle plume head by the Indian lithosphere. The Rodrigues Ridge, an E-W trending structure more than 600 km-long and 2500 m-high above the seafloor, and small volcanic features that extend it up to the Central Indian Ridge axis at 19°S, do not fit well into this scheme and more probably correspond to the manifestation of an interaction of the Reunion hotspot with the Central Indian Ridge. In this talk we present bathymetric, geophysical and geochemical evidences for such a ridge-hotspot interaction as provided by the analysis of data and samples collected by cruises Magofond 2 of R/V Marion Dufresne (IPEV, France), Gimnaut of R/V L'Atalante with deep-sea submersible Nautile (IFREMER, France), and KNOX11RR of R/V Revelle (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA). The reality of the ridge hotspot interaction is substantiated by the shallow bathymetry and the "hot" morphology of the Central Indian Ridge, as well as the presence of volcanic ridges - the Rodrigues, Three Magi and Gasitao ridges - which exhibit isotopic signatures intermediate between those of the Reunion hotspot and MORB. The few age determinations obtained on the Rodrigues Ridge and its eastern extension suggest synchronous pulses of activity on the hotspot and the region of interaction with the spreading centre: the first pulse, between 12 and 8 Ma, corresponds to the shield volcano building of Mauritius Island and the formation of the Rodrigues Ridge, whereas the second pulse, since about 2 Ma, results in the building of Reunion Island, the formation of Rodrigues Island, Three Magi and Gasitao ridges close to the Central Indian Ridge. These pulses are further confirmed by the detailed evolution of the ridge segmentation of the Central Indian Ridge for the last 10 Ma, deciphered from

  8. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  9. Flooding in the Northeastern United States, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suro, Thomas P.; Roland, Mark A.; Kiah, Richard G.

    2015-12-31

    The annual exceedance probability (AEP) for 327 streamgages in the Northeastern United States were computed using annual peak streamflow data through 2011 and are included in this report. The 2011 peak streamflow for 129 of those streamgages was estimated to have an AEP of less than or equal to 1 percent. Almost 100 of these peak streamflows were a result of the flooding associated with Hurricane Irene in late August 2011. More extreme than the 1-percent AEP, is the 0.2-percent AEP. The USGS recorded peak streamflows at 31 streamgages that equaled or exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent AEP during 2011. Collectively, the USGS recorded peak streamflows having estimated AEPs of less than 1 percent in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Vermont and new period-of-record peak streamflows were recorded at more than 180 streamgages resulting from the floods of 2011.

  10. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective.

  11. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  12. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge.

  13. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  14. Archaeofaunal insights on pinniped-human interactions in the northeastern Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford-Gonzales, D; Newsome, S; Koch, P; Guilderson, T; Snodgrass, J; Burton, R

    2004-02-07

    Human exploitation of pinnipeds has considerable antiquity but shows increasing impacts on population numbers in the Holocene. Pinnipeds are a rich source of fat as well as protein. A few well-documented cases of regional extirpation of seals and sea lions by non-industrial peoples exist. The northeastern Pacific region, from southern California to Alaska, has yielded archaeological evidence for distributions and abundances of eared seals that differs markedly from historically documented biogeography. This is especially true of the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), among the most common pinnipeds in many archaeological sites from the Santa Barbara Channel area through to Kodiak Islands. This chapter reviews contemporary eared seal biogeography, evidence for the earlier timing and extent, of occurrence of northern fur seals along the northeastern Pacific coast, zooarchaeological and isotopic evidence for their foraging and probable maintenance of rookeries in lower latitudes, and for their disappearance from the southernmost part of their ancient distribution well before European contact. It also reviews ongoing debates over the behavioral ecology of ancient fur seals and over humans role in contributing to their disappearance.

  15. Geographic distributions and ecology of ornamental Curcuma (Zingiberaceae) in Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khumkratok, Sutthira; Boongtiang, Kriangsuk; Chutichudet, Prasit; Pramaul, Pairot

    2012-10-01

    The genus Curcuma is a very important economic plant. Members of this genus were used as food, medicine and ornament plants. The objectives of this study were to examine the geographic distributions and ecological conditions in the natural habitats of Curcuma in Northeastern Thailand. Species diversity was examined using the line transect method. Ecological conditions of the species were examined using a sampling plot of 20 x 20 m. A total of five species were found including Curcuma angustifolia Roxb., C. alismatifolia Gagnep., C. gracillima Gagnep., C. parviflora Wall. and C. rhabdota. These species were in an altitudinal range between 290 m and 831 m above sea level. Four species (C. angustifolia, C. alismatifolia, C. gracillima and C. rhabdota) were distributed in open gaps in dry dipterocarp forest. One species, C. parviflora was found in the contact zone between dry dipterocarp and bamboo (Gigantochloa sp.) forest. C. rhabdota was found only in a habitat with high humidity and shading along the Thailand-Lao PDR border. Significant ecological conditions of the natural habitats of these Curcuma species were identified. Altitude is the most important factor when determining the geographic distributions of these Curcuma species in Northeastern Thailand.

  16. Indian Season in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherford, Jack

    1991-01-01

    Reminds teachers that American Indians played a major role in shaping the modern world. Notes that the indigenous peoples of the Americas introduced European American settlers to a variety of foods and agricultural methods. Argues that American Indians also contributed to U.S. concepts of democracy and federalism. Provides guidelines for teaching…

  17. Textbooks and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costo, Rupert, Ed.

    An independent Indian publishing house has been formed to provide classroom instructional materials which deal accurately with the history, culture, and role of the American Indian. This book is a preliminary statement in that publishing program. General criteria, valid for instructional materials from elementary through high school, are applied…

  18. NEW APPROACH TO INDIAN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRYDE, JOHN F.

    RECENT RESEARCH INDICATES THAT THE EXCESSIVE NATIONAL INDIAN DROPOUT RATE IS NOT WHOLLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE VALUE CONFLICT CREATED WHEN INDIAN YOUTH ENTER THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM, BUT IS ALSO RELATED TO THE IDENTIFICATION PROBLEM EXPERIENCED BY THESE YOUNGSTERS. THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS RESEARCH WAS TO DETERMINE THE POSSIBLE CAUSES OF WHAT IS…

  19. Human Behavior and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Wynne DuBray; Eisenbise, Margaret DeOcampo

    Divided into five sections, the monograph is intended to make students aware that the practices customary to social work agencies are not relevant to the needs of most American Indian clientele. The first section provides an overview of the following historical, geographical, and cultural areas of American Indian tribes: California, Plateau, Great…

  20. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…